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Sample records for nmda receptor subunits

  1. Specific Roles of NMDA Receptor Subunits in Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, H.; Hagino, Y.; Kasai, S.; Ikeda, K.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays important roles in learning and memory. NMDA receptors are a tetramer that consists of two glycine-binding subunits GluN1, two glutamate-binding subunits (i.e., GluN2A, GluN2B, GluN2C, and GluN2D), a combination of a GluN2 subunit and glycine-binding GluN3 subunit (i.e., GluN3A or GluN3B), or two GluN3 subunits. Recent studies revealed that the specific expression and distribution of each subunit are deeply involved in neural excitability, plasticity, and synaptic deficits. The present article summarizes reports on the dysfunction of NMDA receptors and responsible subunits in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunction, mood disorders, and autism. A key role for the GluN2D subunit in NMDA receptor antagonist-induced psychosis has been recently revealed. PMID:25817860

  2. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  3. Subunit-dependent effects of nickel on NMDA receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Carla; Gavazzo, Paola

    2003-10-07

    Nickel (Ni2+) is a transition metal that affects different neuronal ionic channels. We investigated its effects on glutamate channels of the NMDA-type in the presence of saturating concentration of glutamate or NMDA (50 microM), in 0 external Mg and in the continuous presence of saturating glycine (30 microM). In neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, Ni2+ inhibited the current evoked by NMDA at -60 mV with an IC50 close to 40 microM. The inhibition was weakly voltage-dependent and the current at +40 mV was inhibited with IC50=86 microM. Wash out of the metal unmasked a stimulatory effect which persisted for a few seconds. In HEK293 cells transiently transfected with recombinant NR1a-NR2A receptors, Ni2+ inhibited the current elicited by glutamate with an IC50=52 microM at -60 mV and 90 microM at +40 mV. In HEK293 expressing NR1a-NR2B receptors, 0.1-100 microM Ni2+ caused a potentiation of the current, with EC50=4 microM, while with 300 microM, a voltage-dependent block became apparent (IC50=170 microM). As previously reported, the current through both classes of recombinant receptors was steeply dependent on external pH, and in both cases the protonic block had an IC50 close to pH 7.2. Application of Ni2+ showed that stimulation of NR1a-NR2B receptor channels was dependent on external pH, while voltage-independent inhibition of NR1a-NR2A was less sensitive to pH change. These results indicate that Ni2+ has multiple and complex effects on NMDA channels, which are largely dependent on the NR2 subunit.

  4. The NMDA receptor NR2A subunit regulates proliferation of MKN45 human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kanako; Kanno, Takeshi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto; Tashiro, Chikara; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-07

    The present study investigated proliferation of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells regulated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit. The NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) inhibited proliferation of MKN45 cells, but not MKN28 cells. Of the NMDA subunits such as NR1, NR2 (2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), and NR3 (3A and 3B), all the NMDA subunit mRNAs except for the NR2B subunit mRNA were expressed in both MKN28 and MKN45 cells. MKN45 cells were characterized by higher expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA, but MKN28 otherwise by higher expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA. MKN45 cell proliferation was also inhibited by silencing the NR2A subunit-targeted gene. For MKN45 cells, AP5 or knocking-down the NR2A subunit increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of cell cycling and decreased the proportion in the S/G{sub 2} phase. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that blockage of NMDA receptors including the NR2A subunit suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation due to cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} phase; in other words, the NR2A subunit promotes MKN45 cell proliferation by accelerating cell cycling.

  5. EM colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at synapses in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kharazia, V N; Phend, K D; Rustioni, A; Weinberg, R J

    1996-05-24

    Electrophysiology and light microscopy suggest that a single excitatory synapse may use both amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we here provide direct evidence for colocalization at individual synapses in sensorimotor cortex of adult rats. Colocalization was most commonly observed on dendritic spines; subunits of the two classes of receptors seemed to be independently distributed within the synaptic active zone.

  6. Location- and Subunit-Specific NMDA Receptors Determine the Developmental Sevoflurane Neurotoxicity Through ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Yuan; Jia, Li-Jie; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Cai, Fang; Mao, Hui; Xu, Wei-Cai; Fang, Jun-Biao; Peng, Zhi-You; Ma, Zheng-Wen; Chen, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Juan; Wei, Zhen; Yu, Bu-Wei; Hu, Shuang-Fei

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that developmental exposure of sevoflurane (an inhalational anesthetic) is capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis and subsequent learning and memory disorders. Synaptic NMDA receptors activity plays an essential role in cell survival, while the extra-synaptic NMDA receptors activation is usually associated with cell death. However, whether synaptic or extra-synaptic NMDA receptors mediate developmental sevoflurane neurotoxicity is largely unknown. Here, we show that developmental sevoflurane treatment decreased NR2A, but increased NR2B subunit expression both in vitro and in vivo. Sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated by synaptic NMDA receptors activation or low dose of exogenous NMDA in vitro. Interestingly, these effects could be abolished by NR2A inhibitor PEAQX, but not NR2B inhibitor Ifenprodil in vitro. In contrast, activation of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors alone had no effects on sevoflurane neurotoxicity. In the scenario of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors stimulation, however, sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis could be prevented by addition of Ifenprodil, but not by PEAQX in vitro. In addition, sevoflurane neurotoxicity could also be rescued by memantine, an uncompetitive antagonist for preferential blockade of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that developmental sevoflurane-induced phospho-ERK1/2 inhibition was restored by synaptic NMDA receptor activation (in vitro), low dose of NMDA (in vitro) or memantine (in vivo). And the neuroprotective role of synaptic NMDA activity was able to be reversed by MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in vitro. Finally, administration of memantine or NMDA significantly improved spatial learning and memory dysfunctions induced by developmental sevoflurane exposure without influence on locomotor activity. These results indicated that activation of synaptic NR2A-containing NMDA receptors, or inhibition of extra-synaptic NR2B-containing NMDA receptors

  7. NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Zhang, Yuan; Lv, Xuan; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2015-05-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases, including epilepsy. The present study investigated the effect of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced pathological and biochemical events in mice. Our results showed that PTZ-kindling up-regulates the expression of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits in the hippocampus and that kindled mice were characterized by significant astrocytosis and neuron loss in the hippocampus. Oxidative stress, including excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) production and decreased enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), were detected in the hippocampus after the mice were fully kindled. Additionally, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was found to be up-regulated in PTZ-kindled mice. However, selectively blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits by ifenprodil significantly suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits also abolished PTZ-kindling-induced BDNF expression. These results indicate that NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to epilepsy-associated pathological and biochemical events, including hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss, and these events might be correlated with up-regulation of BDNF expression.

  8. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Vance, Katie M; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-12-02

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)-P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3515971-13$15.00/0.

  9. Pathological reorganization of NMDA receptors subunits and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 distribution in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leuba, Genevieve; Vernay, Andre; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Tardif, Eric; Riederer, Beat Michel; Savioz, Armand

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), synaptic alterations play a major role and are often correlated with cognitive changes. In order to better understand synaptic modifications, we compared alterations in NMDA receptors and postsynaptic protein PSD-95 expression in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and frontal cortex (FC; area 9) of AD and control brains. We combined immunohistochemical and image analysis methods to quantify on consecutive sections the distribution of PSD-95 and NMDA receptors GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B in EC and FC from 25 AD and control cases. The density of stained receptors was analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to assess the effect of neurodegeneration. In both regions, the number of neuronal profiles immunostained for GluN1 receptors subunit and PSD-95 protein was significantly increased in AD compared to controls (3-6 fold), while the number of neuronal profiles stained for GluN2A and GluN2B receptors subunits was on the contrary decreased (3-4 fold). The increase in marked neuronal profiles was more prominent in a cortical band corresponding to layers 3 to 5 with large pyramidal cells. Neurons positive for GluN1 or PSD-95 staining were often found in the same localization on consecutive sections and they were also reactive for the anti-tau antibody AD2, indicating a neurodegenerative process. Differences in the density of immunoreactive puncta representing neuropile were not statistically significant. Altogether these data indicate that GluN1 and PSD-95 accumulate in the neuronal perikarya, but this is not the case for GluN2A and GluN2B, while the neuropile compartment is less subject to modifications. Thus, important variations in the pattern of distribution of the NMDA receptors subunits and PSD-95 represent a marker in AD and by impairing the neuronal network, contribute to functional deterioration.

  10. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  11. The DREAM protein negatively regulates the NMDA receptor through interaction with the NR1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Ping; Liang, Ping; Liu, Tao; Liu, Xu; Liu, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Han, Tao; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Yin, Dong-Min; Li, Junfa; Zhou, Zhuan; Wang, Ke-Wei; Wang, Yun

    2010-06-02

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in the etiology of stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a pivotal role in excitotoxic injury; however, clinical trials testing NMDAR antagonists as neuroprotectants have been discouraging. The development of novel neuroprotectant molecules is being vigorously pursued. Here, we report that downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) significantly inhibits surface expression of NMDARs and NMDAR-mediated current. Overexpression of DREAM showed neuroprotection against excitotoxic neuronal injury, whereas knockdown of DREAM enhanced NMDA-induced toxicity. DREAM could directly bind to the C0 domain of the NR1 subunit. Although DREAM contains multiple binding sites for the NR1 subunit, residues 21-40 of the N terminus are the main binding site for the NR1 subunit. Thus, 21-40 residues might relieve the autoinhibition conferred by residues 1-50 and derepress the DREAM core domain by a competitive mechanism. Intriguingly, the cell-permeable TAT-21-40 peptide, constructed according to the critical binding site of DREAM to the NR1 subunit, inhibits NMDAR-mediated currents in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and has a neuroprotective effect on in vitro neuronal excitotoxic injury and in vivo ischemic brain damage. Moreover, both pretreatment and posttreatment of TAT-21-40 is effective against excitotoxicity. In summary, this work reveals a novel, negative regulator of NMDARs and provides an attractive candidate for the treatment of excitotoxicity-related disease.

  12. Distribution of NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits at thalamo-amygdaloid dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Radley, Jason J; Farb, Claudia R; He, Yong; Janssen, William G M; Rodrigues, Sarina M; Johnson, Luke R; Hof, Patrick R; LeDoux, Joseph E; Morrison, John H

    2007-02-23

    Synapses onto dendritic spines in the lateral amygdala formed by afferents from the auditory thalamus represent a site of plasticity in Pavlovian fear conditioning. Previous work has demonstrated that thalamic afferents synapse onto LA spines expressing glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits, but the GluR subunit distribution at the synapse and within the cytoplasm has not been characterized. Therefore, we performed a quantitative analysis for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR2 and GluR3 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B by combining anterograde labeling of thalamo-amygdaloid afferents with postembedding immunoelectron microscopy for the GluRs in adult rats. A high percentage of thalamo-amygdaloid spines was immunoreactive for GluR2 (80%), GluR3 (83%), and NR1 (83%), while a smaller proportion of spines expressed NR2B (59%). To compare across the various subunits, the cytoplasmic to synaptic ratios of GluRs were measured within thalamo-amygdaloid spines. Analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic pool of GluR2 receptors was twice as large compared to the GluR3, NR1, and NR2B subunits. Our data also show that in the adult brain, the NR2B subunit is expressed in the majority of in thalamo-amygdaloid spines and that within these spines, the various GluRs are differentially distributed between synaptic and non-synaptic sites. The prevalence of the NR2B subunit in thalamo-amygdaloid spines provides morphological evidence supporting its role in the fear conditioning circuit while the differential distribution of the GluR subtypes may reflect distinct roles for their involvement in this circuitry and synaptic plasticity.

  13. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Vance, Katie M.; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)–P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a key component of the basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei that control movement and are dysregulated in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Subthalamic neurons receive direct excitatory input, but the pharmacology of excitatory

  14. NR2B subunit of the NMDA glutamate receptor regulates appetite in the parabrachial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Zheng, Ruimao; Srisai, Dollada; McKnight, G Stanley; Palmiter, Richard D

    2013-09-03

    Diphtheria toxin-mediated, acute ablation of hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related protein (AgRP) in adult mice leads to anorexia and starvation within 7 d that is caused by hyperactivity of neurons within the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Because NMDA glutamate receptors are involved in various synaptic plasticity-based behavioral modifications, we hypothesized that modulation of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor in PBN neurons could contribute to the anorexia phenotype. We observed by Western blot analyses that ablation of AgRP neurons results in enhanced expression of NR2B along with a modest suppression of NR2A. Interestingly, systemic administration of LiCl in a critical time window before AgRP neuron ablation abolished the anorectic response. LiCl treatment suppressed NR2B levels in the PBN and ameliorated the local Fos induction that is associated with anorexia. This protective role of LiCl on feeding was blunted in vagotomized mice. Chronic infusion of RO25-6981, a selective NR2B inhibitor, into the PBN recapitulated the role of LiCl in maintaining feeding after AgRP neuron ablation. We suggest that the accumulation of NR2B subunits in the PBN contributes to aphagia in response to AgRP neuron ablation and may be involved in other forms of anorexia.

  15. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore

  16. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  17. Early chronic blockade of NR2B subunits and transient activation of NMDA receptors modulate LTP in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuting; Zang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2006-02-16

    In the auditory cortex, the properties of NMDA receptors depend primarily on the ratio of NR2A and NR2B subunits. NR2B subunit expression is high at the beginning of critical period and lower in adulthood. Because NMDA receptors are crucial in triggering long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, developmental or experience-dependent modification of NMDAR subunit composition is likely to influence synaptic plasticity. To examine how NMDA subunit change during postnatal development affect the adult synaptic plasticity, we employed chronic ifenprodil blockade of NR2B subunits and analyzed evoked field potentials in adult C57BL/6 mice auditory cortex (AC). We found that chronic loss of NR2B activity led to a decline in LTP magnitude in the AC of adult mice. Adding NMDA to the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in blocked mice had the opposite effect, producing LTP magnitudes at or exceeding those found in treated or untreated animals. These results suggest that, even in adulthood when NR2B expression is downregulated, these receptor subunits play an important role in experience-dependent plasticity of mouse auditory cortex. Blockade from P60 did not result in any decrease of LTP amplitude, suggesting that chronic block in postnatal period may permanently affect cortical circuits so that they cannot produce significant LTP in adulthood.

  18. The A-Current Modulates Learning via NMDA Receptors Containing the NR2B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Suárez-Pereira, Irene; González-Forero, David; Carrión, Ángel Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity involves short- and long-term events, although the molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are not fully understood. The transient A-type K+ current (IA) controls the excitability of the dendrites from CA1 pyramidal neurons by regulating the back-propagation of action potentials and shaping synaptic input. Here, we have studied how decreases in IA affect cognitive processes and synaptic plasticity. Using wild-type mice treated with 4-AP, an IA inhibitor, and mice lacking the DREAM protein, a transcriptional repressor and modulator of the IA, we demonstrate that impairment of IA decreases the stimulation threshold for learning and the induction of early-LTP. Hippocampal electrical recordings in both models revealed alterations in basal electrical oscillatory properties toward low-theta frequencies. In addition, we demonstrated that the facilitated learning induced by decreased IA requires the activation of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit. Together, these findings point to a balance between the IA and the activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the regulation of learning. PMID:21966384

  19. GluN2A Subunit-Containing NMDA Receptors Are the Preferential Neuronal Targets of Homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Sibarov, Dmitry A.; Abushik, Polina A.; Giniatullin, Rashid; Antonov, Sergei M.

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is an endogenous redox active amino acid, best known as contributor to various neurodegenerative disorders. Although it is known that HCY can activate NMDA receptors (NMDARs), the mechanisms of its action on receptors composed of different NMDA receptor subunits remains almost unknown. In this study, using imaging and patch clamp technique in cultured cortical neurons and heterologous expression in HEK293T cells we tested the agonist activity of HCY on NMDARs composed of GluN1 and GluN2A subunits (GluN1/2A receptors) and GluN1 and GluN2B subunits (GluN1/2B receptors). We demonstrate that the time courses of Ca2+ transients and membrane currents activated by HCY and NMDA in cortical neurons are drastically different. Application of HCY to cortical neurons induced responses, which in contrast to currents induced by NMDA (both in the presence of glycine) considerably decreased to steady state of small amplitude. In contrast to NMDA, HCY-activated currents at steady state were resistant to the selective GluN2B subunit inhibitor ifenprodil. In calcium-free external solution the decrease of NMDA evoked currents was abolished, suggesting the Ca2+-dependent NMDAR desensitization. Under these conditions HCY evoked currents still declined almost to the baseline suggesting Ca2+-independent desensitization. In HEK293T cells HCY activated NMDARs of GluN1/2A and GluN1/2B subunit compositions with EC50s of 9.7 ± 1.8 and 61.8 ± 8.9 μM, respectively. Recombinant GluN1/2A receptors, however, did not desensitize by HCY, whereas GluN1/2B receptors were almost fully desensitized by HCY. Thus, HCY is a high affinity agonist of NMDARs preferring the GluN1/2A subunit composition. Our data suggest that HCY induced native NMDAR currents in neurons are mainly mediated by the “synaptic type” GluN1/2A NMDARs. This implies that in hyperhomocysteinemia, a disorder with enlarged level of HCY in plasma, HCY may persistently contribute to post-synaptic responses mediated

  20. Role for the NR2B Subunit of the NMDA Receptor in Mediating Light Input to the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, LM; Schroeder, A; Loh, D; Smith, D; Lin, K; Han, JH; Michel, S; Hummer, DL; Ehlen, JC; Albers, HE; Colwell, CS

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells that utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter. A variety of evidence suggests that the release of glutamate then activates N-methyl-Daspartate (NMDA) receptors within the SCN and triggers a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to phase shifts in the circadian system. In this study, we first sought to explore the role of the NR2B subunit in mediating the effects of light on the circadian system. We found that localized microinjection of the NR2B subunit antagonist ifenprodil into the SCN region inhibits the magnitude of light-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm in wheel-running activity. Next, we found that the NR2B message and levels of phospho-NR2B levels vary with time of day in SCN tissue using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Functionally, we found that blocking the NR2B subunit with ifenprodil significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA currents recorded in SCN neurons. Ifenprodil also significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA-induced calcium changes in SCN cells. Together, these results demonstrate that the NR2B subunit is an important component of NMDA receptor mediated responses within SCN neurons and that this subunit contributes to light-induced phase shifts of the mammalian circadian system. PMID:18380671

  1. Subunit-specific mechanisms and proton sensitivity of NMDA receptor channel block.

    PubMed

    Dravid, Shashank M; Erreger, Kevin; Yuan, Hongjie; Nicholson, Katherine; Le, Phuong; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Almonte, Antoine; Murray, Ernest; Mosely, Cara; Barber, Jeremy; French, Adam; Balster, Robert; Murray, Thomas F; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-05-15

    We have compared the potencies of structurally distinct channel blockers at recombinant NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C and NR1/NR2D receptors. The IC50 values varied with stereochemistry and subunit composition, suggesting that it may be possible to design subunit-selective channel blockers. For dizocilpine (MK-801), the differential potency of MK-801 stereoisomers determined at recombinant NMDA receptors was confirmed at native receptors in vitro and in vivo. Since the proton sensor is tightly linked both structurally and functionally to channel gating, we examined whether blocking molecules that interact in the channel pore with the gating machinery can differentially sense protonation of the receptor. Blockers capable of remaining trapped in the pore during agonist unbinding showed the strongest dependence on extracellular pH, appearing more potent at acidic pH values that promote channel closure. Determination of pK(a) values for channel blockers suggests that the ionization of ketamine but not of other blockers can influence its pH-dependent potency. Kinetic modelling and single channel studies suggest that the pH-dependent block of NR1/NR2A by (-)MK-801 but not (+)MK-801 reflects an increase in the MK-801 association rate even though protons reduce channel open probability and thus MK-801 access to its binding site. Allosteric modulators that alter pH sensitivity alter the potency of MK-801, supporting the interpretation that the pH sensitivity of MK-801 binding reflects the changes at the proton sensor rather than a secondary effect of pH. These data suggest a tight coupling between the proton sensor and the ion channel gate as well as unique subunit-specific mechanisms of channel block.

  2. Subunit-specific mechanisms and proton sensitivity of NMDA receptor channel block

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Shashank M; Erreger, Kevin; Yuan, Hongjie; Nicholson, Katherine; Le, Phuong; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Almonte, Antoine; Murray, Ernest; Mosely, Cara; Barber, Jeremy; French, Adam; Balster, Robert; Murray, Thomas F; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-01-01

    We have compared the potencies of structurally distinct channel blockers at recombinant NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C and NR1/NR2D receptors. The IC50 values varied with stereochemistry and subunit composition, suggesting that it may be possible to design subunit-selective channel blockers. For dizocilpine (MK-801), the differential potency of MK-801 stereoisomers determined at recombinant NMDA receptors was confirmed at native receptors in vitro and in vivo. Since the proton sensor is tightly linked both structurally and functionally to channel gating, we examined whether blocking molecules that interact in the channel pore with the gating machinery can differentially sense protonation of the receptor. Blockers capable of remaining trapped in the pore during agonist unbinding showed the strongest dependence on extracellular pH, appearing more potent at acidic pH values that promote channel closure. Determination of pKa values for channel blockers suggests that the ionization of ketamine but not of other blockers can influence its pH-dependent potency. Kinetic modelling and single channel studies suggest that the pH-dependent block of NR1/NR2A by (−)MK-801 but not (+)MK-801 reflects an increase in the MK-801 association rate even though protons reduce channel open probability and thus MK-801 access to its binding site. Allosteric modulators that alter pH sensitivity alter the potency of MK-801, supporting the interpretation that the pH sensitivity of MK-801 binding reflects the changes at the proton sensor rather than a secondary effect of pH. These data suggest a tight coupling between the proton sensor and the ion channel gate as well as unique subunit-specific mechanisms of channel block. PMID:17303642

  3. Immunocytochemical localization of the NMDA-R2A receptor subunit in the cat retina.

    PubMed

    Goebel, D J; Aurelia, J L; Tai, Q; Jojich, L; Poosch, M S

    1998-10-19

    Immunocytochemical studies were performed to determine the distribution and cellular localization of the NMDA-R2A receptor subunit (R2A) in the cat retina. R2A-immunoreactivity (R2A-IR) was noted in all layers of the retina, with specific localizations in the outer segments of red/green and blue cone photoreceptors, B-type horizontal cells, several types of amacrine cells, Müller cells and the majority of cells in the ganglion cell layer. In the inner nuclear layer, 48% of all cells residing in the amacrine cell layer were R2A-IR including a cell resembling the GABAergic A17 amacrine cell. Interestingly, the AII rod amacrine cell was devoid of R2A-IR. Although the localization of the R2A subunit was anticipated in ganglion cells, amacrines and Müller cells, the presence of this receptor subunit to the cells in the outer retina was not expected. Here, both the R2A and the R2B subunits were found to be present in the outer segments of cone photoreceptors and to the tips of rod outer segments. Although the function of these receptor subunits in rod and cone photoreceptors remains to be determined, the fact that both R2A and R2B receptor subunits are localized to cone outer segments suggests a possible alternative pathway for calcium entry into a region where this cation plays such a crucial role in the process of phototransduction. To further classify the cells that display NR2A-IR, we performed dual labeling experiments showing the relationship between R2A-labeled cells with GABA. Results showed that all GABAergic-amacrines and displaced amacrines express the R2A-subunit protein. In addition, approximately 11% of the NR2A-labeled amacrines, did not stain for GABA. These findings support pharmacological data showing that NMDA directly facilitates GABA release in retina and retinal cultures [I.L. Ferreira, C.B. Duarte, P.F. Santos, C.M. Carvalho, A.P. Carvalho, Release of [3H]GABA evoked by glutamate receptor agonist in cultured chick retinal cells: effect of Ca2

  4. Diminution of the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in cortical and subcortical areas of WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Fariba; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Jafarian, Maryam; Mohamadpour, Maliheh; Kazemi, Hadi; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Gorji, Ali

    2013-12-01

    Modulation of glutamatergic NMDA receptors affects the synchronization of spike discharges in in WAG/Rij rats, a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy. In this study, we describe the alteration of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors expression in WAG/Rij rats in different somatosensory cortical layers and in hippocampal CA1 area. Experimental groups were divided into four groups of six rats of both WAG/Rij and Wistar strains with 2 and 6 months of age. The distribution of NR2B receptors was assessed by immunohistochemical staining in WAG/Rij and compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The expression of NR2B subunit was significantly decreased in different somatosensory cortical layers in 2- and 6-month-old WAG/Rij rats. In addition, the distribution of NR2B in hippocampal CA1 area was lower in 6-month-old WAG/Rij compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The reduction of NR2B receptors in different brain areas points to disturbance of glutamate receptors expression in cortical and subcortical areas in WAG/Rij rats. An altered subunit assembly of NMDA receptors may underlie cortical hyperexcitability in absence epilepsy.

  5. Do specific NMDA receptor subunits act as gateways for addictive behaviors?

    PubMed

    Hopf, F W

    2017-01-01

    Addiction to alcohol and drugs is a major social and economic problem, and there is considerable interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms that promote addictive drives. A number of proteins have been identified that contribute to expression of addictive behaviors. NMDA receptors (NMDARs), a subclass of ionotropic glutamate receptors, have been of particular interest because their physiological properties make them an attractive candidate for gating induction of synaptic plasticity, a molecular change thought to mediate learning and memory. NMDARs are generally inactive at the hyperpolarized resting potentials of many neurons. However, given sufficient depolarization, NMDARs are activated and exhibit long-lasting currents with significant calcium permeability. Also, in addition to stimulating neurons by direct depolarization, NMDARs and their calcium signaling can allow strong and/or synchronized inputs to produce long-term changes in other molecules (such as AMPA-type glutamate receptors) which can last from days to years, binding internal and external stimuli in a long-term memory trace. Such memories could allow salient drug-related stimuli to exert strong control over future behaviors and thus promote addictive drives. Finally, NMDARs may themselves undergo plasticity, which can alter subsequent neuronal stimulation and/or the ability to induce plasticity. This review will address recent and past findings suggesting that NMDAR activity promotes drug- and alcohol-related behaviors, with a particular focus on GluN2B subunits as possible central regulators of many addictive behaviors, as well as newer studies examining the importance of non-canonical NMDAR subunits and endogenous NMDAR cofactors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  6. Developmental origin dictates interneuron AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit composition and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Matta, Jose A; Pelkey, Kenneth A; Craig, Michael T; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Jeffries, Brian W; McBain, Chris J

    2013-08-01

    Disrupted excitatory synapse maturation in GABAergic interneurons may promote neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. However, establishing developmental programs for nascent synapses in GABAergic cells is confounded by their sparsity, heterogeneity and late acquisition of subtype-defining characteristics. We investigated synaptic development in mouse interneurons targeting cells by lineage from medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) or caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) progenitors. MGE-derived interneuron synapses were dominated by GluA2-lacking AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), with little contribution from NMDA-type receptors (NMDARs) throughout development. In contrast, CGE-derived cell synapses had large NMDAR components and used GluA2-containing AMPARs. In neonates, both MGE- and CGE-derived interneurons expressed primarily GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs, which most CGE-derived interneurons retained into adulthood. However, MGE-derived interneuron NMDARs underwent a GluN2B-to-GluN2A switch that could be triggered acutely with repetitive synaptic activity. Our findings establish ganglionic eminence-dependent rules for early synaptic integration programs of distinct interneuron cohorts, including parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells.

  7. Localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of a NMDA receptor (GRINA) to 8q24

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; DuPont, B.R.; Leach, R.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, called GRINA, to human chromosome 8q24 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and radiation hybridization mapping. This gene mapped outside the critical region for benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), a rare form of epilepsy; however, GRINA could be the causative genetic factor inducing idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Further studies need to be conducted. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Parafascicular thalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation decreases NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit gene expression in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cabrera, Mónica R; Selvas, Abraham; Miguéns, Miguel; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Ambrosio, Emilio; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma

    2017-04-21

    The rodent parafascicular nucleus (PFn) or the centromedian-parafascicular complex of primates is a posterior intralaminar nucleus of the thalamus related to cortical activation and maintenance of states of consciousness underlying attention, learning and memory. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the PFn has been proved to restore arousal and consciousness in humans and to enhance performance in learning and memory tasks in rats. The primary expected effect of PFn DBS is to induce plastic changes in target neurons of brain areas associated with cognitive function. In this study, Wistar rats were stimulated for 20mins in the PFn following a DBS protocol that had previously facilitated memory in rats. NMDA and GABAB receptor binding, and gene expression of the GluN1subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) were assessed in regions related to cognitive functions, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The results showed that PFn DBS induced a decrease in NMDAR GluN1 subunit gene expression in the cingulate and prelimbic cortices, but no significant statistical differences were found in the density of NMDA or GABAB receptors in any of the analyzed regions. Taken together, our findings suggest a possible role for the NMDAR GluN1 subunit in the prefrontal cortex in the procognitive actions of the PFn DBS.

  9. Adult naked mole-rat brain retains the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2D associated with hypoxia tolerance in neonatal mammals.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Bethany L; Park, Thomas J; Larson, John

    2012-01-11

    Adult naked mole-rats show a number of systemic adaptations to a crowded underground habitat that is low in oxygen and high in carbon dioxide. Remarkably, brain slice tissue from adult naked mole-rats also is extremely tolerant to oxygen deprivation as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under hypoxic conditions as well as by a delayed neuronal depolarization during anoxia. These characteristics resemble hypoxia tolerance in brain slices from neonates in a variety of mammal species. An important component of neonatal tolerance to hypoxia involves the subunit composition of NMDA receptors. Neonates have a high proportion of NMDA receptors with GluN2D subunits which are protective because they retard calcium entry into neurons during hypoxic episodes. Therefore, we hypothesized that adult naked mole-rats retain a protective, neonatal-like, NMDA receptor subunit profile. We used immunoblotting to assess age-related changes in NMDA receptor subunits in naked mole-rats and mice. The results show that adult naked mole-rat brain retains a much greater proportion of the hypoxia-protective GluN2D subunit compared to adult mice. However, age-related changes in other subunits (GluN2A and GluN2B) from the neonatal period to adulthood were comparable in mice and naked mole-rats. Hence, adult naked mole-rat brain only retains the neonatal NMDA receptor subunit that is associated with hypoxia tolerance.

  10. A lasting effect of postnatal sevoflurane anesthesia on the composition of NMDA receptor subunits in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Shen, Fengyan; Xu, Daojie; Zhao, Xuan

    2016-11-01

    Sevoflurane is widely used in pediatric anesthesia and studies have shown that it is capable of inducing neurodegeneration and subsequent cognitive disorders in the developing brain. However, the evidence that anesthetics are toxic to the human brain is insufficient. N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, critical for learning and memory, display expression changes with age and can be modulated by inhalation anesthetics. Generally, NMDA receptor (NR) type 1 is expressed at birth, peaks around the third postnatal week, and then declines slightly to adult levels. NR2Bs slowly decrease and NR2As gradually increase during postnatal development. These developmental switches of NMDA receptor subunits composition mark the transition from immature to adult neural processing and allow for the final maturation of associative learning abilities. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of repeated sevoflurane anesthesia on NMDA receptor subunits composition in the developing rat brain and related behavioral disorders. Six-day-old male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated into either a control group (group con) or a sevoflurane group (group sevo). Group sevo inhaled 2.1% sevoflurane carried by 70% oxygen for 2h each day from postnatal day (PND) 6 to PND 8. The same procedure, without applying the sevoflurane, was executed in group con. The membrane protein expression of NR1, NR2A and NR2B in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus was assessed at the end of the three days of anesthesia and at PND 21. An open field test was carried out to assess spontaneous locomotion on PNDs 21, 28 and 35. Y maze performance was used to assess attention and working memory on PND 28. Sevoflurane induced upregulation of NR1 and NR2B in the PFC at the end of anesthesia. On PND 21, NR1 and NR2B receptors were significantly increased whereas NR2A receptors were significantly decreased in the PFC in group sevo. Sevoflurane-treated rats showed hyper-locomotion and impairment of

  11. Kalirin binds the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, altering its synaptic localization and function.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Drew D; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Levine, Eric S; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2011-08-31

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins, including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6, and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7(KO)) exhibit deficient hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7(KO) mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7(KO) animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7(KO) mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity.

  12. Kalirin binds the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, altering its synaptic localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Drew D.; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Levine, Eric S.; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6 and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7KO) exhibit deficient hippocampal LTP as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7KO mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7KO animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell-surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7KO mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity. PMID:21880917

  13. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  14. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  15. SETDB1 HISTONE METHYLTRANSFERASE REGULATES MOOD-RELATED BEHAVIORS AND EXPRESSION OF THE NMDA RECEPTOR SUBUNIT NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Jakovcevski, Mira; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Connor, Caroline; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Lin, Cong L.; Straubhaar, Juerg; Martin, Gilles; Akbarian, Schahram

    2010-01-01

    Histone methyltransferases specific for the histone H3-lysine 9 (H3K9) residue, including Setdb1 (Set domain, bifurcated 1)/Eset/Kmt1e are associated with repressive chromatin remodeling and expressed in adult brain, but potential effects on neuronal function and behavior remain unexplored. Here, we report that transgenic mice with increased Setdb1 expression in adult forebrain neurons show antidepressant-like phenotypes in behavioral paradigms for anhedonia, despair and learned helplessness. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in conjunction with DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip) revealed that genomic occupancies of neuronal Setdb1 are limited to less than 1% of annotated genes, which include the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B/Grin2B and other ionotropic glutamate receptor genes. Chromatin conformation capture (“3C”) and Setdb1-ChIP revealed a loop formation tethering the NR2B/Grin2b promoter to the Setdb1 target site positioned 30Kb downstream of the transcription start site. In hippocampus and ventral striatum, two key structures in the neuronal circuitry regulating mood-related behaviors, Setdb1-mediated repressive histone methylation at NR2B/Grin2b was associated with decreased NR2B expression and EPSP insensitivity to pharmacological blockade of NR2B, and accelerated NMDA receptor desensitization consistent with a shift in NR2A/B subunit ratios. In wildtype mice, systemic treatment with the NR2B antagonist, Ro-256981, and hippocampal siRNA-mediated NR2B/Grin2b knockdown, resulted in behavioral changes similar to those elicited by the Setdb1 transgene. Together, these findings point to a role for neuronal Setdb1 in the regulation of affective and motivational behaviors through repressive chromatin remodeling at a select set of target genes, resulting in altered NMDA receptor subunit composition and other molecular adaptations. PMID:20505083

  16. NMDA receptor subunits and associated signaling molecules mediating antidepressant-related effects of NMDA-GluN2B antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Kiselycznyk, Carly; Jury, Nicholas; Halladay, Lindsay; Nakazawa, Kazu; Mishina, Masayoshi; Sprengel, Rolf; Grant, Seth G.N.; Svenningsson, Per; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may be efficacious for treating mood disorders, as exemplified by the rapid antidepressant effects produced by single administration of the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. Though the precise mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-related effects of NMDAR antagonism remain unclear, recent studies implicate specific NMDAR subunits, including GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor interacting molecule, PSD-95. Here, integrating mutant and pharmacological in mice, we investigated the contribution of these subunits and molecules to antidepressant-related behaviors and the antidepressant-related effects of the GluN2B blocker, Ro 25-6981. We found that global deletion of GluA1 or PSD-95 reduced forced swim test (FST) immobility, mimicking the antidepressant-related effect produced by systemically administered Ro 25-6981 in C57BL/6J mice. Moreover, the FST antidepressant-like effects of systemic Ro 25-6981 were intact in mutants with global GluA1 deletion or GluN1 deletion in forebrain interneurons, but were absent in mutants constitutively lacking GluN2A or PSD-95. Next, we found that microinfusing Ro 25-6981 into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not basolateral amygdala, of C57BL/6J mice was sufficient to produce an antidepressant-like effect. Together, these findings extend and refine current understanding of the mechanisms mediating antidepressant-like effects produced by NMDAR-GluN2B antagonists, and may inform the development of a novel class of medications for treating depression that target the GluN2B subtype of NMDAR. PMID:25800971

  17. Unique domain anchoring of Src to synaptic NMDA receptors via the mitochondrial protein NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2

    PubMed Central

    Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Fam, Sami R.; Huang, Yueqiao; Petralia, Ronald S.; Wenthold, Robert J.; Salter, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Src is the prototypic protein tyrosine kinase and is critical for controlling diverse cellular functions. Regions in Src define structural and functional domains conserved in many cell signaling proteins. Src also contains a region of low sequence conservation termed the unique domain, the function of which has until now remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unique domain of Src is a protein–protein interaction region and we identify NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) as a Src unique domain-interacting protein. ND2 is a subunit of complex I in mitochondria, but we find that ND2 interacts with Src outside this organelle at excitatory synapses in the brain. ND2 acts as an adapter protein anchoring Src to the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex, and is crucial for Src regulation of synaptic NMDA receptor activity. By showing an extramitochondrial action for a protein encoded in the mitochondrial genome, we identify a previously unsuspected means by which mitochondria regulate cellular function, suggesting a new paradigm that may be of general relevance for control of Src signaling. PMID:15069201

  18. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  19. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  20. Local constraints in either the GluN1 or GluN2 subunit equally impair NMDA receptor pore opening

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Iehab

    2011-01-01

    The defining functional feature of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is activation gating, the energetic coupling of ligand binding into opening of the associated ion channel pore. NMDA receptors are obligate heterotetramers typically composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits that gate in a concerted fashion, requiring all four ligands to bind for subsequent opening of the channel pore. In an individual subunit, the extracellular ligand-binding domain, composed of discontinuous polypeptide segments S1 and S2, and the transmembrane channel–forming domain, composed of M1–M4 segments, are connected by three linkers: S1–M1, M3–S2, and S2–M4. To study subunit-specific events during pore opening in NMDA receptors, we impaired activation gating via intrasubunit disulfide bonds connecting the M3–S2 and S2–M4 in either the GluN1 or GluN2A subunit, thereby interfering with the movement of the M3 segment, the major pore-lining and channel-gating element. NMDA receptors with gating impairments in either the GluN1 or GluN2A subunit were dramatically resistant to channel opening, but when they did open, they showed only a single-conductance level indistinguishable from wild type. Importantly, the late gating steps comprising pore opening to its main long-duration open state were equivalently affected regardless of which subunit was constrained. Thus, the NMDA receptor ion channel undergoes a pore-opening mechanism in which the intrasubunit conformational dynamics at the level of the ligand-binding/transmembrane domain (TMD) linkers are tightly coupled across the four subunits. Our results further indicate that conformational freedom of the linkers between the ligand-binding and TMDs is critical to the activation gating process. PMID:21746848

  1. NMDA receptor subunit expression in the supraoptic nucleus of adult rats: Dominance of NR2B and NR2D

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Faye C; Sladek, Celia D

    2011-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus contains magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (MNC) which synthesize and release the peptide hormones vasopressin and oxytocin. Glutamate is a prominent excitatory neurotransmitter in the SON and regulates MNC excitability. NMDA receptors (NMDAR), a type of ionotropic glutamate receptor, mediate synaptic plasticity of MNCs and are necessary for characteristic burst firing patterns which serve to maximize hormone release. NMDARs are di- or tri-heteromeric complexes of NR1 and NR2 subunits. Receptor properties depend on NR2 subunit composition and variable splicing of NR1. We investigated the expression profile of NR1 and NR2 subunits in the SON at the mRNA and protein levels, plus protein expression of NR1 splice variants in control and salt-loaded adult rats. There was robust mRNA expression of all subunits, with NR2D levels being the highest. At the protein level, NR1, NR2B and NR2D were robustly expressed, while NR2A was weakly expressed. NR2C protein was not detected with either of two antibodies. All four NR1 splice variant cassettes (N1, C1, C2, C2’) were detected in the SON, though NR1 N1 expression was too low for accurate analysis. Three days of salt-loading did not alter mRNA, protein or splice variant expression of NMDAR subunits in the SON. Robust NR2D protein expression has not been previously shown in MNCs, and is uncommon in the adult brain. Though the functional significance of this unusual expression profile is unknown, it may contribute to important physiological characteristics of SON neurons, such as burst firing and resistance to excitotoxicity. PMID:21397592

  2. HIV-1 gp120Bal down-regulates phosphorylated NMDA receptor subunit 1 in cortical neurons via activation of glutamate and chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Wenjuan; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 (gp120) is a major virulence protein implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although gp120 has been suggested to cause synaptic and neuronal injuries by disrupting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that gp120Bal down-regulates the phosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit 1 NR1 (at Ser896 and Ser897), which is essential for NMDAR function. This effect of gp120Bal is blocked by specific antagonists of both NMDA and AMPA receptors, indicating a critical role of synaptic activation. Furthermore, AMD3100 and maraviroc, antagonists of CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively, inhibit the effect of gp120Bal on NR1, suggesting that CXCR4 and CCR5 activation are involved. These findings may provide mechanistic insights into the synaptopathogenesis caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:26582091

  3. PICK1 and phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) AMPA receptor subunit regulates GluR2 recycling after NMDA receptor-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Ting; Huganir, Richard L

    2007-12-12

    Changes in surface trafficking of AMPA receptors play an important role in synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of the C terminus of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) and the binding of GluR2 to the PDZ [postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1]-domain containing protein, protein interacting with protein kinase C (PICK1), have been proposed to play an important role in NMDA receptor dependent internalization of GluR2. However, the fate of internalized GluR2 after NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation is still unclear. Both recycling and degradation of GluR2 after the activation of NMDAR have been reported. Here, we used a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein variant, pHluorin, tagged to the N terminus of GluR2 (pH-GluR2) to study the dynamic internalization and recycling of GluR2 after NMDAR activation. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP), we directly demonstrate that internalized pH-GluR2 subunits recycle back to the cell surface after NMDAR activation. We further demonstrate that changing the phosphorylation state of the S880 residue at the C terminus of GluR2 does not affect NMDAR-dependent GluR2 internalization, but alters the recycling of GluR2 after NMDAR activation. In addition, mutation of the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) binding site in the pH-GluR2 slows receptor recycling. Finally, neurons lacking PICK1 display normal NMDAR dependent GluR2 internalization compared with wild-type neurons, but demonstrate accelerated GluR2 recycling after NMDAR activation. These results indicate that phosphorylation of GluR2 S880 and NSF and PICK1 binding to GluR2 dynamically regulate GluR2 recycling.

  4. N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor NR2 Subunit Selectivity of a Series of Novel Piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylate Derivatives: Preferential Blockade of Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptors in the Rat Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bihua; Tsintsadze, Timur S.; Morley, Richard M.; Irvine, Mark W.; Tsintsadze, Vera; Lozovaya, Natasha A.; Jane, David E.; Monaghan, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists that are highly selective for specific NMDA receptor 2 (NR2) subunits have several potential therapeutic applications; however, to date, only NR2B-selective antagonists have been described. Whereas most glutamate binding site antagonists display a common pattern of NR2 selectivity, NR2A > NR2B > NR2C > NR2D (high to low affinity), (2S*,3R*)-1-(phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PPDA) has a low selectivity for NR2C- and NR2D-containing NMDA receptors. A series of PPDA derivatives were synthesized and then tested at recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In addition, the optical isomers of PPDA were resolved; the (−) isomer displayed a 50- to 80-fold greater potency than the (+) isomer. Replacement of the phenanthrene moiety of PPDA with naphthalene or anthracene did not improve selectivity. However, phenylazobenzoyl (UBP125) or phenylethynylbenzoyl (UBP128) substitution significantly improved selectivity for NR2B-, NR2C-, and NR2D-containing receptors over NR2A-containing NMDA receptors. Phenanthrene attachment at the 3 position [(2R*,3S*)-1-(phenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP141); (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-bromophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP145); (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-chlorophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP160); and (2R*,3S*)-1-(9-iodophenanthrene-3-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (UBP161)] displayed improved NR2D selectivity. UBP141 and its 9-brominated homolog (UBP145) both display a 7- to 10- fold selectivity for NR2D-containing receptors over NR2B- or NR2A-containing receptors. Schild analysis indicates that these two compounds are competitive glutamate binding site antagonists. Consistent with a physiological role for NR2D-containing receptors in the hippocampus, UBP141 (5 μM) displayed greater selectivity than PPDA for inhibiting the slow-decaying component of the NMDA receptor

  5. The NMDA receptor GluN2C subunit controls cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance, neuronal oscillations and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subhash C.; Ravikrishnan, Aparna; Liu, Jinxu; Mao, Zhihao; Pavuluri, Ratnamala; Hillman, Brandon G.; Gandhi, Pauravi J.; Stairs, Dustin J.; Li, Ming; Ugale, Rajesh R.; Monaghan, Daniel T.; Dravid, Shashank M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong evidence for NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction as an underlying factor for cognitive disorders, the precise roles of various NMDAR subtypes remains unknown. The GluN2C-containing NMDARs exhibit unique biophysical properties and expression pattern, and lower expression of GluN2C subunit has been reported in postmortem brains from schizophrenia patients. We found that loss of GluN2C subunit leads to a shift in cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance towards greater inhibition. Specifically, pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of GluN2C knockout mice have reduced mEPSC frequency and dendritic spine density and a contrasting higher frequency of mIPSCs. In addition a greater number of perisomatic GAD67 puncta was observed suggesting a potential increase in parvalbumin interneuron inputs. At a network level the GluN2C knockout mice were found to have a more robust increase in power of oscillations in response to NMDAR blocker MK-801. Furthermore, GluN2C heterozygous and knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in cognition and sensorimotor gating. Our results demonstrate that loss of GluN2C subunit leads to cortical excitatory-inhibitory imbalance and abnormal neuronal oscillations associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27922130

  6. Targeting the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B for treating or preventing age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deheng; Jacobs, Stephanie A; Tsien, Joe Z

    2014-10-01

    Age-related memory loss is believed to be a result of reduced synaptic plasticity, including changes in the NR2 subunit composition of the NMDA receptor. It is known that endogenous NR2B subunits decrease as the brain ages, whereas transgenic upregulation of NR2B enhances synaptic plasticity and learning and memory in several animal species. Accumulating evidence suggests that elevated brain magnesium levels, via dietary supplementation, can boost NR2B in the brain, consequently reversing memory deficits and enhancing cognitive abilities. This review highlights the convergent molecular mechanisms via the NR2B pathway as a useful strategy for treating age-related memory loss. A dietary approach, via oral intake of a novel compound, magnesium L-threonate (MgT), to boost NR2B expression in the brain is highlighted. Direct upregulation of the NR2B subunit expression can enhance synaptic plasticity and memory functions in a broad range of behavioral tasks in rodents. Other upregulation approaches, such as targeting the NR2B transporter or surface recycling pathway via cyclin-dependent kinase 5, are highly effective in improving memory functions. A dietary supplemental approach by optimally elevating the [Mg²⁺] in the brain is surprisingly effective in upregulating NR2B expression and improving memories in preclinical studies. MgT is currently under clinical trials.

  7. Dichotomy in the anxiolytic versus antidepressant effect of C-terminal truncation of the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Inta, Dragos; Vogt, Miriam A; Pfeiffer, Natascha; Köhr, Georg; Gass, Peter

    2013-06-15

    The glutamate system is thought to play an important role in modulating mood and anxiety. Ionotropic NMDA receptors critically influence neuronal circuits regulating emotional behaviour. Their pharmacological blockade triggers fast antidepressant and anxiolytic effects. In line with this concept, ablation of the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors induces antidepressant and anxiolytic effects. However, it is not known if absence of the GluN2A-containing NMDA channel or of the GluN2A-mediated intracellular signalling is responsible for these effects. To further investigate the contribution of the GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors in mood disorders we analysed mice lacking the intracellular C-terminus of the GluN2A subunit (GluN2AΔC/ΔC) in tests relevant for anxiety and depression. Interestingly, GluN2AΔC/ΔC mice showed decreased anxiety, but no anti-depressive-like phenotype, indicating a predominant role of the intracellular signalling of the GluN2A subunit in anxiety. These data suggest distinct roles of the GluN2A subunit as whole vs. its intracellular domain in modulating anxiety and depression-like symptoms and reveal differential molecular targets for the therapy of mood and anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bisphenol-A rapidly promotes dynamic changes in hippocampal dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Ye Yinping; Li Tao; Chen Lei; Tian Dong; Luo Qingqing; Lu Mei

    2010-12-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is known to be a potent endocrine disrupter. Evidence is emerging that estrogen exerts a rapid influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the dendritic spine density, which requires activation of NMDA receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BPA (ranging from 1 to 1000 nM), focusing on the rapid dynamic changes in dendritic filopodia and the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) {beta} and NMDA receptor, as well as the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the cultured hippocampal neurons. A specific ER antagonist ICI 182,780 was used to examine the potential involvement of ERs. The results demonstrated that exposure to BPA (ranging from 10 to 1000 nM) for 30 min rapidly enhanced the motility and the density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons, as well as the phosphorylation of NR2B (pNR2B), though the expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2B, and ER{beta} were not changed. The antagonist of ERs completely inhibited the BPA-induced increases in the filopodial motility and the number of filopodia extending from dendrites. The increased pNR2B induced by BPA (100 nM) was also completely eliminated. Furthermore, BPA attenuated the effects of 17{beta}-estradiol (17{beta}-E{sub 2}) on the dendritic filopodia outgrowth and the expression of pNR2B when BPA was co-treated with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. The present results suggest that BPA, like 17{beta}-E{sub 2}, rapidly results in the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons with the concomitant activation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B via an ER-mediated signaling pathway. Meanwhile, BPA suppressed the enhancement effects of 17{beta}-E{sub 2} when it coexists with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. These results provided important evidence suggesting the neurotoxicity of the low levels of BPA during the early postnatal development of the brain.

  9. Cleavage of the NR2B subunit amino terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by tissue plasminogen activator: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of ifenprodil and glycine affinities on truncated NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T-H; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-07-20

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg(67)). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ~4-kDa fragment (Arg(27)-Arg(67)) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg(67) to Ala(67) impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg(27)-Arg(67)-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln(29)-Arg(67) deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC(50) with no change in glutamate EC(50). Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  10. Increased brain monoaminergic tone after the NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit gene knockout is responsible for resistance to the hypnotic effect of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Kohno, Tatsuro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2013-01-05

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors can be inhibited by inhalational anesthetics in vitro at clinically relevant concentrations. Here, to clarify the role of NMDA receptors in anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, we examined the hypnotic properties of isoflurane, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide in NMDA receptor GluN2A subunit knockout mice. The hypnotic properties of inhalational anesthetics were evaluated in mice in the loss of righting reflex (LORR) assay by measuring the 50% concentration for LORR (LORR ED(50)). Knockout mice displayed isoflurane and sevoflurane LORR ED(50) values similar to wild-type controls, indicating no significant contribution of these receptors to the hypnotic action of halogenated anesthetics. However, compared with wild-type controls, mutant mice displayed larger isoflurane LORR ED(50) values in the presence of nitrous oxide, indicating a resistance to this gaseous anesthetic. Knockout mice have enhanced brain monoaminergic activity which occurs secondary to NMDA receptor dysfunction, and the observed resistance to the isoflurane LORR ED(50)-sparing effect of nitrous oxide could be abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist droperidol or with the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. Thus, resistance to nitrous oxide in knockout mice appears to be a secondary phenomenon of monoaminergic origin and not a direct result of impaired NMDA receptor function. Our results indicate that NMDA receptors are not critically involved in the hypnotic action of conventionally-used inhalational anesthetics. Also, they suggest that increased brain monoaminergic tone can diminish the effects of general anesthesia. Finally, they provide further evidence that changes secondary to genetic manipulation can explain the results obtained in global knockouts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Deletion of the NMDA-NR1 receptor subunit gene in the mouse nucleus accumbens attenuates apomorphine-induced dopamine D1 receptor trafficking and acoustic startle behavior

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Michael J.; Robinson, Danielle C.; Waters, Elizabeth; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (Acb) contains subpopulations of neurons defined by their receptor content and potential involvement in sensorimotor gating and other behaviors that are dysfunctional in schizophrenia. In Acb neurons, the NMDA NR1 (NR1) subunit is co-expressed not only with the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R), but also with the μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR), which mediates certain behaviors that are adversely impacted by schizophrenia. The NMDA-NR1 subunit has been suggested to play a role in the D1R trafficking and behavioral dysfunctions resulting from systemic administration of apomorphine, a D1R and dopamine D2 receptor agonist that impacts prepulse inhibition (PPI) to auditory-evoked startle (AS). Together, this evidence suggests that the NMDA receptor may regulate D1R trafficking in Acb neurons, including those expressing μ-OR, in animals exposed to auditory startle and apomorphine. We tested this hypothesis by combining spatial-temporal gene deletion technology, dual labeling immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. Deleting NR1 in Acb neurons prevented the increase in the dendritic density of plasma membrane D1Rs in single D1R and dual (D1R and μ-OR) labeled dendrites in the Acb in response to apomorphine and AS. Deleting NR1 also attenuated the decrease in AS induced by apomorphine. In the absence of apomorphine and startle, deletion of Acb NR1 diminished social interaction, without affecting novel object recognition, or open field activity. These results suggest that NR1 expression in the Acb is essential for apomorphine-induced D1R surface trafficking and reduction in AS, but also plays an independent role in controling social behaviors that are impaired in multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:23345061

  12. Deletion of the NMDA-NR1 receptor subunit gene in the mouse nucleus accumbens attenuates apomorphine-induced dopamine D1 receptor trafficking and acoustic startle behavior.

    PubMed

    Glass, Michael J; Robinson, Danielle C; Waters, Elizabeth; Pickel, Virginia M

    2013-06-01

    The nucleus accumbens (Acb) contains subpopulations of neurons defined by their receptor content and potential involvement in sensorimotor gating and other behaviors that are dysfunctional in schizophrenia. In Acb neurons, the NMDA NR1 (NR1) subunit is coexpressed not only with the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R), but also with the µ-opioid receptor (µ-OR), which mediates certain behaviors that are adversely impacted by schizophrenia. The NMDA-NR1 subunit has been suggested to play a role in the D1R trafficking and behavioral dysfunctions resulting from systemic administration of apomorphine, a D1R and dopamine D2 receptor agonist that impacts prepulse inhibition to auditory-evoked startle (AS). Together, this evidence suggests that the NMDA receptor may regulate D1R trafficking in Acb neurons, including those expressing µ-OR, in animals exposed to auditory startle and apomorphine. We tested this hypothesis by combining spatial-temporal gene deletion technology, dual labeling immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. Deleting NR1 in Acb neurons prevented the increase in the dendritic density of plasma membrane D1Rs in single D1R and dual (D1R and µ-OR) labeled dendrites in the Acb in response to apomorphine and AS. Deleting NR1 also attenuated the decrease in AS induced by apomorphine. In the absence of apomorphine and startle, deletion of Acb NR1 diminished social interaction, without affecting novel object recognition, or open field activity. These results suggest that NR1 expression in the Acb is essential for apomorphine-induced D1R surface trafficking, as well as auditory startle and social behaviors that are impaired in multiple psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Downregulation of the spinal NMDA receptor NR2B subunit during electro-acupuncture relief of chronic visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongping; Zhang, Yuhua; Qi, Debo; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of spinal NR2B, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, in the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on chronic visceral hyperalgesia was investigated. Chronic visceral hyperalgesia was induced using an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) model in rats. Graded colorectal distention (CRD) stimuli at strengths of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were applied, and behavioral tests were performed to measure the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in response to the CRD stimuli and assess the severity of the visceral hyperalgesia. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal intact (control) group, IBS model (model) group, EA-treated IBS rats (EA) group and sham EA-treated IBS rats (sham EA) group. For the EA treatment, electric stimuli were applied through needles inserted into two acupoints [Zu-san-li (ST-36) and Shang-ju-xu (ST-37)] in both hind limbs, while the sham EA treatment consisted of only the insertion of needles into these same acupoints without an application of electric stimuli. Our results showed that AWR scores of the model group responding to CRD stimuli of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were significantly increased. These increased scores subsequently decreased following EA treatment (P < 0.05) compared with those for the other groups. The expression of NR2B in the superficial laminae (SDH, laminae I and II), nucleus proprius (NP, laminae III and IV), neck of the dorsal horn (NECK, laminae V and VI) and central canal region (lamina X) at thoracolumbar (T13-L2) and lumbosacral (L6-S2) segmental level significantly increased in the model group versus the control group (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased after EA treatment (P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in neither AWR scores nor expression of the NR2B subunit in these spinal regions after the sham EA treatment. These results confirm that EA can relieve chronic visceral hyperalgesia in IBS model rats and suggest that such an effect is possibly mediated through the

  14. Memory in aged mice is rescued by enhanced expression of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Brim, B. L.; Haskell, R.; Awedikian, R.; Ellinwood, N.M.; Jin, L.; Kumar, A.; Foster, T.C.; Magnusson, K.

    2012-01-01

    The GluN2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor shows age-related declines in expression across the frontal cortex and hippocampus. This decline is strongly correlated to age-related memory declines. This study was designed to determine if increasing GluN2B subunit expression in the frontal lobe or hippocampus would improve memory in aged mice. Mice were injected bilaterally with either the GluN2B vector, containing cDNA specific for the GluN2B subunit and enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP); a control vector or vehicle. Spatial memory, cognitive flexibility, and associative memory were assessed using the Morris water maze. Aged mice, with increased GluN2B subunit expression, exhibited improved long-term spatial memory, comparable to young mice. However, memory was rescued on different days in the Morris water maze; early for hippocampal GluN2B subunit enrichment and later for the frontal lobe. A higher concentration of the GluN2B antagonist, Ro 25-6981, was required to impair long-term spatial memory in aged mice with enhanced GluN2B expression, as compared to aged controls, suggesting there was an increase in the number of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. In addition, hippocampal slices from aged mice with increased GluN2B subunit expression exhibited enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSP). Treatment with Ro 25-6981 showed that a greater proportion of the NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP was due to the GluN2B subunit in these animals, as compared to aged controls. These results suggest that increasing the production of the GluN2B subunit in aged animals enhances memory and synaptic transmission. Therapies that enhance GluN2B subunit expression within the aged brain may be useful for ameliorating age-related memory declines. PMID:23103326

  15. IL-1ra alleviates inflammatory hyperalgesia through preventing phosphorylation of NMDA receptor NR-1 subunit in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Xin; Li, Aihui; Liu, Bing; Wang, Linbo; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Haiqing; Berman, Brian M; Lao, Lixing

    2008-04-01

    Although it has been shown that pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) facilitate perception of noxious inputs at the spinal level, the mechanisms have not been understood. This study determined the cell type that produces IL-1beta, the co-localization of IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and Fos and NR1 in the spinal cord, and the effects of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) on NR1 phosphorylation and hyperalgesia in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of NR1, an essential subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), is known to modulate NMDAR activity and facilitate pain. Hyperalgesia was induced by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 0.08ml, 40microg Mycobacterium tuberculosis) into one hind paw of each rat. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was tested before CFA (-48h) for baseline and 2 and 24h after CFA to assess hyperalgesia. IL-1ra was given (i.t.) 24h before CFA to block the action of basal IL-1beta and 2h prior to each of two PWL tests to block CFA-induced IL-1beta. Spinal cords were removed for double immunostaining of IL-1beta/neuronal marker and IL-1beta/glial cell markers, IL-1RI/Fos and IL-1RI/NR1, and for Western blot to measure NR1 phosphorylation. The data showed that: (1) astrocytes produce IL-1beta, (2) IL-1RI is localized in Fos- and NR1-immunoreactive neurons within the spinal dorsal horn, and (3) IL-1ra at 0.01mg/rat significantly increased PWL (P<0.05) and inhibited NR1 phosphorylation compared to saline control. The results suggest that spinal IL-1beta is produced by astrocytes and enhances NR1 phosphorylation to facilitate inflammatory pain.

  16. Spinal NMDA NR1 Subunit Expression Following Transient TNBS Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert M.; Verne, G. Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Background: N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors play an important role in the development of hypersensitivity to visceral and somatic stimuli following inflammation or tissue injury. Our objective was to investigate the role of NMDA NR1 receptors in the spinal cord (T10-L1; L4-S1) of a subset of rats that remain hypersensitive following histological resolution of TNBS-induced colitis compared to saline treated rats and rats that had recovered both behaviorally and histologically. We hypothesized that NMDA NR1 subunit expression mediates hypersensitivity following transient TNBS colitis. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (150g-250g) received 20mg/rat intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in 50% ethanol or saline. Animals underwent nociceptive visceral/somatic pain testing 16 weeks after resolution of TNBS colitis. Animals were sacrificed and their spinal cord (T10-L1; L4-S1) was retrieved and 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunohistocytochemistry techniques were used to investigate spinal-NMDA receptor expression. Results: NR1001 was the only NMDA NR1 receptor subunit that was expressed in recovered and control rats, whereas hypersensitive animals expressed NR1011 and NR1111 as well as NR1001 subunits. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated increased expression of NMDA NR1-N1, C1, and C2-plus expression in lamina I & II of the spinal cord (T10-L1; L4-S1) in hypersensitive rats but not in recovered/control rats. Conclusions: Selective increases in the expression of the NMDA NR1 splice variants occur in hypersensitive rats following resolution of TNBS colitis. This suggests that the NMDA NR1 receptor play an important role in the development of neuronal plasticity and central sensitization. The recombination of NR1 splice variants may serve as a key functional protein that maintains hypersensitivity following resolution of TNBS colitis. PMID:19406112

  17. NMDA receptor subunit composition controls dendritogenesis of hippocampal neurons through CAMKII, CREB-P, and H3K27ac.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Fernando J; Jury, Nur; Martinez, Pablo; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Campos, Matias; Abarzúa, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Karen; Ibing, Susanne; Mardones, Muriel D; Haensgen, Henny; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Tevy, Maria Florencia; Neve, Rachael; Sanhueza, Magdalena; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Montecino, Martín; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2017-12-01

    Dendrite arbor growth, or dendritogenesis, is choreographed by a diverse set of cues, including the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR2A and NR2B. While NR1NR2B receptors are predominantly expressed in immature neurons and promote plasticity, NR1NR2A receptors are mainly expressed in mature neurons and induce circuit stability. How the different subunits regulate these processes is unclear, but this is likely related to the presence of their distinct C-terminal sequences that couple different signaling proteins. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is an interesting candidate as this protein can be activated by calcium influx through NMDARs. CaMKII triggers a series of biochemical signaling cascades, involving the phosphorylation of diverse targets. Among them, the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB-P) pathway triggers a plasticity-specific transcriptional program through unknown epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we found that dendritogenesis in hippocampal neurons is impaired by several well-characterized constructs (i.e., NR2B-RS/QD) and peptides (i.e., tatCN21) that specifically interfere with the recruitment and interaction of CaMKII with the NR2B C-terminal domain. Interestingly, we found that transduction of NR2AΔIN, a mutant NR2A construct with increased interaction to CaMKII, reactivates dendritogenesis in mature hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. To gain insights into the signaling and epigenetic mechanisms underlying NMDAR-mediated dendritogenesis, we used immunofluorescence staining to detect CREB-P and acetylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27ac), an activation-associated histone tail mark. In contrast to control mature neurons, our data shows that activation of the NMDAR/CaMKII/ERK-P/CREB-P signaling axis in neurons expressing NR2AΔIN is not correlated with increased nuclear H3K27ac levels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  19. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Robert A; Fanger, Christopher M; Anderson, David R; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders.

  20. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Forster, Gina L; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2014-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In this study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A : NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. A behaviorally sensitizing regimen of cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip 7 days) also sensitized ventral hippocampus (hipp)-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the nucleus accumbens (Nac) to NMDA stimulation (bolts). This was associated with reduced ventral hippocampal NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio, suggesting that repeated exposure to cocaine produces changes in hippocampal NMDA receptor composition that lead to enhanced ventral hippocampus-nucleus accumbens communication.

  1. Postsynaptic density levels of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit and PSD-95 protein in prefrontal cortex from people with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Catts, Vibeke Sørensen; Derminio, Dominique Suzanne; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is converging evidence of involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Our group recently identified a decrease in total NR1 mRNA and protein expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in a case-control study of individuals with schizophrenia (n=37/group). The NR1 subunit is critical to NMDA receptor function at the postsynaptic density, a cellular structure rich in the scaffolding protein, PSD-95. The extent to which the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit is altered at the site of action, in the postsynaptic density, is not clear. Aims: To extend our previous results by measuring levels of NR1 and PSD-95 protein in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions of prefrontal cortex from the same individuals in the case-control study noted above. Methods: Postsynaptic density-enriched fractions were isolated from fresh-frozen prefrontal cortex (BA10) and subjected to western blot analysis for NR1 and PSD-95. Results: We found a 20% decrease in NR1 protein (t(66)=−2.874, P=0.006) and a 30% decrease in PSD-95 protein (t(63)=−2.668, P=0.010) in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions from individuals with schizophrenia relative to unaffected controls. Conclusions: Individuals with schizophrenia have less NR1 protein, and therefore potentially fewer functional NMDA receptors, at the postsynaptic density. The associated decrease in PSD-95 protein at the postsynaptic density suggests that not only are glutamate receptors compromised in individuals with schizophrenia, but the overall spine architecture and downstream signaling supported by PSD-95 may also be deficient. PMID:27336043

  2. Postsynaptic density levels of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit and PSD-95 protein in prefrontal cortex from people with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Catts, Vibeke Sørensen; Derminio, Dominique Suzanne; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-01-01

    There is converging evidence of involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Our group recently identified a decrease in total NR1 mRNA and protein expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in a case-control study of individuals with schizophrenia (n=37/group). The NR1 subunit is critical to NMDA receptor function at the postsynaptic density, a cellular structure rich in the scaffolding protein, PSD-95. The extent to which the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit is altered at the site of action, in the postsynaptic density, is not clear. To extend our previous results by measuring levels of NR1 and PSD-95 protein in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions of prefrontal cortex from the same individuals in the case-control study noted above. Postsynaptic density-enriched fractions were isolated from fresh-frozen prefrontal cortex (BA10) and subjected to western blot analysis for NR1 and PSD-95. We found a 20% decrease in NR1 protein (t(66)=-2.874, P=0.006) and a 30% decrease in PSD-95 protein (t(63)=-2.668, P=0.010) in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions from individuals with schizophrenia relative to unaffected controls. Individuals with schizophrenia have less NR1 protein, and therefore potentially fewer functional NMDA receptors, at the postsynaptic density. The associated decrease in PSD-95 protein at the postsynaptic density suggests that not only are glutamate receptors compromised in individuals with schizophrenia, but the overall spine architecture and downstream signaling supported by PSD-95 may also be deficient.

  3. Anxious phenotypes plus environmental stressors are related to brain DNA damage and changes in NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abaleira, Helena M; Michels, Monique; Tomaz, Débora B; dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; Carlessi, Anelise S; Matias, Beatriz I; Leffa, Daniela D; Damiani, Adriani P; Gomes, Vitor de C; Andrade, Vanessa M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Landeira-Fernadez, Jesus; Quevedo, João

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of chronic mild stress on DNA damage, NMDA receptor subunits and glutamate transport levels in the brains of rats with an anxious phenotype, which were selected to represent both the high-freezing (CHF) and low-freezing (CLF) lines. The anxious phenotype induced DNA damage in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAc). CHF rats subjected to chronic stress presented a more pronounced DNA damage in the hippocampus and NAc. NMDAR1 were increased in the prefrontal cortex (PC), hippocampus and amygdala of CHF, and decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and NAc of CHF stressed. NMDAR2A were decreased in the amygdala of the CHF and stressed; and increased in CHF stressed. NMDRA2A in the NAc was increased after stress, and decreased in the CLF. NMDAR2B were increased in the hippocampus of CLF and CHF. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the NMDAR2B for stress in the CLF and CHF. NMDAR2B in the NAc were decreased for stress and increased in the CHF; in the PC NMDAR2B increased in the CHF. EAAT1 increased in the PC of CLF+stress. In the hippocampus, EAAT1 decreased in all groups. In the amygdala, EAAT1 decreased in the CLF+stress and CHF. EAAT2 were decreased in the PC for stress, and increased in CHF+control. In the hippocampus, the EAAT2 were increased for the CLF and decreased in the CLF+stress. In the amygdala, there was a decrease in the EATT2 in the CLF+stress and CHF. These findings suggest that an anxious phenotype plus stress may induce a more pronounced DNA damage, and promote more alterations in the glutamatergic system. These findings may help to explain, at least in part, the common point of the mechanisms involved with the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stroke Patients Develop Antibodies that React with Components of NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 in Proportion to Lesion Size

    PubMed Central

    Kalev-Zylinska, Maggie L.; Symes, Wymond; Little, Kevin C. E.; Sun, Peng; Wen, Daying; Qiao, Linzi; Young, Deborah; During, Matthew J.; Barber, P. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Antibodies against neuronal antigens develop in patients after stroke and some may serve as biomarkers of neuronal injury. We aimed to determine if antibodies against subunit 1 (GluN1) of the NMDA receptor also develop after stroke and if so, whether they correlate with stroke characteristics. Methods Forty-eight ischaemic stroke patients and 96 healthy controls were tested for the presence of serum antibodies targeting GluN1. Testing was conducted using 20 kDa recombinant GluN1-S2 peptide (by ELISA and Western blotting) and on rat brain tissue (by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry). Clinical examinations and CT brain scans were performed to assess clinical state and infarct size and location. Results Of the 48 ischaemic stroke patients, 21 (44%) had antibodies that reacted with the recombinant GluN1-S2. There was no evidence of antibody binding to intact GluN1 in brain tissue. Western blot appearances suggested reactivity with GluN1 degradation products. Patients with anti-GluN1-S2 antibodies were more likely to have higher NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, larger infarcts and more frequent cortical involvement. Of the 96 controls, only three (3%), all aged over 50 years, had antibodies that reacted with GluN1-S2 at low levels. Conclusions Antibodies that bind recombinant GluN1-S2 peptides (but not the intact GluN1 protein) develop transiently in patients after stroke in proportion to infarct size, suggesting that these antibodies are raised secondarily to neuronal damage. The anti-GluN1-S2 antibodies may provide useful information about the presence and severity of cerebral infarction. This will require confirmation in larger studies. PMID:23723305

  5. State-dependent increase of cortical gamma activity during REM sleep after selective blockade of NR2B subunit containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Bernat

    2012-07-01

    Sub-anesthetic doses of NMDA receptor antagonists suppress sleep and elicit continuous high-power gamma oscillations lasting for hours. This effect is subunit-specific, as it was also seen after preferential blockade of the NR2A but not of the NR2B subunit-containing receptors. The objective of this study was to test whether NR2B receptor antagonists that do not induce lasting aberrant gamma elevation affect gamma activity during specific behaviors and states, including REM sleep, when gamma normally occurs. Gamma oscillations in cortical EEG were assessed in different vigilance states in rats and were compared before and after injection of nonselective (ketamine, 10 mg/kg, and MK801, 0.2 mg/kg), as well as NR2A-preferring (NVP-AAM077, 20 mg/kg), and NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonists (Ro25-6985, 10 mg), and vehicle. In contrast to nonselective and NR2A-preferring antagonists, Ro25-6985 did not disrupt sleep and had no effect on gamma activity during waking and slow wave sleep. It significantly increased, however, gamma power in the frontal (but not in occipital) cortex during REM sleep (by 37% ± 10%, average in the first 4 h). The effect had a short onset; enhanced gamma activity appeared as early as in the first REM sleep episode post-injection and lasted over 8 hours. Increased gamma power induced by MK-801 (46% ± 5%) and NVP-AAM077 (100% ± 8%) during REM sleep could also be detected several hours after injection when periodic alternation of sleep-wake states returned. By acting on gamma oscillations in a state-dependent manner, NMDA receptors might have subunit-specific role in REM sleep-associated cognitive processes.

  6. Taste novelty induces intracellular redistribution of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptor in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Jimenez, Beatriz; Ramirez-Munguía, Nadia; Delint-Ramírez, Ilse; Luna-Illades, Claudio; Tapia, Ricardo; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2008-06-18

    Taste recognition memory is a process by which animals associate a taste previously experienced with its gastric consequences. Novel taste presentation induces in the insular cortex biochemical modifications that decrease after the taste becomes familiar. Here we show that, in this cortex, consumption of a novel taste produces an increase of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor in the detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. This increase did not occur in the adjacent parietal cortex, was not due to a change in the total amount of protein, and is related with the novelty of the stimulus since it was reduced after the taste became familiar. Furthermore, NR2A and NR2B subunits increase in the DRM was blocked by the injection of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. These results suggest that modulation of NMDA receptors in the insular cortex through the increase of its NR2A and NR2B subunits in the DRM is involved in the taste memory formation via a cholinergic process.

  7. Glutamate Binding to the GluN2B Subunit Controls Surface Trafficking of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors*♦

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Ferreira, Joana S.; Carvalho, Ana Luisa; Craig, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking of NMDA receptors to the surface of neurons and to synapses is critical for proper brain function and activity-dependent plasticity. Recent evidence suggests that surface trafficking of other ionotropic glutamate receptors requires ligand binding for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that glutamate binding to GluN2 is required for trafficking of NMDA receptors to the cell surface. We expressed a panel of GluN2B ligand binding mutants in heterologous cells with GluN1 or in rat cultured neurons and found that surface expression correlates with glutamate efficacy. Such a correlation was found even in the presence of dominant negative dynamin to inhibit endocytosis and surface expression correlated with Golgi localization, indicating differences in forward trafficking. Co-expression of wild type GluN2B did not enhance surface expression of the mutants, suggesting that glutamate must bind to both GluN2 subunits in a tetramer and that surface expression is limited by the least avid of the two glutamate binding sites. Surface trafficking of a constitutively closed cleft GluN2B was indistinguishable from that of wild type, suggesting that glutamate concentrations are typically not limiting for forward trafficking. YFP-GluN2B expressed in hippocampal neurons from GluN2B−/− mice rescued synaptic accumulation at similar levels to wild type. Under these conditions, surface synaptic accumulation of YFP-GluN2B mutants also correlated with apparent glutamate affinity. Altogether, these results indicate that glutamate controls forward trafficking of NMDA receptors to the cell surface and to synapses and raise the intriguing idea that NMDA receptors may be functional at intracellular sites. PMID:22740692

  8. Alteration in NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression in vulnerable and resistant regions of in vitro ischemic rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Small, D L; Poulter, M O; Buchan, A M; Morley, P

    1997-08-29

    Brain insults, including cerebral ischemia, can alter glutamate receptor subunit expression in vulnerable neurons. Understanding these post-ischemic changes in glutamate receptors could enhance our ability to identify specific, novel neuroprotective compounds. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was used to quantify the altered expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) NR2A, NR2B and NR2C subunits relative to one another in rat hippocampal slices in resistant and vulnerable regions following in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation. Ninety minutes after re-oxygenation and return to 10 mM glucose, there was a significant increase in the expression of NR2C relative to NR2B and NR2A in the slice as a whole, as well as in the selectively vulnerable CA1 region and the resistant CA3 and dentate gyrus regions.

  9. Differential contribution of the NR1- and NR2A-subunits to the selectivity filter of recombinant NMDA receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, L P; Kuner, T; Seeburg, P H; Sakmann, B

    1996-01-01

    1. The molecular determinants for the narrow constriction of recombinant N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels composed of wild-type and mutant NR1- and NR2A-subunits were studied in Xenopus oocytes. 2. The relative permeability of differently sized organic cations was used as an indicator of the size of the narrow constriction. From measured reversal potentials under bi-ionic conditions with K+ as the reference solution, permeability ratios were calculated with the Lewis equation. 3. For wild-type NMDA receptor channels, five organic cations showed clear reversal potentials, with permeability ratios (PX/PK): ammonium, 1.28; methylammonium, 0.48; dimethylammonium (DMA), 0.20; diethylammonium, 0.07; and dimethylethanol-ammonium, 0.02. 4. Mutation of the N-site asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) at homologous positions in either NR1 (position 598) or NR2A (position 595) increased the permeability of DMA relative to wild-type channels about equally. However, for larger sized organic cations, the NR1(N598Q) mutation had stronger effects on increasing their permeability whereas the NR2A(N595Q) mutation was without effect. These changes in organic cation permeability suggest that the NR1(N598Q) mutation increases the pore size while the NR2A(N595Q) mutation does not. 5. Channels in which the NR1 N-site asparagine was replaced by the smaller glycine (G), NR1(N598G)-NR2A, showed the largest increase in pore size of all sites examined in either subunit. In contrast, in the NR2A-subunit the same N-site substitution to glycine produced only small effects on pore size. 6. For the NR2A-subunit, an asparagine residue (position 596) on the C-terminal side of the N-site, when mutated to larger or smaller sized amino acids, produced large, volume-specific effects on pore size. The mutant channel NR1-NR2A(N596G) had the largest increase in pore size of all sites examined in the NR2A-subunit. In contrast, mutation of the homologous position in the NR1-subunit had no effect on

  10. NMDA receptor subunits in the adult rat hippocampus undergo similar changes after 5 minutes in an open field and after LTP induction.

    PubMed

    Baez, Maria Veronica; Oberholzer, Maria Victoria; Cercato, Magali Cecilia; Snitcofsky, Marina; Aguirre, Alejandra Ines; Jerusalinsky, Diana Alicia

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor subunits change during development and their synaptic expression is modified rapidly after synaptic plasticity induction in hippocampal slices. However, there is scarce information on subunits expression after synaptic plasticity induction or memory acquisition, particularly in adults. GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits were assessed by western blot in 1) adult rats that had explored an open field (OF) for 5 minutes, a time sufficient to induce habituation, 2) mature rat hippocampal neuron cultures depolarized by KCl and 3) hippocampal slices from adult rats where long term potentiation (LTP) was induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS). GluN1 and GluN2A, though not GluN2B, were significantly higher 70 minutes--but not 30 minutes--after a 5 minutes session in an OF. GluN1 and GluN2A total immunofluorescence and puncta in neurites increased in cultures, as evaluated 70 minutes after KCl stimulation. Similar changes were found in hippocampal slices 70 minutes after LTP induction. To start to explore underlying mechanisms, hippocampal slices were treated either with cycloheximide (a translation inhibitor) or actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) during electrophysiological assays. It was corroborated that translation was necessary for LTP induction and expression. The rise in GluN1 depends on transcription and translation, while the increase in GluN2A appears to mainly depend on translation, though a contribution of some remaining transcriptional activity during actinomycin D treatment could not be rouled out. LTP effective induction was required for the subunits to increase. Although in the three models same subunits suffered modifications in the same direction, within an apparently similar temporal course, further investigation is required to reveal if they are related processes and to find out whether they are causally related with synaptic plasticity, learning and memory.

  11. Differential effects of insufflated, subcutaneous, and intravenous growth hormone on bone growth, cognitive function, and NMDA receptor subunit expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Won; Shin, Sooyoung; Kim, Chi Hwa; Ko, Ah-ra; Kwak, Min Jung; Nam, Mi Hyun; Park, So Young; Kim, Su Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Galinsky, Raymond E; Kim, Hojoong; Yeo, Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of inhalable growth hormone (GH) delivered by an insufflator to the lungs of hypophysectomized Sprague Dawley rats. In the first cohort, the safety and efficacy of the insufflated GH were evaluated. Three experimental groups (n = 7 per group) were treated with GH for 15 d: One group received sc injection of GH daily at 200 microg/kg (SC200). Two other groups received GH by insufflation daily: 200 microg/kg (INS 200) and 600 microg/kg (INS 600). In the second set of experiments, GH was administered in three routes [SC200, INS200, intravenous (IV200)] (n=10) for 5 d, and escape latency and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression were evaluated. In the first cohort, INS200 showed similar bioactivity as SC200 in growth promotion, tibial growth, as well as escape latency on the 12th day of treatment. Insufflated GH was well tolerated without significant inflammatory responses. In the second cohort, expression of the NMDA receptor 1 and 2B in hippocampus measured after 3 or 6 d of daily treatments were significantly higher in INS200 as compared to IV200, consistent with the improvement of the escape latency. In summary, the inhalable form of GH delivered by intratracheal insufflation was safe, and its bioactivity was comparable to sc injection both in promotion of growth and acquisition of learning ability. If applied properly to human, inhalable GH would be effective for growth promotion and possibly for several disorders caused by underexpression of NMDA receptors.

  12. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  13. D1/5 modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor currents

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Juan A.; Hirsch, Silke J.; Chapman, David; Leverich, Leah S.; Greene, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that salience-associated modulation of behavior is mediated by the release of monoamines and that monoaminergic activation of D1/5 receptors is required for normal hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. However, it is not understood how D1/5 modulation of hippocampal circuits can affect salience-associated learning and memory. We have observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons that D1/5 receptor activation elicits a bi-directional long-term plasticity of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents with the polarity of plasticity determined by NMDA receptor, NR2A/B subunit composition. This plasticity results in a decrease in the NR2A/NR2B ratio of subunit composition. Synaptic responses mediated by NMDA receptors that include NR2B subunits are potentiated by D1/5 receptor activation, while responses mediated by NMDA receptors that include NR2A subunits are depressed. Furthermore, these bidirectional, subunit-specific effects are mediated by distinctive intracellular signaling mechanisms. As there is a predominance of NMDA receptors composed of NR2A subunits observed in entorhinal-CA1 inputs and a predominance of NMDA receptors composed of NR2B subunits in CA3-CA1 synapses, potentiation of synaptic NMDA currents predominates in the proximal CA3-CA1 synapses, while depression of synaptic NMDA currents predominates in the distal entorhinal-CA1 synapses. Finally, all of these effects are reproduced by the release of endogenous monoamines through activation of D1/5 receptors. Thus, endogenous D1/5 activation can, 1) decrease the NR2A/B ratio of NMDAR subunit composition at glutamatergic synapses, a rejuvenation to a composition similar to developmentally immature synapses, and, 2) in CA1, bias NMDA receptor responsiveness towards the more highly processed tri-synaptic CA3-CA1 circuit and away from the direct entorhinal-CA1 input. PMID:19279248

  14. The N-terminal domain of the GluN3A subunit determines the efficacy of glycine-activated NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mesic, Ivana; Madry, Christian; Geider, Kirsten; Bernhard, Max; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2016-06-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and GluN3 subunits function as excitatory glycine receptors that respond to agonist application only with a very low efficacy. Binding of glycine to the high-affinity GluN3 subunits triggers channel opening, whereas glycine binding to the low-affinity GluN1 subunits causes an auto-inhibition of the maximal glycine-inducible receptor current (Imax). Hence, competitive antagonists of the GluN1 subunit strongly potentiate glycine responses of wild type (wt) GluN1/GluN3 receptors. Here, we show that co-expression of N-terminal domain (NTD) deleted GluN1 (GluN1(ΔNTD)) and GluN3 (GluN3(ΔNTD)) subunits in Xenopus oocytes generates GluN1/GluN3 receptors with a large increase in the glycine-inducible Imax accompanied by a strongly impaired GluN1 antagonist-mediated potentiation. Affinity purification after metabolic or surface labeling revealed no differences in subunit stoichiometry and surface expression between wt GluN1/GluN3A and mutant GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors, indicating a specific effect of NTD deletions on the efficacy of receptor opening. Notably, GluN1/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors showed a similar increase in Imax and a greatly reduced GluN1 antagonist-mediated current potentiation as GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors, whereas the glycine-induced currents of GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A receptors resembled those of wt GluN1/GluN3A receptors. Furthermore, oxidative crosslinking of the homophilic GluN3A NTD intersubunit interface in mutant GluN1/GluN3A(R319C) receptors caused both a decrease in the glycine-induced Imax concomitantly with a marked increase in GluN1 antagonist-mediated current potentiation, whilst mutations within the intrasubunit region linking the GluN3A NTD to the ligand binding domain had opposite effects. Together these results show that the GluN3A NTD constitutes a crucial regulatory determinant of GluN1/GluN3A receptor function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. NMDA receptor modulators: an updated patent review (2013 – 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Katie L; Jing, Yao; Prosser, Anthony R; Traynelis, Stephen F; Liotta, Dennis C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The NMDA receptor mediates a slow component of excitatory synaptic transmission, and NMDA receptor dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neurological disorders. Thus, interest in developing modulators that are able to regulate the channel continues to be strong. Recent research has led to the discovery of a number of compounds that hold therapeutic and clinical value. Deeper insight into the NMDA inter-subunit interactions and structural motifs gleaned from the recently solved crystal structures of the NMDA receptor should facilitate a deeper understanding of how these compounds modulate the receptor. Areas covered This article discusses the known pharmacology of NMDA receptors. A discussion of the patent literature since 2012 is also included, with an emphasis on those that claimed new chemical entities as regulators of the NMDA receptor. Expert Opinion The number of patents involving novel NMDA receptor modulators suggests a renewed interest in the NMDA receptor as a therapeutic target. Subunit-selective modulators continue to show promise, and the development of new subunit-selective NMDA receptor modulators appears poised for continued growth. Although a modest number of channel blocker patents were published, successful clinical outcomes involving ketamine have led to a resurgent interest in low-affinity channel blockers as therapeutics. PMID:25351527

  16. MPX-004 and MPX-007: New Pharmacological Tools to Study the Physiology of NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2A Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, Robert A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Anderson, David R.; Sirivolu, Venkata Ramana; Paschetto, Kathy; Gordon, Earl; Virginio, Caterina; Gleyzes, Melanie; Buisson, Bruno; Steidl, Esther; Mierau, Susanna B.; Fagiolini, Michela; Menniti, Frank S.

    2016-01-01

    GluN2A is the most abundant of the GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the mammalian CNS. Physiological and genetic evidence implicate GluN2A-containing receptors in susceptibility to autism, schizophrenia, childhood epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett Syndrome. However, GluN2A-selective pharmacological probes to explore the therapeutic potential of targeting these receptors have been lacking. Here we disclose a novel series of pyrazine-containing GluN2A antagonists exemplified by MPX-004 (5-(((3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide) and MPX-007 (5-(((3-fluoro-4-fluorophenyl)sulfonamido)methyl)-N-((2-methylthiazol-5-yl)methyl)methylpyrazine-2-carboxamide). MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibit GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors expressed in HEK cells with IC50s of 79 nM and 27 nM, respectively. In contrast, at concentrations that completely inhibited GluN2A activity these compounds have no inhibitory effect on GluN2B or GluN2D receptor-mediated responses in similar HEK cell-based assays. Potency and selectivity were confirmed in electrophysiology assays in Xenopus oocytes expressing GluN2A-D receptor subtypes. Maximal concentrations of MPX-004 and MPX-007 inhibited ~30% of the whole-cell current in rat pyramidal neurons in primary culture and MPX-004 inhibited ~60% of the total NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP in rat hippocampal slices. GluN2A-selectivity at native receptors was confirmed by the finding that MPX-004 had no inhibitory effect on NMDA receptor mediated synaptic currents in cortical slices from GRIN2A knock out mice. Thus, MPX-004 and MPX-007 offer highly selective pharmacological tools to probe GluN2A physiology and involvement in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. PMID:26829109

  17. Cleavage of the NR2B Subunit Amino Terminus of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor by Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T.-H.; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg67). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ∼4-kDa fragment (Arg27-Arg67) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg67 to Ala67 impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg27–Arg67-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln29–Arg67 deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC50 with no change in glutamate EC50. Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. PMID:22610100

  18. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways.

  19. GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Olivia A.; Paulsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity is a strong candidate to mediate learning and memory processes that require the hippocampus. This plasticity is bidirectional, and how the same receptor can mediate opposite changes in synaptic weights remains a conundrum. It has been suggested that the NMDAR subunit composition could be involved. Specifically, one subunit composition of NMDARs would be responsible for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas NMDARs with a different subunit composition would be engaged in the induction of long-term depression (LTD). Unfortunately, the results from studies that have investigated this hypothesis are contradictory, particularly in relation to LTD. Nevertheless, current evidence does suggest that the GluN2B subunit might be particularly important for plasticity and may make a synapse bidirectionally malleable. In particular, we conclude that the presence of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs at the postsynaptic density might be a necessary, though not a sufficient, condition for the strengthening of individual synapses. This is owing to the interaction of GluN2B with calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and is distinct from its contribution as an ion channel. PMID:24298164

  20. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  1. Hunger States Control the Directions of Synaptic Plasticity via Switching Cell Type-Specific Subunits of NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Yang, Yunlei

    2015-09-23

    It remains largely unknown whether and how hunger states control activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). We here report that both LTP and LTD of excitatory synaptic strength within the appetite control circuits residing in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) behave in a manner of hunger states dependence and cell type specificity. For instance, we find that tetanic stimulation induces LTP at orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ad libitum fed mice, whereas it induces LTD in food-deprived mice. In an opposite direction, the same induction protocol induces LTD at anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in fed mice but weak LTP in deprived mice. Mechanistically, we also find that food deprivation increases the expressions of NR2C/NR2D/NR3-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at AgRP neurons that contribute to the inductions of LTD, whereas it decreases their expressions at POMC neurons. Collectively, our data reveal that hunger states control the directions of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity by switching NMDA receptor subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner, providing insights into NMDAR-mediated interactions between energy states and associative memory. Significance statement: Based on the experiments performed in this study, we demonstrate that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is also under the control of energy states by regulating NMDAR subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner. We thus propose a reversible memory configuration constructed from energy states-dependent cell type-specific bidirectional conversions of LTP and LTD. Together with the distinct functional roles played by NMDAR signaling in the control of food intake and energy states, these findings reveal a new reciprocal interaction between energy states and associative memory, one that might serve as a target for therapeutic treatments of the energy-related memory disorders or vice versa.

  2. Expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in neurochemically identified projection and interneurons in the striatum of the rat.

    PubMed

    Standaert, D G; Friberg, I K; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Young, A B; Penney, J B

    1999-01-22

    NMDA receptors are composed of proteins from two families: NMDAR1 and NMDAR2. We used quantitative double-label in situ hybridization to examine in rat brain the expression of NMDAR1, NMDAR2A, NMDAR2B, and NMDAR2C mRNA in six neurochemically defined populations of striatal neurons: preproenkephalin (ENK) and preprotachykinin (SP) expressing projection neurons, and somatostatin (SOM), glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), parvalbumin (PARV), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expressing interneurons. NMDAR1 was expressed by all striatal neurons: strongly in ENK, SP, PARV and ChAT neurons, and less intensely in SOM and GAD67 positive cells. NMDAR2A mRNA was present at moderate levels in all striatal neurons except those containing ChAT. Labeling for NMDAR2B was strong in projection neurons and ChAT interneurons, and only moderate in SOM, GAD67 and PARV interneurons. NMDAR2C was scarce in striatal neurons, but a low level signal was detected in GAD67 positive cells. NMDAR2C expression was also observed in small cells not labeled by any of the markers, most likely glia. These data suggest that all striatal neurons have NMDA receptors, but different populations have different subunit compositions which may affect function as well as selective vulnerability.

  3. NMDA Receptor Function During Senescence: Implication on Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function. PMID:26732087

  4. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  5. Fyn Kinase regulates GluN2B subunit-dominant NMDA receptors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Ross, P Joel; Tu, YuShan; Wang, Yongqian; Beggs, Simon; Sengar, Ameet S; Ellis, James; Salter, Michael W

    2016-04-04

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated fast excitatory neurotransmission is implicated in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes in the mammalian central nervous system. The function and regulation of NMDARs have been extensively studied in neurons from rodents and other non-human species, and in recombinant expression systems. Here, we investigated human NMDARs in situ by using neurons produced by directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The resultant cells showed electrophysiological characteristics demonstrating that they are bona fide neurons. In particular, human iPSC-derived neurons expressed functional ligand-gated ion channels, including NMDARs, AMPA receptors, GABAA receptors, as well as glycine receptors. Pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of NMDAR-mediated currents indicated that these were dominated by receptors containing GluN2B subunits. The NMDAR currents were suppressed by genistein, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The NMDAR currents were also inhibited by a Fyn-interfering peptide, Fyn(39-57), but not a Src-interfering peptide, Src(40-58). Together, these findings are the first evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the function of NMDARs in human iPSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide a basis for utilizing human iPSC-derived neurons in screening for drugs targeting NMDARs in neurological disorders.

  6. Fyn Kinase regulates GluN2B subunit-dominant NMDA receptors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Ross, P. Joel; Tu, YuShan; Wang, Yongqian; Beggs, Simon; Sengar, Ameet S.; Ellis, James; Salter, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated fast excitatory neurotransmission is implicated in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes in the mammalian central nervous system. The function and regulation of NMDARs have been extensively studied in neurons from rodents and other non-human species, and in recombinant expression systems. Here, we investigated human NMDARs in situ by using neurons produced by directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The resultant cells showed electrophysiological characteristics demonstrating that they are bona fide neurons. In particular, human iPSC-derived neurons expressed functional ligand-gated ion channels, including NMDARs, AMPA receptors, GABAA receptors, as well as glycine receptors. Pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of NMDAR-mediated currents indicated that these were dominated by receptors containing GluN2B subunits. The NMDAR currents were suppressed by genistein, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The NMDAR currents were also inhibited by a Fyn-interfering peptide, Fyn(39–57), but not a Src-interfering peptide, Src(40–58). Together, these findings are the first evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the function of NMDARs in human iPSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide a basis for utilizing human iPSC-derived neurons in screening for drugs targeting NMDARs in neurological disorders. PMID:27040756

  7. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: > BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. > BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. > ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  8. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  9. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  10. The role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Cepeda, Carlos; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2009-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an impressive accumulation of evidence indicating that the excitatory amino acid glutamate and its receptors, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype, play an important role in drug addiction. Various lines of research using animal models of drug addiction have demonstrated that drug-induced craving is accompanied by significant upregulation of NR2B subunit expression. Furthermore, selective blockade of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the striatum, especially in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) can inhibit drug craving and reinstatement. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction. After a brief description of glutamatergic innervation and NMDA receptor subunit distribution in the striatum, we discuss potential mechanisms to explain the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction by elucidating signaling cascades involved in the regulation of subunit expression and redistribution, phosphorylation of receptor subunits, as well as activation of intracellular signals triggered by drug experience. Understanding the mechanisms regulating striatal NMDA receptor changes in drug addiction will provide more specific and rational targets to counteract the deleterious effects of drug addiction.

  11. Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance Effect on Gene Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 in Rat Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Morphine is a potent analgesic but its continual use results in analgesic tolerance. Mechanisms of this tolerance remain to be clarified. However, changes in the functions of μ-opioid and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been proposed in morphine tolerance. We examined changes in gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 (NR1) at mRNA levels in rat striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after induction of morphine tolerance. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: The results showed that long-term morphine a administration induces tolerance to analgesic effect of the opioid, as revealed by a significant decrease in morphine-induced analgesia on day 8 compared to day 1 of the injections (P<0.001). The results also showed that the NR1 gene expression at mRNA level in rats tolerant to morphine was significantly increased in the striatum (P<0.01) but decreased in the PFC (P<0.001). Conclusion: Therefore, changes in the NR1 gene expression in rat striatum and PFC have a region-specific association with morphine-induced analgesic tolerance. PMID:27563417

  12. Conserved Expression of the Glutamate NMDA Receptor 1 Subunit Splice Variants during the Development of the Siberian Hamster Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Giles E.; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Ebling, Francis J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) are central to photic signaling to the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). NMDARs also play important roles in brain development including visual input circuits. The functional NMDAR is comprised of multiple subunits, but each requiring the NR1 subunit for normal activity. The NR1 can be alternatively spliced to produce isoforms that confer different functional properties on the NMDAR. The SCN undergoes extensive developmental changes during postnatal life, including synaptogenesis and acquisition of photic signaling. These changes are especially important in the highly photoperiodic Siberian hamster, in which development of sensitivity to photic cues within the SCN could impact early physiological programming. In this study we examined the expression of NR1 isoforms in the hamster at different developmental ages. Gene expression in the forebrain was quantified by in situ hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific to alternatively spliced regions of the NR1 heteronuclear mRNA, including examination of anterior hypothalamus, piriform cortex, caudate-putamen, thalamus and hippocampus. Gene expression analysis within the SCN revealed the absence of the N1 cassette, the presence of the C2 cassette alone and the combined absence of C1 and C2 cassettes, indicating that the dominant splice variants are NR1-2a and NR1-4a. Whilst we observe changes at different developmental ages in levels of NR1 isoform probe hybridization in various forebrain structures, we find no significant changes within the SCN. This suggests that a switch in NR1 isoform does not underlie or is not produced by developmental changes within the hamster SCN. Consistency of the NR1 isoforms would ensure that the response of the SCN cells to photic signals remains stable throughout life, an important aspect of the function of the SCN as a responder to environmental changes

  13. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA Receptor Subunits Increase in the Hippocampus during Memory Consolidation in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Cercato, Magali C; Vázquez, Cecilia A; Kornisiuk, Edgar; Aguirre, Alejandra I; Colettis, Natalia; Snitcofsky, Marina; Jerusalinsky, Diana A; Baez, María V

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are required for learning and memory formation, and for synaptic plasticity induction. We have previously shown that hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A NMDAR subunits significantly increased following habituation of rats to an open field (OF), while GluN2B remained unchanged. Similar results were obtained after CA1-long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in rat hippocampal slices. Other studies have also shown NMDAR up regulation at earlier and later time points after LTP induction or learning acquisition. In this work, we have studied NMDAR subunits levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after OF habituation and after object recognition (OR), to find out whether rising of NMDAR subunits is a general and structure-specific feature during memory formation. In 1, 2 and 3 month old rats there was an increase in hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A, but not in GluN2B levels 70 min after OF habituation. This rise overlaps with early phase of memory consolidation, suggesting a putative relationship between them. The increases fell down to control levels 90 min after training. Similar results were obtained in the hippocampus of adult rats 70 min after OR training, without changes in PFC. Following OF test or OR discrimination phase, NMDAR subunits remained unchanged. Hence, rising of hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A appears to be a general feature after novel "spatial/discrimination" memory acquisition. To start investigating the dynamics and possible mechanisms of these changes, we have studied hippocampal neuron cultures stimulated by KCl to induce plasticity. GluN1 and GluN2A increased both in dendrites and neuronal bodies, reaching a maximum 75 min later and returning to control levels at 90 min. Translation and/or transcription and mobilization differentially contribute to this rise in subunits in bodies and dendrites. Our results showed that the NMDAR subunits increase follows a similar time course both in vitro and in

  14. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA Receptor Subunits Increase in the Hippocampus during Memory Consolidation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cercato, Magali C.; Vázquez, Cecilia A.; Kornisiuk, Edgar; Aguirre, Alejandra I.; Colettis, Natalia; Snitcofsky, Marina; Jerusalinsky, Diana A.; Baez, María V.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are required for learning and memory formation, and for synaptic plasticity induction. We have previously shown that hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A NMDAR subunits significantly increased following habituation of rats to an open field (OF), while GluN2B remained unchanged. Similar results were obtained after CA1-long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in rat hippocampal slices. Other studies have also shown NMDAR up regulation at earlier and later time points after LTP induction or learning acquisition. In this work, we have studied NMDAR subunits levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after OF habituation and after object recognition (OR), to find out whether rising of NMDAR subunits is a general and structure-specific feature during memory formation. In 1, 2 and 3 month old rats there was an increase in hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A, but not in GluN2B levels 70 min after OF habituation. This rise overlaps with early phase of memory consolidation, suggesting a putative relationship between them. The increases fell down to control levels 90 min after training. Similar results were obtained in the hippocampus of adult rats 70 min after OR training, without changes in PFC. Following OF test or OR discrimination phase, NMDAR subunits remained unchanged. Hence, rising of hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A appears to be a general feature after novel “spatial/discrimination” memory acquisition. To start investigating the dynamics and possible mechanisms of these changes, we have studied hippocampal neuron cultures stimulated by KCl to induce plasticity. GluN1 and GluN2A increased both in dendrites and neuronal bodies, reaching a maximum 75 min later and returning to control levels at 90 min. Translation and/or transcription and mobilization differentially contribute to this rise in subunits in bodies and dendrites. Our results showed that the NMDAR subunits increase follows a similar time course both in vitro and

  15. A family of photoswitchable NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Shai; Szobota, Stephanie; Reiner, Andreas; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Kienzler, Michael A; Guyon, Alice; Xiao, Tong; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors, which regulate synaptic strength and are implicated in learning and memory, consist of several subtypes with distinct subunit compositions and functional properties. To enable spatiotemporally defined, rapid and reproducible manipulation of function of specific subtypes, we engineered a set of photoswitchable GluN subunits ('LiGluNs'). Photo-agonism of GluN2A or GluN2B elicits an excitatory drive to hippocampal neurons that can be shaped in time to mimic synaptic activation. Photo-agonism of GluN2A at single dendritic spines evokes spine-specific calcium elevation and expansion, the morphological correlate of LTP. Photo-antagonism of GluN2A alone, or in combination with photo-antagonism of GluN1a, reversibly blocks excitatory synaptic currents, prevents the induction of long-term potentiation and prevents spine expansion. In addition, photo-antagonism in vivo disrupts synaptic pruning of developing retino-tectal projections in larval zebrafish. By providing precise and rapidly reversible optical control of NMDA receptor subtypes, LiGluNs should help unravel the contribution of specific NMDA receptors to synaptic transmission, integration and plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12040.001 PMID:26929991

  16. The effects of walnut supplementation on hippocampal NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B of rats.

    PubMed

    Hicyilmaz, Hicran; Vural, Huseyin; Delibas, Namik; Sutcu, Recep; Gultekin, Fatih; Yilmaz, Nigar

    2017-04-01

    Walnuts contain numerous selected dietary factors that have an impact on brain functions, especially learning and memory formation in the hippocampus. Hippocampal N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are involved in the formation of cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular effects of walnut supplementation on the hippocampal expressions of NMDARs involved in cognitive functions and lipid peroxidation levels in rats. The male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old, n = 24) were fed with a walnut-supplemented diet (6% walnut diet, n = 12) and a control diet (rat food, n = 12) as ad libitum for 8 weeks. At the end of this period, NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B in the hippocampi were assayed by western blotting. Lipid peroxidation levels were measured using the thiobarbituric acid. The expression of NR2A and NR2B was elevated in the walnut-supplemented rats compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the levels of lipid peroxidation in the walnut-supplemented group were significantly decreased compared with the control group. We suggested that walnut supplementation may have protective effects against the decline of cognitive functions by regulating NMDAR and lipid peroxidation levels in the hippocampus. The study provides evidence that selected dietary factors (polyunsaturated fatty acids, melatonin, vitamin E, and flavonoids) within walnut may help to trigger hippocampal neuronal signal transduction for the formation of learning and memory.

  17. The effects of walnut supplementation on hippocampal NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B of rats.

    PubMed

    Hicyilmaz, Hicran; Vural, Huseyin; Delibas, Namik; Sutcu, Recep; Gultekin, Fatih; Yilmaz, Nigar

    2015-12-28

    Walnuts contain numerous selected dietary factors that have an impact on brain functions, especially learning and memory formation in the hippocampus. Hippocampal N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are involved in the formation of cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular effects of walnut supplementation on the hippocampal expressions of NMDARs involved in cognitive functions and lipid peroxidation levels in rats. The male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old, n = 24) were fed with a walnut-supplemented diet (6% walnut diet, n = 12) and a control diet (rat food, n = 12) as ad libitum for 8 weeks. At the end of this period, NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B in the hippocampi were assayed by western blotting. Lipid peroxidation levels were measured using the thiobarbituric acid. The expression of NR2A and NR2B was elevated in the walnut-supplemented rats compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the levels of lipid peroxidation in the walnut-supplemented group were significantly decreased compared with the control group. We suggested that walnut supplementation may have protective effects against the decline of cognitive functions by regulating NMDAR and lipid peroxidation levels in the hippocampus. The study provides evidence that selected dietary factors (polyunsaturated fatty acids, melatonin, vitamin E, and flavonoids) within walnut may help to trigger hippocampal neuronal signal transduction for the formation of learning and memory.

  18. Neonatal seizures alter NMDA glutamate receptor GluN2A and 3A subunit expression and function in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Sun, Hongyu; Klein, Peter M.; Jensen, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly caused by hypoxic and/or ischemic injury during birth and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. In a rodent hypoxic seizure (HS) model, we have previously demonstrated a critical role for seizure-induced enhancement of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluA) in epileptogenesis and cognitive consequences, in part due to GluA maturational upregulation of expression. Similarly, as the expression and function of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN) is also developmentally controlled, we examined how early life seizures during the critical period of synaptogenesis could modify GluN development and function. In a postnatal day (P)10 rat model of neonatal seizures, we found that seizures could alter GluN2/3 subunit composition of GluNs and physiological function of synaptic GluNs. In hippocampal slices removed from rats within 48–96 h following seizures, the amplitudes of synaptic GluN-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were elevated in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, GluN eEPSCs showed a decreased sensitivity to GluN2B selective antagonists and decreased Mg2+ sensitivity at negative holding potentials, indicating a higher proportion of GluN2A and GluN3A subunit function, respectively. These physiological findings were accompanied by a concurrent increase in GluN2A phosphorylation and GluN3A protein. These results suggest that altered GluN function and expression could potentially contribute to future epileptogenesis following neonatal seizures, and may represent potential therapeutic targets for the blockade of future epileptogenesis in the developing brain. PMID:26441533

  19. Functional reorganization of visual cortex maps after ischemic lesions is accompanied by changes in expression of cytoskeletal proteins and NMDA and GABA(A) receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Angelica; Sengpiel, Frank; Guagnelli, Miguel Angel; Vaca, Luis; Arias, Clorinda

    2004-02-25

    Reorganization of cortical representations after focal visual cortex lesions has been documented. It has been suggested that functional reorganization may rely on cellular mechanisms involving modifications in the excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission balance and on morphological changes of neurons peripheral to the lesion. We explored functional reorganization of cortical retinotopic maps after a focal ischemic lesion in primary visual cortex of kittens using optical imaging of intrinsic signals. After 1, 2, and 5 weeks postlesion (wPL), we addressed whether functional reorganization correlated in time with changes in the expression of MAP-2, GAP-43, GFAP, GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha1 (GABA(A)alpha1), subunit 1 of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR1), and in neurotransmitter levels at the border of the lesion. Our results show that: (1) retinotopic maps reorganize with time after an ischemic lesion; (2) MAP-2 levels increase gradually from 1wPL to 5wPL; (3) MAP-2 upregulation is associated with an increase in dendritic-like structures surrounding the lesion and a decrease in GFAP-positive cells; (4) GAP-43 levels reach the highest point at 2wPL; (5) NMDAR1 and glutamate contents increase in parallel from 1wPL to 5wPL; (6) GABA(A)alpha1 levels increase from 1wPL to 2wPL but do not change after this time point; and (7) GABA contents remain low from 1wPL to 5wPL. This is a comprehensive study showing for the first time that functional reorganization correlates in time with dendritic sprouting and with changes in the excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission systems previously proposed to participate in cortical remodeling and suggests mechanisms by which plasticity of cortical representations may occur.

  20. Role of protein kinase A in phosphorylation of NMDA receptor 1 subunits in dorsal horn and spinothalamic tract neurons after intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, X; Lin, Q; Willis, W D

    2002-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism for regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function. The NMDA receptor 1 subunit (NR1) is phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) on serine 890 and 897. We have recently reported that there is enhanced phosphorylation of NR1 on serine 897 in dorsal horn and spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons after intradermal injection of capsaicin (CAP) in rats [Zou et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 6989-6997]. Whether or not this phosphorylation, which develops during central sensitization following CAP injection, is mediated by PKA remains to be determined. In this study, western blots and immunofluorescence staining were employed to observe if pretreatment with a PKA inhibitor, N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, HCl (H89), blocks the enhanced phosphorylation of NR1 on serine 897 following injection of CAP into the glabrous skin of one hind paw of anesthetized rats. Western blots showed that pretreatment with H89 caused a decrease in CAP-induced phosphorylation of NR1 protein in spinal cord segments L(4)-S(1). In experiments using immunofluorescence staining, the numbers of phospho-NR1-like immunoreactive (p-NR1-LI) neurons seen after CAP injection were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the L(4)-L(5) segments on the side ipsilateral to the injection after PKA was inhibited. When STT cells were labeled by microinjection of the retrograde tracer, fluorogold, we found that the proportion of p-NR1-LI STT cells on the side ipsilateral to the injection in the superficial laminae of spinal cord segments L(4)-L(5) was markedly reduced when H89 was administered intrathecally before CAP injection. However, the proportion of p-NR1-LI STT cells in deep laminae was unchanged unless the PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride, was co-administered with H89. Combined with our previous findings, the present results indicate that NR1 in spinal dorsal horn neurons, including the superficial dorsal horn STT

  1. Cellular prion protein and NMDA receptor modulation: protecting against excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Stefanie A. G.; Stys, Peter K.; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Tsutsui, Shigeki

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the β-sheet-rich, aggregated scrapie conformation (PrPSc) causes a variety of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the physiological roles of PrPC are still incompletely understood. There is accumulating evidence describing the roles of PrPC in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Recently, we identified a functional regulation of NMDA receptors by PrPC that involves formation of a physical protein complex between these proteins. Excessive NMDA receptor activity during conditions such as ischemia mediates enhanced Ca2+ entry into cells and contributes to excitotoxic neuronal death. In addition, NMDA receptors and/or PrPC play critical roles in neuroinflammation and glial cell toxicity. Inhibition of NMDA receptor activity protects against PrPSc-induced neuronal death. Moreover, in mice lacking PrPC, infarct size is increased after focal cerebral ischemia, and absence of PrPC increases susceptibility of neurons to NMDA receptor-dependent death. Recently, PrPC was found to be a receptor for oligomeric beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, suggesting a role for PrPC in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent findings suggest that Aβ peptides enhance NMDA receptor current by perturbing the normal copper- and PrPC-dependent regulation of these receptors. Here, we review evidence highlighting a role for PrPC in preventing NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and inflammation. There is a need for more detailed molecular characterization of PrPC-mediated regulation of NMDA receptors, such as determining which NMDA receptor subunits mediate pathogenic effects upon loss of PrPC-mediated regulation and identifying PrPC binding site(s) on the receptor. This knowledge will allow development of novel therapeutic interventions for not only TSEs, but also for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders involving dysfunction of PrPC. PMID:25364752

  2. GluN2C/GluN2D subunit-selective NMDA receptor potentiator CIQ reverses MK-801-induced impairment in prepulse inhibition and working memory in Y-maze test in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suryavanshi, P S; Ugale, R R; Yilmazer-Hanke, D; Stairs, D J; Dravid, S M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite ample evidence supporting the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, progress in the development of effective therapeutics based on this hypothesis has been limited. Facilitation of NMDA receptor function by co-agonists (d-serine or glycine) only partially alleviates the symptoms in schizophrenia; other means to facilitate NMDA receptors are required. NMDA receptor sub-types differ in their subunit composition, with varied GluN2 subunits (GluN2A-GluN2D) imparting different physiological, biochemical and pharmacological properties. CIQ is a positive allosteric modulator that is selective for GluN2C/GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors (Mullasseril et al.). Experimental Approach The effect of systemic administration of CIQ was tested on impairment in prepulse inhibition (PPI), hyperlocomotion and stereotypy induced by i.p. administration of MK-801 and methamphetamine. The effect of CIQ was also tested on MK-801-induced impairment in working memory in Y-maze spontaneous alternation test. Key Results We found that systemic administration of CIQ (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) in mice reversed MK-801 (0.15 mg·kg−1, i.p.)-induced, but not methamphetamine (3 mg·kg−1, i.p.)-induced, deficit in PPI. MK-801 increased the startle amplitude to pulse alone, which was not reversed by CIQ. In contrast, methamphetamine reduced the startle amplitude to pulse alone, which was reversed by CIQ. CIQ also partially attenuated MK-801- and methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotyped behaviours. Additionally, CIQ reversed the MK-801-induced working memory deficit in spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze. Conclusion and Implications Together, these results suggest that facilitation of GluN2C/GluN2D-containing receptors may serve as an important therapeutic strategy for treating positive and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:24236947

  3. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 regulates the expression of the same NMDA receptor subunit genes as NRF-1: both factors act by a concurrent and parallel mechanism to couple energy metabolism and synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled processes. Previously, we found that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) transcriptionally co-regulates energy metabolism and neuronal activity by regulating all 13 subunits of the critical energy generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), as well as N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits 1 and 2B, GluN1 (Grin1) and GluN2B (Grin2b). We also found that another transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2 or GA-binding protein) regulates all subunits of COX as well. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that NRF-2 also regulates specific subunits of NMDA receptors, and that it functions with NRF-1 via one of three mechanisms: complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and rat visual cortical tissue, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, NRF-2 was found to functionally regulate Grin1 and Grin2b genes, but not any other NMDA subunit genes. Grin1 and Grin2b transcripts were up-regulated by depolarizing KCl, but silencing of NRF-2 prevented this up-regulation. On the other hand, over-expression of NRF-2 rescued the down-regulation of these subunits by the impulse blocker TTX. NRF-2 binding sites on Grin1 and Grin2b are conserved among species. Our data indicate that NRF-2 and NRF-1 operate in a concurrent and parallel manner in mediating the tight coupling between energy metabolism and neuronal activity at the molecular level.

  4. Lead inhibition of NMDA channels in native and recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Gavazzo, P; Gazzoli, A; Mazzolini, M; Marchetti, C

    2001-10-08

    NMDA channels are key targets for lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicity and Pb2+-induced inhibition of NMDA current is age- and subunit-dependent. In rat cerebellar granule cells maintained in high KCl, glycine affinity as well as sensitivity to ifenprodil change significantly with the days in vitro, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunit expression. Pb2+ blocked NMDA current with IC50 approximately 4 microM and this effect decreased significantly during the second week in vitro. In Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing recombinant NR1-NR2A, NR1-NR2B or NR1-NR2C receptors, Pb2+ inhibited glutamate-activated currents with IC50 of 3.3, 2.5 and 4.7 microM respectively. These data indicate that Pb2+ action is dependent on subunit composition and suggest that down-regulation of the NR2B subunit is correlated to a diminished sensitivity to Pb2+ inhibition.

  5. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition.

  6. [Effects of 2000 μW/cm2; electromagnetic radiation on expression of immunoreactive protein and mRNA of NMDA receptor 2A subunit in rats hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-hong; Lu, Guo-bing; Shi, Chang-hua; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of electromagnetic irradiation of 2000 μW/cm(2); exposure on mRNA and protein expression levels of immunoreactive protein and mRNA of NMDA receptor 2A subunit in rats hippocampal, and to explore the mechanism of electromagnetic irradiation induced learning and memory impairment. Rats were randomly divided into normal control group, sham-radiated group, and 1 h/d, 2 h/d, and 3 h/d radiation groups. The rats in the radiation groups were fixed after microwave exposure of 2000 μW/cm(2);, then their learning and memory abilities were tested by Morris water maze experiment, the change of NR2A protein in hippocampal neurons of each group of rats were measured with immunohistochmistry and Western blot techniques, and the expression of NR2A mRNA in hippocampus were determined by RT-PCR. Compared with the normal control group, each index of the sham-radiated group has no significant change (P>0.05), while the latency of rats of radiated group in Morris water maze test were significantly longer (P<0.05). In the radiation group, the hippocampal neurons of rats showing evident reduction in the ratio of NR2A positive cells, irregular, and arrayed in disorder. Moreover, the expession of NR2A protein and its mRNA in hippocampal neurons were significant decreased (P<0.05). Electromagnetic irradiation of 2000 μW/cm(2); exposure can impair the learning and memory abilities of rats possibly through a mechanism correlated with the lower expression of NR2A protein and its mRNA in hippocampus.

  7. Gestational Chronodisruption Impairs Hippocampal Expression of NMDA Receptor Subunits Grin1b/Grin3a and Spatial Memory in the Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vilches, Nelson; Spichiger, Carlos; Mendez, Natalia; Abarzua-Catalan, Lorena; Galdames, Hugo A.; Hazlerigg, David G.; Richter, Hans G.; Torres-Farfan, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence correlates adverse intrauterine conditions with the onset of disease later in life. For a fetus to achieve a successful transition to extrauterine life, a myriad of temporally integrated humoral/biophysical signals must be accurately provided by the mother. We and others have shown the existence of daily rhythms in the fetus, with peripheral clocks being entrained by maternal cues, such as transplacental melatonin signaling. Among developing tissues, the fetal hippocampus is a key structure for learning and memory processing that may be anticipated as a sensitive target of gestational chronodisruption. Here, we used pregnant rats exposed to constant light treated with or without melatonin as a model of gestational chronodisruption, to investigate effects on the putative fetal hippocampus clock, as well as on adult offspring’s rhythms, endocrine and spatial memory outcomes. The hippocampus of fetuses gestated under light:dark photoperiod (12:12 LD) displayed daily oscillatory expression of the clock genes Bmal1 and Per2, clock-controlled genes Mtnr1b, Slc2a4, Nr3c1 and NMDA receptor subunits 1B-3A-3B. In contrast, in the hippocampus of fetuses gestated under constant light (LL), these oscillations were suppressed. In the adult LL offspring (reared in LD during postpartum), we observed complete lack of day/night differences in plasma melatonin and decreased day/night differences in plasma corticosterone. In the adult LL offspring, overall hippocampal day/night difference of gene expression was decreased, which was accompanied by a significant deficit of spatial memory. Notably, maternal melatonin replacement to dams subjected to gestational chronodisruption prevented the effects observed in both, LL fetuses and adult LL offspring. Collectively, the present data point to adverse effects of gestational chronodisruption on long-term cognitive function; raising challenging questions about the consequences of shift work during

  8. The possible involvement of NMDA glutamate receptor in the etiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and the ionotropic NMDA receptor is one of the major classes of its receptors, thought to play an important role in schizophrenia and mood disorders. The current systematic review summarized the evidence concerning the involvement of NMDA receptors in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Genetic studies point to the genes encoding the NMDA 1, 2A and 2B subunits while neuropathological studies suggest a possible region specific decrease in the density of NMDA receptor and more consistently a reduced NMDA-mediated glutamatergic activity in patients with bipolar disorder in the frame of slower NMDA kinetics because of lower contribution of NR2A subunits. However the literature is poor and incomplete; future research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder and its specific relationship to a possible NMDA malfunction and to explore the possibility of developing novel therapeutic agents.

  9. AMPA, NMDA and kainate glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) where the expression of GluK4 is altered by pregnancy and GluN2D by depression in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Hellgren, Charlotte; Korol, Sergiy V; Nowak, Krzysztof; Williamsson, Louise; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Birnir, Bryndis

    2017-04-15

    The amino acid glutamate opens cation permeable ion channels, the iGlu receptors. These ion channels are abundantly expressed in the mammalian brain where glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitters and their receptors are being increasingly detected in the cells of immune system. Here we examined the expression of the 18 known subunits of the iGlu receptors families; α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and delta in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We compared the expression of the subunits between four groups: men, non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women and depressed pregnant women. Out of 18 subunits of the iGlu receptors, mRNAs for 11 subunits were detected in PBMCs from men and non-pregnant women; AMPA: GluA3, GluA4, kainate: GluK2, GluK4, GluK5, NMDA: GluN1, GluN2C, GluN2D, GluN3A, GluN3B, and delta: GluD1. In the healthy and the depressed pregnant women, in addition, the delta GluD2 subunit was identified. The mRNAs for GluK4, GluK5, GluN2C and GluN2D were expressed at a higher level than other subunits. Gender, pregnancy or depression during pregnancy altered the expression of GluA3, GluK4, GluN2D, GluN3B and GluD1 iGlu subunit mRNAs. The greatest changes recorded were the lower GluA3 and GluK4 mRNA levels in pregnant women and the higher GluN2D mRNA level in healthy but not in depressed pregnant women as compared to non-pregnant individuals. Using subunit specific antibodies, the GluK4, GluK5, GluN1, GluN2C and GluN2D subunit proteins were identified in the PBMCs. The results show expression of specific iGlu receptor subunit in the PBMCs and support the idea of physiology-driven changes of iGlu receptors subtypes in the immune cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  11. Intrathecal administration of roscovitine attenuates cancer pain and inhibits the expression of NMDA receptor 2B subunit mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Yaguo; Gu, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhengliang

    2012-07-01

    Cancer pain is one of the most severe chronic pains. The mechanisms underlying cancer pain are still unclear. Because of the pain-relieving effects of Cdk5 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 5) antagonist roscovitine in inflammation pain models, we tested whether roscovitine would induce antihyperalgesia in cancer pain. Our previous study showed that the NR2B (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B) in the spinal cord participates in bone cancer pain in mice. In this study, we used a mouse model of bone cancer pain to investigate whether roscovitine could attenuate bone cancer pain by regulating the expression level of NR2B mRNA in spinal cord. C3H/HeJ mice were inoculated into the intramedullary space of the right femur with Osteosarcoma cells to induce ongoing bone cancer pain behaviors. At day 14 after operation, inoculation of Osteosarcoma cells significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which was attenuated by intrathecal administration of different doses of roscovitine. Correlated with the pain behaviors changes, RT-PCR experiments in our study revealed that there was a marked increase in the expression of NR2B mRNA in spinal cord after operation, which was attenuated by intrathecal administration of roscovitine. These results suggest that roscovitine may be a useful adjunct therapy for bone cancer pain, and NR2B in spinal cord may participate in this effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interferon-α Induces Neurotoxicity Through Activation of the Type I Receptor and the GluN2A Subunit of the NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kessing, Cari F.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of interferon-alpha (IFNα) in the central nervous system (CNS) are linked to cognitive dysfunction in patients with inflammatory CNS diseases such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Increased CNS IFNα has also been found to be associated with cognitive dysfunction in a HAND mouse model. Here, we corroborate previous studies showing a dose-dependent decrease in dendritic branching and length caused by IFNα treatment and extend those studies. Because both direct and indirect mechanisms of IFNα-induced neurotoxicity are likely involved, the cell signaling pathway involving the IFNα receptor (IFNAR) was initially evaluated. Rat neuronal cultures exposed to IFNα demonstrate increased phosphorylation of STAT1 and increased interferon stimulating gene 15 (ISG15) expression, indicators of IFNAR engagement. However, specific blocking antibodies to the IFNAR were found to only partially protect neurons from IFNα-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, inhibiting the GluN2A subunit of N-methyl-D-asparate receptor (NMDAR) was also found to be partially protective against IFNα-induced neurotoxicity compared with the GluN2B subunit. Neurotoxicity is evident in neurons extracted from IFNAR KO mice treated with IFNα as well, further indicating that IFNAR signaling is not required for IFNα neurotoxicity. The neurotoxic actions of IFNα are mediated through both the IFNAR as well as the GluN2A subunit of the NMDAR to reduce dendritic arborization in neurons. Complete protection from IFNα-induced neurotoxicity was demonstrated when both pathways were blocked. Blocking these pathways could lead to potential therapies for cognitive dysfunction during neuroinflammation and specifically lead to better treatments for HAND. PMID:25517826

  13. Long-Term Potentiation in the CA1 Hippocampus Induced by NR2A Subunit-Containing NMDA Glutamate Receptors Is Mediated by Ras-GRF2/Erk Map Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan-xue; Feig, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Background NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are major contributors to long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity implicated in the process of learning and memory. These receptors consist of calcium-permeating NR1 and multiple regulatory NR2 subunits. A majority of studies show that both NR2A and NR2B-containing NMDARs can contribute to LTP, but their unique contributions to this form of synaptic plasticity remain poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we show that NR2A and NR2B-containing receptors promote LTP differently in the CA1 hippocampus of 1-month old mice, with the NR2A receptors functioning through Ras-GRF2 and its downstream effector, Erk Map kinase, and NR2B receptors functioning independently of these signaling molecules. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that NR2A-, but not NR2B, containing NMDA receptors induce LTP in pyramidal neurons of the CA1 hippocamus from 1 month old mice through Ras-GRF2 and Erk. This difference add new significance to the observation that the relative levels of these NMDAR subtypes is regulated in neurons, such that NR2A-containing receptors become more prominent late in postnatal development, after sensory experience and synaptic activity. PMID:20661302

  14. Autoimmune NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Tebo, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with prominent neurologic and psychiatric features at disease onset. The disease is associated with the production of autoantibodies to NMDAR, a protein involved in memory function and synaptic plasticity. Affected patients develop a multistage progressive illness with symptoms ranging from memory deficits, seizures and psychosis, to potentially lethal catatonia, and autonomic and breathing instability. The outcome can be much improved with accurate diagnosis and early treatment using adequate immunosuppressive therapy. However, since the neurological and psychiatric symptoms as well as the clinical examination results can be non-specific, the disease is probably under-recognized. Reliable and accurate clinical testing for the identification of NMDAR autoantibodies is crucial for diagnosis, timely treatment selection, and monitoring. Recently, a cell-based indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for the detection of IgG antibodies to NMDAR has become available for diagnostic use. This review highlights the progress and challenges of laboratory testing in the evaluation and management anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and perspectives for the future.

  15. The Role of GluN2A and GluN2B Subunits on the Effects of NMDA Receptor Antagonists in Modeling Schizophrenia and Treating Refractory Depression

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Campa, Leticia; Auberson, Yves P; Adell, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxically, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists are used to model certain aspects of schizophrenia as well as to treat refractory depression. However, the role of different subunits of the NMDA receptor in both conditions is poorly understood. Here we used biochemical and behavioral readouts to examine the in vivo prefrontal efflux of serotonin and glutamate as well as the stereotypical behavior and the antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test elicited by antagonists selective for the GluN2A (NVP-AAM077) and GluN2B (Ro 25-6981) subunits. The effects of the non-subunit selective antagonist, MK-801; were also studied for comparison. The administration of MK-801 dose dependently increased the prefrontal efflux of serotonin and glutamate and markedly increased the stereotypy scores. NVP-AAM077 also increased the efflux of serotonin and glutamate, but without the induction of stereotypies. In contrast, Ro 25-6981 did not change any of the biochemical and behavioral parameters tested. Interestingly, the administration of NVP-AAM077 and Ro 25-6981 alone elicited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test, in contrast to the combination of both compounds that evoked marked stereotypies. Our interpretation of the results is that both GluN2A and GluN2B subunits are needed to induce stereotypies, which might be suggestive of potential psychotomimetic effects in humans, but the antagonism of only one of these subunits is sufficient to evoke an antidepressant response. We also propose that GluN2A receptor antagonists could have potential antidepressant activity in the absence of potential psychotomimetic effects. PMID:24871546

  16. LPS and TNF alpha modulate AMPA/NMDA receptor subunit expression and induce PGE2 and glutamate release in preterm fetal ovine mixed glial cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background White matter injury (WMI) is the major antecedent of cerebral palsy in premature infants, and is often associated with maternal infection and the fetal inflammatory response. The current study explores the therapeutic potential of glutamate receptor blockade or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition for inflammatory WMI. Methods Using fetal ovine derived mixed glia cultures exposed to tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors and their contribution to inflammation mediated pre-oligodendrocyte (OL) death was evaluated. The functional significance of TNF-α and COX-2 signalling in glutamate release in association with TNF-α and LPS exposure was also assessed. Results AMPA and NMDA receptors were expressed in primary mixed glial cultures on developing OLs, the main cell-type present in fetal white matter at a period of high risk for WMI. We show that glutamate receptor expression and configuration are regulated by TNF-α and LPS exposure, but AMPA and NMDA blockade, either alone or in combination, did not reduce pre-OL death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release following TNF-α or LPS are mediated by a TNF-α-COX-2 dependent mechanism. Conclusions Overall, these findings suggest that glial-localised glutamate receptors likely play a limited role in OL demise associated with chronic inflammation, but supports the COX-2 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for infection/inflammatory-mediated WMI. PMID:24344780

  17. Adult forebrain NMDA receptors gate social motivation and social memory.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-02-01

    Motivation to engage in social interaction is critical to ensure normal social behaviors, whereas dysregulation in social motivation can contribute to psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, social anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While dopamine is well known to regulate motivation, its downstream targets are poorly understood. Given the fact that the dopamine 1 (D1) receptors are often physically coupled with the NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that the NMDA receptor activity in the adult forebrain principal neurons are crucial not only for learning and memory, but also for the proper gating of social motivation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining sociability and social memory in inducible forebrain-specific NR1 knockout mice. These mice are ideal for exploring the role of the NR1 subunit in social behavior because the NR1 subunit can be selectively knocked out after the critical developmental period, in which NR1 is required for normal development. We found that the inducible deletion of the NMDA receptors prior to behavioral assays impaired, not only object and social recognition memory tests, but also resulted in profound deficits in social motivation. Mice with ablated NR1 subunits in the forebrain demonstrated significant decreases in sociability compared to their wild type counterparts. These results suggest that in addition to its crucial role in learning and memory, the NMDA receptors in the adult forebrain principal neurons gate social motivation, independent of neuronal development.

  18. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure enhances NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses and NMDA receptor expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T E; Ur, C L; Gruol, D L

    2005-06-28

    In previous studies, we found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment-a model of ethanol consumption in which animals are exposed to and withdrawn from intoxicating levels of ethanol on a daily basis-produces neuroadaptive changes in hippocampal area CA1 excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Synaptic responses mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are known to be sensitive to ethanol and could play an important role in the neuroadaptive changes induced by CIE treatment. To address this issue, we compared electrophysiological recordings of pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices prepared from control rats and rats exposed to 2 weeks of CIE treatment administered by vapor inhalation. We found that fEPSPs induced by NMDA receptor activation were unaltered in slices prepared shortly after cessation of CIE treatment (i.e., < or = 1 day of withdrawal from CIE). However, following 7 days of withdrawal from CIE treatment, NMDA-receptor-mediated fEPSPs were augmented relative to age-matched controls. Western blot analysis of NMDA receptor subunit expression showed that, at 7 days of withdrawal, the level of protein for NR2A and NR2B subunits was elevated in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from CIE-treated animals compared with slices from age-matched controls. These results are consistent with an involvement of NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the neuroadaptive effects of CIE on hippocampal physiology and suggest that such changes may contribute to ethanol-induced changes in processes dependent on NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses such as learning and memory, neural development, hyperexcitability and seizures, and neurotoxicity.

  19. NMDA receptor mediated phosphorylation of GluR1 subunits contributes to the appearance of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors after mechanical stretch injury

    PubMed Central

    Spaethling, Jennifer; Le, Linda; Meaney, David F

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal cytosolic calcium is a key mediator of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathobiology, but less is known of the role and source of calcium in shaping early changes in synaptic receptors and neural circuits after TBI. In this study, we examined the calcium source and potential phosphorylation events leading to insertion of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) after in vitro traumatic brain injury, a receptor subtype that influences neural circuit dynamics for hours to days following injury. We found that both synaptic and NR2B-containing NMDARs contribute significantly to the calcium influx following stretch injury. Moreover, an early and sustained phosphorylation of the S-831 site of the GluR1 subunit appeared after mechanical injury, and this phosphorylation was blocked with the inhibition of either synaptic NMDARs or NR2B-containing NMDARs. In comparison, mechanical injury led to no significant change in the S-845 phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit. Although no change in S-845 phosphorylation appeared in injured cultures, we observed that inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs significantly increased S-845 phosphorylation one hour after injury while blockade of synaptic NMDARs did not change S-845 phosphorylation at any time point following injury. These findings show that a broad class of NMDARs are activated in parallel and that targeting either subpopulation will reverse some of the consequences of mechanical injury, providing distinct paths to treat the effects of mechanical injury on neural circuits after TBI. PMID:22426393

  20. STEP activation by Gαq coupled GPCRs opposes Src regulation of NMDA receptors containing the GluN2A subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meng; Xu, Jian; Lei, Gang; Lombroso, Paul J.; Jackson, Michael F.; MacDonald, John F.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are necessary for the induction of synaptic plasticity and for the consolidation of learning and memory. NMDAR function is tightly regulated by functionally opposed families of kinases and phosphatases. Herein we show that the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is recruited by Gαq-coupled receptors, including the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1R), and opposes the Src tyrosine kinase-mediated increase in the function of NMDARs composed of GluN2A. STEP activation by M1R stimulation requires IP3Rs and can depress NMDA-evoked currents with modest intracellular Ca2+ buffering. Src recruitment by M1R stimulation requires coincident NMDAR activation and can augment NMDA-evoked currents with high intracellular Ca2+ buffering. Our findings suggest that Src and STEP recruitment is contingent on differing intracellular Ca2+ dynamics that dictate whether NMDAR function is augmented or depressed following M1R stimulation. PMID:27857196

  1. Structural insights into competitive antagonism in NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Annie; Tajima, Nami; Fernandez-Cuervo, Gabriela; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary There has been a great level of enthusiasm to down-regulate overactive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors to protect neurons from excitotoxicity. NMDA receptors play pivotal roles in basic brain development and functions as well as in neurological disorders and diseases. However, mechanistic understanding of antagonism in NMDA receptors is limited due to complete lack of antagonist-bound structures for the l-glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Here we report the crystal structures of GluN1/GluN2A NMDA receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) heterodimers in complex with GluN1- and GluN2-targeting antagonists. The crystal structures reveal that the antagonists, D-(−)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) and 1-(Phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PPDA), have discrete binding modes and mechanisms for opening of the bilobed architecture of GluN2A LBD compared to the agonist-bound form. The current study shows distinct ways by which the conformations of NMDA receptor LBDs may be controlled and coupled to receptor inhibition and provides possible strategies to develop therapeutic compounds with higher subtype-specificity. PMID:24462099

  2. A Negative Allosteric Modulator for α5 Subunit-Containing GABA Receptors Exerts a Rapid and Persistent Antidepressant-Like Action without the Side Effects of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mackenzie E.; Krimmel, Samuel R.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Gould, Todd D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract New antidepressant pharmacotherapies that provide rapid relief of depressive symptoms are needed. The NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine exerts rapid antidepressant actions in depressed patients but also side effects that complicate its clinical utility. Ketamine promotes excitatory synaptic strength, likely by producing high-frequency correlated activity in mood-relevant regions of the forebrain. Negative allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors containing α5 subunits (α5 GABA-NAMs) should also promote high-frequency correlated electroencephalogram (EEG) activity and should therefore exert rapid antidepressant responses. Because α5 subunits display a restricted expression in the forebrain, we predicted that α5 GABA-NAMs would produce activation of principle neurons but exert fewer side effects than ketamine. We tested this hypothesis in male mice and observed that the α5 GABA-NAM MRK-016 exerted an antidepressant-like response in the forced swim test at 1 and 24 h after administration and an anti-anhedonic response after chronic stress in the female urine sniffing test (FUST). Like ketamine, MRK-016 produced a transient increase in EEG γ power, and both the increase in γ power and its antidepressant effects in the forced swim test were blocked by prior administration of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX). Unlike ketamine, however, MRK-016 produced no impairment of rota-rod performance, no reduction of prepulse inhibition (PPI), no conditioned-place preference (CPP), and no change in locomotion. α5 GABA-NAMs, thus reproduce the rapid antidepressant-like actions of ketamine, perhaps via an AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-dependent increase in coherent neuronal activity, but display fewer potential negative side effects. These compounds thus demonstrate promise as clinically useful fast-acting antidepressants. PMID:28275719

  3. Single-channel analysis of a point mutation of a conserved serine residue in the S2 ligand-binding domain of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Wyllie, David J A; Johnston, Alexander R; Lipscombe, Diane; Chen, Philip E

    2006-07-15

    We have examined the function of a conserved serine residue (Ser670) in the S2 ligand-binding region of the NR2A N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, using recombinant NR1/NR2A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutation of Ser670 to glycine (S670G) in NR2A reduced the potency of glutamate by 124-fold. Single-channel conductance and the duration of apparent open periods of NR2A(S670G) receptor mutants were, however, indistinguishable from wild-type NMDA receptors. NR1/NR2A(S670G) shut-time distributions were best described by a mixture of six exponential components, and the four shortest shut intervals of each distribution were considered to occur within a channel activation (burst). Bursts of single-channel openings were fitted with a mixture of four exponential components. The longest two components carried the majority of the charge transfer and had mean durations of 9.6 +/- 0.5 and 29.6 +/- 1.5 ms. The overall channel open probability during a burst was high (mean, 0.83 +/- 0.06). Consistent with a shortening of NMDA receptor-channel burst lengths was the observation of an increased deactivation rate of macroscopic currents evoked by brief applications of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches. Correlations between shut times and adjacent open times were observed in all data records. Noticeably, shorter than average openings tended to occur next to long closed periods, whereas longer than average openings tended to occur next to short closings. Our single-channel data, together with modelling using a kinetic scheme to describe channel activations, support our hypothesis that the S670G point mutation reduces the dwell time of glutamate in its binding site.

  4. Expression of NMDA receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit mRNAs during development of the human hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Law, Amanda J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Webster, Maree J; Herman, Mary M; Kleinman, Joel E; Harrison, Paul J

    2003-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor plays a critical role in the formation and maintenance of synapses during brain development. In the rodent, changes in subunit expression and assembly of the heteromeric receptor complex accompany these maturational processes. However, little is known about N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit expression during human brain development. We used in situ hybridization to examine the distribution and relative abundance of NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit messenger ribonucleic acids in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of 34 human subjects at five stages of life (neonate, infant, adolescent, young adult and adult). At all ages, the three messenger ribonucleic acids were expressed in all subfields, predominantly by pyramidal neurons, granule cells and polymorphic hilar cells. However, their abundance varied across ontogeny. Levels of NR1 messenger ribonucleic acid in CA4, CA3 and CA2 subfields were significantly lower in the neonate than all other age groups. In the dentate gyrus, subiculum and parahippocampal gyrus, NR2B messenger ribonucleic acid levels were higher in the neonate than in older age groups. NR2A messenger ribonucleic acid levels remained constant, leading to an age-related increase in NR2A/2B transcript ratio. We conclude that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit messenger ribonucleic acids are differentially expressed during postnatal development of the human hippocampus, with a pattern similar but not identical to that seen in the rodent. Changes in subunit composition may thus contribute to maturational differences in human hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, and to their role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Developmental expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in human white and gray matter: potential mechanism of increased vulnerability in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Talos, Delia M; Jackson, Michele C; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Graham, Dionne A; Lechpammer, Mirna; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury is multifactorial and involves hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and inflammation. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are present on neurons and glia in immature rodents, and NMDAR antagonists are protective in HI models. To enhance clinical translation of rodent data, we examined protein expression of 6 NMDAR subunits in postmortem human brains without injury from 20 postconceptional weeks through adulthood and in cases of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). We hypothesized that the developing brain is intrinsically vulnerable to excitotoxicity via maturation-specific NMDAR levels and subunit composition. In normal white matter, NR1 and NR2B levels were highest in the preterm period compared with adult. In gray matter, NR2A and NR3A expression were highest near term. NR2A was significantly elevated in PVL white matter, with reduced NR1 and NR3A in gray matter compared with uninjured controls. These data suggest increased NMDAR-mediated vulnerability during early brain development due to an overall upregulation of individual receptors subunits, in particular, the presence of highly calcium permeable NR2B-containing and magnesium-insensitive NR3A NMDARs. These data improve understanding of molecular diversity and heterogeneity of NMDAR subunit expression in human brain development and supports an intrinsic prenatal vulnerability to glutamate-mediated injury; validating NMDAR subunit-specific targeted therapies for PVL. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. NMDA receptor and schizophrenia: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-09-01

    Although glutamate was first hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the 1980s, it was the demonstration that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, the dissociative anesthetics, could replicate the full range of psychotic, negative, cognitive, and physiologic features of schizophrenia in normal subjects that placed the "NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis" on firm footing. Additional support came from the demonstration that a variety of agents that enhanced NMDA receptor function at the glycine modulatory site significantly reduced negative symptoms and variably improved cognition in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic drugs. Finally, persistent blockade of NMDA receptors recreates in experimental animals the critical pathologic features of schizophrenia including downregulation of parvalbumin-positive cortical GABAergic neurons, pyramidal neuron dendritic dysgenesis, and reduced spine density.

  7. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption.

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the spinal cord contributes to chronic visceral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Qin-Yan; Chen, Yu; Guo, Li-Xia; Chen, Ai-Qin; Wu, Zhen-Quan; Lin, Chun

    2014-01-13

    The roles of spinal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain were investigated. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by colorectal distention (CRD) on post-natal days 8-14. Responses of the external oblique muscle of the abdomen to CRD were measured to evaluate the sensitivity of visceral pain in rats. The sensitivity of visceral pain significantly increased in IBS-like rats. Expressions of spinal NR2B subunit and phosphorylated NR2B subunit significantly increased by 50-55% in IBS-like rats when compared with those in control rats. Ro 25-6981, a selective antagonist of NR2B subunit, has a dose-dependent anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effect without causing motor dysfunction in IBS-like rats. Furthermore, the activation mechanism of the spinal NR2B subunit in chronic visceral pain was also investigated. Spinal administration of genistein, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, also decreased the visceral pain hypersensitivity of IBS-like rats in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated NR2B subunit was decreased after spinal administration of Ro 25-6981 or genistein in IBS-like rats. In conclusion, tyrosine kinase activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B subunit may play a crucial role in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemical modulation of NMDA receptors: role in conditioned taste aversion.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Beatriz; Tapia, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission plays a crucial role in a variety of functions in the central nervous system, including learning and memory. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this process in mammals because of the scarceness of experimental models that permit correlation of behavioral and biochemical changes occurring during the different stages of learning and the retrieval of the acquired information. One model that has been useful to study these mechanisms is conditioned taste aversion (CTA), a paradigm in which animals learn to avoid new tastes when they are associated with gastrointestinal malaise. Glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type appear to be necessary in this process, because blockade of this receptor prevents CTA. Phosphorylation of the main subunits of the NMDA receptor is a well-established biochemical mechanism for the modulation of the receptor response. Such modulation seems to be involved in CTA, because inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) block CTA acquisition and because the exposure to an unfamiliar taste results in an increased phosphorylation of tyrosine and serine residues of the NR2B subunit of the receptor in the insular cortex, the cerebral region where gustatory and visceral information converge. In this work we review these mechanisms of NMDA receptor modulation in CTA.

  10. GABA-A and NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression is altered in the caudate but not the putamen of the postmortem brains of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol by humans has been shown to lead to impairment of executive and cognitive functions. Here, we have studied the mRNA expression of ion channel receptors for glutamate and GABA in the dorsal striatum of post-mortem brains from alcoholics (n = 29) and normal controls (n = 29), with the focus on the caudate nucleus that is associated with the frontal cortex executive functions and automatic thinking and on the putamen area that is linked to motor cortices and automatic movements. The results obtained by qPCR assay revealed significant changes in the expression of specific excitatory ionotropic glutamate and inhibitory GABA-A receptor subunit genes in the caudate but not the putamen. Thus, in the caudate we found reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the GluN2A glutamate receptor and the δ, ε, and ρ2 GABA-A receptor subunits, and increased levels of the mRNAs encoding GluD1, GluD2, and GABA-A γ1 subunits in the alcoholics as compared to controls. Interestingly in the controls, 11 glutamate and 5 GABA-A receptor genes were more prominently expressed in the caudate than the putamen (fold-increase varied from 1.24 to 2.91). Differences in gene expression patterns between the striatal regions may underlie differences in associated behavioral outputs. Our results suggest an altered balance between caudate-mediated voluntarily controlled and automatic behaviors in alcoholics, including diminished executive control on goal-directed alcohol-seeking behavior.

  11. Functional Interaction Between Na/K-ATPase and NMDA Receptor in Cerebellar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Lopacheva, Olga M; Kruusmägi, Markus; Lopachev, Alexandr V; Shah, Zahoor A; Boldyrev, Alexander A; Liu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors play a crucial role in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Activation of NMDA receptors changes intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and K(+), which are subsequently restored by Na/K-ATPase. We used immunochemical and biochemical methods to elucidate the potential mechanisms of interaction between these two proteins. We observed that NMDA receptor and Na/K-ATPase interact with each other and this interaction was shown for both isoforms of α subunit (α1 and α3) of Na/K-ATPase expressed in neurons. Using Western blotting, we showed that long-term exposure of the primary culture of cerebellar neurons to nanomolar concentrations of ouabain (a cardiotonic steroid, a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) leads to a decrease in the levels of NMDA receptors which is likely mediated by the α3 subunit of Na/K-ATPase. We also observed a decrease in enzymatic activity of the α1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase caused by NMDA receptor activation. This effect is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Thus, Na/K-ATPase and NMDA receptor can interact functionally by forming a macromolecular complex which can be important for restoring ionic balance after neuronal excitation. Furthermore, this interaction suggests that NMDA receptor function can be regulated by endogenous cardiotonic steroids which recently have been found in cerebrospinal fluid or by pharmacological drugs affecting Na/K-ATPase function.

  12. Genetic analysis of neuronal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Gray, John A; Lu, Wei; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-09-01

    In the brain, fast, excitatory synaptic transmission occurs primarily through AMPA- and NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors are composed of subunit proteins that determine their biophysical properties and trafficking behaviour. Therefore, determining the function of these subunits and receptor subunit composition is essential for understanding the physiological properties of synaptic transmission. Here, we discuss and evaluate various genetic approaches that have been used to study AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits. These approaches have demonstrated that the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is required for activity-dependent trafficking and contributes to basal synaptic transmission, while the GluA2 subunit regulates Ca(2+) permeability, homeostasis and trafficking to the synapse under basal conditions. In contrast, the GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits regulate synaptic AMPA receptor content, both during synaptic development and plasticity. Ongoing research in this field is focusing on the molecular interactions and mechanisms that control these functions. To accomplish this, molecular replacement techniques are being used, where native subunits are replaced with receptors containing targeted mutations. In this review, we discuss a single-cell molecular replacement approach which should arguably advance our physiological understanding of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, but is generally applicable to study of any neuronal protein.

  13. The NMDA Receptor Subunit NR2b: Effects on LH Release and GnRH Gene Expression in Young and Middle-aged Female Rats, with Modulation by Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Jacqueline A.; Walker, Deena M.; Ikegami, Aiko; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2008-01-01

    The loss of reproductive capacity during aging involves changes in the neural regulation of the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons controlling reproduction. This neuronal circuitry includes glutamate receptors on GnRH neurons. Previously, we reported an increase in the expression of the NR2b subunit protein of the NMDA receptor on GnRH neurons in middle-aged compared to young female rats. Here, we examined the functional implications of the NR2b subunit on the onset of reproductive aging, using an NR2b-specific antagonist ifenprodil. Young (3–5 mos.) and middle-aged (10–13 mos.) female rats were ovariectomized (OVX), 17β-estradiol (E2) or vehicle (cholesterol) treated, and implanted with a jugular catheter. Serial blood sampling was undertaken every 10 minutes for 4 hours, with ifenprodil (10mg/kg) or vehicle injected (i.p.) after one hour of baseline sampling. The pulsatile release of pituitary LH and levels of GnRH mRNA in hypothalamus were quantified as indices of the reproductive axis. Our results showed effects of ifenprodil on both endpoints. In OVX rats given cholesterol, neither age nor ifenprodil had any effects on LH release. In E2-treated rats, aging was associated with significant decreases in pulsatile LH release. Additionally, ifenprodil stimulated parameters of pulsatile LH release in both young and middle-aged animals. Ifenprodil had few effects on GnRH mRNA; the only significant effect of ifenprodil was found in the middle-aged, cholesterol group. Together, these findings support a role for the NR2b subunit of the NMDAR in GnRH/LH regulation. Because most of these effects were exhibited on pituitary LH release in the absence of a concomitant change in GnRH gene expression, it is likely that NMDA receptors containing the NR2b subunit plays a role in GnRH-induced LH release, independent of de novo GnRH gene expression. PMID:18025808

  14. The Site Specific Demethylation in the 5′-Regulatory Area of NMDA Receptor 2B Subunit Gene Associated with CIE-Induced Up-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Chen, Jiguo; Ticku, Maharaj K.; Yan, Bo; Henderson, George

    2010-01-01

    Background The NMDA receptor represents a particularly important site of ethanol action in the CNS. We recently reported that NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene expression was persistently up-regulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment. Increasing evidence that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in dynamic and long-lasting regulation of gene expression in multiple neuroadaptive processes prompted us to investigate the role of DNA methylation in mediating CIE-induced up-regulation of NR2B gene transcription. To dissect the changes of DNA methylation in the NR2B gene, we have screened a large number of CpG sites within its 5′-regulatory area following CIE treatment. Methods Primary cortical cultured neurons were subjected to ethanol treatment in a CIE paradigm. Bisulfite conversion followed by pyrosequencing was used for quantitative measurement and analysis of CpG methylation status within the 5′-regulatory area of the NR2B gene; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to examine DNA levels associated with methylation and transcription factor binding. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and in vitro DNA methylation assays were performed to determine the direct impact of DNA methylation on the interaction between DNA and transcription factor and promoter activity. Results Analysis of individual CpG methylation sites within the NR2B 5′regulatory area revealed three regions with clusters of site-specific CpG demethylation following CIE treatment and withdrawal. This was confirmed by ChIP showing similar decreases of methylated DNA in the same regions. The CIE-induced demethylation is characterized by being located near certain transcription factor binding sequences, AP-1 and CRE, and occurred during treatment as well as after ethanol withdrawal. Furthermore, the increase in vitro of methylated DNA decreased transcription factor binding activity and promoter activity. An additional ChIP assay indicated that the CIE-induced DNA

  15. The site specific demethylation in the 5'-regulatory area of NMDA receptor 2B subunit gene associated with CIE-induced up-regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Chen, Jiguo; Ticku, Maharaj K; Yan, Bo; Henderson, George

    2010-01-20

    The NMDA receptor represents a particularly important site of ethanol action in the CNS. We recently reported that NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene expression was persistently up-regulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment. Increasing evidence that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in dynamic and long-lasting regulation of gene expression in multiple neuroadaptive processes prompted us to investigate the role of DNA methylation in mediating CIE-induced up-regulation of NR2B gene transcription. To dissect the changes of DNA methylation in the NR2B gene, we have screened a large number of CpG sites within its 5'-regulatory area following CIE treatment. Primary cortical cultured neurons were subjected to ethanol treatment in a CIE paradigm. Bisulfite conversion followed by pyrosequencing was used for quantitative measurement and analysis of CpG methylation status within the 5'-regulatory area of the NR2B gene; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to examine DNA levels associated with methylation and transcription factor binding. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and in vitro DNA methylation assays were performed to determine the direct impact of DNA methylation on the interaction between DNA and transcription factor and promoter activity. Analysis of individual CpG methylation sites within the NR2B 5'regulatory area revealed three regions with clusters of site-specific CpG demethylation following CIE treatment and withdrawal. This was confirmed by ChIP showing similar decreases of methylated DNA in the same regions. The CIE-induced demethylation is characterized by being located near certain transcription factor binding sequences, AP-1 and CRE, and occurred during treatment as well as after ethanol withdrawal. Furthermore, the increase in vitro of methylated DNA decreased transcription factor binding activity and promoter activity. An additional ChIP assay indicated that the CIE-induced DNA demethylation is accompanied by

  16. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. An interdisciplinary clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Prüss, H; Dalmau, J; Arolt, V; Wandinger, K-P

    2010-04-01

    Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a severe and considerably underdiagnosed form of encephalitis with characteristic clinical features including psychiatric symptoms, decreased levels of consciousness, hypoventilation, epileptic seizures, autonomic dysfunction and dyskinesias. Most patients are primarily seen by psychiatrists, often on the assumption of a drug-induced psychosis. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis had initially been described in young women with ovarian teratoma, but is also common in women without tumour, in men and in children. The diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, supporting findings of brain MRI, electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the presence of highly specific autoantibodies directed against the NR1 subunit of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the serum or CSF. In particular, anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis must be excluded in patients with 'encephalitis of unknown cause'. In principle, the prognosis is favourable and recovery from symptoms can be expected even after prolonged intensive care treatment and mechanical ventilation. However, improvement correlates with prompt identification of the disorder, early immunotherapy and - in the case of a malignancy - with complete tumour removal. Patient care requires an interdisciplinary approach including neurologists, psychiatrists, paediatricians, oncologists and gynaecologists.

  17. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ates-Alagoz, Zeynep; Adejare, Adeboye

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker), and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery. PMID:24276119

  18. Open-channel blockers of the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Albensi, Benedict C; Ilkanich, Erin

    2004-11-01

    A variety of compounds have been shown to limit or prevent excitotoxicity by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated neurotransmission. However, many first-generation NMDA antagonists did not live up to clinical expectations in trials of acute brain injury because of the manifestation of multiple side effects. In spite of this, development of NMDA antagonists continues, where some of the newer agents block excitotoxicity through alternative mechanisms. For example, blockers selective to the NR2B subunit or agents that block metabotropic glutamate receptors or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors are currently under investigation. Several years ago, the arylalkylamine spider toxins were demonstrated to function as open-channel blockers similar to memantine, which was very recently approved by the U.S. FDA for use in patients with Alzheimer's dementia. With this said, programs focusing on NMDA antagonism via alternative mechanisms may still hold promise for treating acute injury and even chronic forms of dementia.

  19. NMDA receptor subunit and CaMKII changes in rat hippocampus by congenital HCMV infection: a mechanism for learning and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Wu, De; Yang, Li; Bu, Xiaosong; Tang, Jiulai; Fan, Xiaocheng

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection on the expression levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NRs) and Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampal neurons of neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Pregnant SD rats were divided into an experimental group and a control group (n=10 in each group). Spatial learning and memory of the offspring of SD rats were evaluated using the Morris water-maze test. Pathological studies of hippocampus sections were carried out. The concentration of [Ca] was measured using a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer method. The expression levels of NRs were detected by an immunohistochemical study. Western blot was performed to detect the expression level of CaMKII. In the Morris water-maze test, the rats in the experimental group showed significantly increased escape latency and distance traveled than the control group. Damaged and structural disorders of the dentate granule in the hippocampus were found in the experimental rats. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expression levels of NR subunits in the hippocampus of the experimental group were significantly decreased. The concentration of [Ca] in the experimental group was significantly increased. In contrast, the level of CaMKII in the experimental group was significantly decreased. The expressions of the NR subunit and CaMKII were decreased in rat hippocampus by human cytomegalovirus congenital infection, which may be associated with the mechanism underlying the impairment of learning and memory function.

  20. Functional heterogeneity of NMDA receptors in rat substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata neurones

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, F.; Zhao, Q.; Monaghan, D. T.; Jane, D. E.; Jones, S.; Gibb, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The nigra substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and substantia pars reticulata (SNr) form two major basal ganglia components with different functional roles. SNc dopaminergic (DA) neurones are vulnerable to cell death in Parkinson's disease, and NMDA receptor activation is a potential contributing mechanism. We have investigated the sensitivity of whole-cell and synaptic NMDA responses to intracellular ATP and GTP application in the SNc and SNr from rats on postnatal day (P) 7 and P28. Both NMDA current density (pA/pF) and desensitization to prolonged or repeated NMDA application were greater in the SNr than in the SNc. When ATP levels were not supplemented, responses to prolonged NMDA administration desensitized in P7 SNc DA neurones but not at P28. At P28, SNr neurones desensitized more than SNc neurones, with or without added ATP. Responses to brief NMDA applications and synaptic NMDA currents were not sensitive to inclusion of ATP in the pipette solution. To investigate these differences between the SNc and SNr, NR2 subunit-selective antagonists were tested. NMDA currents were inhibited by ifenprodil (10 μm) and UBP141 (4 μm), but not by Zn2+ (100 nm), in both the SNr and SNc, suggesting that SNc and SNr neurones express similar receptor subunits; NR2B and NR2D, but not NR2A. The different NMDA response properties in the SNc and SNr may be caused by differences in receptor modulation and/or trafficking. The vulnerability of SNc DA neurones to cell death is not correlated with NMDA current density or receptor subtypes, but could in part be related to inadequate NMDA receptor desensitization. PMID:20618827

  1. Potentiation of convergent synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex: dependence on brain wave frequencies and NMDA receptor subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Pilli, J; Kumar, S S

    2014-07-11

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) at layer (L)1/primary whisker motor cortex synaptic inputs are distinct from thalamic/striatal (Str) synaptic inputs onto L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat somatosensory cortex. However, the consequences of differential expression of putative GluN3A-containing triheteromeric NMDARs at L1 inputs and GluN2A-containing diheteromeric NMDARs at Str inputs on plasticity of the underlying synapses at the respective inputs remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that L1, but not Str, synapses are potentiated following delta burst stimulation (dBS). This potentiation is blocked by d-serine and/or intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) suggesting that it is subunit-specific and dependent on elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Interestingly, ifenprodil, the GluN2B-preferring antagonist, suppresses baseline L1 responses but does not prevent induction of dBS-evoked potentiation. Unlike L1, Str synapses are maximally potentiated following theta burst stimulation (tBS) and this potentiation is blocked with BAPTA and/or the GluN2A-preferring antagonist NVP-AAM077. We show further that while dBS is both necessary and sufficient to potentiate L1 synapses, tBS is most effective in potentiating Str synapses. Our data suggest distinct potentiating paradigms for the two convergent inputs onto pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory cortex and co-dependence of synaptic potentiation on brain wave-tuned frequencies of burst stimulation and subunit composition of underlying NMDARs. A model for predicting the likelihood of enhancing synaptic efficacy is proposed based on Ca(2+) influx through these receptors and integration of EPSPs at these inputs. Together, these findings raise the possibility of input-specific enhancements of synaptic efficacy in neurons as a function of the animal's behavioral state and/or arousal in vivo.

  2. [Roles and expressions of the NMDA receptor subunits (NR2A and NR2B) in visual cortex area of kittens with the normal visual development and anisometropic amblyopia].

    PubMed

    Li, Haiwei; Liu, Longqian; Liu, Xuyang

    2011-04-01

    In order to understand the roles of the other subunits, we investigated expression of the NMDA receptor subunits (NR2A and NR2B) in visual cortex of normal and anisometropic amblyopia kittens with different ages in the present study. We examined the expressions of NR2A and NR2B in the visual cortex of the kittens by immunohistochemistry with polyclonal anti-NR2A antibody and anti-NR2B antibody, respectively. Using immunohisto-chemical Streptavidin Perosidase (SP) method, we observed the dynamic changes of NR2A and NR2B with microscope and computer-assisted image analyses. We found that NR2A and NR2B remained low expression after the peak of the critical period of kitten visual development; compared with normal group of the same age, NR2A expresses low. However, the difference is not significant for NR2B before maturation period of visual development. NR2B rises after the maturation period of visual development. According to this, the component of NR2A and NR2B can be affected by anisometropia. This research suggests that the difference of NR2A and NR2B expressions may affect the formation of amblyopia.

  3. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-18

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint.

  4. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint. PMID:28106787

  5. Enhancement of GluN2B Subunit-Containing NMDA Receptor Underlies Serotonergic Regulation of Long-Term Potentiation after Critical Period in the Rat Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kayoung; Rhie, Duck-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] regulates synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex. Although the effects of 5-HT on plasticity showed huge diversity depending on the ages of animals and species, it has been unclear how 5-HT can show such diverse effects. In the rat visual cortex, 5-HT suppressed long-term potentiation (LTP) at 5 weeks but enhanced LTP at 8 weeks. We speculated that this difference may originate from differential regulation of neurotransmission by 5-HT between the age groups. Thus, we investigated the effects of 5-HT on apha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAAR)-, and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-mediated neurotransmissions and their involvement in the differential regulation of plasticity between 5 and 8 weeks. AMPAR-mediated currents were not affected by 5-HT at both 5 and 8 weeks. GABAAR-mediated currents were enhanced by 5-HT at both age groups. However, 5-HT enhanced NMDAR-mediated currents only at 8 weeks. The enhancement of NMDAR-mediated currents appeared to be mediated by the enhanced function of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDAR. The enhanced GABAAR- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmissions were responsible for the suppression of LTP at 5 weeks and the facilitation of LTP at 8 weeks, respectively. These results indicate that the effects of 5-HT on neurotransmission change with development, and the changes may underlie the differential regulation of synaptic plasticity between different age groups. Thus, the developmental changes in 5-HT function should be carefully considered while investigating the 5-HT-mediated metaplastic control of the cortical network. PMID:26557019

  6. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S.; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A.; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75NTR inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr1472 phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and an Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  8. Separation of domain contacts is required for heterotetrameric assembly of functional NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Anthony N.; Blain, Katherine Y.; Maruo, Tomohiko; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2011-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the subunit assembly process of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) is essential to understand the receptor architecture and underlying mechanism of channel function. Because NMDA-Rs are obligatory heterotetramers requiring the GluN1 subunit, it is critical to investigate how GluN1 and GluN2 type subunits co-assemble into tetramers. By combining approaches in cell biology, biochemistry, single particle electron microscopy, and X-ray crystallography, we report the mechanisms and phenotypes of mutant GluN1 subunits that are defective in receptor maturation. The T110A mutation in the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the GluN1 promotes heterodimerization between the NTDs of GluN1 and GluN2, whereas the Y109C mutation in the adjacent residue stabilizes the homodimer of the NTD of GluN1. The crystal structure of the NTD of GluN1 revealed the mechanism underlying the biochemical properties of these mutants. Effects of these mutations on the maturation of heteromeric NMDA-Rs were investigated using a receptor trafficking assay. Our results suggest that the NTDs of the GluN1 subunit initially form homodimers and the subsequent dimer dissociation is critical for forming heterotetrameric NMDA-Rs containing GluN2 subunits, defining a molecular determinant for receptor assembly. The domain arrangement of the dimeric NTD of GluN1 is unique among the ionotropic glutamate receptors and predicts that the structure and mechanism around the NTDs of NMDA-Rs are different from those of the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors. PMID:21389213

  9. Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08) Modulates the NMDA Receptor Subunits and nNOS-Apoptosis Axis in Cerebellum of Hepatic Encephalopathy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Papia; Trigun, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by impaired cerebellar functions during chronic liver failure (CLF), involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) overactivation in the brain cells. Bacopa monnieri (BM) extract is a known neuroprotectant. The present paper evaluates whether BM extract is able to modulate the two NMDAR subunits (NR2A and NR2B) and its downstream mediators in cerebellum of rats with chronic liver failure (CLF), induced by administration of 50 mg/kg bw thioacetamide (TAA) i.p. for 14 days, and in the TAA group rats orally treated with 200 mg/kg bw BM extract from days 8 to 14. NR2A is known to impart neuroprotection and that of NR2B induces neuronal death during NMDAR activation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase- (nNOS-) apoptosis pathway is known to mediate NMDAR led excitotoxicity. The level of NR2A was found to be significantly reduced with a concomitant increase of NR2B in cerebellum of the CLF rats. This was consistent with significantly enhanced nNOS expression, nitric oxide level, and reduced Bcl2/Bax ratio. Moreover, treatment with BM extract reversed the NR2A/NR2B ratio and also normalized the levels of nNOS-apoptotic factors in cerebellum of those rats. The findings suggest modulation of NR2A and NR2B expression by BM extract to prevent neurochemical alterations associated with HE. PMID:26413124

  10. The Nucleosome Assembly Protein TSPYL2 Regulates the Expression of NMDA Receptor Subunits GluN2A and GluN2B

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Ka Hing; Lai, Suk King; Li, Qi; Yung, Wing Ho; Liu, Hang; Mak, Priscilla Hoi Shan; Ng, Cypress Chun Pong; McAlonan, Grainne; Chan, Ying Shing; Chan, Siu Yuen

    2014-01-01

    TSPYL2 is an X-linked gene encoding a nucleosome assembly protein. TSPYL2 interacts with calmodulin-associated serine/threonine kinase, which is implicated in X-linked mental retardation. As nucleosome assembly and chromatin remodeling are important in transcriptional regulation and neuronal function, we addressed the importance of TSPYL2 through analyzing Tspyl2 loss-of-function mice. We detected down-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits 2A and 2B (GluN2A and GluN2B) in the mutant hippocampus. Evidence from luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation supported that TSPYL2 regulated the expression of Grin2a and Grin2b, the genes encoding GluN2A and GluN2B. We also detected an interaction between TSPYL2 and CBP, indicating that TSPYL2 may activate gene expression through binding CBP. In terms of functional outcome, Tspyl2 loss-of-function impaired long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Moreover, mutant mice showed a deficit in fear learning and memory. We conclude that TSPYL2 contributes to cognitive variability through regulating the expression of Grin2a and Grin2b. PMID:24413569

  11. Nampt is required for long-term depression and the function of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Liana Roberts; Zorumski, Charles F.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential coenzyme/cosubstrate for many biological processes in cellular metabolism. The rate-limiting step in the major pathway of mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis is mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). Previously, we showed that mice lacking Nampt in forebrain excitatory neurons (CamKIIαNampt−/− mice) exhibited hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and reduced anxiety-like behaviors. However, it remained unclear if these functional effects were accompanied by synaptic changes. Here, we show that CamKIIαNampt−/− mice have impaired induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the Schaffer collateral pathway, but normal induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), at postnatal day 30. Pharmacological assessments demonstrated that CamKIIαNampt−/− mice also display dysfunction of synaptic GluN2B (NR2B)-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) prior to changes in NMDAR subunit expression. These results support a novel, important role for Nampt-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis in LTD and in the function of GluN2B–containing NMDARs. PMID:26481044

  12. Nampt is required for long-term depression and the function of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana Roberts; Zorumski, Charles F; Imai, Shin-Ichiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential coenzyme/cosubstrate for many biological processes in cellular metabolism. The rate-limiting step in the major pathway of mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis is mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). Previously, we showed that mice lacking Nampt in forebrain excitatory neurons (CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice) exhibited hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and reduced anxiety-like behaviors. However, it remained unclear if these functional effects were accompanied by synaptic changes. Here, we show that CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice have impaired induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the Schaffer collateral pathway, but normal induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), at postnatal day 30. Pharmacological assessments demonstrated that CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice also display dysfunction of synaptic GluN2B (NR2B)-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) prior to changes in NMDAR subunit expression. These results support a novel, important role for Nampt-mediated NAD(+) biosynthesis in LTD and in the function of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of lisinopril on NMDA receptor subunits 2A and 2B levels in the hippocampus of rats with L-NAME-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sutcu, Recep; Kirbas, Aynur; Kirbas, Serkan; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Delibas, Namik

    2012-10-01

    Hypertension is major risk factor leading to cerebrovascular pathologies. N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and renin-angiotensin system are involved in neuronal plasticity, as well as cognitive functions in the hippocampus. In this study, we examined the effects of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor, on the levels of hippocampal NMDAR subunits; NR2A and NR2B in L-NAME (N(ε)-nitro-L-arginine Methyl Ester)-induced hypertensive rats. In addition, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as a marker for lipid peroxidation. Compared with the control group, the MDA level was significantly increased after 8 weeks in the L-NAME-treated group. Rats treated with lisinopril and L-NAME plus lisinopril were found to have significantly decreased hippocampal MDA levels. Regarding the hippocampal concentrations of NR2A and NR2B, there were no statistically significant differences between groups. We demonstrated that lisinopril treatment has no direct regulatory effect on the levels of NR2A and NR2B in the rat hippocampus. Our results showed that Lisinopril could act as an antioxidant agent against hypertension-induced oxidative stress in rat hippocampus. The findings support that the use of lisinopril may offer a good alternative in the treatment of hypertension by reducing not only blood pressure but also prevent hypertensive complications in the brain.

  14. Alcohol and NMDA receptor: current research and future direction.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors) are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadaptation) is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism.

  15. Alcohol and NMDA receptor: current research and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors) are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadaptation) is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism. PMID:23754976

  16. Modulation of the NMDA receptor by polyamines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Romano, C.; Dichter, M.A.; Molinoff, P.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Results of recent biochemical and electrophysiological studies have suggested that a recognition site for polyamines exists as part of the NMDA receptor complex. The endogenous polyamines spermine and spermidine increase the binding of open-channel blockers and increase NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neutrons. These polyamines have been termed agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Studies of the effects of natural and synthetic polyamines on the binding of ({sup 3}H)MK-801 and on NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neurons have led to the identification of compounds classified as partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Polyamines have also been found to affect the binding of ligands to the recognition sites for glutamate and glycine. However, these effects may be mediated at a site distinct from that at which polyamines act to modulate the binding of open-channel blockers. Endogenous polyamines may modulate excitatory synaptic transmission by acting at the polyamine recognition site of the NMDA receptor. This site could represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemia-induced neurotoxicity, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Gene expression studies of mRNAs encoding the NMDA receptor subunits NMDAR1, NMDAR2A, NMDAR2B, NMDAR2C, and NMDAR2D following long-term treatment with cis-and trans-flupenthixol as a model for understanding the mode of action of schizophrenia drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, A C; McDonald, B; Moss, S J; Gurling, H M

    1998-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that glutamate receptor function is important in both the aetiology and treatment of schizophrenia. In order to understand how specific glutamate receptor genes are involved in the treatment of schizophrenia we have used a multiprobe oligonucleotide solution hybridization (MOSH) technique to examine the regulation of gene express of the NMDAR1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D receptor subunits in the left rat brain following treatment with the optical isomers of flupenthixol. cis- and trans-flupenthixol are both present in the commonly used oral and depot treatments for schizophrenia and a controlled trial showed that cis-flupenthixol had a significantly superior ability to ameliorate the positive symptoms of schizophrenia compared to its trans-isomer. At a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day over a period of 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks, we found that both isomers down regulated the expression of NMDAR1 mRNA in most regions of the brain. NMDAR2A, 2B and 2C receptor subunits showed a significantly decreased expression from 12 to 24 weeks but after 2 weeks NMDAR2B, 2C, 2D expression was increased in several brain regions. The NMDAR1 receptor subunit immunoreactivity in the right brain following 4 and 24 weeks of drug treatment was also examined by Western blotting. Both trans- and cis-flupenthixol significantly decreased the NR1 immunoreactivity in the right cerebellum after 24 weeks of treatment. These results suggest that NMDA receptor subunits may have a role in the action of antipsychotic drugs. If we assume that the NMDA receptor expression changes reflect a beneficial and significant mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia, it could be argued that NMDA receptor changes are more related to the negative or non-specific symptoms of schizophrenia.

  18. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut.

    PubMed

    Prüss, H; Leubner, J; Wenke, N K; Czirják, G Á; Szentiks, C A; Greenwood, A D

    2015-08-27

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut's encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut's cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed.

  19. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut

    PubMed Central

    Prüss, H.; Leubner, J.; Wenke, N. K.; Czirják, G. Á.; Szentiks, C. A.; Greenwood, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut’s encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut’s cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed. PMID:26313569

  20. Protection of α-CaMKII from Dephosphorylation by GluN2B Subunit of NMDA Receptor Is Abolished by Mutation of Glu96 or His282 of α-CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Suma Priya, Sudarsana Devi; John, Sebastian; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of CaMKII and the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptor is essential for synaptic plasticity events such as LTP. Synaptic targeting of CaMKII and regulation of its biochemical functions result from this interaction. GluN2B binding to the T-site of CaMKII leads to changes in substrate binding and catalytic parameters and inhibition of its own dephosphorylation. We find that CaMKIINα, a natural inhibitor that binds to the T-site of CaMKII, also causes inhibition of dephosphorylation of CaMKII similar to GluN2B. Two residues on α-CaMKII, Glu96 and His282, are involved in the inhibition of CaMKII dephosphorylation exerted by binding of GluN2B. E96A-α-CaMKII is known to be defective in GluN2B-induced catalytic modulation. Data presented here show that, in both E96A and H282A mutants of α-CaMKII, GluN2B-induced inhibition of dephosphorylation is impaired. PMID:27610621

  1. Protection of α-CaMKII from Dephosphorylation by GluN2B Subunit of NMDA Receptor Is Abolished by Mutation of Glu96 or His282 of α-CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Mayadevi, Madhavan; Lakshmi, Kesavan; Suma Priya, Sudarsana Devi; John, Sebastian; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of CaMKII and the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptor is essential for synaptic plasticity events such as LTP. Synaptic targeting of CaMKII and regulation of its biochemical functions result from this interaction. GluN2B binding to the T-site of CaMKII leads to changes in substrate binding and catalytic parameters and inhibition of its own dephosphorylation. We find that CaMKIINα, a natural inhibitor that binds to the T-site of CaMKII, also causes inhibition of dephosphorylation of CaMKII similar to GluN2B. Two residues on α-CaMKII, Glu96 and His282, are involved in the inhibition of CaMKII dephosphorylation exerted by binding of GluN2B. E96A-α-CaMKII is known to be defective in GluN2B-induced catalytic modulation. Data presented here show that, in both E96A and H282A mutants of α-CaMKII, GluN2B-induced inhibition of dephosphorylation is impaired.

  2. Defining the role of NMDA receptors in anesthesia: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Andrey B; Yamakura, Tomohiro; Sakimura, Kenji; Baba, Hiroshi

    2014-01-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are important in mediating excitatory neurotransmission in the nervous system. They are preferentially inhibited by some general anesthetics and have, therefore, been implied in the mediation of their effects. This review summarizes the main research findings available related to NMDA receptors and their role in anesthesia. The contribution of NMDA receptors to the anesthetized state is discussed separately for each of its components: amnesia, analgesia, unconsciousness and immobility. Anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and immobility have received the most attention in the research community and are the main focus of this review. In the overall perspective, however, studies using pharmacological or electrophysiological approaches have failed to reach definitive conclusions regarding the contribution of NMDA receptors to these anesthetic endpoints. None of the studies have specifically addressed the role of NMDA receptors in the amnestic effect of general anesthetics, and the few available data are (at best) only indirect. NMDA receptor antagonism by general anesthetics may have a preventive anti-hyperalgesic effect. The only and most extensively used genetic tool to examine the role of NMDA receptors in anesthesia is global knockout of the GluN2A subunit of the NMDA receptor. These animals are resistant to many intravenous and inhalational anesthetics, but the interpretation of their phenotype is hindered by the secondary changes occurring in these animals after GluN2A knockout, which are themselves capable of altering anesthetic sensitivity. Generation of more sophisticated conditional knockout models targeting NMDA receptors is required to finally define their role in the mechanisms of anesthesia. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Traxoprodil, a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, potentiates the antidepressant-like effects of certain antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Stasiuk, Weronika; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Oniszczuk, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Świąder, Katarzyna; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    One of the newest substances, whose antidepressant activity was shown is traxoprodil, which is a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of traxoprodil on animals' behavior using the forced swim test (FST), as well as the effect of traxoprodil (10 mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg) and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Serotonergic lesion and experiment using the selective agonists of serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 was conducted to evaluate the role of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant action of traxoprodil. Brain concentrations of tested agents were determined using HPLC. The results showed that traxoprodil at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST and it was not related to changes in animals' locomotor activity. Co-administration of traxoprodil with imipramine, fluoxetine or escitalopram, each in subtherapeutic doses, significantly affected the animals' behavior in the FST and, what is important, these changes were not due to the severity of locomotor activity. The observed effect of traxoprodil is only partially associated with serotonergic system and is independent of the effect on the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 serotonin receptors. The results of an attempt to assess the nature of the interaction between traxoprodil and the tested drugs show that in the case of joint administration of traxoprodil and fluoxetine, imipramine or escitalopram, there were interactions in the pharmacokinetic phase.

  4. Spatial learning and goldfish telencephalon NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Yolanda; Vargas, Juan Pedro; Portavella, Manuel; López, Juan Carlos

    2006-05-01

    Recent results have demonstrated that the mammalian hippocampus and the dorso-lateral telencephalon of ray-finned fishes share functional similarities in relation to spatial memory systems. In the present study, we investigated whether the physiological mechanisms of this hippocampus-dependent spatial memory system were also similar in mammals and ray-finned fishes, and therefore possibly conserved through evolution in vertebrates. In Experiment 1, we studied the effects of the intracranial administration of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 during the acquisition of a spatial task. The results indicated dose-dependent drug-induced impairment of spatial memory. Experiment 2 evaluated if the MK-801 produced disruption of retrieval of a learned spatial response. Data showed that the administration of MK-801 did not impair the retrieval of the information previously stored. The last experiment analyzed the involvement of the telencephalic NMDA receptors in a spatial and in a cue task. Results showed a clear impairment in spatial learning but not in cue learning when NMDA receptors were blocked. As a whole, these results indicate that physiological mechanisms of this hippocampus-dependent system could be a general feature in vertebrate, and therefore phylogenetically conserved.

  5. Synaptic NMDA Receptors Mediate Hypoxic Excitotoxic Death

    PubMed Central

    Wroge, Christine M.; Hogins, Joshua; Eisenman, Larry; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NMDA receptor activation and excitotoxicity underlies pathology in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including hypoxia/ischemia. Thus, the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders demands a complete understanding of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation during excitotoxic insults. The extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis posits that synaptic NMDARs are neurotrophic/neuroprotective and extrasynaptic NMDARs are neurotoxic. In part, the extrasynaptic hypothesis is built on observed selectivity for extrasynaptic receptors of a neuroprotective use-dependent NMDAR channel blocker, memantine. In rat hippocampal neurons we found that a neuroprotective concentration of memantine shows little selectivity for extrasynaptic NMDARs when all receptors are tonically activated by exogenous glutamate. This led us to test the extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis using metabolic challenge, where the source of excitotoxic glutamate buildup may be largely synaptic. Three independent approaches suggest strongly that synaptic receptors participate prominently in hypoxic excitotoxicity. First, block of glutamate transporters with a non-substrate antagonist exacerbated rather than prevented damage, consistent with a primarily synaptic source of glutamate. Second, selective, preblock of synaptic NMDARs with a slowly reversible, use-dependent antagonist protected nearly fully against prolonged hypoxic insult. Third, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), which degrades ambient but not synaptic glutamate, did not protect against hypoxia but protected against exogenous glutamate damage. Together, these results suggest that synaptic NMDARs can mediate excitotoxicity, particularly when the glutamate source is synaptic and when synaptic receptor contributions are rigorously defined. Moreover, the results suggest that in some situations therapeutically targeting extrasynaptic receptors may be inappropriate. PMID:22573696

  6. IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR THE NMDA NR1 SUBUNIT IN BULBOSPINAL CATECHOLAMINE AND SEROTONIN NEURONS OF RAT VENTRAL MEDULLA

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.; Mueller, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bulbospinal neurons in the ventral medulla play important roles in the regulation of sympathetic outflow. Physiological evidence suggests that these neurons are activated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA subtypes of glutamate receptors. In this study, we examined bulbospinal neurons in the ventral medulla for the presence of immunoreactivity for the NMDA NR1 subunit, which is essential for NMDA receptor function. Rats received bilateral injections of cholera toxin B into the tenth thoracic spinal segment to label bulbospinal neurons. Triple immunofluorescent labelling was used to detect cholera toxin B with a blue fluorophore, NR1 with a red fluorophore and either tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase with a green fluorophore. In the rostral ventrolateral medulla, NR1 occurred in all bulbospinal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons and 96% of bulbospinal tyrosine hydroxylase-negative neurons, which were more common in sections containing the facial nucleus. In raphé pallidus, the parapyramidal region and the marginal layer, 98% of bulbospinal tryptophan hydroxylase-positive neurons contained NR1-immunoreactivity. NR1 was also present in all of the bulbospinal tryptophan hydroxylase-negative neurons, which comprised 20% of bulbospinal neurons in raphé pallidus and the parapyramidal region. These results show that virtually all bulbospinal tyrosine hydroxylase and non-tyrosine hydroxylase neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla and virtually all bulbospinal serotonin and non-serotonin neurons in raphé pallidus and the parapyramidal region express NR1, the obligatory subunit of the NMDA receptor. NMDA receptors on bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventral medulla likely influence sympathoexcitation in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23562375

  7. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  8. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  9. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seung Ha; Jung, Yu Ri; Park, Soon Won; Jung, Dae Soo

    2015-06-01

    Anti N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is one of the most common types of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis commonly occurs in young women with ovarian teratoma. It has variable clinical manifestations and treatment responses. Sometimes it is misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder or viral encephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a rare condition in pregnant women. We report a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a pregnant woman who presented with abnormal behavior, epileptic seizure, and hypoventilation.

  10. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-10-01

    To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [(18)F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [(18)F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [(18)F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [(18)F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [(18)F]GE-179 VT (-29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [(18)F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [(18)F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-08-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions.

  12. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  13. Arcuate Src activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit contributes to inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Zhu, Qi; Gong, Shan; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guang-Yin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2012-12-01

    The tyrosine kinases of Src family play an important role in the central sensitization following peripheral inflammation. However, whether the Src family in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of mediobasal hypothalamus is involved in central sensitization remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanisms of tyrosine kinases of Src family in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the ARC following peripheral inflammation. Peripheral inflammation was induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat hindpaw. The neuronal activities of the ARC were recorded using electrophysiological field recording from the in vitro mediobasal hypothalamic slices from control and CFA rats. Expression of total and phosphorylated Src and NR2B subunit protein was analyzed by Western blot and immuoprecipitation. Our results showed that CFA injection resulted in an increase in mechanical and thermal sensitivity, which was partially blocked by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment. CFA injection also enhanced spontaneous firings of ARC neurons, which were reversed by the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit specific antagonist Ro25-6981 and by PP2, an Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In addition, peripheral inflammation enhanced Src phosphorylation and NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation without alteration of total NR2B subunit expression in the ARC. Peripheral inflammation also increased the association of NR2B protein with p-Src protein in the ARC. Administration of PP2 blocked the upregulation of NR2B phosphorylation induced by CFA injection. Taken together, our present results suggest that the arcuate Src activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit may contribute to inflammatory pain.

  14. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  15. Role of motor cortex NMDA receptors in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity of behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mazahir T; Hernández-González, Samuel; Dogbevia, Godwin; Treviño, Mario; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2013-01-01

    The primary motor cortex has an important role in the precise execution of learned motor responses. During motor learning, synaptic efficacy between sensory and primary motor cortical neurons is enhanced, possibly involving long-term potentiation and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-specific glutamate receptor function. To investigate whether NMDA receptor in the primary motor cortex can act as a coincidence detector for activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and associative learning, here we generate mice with deletion of the Grin1 gene, encoding the essential NMDA receptor subunit 1 (GluN1), specifically in the primary motor cortex. The loss of NMDA receptor function impairs primary motor cortex long-term potentiation in vivo. Importantly, it impairs the synaptic efficacy between the primary somatosensory and primary motor cortices and significantly reduces classically conditioned eyeblink responses. Furthermore, compared with wild-type littermates, mice lacking NMDA receptors in the [corrected] primary motor cortex show slower learning in Skinner-box tasks. Thus, primary motor cortex NMDA receptors are necessary for activity-dependent synaptic strengthening and associative learning.

  16. Neonatal NMDA Receptor Blockade Disrupts Spike Timing and Glutamatergic Synapses in Fast Spiking Interneurons in a NMDA Receptor Hypofunction Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin S.; Corbin, Joshua G.; Huntsman, Molly M.

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of parvalbumin-positive, fast-spiking interneurons (FSI) is considered a primary contributor to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ), but deficits in FSI physiology have not been explicitly characterized. We show for the first time, that a widely-employed model of schizophrenia minimizes first spike latency and increases GluN2B-mediated current in neocortical FSIs. The reduction in FSI first-spike latency coincides with reduced expression of the Kv1.1 potassium channel subunit which provides a biophysical explanation for the abnormal spiking behavior. Similarly, the increase in NMDA current coincides with enhanced expression of the GluN2B NMDA receptor subunit, specifically in FSIs. In this study mice were treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, during the first week of life. During adolescence, we detected reduced spike latency and increased GluN2B-mediated NMDA current in FSIs, which suggests transient disruption of NMDA signaling during neonatal development exerts lasting changes in the cellular and synaptic physiology of neocortical FSIs. Overall, we propose these physiological disturbances represent a general impairment to the physiological maturation of FSIs which may contribute to schizophrenia-like behaviors produced by this model. PMID:25290690

  17. GluN2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Regulate AMPA Receptor Traffic through Anchoring of the Synaptic Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana S; Schmidt, Jeannette; Rio, Pedro; Águas, Rodolfo; Rooyakkers, Amanda; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Craig, Ann Marie; Carvalho, Ana Luisa

    2015-06-03

    NMDA receptors play a central role in shaping the strength of synaptic connections throughout development and in mediating synaptic plasticity mechanisms that underlie some forms of learning and memory formation in the CNS. In the hippocampus and the neocortex, GluN1 is combined primarily with GluN2A and GluN2B, which are differentially expressed during development and confer distinct molecular and physiological properties to NMDA receptors. The contribution of each subunit to the synaptic traffic of NMDA receptors and therefore to their role during development and in synaptic plasticity is still controversial. We report a critical role for the GluN2B subunit in regulating NMDA receptor synaptic targeting. In the absence of GluN2B, the synaptic levels of AMPA receptors are increased and accompanied by decreased constitutive endocytosis of GluA1-AMPA receptor. We used quantitative proteomic analysis to identify changes in the composition of postsynaptic densities from GluN2B(-/-) mouse primary neuronal cultures and found altered levels of several ubiquitin proteasome system components, in particular decreased levels of proteasome subunits. Enhancing the proteasome activity with a novel proteasome activator restored the synaptic levels of AMPA receptors in GluN2B(-/-) neurons and their endocytosis, revealing that GluN2B-mediated anchoring of the synaptic proteasome is responsible for fine tuning AMPA receptor synaptic levels under basal conditions.

  18. CGX-1007 prevents excitotoxic cell death via actions at multiple types of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anitha B; Saunders, Gerald W; Dalpé-Charron, Alexandre; Reilly, Christopher A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2011-08-01

    Glutamate induced excitotoxic injury through over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) plays a critical role in the development of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of CGX-1007 (Conantokin G) as a neuroprotective agent against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Conantokin G, a cone snail peptide isolated from Conus geographus is reported to selectively inhibit NR2B containing NMDARs with high specificity and is shown to have potent anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects. CGX-1007 significantly reduced the excitotoxic cell death induced by NMDA in organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, ifenprodil, another NR2B specific antagonist failed to offer neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. We further determined that the neuroprotection observed is likely due to the action of CGX-1007 at multiple NMDA receptor subtypes. In a series of electrophysiology experiments, CGX-1007 inhibited NMDA-gated currents in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing NMDA receptors containing either NR1a/NR2B or NR1a/NR2A subunit combinations. CGX-1007 produced a weak inhibition at NR1a/NR2C receptors, whereas it had no effect on NR1a/NR2D receptors. Further, the inhibition of NMDA receptors by CGX-1007 was voltage-dependent with greater inhibition seen at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The voltage-dependence of CGX-1007 activity was also observed in recordings of NMDA-gated currents evoked in native receptors expressed in cortical neurons in culture. Based on our results, we conclude that CGX-1007 is a potent neuroprotective agent that acts as an antagonist at both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors.

  19. The role of NR2B containing NMDA receptor in place preference conditioned with morphine and natural reinforcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Guo, Chang-Yong; Yu, Peng; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Han, Ji-Sheng; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2006-08-01

    It has been reported that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is implicated in drug addiction and antagonists of the NMDA receptor complex can inhibit the development and expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by several addictive drugs, implying that this class of compounds might be considered as candidate for the treatment of substance abuse. To explore this possibility, it is important to evaluate whether the inhibitory effect of NMDA receptor antagonists would be confined to behaviors produced by drugs of abuse only, but not by natural reinforcers. According to the quantitative changes of NMDA receptor subunits, including NR1, NR2A, and NR2B, induced by diverse types of reinforcers, we chose NR2B subunit as the target of research. Experimental results showed that (1) an augmented expression of NR2B subunit was revealed by Western blotting in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus in rats with CPP induced by morphine, but not by natural rewards such as food, novel environment and social interaction. (2) Ifenprodil, an antagonist highly selective for NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, produced a dose-dependent reduction in CPP induced by morphine and novel environment, but not that by food consumption and social interaction. Taking together, these findings suggested that NR2B containing NMDA receptor may be more involved with morphine reward rather than natural rewards, and that antagonism of NR2B may have a potential for the treatment of morphine abuse.

  20. Evaluation of age-dependent response to NMDA receptor antagonism in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-04-01

    Imbalances in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed as the cause of several neurological disturbances. The use of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, to mimic features of these neurological disorders is effective both in mammals and in fish. However, the variability of the subunits comprising the NMDA receptor during development alters the pharmacokinetic properties of the receptor and leads to different responses to this drug. Here, we evaluated the locomotor response of zebrafish to MK-801 (1, 5, and 20 μM) through the development (30 days postfertilization [dpf] to 2 years postfertilization [ypf]). The NMDA receptor subunit gene expression was also analyzed through the development (7 dpf to 2 ypf). Zebrafish displayed an age-related response to MK-801 with a higher response at 60 and 120 dpf. The magnitude of hyperlocomotion promoted by MK-801 seems to be less powerful for zebrafish in relation to rodents. The verification of expression levels in zebrafish NMDA receptor subunits shows that NR1.1 had a slight reduction throughout the development, while the NR2 subunits, especially NR2A.2 and NR2C.1, vary their expression levels according to the stage of development. The time-specific locomotor response to MK-801 through the development could be a consequence of differential NMDA receptor subunit expression. This result of developmental response to MK-801 is a crucial component in the consolidation of zebrafish as a suitable model to study glutamatergic neurotransmission in early phases.

  1. Ketamine's antidepressant action: beyond NMDA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine is one of the most attractive antidepressants since this drug causes rapid-onset and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment resistant patients with depression. There are unanswered questions about how ketamine induces its rapid and sustained antidepressant actions. This key article suggests that (2R,6R)-HNK (hydroxynorketamine), a major metabolite of (R)-ketamine, shows antidepressant effects in rodent models of depression, indicating that the metabolism of (R)-ketamine to (2R,6R)-HNK is pivotal in its antidepressant action. Here these findings are put into context and their significance is discussed.

  2. An NMDA Receptor-Dependent Mechanism Underlies Inhibitory Synapse Development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xinglong; Zhou, Liang; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-26

    In the mammalian brain, GABAergic synaptic transmission provides inhibitory balance to glutamatergic excitatory drive and controls neuronal output. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of GABAergic synapses remain largely unclear. Here, we report that NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in individual immature neurons are the upstream signaling molecules essential for GABAergic synapse development, which requires signaling via Calmodulin binding motif in the C0 domain of the NMDAR GluN1 subunit. Interestingly, in neurons lacking NMDARs, whereas GABAergic synaptic transmission is strongly reduced, the tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors is increased, suggesting a compensatory mechanism for the lack of synaptic inhibition. These results demonstrate a crucial role for NMDARs in specifying the development of inhibitory synapses, and suggest an important mechanism for controlling the establishment of the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition in the developing brain.

  3. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  4. Receptor to glutamate NMDA-type: the functional diversity of the nr1 isoforms and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Flores-Soto, Mario Eduardo; Chaparro-Huerta, Verónica; Escoto-Delgadillo, Martha; Ureña-Guerrero, Mónica Elisa; Camins, Antoni; Beas-Zarate, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and interacts with two classes of receptor: metabotropic and ionotropic receptors. Ionotropic receptors are divided according to the affinity of their specific agonists: Nmethyl- D-aspartate (NMDA), amino acid-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole acid (AMPA) and kainic acid (KA). NMDA receptors (NMDA-R) are macromolecular structures that are formed by different combinations of subunits: NMDAR1 (NR1), NMDAR2 (NR2) and NMDAR3 (NR3). The study of this receptor has aroused great interest, partly due to its role in synaptic plasticity but mainly because of its permeability to the Ca(2+) ion. This review examines the molecular composition of NMDA-R and the variants of NR1 subunit editing in association with NR2 subunit dimers, which form the main components of this receptor. Their composition, structure, function and distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns demonstrate the versatility and diversity of functionally different isoforms of NR1 subunits and the various pharmacological properties of the NR2 subunit. Finally, the involvement of NMDA-R in the excitotoxicity phenomenon, as well as, its expression changes under these conditions as neuronal response are also discussed.

  5. Control of Proton Sensitivity of the NMDA Receptor by RNA Splicing and Polyamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynelis, Stephen F.; Hartley, Melissa; Heinemann, Stephen F.

    1995-05-01

    The function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-preferring glutamate receptor can be regulated by extracellular pH, a process that may be important during ischemia in the brain or during seizures. Protons inhibit NMDA receptor function by 50 percent at pH 7.3 through interactions with the NR1 subunit, and both polyamines and NR1 exon 5 potentiate receptor function through relief of the tonic proton inhibition present at physiological pH. A single amino acid (lysine 211) was identified that mediates the effects of exon 5 in the rat brain. Electroneutral substitutions at this position restored pH sensitivity and, consequently, polyamine relief of tonic inhibition. This effect, together with the structural similarities between polyamines and the surface loop encoded by exon 5, suggest that exon 5 may act as a tethered pH-sensitive constitutive modulator of NMDA receptor function.

  6. NMDA Receptor Modulators in the Treatment of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Tomek, Seven E; Lacrosse, Amber L; Nemirovsky, Natali E; Olive, M Foster

    2013-02-06

    Glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subtype serves as a molecular target for several drugs of abuse. In this review, we will provide an overview of NMDA receptor structure and function, followed by a review of the mechanism of action, clinical efficacy, and side effect profile of NMDA receptor ligands that are currently in use or being explored for the treatment of drug addiction. These ligands include the NMDA receptor modulators memantine and acamprosate, as well as the partial NMDA agonist D-cycloserine. Data collected to date suggest that direct NMDA receptor modulators have relatively limited efficacy in the treatment of drug addiction, and that partial agonism of NMDA receptors may have some efficacy with regards to extinction learning during cue exposure therapy. However, the lack of consistency in results to date clearly indicates that additional studies are needed, as are studies examining novel ligands with indirect mechanisms for altering NMDA receptor function.

  7. Involvement of NMDA receptor subtypes in cortical spreading depression in rats assessed by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shatillo, Artem; Salo, Raimo A; Giniatullin, Rashid; Gröhn, Olli H

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a phenomenon implicated in migraine with aura and associated with other neurological disorders (e.g. stroke, brain trauma). Current evidence points to the essential role of NMDA receptors in CSD mechanisms. However, the roles of multiple subunits of NMDA receptors expressed in neurons, glia and blood vessels in vivo, are little explored. Using BOLD fMRI of urethane anesthetized rats as an integrative CSD readout, we tested the involvement of different NMDA receptor subtypes in CSD induction and propagation. Rats were treated with a non-selective NMDA blocker (MK-801), NR2B antagonist (ifenprodil) or a NR2A selective antagonist (TCN-201). CSD was induced during fMRI scanning by application of KCl onto the cerebral cortex and fMRI data were collected by 9.4 T MRI. The non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801 completely blocked CSD, which was not observed in the NR2A group where TCN-201 did not alter the CSD features. Unexpectedly, the NR2B specific antagonist ifenprodil largely promoted the initial negative phase of the BOLD CSD response, likely due to altered neurovascular coupling. Our data suggest key roles and differential involvement of NMDA receptor subtypes in CSD generation and propagation, highlighting an important role for the NR2B subtype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Three-dimensional models of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, M J; Wo, Z G; Oswald, R E

    1996-01-01

    Structural models have been produced for three types of non-NMDA inotropic glutamate receptors: an AMPA receptor, GluR1, a kainate receptor, GluR6; and a low-molecular-weight kainate receptor from goldfish, GFKAR alpha. Modeling was restricted to the domains of the proteins that bind the neurotransmitter glutamate and that form the ion channel. Model building combined homology modeling, distance geometry, molecular mechanics, interactive modeling, and known constraints. The models indicate new potential interactions in the extracellular domain between protein and agonists, and suggest that the transition from the "closed" to the "open" state involves the movement of a conserved positive residue away from, and two conserved negative residues into, the extracellular entrance to the pore upon binding. As a first approximation, the ion channel domain was modeled with a structure comprising a central antiparallel beta-barrel that partially crosses the membrane, and against which alpha-helices from each subunit are packed; a third alpha-helix packs against these two helices in each subunit. Much, but not all, of the available data were consistent with this structure. Modifying the beta-barrel to a loop-like topology produced a model consistent with available data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785317

  9. Differential trafficking of AMPA receptors following activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas M; Collingridge, Graham L; Fitzjohn, Stephen M

    2011-07-27

    The removal of AMPA receptors from synapses is a major component of long-term depression (LTD). How this occurs, however, is still only partially understood. To investigate the trafficking of AMPA receptors in real-time we previously tagged the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors with ecliptic pHluorin and studied the effects of NMDA receptor activation. In the present study we have compared the effect of NMDA receptor and group I mGluR activation, using GluA2 tagged with super ecliptic pHluorin (SEP-GluA2) expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Surprisingly, agonists of the two receptors, which are both able to induce chemical forms of LTD, had clearly distinct effects on AMPA receptor trafficking. In agreement with our previous work we found that transient NMDA receptor activation results in an initial decrease in surface GluA2 from extrasynaptic sites followed by a delayed reduction in GluA2 from puncta (putative synapses). In contrast, transient activation of group I mGluRs, using DHPG, led to a pronounced but more delayed decrease in GluA2 from the dendritic shafts. Surprisingly, there was no average change in the fluorescence of the puncta. Examination of fluorescence at individual puncta, however, indicated that alterations did take place, with some puncta showing an increase and others a decrease in fluorescence. The effects of DHPG were, like DHPG-induced LTD, prevented by treatment with a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor. The electrophysiological correlate of the effects of DHPG in the SEP-GluA2 infected cultures was a reduction in mEPSC frequency with no change in amplitude. The implications of these findings for the initial mechanisms of expression of both NMDA receptor- and mGluR-induced LTD are discussed.

  10. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Active NMDA glutamate receptors are expressed by mammalian osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Itzstein, Cécile; Cheynel, Hervé; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system, has recently been identified in bone. In this study, we have investigated whether NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts have an electrophysiological activity. Using the patch clamp technique two agonists of the NMDA receptor, L-glutamate (Glu) and NMDA, were shown to activate whole-cell currents recorded in isolated rabbit osteoclasts. The current-voltage (I-V) relationships of the currents induced by Glu (IGlu) and NMDA (INMDA) were studied using Mg2+-free solutions. The agonist-induced currents had a linear I-V relationship with a reversal potential near 0 mV, as expected for a voltage independent and non-selective cationic current. IGlu and INMDA were sensitive to specific blockers of NMDA subtype glutamate receptors, such as magnesium ions, (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]cyclohepten -5,10-imine (MK-801) and 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl) piperidine (DEP). The block of IGlu and INMDA by these specific antagonists was voltage dependent, strong for negative potentials (inward current) and absent for positive potentials (outward current). These results demonstrate that NMDA receptors are functional in rabbit osteoclasts, and that their electrophysiological and pharmacological properties in these cells are similar to those documented for neuronal cells. Active NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts may represent a new target for regulating bone resorption. PMID:10373688

  12. GHB–Induced Cognitive Deficits During Adolescence and the Role of NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, R; Wu, L-C; Reddy, K; Sircar, D; Basak, A.K

    2011-01-01

    We have earlier reported that γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) disrupts the acquisition of spatial learning and memory in adolescent rats. GHB is known to interact with several neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in cognitive functioning. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) -type of glutamate receptor is considered to be an important target for spatial learning and memory. Molecular mechanisms governing the neuroadptations following repeated GHB treatment in adolecent rats remain unknown. We examined the role of NMDA receptor in adolescent GHB-induced cognitive deficit. Adolescent rats were administered with GHB on 6 consecutive days, and surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits levels were measured. GHB significantly decreased NR1 levels in the frontal cortex. Adolescent GHB also significantly reduced cortical NR2A subunit levels. Our findings support the hypothesis that adolescent GHB-induced cogntive deficits are associated with neuroadaptations in glutamatergic transmission, particulaly NR functioning in the frontal cortex. PMID:21886597

  13. GHB-Induced Cognitive Deficits During Adolescence and the Role of NMDA Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sircar, R; Wu, L-C; Reddy, K; Sircar, D; Basak, A K

    2011-03-01

    We have earlier reported that γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) disrupts the acquisition of spatial learning and memory in adolescent rats. GHB is known to interact with several neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in cognitive functioning. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) -type of glutamate receptor is considered to be an important target for spatial learning and memory. Molecular mechanisms governing the neuroadptations following repeated GHB treatment in adolecent rats remain unknown. We examined the role of NMDA receptor in adolescent GHB-induced cognitive deficit. Adolescent rats were administered with GHB on 6 consecutive days, and surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits levels were measured. GHB significantly decreased NR1 levels in the frontal cortex. Adolescent GHB also significantly reduced cortical NR2A subunit levels. Our findings support the hypothesis that adolescent GHB-induced cogntive deficits are associated with neuroadaptations in glutamatergic transmission, particulaly NR functioning in the frontal cortex.

  14. Regulation of spine morphology and spine density by NMDA receptor signaling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ultanir, Sila K.; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hall, Benjamin J.; Deerinck, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, and their size and density influence the functioning of neuronal circuits. Here we report that NMDA receptor signaling plays a critical role in regulating spine size and density in the developing cortex. Genetic deletion of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in the cortex leads to a decrease in spine density and an increase in spine head size in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. This process is accompanied by an increase in the presynaptic axon bouton volume and the postsynaptic density area, as well as an increase in the miniature excitatory postsynaptic current amplitude and frequency. These observations indicate that NMDA receptors regulate synapse structure and function in the developing cortex. PMID:18048342

  15. Regulation of spine morphology and spine density by NMDA receptor signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Sila K; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hall, Benjamin J; Deerinck, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2007-12-04

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, and their size and density influence the functioning of neuronal circuits. Here we report that NMDA receptor signaling plays a critical role in regulating spine size and density in the developing cortex. Genetic deletion of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in the cortex leads to a decrease in spine density and an increase in spine head size in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. This process is accompanied by an increase in the presynaptic axon bouton volume and the postsynaptic density area, as well as an increase in the miniature excitatory postsynaptic current amplitude and frequency. These observations indicate that NMDA receptors regulate synapse structure and function in the developing cortex.

  16. The NMDA receptor as a target for cognitive enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Collingridge, Graham L.; Volianskis, Arturas; Bannister, Neil; France, Grace; Hanna, Lydia; Mercier, Marion; Tidball, Patrick; Fang, Guangyu; Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise M.; Monaghan, Daniel T.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Molnár, Elek; Lodge, David; Jane, David E.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) play an important role in neural plasticity including long-term potentiation and long-term depression, which are likely to explain their importance for learning and memory. Cognitive decline is a major problem facing an ageing human population, so much so that its reversal has become an important goal for scientific research and pharmaceutical development. Enhancement of NMDAR function is a core strategy toward this goal. In this review we indicate some of the major ways of potentiating NMDAR function by both direct and indirect modulation. There is good evidence that both positive and negative modulation can enhance function suggesting that a subtle approach correcting imbalances in particular clinical situations will be required. Excessive activation and the resultant deleterious effects will need to be carefully avoided. Finally we describe some novel positive allosteric modulators of NMDARs, with some subunit selectivity, and show initial evidence of their ability to affect NMDAR mediated events. PMID:22796429

  17. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis: case series and analysis of the effects of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Gleichman, Amy J; Hughes, Ethan G; Rossi, Jeffrey E; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lai, Meizan; Dessain, Scott K; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Lynch, David R

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background A severe form of encephalitis associated with antibodies against NR1–NR2 heteromers of the NMDA receptor was recently identified. We aimed to analyse the clinical and immunological features of patients with the disorder and examine the effects of antibodies against NMDA receptors in neuronal cultures. Methods We describe the clinical characteristics of 100 patients with encephalitis and NR1–NR2 antibodies. HEK293 cells ectopically expressing single or assembled NR1–NR2 subunits were used to determine the epitope targeted by the antibodies. Antibody titres were measured with ELISA. The effect of antibodies on neuronal cultures was determined by quantitative analysis of NMDA-receptor clusters. Findings Median age of patients was 23 years (range 5–76 years); 91 were women. All patients presented with psychiatric symptoms or memory problems; 76 had seizures, 88 unresponsiveness (decreased conciousness), 86 dyskinesias, 69 autonomic instability, and 66 hypoventilation. 58 (59%) of 98 patients for whom results of oncological assessments were available had tumours, most commonly ovarian teratoma. Patients who received early tumour treatment (usually with immunotherapy) had better outcome (p=0.004) and fewer neurological relapses (p=0.009) than the rest of the patients. 75 patients recovered or had mild deficits and 25 had severe deficits or died. Improvement was associated with a decrease of serum antibody titres. The main epitope targeted by the antibodies is in the extracellular N-terminal domain of the NR1 subunit. Patients’ antibodies decreased the numbers of cell-surface NMDA receptors and NMDA-receptor clusters in postsynaptic dendrites, an effect that could be reversed by antibody removal. Interpretation A well-defined set of clinical characteristics are associated with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. The pathogenesis of the disorder seems to be mediated by antibodies. PMID:18851928

  18. Cortical NR2B NMDA subunit antagonism reduces inflammatory pain in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Gabriel C; Herrera, Jairo; Bethancourt, José

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a critical role in pain processing at different levels of the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we used adult Wistar rats to examine gender differences in the effects of NR2B NMDA antagonism at the level of the anterior cingulate cortex in phasic pain, and in the first and second phases of a formalin test. Rats underwent stereotactic surgery for cannula implantation in the anterior cingulate cortex. After recovery, paw withdrawal latency to a noxious thermal stimulus was assessed. Rats were also subjected to a formalin pain test whereby 60 μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hind paw. Results Female and male rats that received Ro 25-6981, an NR2B antagonist, before formalin injection showed significantly reduced pain responses to the formalin test compared with saline-injected control rats (P < 0.05). No gender differences in phasic pain responses were found in rats treated with Ro 25-6981. Conclusion These results suggest that cortical antagonism of the NR2B subunit reduces inflammatory pain levels in both genders of rat. PMID:22003303

  19. [NMDA-GluR Subunit Antibody-Positive Encephalitis: A Clinical Analysis of Five Cases].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Chikako; Shakespear, Norshalena; Tuchiya, Mario; Kubo, Jin; Yamamoto, Teiji; Katayama, Soichi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi

    2016-09-01

    Five consecutive cases of anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis that we encountered were marked by a rapidly fluctuating level of consciousness associated with psychotic and delirious mental states. Opisthotonus, catatonia, and rhythmic and non-rhythmic involuntary movements of the mouth and jaw were also characteristic features of these particular cases. Serious and potentially fatal problems included epilepsia partialis continua, partial and generalized seizures, and respiratory depression, resembling the symptoms of encephalitis lethargica. An epidemic of encephalitis lethargica, also known of Economo encephalitis, occurred around 1917. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema of the neocortex in two cases and electroencephalography showed polymorphic and monomorphic delta slowing in the acute stage, although electroencephalographic seizure activity were not apparent. Routine cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed lymphocyte-dominant pleocytosis in three cases, but antibodies against the NMDA-GluR subunit, GluN2B N-terminal, were at a high level in the fluid. All patients recovered without apparent sequelae. Two patients found to have ovarian teratoma underwent surgery for tumor removal. Treatments included pulse intravenous methylprednisolone, high-dose immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange together with seizure control and respiratory support. However, rituximab and or cyclophosphamide pulse therapy should also be considered for intractable cases, as indicated by recent reports. (Received February 16, 2016; Accepted May 2, 2016; Published September 1, 2016).

  20. NMDA receptor GluN2B (GluR epsilon 2/NR2B) subunit is crucial for channel function, postsynaptic macromolecular organization, and actin cytoskeleton at hippocampal CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kaori; Kakizaki, Toshikazu; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Fukaya, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Miwako; Abe, Manabu; Natsume, Rie; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji

    2009-09-02

    GluN2B (GluRepsilon2/NR2B) subunit is involved in synapse development, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function. However, its roles in synaptic expression and function of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in the brain remain mostly unknown because of the neonatal lethality of global knock-out mice. To address this, we generated conditional knock-out mice, in which GluN2B was ablated exclusively in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. By immunohistochemistry, GluN2B disappeared and GluN1 (GluRzeta1/NR1) was moderately reduced, whereas GluN2A (GluRepsilon1/NR2A) and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) were unaltered in the mutant CA3. This was consistent with protein contents in the CA3 crude fraction: 9.6% of control level for GluN2B, 47.7% for GluN1, 90.6% for GluN2A, and 98.0% for PSD-95. Despite the remaining NMDARs, NMDAR-mediated currents and long-term potentiation were virtually lost at various CA3 synapses. Then, we compared synaptic NMDARs by postembedding immunogold electron microscopy and immunoblot using the PSD fraction. In the mutant CA3, GluN1 was severely reduced in both immunogold (20.6-23.6%) and immunoblot (24.6%), whereas GluN2A and PSD-95 were unchanged in immunogold but markedly reduced in the PSD fraction (51.4 and 36.5%, respectively), indicating increased detergent solubility of PSD molecules. No such increased solubility was observed for GluN2B in the CA3 of GluN2A-knock-out mice. Furthermore, significant decreases were found in the ratio of filamentous to globular actin (49.5%) and in the density of dendritic spines (76.2%). These findings suggest that GluN2B is critically involved in NMDAR channel function, organization of postsynaptic macromolecular complexes, formation or maintenance of dendritic spines, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  2. Direct inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor function by antiglaucomatous beta-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tatsuo; Ueno, Susumu; Morita, Hirofumi; Kubota, Toshiaki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Masato; Tawara, Akihiko; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the direct effects of antiglaucoma drugs (timolol, betaxolol, pilocarpine, and latanoprost) on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor function using a Xenopus oocytes expression system and electrophysiological techniques. In oocytes expressing wild-type NMDA (NR1a/NR2A) receptors, timolol and betaxolol significantly inhibited glutamate-evoked currents, whereas less inhibition was obtained with pilocarpine, and latanoprost had few effects. Moreover, the effect of timolol and betaxolol was noncompetitive with respect to glutamate. Mutations that changed Asn616 of the NR1a subunit, a critical residue for Mg(2+) blocking of NMDA receptors, to Arg (N616R) or Gln (N616Q) almost eliminated the inhibitory effects of timolol and betaxolol, as well as the blocking effect of Mg(2+). Experiments were also carried out to examine the protective effects of timolol and betaxolol against death of oocytes expressing NMDA receptors. During incubation of oocytes, especially in Mg(2+)-free medium, cell death was induced by addition of glutamate because of the continuous activation of the NMDA receptors expressed. Timolol and betaxolol significantly improved oocyte viability when they were added during the incubation period. These results suggest that timolol and betaxolol may have an additional role that they directly inhibit NMDA-receptor function, possibly via N616 of the NR1a subunit.

  3. Influence of CGS 21680, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, on NMDA receptor function and expression in the brain of Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Antonella; Martire, Alberto; Armida, Monica; Chiodi, Valentina; Pézzola, Antonella; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-04-06

    The effect of chronic treatment with the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS 21680 on N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor function and expression has been studied in the striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice, a genetic mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). Starting from 8weeks of age, R6/2 and wild type (WT) mice were treated daily with CGS 21680 (0.5mg/kg i.p.) for 3weeks and the expression levels of NMDA receptor subunits were then evaluated. In addition, to study CGS 21680-induced changes in NMDA receptor function, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices from both R6/2 and WT mice was investigated. We found that CGS 21680 increased NR2A subunit expression and the NR2A/NR2B ratio in the cortex of R6/2 mice, having no effect in WT mice. In the striatum, CGS 21680 reduced NR1 expression in both R6/2 and WT mice while the effect on NR2A and NR2/NR2B expression was genotype-dependent, reducing and increasing their expression in WT and R6/2 mice, respectively. On the contrary, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices was not modified by the treatment in WT or HD mice. These results demonstrate that in vivo activation of A(2A) receptors modulates the subunit composition of NMDA receptors in the brain of HD mice.

  4. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  5. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S.; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W. Marie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  6. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Hydrocarbon molar water solubility predicts NMDA vs. GABAA receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pham, Trung L

    2014-11-19

    Many anesthetics modulate 3-transmembrane (such as NMDA) and 4-transmembrane (such as GABAA) receptors. Clinical and experimental anesthetics exhibiting receptor family specificity often have low water solubility. We hypothesized that the molar water solubility of a hydrocarbon could be used to predict receptor modulation in vitro. GABAA (α1β2γ2s) or NMDA (NR1/NR2A) receptors were expressed in oocytes and studied using standard two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Hydrocarbons from 14 different organic functional groups were studied at saturated concentrations, and compounds within each group differed only by the carbon number at the ω-position or within a saturated ring. An effect on GABAA or NMDA receptors was defined as a 10% or greater reversible current change from baseline that was statistically different from zero. Hydrocarbon moieties potentiated GABAA and inhibited NMDA receptor currents with at least some members from each functional group modulating both receptor types. A water solubility cut-off for NMDA receptors occurred at 1.1 mM with a 95% CI = 0.45 to 2.8 mM. NMDA receptor cut-off effects were not well correlated with hydrocarbon chain length or molecular volume. No cut-off was observed for GABAA receptors within the solubility range of hydrocarbons studied. Hydrocarbon modulation of NMDA receptor function exhibits a molar water solubility cut-off. Differences between unrelated receptor cut-off values suggest that the number, affinity, or efficacy of protein-hydrocarbon interactions at these sites likely differ.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of NMDA-like receptors in the single-celled organism Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, Paola; Candiani, Simona; Pittaluga, Anna Maria; Usai, Cesare; Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Milanese, Marco; Faimali, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2014-02-01

    Paramecium primaurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that moves in freshwater by ciliary beating and responds to environmental stimuli by altering motile behaviour. The movements of the cilia are controlled by the electrical changes of the cell membrane: when the intraciliary Ca(2+) concentration associated with plasma membrane depolarization increases, the ciliary beating reverses its direction, and consequently the swimming direction changes. The ciliary reversal duration is correlated with the amount of Ca(2+) influx. Here, we evaluated the effects due to the activation or blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on swimming behaviour in Paramecium. Paramecia normally swim forward, drawing almost linear tracks. We observed that the simultaneous administration of NMDA and glycine induced a partial ciliary reversal (PaCR) leading to a continuous spiral-like swim. Furthermore, the duration of continuous ciliary reversal (CCR), triggered by high external KCl concentrations, was longer in NMDA+glycine-treated cells. NMDA action required the presence of Ca(2+), as the normal forward swimming was restored when the ion was omitted from the extracellular milieu. The PaCR and the enhancement of CCR duration significantly decreased when the antagonists of the glutamate site D-AP5 or CGS19755, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 or the glycine site antagonist DCKA was added. The action of NMDA+glycine was also abolished by Zn(2+) or ifenprodil, the GluN2A and the GluN2B NMDA-containing subunit blockers, respectively. Searches of the Paramecium genome database currently available indicate that the NMDA-like receptor with ligand-binding characteristics of an NMDA receptor-like complex, purified from rat brain synaptic membranes and found in some metazoan genomes, is also present in Paramecium. These results provide evidence that functional NMDA receptors similar to those typical of mammalian neuronal cells are present in the single-celled organism Paramecium and thus

  10. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors to rat neocortical neurons that contain either NMDA receptor 2B or 2A subunits.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2011-09-30

    Because of the numerous types of neurons in the brain, and particularly the forebrain, neuron type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two most promising approaches for achieving neuron type-specific expression are targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron and using a neuron type-specific promoter. We previously developed antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors by modifying glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which mediates the initial binding of HSV-1 particles to many cell types, with the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. We showed that a chimeric gC-ZZ protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds IgG. As a proof-of-principle for antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer, we isolated complexes of these vector particles and an anti-NMDA NR1 subunit antibody, and demonstrated targeted gene transfer to neocortical cells that contain NR1 subunits. However, because most forebrain neurons contain NR1, we obtained only a modest increase in the specificity of gene transfer, and this targeting specificity is of limited utility for physiological experiments. Here, we report efficient antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR2B- or NR2A-containing cells in rat postrhinal cortex, and a neuron-specific promoter further restricted recombinant expression to neurons. Of note, because NR2A-containing neurons are relatively rare, these results show that antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with HSV-1 vectors containing neuron type-specific promoters can restrict recombinant expression to specific types of forebrain neurons of physiological significance.

  11. Peripheral NMDA and non-NMDA receptors contribute to nociception: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Wang, Y; Zhao, Z

    2000-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of peripheral administration of N-methy-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptor antagonists on C-fiber evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in the spinalized rats. When DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) (10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM, 20 microl) or 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (DNQX) (1 mM, 0.1 mM, 0.01 mM, 20 microl) was subcutaneously injected into the receptive field on the hindplantar region, C-fiber evoked responses of the dorsal horn neurons were profoundly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Three hours after subcutaneous injection of carrageenan into the ipsilateral hindpaw, NMDA and non-NMDA antagonist-induced inhibition of C-fiber evoked responses was more potent than that in the normal rat (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). In the carragenan-treated rats, DNQX-induced inhibition was stronger than AP-5-induced one (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). The results suggest that peripheral NMDA and non-NMDA receptors are involved in mediating excitation of nociceptors.

  12. Activity-dependent anchoring of importin α at the synapse involves regulated binding to the cytoplasmic tail of the NR1-1a subunit of the NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Rachel A.; Ch'ng, Toh Hean; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Martin, Kelsey C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Synaptic plasticity, the capacity of neurons to change the strength of their connections with experience, provides a mechanism for learning and memory in the brain. Long-term plasticity requires new transcription, indicating that synaptically generated signals must be transported to the nucleus. Previous studies have described a role for importin nuclear transport adaptors in mediating the retrograde transport of signals from synapse to nucleus during plasticity. Here, we investigated the possibility that stimulus-induced translocation of importins from synapse to nucleus involves activity-dependent anchoring of importins at the synapse. We show that importin a binds to a nuclear localization signal (NLS) present in the cytoplasmic tail of NR1-1a. This interaction is disrupted by activation of NMDA receptors in cultured neurons and by stimuli that trigger late-phase, but not early phase LTP, of CA3-CA1 synapses in acute hippocampal slices. In vitro PKC phosphorylation of GST-NR1-1a abolishes its ability to bind importin α in brain lysates, and the interaction of importin α and NR1 in neurons is modulated by PKC activity. Together, our results indicate that importin α is tethered at the PSD by binding to the NLS present in NR1-1a. This interaction is activity dependent, with importin α being released following NMDA receptor and phosphorylation rendering it available to bind soluble cargoes and transport them to the nucleus during transcription-dependent forms of neuronal plasticity. PMID:20016075

  13. Scopolamine administration modulates muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Deli, Alev; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the effect of scopolamine on memory are abundant but so far only regulation of the muscarinic receptor (M1) has been reported. We hypothesized that levels of other cholinergic brain receptors as the nicotinic receptors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, known to be involved in memory formation, would be modified by scopolamine administration.C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments and divided into four groups. Two groups were given scopolamine 1 mg/kg i.p. (the first group was trained and the second group untrained) in the multiple T-maze (MTM), a paradigm for evaluation of spatial memory. Likewise, vehicle-treated mice were trained or untrained thus serving as controls. Hippocampal levels of M1, nicotinic receptor alpha 4 (Nic4) and 7 (Nic7) and subunit NR1containing complexes were determined by immunoblotting on blue native gel electrophoresis.Vehicle-treated trained mice learned the task and showed memory retrieval on day 8, while scopolamine-treatment led to significant impairment of performance in the MTM. At the day of retrieval, hippocampal levels for M1, Nic7 and NR1 were higher in the scopolamine treated groups than in vehicle-treated groups.The concerted action, i.e. the pattern of four brain receptor complexes regulated by the anticholinergic compound scopolamine, is shown. Insight into probable action mechanisms of scopolamine at the brain receptor complex level in the hippocampus is provided. Scopolamine treatment is a standard approach to test cognitive enhancers and other psychoactive compounds in pharmacological studies and therefore knowledge on mechanisms is of pivotal interest.

  14. Targeting of NMDA receptors in new treatments for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, although the precise mechanisms are unknown. The author examines the role of the NMDA receptor in schizophrenia, focusing on results from preclinical and clinical studies that support the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia. The author first reviewed papers detailing alterations in the levels of endogenous substances such as glutamine, glutamate, d-serine, l-serine, kynurenic acid and glutathione (GSH), all of which can affect NMDA receptor function. Next, the author reviewed clinical findings for glycine, d-serine, d-cycloserine, d-amino acid oxidase inhibitors (e.g., sodium benzoate) and glycine transporter-1 inhibitors (e.g., sarcosine, bitopertin), as potential therapeutic drugs. In addition, the author outlined how oxidative stress associated with decreased levels of the endogenous antioxidant GSH may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Finally, the author reviewed N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH and an activator of the cystine-glutamate antiporter, as a potential therapeutic drug. Given the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia, the glycine modulatory site on NMDA receptors is the most attractive therapeutic target for this disease. In addition, both the kynurenine pathway and cystine-glutamate antiporter represent credible potential therapeutic targets for schizophrenia.

  15. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  16. NMDA receptors in the rat VTA: a critical site for social stress to intensify cocaine taking.

    PubMed

    Covington, Herbert E; Tropea, Thomas F; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Kosofsky, Barry E; Miczek, Klaus A

    2008-04-01

    Cocaine strengthens behaviors associated with its administration. The stress response by individuals that are defeated in a brief aggressive confrontation can also promote enduring behavioral consequences similar to those of stimulants. The study intends to find whether intermittent episodes of defeat promote cocaine's reinforcing effects by triggering N-methyl-D: -aspartic acid (NMDA)-receptor-mediated plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Long-Evans rats were investigated after four social defeats in three experiments. Two experiments examined systemic or intra-VTA antagonism of NMDA receptors during stress on the later expression of behavioral sensitization and cocaine self-administration during fixed and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement (0.3 mg/kg/infusion), including a novel 24-h variable-dose continuous access binge (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg/infusion, delivered in an irregular sequence). Third, the expression of receptor proteins NR1 (NMDA) and GluR1 [alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)] were examined in VTA and nucleus accumbens. Intermittent defeats augment locomotor responses to cocaine and increase cocaine taking. Rates of responding during binges are increased after defeat stress. These effects are prevented when NMDA or AMPA receptor antagonists are administered before defeats. VTA infusions of the NMDA antagonist AP-5 (5 nmol/side) before stress prevents locomotor sensitization to cocaine and intensified responding for cocaine during a PR schedule or binge. Episodic defeats increase GluR1 AMPA subunit protein expression in the VTA. Social stress stimulates NMDA receptors in the VTA, and this neural action of defeat may be essential for prompting a later increase in cocaine intake during binges.

  17. A specialized NMDA receptor function in layer 5 recurrent microcircuitry of the adult rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaixing; Stradtman, George G.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2008-01-01

    In the prefrontal cortex, NMDA receptors are important for normal prefrontal functions such as working memory, and their dysfunction plays a key role in the pathological processes of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Little is known, however, about the synaptic properties of NMDA receptors in the local circuits of recurrent excitation, a leading candidate mechanism underlying working memory. We investigated the NMDA receptor-mediated currents at monosynaptic connections between pairs of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that NMDA receptor-mediated currents at prefrontal synapses in the adult, but not young, rats exhibit a twofold longer decay time-constant and temporally summate a train of stimuli more effectively, compared to those in the primary visual cortex. Experiments with pharmacological, immunocytochemical, and biochemical approaches further suggest that, in the adult animals, neurons express significantly more NR2B subunits in the prefrontal cortex than the visual cortex. The NR2B-rich synapses in the prefrontal circuitry may be critically implicated in online cognitive computations and plasticity in learning, as well as psychiatric disorders. PMID:18922773

  18. Cortical hypometabolism demonstrated by PET in relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sekhar C; Gill, Deepak; Webster, Richard; Howman-Giles, Robert; Dale, Russell C

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly defined type of autoimmune encephalitis. Two girls (age 3 years, case 1, and 7 years, case 2) with relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis each had the classic clinical features of encephalopathy, movement disorders, psychiatric symptoms, seizures, insomnia, and mild autonomic dysfunction. Both patients had persistent neuropsychiatric disability, despite immune therapies. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed during clinical relapse at 6 weeks (case 1) and 5 months (case 2). In both cases, the scans demonstrated reduced fluorodeoxyglucose metabolism in the cerebral cortex, with the temporal regions being most affected. PET imaging was more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. In contrast, the one previous report of acute NMDA receptor encephalitis indicated cortical hypermetabolism. Thus, NMDA receptor encephalitis may be associated with variable PET findings, possibly dependent upon the timing of the study, or other factors. Future studies should investigate whether cortical hypometabolism is associated with a relapsing course, and whether it is predictive of a poorer outcome in NMDA receptor encephalitis.

  19. Olfactory bulb glomerular NMDA receptors mediate olfactory nerve potentiation and odor preference learning in the neonate rat.

    PubMed

    Lethbridge, Rebecca; Hou, Qinlong; Harley, Carolyn W; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Rat pup odor preference learning follows pairing of bulbar beta-adrenoceptor activation with olfactory input. We hypothesize that NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated olfactory input to mitral cells is enhanced during training, such that increased calcium facilitates and shapes the critical cAMP pattern. Here, we demonstrate, in vitro, that olfactory nerve stimulation, at sniffing frequencies, paired with beta-adrenoceptor activation, potentiates olfactory nerve-evoked mitral cell firing. This potentiation is blocked by a NMDAR antagonist and by increased inhibition. Glomerular disinhibition also induces NMDAR-sensitive potentiation. In vivo, in parallel, behavioral learning is prevented by glomerular infusion of an NMDAR antagonist or a GABA(A) receptor agonist. A glomerular GABA(A) receptor antagonist paired with odor can induce NMDAR-dependent learning. The NMDA GluN1 subunit is phosphorylated in odor-specific glomeruli within 5 min of training suggesting early activation, and enhanced calcium entry, during acquisition. The GluN1 subunit is down-regulated 3 h after learning; and at 24 h post-training the GluN2B subunit is down-regulated. These events may assist memory stability. Ex vivo experiments using bulbs from trained rat pups reveal an increase in the AMPA/NMDA EPSC ratio post-training, consistent with an increase in AMPA receptor insertion and/or the decrease in NMDAR subunits. These results support a model of a cAMP/NMDA interaction in generating rat pup odor preference learning.

  20. Olfactory Bulb Glomerular NMDA Receptors Mediate Olfactory Nerve Potentiation and Odor Preference Learning in the Neonate Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Rat pup odor preference learning follows pairing of bulbar beta-adrenoceptor activation with olfactory input. We hypothesize that NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated olfactory input to mitral cells is enhanced during training, such that increased calcium facilitates and shapes the critical cAMP pattern. Here, we demonstrate, in vitro, that olfactory nerve stimulation, at sniffing frequencies, paired with beta-adrenoceptor activation, potentiates olfactory nerve-evoked mitral cell firing. This potentiation is blocked by a NMDAR antagonist and by increased inhibition. Glomerular dishinhibtion also induces NMDAR-sensitive potentiation. In vivo, in parallel, behavioral learning is prevented by glomerular infusion of an NMDAR antagonist or a GABAA receptor agonist. A glomerular GABAA receptor antagonist paired with odor can induce NMDAR-dependent learning. The NMDA GluN1 subunit is phosphorylated in odor-specific glomeruli within 5 min of training suggesting early activation, and enhanced calcium entry, during acquisition. The GluN1 subunit is down-regulated 3 h after learning; and at 24 h post-training the GluN2B subunit is down-regulated. These events may assist memory stability. Ex vivo experiments using bulbs from trained rat pups reveal an increase in the AMPA/NMDA EPSC ratio post-training, consistent with an increase in AMPA receptor insertion and/or the decrease in NMDAR subunits. These results support a model of a cAMP/NMDA interaction in generating rat pup odor preference learning. PMID:22496886

  1. Functional interactions between NMDA receptors and TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat masseter muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongseok; Saloman, Jami L.; Weiland, Gustave; Auh, Q-Schick; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y.

    2012-01-01

    NMDA and TRPV1 receptors that are expressed in sensory neurons have been independently demonstrated to play important roles in peripheral pain mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated whether the two receptor-channel systems form a functional complex that provides the basis for the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct application of NMDA induced a time dependent increase in mechanical sensitivity, which was significantly blocked when the muscle was pretreated with a specific TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810. The NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor and TRPV1 were co-expressed in 32% of masseter afferents in trigeminal ganglia (TG). Furthermore, NR1 and NR2B formed protein-protein complexes with TRPV1 in TG as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Calcium imaging analyses further corroborated that NMDA and TRPV1 receptors functionally interact. In TG culture, application of NMDA resulted in phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine or tyrosine, residues of TRPV1 in a time course similar to that of the development of NMDA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. The NMDA-induced phosphorylation was significantly attenuated by CaMKII and PKC inhibitors, but not by a PKA inhibitor. Consistent with the biochemical data, the NMDA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was also effectively blocked when the muscle was pretreated with a CaMKII or PKC inhibitor. Thus, NMDA receptors and TRPV1 functionally interact via CaMKII and PKC signaling cascades and contribute to mechanical hyperalgesia. These data offer novel mechanisms by which two ligand-gated channels in sensory neurons interact and reinforce the notion that TRPV1 functions as a “signal integrator” under pathological conditions. PMID:22609428

  2. Modulation of NMDA receptor expression in the rat spinal cord by peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting.

    PubMed

    Hama, A T; Unnerstall, J R; Siegan, J B; Sagen, J

    1995-07-31

    Excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the spinal cord consequent to peripheral injury has been implicated in the initiation of neuropathologic events leading to a state of chronic hyperexcitability and persistence of exaggerated sensory processing. In other CNS disease or injury states, NMDA-mediated neurotoxic damage is associated with a loss of NMDA receptors, and outcome may be improved by agents reducing NMDA activation. Previous findings in our laboratory have demonstrated that the transplantation of adrenal medullary tissue into the spinal subarachnoid space can alleviate sensory abnormalities and reduce the induction of a putative nitric oxide synthase consequent to peripheral nerve injury. In order to determine changes in NMDA receptor expression in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting, NMDA receptor binding using a high-affinity competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP-39653, and NMDAR1 subunit distribution using immunocytochemistry were investigated. Two weeks following peripheral nerve injury by loose ligation of the right sciatic nerve, either adrenal medullary or striated muscle (control) tissue pieces were implanted in the spinal subarachnoid space. Binding studies revealed a marked reduction in [3H]CGP-39653 binding at L4-L5 levels ipsilateral to peripheral nerve injury in control transplanted animals. In contrast, NMDA binding was normalized in adrenal medullary grafted animals. In addition, NMDAR1 immunoreactivity was reduced in both the dorsal horn neuropil and motor neurons of the ventral horn in animals with peripheral nerve injury, while levels in adrenal medullary grafted animals appeared similar to intact controls. These results suggest that adrenal medullary transplants reduce abnormal sensory processing resulting from peripheral injury by intervening in the spinal NMDA-excitotoxicity cascade.

  3. The NMDA receptor complex: a long and winding road to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wood, Paul L

    2005-03-01

    Advances in our basic understanding of inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission have provided the foundation for directed drug discovery programs to modulate inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synapses. Gamma-Amino butyric acid (GABA(A)) and NMDA receptors are complex ion channels formed by multiple protein subunits that act as binding sites for transmitter amino acids and as allosteric regulatory binding sites to regulate ion channel activity. In the case of the NMDA receptor complex, one such allosteric site binds the obligatory glycine and/or d-serine co-agonist. Historical data from preclinical and clinical studies of GABAergic agents have clearly demonstrated that direct receptor modulators lack sufficient therapeutic indices to warrant clinical utility. However, pharmacological modulation of allosteric sites of the GABA multimeric receptor has resulted in the clinical development of safe and efficacious agents, exemplified by the benzodiazepines. Research has also revealed a similar outcome for the NMDA receptor, with allosteric modulators demonstrating improved safety profiles in the modulation of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmission compared with direct NMDA receptor antagonists. First-generation EAA drugs were low affinity channel blockers of the NMDA multimeric receptor complex and included the anesthetic agent ketamine and the Alzheimer's drug memantine. As predicted by preclinical studies, direct NMDA receptor antagonists (eg, selfotel (Novartis AG) and high-affinity channel blockers (eg, dizocilpine) failed in the clinic as a result of narrow therapeutic indices. More recent efforts have focused on glycine/d-serine co-agonist function. These approaches include partial glycine agonists, in their agonist dose-range, for cognitive improvement and for treating schizophrenia. Such partial glycine agonists are also being advanced for the treatment of neuropathic pain in the antagonist dose

  4. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-06

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual effects of anandamide on NMDA receptor-mediated responses and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Hampson, A J; Bornheim, L M; Scanziani, M; Yost, C S; Gray, A T; Hansen, B M; Leonoudakis, D J; Bickler, P E

    1998-02-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand of cannabinoid receptors that induces pharmacological responses in animals similar to those of cannabinoids such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Typical pharmacological effects of cannabinoids include disruption of pain, memory formation, and motor coordination, systems that all depend on NMDA receptor mediated neurotransmission. We investigated whether anandamide can influence NMDA receptor activity by examining NMDA-induced calcium flux (deltaCa2+NMDA) in rat brain slices. The presence of anandamide reduced deltaCa2+NMDA and the inhibition was disrupted by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, pertussis toxin treatment, and agatoxin (a calcium channel inhibitor). Whereas these treatments prevented anandamide inhibiting deltaCa2+NMDA, they also revealed another, underlying mechanism by which anandamide influences deltaCa2+NMDA. In the presence of cannabinoid receptor antagonist, anandamide potentiated deltaCa2+NMDA in cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal slices. Anandamide (but not THC) also augmented NMDA-stimulated currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned NMDA receptors, suggesting a capacity to directly modulate NMDA receptor activity. In a similar manner, anandamide enhanced neurotransmission across NMDA receptor-dependent synapses in hippocampus in a manner that was not mimicked by THC and was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that anandamide can modulate NMDA receptor activity in addition to its role as a cannabinoid receptor ligand.

  6. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  7. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  8. Increased NMDA receptor inhibition at an increased Sevoflurane MAC

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sevoflurane potently enhances glycine receptor currents and more modestly decreases NMDA receptor currents, each of which may contribute to immobility. This modest NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at a minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) could be reciprocally related to large potentiation of other inhibitory ion channels. If so, then reduced glycine receptor potency should increase NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. Methods Indwelling lumbar subarachnoid catheters were surgically placed in 14 anesthetized rats. Rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane the next day, and a pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was measured in duplicate using a tail clamp method. Artificial CSF (aCSF) containing either 0 or 4 mg/mL strychnine was then infused intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-infusion baseline sevoflurane MAC was measured. Finally, aCSF containing strychnine (either 0 or 4 mg/mL) plus 0.4 mg/mL dizocilpine (MK-801) was administered intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-dizocilpine sevoflurane MAC was measured. Results Pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was 2.26%. Intrathecal aCSF alone did not affect MAC, but intrathecal strychnine significantly increased sevoflurane requirement. Addition of dizocilpine significantly decreased MAC in all rats, but this decrease was two times larger in rats without intrathecal strychnine compared to rats with intrathecal strychnine, a statistically significant (P < 0.005) difference that is consistent with increased NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane in rats receiving strychnine. Conclusions Glycine receptor antagonism increases NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. The magnitude of anesthetic effects on a given ion channel may therefore depend on the magnitude of its effects on other receptors that modulate neuronal excitability. PMID:22672766

  9. Increased NMDA receptor inhibition at an increased Sevoflurane MAC.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Robert J; Thiesen, Roberto

    2012-06-06

    Sevoflurane potently enhances glycine receptor currents and more modestly decreases NMDA receptor currents, each of which may contribute to immobility. This modest NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at a minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) could be reciprocally related to large potentiation of other inhibitory ion channels. If so, then reduced glycine receptor potency should increase NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. Indwelling lumbar subarachnoid catheters were surgically placed in 14 anesthetized rats. Rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane the next day, and a pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was measured in duplicate using a tail clamp method. Artificial CSF (aCSF) containing either 0 or 4 mg/mL strychnine was then infused intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-infusion baseline sevoflurane MAC was measured. Finally, aCSF containing strychnine (either 0 or 4 mg/mL) plus 0.4 mg/mL dizocilpine (MK-801) was administered intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-dizocilpine sevoflurane MAC was measured. Pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was 2.26%. Intrathecal aCSF alone did not affect MAC, but intrathecal strychnine significantly increased sevoflurane requirement. Addition of dizocilpine significantly decreased MAC in all rats, but this decrease was two times larger in rats without intrathecal strychnine compared to rats with intrathecal strychnine, a statistically significant (P < 0.005) difference that is consistent with increased NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane in rats receiving strychnine. Glycine receptor antagonism increases NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. The magnitude of anesthetic effects on a given ion channel may therefore depend on the magnitude of its effects on other receptors that modulate neuronal excitability.

  10. Amygdala Infusions of an NR2B-Selective or an NR2A-Preferring NMDA Receptor Antagonist Differentially Influence Fear Conditioning and Expression in the Fear-Potentiated Startle Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Within the amygdala, most N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors consist of NR1 subunits in combination with either NR2A or NR2B subunits. Because the particular subunit composition greatly influences the receptors' properties, we investigated the contribution of both subtypes to fear conditioning and expression. To do so, we infused the…

  11. Amygdala Infusions of an NR2B-Selective or an NR2A-Preferring NMDA Receptor Antagonist Differentially Influence Fear Conditioning and Expression in the Fear-Potentiated Startle Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Within the amygdala, most N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors consist of NR1 subunits in combination with either NR2A or NR2B subunits. Because the particular subunit composition greatly influences the receptors' properties, we investigated the contribution of both subtypes to fear conditioning and expression. To do so, we infused the…

  12. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  13. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  14. Attenuation of NMDA receptor activity and neurotoxicity by nitroxyl anion, NO-.

    PubMed

    Kim, W K; Choi, Y B; Rayudu, P V; Das, P; Asaad, W; Arnelle, D R; Stamler, J S; Lipton, S A

    1999-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the NO-related species, nitroxyl anion (NO), is produced in physiological systems by several redox metal-containing proteins, including hemoglobin, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), superoxide dismutase, and S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), which have recently been identified in brain. However, the chemical biology of NO- remains largely unknown. Here, we show that NO- -unlike NO*, but reminiscent of NO+ transfer (or S-nitrosylation)- -reacts mainly with Cys-399 in the NR2A subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to curtail excessive Ca2+ influx and thus provide neuroprotection from excitotoxic insults. This effect of NO- closely resembles that of NOS, which also downregulates NMDA receptor activity under similar conditions in culture.

  15. Identification of a single amino acid in GluN1 that is critical for glycine-primed internalization of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels with essential roles in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS. As co-receptors for glutamate and glycine, gating of the NMDA receptor/channel pore requires agonist binding to the glycine sites, as well as to the glutamate sites, on the ligand-binding domains of the receptor. In addition to channel gating, glycine has been found to prime NMDA receptors for internalization upon subsequent stimulation of glutamate and glycine sites. Results Here we address the key issue of identifying molecular determinants in the glycine-binding subunit, GluN1, that are essential for priming of NMDA receptors. We found that glycine treatment of wild-type NMDA receptors led to recruitment of the adaptor protein 2 (AP-2), and subsequent internalization after activating the receptors by NMDA plus glycine. However, with a glycine-binding mutant of GluN1 – N710R/Y711R/E712A/A714L – we found that treating with glycine did not promote recruitment of AP-2 nor were glycine-treated receptors internalized when subsequently activated with NMDA plus glycine. Likewise, GluN1 carrying a single point mutation – A714L – did not prime upon glycine treatment. Importantly, both of the mutant receptors were functional, as stimulating with NMDA plus glycine evoked inward currents. Conclusions Thus, we have identified a single amino acid in GluN1 that is critical for priming of NMDA receptors by glycine. Moreover, we have demonstrated the principle that while NMDA receptor gating and priming share a common requirement for glycine binding, the molecular constraints in GluN1 for gating are distinct from those for priming. PMID:23941530

  16. Src potentiation of NMDA receptors in hippocampal and spinal neurons is not mediated by reducing zinc inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z G; Pelkey, K A; Lu, W Y; Lu, Y M; Roder, J C; MacDonald, J F; Salter, M W

    1999-11-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase Src is known to potentiate the function of NMDA receptors, which is necessary for the induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. With recombinant receptors composed of NR1-1a/NR2A or NR1-1a/2B subunits, Src reduces voltage-independent inhibition by the divalent cation Zn2+. Thereby the function of recombinant NMDA receptors is potentiated by Src only when the Zn2+ level is sufficient to cause tonic inhibition. Here we investigated whether the Src-induced potentiation of NMDA receptor function in neurons is caused by reducing voltage-independent Zn2+ inhibition. Whereas chelating extracellular Zn2+ blocked the Src-induced potentiation of NR1-1a/2A receptors, we found that Zn2+ chelation did not affect the potentiation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) currents by Src applied into hippocampal CA1 or CA3 neurons. Moreover, Src did not alter the Zn2+ concentration-inhibition relationship for NMDAR currents in CA1 or CA3 neurons. Also, chelating extracellular Zn2+ did not prevent the upregulation of NMDA single-channel activity by endogenous Src in membrane patches from spinal dorsal horn neurons. Taking these results together we conclude that Src-induced potentiation of NMDAR currents is not mediated by reducing Zn2+ inhibition in hippocampal and dorsal horn neurons.

  17. [Two cases of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazue; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Matsuoka, Tadasu; Kido, Mikio; Uehara, Takashi; Suzuki, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, reported by Dalmau et al., is a paraneoplastic encephalitis frequently associated with ovarian teratoma. After the manifestation of schizophrenia-like psychotic symptoms in the initial stage, serious neurological symptoms such as convulsions and central hypoventilation develop. We report two cases of 17-year-old girls with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis who exhibited different clinical courses. Case 1 showed a typical course of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis associated with sustained consciousness disturbance requiring long-term artificial respiration. Case 2 underwent surgery for an ovarian teratoma in the early stages of the disorder, did not show convulsions or central hypoventilation, and recovered without any sequelae. Early resection of the ovarian teratoma and the immune suppression therapy may have contributed to the rapid recovery and favorable outcome in case 2. Psychiatrists are the first to see a majority of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis because of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral changes observed in the initial stage. For successful treatment, psychiatrists need to cooperate with neurologists and gynecologists early in the course of this disorder. Psychiatrists' knowledge of the symptoms and clinical course of this form of encephalitis is essential for early detection and adequate treatment, which may be life-saving and contribute to good functional outcomes.

  18. Thinking outside the synapse: glycine at extrasynaptic NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Gray, John A; Nicoll, Roger A

    2012-08-03

    In this issue, Papouin et al. show that glycine is the endogenous coagonist for extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), unlike at synapses where the coagonist is d-serine. By enzymatically degrading endogenous glycine, they begin to address the enigmatic physiological and pathological roles for extrasynaptic NMDARs.

  19. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  20. Coexpression of striatal dopamine receptor subtypes and excitatory amino acid subunits.

    PubMed

    Ariano, M A; Larson, E R; Noblett, K L; Sibley, D R; Levine, M S

    1997-08-01

    The striatal cellular coexpression patterns for the D(1A) and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and the ionotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-R1) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) (GluR1 and GluR2/3) receptor subunits were examined morphologically. Their coincidence was assessed by visualization of mRNA transcripts, localization of encoded receptor proteins, and binding analysis using concurrently paired methods of fluorescence detection. The findings indicated that 1) mRNA transcripts for both receptor systems were detected in the medium-sized neuron population, and the distribution of receptor message closely reflected protein and binding patterns, with the exception of the GluR1 subunit; 2) both DA receptor mRNA transcripts were coexpressed with each ionotropic EAA receptor subunit examined and with each other, and NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits also showed coincident expression; 3) D(1A) DA receptor protein was detected in neurons which coexpressed EAA subunit proteins; and 4) GluR2/3 and NMDA-R1 subunit proteins were coexpressed in medium-sized neurons which also demonstrated D2 DA receptor binding sites. These findings suggest morphological receptor "promiscuity" since the coexpression patterns between DA and EAA receptors were found in all permutations. The results provide a spatial framework for physiological findings describing functional interactions between the two DA receptor types and between specific DA and EAA receptors in the striatum.

  1. NMDA receptor gating of information flow through the striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pomata, Pablo E; Belluscio, Mariano A; Riquelme, Luis A; Murer, M Gustavo

    2008-12-10

    A role of NMDA receptors in corticostriatal synaptic plasticity is widely acknowledged. However, the conditions that allow NMDA receptor activation in the striatum in vivo remain obscure. Here we show that NMDA receptors contribute to sustain the membrane potential of striatal medium spiny projection neurons close to threshold during spontaneous UP states in vivo. Moreover, we found that the blockade of striatal NMDA receptors reduces markedly the spontaneous firing of ensembles of medium spiny neurons during slow waves in urethane-anesthetized rats. We speculate that recurrent activation of NMDA receptors during UP states allows off-line information flow through the striatum and system level consolidation during habit formation.

  2. NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference123

    PubMed Central

    Tokarski, Krzysztof; Bobula, Bartosz; Zygmunt, Magdalena; Smutek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Hess, Grzegorz; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Plasticity of the brain’s dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1D1CreERT2 mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1D1CreERT2 mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general. PMID:27294197

  3. NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Magdalena; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Bobula, Bartosz; Zajdel, Joanna; Jastrzębska, Kamila; Cieślak, Przemysław Eligiusz; Zygmunt, Magdalena; Sowa, Joanna; Smutek, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Engblom, David; Hess, Grzegorz; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity of the brain's dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1(D1CreERT2) mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1(D1CreERT2) mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general.

  4. Ischaemia differentially regulates GABAB receptor subunits in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cimarosti, Helena; Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced synaptic inhibition due to dysfunction of ionotropic GABAA receptors has been proposed as one factor in cerebral ischaemia-induced excitotoxic cell death. However, the participation of the inhibitory metabotropic GABAB receptors in these pathological processes has not been extensively investigated. We used oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) and NMDA-induced excitotoxicity as models to investigate whether ischaemia-like challenges alter the protein levels of GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Twenty-four hours after the insult both OGD and NMDA produced a marked decrease in the total levels of GABAB2 (~75%), while there was no significant change in the levels of GABAB1 after OGD, but an increase after NMDA treatment (~100%). The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (100 μM) was neuroprotective following OGD or NMDA treatment if added before or during the insult. GABAB receptors comprise heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and our results suggest that the separate subunits are independently regulated in response to extreme neuronal stress. However, because GABAB2 is required for functional surface expression, down-regulation of this subunit removes an important inhibitory feedback mechanism under pathological conditions. PMID:19328818

  5. Glutamatergic NMDA Receptor as Therapeutic Target for Depression.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Tuon, Talita; Titus, Stephanie E; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects approximately 121 million individuals globally and poses a significant burden to the healthcare system. Around 50-60% of patients with MDD respond adequately to existing treatments that are primarily based on a monoaminergic system. However, the neurobiology of MDD has not been fully elucidated; therefore, it is possible that other biochemical alterations are involved. The glutamatergic system and its associated receptors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD. In fact, the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a glutamate receptor, is a binding or modulation site for both classical antidepressants and new fast-acting antidepressants. Thus, this review aims to present evidence describing the effect of antidepressants that modulate NMDA receptors and the mechanisms that contribute to the antidepressant response.

  6. NMDA receptors and the differential ischemic vulnerability of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Benquet, Pascal; Raineteau, Olivier; Rietschin, Lotty; Kirbach, Sebastian W; Gerber, Urs

    2006-05-01

    Transient cerebral ischemia causes an inhomogeneous pattern of cell death in the brain. We investigated mechanisms, which may underlie the greater susceptibility of hippocampal CA1 vs. CA3 pyramidal cells to ischemic insult. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of ischemia, we found that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were enhanced in the more susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells and transiently depressed in the resistant CA3 pyramidal cells. The long-lasting potentiation of NMDA responses in CA1 cells was associated with delayed cell death and was prevented by blocking tyrosine kinase-dependent up-regulation of NMDA receptor function. In CA3 cells, the energy deprivation-induced transient depression of NMDA responses was converted to potentiation by blocking protein phosphatase signalling. These results suggest that energy deprivation differentially shifts the intracellular equilibrium between the tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that modulate NMDA responses in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. Therapeutic modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation may thus prove beneficial in mitigating ischemia-induced neuronal death in vulnerable brain areas.

  7. Intramuscular ketorolac inhibits activation of rat peripheral NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xu-Dong; Wong, Hayes; Svensson, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac has local anesthetic-like and peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist characteristics when administered at higher concentrations to masticatory muscle. It is not known if the ability to inhibit NMDA receptors is unique to diclofenac or shared by other NSAIDs. This study was undertaken to determine whether intramuscular injection of ketorolac or naproxen at concentrations that do not induce local anesthetic-like effects could attenuate jaw-closer muscle nociceptor discharge in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. It was found that ketorolac (5 mM) inhibited hypertonic saline-evoked nociceptor discharge, which suggests that at this concentration, ketorolac has local anesthetic-like properties. A lower concentration of ketorolac (0.5 mM), which did not affect hypertonic saline-evoked discharge, did inhibit nociceptor discharge evoked by NMDA. In contrast, naproxen (5 mM) did not alter hypertonic saline- or NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. Subsequent experiments revealed that ketorolac (0.5 mM) had no effect on nociceptor discharge evoked by αβ-methylene ATP, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or AMPA. The inhibitory effect of ketorolac did not appear to be related to cyclooxygenase inhibition, because the concentration of prostaglandin E(2) in the masticatory muscles 10 min after injection of either NSAID was not significantly decreased. The present study indicates that in vivo, ketorolac, but not naproxen, can antagonize NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge similarly to diclofenac. We speculate that structural similarities between ketorolac and diclofenac could account for the ability of these NSAIDs to inhibit NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. These properties may partly explain the analgesic effect of intramuscularly injected ketorolac in the clinic.

  8. The role of the PDZ protein GIPC in regulating NMDA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhaohong; Petralia, Ronald S; Fu, Zhanyan; Swanwick, Catherine Croft; Wang, Ya-Xian; Prybylowski, Kate; Sans, Nathalie; Vicini, Stefano; Wenthold, Robert J

    2007-10-24

    The NMDA receptor is an important component of excitatory synapses in the CNS. In addition to its synaptic localization, the NMDA receptor is also present at extrasynaptic sites where it may have functions distinct from those at the synapse. Little is known about how the number, composition, and localization of extrasynaptic receptors are regulated. We identified a novel NMDA receptor-interacting protein, GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus), that associates with surface as well as internalized NMDA receptors when expressed in heterologous cells. In neurons, GIPC colocalizes with a population of NMDA receptors on the cell surface, and changes in GIPC expression alter the number of surface receptors. GIPC is mainly excluded from the synapse, and changes in GIPC expression do not change the total number of synaptic receptors. Our results suggest that GIPC may be preferentially associated with extrasynaptic NMDA receptors and may play a role in the organization and trafficking of this population of receptors.

  9. Differential effects of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate on synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors are subunit- and pH-dependent in the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Khacho, Pamela; Wang, Boyang; Ahlskog, Nina; Hristova, Elitza; Bergeron, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Ischemic strokes cause excessive release of glutamate, leading to overactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and excitotoxicity-induced neuronal death. For this reason, inhibition of NMDARs has been a central focus in identifying mechanisms to avert this extensive neuronal damage. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), the most abundant neuropeptide in the brain, is neuroprotective in ischemic conditions in vivo. Despite this evidence, the exact mechanism underlying its neuroprotection, and more specifically its effect on NMDARs, is currently unknown due to conflicting results in the literature. Here, we uncover a pH-dependent subunit-specific action of NAAG on NMDARs. Using whole-cell electrophysiological recordings on acute hippocampal slices from adult mice and on HEK293 cells, we found that NAAG increases synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDAR EPSCs, while effectively decreasing extrasynaptic GluN2B-containing NMDAR EPSCs in physiological pH. Intriguingly, the results of our study further show that in low pH, which is a physiological occurrence during ischemia, NAAG depresses GluN2A-containing NMDAR EPSCs and amplifies its inhibitory effect on GluN2B-containing NMDAR EPSCs, as well as upregulates the surface expression of the GluN2A subunit. Altogether, our data demonstrate that NAAG has differential effects on NMDAR function based on subunit composition and pH. These findings suggest that the role of NAAG as a neuroprotective agent during an ischemic stroke is likely mediated by its ability to reduce NMDAR excitation. The inhibitory effect of NAAG on NMDARs and its enhanced function in acidic conditions make NAAG a prime therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic events.

  10. In vivo effects of antibodies from patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: further evidence of synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A severe encephalitis that associates with auto-antibodies to the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) was recently reported. Patients' antibodies cause a decrease of the density of NMDA-R and synaptic mediated currents, but the in vivo effects on the extracellular glutamate and glutamatergic transmission are unknown. Methods We investigated the acute metabolic effects of patients' CSF and purified IgG injected in vivo. Injections were performed in CA1 area of Ammon's horn and in premotor cortex in rats. Results Patient's CSF increased the concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular space. The increase was dose-dependent and was dramatic with purified IgG. Patients' CSF impaired both the NMDA- and the AMPA-mediated synaptic regulation of glutamate, and did not affect the glial transport of glutamate. Blockade of GABA-A receptors was associated with a marked elevation of extra-cellular levels of glutamate following a pretreatment with patients' CSF. Conclusion These results support a direct role of NMDA-R antibodies upon altering glutamatergic transmission. Furthermore, we provide additional evidence in vivo that NMDA-R antibodies deregulate the glutamatergic pathways and that the encephalitis associated with these antibodies is an auto-immune synaptic disorder. PMID:21110857

  11. In vivo effects of antibodies from patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: further evidence of synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Dalmau, Josep; Didelot, Adrien; Rogemond, Véronique; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2010-11-26

    A severe encephalitis that associates with auto-antibodies to the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) was recently reported. Patients' antibodies cause a decrease of the density of NMDA-R and synaptic mediated currents, but the in vivo effects on the extracellular glutamate and glutamatergic transmission are unknown. We investigated the acute metabolic effects of patients' CSF and purified IgG injected in vivo. Injections were performed in CA1 area of Ammon's horn and in premotor cortex in rats. Patient's CSF increased the concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular space. The increase was dose-dependent and was dramatic with purified IgG. Patients' CSF impaired both the NMDA- and the AMPA-mediated synaptic regulation of glutamate, and did not affect the glial transport of glutamate. Blockade of GABA-A receptors was associated with a marked elevation of extra-cellular levels of glutamate following a pretreatment with patients' CSF. These results support a direct role of NMDA-R antibodies upon altering glutamatergic transmission. Furthermore, we provide additional evidence in vivo that NMDA-R antibodies deregulate the glutamatergic pathways and that the encephalitis associated with these antibodies is an auto-immune synaptic disorder.

  12. Prenatal ethanol exposure modifies [3H]MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors: spermidine and ifenprodil.

    PubMed

    Honse, Yumiko; Randall, Patrick K; Leslie, Steven W

    2003-12-01

    It has been suggested that abnormalities seen in fetal alcohol syndrome are linked with NMDA receptor malfunction. Our laboratory has previously shown that prenatal ethanol treatment decreases [3H]MK-801 binding density at postnatal day 21, when NMDA receptor subunit protein levels were unaltered. Thus, the focus of the present study was to examine whether prenatal ethanol modifies native NMDA receptor levels. Cerebral cortices were taken from offspring born to three treatment groups of pregnant Sprague Dawley(R) rats: an ethanol group given an ethanol liquid diet during the gestational period, a pair-fed control group that received a liquid diet without ethanol, and an ad libitum group fed rat chow and tap water. Western blot studies were carried out at postnatal days 1, 7, 14, and 21 to examine total protein expression of NR1 and NR1b splice variants. NR2 subunit levels were examined by [3H]MK-801 binding studies using spermidine, an endogenous polyamine, and ifenprodil, a selective NR2B antagonist. [3H]MK-801 binding density was significantly reduced in prenatal ethanol-treated groups compared with ad libitum and pair-fed control groups. Spermidine increased [3H]MK-801 binding, although potentiation by spermidine was not significantly different among all three experimental groups. Furthermore, no significant differences in total protein expression of NR1 or NR1b splice variants were observed in cortical membrane homogenates at postnatal days 1 through 21. [3H]MK-801 binding in the presence of ifenprodil showed that prenatal ethanol treatment significantly decreased low-affinity ifenprodil binding. High-affinity ifenprodil binding was reduced in both pair-fed and ethanol-treated groups. These results suggest that prenatal ethanol treatment reduces [3H]MK-801 binding and that this reduction may be due to a decrease in NR2A subunits.

  13. NMDA Receptor Hypofunction Phase Couples Independent γ-Oscillations in the Rat Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Anver, Himashi; Ward, Peter D; Magony, Andor; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Hallucinations, a hallmark of psychosis, can be induced by the psychotomimetic N-methyl--aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists, ketamine and phencyclidine (PCP), and are associated with hypersynchronization in the γ-frequency band, but it is unknown how reduced interneuron activation associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction can cause hypersynchronization or distorted perception. Low-frequency γ-oscillations (LFγ) and high-frequency γ-oscillations (HFγ) serve different aspects of perception. In this study, we test whether ketamine and PCP affect the interactions between HFγ and LFγ in the rat visual cortex in vitro. In slices of the rat visual cortex, kainate and carbachol induced LFγ (∼34 Hz at 32°C) in layer V and HFγ (∼54 Hz) in layer III of the same cortical column. In controls, HFγ and LFγ were independent, and pyramidal neurons recorded in layer III were entrained by HFγ, but not by LFγ. Sub-anesthetic concentrations of ketamine selectively decelerated HFγ by 22 Hz (EC50=2.7 μM), to match the frequency of LFγ in layer V. This caused phase coupling of the two γ-oscillations, increased spatial coherence in layer III, and entrained the firing of layer III pyramidal neurons by LFγ in layer V. PCP similarly decelerated HFγ by 22 Hz (EC50=0.16 μM), causing cross-layer phase coupling of γ-oscillations. Selective NMDA receptor antagonism, selective NR2B subunit-containing receptor antagonism, and reduced D-serine levels caused a similar selective deceleration of HFγ, whereas increasing NMDA receptor activation through exogenous NMDA, D-serine, or mGluR group 1 agonism selectively accelerated HFγ. The NMDA receptor hypofunction-induced phase coupling of the normally independent γ-generating networks is likely to cause abnormal cross-layer interactions, which may distort perceptions due to aberrant matching of top-down information with bottom-up information. If decelerated HFγ and subsequent cross-layer synchronization

  14. NMDA and PACAP Receptor Signaling Interact to Mediate Retinal-Induced SCN Cellular Rhythmicity in the Absence of Light

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Ian C.; Coolen, Lique M.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    The “core” region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a central clock responsible for coordinating circadian rhythms, shows a daily rhythm in phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (pERK). This cellular rhythm persists under constant darkness and, despite the absence of light, is dependent upon inputs from the eye. The neural signals driving this rhythmicity remain unknown and here the roles of glutamate and PACAP are examined. First, rhythmic phosphorylation of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit (pNR1, a marker for receptor activation) was shown to coincide with SCN core pERK, with a peak at circadian time (CT) 16. Enucleation and intraocular TTX administration attenuated the peak in the pERK and pNR1 rhythms, demonstrating that activation of the NMDA receptor and ERK in the SCN core at CT16 are dependent on retinal inputs. In contrast, ERK and NR1 phosphorylation in the SCN shell region were unaffected by these treatments. Intraventricular administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 also attenuated the peak in SCN core pERK, indicating that ERK phosphorylation in this region requires NMDA receptor activation. As PACAP is implicated in photic entrainment and is known to modulate glutamate signaling, the effects of a PAC1 receptor antagonist (PACAP 6-38) on SCN core pERK and pNR1 also were examined. PACAP 6-38 administration attenuated SCN core pERK and pNR1, suggesting that PACAP induces pERK directly, and indirectly via a modulation of NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that, in the absence of light, retinal-mediated NMDA and PAC1 receptor activation interact to induce cellular rhythms in the SCN core. These results highlight a novel function for glutamate and PACAP release in the hamster SCN apart from their well-known roles in the induction of photic circadian clock resetting. PMID:24098484

  15. NMDA receptor phosphorylation at a site affected in schizophrenia controls synaptic and behavioral plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Devidze, Nino; Barengolts, Denis; Prostak, Naseem; Sphicas, Eleana; Apicella, Alfonso; Malinow, Roberto; Emamian, Effat S.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDAR) at serine (S) 897 is markedly reduced in schizophrenia patients. However, the role of NR1 S897 phosphorylation in normal synaptic function and adaptive behaviors are unknown. To address these questions we generated mice in which the NR1 S897 is replaced with alanine (A). This knock-in mutation causes severe impairment in NMDAR synaptic incorporation and NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission. Furthermore, the phosphomutant animals have reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission, decreased AMPAR GluR1 subunit in the synapse, and impaired long-term potentiation (LTP). Finally, the mutant mice exhibit behavioral deficits in social interaction and sensorimotor gating. Our results suggest that an impairment in NR1 phosphorylation leads to glutamatergic hypofunction that can contribute to behavioral deficits associated with psychiatric disorders. PMID:19776282

  16. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  17. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  18. A novel fluorescent GSH-adduct binds to the NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Pasqualotto, B A; Curry, K; Kim, S U; LeCompte, K A; Langmuir, M E

    1999-10-30

    In an attempt to develop various fluorescent probes to label glutathione (GSH) receptors, we have serendipitously synthesized a probe that binds to and antagonizes the NMDA receptor. Probe 1, a GSH adduct, displaces the competitive NMDA antagonist [3H]-CGP 39653 with a higher affinity than NMDA or cysteine in rat synaptic membranes. In recording experiments from a rat cortical 'wedge' preparation, Probe 1 reversibly blocks both NMDA- and cysteine-induced depolarization. In mixed astrocyte-neuron tissue culture preparations, Probe 1 labels parts of both cell bodies as well as processes. The present data suggest that Probe 1 binds to the NMDA receptor and antagonizes channel function.

  19. Extrasynaptic and synaptic NMDA receptors form stable and uniform pools in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2007-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation can trigger both long- and short-term plasticity, promote cell survival, and initiate cell death. A number of studies suggest that the consequences of NMDAR activation can vary widely depending on whether synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors are activated. Here we have examined the spatial distribution of NMDARs of CA1 pyramidal neurons in acutely dissected hippocampal slices. Using a physiological definition of extrasynaptic receptors as those not accessible to single release events, we find that extrasynaptic NMDARs comprise a substantial proportion of the dendritic NMDAR pool (36%). This pool of extrasynaptic NMDARs is stable and does not shuttle into the synaptic receptor pool, as we observe no recovery of synaptic current after MK-801 synaptic blockade and washout. The subunit composition of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor pools is similar at 3 weeks of age, with NR2B subunits present in both compartments. NR2B receptors are not enriched in the extrasynaptic compartment. Our data suggest that any role played by extrasynaptic NMDARs in synaptic transmission is dictated by their subcellular location rather than their subunit composition or mobility. PMID:17717018

  20. Extrasynaptic and synaptic NMDA receptors form stable and uniform pools in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2007-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation can trigger both long- and short-term plasticity, promote cell survival, and initiate cell death. A number of studies suggest that the consequences of NMDAR activation can vary widely depending on whether synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors are activated. Here we have examined the spatial distribution of NMDARs of CA1 pyramidal neurons in acutely dissected hippocampal slices. Using a physiological definition of extrasynaptic receptors as those not accessible to single release events, we find that extrasynaptic NMDARs comprise a substantial proportion of the dendritic NMDAR pool (36%). This pool of extrasynaptic NMDARs is stable and does not shuttle into the synaptic receptor pool, as we observe no recovery of synaptic current after MK-801 synaptic blockade and washout. The subunit composition of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor pools is similar at 3 weeks of age, with NR2B subunits present in both compartments. NR2B receptors are not enriched in the extrasynaptic compartment. Our data suggest that any role played by extrasynaptic NMDARs in synaptic transmission is dictated by their subcellular location rather than their subunit composition or mobility.

  1. NMDA receptor modulation of incidental learning in Pavlovian context conditioning.

    PubMed

    Stote, Deborah L; Fanselow, Michael S

    2004-02-01

    Rats exposed to a footshock show conditional fear when reexposed to the shock context. Immediate presentation of shock after placement in the context significantly reduces this fear. Preexposure to the context in the absence of shock, coupled with a minimum preshock interval during training, overcomes this immediate shock deficit. Because rats learn about the context during preexposure and express that learning after being reinforced, the context preexposure effect is an aversive analogue of latent learning. The authors examined the effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphovalerate (APV) on the facilitatory effect of context preexposure. Rats were preexposed to a chamber after APV administration. The next day they were placed in the same chamber without drug and received shock 35 s later. APV blocked the facilitatory effect of preexposure. Therefore NMDA receptors are important for contextual latent learning.

  2. Efficacies of treatments for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis include immunotherapy with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, or plasmapheresis as first-line treatments, immunotherapy with rituximab or cyclophosphamide as second-line treatments, and tumor removal. In this systematic review, we evaluated previous studies and examined the association between certain microRNAs and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis to investigate the performance of different treatment combinations. The efficacies of different combinations of treatments classified into the following four categories were compared: (I) intravenous immunoglobulin administration, (II) plasmapheresis or plasma exchange, (III) treatment with rituximab or cyclophosphamide and (IV) tumor removal. Statistical analyses showed that treatment combinations including at least two of these categories resulted in higher efficacy rates than treatment with a single form of therapy. These findings suggest that if a patient is not recovering, converting to other therapies is more likely to result in early recovery than continuing on the original therapy.

  3. Opposing roles of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in neuronal calcium signalling and BDNF gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2003-06-01

    Neuronal responses to electrical activity-induced calcium signals are specified by the localization of the calcium entry site and the spatial properties of the calcium transient. Calcium flux through NMDA receptors located in the synapse initiates changes in synaptic efficacy and promotes pro-survival events, whereas calcium flux through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors is coupled to cell death pathways. The dialogue between the synaptic NMDA receptors and the nucleus is also modulated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, which shut down activity of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and antagonize the increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression induced by synaptic NMDA receptors. The specification of the biological response by the localization of the receptor activated is a new concept in neuronal calcium signalling that can explain many of the opposing roles of NMDA receptors.

  4. Presynaptic NMDA receptors – dynamics and distribution in developing axons in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ishwar; Droubi, Sammy; Giovedi, Silvia; Fedder, Karlie N.; Bury, Luke A. D.; Bosco, Federica; Sceniak, Michael P.; Benfenati, Fabio; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During cortical development, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) facilitate presynaptic terminal formation, enhance neurotransmitter release and are required in presynaptic neurons for spike-timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD). However, the extent to which NMDARs are found within cortical presynaptic terminals has remained controversial, and the sub-synaptic localization and dynamics of axonal NMDARs are unknown. Here, using live confocal imaging and biochemical purification of presynaptic membranes, we provide strong evidence that NMDARs localize to presynaptic terminals in vitro and in vivo in a developmentally regulated manner. The NR1 and NR2B subunits (also known as GRIN1 and GRIN2B, respectively) were found within the active zone membrane, where they could respond to synaptic glutamate release. Surprisingly, NR1 also appeared in glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic vesicles. During synaptogenesis, NR1 was mobile throughout axons – including growth cones and filopodia, structures that are involved in synaptogenesis. Upon synaptogenic contact, NMDA receptors were quickly recruited to terminals by neuroligin-1 signaling. Unlike dendrites, the trafficking and distribution of axonal NR1 were insensitive to activity changes, including NMDA exposure, local glutamate uncaging or action potential blockade. These results support the idea that presynaptic NMDARs play an early role in presynaptic development. PMID:25526735

  5. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers’ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position. PMID:27114630

  6. NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine impairs feature integration in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Julia D I; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans.

  7. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers' critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position.

  8. Involvement of NMDA receptors in the ventrolateral striatum of rats in apomorphine-induced jaw movements.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Kiguchi, Motori; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Waddington, John L

    2010-03-31

    The role of NMDA receptors in the ventrolateral striatum to modulate dopamine receptor-mediated jaw movements was investigated in freely moving rats, using a magnetic sensor system combined with intracerebral microinjection of drugs. Apomorphine (1mg/kg i.v.) induced repetitive jaw movements that were reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, by bilateral microinjections of the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA (0.1 and 1mug/0.2mul bilaterally) into the ventrolateral striatum. Apomorphine-induced repetitive jaw movements were also reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, by bilateral microinjections of the NMDA receptor antagonists d-APV (0.01 and 0.1mug) or MK-801 (0.5 and 5mug). The inhibitory effect of NMDA (1mug) was reduced by co-administration of MK-801 (0.5mug). Microinjections of drugs into the ventrolateral striatum in the absence of apomorphine did not affect jaw movements. These results suggest that NMDA receptors in the ventrolateral striatum play an important modulatory role in the expression of dopamine receptor-mediated jaw movements. However, similar effects of NMDA and NMDA antagonists echo previous paradoxical findings and indicate that interactions between dopamine and NMDA receptors are complex and multifaceted. Cellular mechanism(s) may involve differential effects of NMDA agonism and antagonism on dopamine D1-like vs D2-like receptors and, possibly, on related GABAergic processes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in NMDA receptor-induced cyclic nucleotide synthesis regulate the age-dependent increase in PDE4A expression in primary cortical cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hajjhussein, Hassan; Suvarna, Neesha U.; Gremillion, Carmen; Judson Chandler, L.; O’Donnell, James M.

    2007-01-01

    NMDA receptor-induced cAMP and cGMP are selectively hydrolyzed by PDE4 and PDE2, respectively, in rat primary cerebral cortical and hippocampal cultures. Because cAMP levels regulate the expression of PDE4 in rat primary cortical cultures, we examined the manner in which NMDA receptor activity regulates the age-dependent increase in the expression of PDE4A observed in vivo and in vitro. Inhibiting the activity of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil blocked NMDA receptor-induced cGMP synthesis and increased NMDA receptor-induced cAMP levels in a manner that reduced PDE4 activity. Therefore, NR1/NR2B receptor-induced cGMP signaling is involved in an acute cross-talk regulation of NR1/NR2A receptor-induced cAMP levels, mediated by PDE4. Chronic inhibition of NMDA receptor activity with MK-801 reduced PDE4A1 and PDE4A5 expression and activity in a time-dependent manner; this effect was reversed by adding the PKA activator dbr-cAMP. Inhibiting GABA receptors with bicuculline increased NMDA receptor-induced cAMP synthesis and PDE4A expression in cultures treated between DIV 16 and DIV 21 but not in cultures treated between DIV 8 and DIV 13. This effect was due to a high tone of NMDA receptor-induced cGMP in younger cultures, which negatively regulated the expression of PDE4A by a PKG-mediated process. The present results are consistent with behavioral data showing that both PDE4 and PDE2 are involved in NMDA receptor-mediated memory processes. PMID:17407767

  10. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-dependent Intracellular Signaling and NMDA-induced Regulation of Postsynaptic Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Kulik, Akos; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Schäfer, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 is essential in neurons of the central nervous system, as was revealed by the analysis of conditional Lrp1-deficient mouse models. The molecular basis of its neuronal functions, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we show by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and postsynaptic density preparation that LRP1 is located postsynaptically. Basal and NMDA-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as NMDA target gene transcription are reduced in LRP1-deficient neurons. In control neurons, NMDA promotes γ-secretase-dependent release of the LRP1 intracellular domain (LRP1-ICD). However, pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed no direct interaction between the LRP1-ICD and either CREB or target gene promoters. On the other hand, NMDA-induced degradation of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 was impaired in the absence of LRP1, whereas its ubiquitination was increased, indicating that LRP1 influences the composition of postsynaptic protein complexes. Accordingly, NMDA-induced internalization of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 was impaired in LRP1-deficient neurons. These results show a role of LRP1 in the regulation and turnover of synaptic proteins, which may contribute to the reduced dendritic branching and to the neurological phenotype observed in the absence of LRP1. PMID:23760271

  11. Gene regulation by NMDA receptor activation in the SDN-POA neurons of male rats during sexual development.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Shao, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ke-Li; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Hsu, Chin

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify possible signaling pathways, which may play a role in prevention of neuronal apoptosis in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) after physiological activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Gene response to the blockage of the NMDA receptor by an antagonist (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate; MK-801) was screened after suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The results showed that differential screening after SSH detected the presence of some neurotrophic genes (RNA binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), alpha-tubulin) as well as apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, cytochrome oxidase subunit III) in the SDN-POA of male rats, which were down-regulated by blocking the NMDA receptor. The RT-PCR products of the aforementioned genes in MK-801-treated males were significantly less than that in untreated males. In particular, the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, including Bcl-2 protein, in male rats were significantly suppressed by MK-801 treatment. Moreover, the binding activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) was significantly higher in male rats than in females, but significantly diminished by blocking the NMDA receptor with MK-801 in male rats. No significant difference in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding activity was observed among untreated male, MK-801-treated male, untreated female and MK-801-treated female groups. These results suggest that genes regulated by NMDA receptor activation might participate in neuronal growth and/or anti-apoptosis, and support an important signaling pathway of NFkappaB activation and its target gene, Bcl-2, in preventing neuronal apoptosis in the SDN-POA of male rats during sexual development.

  12. Anti-NMDA Receptor antibody encephalitis with concomitant detection of Varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Solís, Natalia; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    The typical presentation of anti-NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate) receptor encephalitis involves young women with psychiatric, neurologic and autonomic symptoms; it is often associated with mature ovarian teratomas. NMDA receptor encephalitis has been described following Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. This case describes a classic presentation of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with the concomitant presence of Varicella zoster virus in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  13. Seroprevalence of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDA-R) autoantibodies in aging subjects without neuropsychiatric disorders and in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Busse, Stefan; Busse, Mandy; Brix, Britta; Probst, Christian; Genz, Axel; Bogerts, Bernhard; Stoecker, Winfried; Steiner, Johann

    2014-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-R) play a key role in learning and memory. Therefore, they may be involved in the pathophysiology of dementia. NMDA-R autoantibodies directed against the NR1a subunit of the NMDA-R, which were first identified as a specific marker for a severe form of encephalitis, cause a decrease in NMDA-Rs, resulting in cognitive impairment and psychosis. We examined the prevalence of NR1a NMDA-R autoantibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 24 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 20 patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD), and 274 volunteers without neuropsychiatric disorder. The latter cases showed an association of seropositivity with age. Notably, the overall seroprevalence was not statistically different between dementia patients and matched controls. Further analysis of the patient samples showed that four patients with AD and three patients with SIVD had positive NMDA-R IgM, IgG, and/or IgA autoantibody titers in serum. These patients suffered from psychosis (with the exception of one case). CSF samples were negative for NMDA-R autoantibodies. We conclude that the seroprevalence of NMDA-R-directed autoantibodies is age-related. It has to be clarified by larger studies whether NMDA-R autoantibodies in peripheral blood may predispose patients with AD and SIVD to susceptibility for psychotic episodes if disturbances of blood-brain-barrier integrity occur.

  14. Region-specific role for GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in injury to Purkinje cells and CA1 neurons following global cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Quillinan, Nidia; Grewal, Himmat; Deng, Guiying; Shimizu, Kaori; Yonchek, Joan C; Strnad, Frank; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2014-01-01

    Motor deficits are present in cardiac arrest survivors and injury to cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) likely contribute to impairments in motor coordination and post-hypoxic myoclonus. NMDA receptor mediated excitotoxicity is a well-established mechanism of cell death in several brain regions, but the role of NMDA receptors in PC injury remains understudied. Emerging data in cortical and hippocampal neurons indicates that the GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors signal to improve cell survival and GluN2B-containing receptors contribute to neuronal injury. This study compared neuronal injury in the hippocampal CA1 region to that in PCs and investigated the role of NMDA receptors in PC injury in our mouse model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR). Analysis of cell density demonstrated a 24% loss of PCs within 24 hours after 8 min CA/CPR and injury stabilized to 33% by 7 days. The subunit promiscuous NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 protected both CA1 neurons and PCs from ischemic injury following CA/CPR, demonstrating a role for NMDA receptor activation in injury to both brain regions. In contrast, the GluN2B antagonist, Co 101244, had no effect on Purkinje cell loss while protecting against injury in the CA1 region. These data indicate that ischemic injury to cerebellar PCs progresses via different cell death mechanisms compared to hippocampal CA1 neurons. PMID:25450957

  15. Distinct NMDA receptors provide differential modes of transmission at mossy fiber-interneuron synapses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2002-03-14

    Dentate gyrus granule cells innervate inhibitory interneurons via a continuum of synapses comprised of either Ca(2+)-impermeable (CI) or Ca(2+)-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Synapses at the extreme ends of this continuum engage distinct postsynaptic responses, with activity at CI synapses being strongly influenced by NMDA receptor activation. NMDARs at CI synapses have a lower NR2B subunit composition and a higher open probability, which generate larger amplitude and more rapid EPSCs than their CP counterparts. A novel form of NMDAR-dependent long-term depression (iLTD) is associated with CI-mossy fiber synapses, whereas iLTD at CP synapses is dependent on Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor activation. Induction of both forms of iLTD required elevation of postsynaptic calcium. Thus mossy fibers engage CA3 interneurons via multiple synapse types that will act to expand the computational repertoire of the mossy fiber-CA3 network.

  16. NMDA receptors and fear extinction: implications for cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Based primarily on studies that employ Pavlovian fear conditioning, extinction of conditioned fear has been found to be mediated by N-methyi-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. This led to the discovery that an NMDA partial agonist, D-cycloserine, could facilitate fear extinction when given systemically or locally into the amygdala. Because many forms of cognitive behavioral therapy depend on fear extinction, this led to the successful use of D-cycloserine as an adjunct to psychotherapy in patients with so-called simple phobias (fear of heights), social phobia, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and panic disorder. Data in support of these conclusions are reviewed, along with some of the possible limitations of D-cycloserine as an adjunct to psychotherapy.

  17. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  18. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis: a severe, multistage, treatable disorder presenting with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Stoecker, Winfried; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-02-01

    Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a severe, treatable and potentially reversible disorder presenting with memory deficits, psychiatric symptoms and seizures. Initially described in young patients with ovarian teratoma, the disease is meanwhile increasingly recognized also in women without tumours, in men and in children. The presence of anti-glutamate receptor (type NMDA) autoantibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid is specific for this novel and widely underdiagnosed disorder. Early recognition is crucial since prognosis largely depends on adequate immunotherapy and, in paraneoplastic cases, complete tumour removal. Indirect immunofluorescence using NMDA-type glutamate receptors recombinantly expressed in human cells is a highly competent method for diagnosing anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis.

  19. A Transmembrane Accessory Subunit that Modulates Kainate-Type Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; St-Gelais, Fannie; Grabner, Chad P.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Sumioka, Akio; Morimoto-Tomita, Megumi; Kim, Kwang S.; Straub, Christoph; Burlingame, Alma L.; Howe, James R.; Tomita, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Glutamate receptors play major roles in excitatory transmission in the vertebrate brain. Among ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate, NMDA), AMPA receptors mediate fast synaptic transmission and require TARP auxiliary subunits. NMDA receptors and kainate receptors play roles in synaptic transmission, but it remains uncertain whether these ionotropic glutamate receptors also have essential subunits. Using a proteomic screen, we have identified NETO2, a brain-specific protein of unknown function, as an interactor with kainate-type glutamate receptors. NETO2 modulates the channel properties of recombinant and native kainate receptors without affecting trafficking of the receptors and also modulates kainate-receptor-mediated mEPSCs. Furthermore, we found that kainate receptors regulate the surface expression of NETO2 and that NETO2 protein levels and surface expression are decreased in mice lacking the kainate receptor GluR6. The results show that NETO2 is a kainate receptor subunit with significant effects on glutamate signaling mechanisms in brain. PMID:19217376

  20. Spinal leptin contributes to the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by activating the STAT3-NMDA receptor pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fen; Cui, Yu; Guo, Ruixian; Chen, Jingfu; Guo, Runming; Shen, Ning; Hua, Xiaoxiao; Mo, Liqiu; Feng, Jianqiang

    2014-08-01

    Leptin, an adipokine synthesized mainly by non‑neuronal tissues, has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. It has been hypothesized that morphine tolerance and neuropathic pain share some common pathological mechanisms. The present study was designed to examine whether spinal leptin is implicated in the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance, and whether spinal leptin induces the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and the NR1 subunit of N‑methyl‑D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor, in morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats. The results demonstrated that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of a leptin antagonist (LA) prevented the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats. Further studies revealed that the levels of the spinal leptin and the leptin receptor (Ob‑R) were time‑dependently increased following chronic morphine treatment. Mechanistic examination indicated that chronic morphine triggered activation of the STAT3 pathway and an increase in the expression of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor, which was ameliorated by i.t. administration of AG490 [a Janus kinase (JAK)‑STAT inhibitor]. The increased activation of STAT3 and the NR1 subunit was markedly attenuated by i.t. treatment with LA. In addition, the spinal administration of AG490 or MK‑801 (a non‑competitive NMDA receptor inhibitor) blocked the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance. Taken together, these results have demonstrated, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that spinal leptin contributes to the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by activating the spinal STAT3‑NMDA receptor pathway.

  1. Recruiting extrasynaptic NMDA receptors augments synaptic signaling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2008-02-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation may promote cell survival or initiate cell death, with the outcome dependent on whether synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors are activated. Similarly, this differential activation has been proposed to govern the direction of plasticity. However, the physiological parameters necessary to activate extrasynaptic NMDARs in brain slices remain unknown. Using the irreversible use-dependent NMDAR antagonist MK-801 to isolate extrasynaptic NMDARs, we have tested the ability of short-stimulation trains from 5 to 400 Hz to activate these receptors on CA1 hippocampal slice pyramidal neurons. Frequencies as low as 25 Hz engage extrasynaptic NMDARs, with maximal activation at frequencies between 100 and 200 Hz. Since similar bursts of synaptic input occur during exploratory behavior in rats, our results demonstrate that "extrasynaptic" NMDARs regularly participate in synaptic transmission. Further, 175-Hz-stimulation trains activate all available synaptic and extrasynaptic dendritic NMDARs, suggesting these NMDARs act as synaptic receptors as needed, transiently increasing synaptic strength. Thus extrasynaptic NMDARs play a vital role in synaptic physiology, calling into question their status as "extrasynaptic."

  2. Sexually dimorphic development and binding characteristics of NMDA receptors in the brain of the platyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Yablonsky-Alter, E.; Banerjee, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated age- and gender-specific variations in properties of the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in a freshwater teleost, the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus). Prior localization of the immunoreactive (ir)-R1 subunit of the NMDAR protein (R1) in cells of the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a primary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus in the platyfish, suggests that NMDAR, as in mammals, is involved in modulation of the platyfish brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. The current study shows that the number of cells in the NOR displaying ir-R1 is significantly increased in pubescent and mature female platyfish when compared to immature and senescent animals. In males, there is no significant change in ir-R1 expression in the NOR at any time in their lifespan. The affinity of the noncompetitive antagonist ((3)H)MK-801 for the NMDAR is significantly increased in pubescent females while maximum binding of ((3)H)MK-801 to the receptor reaches a significant maximum in mature females. In males, both MK-801 affinity and maximum binding remain unchanged throughout development. This is the first report of gender differences in the association of NMDA receptors with neuroendocrine brain areas during development. It is also the first report to suggest NMDA receptor involvement in the development of the BPG axis in a nonmammalian vertebrate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  4. Sexually dimorphic development and binding characteristics of NMDA receptors in the brain of the platyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Yablonsky-Alter, E.; Banerjee, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated age- and gender-specific variations in properties of the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in a freshwater teleost, the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus). Prior localization of the immunoreactive (ir)-R1 subunit of the NMDAR protein (R1) in cells of the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a primary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus in the platyfish, suggests that NMDAR, as in mammals, is involved in modulation of the platyfish brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. The current study shows that the number of cells in the NOR displaying ir-R1 is significantly increased in pubescent and mature female platyfish when compared to immature and senescent animals. In males, there is no significant change in ir-R1 expression in the NOR at any time in their lifespan. The affinity of the noncompetitive antagonist ((3)H)MK-801 for the NMDAR is significantly increased in pubescent females while maximum binding of ((3)H)MK-801 to the receptor reaches a significant maximum in mature females. In males, both MK-801 affinity and maximum binding remain unchanged throughout development. This is the first report of gender differences in the association of NMDA receptors with neuroendocrine brain areas during development. It is also the first report to suggest NMDA receptor involvement in the development of the BPG axis in a nonmammalian vertebrate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Spontaneous hyperactivity in mutant mice lacking the NMDA receptor GluRepsilon1 subunit is aggravated during exposure to 0.1 MAC sevoflurane and is preserved after emergence from sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, A B; Kohno, T; Wu, J; Sakimura, K; Baba, H

    2008-12-01

    Patients who awake from sevoflurane anaesthesia with symptoms of agitation may have some underlying functional substrate that is sensitive to the low concentrations of anaesthetic encountered during emergence. One candidate for such a substrate could be neurocircuitry implied in the pathophysiology of both agitation and movement disorders with hyperactivity. We postulated that hyperactive animals would show a further increase in activity in the presence of low concentrations of volatile anaesthetics, such as sevoflurane. To confirm our hypothesis, we examined the effects of two subanaesthetic concentrations of sevoflurane, isoflurane and halothane (0.1 and 0.2 MAC (minimum alveolar concentration)) on spontaneous activity in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor GluRepsilon1 subunit knockout mice exhibiting locomotor hyperactivity in a novel environment and compared these results with those for wild-type controls. We also compared the effects of anaesthetic concentrations of sevoflurane (1.2 MAC) on mice activity during postanaesthesia recovery. Out of the three anaesthetics used, only sevoflurane administered at 0.1 MAC caused a significantly different response between the two experimental groups. Exposure to this subanaesthetic concentration of sevoflurane reduced the activity of wild-type mice, whereas mutant animals showed a further increase in hyperactivity. The effects of 1.2 MAC sevoflurane anaesthesia on mice activity during postanaesthesia recovery also differed significantly between the two genotypes. Exposure to anaesthetic concentrations of sevoflurane had a sedative effect on wild-type mice, whereas mutant mice preserved their high levels of activity upon emergence from the anaesthesia. The presence of an inherent anomaly in mutant mice that becomes more manifest during exposure to 0.1 MAC sevoflurane and is still present after the emergence from sevoflurane anaesthesia suggests the presence of and necessitates a search for some putative substrate that may, by

  6. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in a Patient with Previous Psychosis and Neurological Abnormalities: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Heekin, R. David; Catalano, Maria C.; Frontera, Alfred T.; Catalano, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder characterized by IgG autoantibodies directed against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA glutamate receptor. Psychiatric symptoms are common and include psychosis, mania, depressed mood, aggression, and speech abnormalities. Neurological symptoms such as seizures, decreased responsiveness, dyskinesias, and other movement abnormalities and/or autonomic instability are frequently seen as well. We present the case of a woman who was followed up at our facility for over 14 years for the treatment of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms. Initially, she presented with paresthesias, memory loss, and manic symptoms. Nine years later, she presented to our facility again, this time with left sided numbness, left eyelid droop, and word finding difficulties. Finally, five years later, she presented with manic symptoms, hallucinations, and memory impairment. During her hospitalization, she subsequently developed catatonic symptoms and seizures. During her stay, it was discovered that she was positive for anti-NMDA receptor antibodies and her symptoms responded well to appropriate therapy. This case demonstrates that it may be useful for clinicians to consider screening for anti-NMDA receptor antibodies in long-term patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms that have not adequately responded to therapy. PMID:26199781

  7. Blockade of NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Prevents BDNF Enhancement of Glutamatergic Transmission in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    Application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to hippocampal neurons has profound effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Both pre- and postsynaptic actions have been identified that depend on the age and type of preparation. To understand the nature of this diversity, we have begun to examine the mechanisms of BDNF action in cultured dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording during iontophoretic application of glutamate revealed that BDNF doubled the amplitude of induced inward current. Coexposure to BDNF and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 markedly reduced, but did not entirely prevent, the increase in current. Coexposure to BDNF and ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit antagonist, reproduced the response observed with AP-5, suggesting BDNF primarily enhanced activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors with a lesser effect on non-NMDA receptors. Protein kinase involvement was confirmed with the broad spectrum inhibitor staurosporine, which prevented the response to BDNF. PKCI19-31 and H-89, selective antagonists of PKC and PKA, had no effect on the response to BDNF, whereas autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, an antagonist of CaM kinase II, reduced response magnitude by 60%. These results demonstrate the predominant role of a specific NMDA receptor subtype in BDNF modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:10492007

  8. Subunit-Specific Trafficking of GABAA Receptors during Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, Howard P.; Joshi, Suchitra; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Brar, Jasmit; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed that a reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors (GABARs) contributes to the pathogenesis of status epilepticus (SE), a condition characterized by prolonged seizures. This hypothesis was based on the finding that prolonged epileptiform bursting (repetitive bursts of prolonged depolarizations with superimposed action potentials) in cultures of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons (dissociated cultures) results in the increased intracellular accumulation of GABARs. However, it is not known whether this rapid modification in the surface-expressed GABAR pool results from selective, subunit-dependent or nonselective, subunit-independent internalization of GABARs. In hippocampal slices obtained from animals undergoing prolonged SE (SE-treated slices), we found that the surface expression of the GABARβ2/3 and γ2 subunits was reduced, whereas that of the δ subunit was not. Complementary electrophysiological recordings from dentate granule cells in SE-treated slices demonstrated a reduction in GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition, but not tonic inhibition. A reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit, but not the δ subunit was also observed in dissociated cultures and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures when incubated in an elevated KCl external medium or an elevated KCl external medium supplemented with NMDA, respectively. Additional studies demonstrated that the reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit was independent of direct ligand binding of the GABAR. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of surface-expressed GABAR pool during SE is subunit-specific and occurs independent of ligand binding. The differential modulation of the surface expression of GABARs during SE has potential implications for the treatment of this neurological emergency. PMID:18322097

  9. Neuroprotective effect of estrogen: role of nonsynaptic NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shui-bing; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2013-04-01

    Excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Some studies reported that NR2A and NR2B play different roles in the central nervous system (CNS). The NR2A subunit is primarily found in the synapses and is required for glutamate-mediated neuronal survival. On the other hand, the NR2B subunit is primarily found in the extrasynaptic sites and is required for glutamate-mediated neuronal death in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Estrogen is a steroid hormone well known for its widespread effects such as neuroprotection in the brain. Classically, estrogen can bind to two kinds of nuclear receptors, namely, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and produce physiological and neuroprotective effects. Aside from nuclear receptors, estrogen has one membrane receptor, which can either be G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), Gq-mER, or ER-X. NMDA exposure clearly promotes NR2B subunit phosphorylation at Ser-1303 and causes neuronal cell death. GPR30 mediates rapid non-genomic effects to protect neurons against injury by inhibiting p-DAPK1 dephosphorylation, which inhibits NR2B subunit phosphorylation at Ser-1303. In addition, NMDA exposure and global ischemia activate the autophagy pathway and induce cell death, which are markedly blocked by the NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981. Thus, NR2B signaling, autophagy induction and cell death may be closely related. Ro 25-6981 inhibits the dissociation of the NR2B-Beclin-1 signaling complex and delays autophagy in vivo, thus confirming the link between NR2B signaling and autophagy. In short, ERα, ERβ, and GPR30 are involved in the neuroprotection of estrogen in the CNS. Additional research must be conducted to reveal the mechanism of estrogen action fully and to identify better targets for the development of more effective drugs. This

  10. Cholesterol modulates open probability and desensitization of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Korinek, Miloslav; Vyklicky, Vojtech; Borovska, Jirina; Lichnerova, Katarina; Kaniakova, Martina; Krausova, Barbora; Krusek, Jan; Balik, Ales; Smejkalova, Tereza; Horak, Martin; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the CNS. Although these receptors are in direct contact with plasma membrane, lipid–NMDAR interactions are little understood. In the present study, we aimed at characterizing the effect of cholesterol on the ionotropic glutamate receptors. Whole-cell current responses induced by fast application of NMDA in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were almost abolished (reduced to 3%) and the relative degree of receptor desensitization was increased (by seven-fold) after acute cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Both of these effects were fully reversible by cholesterol repletion. By contrast, the responses mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors were not affected by cholesterol depletion. Similar results were obtained in CGCs after chronic inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis by simvastatin and acute enzymatic cholesterol degradation to 4-cholesten-3-one by cholesterol oxidase. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that membrane fluidity increased after methyl-β-cyclodextrin pretreatment. However, no change in fluidity was observed after cholesterol enzymatic degradation, suggesting that the effect of cholesterol on NMDARs is not mediated by changes in membrane fluidity. Our data show that diminution of NMDAR responses by cholesterol depletion is the result of a reduction of the open probability, whereas the increase in receptor desensitization is the result of an increase in the rate constant of entry into the desensitized state. Surface NMDAR population, agonist affinity, single-channel conductance and open time were not altered in cholesterol-depleted CGCs. The results of our experiments show that cholesterol is a strong endogenous modulator of NMDARs. Key points NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are tetrameric cation channels permeable to calcium; they mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS and their excessive activation can lead to

  11. Visualization of NMDA receptor-dependent AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Cudmore, Robert H.; Lin, Da-Ting; Linden, David J.; Huganir, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) membrane trafficking plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. However, how AMPAR trafficking occurs in vivo remains elusive. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy in the mouse somatosensory barrel cortex, we found that acute whisker stimulation leads to a significant increase in the surface expression of the AMPAR GluA1 subunit (sGluA1) in both spines and dendritic shafts and small increases in spine size. Interestingly, initial spine properties bias spine changes following whisker stimulation. Changes in spine sGluA1 are positively correlated with changes in spine size and dendritic shaft sGluA1 following whisker stimulation. The increase in spine sGluA1 evoked by whisker stimulation is NMDA receptor dependent and long lasting, similar to major forms of synaptic plasticity in the brain. These results reveal experience dependent AMPAR trafficking in real time and characterize, in vivo, a major form of synaptic plasticity in the brain. PMID:25643295

  12. Non-ionotropic signaling by the NMDA receptor: controversy and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Gray, John A; Zito, Karen; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Provocative emerging evidence suggests that the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can signal in the absence of ion flux through the receptor. This non-ionotropic signaling is thought to be due to agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, independently of channel opening. Non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling has been proposed to be sufficient to induce synaptic long-term depression (LTD), directly challenging the decades-old model that prolonged low-level calcium influx is required to induce LTD. Here, we briefly review these recent findings, focusing primarily on the potential role of non-ionotropic signaling in NMDA receptor-mediated LTD. Further reports concerning additional roles of non-ionotropic NMDA receptor signaling are also discussed. If validated, this new view of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling will usher in an exciting new era of exploring synapse function and dysfunction.

  13. NMDA receptor blockade attenuates locomotion elicited by intrastriatal dopamine D1-receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Christian W; Walker, Paul D

    2004-07-01

    Previous behavioral studies suggest that the striatum mediates a hyperactive response to systemic NMDA receptor antagonism in combination with systemic D1 receptor stimulation. However, many experiments conducted at the cellular level suggest that inhibition of NMDA receptors should block D1 receptor-mediated locomotor activity. Therefore, we investigated the consequences of NMDA receptor blockade on the ability of striatal D1 receptors to elicit locomotor activity using systemic and intrastriatal injections of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 combined with intrastriatal injections of the D1 full agonist SKF 82958. Following drug treatment locomotor activity was measured via computerized activity monitors designed to quantify multiple parameters of rodent open-field behavior. Both systemic (0.1 mg/kg) and intrastriatal (1.0 microg) MK-801 pretreatments completely blocked locomotor and stereotypic activity elicited by 10 microg of SKF 82958 directly infused into the striatum. Further, increased activity triggered by intrastriatal SKF 82958 was attenuated by a posttreatment with intrastriatal infusion of 1 microg MK-801. These data suggest that D1-stimulated locomotor behaviors controlled by the striatum require functional NMDA channels.

  14. Behavioral Deficits and Subregion-Specific Suppression of LTP in Mice Expressing a Population of Mutant NMDA Receptors throughout the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Philip E.; Errington, Michael L.; Kneussel, Matthias; Chen, Guiquan; Annala, Alexander J.; Rudhard, York H.; Rast, Georg F.; Specht, Christian G.; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Morris, Richard G.M.; Bliss, Timothy V. P.; Schoepfer, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is an obligatory component of NMDARs without a known functional homolog and is expressed in almost every neuronal cell type. The NMDAR system is a coincidence detector with critical roles in spatial learning and synaptic plasticity. Its coincidence detection property is crucial for the induction of…

  15. Behavioral Deficits and Subregion-Specific Suppression of LTP in Mice Expressing a Population of Mutant NMDA Receptors throughout the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Philip E.; Errington, Michael L.; Kneussel, Matthias; Chen, Guiquan; Annala, Alexander J.; Rudhard, York H.; Rast, Georg F.; Specht, Christian G.; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Morris, Richard G.M.; Bliss, Timothy V. P.; Schoepfer, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is an obligatory component of NMDARs without a known functional homolog and is expressed in almost every neuronal cell type. The NMDAR system is a coincidence detector with critical roles in spatial learning and synaptic plasticity. Its coincidence detection property is crucial for the induction of…

  16. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Pin, Jean-Christophe; Pierre, Fabrice; Ciron, Jonathan; Iljicsov, Anna; Lamy, Matthias; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-MMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated encephalitis mainly affecting young women. We describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who developed a classical form of anti-NMDAR encephalitis during the 10th week of gestation. The patient had been treated with methylpredinsolone and intravenous immunoglobulins. Birth history of the child was normal, with normal APGAR score. The clinical symptoms of the patient have improved after a few months. This rare occurrence during pregnancy (only 9 other cases described) presents an opportunity to highlight the importance of making the earliest possible diagnosis of this treatable and potentially reversible encephalitis, and to educate gynecologists, psychiatrists, anesthetists, and neurologists on this potential cause of psychiatric and neurological manifestations during pregnancy. PMID:26131809

  17. Differential Regulation of GABAB Receptor Trafficking by Different Modes of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Gonzàlez-Gonzàlez, Immaculada M.; Luo, Jia; Cimarosti, Helena; Jacobs, Susan C.; Jaafari, Nadia; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory GABAB receptors (GABABRs) can down-regulate most excitatory synapses in the CNS by reducing postsynaptic excitability. Functional GABABRs are heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and here we show that the trafficking and surface expression of GABABRs is differentially regulated by synaptic or pathophysiological activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic NMDARs using a chemLTP protocol increases GABABR recycling and surface expression. In contrast, excitotoxic global activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDARs by bath application of NMDA causes the loss of surface GABABRs. Intriguingly, exposing neurons to extreme metabolic stress using oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) increases GABAB1 but decreases GABAB2 surface expression. The increase in surface GABAB1 involves enhanced recycling and is blocked by the NMDAR antagonist AP5. The decrease in surface GABAB2 is also blocked by AP5 and by inhibiting degradation pathways. These results indicate that NMDAR activity is critical in GABABR trafficking and function and that the individual subunits can be separately controlled to regulate neuronal responsiveness and survival. PMID:24425870

  18. An Increase in the Association of GluN2B Containing NMDA Receptors with Membrane Scaffolding Proteins Was Related to Memory Declines during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zamzow, Daniel R.; Elias, Valerie; Shumaker, Michelle; Larson, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    The NMDA receptor is an important component of spatial working and reference memory. The receptor is a heterotetramer composed of a family of related subunits. The GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor appears to be essential for some forms of memory and is particularly vulnerable to change with age in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. GluN2B expression is particularly reduced in frontal cortex synaptic membranes. The current study examined the relationship between spatial cognition and protein–protein interactions of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in frontal cortex crude synaptosome from 3, 12, and 26-month-old C57BL/6 mice. Aged mice showed a significant decline in spatial reference memory and reversal learning from both young and middle-aged mice. Coimmunoprecipitation of GluN2B subunits revealed an age-related increase in the ratio of both postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and the GluN2A subunit to the GluN2B subunit. Higher ratios of PSD-95/GluN2B and GAIP-interacting protein C-terminus (GIPC)/GluN2B were associated with poorer learning index scores across all ages. There was a significant correlation between GIPC/GluN2B and PSD-95/GluN2B ratios, but PSD-95/GluN2B and GluN2A/GluN2B ratios did not show a relationship. These results suggest that there were more triheteromeric (GluN2B/GluN2A/GluN1) NMDA receptors in older mice than in young adults, but this did not appear to impact spatial reference memory. Instead, an increased association of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors with synaptic scaffolding proteins in aged animals may have contributed to the age-related memory declines. PMID:23884936

  19. An increase in the association of GluN2B containing NMDA receptors with membrane scaffolding proteins was related to memory declines during aging.

    PubMed

    Zamzow, Daniel R; Elias, Valerie; Shumaker, Michelle; Larson, Cameron; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2013-07-24

    The NMDA receptor is an important component of spatial working and reference memory. The receptor is a heterotetramer composed of a family of related subunits. The GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor appears to be essential for some forms of memory and is particularly vulnerable to change with age in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. GluN2B expression is particularly reduced in frontal cortex synaptic membranes. The current study examined the relationship between spatial cognition and protein-protein interactions of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in frontal cortex crude synaptosome from 3, 12, and 26-month-old C57BL/6 mice. Aged mice showed a significant decline in spatial reference memory and reversal learning from both young and middle-aged mice. Coimmunoprecipitation of GluN2B subunits revealed an age-related increase in the ratio of both postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and the GluN2A subunit to the GluN2B subunit. Higher ratios of PSD-95/GluN2B and GAIP-interacting protein C-terminus (GIPC)/GluN2B were associated with poorer learning index scores across all ages. There was a significant correlation between GIPC/GluN2B and PSD-95/GluN2B ratios, but PSD-95/GluN2B and GluN2A/GluN2B ratios did not show a relationship. These results suggest that there were more triheteromeric (GluN2B/GluN2A/GluN1) NMDA receptors in older mice than in young adults, but this did not appear to impact spatial reference memory. Instead, an increased association of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors with synaptic scaffolding proteins in aged animals may have contributed to the age-related memory declines.

  20. Severely impaired learning and altered neuronal morphology in mice lacking NMDA receptors in medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Lisa R; Eldred, Kiara C; Quintana, Albert; Keene, C Dirk; Rose, Shannon E; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Thomas J; Palmiter, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is composed predominantly of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that integrate excitatory, glutamatergic inputs from the cortex and thalamus, and modulatory dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain to influence behavior. Glutamatergic activation of AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic receptors on MSNs is important for striatal development and function, but the roles of each of these receptor classes remain incompletely understood. Signaling through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in the striatum has been implicated in various motor and appetitive learning paradigms. In addition, signaling through NMDARs influences neuronal morphology, which could underlie their role in mediating learned behaviors. To study the role of NMDARs on MSNs in learning and in morphological development, we generated mice lacking the essential NR1 subunit, encoded by the Grin1 gene, selectively in MSNs. Although these knockout mice appear normal and display normal 24-hour locomotion, they have severe deficits in motor learning, operant conditioning and active avoidance. In addition, the MSNs from these knockout mice have smaller cell bodies and decreased dendritic length compared to littermate controls. We conclude that NMDAR signaling in MSNs is critical for normal MSN morphology and many forms of learning.

  1. Roles of presynaptic NMDA receptors in neurotransmission and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Larsen, Rylan S.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Paulsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) play pivotal roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. They facilitate presynaptic neurotransmitter release and modulate mechanisms controlling synaptic maturation and plasticity during formative periods of brain development. There is an increasing understanding of the roles of preNMDARs in experience-dependent synaptic and circuit-specific computation. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of compartment-specific expression and function of preNMDARs, and how they contribute to synapse-specific and circuit-level information processing. PMID:26726120

  2. Copper-dependent regulation of NMDA receptors by cellular prion protein: implications for neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stys, Peter K; You, Haitao; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate a wide range of important nervous system functions. Conversely, excessive NMDA receptor activity leads to cytotoxic calcium overload and neuronal damage in a wide variety of CNS disorders. It is well established that NMDA receptors are tightly regulated by a number of cell signalling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that NMDA receptor activity is modulated by cellular prion protein (PrPC) in a copper-dependent manner. Here we give an overview of the current state of knowledge concerning the novel concept of potent modulation of this receptor's kinetics by copper ions, and the interplay between NMDA receptors and PrPC in the context of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, pain and depression. PMID:22310309

  3. Chronic Stress Triggers Expression of Immediate Early Genes and Differentially Affects the Expression of AMPA and NMDA Subunits in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Anibal; Aguayo, Felipe I.; Aliaga, Esteban; Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Olave, Felipe A.; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolas A.; García-Pérez, Alexandra; Tejos-Bravo, Macarena; Rojas, Paulina S.; Parra, Claudio S.; Fiedler, Jenny L.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies in rats have demonstrated that chronic restraint stress triggers anhedonia, depressive-like behaviors, anxiety and a reduction in dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons. In this study, we compared the effect of repeated stress on the expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and stressed groups, and were daily restrained in their motion (2.5 h/day) during 14 days. We found that chronic stress promotes an increase in c-Fos mRNA levels in both hippocampal areas, although it was observed a reduction in the immunoreactivity at pyramidal cell layer. Furthermore, Arc mRNAs levels were increased in both dorsal and VH, accompanied by an increase in Arc immunoreactivity in dendritic hippocampal layers. Furthermore, stress triggered a reduction in PSD-95 and NR1 protein levels in whole extract of dorsal and VH. Moreover, a reduction in NR2A/NR2B ratio was observed only in dorsal pole. In synaptosomal fractions, we detected a rise in NR1 in dorsal hippocampus (DH). By indirect immunofluorescence we found that NR1 subunits rise, especially in neuropil areas of dorsal, but not VH. In relation to AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits, chronic stress did not trigger any change, either in dorsal or ventral hippocampal areas. These data suggest that DH is more sensitive than VH to chronic stress exposure, mainly altering the expression of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits, and probably favors changes in the configuration of this receptor that may influence the function of this area. PMID:28848384

  4. Chronic Stress Triggers Expression of Immediate Early Genes and Differentially Affects the Expression of AMPA and NMDA Subunits in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus of Rats.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Anibal; Aguayo, Felipe I; Aliaga, Esteban; Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Olave, Felipe A; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolas A; García-Pérez, Alexandra; Tejos-Bravo, Macarena; Rojas, Paulina S; Parra, Claudio S; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies in rats have demonstrated that chronic restraint stress triggers anhedonia, depressive-like behaviors, anxiety and a reduction in dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons. In this study, we compared the effect of repeated stress on the expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and stressed groups, and were daily restrained in their motion (2.5 h/day) during 14 days. We found that chronic stress promotes an increase in c-Fos mRNA levels in both hippocampal areas, although it was observed a reduction in the immunoreactivity at pyramidal cell layer. Furthermore, Arc mRNAs levels were increased in both dorsal and VH, accompanied by an increase in Arc immunoreactivity in dendritic hippocampal layers. Furthermore, stress triggered a reduction in PSD-95 and NR1 protein levels in whole extract of dorsal and VH. Moreover, a reduction in NR2A/NR2B ratio was observed only in dorsal pole. In synaptosomal fractions, we detected a rise in NR1 in dorsal hippocampus (DH). By indirect immunofluorescence we found that NR1 subunits rise, especially in neuropil areas of dorsal, but not VH. In relation to AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits, chronic stress did not trigger any change, either in dorsal or ventral hippocampal areas. These data suggest that DH is more sensitive than VH to chronic stress exposure, mainly altering the expression of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits, and probably favors changes in the configuration of this receptor that may influence the function of this area.

  5. Assemblies of glutamate receptor subunits with post-synaptic density proteins and their alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Di Luca, Monica; Calabresi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been implicated as a mediator of neuronal injury associated with many neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, brain trauma, dementia and neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. To this, non-selective NMDA receptor antagonists have been tried and have been shown to be effective in many experimental animal models of disease, and some of these compounds have moved into clinical trials. However, the initial enthusiasm for this approach has waned, because the therapeutic index for most NMDA antagonists is quite poor, with significant adverse effects at clinically effective doses, thus limiting their utility. More recently, the concept that the exact pathways downstream NMDA receptor activation could represent a key variable element among neurological disorders has been put forward. In particular, variations in NMDA receptor subunit composition could be important in different disorders, both in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cell death and in the application of specific symptomatic therapies. As to PD, NMDA receptor complex has been shown to be altered in experimental models of parkinsonism and in PD in humans. Further, it has become increasingly evident that the NMDA receptor complex is intimately involved in the regulation of corticostriatal long-term potentiation, which is altered in experimental parkinsonism. The following sections will examine the modifications of specific NMDA receptor subunits as well as post-synaptic associated signalling complex including kinases and scaffolding proteins in experimental parkinsonism. These findings may allow the identification of specific molecular targets whose pharmacological or genetic manipulation might lead to innovative therapies for PD.

  6. Status Epilepticus Impairs Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Hippocampus and Is Followed by Changes in Expression of NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, T Y; Zubareva, O E; Kovalenko, A A; Kim, K K; Magazanik, L G; Zaitsev, A V

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive deficits and memory loss are frequent in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Persistent changes in synaptic efficacy are considered as a cellular substrate underlying memory processes. Electrophysiological studies have shown that the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in the cortex and hippocampus may undergo substantial changes after seizures. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for these changes are not clear. In this study, we investigated the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal slices 24 h after pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus. We found that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 pyramidal cells is reduced compared to the control, while short-term facilitation is increased. The experimental results do not support the hypothesis that status epilepticus leads to background potentiation of hippocampal synapses and further LTP induction becomes weaker due to occlusion, as the dependence of synaptic responses on the strength of input stimulation was not different in the control and experimental animals. The decrease in LTP can be caused by impairment of molecular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity, including those associated with NMDA receptors and/or changes in their subunit composition. Real-time PCR demonstrated significant increases in the expression of GluN1 and GluN2A subunits 3 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus. The overexpression of obligate GluN1 subunit suggests an increase in the total number of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus. A 3-fold increase in the expression of the GluN2B subunit observed 24 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus might be indicative of an increase in the proportion of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. Increased expression of the GluN2B subunit may be a cause for reducing the magnitude of LTP at hippocampal synapses after status epilepticus.

  7. The role of NMDA receptors in human eating behavior: evidence from a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Perogamvros, Lampros; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Beatrice

    2012-06-01

    Research in animal models has implicated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) in the control of food intake. Until now, these findings have been not replicated in humans. Here we describe a 22-year-old woman with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and no prior neurological or psychiatric history. Her clinical course was marked by successive eating disorders: anorexia followed by hyperphagia. We propose that, much as they do in other animals, NMDARs in humans interact with the neuroendocrine, homeostatic, and reward systems controlling food intake in the central and peripheral nervous system structures related to feeding and satiety.

  8. Prenatal exposure of testosterone prevents SDN-POA neurons of postnatal male rats from apoptosis through NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H K; Yang, R C; Shih, H C; Hsieh, Y L; Chen, U Y; Hsu, C

    2001-11-01

    The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in mediating the effect of testosterone exposure prenatally on neuronal apoptosis in the sexual dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) of rats was studied. The endogenous testosterone was diminished by prenatal stress (PNS) or simulated by testosterone exposure (TE) to understand the effect of testosterone on NR(1) (a functional subunit protein of NMDA receptor) expression and neuronal apoptosis. To further study whether the testosterone, after being converted into estradiol, modulates NR(1) expression, 4-androstein-4-ol-3,17-dione (ATD; an aromatase inhibitor) was used to block the conversion of estradiol from testosterone. The expressions of the NR(1) mRNA and NR(1) subunit protein were quantified by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis, respectively. In addition, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, MK-801, was used to find out whether blockage of NMDA receptor affects the naturally occurring apoptosis in SDN-POA. The results showed the following. 1) Expression of perinatal NR(1) subunit protein in the central part of the medial preoptic area of male rats was significantly higher than that of females, especially on postnatal days 1 and 3. 2) The testosterone level of male fetuses on embryonic day 18 was significantly higher than that of females, while the testosterone level of TE females or PNS males was similar to that of intact males or intact females, respectively. 3) The apoptotic incidence of intact male rats was significantly less than that of females, and the apoptosis was stimulated by PNS in male or inhibited by TE in female. 4) The expression of NR(1) subunit protein could be inhibited by PNS or ATD-treatment in male, while stimulated by TE in female. 5) NR(1) mRNA showed no significant difference among intact male, PNS male, ATD-treated male, TE female and intact female rats. 6) The low apoptotic incidence of male rats was significantly increased when NMDA receptor was blocked by MK

  9. Contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to in vivo glutamate-induced calpain activation in the rat striatum. Relation to neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Perla; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes

    2008-08-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, can cause the death of neurons by a mechanism known as excitotoxicity. This is a calcium-dependent process and activation of the NMDA receptor subtype contributes mainly to neuronal damage, due to its high permeability to calcium. Activation of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, has been implicated in necrotic excitotoxic neuronal death. We have investigated the contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic receptors to calpain activation and neuronal death induced by the acute administration of glutamate into the rat striatum. Calpain activity was assessed by the cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein, alpha-spectrin. Caspase-3 activity was also studied because glutamate can also lead to apoptosis. Results show no caspase-3 activity, but a strong calpain activation involving both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Although neuronal damage is mediated mainly by the NMDA receptor subtype, it can not be attributed solely to calpain activity.

  10. IGF-1-Involved Negative Feedback of NR2B NMDA Subunits Protects Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Against NMDA-Induced Excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sun, Wei; Han, Song; Li, Jianing; Ding, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in neuronal polarity and axonal guidance. In our previous study, it was discovered that IGF-1 alleviated 50-μM NMDA-induced excitotoxicity against neuronal autophagy via depression of NR2B p-Ser1303 activation. However, it was found that NMDA at a higher dose did not cause neuronal autophagy. And, the performance of IGF-1 under severe excitotoxicity still needs to be clarified. In this study, we observed that IGF-1 can salvage the hippocampal neurons in an autophagy-independent manner after 150-μM NMDA exposure using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Western blot assay, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, over-activation of post-synaptic NMDARs was found with the whole-cell patch clamp recording method. In order to explore whether there is a positive feedback way for post-synaptic NMDARs and the different pathway caused by 150 μM NMDA, the phosphorylation level of Fyn and the phosphorylation site of NR2B were investigated. It was observed that NR2B p-Tyr1472 was increased by the activation of Fyn after 150-μM NMDA exposure. When the neutralizing antibody against NR2B p-Ser1303 was added into the medium, both the activations of Fyn and NR2B p-Tyr1472 were blocked, suggesting NR2B p-Ser1303 may be the initial step of NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. In addition, since IGF-1 can block the initial step of NR2B activation, its effect is concluded to continue with the development of excitotoxicity. Overall, this study strongly indicates that the relationship between different phosphorylation sites of NR2B should be laid more emphasis on, which may be a vital target for the NR2B-involved excitotoxicity.

  11. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) or [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca(2+) from intraterminal IP3-sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [(3)H]NA and [(3)H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  12. PSD-95 stabilizes NMDA receptors by inducing the degradation of STEP61

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sehoon; Incontro, Salvatore; Nicoll, Roger A.; Roche, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation regulates surface and synaptic expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Both the tyrosine kinase Fyn and the tyrosine phosphatase striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) are known to target the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2B on tyrosine 1472, which is a critical residue that mediates NMDAR endocytosis. STEP reduces the surface expression of NMDARs by promoting dephosphorylation of GluN2B Y1472, whereas the synaptic scaffolding protein postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) stabilizes the surface expression of NMDARs. However, nothing is known about a potential functional interaction between STEP and PSD-95. We now report that STEP61 binds to PSD-95 but not to other PSD-95 family members. We find that PSD-95 expression destabilizes STEP61 via ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Using subcellular fractionation, we detect low amounts of STEP61 in the PSD fraction. However, STEP61 expression in the PSD is increased upon knockdown of PSD-95 or in vivo as detected in PSD-95–KO mice, demonstrating that PSD-95 excludes STEP61 from the PSD. Importantly, only extrasynaptic NMDAR expression and currents were increased upon STEP knockdown, as is consistent with low STEP61 localization in the PSD. Our findings support a dual role for PSD-95 in stabilizing synaptic NMDARs by binding directly to GluN2B but also by promoting synaptic exclusion and degradation of the negative regulator STEP61. PMID:27457929

  13. Capsaicin protects cortical neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury via down-regulating NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Cheng, Gen; Tan, Han; Qin, Rui; Zou, Yimin; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Capsaicin, the ingredient responsible for the pungent taste of hot chili peppers, is widely used in the study and management of pain. Recently, its neuroprotective effect has been described in multiple studies. Herein, we investigated the underlying mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin. Direct injection of capsaicin (1 or 3nmol) into the peri-infarct area reduced the infarct volume and improved neurological behavioral scoring and motor coordination function in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/reperfusion model in rats. The time window of the protective effect of capsaicin was within 1h after reperfusion, when excitotoxicity is the main reason of cell death. In cultured cortical neurons, administration of capsaicin attenuated glutamate-induced excitotoxic injury. With respect to the mechanisms of the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin, reduced calcium influx after glutamate stimulation was observed following capsaicin pretreatment in cortical neurons. Trpv1 knock-out abolished the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on glutamate-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal death. Reduced expression of GluN1 and GluN2B, subunits of NMDA receptor, was examined after capsaicin treatment in cortical neurons. In summary, our studies reveal that the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin in cortical neurons is TRPV1-dependent and down-regulation of the expression and function of NMDA receptors contributes to the protection afforded by capsaicin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. PSD-95 stabilizes NMDA receptors by inducing the degradation of STEP61.

    PubMed

    Won, Sehoon; Incontro, Salvatore; Nicoll, Roger A; Roche, Katherine W

    2016-08-09

    Phosphorylation regulates surface and synaptic expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Both the tyrosine kinase Fyn and the tyrosine phosphatase striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) are known to target the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2B on tyrosine 1472, which is a critical residue that mediates NMDAR endocytosis. STEP reduces the surface expression of NMDARs by promoting dephosphorylation of GluN2B Y1472, whereas the synaptic scaffolding protein postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) stabilizes the surface expression of NMDARs. However, nothing is known about a potential functional interaction between STEP and PSD-95. We now report that STEP61 binds to PSD-95 but not to other PSD-95 family members. We find that PSD-95 expression destabilizes STEP61 via ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Using subcellular fractionation, we detect low amounts of STEP61 in the PSD fraction. However, STEP61 expression in the PSD is increased upon knockdown of PSD-95 or in vivo as detected in PSD-95-KO mice, demonstrating that PSD-95 excludes STEP61 from the PSD. Importantly, only extrasynaptic NMDAR expression and currents were increased upon STEP knockdown, as is consistent with low STEP61 localization in the PSD. Our findings support a dual role for PSD-95 in stabilizing synaptic NMDARs by binding directly to GluN2B but also by promoting synaptic exclusion and degradation of the negative regulator STEP61.

  15. A Special Extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI-08) Restores Learning and Memory by Upregulating Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit GluN2B in the Brain of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Singh, Hemant K.; Prasad, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, we have investigated effects of the CDRI-08, a well characterized extract of Bacopa monnieri, on expression of the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR in various brain regions of the scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Our behavioral data reveal that scopolamine-treated amnesic mice exhibit significant decline in the spatial memory compared to the normal control mice. Our RT-PCR and immunoblotting data revealed that the scopolamine treatment resulted in a significant downregulation of the NMDAR GluN2B subunit expression in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our enzyme assay data revealed that scopolamine caused a significant increase in the acetylcholinesterase activity in both the brain regions. Further, oral administration of the CDRI-08 to scopolamine-treated amnesic mice restored the spatial memory which was found to be associated with significant upregulation of the GluN2B subunit expression and decline in the acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex as well as hippocampus towards their levels in the normal control mice. Our study provides the evidence for the mechanism underlying role of the Bacopa monnieri extract (CDRI-08) in restoring spatial memory in amnesic mice, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26413117

  16. Synaptic plasticity of NMDA receptors: mechanisms and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David L.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2012-01-01

    Beyond their well-established role as triggers for LTP and LTD of fast synaptic transmission mediated by AMPA receptors, an expanding body of evidence indicates that NMDA receptors (NMDARs) themselves are also dynamically regulated and subject to activity-dependent long-term plasticity. NMDARs can significantly contribute to information transfer at synapses particularly during periods of repetitive activity. It is also increasingly recognized that NMDARs participate in dendritic synaptic integration and are critical for generating persistent activity of neural assemblies. Here we review recent advances on the mechanisms and functional consequences of NMDAR plasticity. Given the unique biophysical properties of NMDARs, synaptic plasticity of NMDAR-mediated transmission emerges as a particularly powerful mechanism for the fine tuning of information encoding and storage throughout the brain. PMID:22325859

  17. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  18. Chronic intermittent ethanol treatment selectively alters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit surface expression in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley D; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-07-01

    A chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure regimen consists of repeated episodes of ethanol intoxication and withdrawal. CIE treatment has been reported to result in a significant enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in vivo, and trafficking of NMDA receptors is emerging a key regulatory mechanism that underlies the channel function. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of CIE on NMDA receptor subunit surface expression. Cultured cortical neurons were exposed to 75 mM ethanol for 14 h followed by 10 h of withdrawal, repeated this cycle five times, and followed by 2 or 5 days of withdrawal. Surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits and their endocytosis were measured by biotinylation and Western blots. CIE significantly increased NMDA receptor (NR) 1 and NR2B but not NR2A subunit surface expression after 5 days of treatment. However, CIE treatment did not reduce the NMDA receptor endocytosis. Quantification of immunocytochemistry confirmed CIE-induced increase in both the total number of NR1 and NR2B subunit clusters and their targeting to synaptic sites. It is noteworthy that this effect persisted even after ethanol withdrawal with a peak expression occurring between 0 and 2 days after withdrawal, and the expression on the plasma membrane was still at high levels after 5 days of withdrawal. In addition, this was accompanied by significant increases in postsynaptic density protein 95 clusters. Protein kinase A inhibitor completely reversed CIE-induced increase in NR1 and partially in NR2B surface level and a long-lasting effect. These changes may contribute to the development of ethanol-induced neurotoxicity and ethanol dependence.

  19. [Learning and Memory Capacity and NMDA Receptor Expression in Shen Deficiency Constitution Rats].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-ru; Sun, Yao-guang; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xiao-di; Wang, Xing; Sun, Li-jun

    2016-05-01

    To explore material bases and neurobiological mechanisms of "Shen storing will" by observing learning and memory capacities and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor expressions in Shen deficiency constitution (SDC) rats. Totally 40 SD rats were randomly divided into the model group, the Zuogui Pill (ZP) group, the Yougui Pill (YP) group, the blank control group (consisting of normal pregnant rats), 10 in each group. SDC young rat model (inherent deficiency and postnatal malnutrition) was prepared by the classic way of "cat scaring rat". Medication started when they were scared by cat. Rats in the ZP group and the YP group were administered by gastrogavage with ZP suspension 0.1875 g/mL and YP suspension 0.0938 g/mL respectively. Equal volume of normal saline was administered to rats in the blank control group and the model group by gastrogavage. All medication was given once per day, 5 days in a week for 2 consecutive months. Learning and memory capacities were detected by Morris water maze test. Expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B in hippocamus were detected by immunohistochemical method. Compared with the blank control group, the latency period, total distance in Morris water maze test were longer in the model group (P < 0.05). All the aforesaid indices all decreased in the ZP group and the YP group, with statistical difference when compared with the model group (P < 0.05). The protein expressions of NR2A and NR2B in hippocamus were lower in the model group than in the blank control group (P < 0.05). But when compared with the model group, they were obviously higher in the ZP group and the YP group (P < 0.05). SDC rats had degenerated learning and memory capacities and lowered NMDA receptor expressions. ZP and YP could up-regulate learning and memory capacities and NMDA receptor expressions, thereby improving deterioration of brain functions in SDC rats.

  20. Homology modeling of NR2B modulatory domain of NMDA receptor and analysis of ifenprodil binding.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Limongelli, Vittorio; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Case, David A

    2007-10-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels (iGluRs) that are involved in several important physiological functions such as neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Among iGluRs, NMDA receptors have been perhaps the most actively investigated for their role in chronic neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Recent studies have shown that the NTD of subunit NR2B modulates ion channel gating through the binding of allosteric modulators such as the prototypical compound ifenprodil. In the present paper, the construction of a three-dimensional model for the NR2B modulatory domain is described and docking calculations allow, for the first time, definition of the ifenprodil binding pose at an atomic level and fully explain all the available structure-activity relationships. Moreover, in an attempt to add further insight into the ifenprodil mechanism of action, as it is not completely clear if it binds and stabilizes an open or a closed conformation of the NR2B modulatory domain, a matter, which is fundamental for the rational design of NMDA antagonists, MD simulations followed by an MM-PBSA analysis were performed. These calculations reveal that the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain, rather than the open, constitutes the high affinity binding site for ifenprodil and that a profound stabilization of the closed conformation upon ifenprodil binding occurs. Thus, for a rational design and/or for virtual screening experiments, the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain should be taken into account and our 3D model can provide valuable hints for the design of NR2B-selective antagonists.

  1. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  2. Age-dependent effects on social interaction of NMDA GluN2A receptor subtype-selective antagonism.

    PubMed

    Green, Torrian L; Burket, Jessica A; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2016-07-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is implicated in the regulation of normal sociability in mice. The heterotetrameric NMDA receptor is composed of two obligatory GluN1 and either two "modulatory" GluN2A or GluN2B receptor subunits. GluN2A and GluN2B-containing receptors differ in terms of their developmental expression, distribution between synaptic and extrasynaptic locations, and channel kinetic properties, among other differences. Because age-dependent differences in disruptive effects of GluN2A and GluN2B subtype-selective antagonists on sociability and locomotor activity have been reported in rats, the current investigation explored age-dependent effects of PEAQX, a GluN2A subtype-selective antagonist, on sociability, stereotypic behaviors emerging during social interaction, and spatial working memory in 4- and 8-week old male Swiss Webster mice. The data implicate an age-dependent contribution of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors to the regulation of normal social interaction in mice. Specifically, at a dose of PEAQX devoid of any effect on locomotor activity and mouse rotarod performance, the social interaction of 8-week old mice was disrupted without any effect on the social salience of a stimulus mouse. Moreover, PEAQX attenuated stereotypic behavior emerging during social interaction in 4- and 8-week old mice. However, PEAQX had no effect on spontaneous alternations, a measure of spatial working memory, suggesting that neural circuits mediating sociability and spatial working memory may be discrete and dissociable from each other. Also, the data suggest that the regulation of stereotypic behaviors and sociability may occur independently of each other. Because expression of GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors occurs at a later developmental stage, they may be more involved in mediating the pathogenesis of ASDs in patients with histories of "regression" after a period of normal development than GluN2B receptors.

  3. NMDA receptor binding is reduced within mesocorticolimbic regions following chronic inhalation of toluene in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Dick, Alec Lindsay Ward; Pooters, Tine; Gibbs, Sarah; Giles, Emma; Qama, Ashleigh; Lawrence, Andrew John; Duncan, Jhodie Rubina

    2015-10-22

    The purposeful inhalation of volatile solvents, such as toluene, to induce self-intoxication is prevalent, particularly within adolescent populations. Chronic misuse results in cognitive and neurobiological impairments, as well as an increased risk for addictive behaviours in adulthood. Toluene-induced neuroadaptations within mesocorticolimbic circuitry are thought, in part, to mediate some of the adverse outcomes of toluene misuse, however our understanding of the neuroadaptive processes remains equivocal. An understanding of these processes is particularly important relative to exposure that occurs during adolescence and at concentrations that reflect various patterns of use. Therefore, we exposed male adolescent Wistar rats (postnatal day [PN] 27) to either air or low or high concentrations of inhaled toluene in a chronic and intermittent fashion (CIT, 3,000 or 10,000ppm) for 1 h/day, 3-5 times per week for 4 weeks to model different patterns of human inhalant abuse. Brains were subsequently analysed using autoradiography, qPCR and immunohistochemistry 3 days following the exposure period to investigate toluene-induced neuroadaptations within mesocorticolimbic circuitry. In CIT-exposed rats binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors containing the GluN2B subunit, as determined using [(3)H]-ifenprodil, was decreased in a concentration-related manner in the caudal cingulate cortex, dorsal striatum and accumbens; however, this was not associated with changes in GluN2B protein expression. There were no differences in [(3)H]-epibatidine binding to heteromeric neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. Relative expression of mRNA transcripts encoding NMDA, nACh, γ-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) and dopamine receptor subunits was unchanged in all regions assessed following CIT. Our data suggest that adolescent CIT exposure impacts NMDA receptors within regions of corticostriatal circuitry, possibly via post-translational mechanisms. Dysfunctional

  4. Regulation of AMPA receptor gating and pharmacology by TARP auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-07-01

    Presynaptic glutamate release elicits brief waves of membrane depolarization in neurons by activating AMPA receptors. Depending on its precise size and shape, current through AMPA receptors gates downstream processes like NMDA receptor activation and action potential generation. Over a decade of research on AMPA receptor structure and function has identified binding sites on AMPA receptors for agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators as well as key residues underlying differences in the gating behavior of various AMPA receptor subtypes. However, the recent discovery that AMPA receptors are accompanied in the synaptic membrane by a family of auxiliary subunits known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) has revealed that the kinetics and pharmacology of neuronal AMPA receptors differ in many respects from those predicted by classical studies of AMPA receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we summarize recent work and discuss remaining questions concerning the structure and function of native TARP-AMPA receptor complexes.

  5. A 16-year-old girl with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis and family history of psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Neil; Lieblich, Samuel; Schalling, Martin; Rahm, Christoffer

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune NMDA-R encephalitis (ANRE) shares clinical features with schizophrenia. Recent research also indicates that both disorders are associated with dysfunction of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-R) subunit 1. We present the case of Ms A, 16 years old. Ms A presented with acute personality change, bizarre behaviour, delusional ideas and atypical seizures. She had a family history of psychotic disorders, and autistic traits diagnosed in childhood. She was initially diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Delayed testing of CSF indicated ANRE. As the patient was a Jehovah's witness the treating team was unable to use gammaglobulin therapy; they instead relied on combined plasmapheresis and rituximab. To exclude the possibility that the affected members of this family shared a gene coding for an abnormal configuration of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 we sequenced the region of the GRIN1 gene in DNA extracted from blood in both Ms A and her grandmother. Ms A's condition improved dramatically, though her long-term memory is still demonstrably impaired. No genetic abnormality was detected. This case emphasizes how important it is, for a first episode psychosis, to exclude ANRE and other autoimmune synaptic encephalitides, even in the face of significant family history, and if seronegative, the importance of testing for CSF autoantibodies.

  6. Long-lasting effects of neonatal dexamethasone treatment on spatial learning and hippocampal synaptic plasticity: involvement of the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Patrick J G H; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Kamal, Amer; Croiset, Gerda; Bakker, Joost M; Cattabeni, Flaminio; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; van Bel, Frank; Di Luca, Monica; Wiegant, Victor M

    2003-05-01

    The effects of neonatal dexamethasone (DEX) treatment on spatial learning and hippocampal synaptic plasticity were investigated in adult rats. Spatial learning in reference and working memory versions of the Morris maze was impaired in DEX-treated rats. In hippocampal slices of DEX rats, long-term depression was facilitated and potentiation was impaired. Paired-pulse facilitation was normal, suggesting a postsynaptic defect as cause of the learning and plasticity deficits. Western blot analysis of hippocampal postsynaptic densities (PSD) revealed a reduction in NR2B subunit protein, whereas the abundance of the other major N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A), AMPA receptor subunits (GluR2/3), scaffolding proteins, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alphaCaMKII) were unaltered. This selective reduction in NR2B likely resulted from altered receptor assembly rather than subunit expression, because the abundance of NR2B in the homogenate and crude synaptosomal fractions was unaltered. In addition, the activity of alphaCaMKII, an NMDA receptor complex associated protein kinase, was increased in PSD of DEX rats. The results indicate that neonatal treatment with DEX causes alterations in composition and function of the hippocampal NMDA receptor complex that persist into adulthood. These alterations likely explain the deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial learning induced by neonatal DEX treatment.

  7. Kinetic Contributions to Gating by Interactions Unique to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Borschel, William F.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Tindell, LeeAnn K.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2015-01-01

    Among glutamate-gated channels, NMDA receptors produce currents that subside with unusually slow kinetics, and this feature is essential to the physiology of central excitatory synapses. Relative to the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDA receptors have additional intersubunit contacts in the ligand binding domain that occur at both conserved and non-conserved sites. We examined GluN1/GluN2A single-channel currents with kinetic analyses and modeling to probe these class-specific intersubunit interactions for their role in glutamate binding and receptor gating. We found that substitutions that eliminate such interactions at non-conserved sites reduced stationary gating, accelerated deactivation, and imparted sensitivity to aniracetam, an AMPA receptor-selective positive modulator. Abolishing unique contacts at conserved sites also reduced stationary gating and accelerated deactivation. These results show that contacts specific to NMDA receptors, which brace the heterodimer interface within the ligand binding domain, stabilize actively gating receptor conformations and result in longer bursts and slower deactivations. They support the view that the strength of the heterodimer interface modulates gating in both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors and that unique interactions at this interface are responsible in part for basic differences between the kinetics of NMDA and non-NMDA currents at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26370091

  8. Prolonged nicotine exposure down-regulates presynaptic NMDA receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Alessia; Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Agostinho, Paula; Tomé, Angelo R; Chen, Jiayang; Pittaluga, Anna; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Marchi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    The presynaptic control of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by glutamate and acetylcholine has a profound impact on reward signaling. Here we provide immunocytochemical and neurochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the NAc. Most NAc dopaminergic terminals possessed the nAChR α4 subunit and the pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 μM) or to the α4β2-containing nAChR agonist 5IA85380 (10 nM) selectively inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked, but not the 4-aminopyridine (10 μM)-evoked, [(3)H] dopamine outflow; this inhibition was blunted by mecamylamine (10 μM). Nicotine and 5IA85380 pretreatment also inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked increase of calcium levels in single nerve terminals, an effect prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (1 μM). This supports a functional interaction between α4β2-containing nAChR and NMDA receptors within the same terminal, as supported by the immunocytochemical co-localization of α4 and GluN1 subunits in individual NAc dopaminergic terminals. The NMDA-evoked [(3)H]dopamine outflow was blocked by MK801 (1 μM) and inhibited by the selective GluN2B-selective antagonists ifenprodil (1 μM) and RO 25-6981 (1 μM), but not by the GluN2A-preferring antagonists CPP-19755 (1 μM) and ZnCl2 (1 nM). Notably, nicotine pretreatment significantly decreased the density of biotin-tagged GluN2B proteins in NAc synaptosomes. These results show that nAChRs dynamically and negatively regulate NMDA receptors in NAc dopaminergic terminals through the internalization of GluN2B receptors.

  9. Lack of NMDA-AMPA interaction in antidepressant-like effect of CGP 37849, an antagonist of NMDA receptor, in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2008-11-01

    The NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP 37849-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test in mice was not antagonized by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX. This is the first demonstration of the antidepressant effect of the NMDA antagonist not being dependent on the AMPA transmission.

  10. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K.; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Mg2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI. PMID:28045032

  11. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  12. Extrasynaptic glutamate NMDA receptors: key players in striatal function.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Lopez-Huerta, Violeta G; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Arbuthnott, Gordon W

    2015-02-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are crucial for the function of excitatory neurotransmission and are present at the synapse and on the extrasynaptic membrane. The major nucleus of the basal ganglia, striatum, receives a large glutamatergic excitatory input carrying information about movements and associated sensory stimulation for its proper function. Such bombardment of glutamate synaptic release results in a large extracellular concentration of glutamate that can overcome the neuronal and glial uptake homeostatic systems therefore allowing the stimulation of extrasynaptic glutamate receptors. Here we have studied the participation of their extrasynaptic type in cortically evoked responses or in the presence of NMDARs stimulation. We report that extrasynaptic NMDAR blocker memantine, reduced in a dose-dependent manner cortically induced NMDA excitatory currents in striatal neurons (recorded in zero-Mg(++) plus DNQX 10 μM). Moreover, memantine (2-4 μM) significantly reduced the NMDAR-dependent membrane potential oscillations called up and down states. Recordings of neuronal striatal networks with a fluorescent calcium indicator or with multielectrode arrays (MEA) also showed that memantine reduced in a dose-dependent manner, NMDA-induced excitatory currents and network behavior. We used multielectrode arrays (MEA) to grow segregated cortical and striatal neurons. Once synaptic contacts were developed (>21DIV) recordings of extracellular activity confirmed the cortical drive of spontaneous synchronous discharges in both compartments. After severing connections between compartments, active striatal neurons in the presence of memantine (1 μM) and CNQX (10 μM) were predominantly fast spiking interneurons (FSI). The significance of extrasynaptic receptors in the regulation of striatal function and neuronal network activity is evident.

  13. Reduction in Ventral Midbrain NMDA Receptors Reveals Two Opposite Modulatory Roles for Glutamate on Reward

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Giovanni; Khodami-Pour, Ali; Lévesque, Daniel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is a major component of the reward circuitry and recent clinical studies suggest that new molecules that would target glutamate neurotransmission are most likely to constitute more effective medications for mood disorders. It is well known that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) initiates dopamine burst firing, a mode associated with reward signaling; but NMDARs also contribute to the maintenance of an inhibitory drive to dopamine neurons. Such opposite modulatory functions imply that different subtypes of NMDARs are expressed on different ventral midbrain (VM) neurons and/or afferent inputs to dopamine neurons. By using the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique, we studied the effects of VM downregulation of NMDAR subunits GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2D on reward induced by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation. Reward thresholds were measured before and 24 h after each of three consecutive daily bilateral microinjections of siRNA for the targeted receptor subunit(s) or non-active RNA sequence. After the last measurement, reward thresholds were reassessed following a bilateral microinjection of the preferred GluN2A-NMDA antagonist, (2R,4S)-4-(3-Phosphopropyl)-2-piperidinecarboxylic acid (PPPA). Western-blot analysis showed that siRNAs reduced GluN1- and GluN2A-containing receptors whereas behavioral tests showed that only a reduction in GluN1 produced reward attenuation. Despite NMDAR reduction, reward-enhancing effect of PPPA remained unchanged. We conclude that VM glutamate relays the reward signal initiated by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation by acting on NMDARs devoid of GluN2A/2D subunits and exerts an inhibition on this reward signal by acting on GluN2A-containing NMDARs most likely located on afferent terminals. PMID:25578795

  14. Organization, control and function of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Papouin, Thomas; Oliet, Stéphane H. R.

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) exist in different forms owing to multiple combinations of subunits that can assemble into a functional receptor. In addition, they are located not only at synapses but also at extrasynaptic sites. There has been intense speculation over the past decade about whether specific NMDAR subtypes and/or locations are responsible for inducing synaptic plasticity and excitotoxicity. Here, we review the latest findings on the organization, subunit composition and endogenous control of NMDARs at extrasynaptic sites and consider their putative functions. Because astrocytes are capable of controlling NMDARs through the release of gliotransmitters, we also discuss the role of the glial environment in regulating the activity of these receptors. PMID:25225095

  15. Control of N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Function by the NR2 Subunit Amino-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Hansen, Kasper B.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    NMDA receptors comprised of different NR2 subunits exhibit strikingly unique biophysical and pharmacological properties. Here we report that the extracellular amino-terminal domain (ATD) of the NR2 subunit controls pharmacological and kinetic properties of recombinant NMDA receptors, such as agonist potency, deactivation time course, open probability (POPEN), and mean open/shut duration. Using ATD deletion mutants of NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D and chimeras of NR2A and NR2D with interchanged ATD (NR2A-(2D-ATD) and NR2D-(2A-ATD)), we show that the ATD contributes to the low glutamate potency of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors and the high glutamate potency of NR2D-containing receptors. The ATD influences the deactivation time courses of NMDA receptors, as removal of the ATD from NR2A slows the deactivation rate, while removal of the ATD from NR2B, NR2C and NR2D accelerates the deactivation rate. Open probability also is influenced by the ATD. Removal of the ATD from NR2A or replacement of the NR2A-ATD with that of NR2D decreases POPEN in single channel recordings from outside-out patches of HEK 293 cells. By contrast, deletion of the ATD from NR2D or replacement of the NR2D ATD with that of NR2A increases POPEN and mean open duration. These data demonstrate the modular nature of NMDA receptors and show that the ATD of the different NR2 subunits plays an important role in fine-tuning the functional properties of the individual NMDA receptor subtypes. PMID:19793963

  16. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Alexandre A; Costa, Ana Paula R; Bicca, Maíra A; Matheus, Filipe C; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L; Bortolotto, Zuner A; de Lima, Thereza C M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine--a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist--displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine--an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)--prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies.

  17. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  18. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  19. Reduction of food intake by cholecystokinin requires activation of hindbrain NMDA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason; Campos, Carlos; Herzog, Thiebaut; Covasa, Mihai; Czaja, Krzysztof; Ritter, Robert C

    2011-08-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of CCK reduces food intake and triggers a behavioral pattern similar to natural satiation. Reduction of food intake by CCK is mediated by vagal afferents that innervate the stomach and small intestine. These afferents synapse in the hindbrain nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) where gastrointestinal satiation signals are processed. Previously, we demonstrated that intraperitoneal (IP) administration of either competitive or noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists attenuates reduction of food intake by CCK. However, because vagal afferents themselves express NMDA receptors at both central and peripheral endings, our results did not speak to the question of whether NMDA receptors in the brain play an essential role in reduction of feeding by CCK. We hypothesized that activation of NMDA receptors in the NTS is necessary for reduction of food intake by CCK. To test this hypothesis, we measured food intake following IP CCK, subsequent to NMDA receptor antagonist injections into the fourth ventricle, directly into the NTS or subcutaneously. We found that either fourth-ventricle or NTS injection of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 was sufficient to inhibit CCK-induced reduction of feeding, while the same antagonist doses injected subcutaneously did not. Similarly fourth ventricle injection of d-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-propenyl-1-phosphoric acid (d-CPPene), a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, also blocked reduction of food intake following IP CCK. Finally, d-CPPene injected into the fourth ventricle attenuated CCK-induced expression of nuclear c-Fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal vagal complex. We conclude that activation of NMDA receptors in the hindbrain is necessary for the reduction of food intake by CCK. Hindbrain NMDA receptors could comprise a critical avenue for control and modulation of satiation signals to influence food intake and energy balance.

  20. NMDA Receptors in Dopaminergic Neurons are Crucial for Habit Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei Phillip; Li, Fei; Wang, Dong; Xie, Kun; Wang, Deheng; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dopamine is crucial for habit learning. Activities of midbrain dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the cortical and subcortical signals among which glutamatergic afferents provide excitatory inputs. Cognitive implications of glutamatergic afferents in regulating and engaging dopamine signals during habit learning however remain unclear. Here we show that mice with dopaminergic neuron-specific NMDAR1 deletion are impaired in a variety of habit learning tasks while normal in some other dopamine-modulated functions such as locomotor activities, goal directed learning, and spatial reference memories. In vivo neural recording revealed that DA neurons in these mutant mice could still develop the cue-reward association responses, but their conditioned response robustness was drastically blunted. Our results suggest that integration of glutamatergic inputs to DA neurons by NMDA receptors, likely by regulating associative activity patterns, is a crucial part of the cellular mechanism underpinning habit learning. PMID:22196339

  1. [Anti- NMDA- receptor encephalitis; a neuropsychiatric illness requiring further study].

    PubMed

    Waas, J A; Storm, A H

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. She had the characteristic psychiatric symptoms such as hallucinations, delirious and bizarre behaviour, and catatonic symptoms. She later also displayed neurological symptoms such as epileptic seizures, dyskinesias and sensitivity disturbances. After treatment with corticosteroids and immunoglobulins patient recovered completely. Potentially lethal symptoms can arise from the autonomic dysregulation. The incidence of this disorder has not yet been established. The catatonic features should be treated adequately with high doses of benzodiazepines. Because patients usually present with psychiatric symptoms, treatment often starts in a psychiatric setting. In view of the serious somatic complications it is desirable that the patient be treated in a general hospital. Early diagnosis and treatment are very important because the chances of recovery are thereby enhanced.

  2. Inhibition of the NMDA and AMPA receptor channels by antidepressants and antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Barygin, Oleg I; Nagaeva, Elina I; Tikhonov, Denis B; Belinskaya, Darya A; Vanchakova, Nina P; Shestakova, Natalia N

    2017-04-01

    It is known that some antidepressants and antipsychotics directly inhibit NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In this study we systematically studied action of seven drugs (Fluoxetine, Citalopram, Desipramine, Amitriptyline, Atomoxetine, Chlorpromazine, and Clozapine) on NMDA receptors and Ca(2+)-permeable and -impermeable AMPA receptors in rat brain neurons by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Except for weak effect of fluoxetine, all drugs were virtually inactive against Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. Fluoxetine and desipramine significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (IC50=43±7 and 105±12µM, respectively). Desipramine, atomoxetine and chlorpromazine inhibited NMDA receptors in clinically relevant low micromolar concentrations, while citalopram had only weak effect. All tested medicines have been clustered into two groups by their action on NMDA receptors: desipramine, amitriptyline, chlorpromazine, and atomoxetine display voltage- and magnesium-dependent open channel blocking mechanism. Action of fluoxetine and clozapine was found to be voltage- and magnesium-independent. All voltage-dependent compounds could be trapped in closed NMDA receptor channels. Possible contribution of NMDA receptor inhibition by certain antidepressants and antipsychotics to their analgesic effects in neuropathic pain is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rat gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion express glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Alejandro; Zucchi, Benedetta; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2004-07-01

    Taste receptor cells are innervated by primary gustatory neurons that relay sensory information to the central nervous system. The transmitter(s) at synapses between taste receptor cells and primary afferent fibers is (are) not yet known. By analogy with other sensory organs, glutamate might a transmitter in taste buds. We examined the presence of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in rat gustatory primary neurons in the ganglion that innervates the anterior tongue (geniculate ganglion). AMPA and NMDA type subunits were immunohistochemically detected with antibodies against GluR1, GluR2, GluR2/3, GluR4 and NR1 subunits. Gustatory neurons were specifically identified by retrograde tracing with fluorogold from injections made into the anterior portion of the tongue. Most gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion were strongly immunoreactive for GluR2/3 (68%), GluR4 (78%) or NR1 (71%). GluR1 was seen in few cells (16%). We further examined if glutamate receptors were present in the peripheral terminals of primary gustatory neurons in taste buds. Many axonal varicosities in fungiform and vallate taste buds were immunoreactive for GluR2/3 but not for NR1. We conclude that gustatory neurons express glutamate receptors and that glutamate receptors of the AMPA type are likely targeted to synapses within taste buds.

  4. [Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: experience with six pediatric patients. Potential efficacy of methotrexate].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Quezada-Corona, Arturo; Dalmau, Josep; Campos-Guevara, Verónica

    2013-11-01

    INTRODUCTION. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a condition that is increasingly more frequently diagnosed in the paediatric age. Unlike adults, in many cases it is not associated to tumours and the most common initial manifestations in children are seizures and movement disorders, while in adults there is a predominance of psychiatric alterations. CASE REPORTS. We present six confirmed paediatric cases with antibodies against the subunit NR1 of the NMDA receptor in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Five of the cases began with seizures as the initial clinical symptom prior to the development of the classical clinical features of this condition. In all cases, steroids were used as the first line of treatment, although these only brought about control over the manifestations in one of them; the other patients therefore required second-line immunomodulators. All the patients received methotrexate as immunomodulator treatment to prevent relapses, and in all cases there was an improvement in the patients' situation. CONCLUSIONS. In our series of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, none were associated with tumours. All of them were given methotrexate for at least one year and no adverse clinical or analytical events were observed; likewise, there were no neurological sequelae or relapses during treatment. Although it is a small series and it would be advisable to increase the number and time to progression, we see methotrexate as an excellent alternative immunomodulator treatment for this pathology.

  5. Effects of cocaine-kindling on the expression of NMDA receptors and glutamate levels in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal M; Núñez-Taltavull, Juan F; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław; Gasior, Maciej; Zapata, Agustin; Shippenberg, Toni S; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we examined the effects of cocaine seizure kindling on the expression of NMDA receptors and levels of extracellular glutamate in mouse brain. Quantitative autoradiography did not reveal any changes in binding of [³H] MK-801 to NMDA receptors in several brain regions. Likewise, in situ hybridization and Western blotting revealed no alteration in expression of the NMDA receptor subunits, NR1 and NR2B. Basal overflow of glutamate in the ventral hippocampus determined by microdialysis in freely moving animals also did not differ between cocaine-kindled and control groups. Perfusion with the selective excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor, pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC, 0.6 mM), increased glutamate overflow confirming transport inhibition. Importantly, KCl-evoked glutamate overflow under tPDC perfusion was significantly higher in cocaine-kindled mice than in control mice. These data suggest that enhancement of depolarization stimulated glutamate release may be one of the mechanisms underlying the development of increased seizure susceptibility after cocaine kindling.

  6. Growth hormone (GH) increases cognition and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA and NMDA) in transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Studzinski, Ana Lupe Motta; Barros, Daniela Martí; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like factor I (GH/IGF-I) somatotropic axis is responsible for somatic growth in vertebrates, and has important functions in the nervous system. Among these, learning and memory functions related to the neural expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, mainly types AMPA (α-amino-3hydroxy-5methylisoxazole-4propionic) and NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) can be highlighted. Studies on these mechanisms have been almost exclusively conducted on mammal models, with little information available on fish. Consequently, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory of a GH-transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model (F0104 strain). Long-term memory (LTM) was tested in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus, and brain expression of igf-I and genes that code for the main subunits of the AMPA and NMDA receptors were evaluated. Results showed a significant increase in LTM for transgenic fish. Transgenic animals also showed a generalized pattern of increase in the expression of AMPA and NMDA genes, as well as a three-fold induction in igf-I expression in the brain. When analyzed together, these results indicate that GH, mediated by IGF-I, has important effects on the brain, with improvement in LTM as a result of increased glutamate receptors. The transgenic strain F0104 was shown to be an interesting model for elucidating the intricate mechanisms related to the effect of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory in vertebrates.

  7. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors. PMID:28378791

  8. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-04-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors.

  9. Temporal and regional alterations in NMDA receptor expression in Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Blue, Mary E; Kaufmann, Walter E; Bressler, Joseph; Eyring, Charlotte; O'driscoll, Cliona; Naidu, Sakkubai; Johnston, Michael V

    2011-10-01

    Our previous postmortem study of girls with Rett Syndrome (RTT), a development disorder caused by MECP2 mutations, found increases in the density of N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the prefrontal cortex of 2-8-year-old girls, whereas girls older than 10 years had reductions in NMDA receptors compared with age-matched controls (Blue et al., Ann Neurol 1999b;45:541-545). Using [(3)H]-CGP to label NMDA-type glutamate receptors in 2- and 7-week old wild-type (WT), Mecp2-null, and Mecp2-heterozygous (HET) mice (Bird model), we found that frontal areas of the brain also exhibited a bimodal pattern in NMDA expression, with increased densities of NMDA receptors in Mecp2-null mice at 2 weeks of age but decreased densities at 7 weeks of age. Visual cortex showed a similar pattern, while other cortical regions only exhibited changes in NMDA receptor densities at 2 weeks (retrosplenial granular) or 7 weeks (somatosensory). In thalamus of null mice, NMDA receptors were increased at 2 and 7 weeks. No significant differences in density were found between HET and WT mice at both ages. Western blots for NMDAR1 expression in frontal brain showed higher levels of expression in Mecp2-null mice at 2 weeks of age but not at 1 or 7 weeks of age. Our mouse data support the notion that deficient MeCP2 function is the primary cause of the NMDA receptor changes we observed in RTT. Furthermore, the findings of regional and temporal differences in NMDA expression illustrate the importance of age and brain region in evaluating different genotypes of mice.

  10. Low doses of the NMDA receptor antagonists, MK-801, PEAQX, and ifenprodil, induces social facilitation in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Melissa; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Linda P

    2013-08-01

    Adolescents display high levels of interactions with peers relative to other age groups, with these interactions further enhanced by ethanol under some circumstances. Understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying these high levels of social interactions is important given that alcohol use is initiated during adolescence and adolescents tend to report drinking for social reasons. Given that ethanol's effects are associated in part with functional antagonism of the NMDA receptor system, the current experiment explored the role of NMDA antagonists for facilitating adolescent social behavior. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were challenged acutely with either the non-competitive NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (0.01, 0.03mg/kg), the NR2A antagonist, PEAQX (1.25, 3.75mg/kg) or the NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil (0.75, 2.25mg/kg) 30min prior to a 10-min social interaction test. All compounds generally increased overall social activity (i.e., sum of social investigation, contact behavior, and play), with ifenprodil also significantly enhancing play and social contact behaviors. Although the frequencies of peer-directed social behaviors were typically greater following administration with these NMDA antagonists, social preference, indexed via the number of crossovers to the side with the partner relative to crossovers away, was significantly reduced in MK-801 and PEAQX-treated rats. None of these changes were associated with concomitant alterations in overall locomotor activity under these test circumstances. These data support the suggestion that the increases in social interactions observed in adolescents following acute ethanol may be driven in part by NMDA receptor antagonism - particularly of the NR2B subunit - given that ifenprodil stimulated social behavior in a manner similar to that produced by low doses of ethanol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subtype-specific binding sites that mediate direct interactions with scaffold protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Sarah L; Stephenson, F Anne

    2012-04-13

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) neurotransmitter receptors and the postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of scaffolding proteins are integral components of post-synaptic macromolecular signaling complexes that serve to propagate glutamate responses intracellularly. Classically, NMDA receptor NR2 subunits associate with PSD-95 MAGUKs via a conserved ES(E/D)V amino acid sequence located at their C termini. We previously challenged this dogma to demonstrate a second non-ES(E/D)V PSD-95-binding site in both NMDA receptor NR2A and NR2B subunits. Here, using a combination of co-immunoprecipitations from transfected mammalian cells, yeast two-hybrid interaction assays, and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays, we show that NR2A subunits interact directly with PSD-95 via the C-terminal ESDV motif and additionally via an Src homology 3 domain-binding motif that associates with the Src homology 3 domain of PSD-95. Peptide inhibition of co-immunoprecipitations of NR2A and PSD-95 demonstrates that both the ESDV and non-ESDV sites are required for association in native brain tissue. Furthermore, we refine the non-ESDV site within NR2B to residues 1149-1157. These findings provide a molecular basis for the differential association of NMDA receptor subtypes with PSD-95 MAGUK scaffold proteins. These selective interactions may contribute to the organization, lateral mobility, and ultimately the function of NMDA receptor subtypes at synapses. Furthermore, they provide a more general molecular mechanism by which the scaffold, PSD-95, may discriminate between potential interacting partner proteins.

  12. Identification of N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid (NMDA) Receptor Subtype-specific Binding Sites That Mediate Direct Interactions with Scaffold Protein PSD-95*

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) neurotransmitter receptors and the postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of scaffolding proteins are integral components of post-synaptic macromolecular signaling complexes that serve to propagate glutamate responses intracellularly. Classically, NMDA receptor NR2 subunits associate with PSD-95 MAGUKs via a conserved ES(E/D)V amino acid sequence located at their C termini. We previously challenged this dogma to demonstrate a second non-ES(E/D)V PSD-95-binding site in both NMDA receptor NR2A and NR2B subunits. Here, using a combination of co-immunoprecipitations from transfected mammalian cells, yeast two-hybrid interaction assays, and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays, we show that NR2A subunits interact directly with PSD-95 via the C-terminal ESDV motif and additionally via an Src homology 3 domain-binding motif that associates with the Src homology 3 domain of PSD-95. Peptide inhibition of co-immunoprecipitations of NR2A and PSD-95 demonstrates that both the ESDV and non-ESDV sites are required for association in native brain tissue. Furthermore, we refine the non-ESDV site within NR2B to residues 1149–1157. These findings provide a molecular basis for the differential association of NMDA receptor subtypes with PSD-95 MAGUK scaffold proteins. These selective interactions may contribute to the organization, lateral mobility, and ultimately the function of NMDA receptor subtypes at synapses. Furthermore, they provide a more general molecular mechanism by which the scaffold, PSD-95, may discriminate between potential interacting partner proteins. PMID:22375001

  13. Modulation of [3H]MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Murray, F; Kennedy, J; Hutson, P H; Elliot, J; Huscroft, I; Mohnen, K; Russell, M G; Grimwood, S

    2000-06-02

    [3H]MK-801 binding in vivo was used to determine the occupancy of NMDA receptor ligands shown to allosterically modulate binding in vitro. ED(50) values (mg/kg) were obtained for the channel blockers (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5,4-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate ((+)-MK-801, 0.2), 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine (phencyclidine, PCP, 1.7) and ketamine (4.4). Antagonists at the glutamate (DL-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (DL-CPP, 5.7)) and glycine site (7-Chloro-4-hydroxy-3-(3-phenoxy)-phenyl-2(H)quinolinone (L-701,324, 14.1), 3R(+)cis-4-methyl-pyrrollid-2-one (L-687,414, 15.1)) inhibited [3H]MK-801 binding in vivo to varying maximum levels (69%, 103% and 45%, respectively). NR2B subunit-selective compounds acting at the ifenprodil site inhibited [3H]MK-801 in vivo by a maximum of 52-72% and gave ED(50) values (mg/kg) of: (+/-)-(1S*, 2S*)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-4-phenylpiperidino)-1-propanol ((+/-)CP-101,606), 1.9; (+/-)-(3R, 4S)-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl]chroman-4,7-diol ((+/-)CP-283,097), 1.8; (+/-)-(R*, S*)-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperidine propanol ((+/-)Ro 25-6981), 1.0; ifenprodil, 6.0. The glycine site agonist D-serine stimulated binding to 151% of control with an ED(50) of 1.7 mg/kg. Results show that [3H]MK-801 binding in vivo may be used to measure receptor occupancy of ligands acting not only within the ion channel but also at modulatory sites on the NMDA receptor complex.

  14. NMDA receptor mediates chronic visceral pain induced by neonatal noxious somatic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adrian; Mickle, Aaron; Bruckert, Mitchell; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2014-12-05

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are important in the development and maintenance of central sensitization. Our objective was to investigate the role of spinal neurons and NMDAR in the maintenance of chronic visceral pain. Neonatal rats were injected with acidic saline adjusted to pH 4.0 in the gastrocnemius muscle every other day for 12 days. In adult rats, NR1 and NR2B subunits were examined in the lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal cord. A baseline, visceromotor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) was recorded before and after administration of the NMDA antagonist, CGS-19755. Extracellular recordings were performed from CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons and pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) before and after CGS-19755. Rats that received pH 4.0 saline injections demonstrated a significant increase in the expression NR2B subunits and VMR response to CRD>20 mmHg. CGS-19755 (i.v. or i.t.) had no effect in naïve rats, but significantly decreased the response to CRD in pH 4.0 saline injected rats. CGS-19755 had no effect on the spontaneous firing of SL-A, but decreased that of SL-S. Similarly, CGS-19755 attenuates the responses of SL-S neurons to CRD, but had no effect on SL-A neurons or on the response characteristics of PNA fibers. Neonatal noxious somatic stimulation results in chronic visceral hyperalgesia and sensitizes a specific subpopulation of CRD-sensitive spinal neurons. The sensitization of these SL-S spinal neurons is attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist. The results of this study suggest that spinal NMDARs play an important role in the development of hyperalgesia early in life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NMDA receptor mediates chronic visceral pain induced by neonatal noxious somatic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Adrian; Mickle, Aaron; Bruckert, Mitchell; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are important in the development and maintenance of central sensitization. Our objective was to investigate the role of spinal neurons and NMDAR in the maintenance of chronic visceral pain. Neonatal rats were injected with acidic saline adjusted to pH4.0 in the gastrocnemius muscle every other day for 12 days. In adult rats, NR1 and NR2B subunits were examined in the lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal cord. A baseline, visceromotor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) was recorded before and after administration of the NMDA antagonist, CGS-19755. Extracellular recordings were performed from CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons and pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) before and after CGS-19755. Rats that received pH 4.0 saline injections demonstrated a significant increase in the expression NR2B subunits and VMR response to CRD >20mmHg. CGS-19755 (i.v. or i.t.) had no effect in naïve rats, but significantly decreased the response to CRD in pH4.0 saline injected rats. CGS-19755 had no effect on the spontaneous firing of SL-A, but decreased that of SL-S. Similarly, CGS-19755 attenuates the responses of SL-S neurons to CRD, but had no effect on SL-A neurons or on the response characteristics of PNA fibers. Neonatal noxious somatic stimulation results in chronic visceral hyperalgesia and sensitizes a specific subpopulation of CRD-sensitive spinal neurons. The sensitization of these SL-S spinal neurons is attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist. The results of this study suggest that spinal NMDARs play an important role in the development of hyperalgesia early in life. PMID:25281204

  16. NMDA receptors on the surface of cancer cells: Target for chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Stephen I.; Tang, Amy H.; Burket, Jessica A.; Benson, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase, is a therapeutic target for many types of cancers. NMDA receptors regulate mTOR signalling activity; their inappropriate expression on several human cancer cell lines represents a potential therapeutic avenue to control dysregulated growth, division and invasiveness. Targeting these receptors with selective ligands (e.g., glycineB site ligands) may be a less toxic and more tolerable approach than administering compounds acting at the mTORC1 complex itself, such as rapamycin and its derivatives. Thus, testing glycineB site ligands in relevant in vitro and in vivo paradigms with established human cancer cells that express NMDA receptors on their surface could provide proofs of concept/principle that would encourage exploration of these and other “non-toxic” strategies. Interestingly, in some cancer models that express NMDA receptors on their surface, NMDA receptor antagonists, such as MK-801 (dizocilpine), were shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects, which conflict with hypotheses about promoting NMDA receptor activation as a cancer chemotherapeutic strategy. Whether NMDA receptor activation or antagonism is associated with anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects may reflect differences between cancer cell lines in terms of the proteins associated with the NMDA receptors on their cell surfaces, which, in turn, could lead to different “downstream” effects on cascades of intracellular phosphorylations. Irrespective of whether activation or antagonism is associated with anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects for specific types of cancer, data are emerging that support exploration of targeting NMDA receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:24751001

  17. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation.

  18. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals.

  19. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata

    PubMed Central

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata. Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation. PMID:27421895

  20. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gean, P.W. )

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  1. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of anti-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical management of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is reviewed. This illness is required the management of the neurological emergency. Typical symptoms of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis develop in several stages that progresses from psychosis, memory deficits, seizures, and language disintegration into a state of unresponsiveness with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements, and autonomic and respiratory instability. The diagnosis is depended on the detection of the NMDA receptor antibody in CSF or serum under the above characteristic symptoms of encephalitis. The disorder predominantly affects children and young adults, occurs with or without tumor association. The presence of a tumor (usually an ovarian teratoma) is dependent on age and sex, being more frequent in women older than 18 years. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis should be treated with tumor resection and immunotherapy (corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange) responded faster to treatment and less frequently needed second-line immunotherapy (cyclophosphamide or rituximab, or both).

  2. DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ACTIVATION REVEALS A NOVEL, KYNURENATE-SENSITIVE COMPONENT OF STRIATAL NMDA NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Poeggeler, Burkhard; Rassoulpour, Arash; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Guidetti, Paolo; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Schwarcz, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors plays an important role in brain physiology, but excessive receptor stimulation results in seizures and excitotoxic nerve cell death. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation and injury can be prevented by high, non-physiological concentrations of the neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA). Here we report that endogenous KYNA, which is formed in and released from astrocytes, controls NMDA receptors in vivo. This was revealed with the aid of the dopaminergic drugs d-amphetamine and apomorphine, which cause rapid, transient decreases in striatal KYNA levels in rats. Intrastriatal injections of the excitotoxins NMDA or quinolinate (but not the non-NMDA receptor agonist kainate) at the time of maximal KYNA reduction resulted in 2-3-fold increases in excitotoxic lesion size. Pre-treatment with kynurenine 3-hydroxylase inhibitors or dopamine receptor antagonists, two classes of pharmacological agents that prevented the reduction in brain KYNA caused by dopaminergic stimulation, abolished the potentiation of neurotoxicity. Thus, the present study identifies a previously unappreciated role of KYNA as a functional link between dopamine receptor stimulation and NMDA neurotoxicity in the striatum. PMID:17629627

  3. EXTREME DELTA BRUSH EEG PATTERN IN A CASE WITH ANTI-NMDA RECEPTOR ENCEPHALITIS.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Elif; Güveli, Betül Tekin; Atakli, Dilek; Yatmazoğlu, Merve; Atay, Turan; Dayan, Cengiz

    2015-09-30

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NMDA-R encephalitis is caused by antibodies against the NMDA-R and characterized by a severe encephalopathy with psychosis, epileptic seizures and autonomic disturbances. This disorder is often accompanied with malignancies, especially ovarian teratoma. Some patients' EEGs show a different pattern similar to the waveforms of premature infants and this pattern is specifically named as extreme delta brush (EDB). We report a 24-year-old female having anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and EDB patern.

  4. Cannabinoid Receptors Couple to NMDA Receptors to Reduce the Production of NO and the Mobilization of Zinc Induced by Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Vicente-Sánchez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Overactivation of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) increases the cytosolic concentrations of calcium and zinc, which significantly contributes to neural death. Since cannabinoids prevent the NMDAR-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium, we investigated whether they also control the rise of potentially toxic free zinc ions, as well as the processes implicated in this phenomenon. Results: The cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CNR1) and NMDARs are cross-regulated in different regions of the nervous system. Cannabinoids abrogated the stimulation of the nitric oxide-zinc pathway by NMDAR, an effect that required the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). Conversely, NMDAR antagonism reduced the analgesia promoted by the CNR1 agonist WIN55,212-2 and impaired its capacity to internalize CNR1s. At the cell surface, CNR1s co-immunoprecipitated with the NR1 subunits of NMDARs, an association that diminished after the administration of NMDA in vivo or as a consequence of neuropathic overactivation of NMDARs, both situations in which cannabinoids do not control NMDAR activity. Under these circumstances, inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) restored the association between CNR1s and NR1 subunits, and cannabinoids regained control over NMDAR activity. Notably, CNR1 and NR1 associated poorly in HINT1−/− mice, in which there was little cross-regulation between these receptors. Innovation: The CNR1 can regulate NMDAR function when the receptor is coupled to HINT1. Thus, internalization of CNR1s drives the co-internalization of the NR1 subunits, neutralizing the overactivation of NMDARs. Conclusion: Cannabinoids require the HINT1 protein to counteract the toxic effects of NMDAR-mediated NO production and zinc release. This study situates the HINT1 protein at the forefront of cannabinoid protection against NMDAR-mediated brain damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1766–1782. PMID:23600761

  5. Diversity of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew K; Sattelle, David B

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. They consist of five subunits arranged around a central ion channeL Since the subunit composition determines the functional and pharmacological properties of the receptor the presence of nAChR families comprising several subunit-encodinggenes provides a molecular basis for broad functional diversity. Analyses of genome sequences have shown that nAChR gene families remain compact in diverse insect species, when compared to their nematode andvertebrate counterparts. Thus, the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae), honey bee (Apis mellifera), silk worm (Bombyx mon) and the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) possess 10-12 nAChR genes while human and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have 16 and 29 respectively. Although insect nAChRgene families are amongst the smallest known, receptor diversity can be considerably increased by the posttranscriptional processes alternative splicing and mRNA A-to-I editingwhich can potentially generate protein products which far outnumber the nAChR genes. These two processes can also generate species-specific subunit isoforms. In addition, each insect possesses at least one highly divergent nAChR subunit which may perform species-specific functions. Species-specific subunit diversification may offer promising targets for future rational design of insecticides that target specific pest insects while sparing beneficial species.

  6. NMDA Receptor Activity in Circulating Red Blood Cells: Methods of Detection.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Kaestner, Lars; Bogdanova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abundance and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in circulating red blood cells contributes to the maintenance of intracellular Ca(2+) in these cells and, by doing that, controls red cell volume, membrane stability, and O2 carrying capacity. Detection of the NMDA receptor activity in red blood cells is challenging as the number of its copies is low and shows substantial cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Receptor abundance is reliably assessed using the radiolabeled antagonist ([(3)H]MK-801) binding technique. Uptake of Ca(2+) following the NMDA receptor activation is detected in cells loaded with Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo-4 AM. Both microfluorescence live-cell imaging and flow cytometry may be used for fluorescence intensity detection. Automated patch clamp is currently used for recording of electric currents triggered by the stimulation of the NMDA receptor. These currents are mediated by the Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (Gardos) channels that open upon Ca(2+) uptake via the active NMDA receptor. Furthermore, K(+) flux through the Gardos channels induced by the NMDA receptor stimulation in red blood cells may be detected using unidirectional K(+)((86)Rb(+)) influx.

  7. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Increases NMDA-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Qu, Weijun; Zhou, Libin; Lu, Zihong; Jie, Pinghui; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate excitotoxicity, mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), plays an important role in cerebral ischemia injury. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) can be activated by multiple stimuli that may happen during stroke. The present study evaluated the effect of TRPV4 activation on NMDA-activated current (INMDA) and that of blocking TRPV4 on brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. We herein report that activation of TRPV4 by 4α-PDD and hypotonic stimulation increased INMDA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was sensitive to TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047 and NMDAR antagonist AP-5, indicating that TRPV4 activation potentiates NMDAR response. In addition, the increase in INMDA by hypotonicity was sensitive to the antagonist of NMDAR NR2B subunit, but not of NR2A subunit. Furthermore, antagonists of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) significantly attenuated hypotonicity-induced increase in INMDA, while antagonists of protein kinase C or casein kinase II had no such effect, indicating that phosphorylation of NR2B subunit by CaMKII is responsible for TRPV4-potentiated NMDAR response. Finally, we found that intracerebroventricular injection of HC-067047 after 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion reduced the cerebral infarction with at least a 12 h efficacious time-window. These findings indicate that activation of TRPV4 increases NMDAR function, which may facilitate glutamate excitotoxicity. Closing TRPV4 may exert potent neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury through many mechanisms at least including the prevention of NMDAR-mediated glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:23459987

  8. Knockout of NMDA receptors in parvalbumin interneurons recreates autism-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, John A; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N; Roberts, Timothy P; Siegel, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. Autism Res 2013, 6: 69-77. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International Society for

  9. Knockout of NMDA Receptors in Parvalbumin Interneurons Recreates Autism-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, John A.; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M.; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N.; Roberts, Timothy P.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. PMID:23441094

  10. Reciprocal and activity-dependent regulation of surface AMPA and NMDA receptors in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo Hua; Jackson, Michael F; Orser, Beverley A; MacDonald, John F

    2010-01-01

    Activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) can modulate excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system by dynamically altering the number of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs). The surface expression of NMDARs themselves is also subject to modulation in an activity-dependent manner. In addition to NMDAR-induced changes in AMPAR expression, AMPARs have also been found to regulate their own surface expression, independently of NMDARs. However, whether or not AMPARs and NMDARs might reciprocally regulate their surface expression has not previously been systematically explored. We utilized surface biotinylation assays and stimulation protocols intended to selectively stimulate various glutamate receptor subpopulations (e.g. AMPARs vs NMDARs; synaptic vs extrasynaptic). We reveal that activation of synaptic NMDARs increases the surface expression of both NMDAR and AMPAR subunits, while activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR produces the opposite effect. Surprisingly, we find that selective activation of AMPARs reduces the surface expression of not only AMPARs but also of NMDARs. These results suggest that both AMPARs and NMDARs at synaptic sites are subject to modulation by multiple signalling pathways in an activity-dependent way. PMID:21383896

  11. Upregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits and c-Fos expressing genes in PC12D cells by nobiletin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Junko; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Degawa, Masakuni; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kosuke; Oku, Naoto; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays a key role in learning and memory. Our recent studies have shown that nobiletin from citrus peels activates the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway and ameliorates NMDA receptor antagonist-induced learning impairment by activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase. For the first time, we have shown that nobiletin significantly upregulated mRNA expression of the NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B in PC12D cells. Furthermore, c-Fos mRNA expression also increased due to the action of nobiletin. Our results indicate that nobiletin modulates the expression of essential genes for learning and memory by activating the CREB signaling pathway, and suggest that this action mechanism of nobiletin plays a crucial role in improving NMDA receptor antagonist-induced learning impairment in model animals with dementia.

  12. A translational approach for NMDA receptor profiling as a vulnerability biomarker for depression and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Kenney, Joshua; Changlani, Suravi; Peixoto, Aldo; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Leone, Cheryl; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2017-03-13

    Altered N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and glutamate signaling may underlie the pathogenesis of both schizophrenia and depression in subgroups of patients. In schizophrenia, pharmacologic modeling, postmortem and imaging data suggest reduced NMDA signaling. In contrast, recent clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of the NMDA antagonist ketamine in severely depressed patients suggest increased NMDA receptor signaling. We conducted a proof of concept study to assess whether there is any in vivo evidence for an inverse association in depression and schizophrenia with respect to the NMDA receptor function. For this purpose we used a translational approach, based on findings from animal studies that NMDA receptor is a key mediator of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) release into the bloodstream. Using hypertonic saline to induce AVP release, as done in animal studies, we found that in depressed patients, NMDA receptor mediated AVP release induced by hypertonic saline infusion was significantly increased 0.24 (0.15) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , P< 0.05 compared to schizophrenia patients 0.07 (0.07) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , in whom same response was abnormally low. Slopes for healthy control were 0.11 (0.09) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , and not different than either group. These findings are consistent with implicated NMDA receptor related abnormalities in depression and schizophrenia in subgroups of patients, and provide the first in vivo evidence towards this dichotomy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Numbers, Densities, and Colocalization of AMPA- and NMDA-Type Glutamate Receptors at Individual Synapses in the Superficial Spinal Dorsal Horn of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Yugo; Eördögh, Mária; Muszil, Dóra; Molnár, Elek; Itakura, Makoto; Takahashi, Masami; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play important roles in spinal processing of nociceptive sensory signals and induction of central sensitization in chronic pain. Here we applied highly sensitive freeze-fracture replica labeling to laminae I–II of the spinal dorsal horn of rats and investigated the numbers, densities, and colocalization of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors at individual postsynaptic membrane specializations with a high resolution. All glutamatergic postsynaptic membranes in laminae I–II expressed AMPA receptors, and most of them (96%) were also immunoreactive for the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors. The numbers of gold particles for AMPA and NMDA receptors at individual postsynaptic membranes showed a linear correlation with the size of postsynaptic membrane specializations and varied in the range of 8–214 and 5–232 with median values of 37 and 28, whereas their densities varied in the range of 325–3365/μm2 and 102–2263/μm2 with median values of 1115/μm2 and 777/μm2, respectively. Virtually all (99%) glutamatergic postsynaptic membranes expressed GluR2, and most of them (87%) were also immunoreactive for GluR1. The numbers of gold particles for pan-AMPA, NR1, and GluR2 subunits showed a linear correlation with the size of postsynaptic surface areas. Concerning GluR1, there may be two populations of synapses with high and low GluR1 densities. In synapses larger than 0.1 μm2, GluR1 subunits were recovered in very low numbers. Differential expression of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits suggests regulation of AMPA receptor subunit composition by presynaptic mechanism. PMID:18815255

  14. Blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to repeated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hingne, Priyanka M.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated daily application transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) results in tolerance, at spinal opioid receptors, to the anti-hyperalgesia produced by TENS. Since N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists prevent analgesic tolerance to opioid agonists we hypothesized that blockade of NMDA receptors will prevent tolerance to TENS. In rats with knee joint inflammation, TENS was applied for 20 minute daily at high frequency (100 Hz), low frequency (4 Hz), or sham TENS. Rats were treated with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg-0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily before TENS. Paw withdrawal thresholds were tested before and after inflammation, and before and after TENS treatment for 4 days. On day 1 TENS reversed the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold induced by joint inflammation. On day 4 TENS had no effect on the decreased withdrawal threshold in the group treated with vehicle demonstrating development of tolerance. However, in the group treated with 0.1 mg/kg MK-801, TENS significantly reversed the mechanical withdrawal thresholds on day 4 demonstrating that tolerance did not develop. Vehicle treated animals developed cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Treatment with MK-801 reversed this cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. In summary, blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to daily TENS by preventing tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Perspective Tolerance observed to the clinical treatment of TENS could be prevented by administration of pharmaceutical agents with NMDA receptors activity such as ketamine or dextromethorphan. PMID:18061543

  15. Manganese inhibits NMDA receptor channel function: implications to psychiatric and cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, Tomás R; Chen, Ming-Kai

    2007-11-01

    Humans exposed to excess levels of manganese (Mn(2+)) express psychiatric problems and deficits in attention and learning and memory. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on molecular mechanisms by which Mn(2+) produces such effects. We now report that Mn(2+) is a potent inhibitor of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel in rat neuronal membrane preparations. The inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 to the NMDA receptor channel by Mn(2+) was activity-dependent since Mn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor in the presence of the NMDA receptor co-agonists glutamate and glycine (K(i)=35.9+/-3.1 microM) than in their absence (K(i)=157.1+/-6.5 microM). We also show that Mn(2+) is a NMDA receptor channel blocker since its inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel is competitive in nature. That is, Mn(2+) significantly increased the affinity constant (K(d)) with no significant effect on the maximal number of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding sites (B(max)). Under stimulating conditions, Mn(2+) was equipotent in inhibiting [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors expressed in neuronal membrane preparations from different brain regions. However, under basal, non-stimulated conditions, Mn(2+) was more potent in inhibiting NMDA receptors in the cerebellum than other brain regions. We have previously shown that chronic Mn(2+) exposure in non-human primates increases Cu(2+), but not zinc or iron concentrations in the basal ganglia [Guilarte TR, Chen M-K, McGlothan JL, Verina T, Wong DF, Zhou Y, Alexander M, Rohde CA, Syversen T, Decamp E, Koser AJ, Fritz S, Gonczi H, Anderson DW, Schneider JS. Nigrostriatal dopamine system dysfunction and subtle motor deficits in manganese-exposed non-human primates. Exp Neurol 2006a;202:381-90]. Therefore, we also tested the inhibitory effects of Cu(2+) on [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel. The data shows that Cu(2+) in the presence of glutamate and glycine is a more potent inhibitor of the NMDA receptor than Mn(2

  16. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  17. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R; Buckley, Camilla; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2014-06-01

    To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody-positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. THREE DISTINCT CLINICORADIOLOGIC PHENOTYPES WERE RECOGNIZED: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease.

  18. Cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jung-Won; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lim, Jung-Ah; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2015-12-01

    Patients with anti-NMDA receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis frequently suffer from autonomic dysfunctions, which can cause substantial morbidity. This study assessed cardiac autonomic functions in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. This was a retrospective single-center case-control study. Eleven patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. To ensure that autonomic dysfunction does not occur in any encephalitis, we additionally analyzed HRV of 9 patients with herpes encephalitis (HSE) and compared with that of NMDAR encephalitis patients and controls. Five minute resting stationary electrocardiogram was collected from each subject, and HRV was analyzed. Total power and low frequency (LF) power were lower in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients than those in controls (p=0.005, 0.001 respectively), indicating cardiac autonomic dysfunction especially in sympathetic system. Patients with HSE showed no significant difference in HRV parameters compared with that of controls. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction was associated with 3 month functional outcome in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients.

  19. Remodeling of striatal NMDA receptors by chronic A(2A) receptor blockade in Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Ferrante, Antonella; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Ferretti, Roberta; Pézzola, Antonella; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease (HD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate excitotoxicity and have been suggested to play a pathogenetic role in HD. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of A(2A)R blockade on the expression and functions of NMDA receptors in the striatum of HD mice (R6/2). We found that 3 weeks' treatment with SCH 58261 (0.01 mg/kg/day i.p. from the 8th week of age) modified NR1 and NR2A/NR2B expression in the striatum of R6/2 (Western blotting) while had no effect on NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices (electrophysiological experiments). In conclusion, in vivo A(2A)R blockade induced a remodeling of NMDA receptors in the striatum of HD mice. Even though the functional relevance of the above effect remains to be fully elucidated, these results add further evidence to the modulatory role of A(2A)Rs in HD.

  20. Natural Reward Experience Alters AMPA and NMDA Receptor Distribution and Function in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Pitchers, Kyle K.; Schmid, Susanne; Di Sebastiano, Andrea R.; Wang, Xu; Laviolette, Steven R.; Lehman, Michael N.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2012-01-01

    Natural reward and drugs of abuse converge upon the mesolimbic system which mediates motivation and reward behaviors. Drugs induce neural adaptations in this system, including transcriptional, morphological, and synaptic changes, which contribute to the development and expression of drug-related memories and addiction. Previously, it has been reported that sexual experience in male rats, a natural reward behavior, induces similar neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic system and affects natural reward and drug-related behavior. The current study determined whether sexual experience causes long-lasting changes in mating, or ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking or function in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), following 3 different reward abstinence periods: 1 day, 1 week, or 1 month after final mating session. Male Sprague Dawley rats mated during 5 consecutive days (sexual experience) or remained sexually naïve to serve as controls. Sexually experienced males displayed facilitation of initiation and performance of mating at each time point. Next, intracellular and membrane surface expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA: NR1 subunit) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA: GluA1, GluA2 subunits) receptors in the NAc was determined using a bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3) protein cross-linking assay followed by Western Blot analysis. NR1 expression was increased at 1 day abstinence both at surface and intracellular, but decreased at surface at 1 week of abstinence. GluA2 was increased intracellularly at 1 week and increased at the surface after 1 month of abstinence. Finally, whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiological recordings determined reduced AMPA/NMDA ratio of synaptic currents in NAc shell neurons following stimulation of cortical afferents in sexually experienced males after all reward abstinence periods. Together, these data show that sexual experience causes long-term alterations in glutamate receptor expression and function in the

  1. Mouse ES cells overexpressing DNMT1 produce abnormal neurons with upregulated NMDA/NR1 subunit.

    PubMed

    D'Aiuto, Leonardo; Di Maio, Roberto; Mohan, K Naga; Minervini, Crescenzio; Saporiti, Federica; Soreca, Isabella; Greenamyre, J Timothy; Chaillet, J Richard

    2011-07-01

    High levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), hypermethylation, and downregulation of GAD(67) and reelin have been described in GABAergic interneurons of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorders. However, overexpression of DNMT1 is lethal, making it difficult to assess the direct effect of high levels of DNMT1 on neuronal development in vivo. We therefore used Dnmt1(tet/tet) mouse ES cells that overexpress DNMT1 as an in vitro model to investigate the impact of high levels of DNMT1 on neuronal differentiation. Although there is down-regulation of DNMT1 during early stages of differentiation in wild type and Dnmt1(tet/tet) ES cell lines, neurons derived from Dnmt1(tet/tet) cells showed abnormal dendritic arborization and branching. The Dnmt1(tet/tet) neuronal cells also showed elevated levels of functional N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a feature also reported in some neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Considering the roles of reelin and GAD(67) in neuronal networking and excitatory/inhibitory balance, respectively, we studied methylation of these genes' promoters in Dnmt1(tet/tet) ES cells and neurons. Both reelin and GAD(67) promoters were not hypermethylated in the Dnmt1(tet/tet) ES cells and neurons, suggesting that overexpression of DNMT1 may not directly result in methylation-mediated repression of these two genes. Taken together, our results suggest that overexpression of DNMT1 in ES cells results in an epigenetic change prior to the onset of differentiation. This epigenetic change in turn results in abnormal neuronal differentiation and upregulation of functional NMDA receptor. Copyright © 2011 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer's disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs) of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs. PMID:28163934

  3. Full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol augments nicotine self-administration by altering ventral tegmental dopaminergic function due to NMDA receptors in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Emily E; Sharp, Burt M; Chen, Hao; Matta, Shannon G

    2014-03-01

    In adult rats, we have shown full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol (Nic + EtOH) augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) (increased nicotine intake) compared to pair-fed (PF) offspring. Therefore, we hypothesized that full-gestational exposure to Nic + EtOH disrupts control of dopaminergic (DA) circuitry by ventral tegmental area (VTA) NMDA receptors, augmenting nicotine SA and DA release in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of adolescents. Both NAcc DA and VTA glutamate release were hyper-responsive to intra-VTA NMDA in Nic + EtOH offspring versus PF (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Similarly, DA release was more responsive to i.v. nicotine in Nic + EtOH offspring (p = 0.02). Local DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid sodium salt (AP5) (NMDA receptor antagonist) infusion into the VTA inhibited nicotine-stimulated DA release in Nic + EtOH and PF offspring. Nicotine SA was augmented in adolescent Nic + EtOH versus PF offspring (p = 0.000001). Daily VTA microinjections of AP5 reduced nicotine SA by Nic + EtOH offspring, without affecting PF (p = 0.000032). Indeed, nicotine SA in Nic + EtOH offspring receiving AP5 was not different from PF offspring. Both VTA mRNA transcripts and NMDA receptor subunit proteins were not altered in Nic + EtOH offspring. In summary, adolescent offspring exposed to gestational Nic + EtOH show markedly increased vulnerability to become dependent on nicotine. This reflects the enhanced function of a subpopulation of VTA NMDA receptors that confer greater nicotine-induced DA release in NAcc. We hypothesized that concurrent gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol would disrupt the control of VTA dopaminergic circuitry by NMDA receptors. Resulting in the augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) in adolescent offspring.

  4. Reconsolidation of Reminder-Induced Amnesia: Role of NMDA and AMPA Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Kozyrev, S A; Solntseva, S V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the role of glutamate receptors and reminder in the mechanisms of amnesia maintenance caused by disruption of conditioned food aversion reconsolidation with an antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptor in snails. At the early stage of amnesia (day 3 after induction), injection or NMDA of AMPA glutamate receptor antagonists prior to reminder (presentation of the conditioned food stimulus) led to memory recovery. Reminder alone or injection of antagonists without reminder or after reminder was ineffective. At the late stage of amnesia (day 10), antagonists/reminder had no effect on amnesia maintenance. It was hypothesized that reminder at the early stage of amnesia led to reactivation and reconsolidation of the molecular processes of amnesia including activation NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors. Injection of antagonists of these receptors prior to reminder led to disruption of reactivation/reconsolidation of amnesia and recovery of the conditioned food aversion memory.

  5. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  6. Developmental Expression Patterns of GABAA Receptor Subunits in Layer 3 and 5 Pyramidal Cells of Monkey Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dibyadeep; Arion, Dominique; Lewis, David A

    2015-08-01

    Cortical pyramidal neuron activity is regulated in part through inhibitory inputs mediated by GABAA receptors. The subunit composition of these receptors confers distinct functional properties. Thus, developmental shifts in subunit expression will likely influence the characteristics of pyramidal cell firing and the functional maturation of processes that depend on these neurons. We used laser microdissection and PCR to quantify postnatal developmental changes in the expression of GABAA receptor subunits (α1, α2, α5, β2, γ2, and δ) in layer 3 pyramidal cells of monkey prefrontal cortex, which are critical for working memory. To determine the specificity of these changes, we examined glutamate receptor subunits (AMPA Glur1 and NMDA Grin1) and conducted the same analyses in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Expression of GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs changed substantially, whereas glutamate receptor subunit changes were modest over postnatal development. Some transcripts (e.g., GABAA α1) progressively increased from birth until adulthood, whereas others (e.g., GABAA α2) declined with age. Changes in some transcripts were present in only one layer (e.g., GABAA δ). The development of GABAA receptor subunit expression in primate prefrontal pyramidal neurons is protracted and subunit- and layer-specific. These trajectories might contribute to the molecular basis for the maturation of working memory.

  7. The antiparkinsonian drugs budipine and biperiden are use-dependent (uncompetitive) NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jackisch, R; Kruchen, A; Sauermann, W; Hertting, G; Feuerstein, T J

    1994-10-24

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) evoked [3H]acetylcholine release in rabbit caudate nucleus slices was inhibited by the antiparkinsonian drugs budipine (1-tert-butyl-4,4-diphenylpiperidine) and biperiden (1-bicyclo[2.2.1.]hept-5-en-2-yl-1-phenyl-3-piperidino propanol) yielding functional Ki values of 4.6 and 8.8 microM. In contrast to the competitive antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentaonate, budipine and biperidene significantly reduced both the apparent KD and the Emax value of NMDA. Moreover, they displaced [3H]MK-801 specifically bound to membranes of the same tissue, although with low affinity (IC50: 38 and 92 microM). It is concluded that budipine and biperiden are use-dependent (uncompetitive) antagonists at the NMDA receptor, binding to the receptor-linked ion channel, but probably not to the MK-801 binding site. NMDA antagonism may contribute to the antiparkinsonian effects of budipine.

  8. Synthesis of C5-tetrazole derivatives of 2-amino-adipic acid displaying NMDA glutamate receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Lenda, Fatimazohra; Crouzin, Nadine; Cavalier, Mélanie; Guiramand, Janique; Lanté, Fabien; Barbanel, Gérard; Cohen-Solal, Catherine; Martinez, Jean; Guenoun, Farhate; Lamaty, Frédéric; Vignes, Michel

    2011-03-01

    Five derivatives of 2-amino-adipic acid bearing a tetrazole-substituted in C5 position were synthesized. These compounds displayed selective antagonism towards N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptors compared with AMPA receptors, and they were devoid of any neurotoxicity. Among these five analogues, one exhibited a higher affinity for synaptic NMDA responses than the other four. Therefore, C5 tetrazole-substituted of 2-amino-adipic acid represent an interesting series of new NMDA receptor antagonists. This approach may be considered as a new strategy to develop ligands specifically targeted to synaptic or extra-synaptic NMDA receptors.

  9. Structure-activity relationships for allosteric NMDA receptor inhibitors based on 2-naphthoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard J.; Mayo-Martin, Maria Belen; Laube, Bodo; Jane, David E.; Monaghan, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is critically involved in many neurological conditions, thus there has been considerable interest in developing NMDA receptor antagonists. We have recently identified a series of naphthoic and phenanthroic acid compounds that allosterically modulate NMDA receptors through a novel mechanism of action. In the present study, we have determined the structure-activity relationships of 18 naphthoic acid derivatives for the ability to inhibit the four GluN1/GluN2(A-D) NMDA receptor subtypes. 2-Naphthoic acid has low activity at GluN2A-containing receptors and yet lower activity at other NMDA receptors. 3-Amino addition, and especially 3-hydroxy addition, to 2-naphthoic acid increased inhibitory activity at GluN1/GluN2C and GluN1/GluN2D receptors. Further halogen and phenyl substitutions to 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid leads to several relatively potent inhibitors, the most potent of which is UBP618 (1-bromo-2-hydroxy-6-phenylnaphthalene-3-carboxylic acid) with an IC50 ~ 2 μM at each of the NMDA receptor subtypes. While UBP618 is non-selective, elimination of the hydroxyl group in UBP618, as in UBP628 and UBP608, leads to an increase in GluN1/GluN2A selectivity. Of the compounds evaluated, specifically those with a 6-phenyl substitution were less able to fully inhibit GluN1/GluN2A, GluN1/GluN2B and GluN1/GluN2C responses (maximal % inhibition of 60 – 90%). Such antagonists may potentially have reduced adverse effects by not excessively blocking NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these studies reveal discrete structure-activity relationships for the allosteric antagonism of NMDA receptors that may facilitate the development of NMDA receptor modulator agents for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. PMID:22155206

  10. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K; Mayer, Mark L

    2015-11-03

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.

  11. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    DOE PAGES

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; ...

    2015-10-12

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysismore » reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. In this paper, we hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and finally suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.« less

  12. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K.; Mayer, Mark L.

    2015-10-12

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. In this paper, we hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and finally suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.

  13. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K.; Mayer, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species. PMID:26460032

  14. Identity of the NMDA receptor coagonist is synapse specific and developmentally regulated in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Le Bail, Matildé; Martineau, Magalie; Sacchi, Silvia; Yatsenko, Natalia; Radzishevsky, Inna; Conrod, Sandrine; Ait Ouares, Karima; Wolosker, Herman; Pollegioni, Loredano; Billard, Jean-Marie; Mothet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-13

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) require the coagonists D-serine or glycine for their activation, but whether the identity of the coagonist could be synapse specific and developmentally regulated remains elusive. We therefore investigated the contribution of D-serine and glycine by recording NMDAR-mediated responses at hippocampal Schaffer collaterals (SC)-CA1 and medial perforant path-dentate gyrus (mPP-DG) synapses in juvenile and adult rats. Selective depletion of endogenous coagonists with enzymatic scavengers as well as pharmacological inhibition of endogenous D-amino acid oxidase activity revealed that D-serine is the preferred coagonist at SC-CA1 mature synapses, whereas, unexpectedly, glycine is mainly involved at mPP-DG synapses. Nevertheless, both coagonist functions are driven by the levels of synaptic activity as inferred by recording long-term potentiation generated at both connections. This regional compartmentalization in the coagonist identity is associated to different GluN1/GluN2A to GluN1/GluN2B subunit composition of synaptic NMDARs. During postnatal development, the replacement of GluN2B- by GluN2A-containing NMDARs at SC-CA1 synapses parallels a change in the identity of the coagonist from glycine to D-serine. In contrast, NMDARs subunit composition at mPP-DG synapses is not altered and glycine remains the main coagonist throughout postnatal development. Altogether, our observations disclose an unprecedented relationship in the identity of the coagonist not only with the GluN2 subunit composition at synaptic NMDARs but also with astrocyte activity in the developing and mature hippocampus that reconciles the complementary functions of D-serine And Glycine In Modulating Nmdars During The Maturation Of Tripartite Glutamatergic Synapses.

  15. Drug discrimination analysis of NMDA receptor channel blockers as nicotinic receptor antagonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, E S; Danysz, W; Bespalov, A Y

    2005-04-01

    Antagonists acting at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors inhibit various phenomena associated with exposures to nicotine (e.g., tolerance, sensitization, dependence, and intravenous self-administration). These effects are often discussed in terms of nicotine-induced glutamate release with subsequent glutamate-dependent stimulation of dopamine metabolism and neuronal plasticity in brain areas critically involved in drug-addiction mechanisms. However, it is also well established that certain types of NMDA receptor antagonists (channel blockers) potently bind to nicotinic receptors and may act as nicotinic receptor antagonists. The present study aimed to evaluate the discriminative-stimulus effects of the NMDA receptor channel blockers (+)MK-801, dextromethorphan, and memantine in rats trained to discriminate nicotine from its vehicle. Adult male Wistar rats were trained to discriminate 0.6 mg/kg nicotine from saline under a two-lever, fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food reinforcement. During test sessions, injections of (+)MK-801 (0.03--0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), dextromethorphan (30 mg/kg, s.c.), or memantine (1--10 mg/kg, i.p.) were co-administered with s.c. nicotine (0.075--0.6 mg/kg; interaction tests) or saline (generalization tests). Additional interaction and generalization tests were conducted with the selective nicotinic receptor antagonists mecamylamine (0.1--3 mg/kg, s.c.) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3--10 mg/kg, i.p.), and the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP (3--10 mg/kg, i.p.). In generalization tests, none of the compounds produced any appreciable levels of substitution for nicotine. The nicotine discriminative-stimulus control was dose dependently attenuated by mecamylamine (ED(50)=0.67 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (ED(50)=9.7 mg/kg). Both agents produced a marked downward shift in the nicotine dose-response curve. Memantine and MPEP slightly attenuated nicotine discriminative-stimulus effects, while (+)MK-801 and dextromethorphan did not affect the

  16. DISPLACEMENT OF α-ACTININ FROM THE NMDA RECEPTOR NR1 C0 DOMAIN BY Ca2+/CALMODULIN PROMOTES CAMKII BINDING

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Michelle A.; Malik, Zulfiqar; Akyol, Zeynep; Bartos, Jason A.; Leonard, A. Soren; Hudmon, Andy; Shea, Madeline A.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor triggers activation and postsynaptic accumulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII, calmodulin, and α-actinin directly bind to the short membrane proximal C0 domain of the C-terminal region of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit. In a negative feedback loop, calmodulin mediates Ca2+-dependent inactivation of the NMDA receptor by displacing α-actinin from NR1 C0 upon Ca2+ influx. We show that Ca2+-depleted calmodulin and α-actinin simultaneously bind to NR1 C0. Upon addition of Ca2+, calmodulin dislodges α-actinin. Either the N- or C-terminal half of calmodulin is sufficient for Ca2+-induced displacement of α-actinin. While α-actinin directly antagonizes CaMKII binding to NR1 C0, the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin shifts binding of NR1 C0 toward CaMKII by displacing α-actinin. Displacement of α-actinin results in the simultaneous binding of calmodulin and CaMKII to NR1 C0. Our results reveal an intricate mechanism whereby Ca2+ functions to govern the complex interactions between the two most prevalent signaling molecules in synaptic plasticity, the NMDA receptor and CaMKII. PMID:17602661

  17. Differential modulation of GABAA and NMDA receptors by α7-nicotinic receptor desensitization in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Cui, Wen-yu; Chen, Ru-zhu; Wang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the modulatory effect of desensitized α7-containing nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChRs) on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons and to identify the mechanism underlying this effect. Methods: Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on cultured rat hippocampal neurons to measure α7-nAChR currents and to determine the role of desensitized α7-nAChRs on brain amino acid receptor activity. Results: Pulse and perfusion applications of the α7-nAChR agonist choline were applied to induce different types of α7-nAChR desensitization in cultured hippocampal neurons. After a brief choline pulse, α7-nAChR was desensitized as a result of receptor activation, which reduced the response of the A type γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor to its agonist, muscimol, and enhanced the response of the NMDA receptor to its agonist NMDA. By contrast, the responses of glycine or AMPA receptors to their agonists, glycine or AMPA, respectively, were not affected. Pretreatment with the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA, 10 nmol/L) blocked the choline-induced negative modulation of the GABAA receptor and the positive modulation of the NMDA receptor. The regulation of the GABAA and NMDA receptors was confirmed using another type of α7-nAChR desensitization, which was produced by a low concentration of choline perfusion. The negative modulation of the GABAA receptor was characterized by choline-duration dependency and intracellular calcium dependency, but the positive modulation of the NMDA receptor was not associated with cytoplasmic calcium. Conclusion: Brain GABAA and NMDA receptors are modulated negatively and positively, respectively, by desensitized α7-nAChR as a result of choline pretreatment in cultured hippocampal neurons. PMID:26806304

  18. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE) pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE. PMID:25649724

  19. Memory retrieval requires ongoing protein synthesis and NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joëlle; Gamache, Karine; Schneider, Rilla; Nader, Karim

    2015-02-11

    Whereas consolidation and reconsolidation are considered dynamic processes requiring protein synthesis, memory retrieval has long been considered a passive readout of previously established plasticity. However, previous findings suggest that memory retrieval may be more dynamic than previously thought. This study therefore aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying memory retrieval in the rat. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors (rapamycin or anisomycin) in the amygdala 10 min before memory retrieval transiently impaired auditory fear memory expression, suggesting ongoing protein synthesis is required to enable memory retrieval. We then investigated the role of protein synthesis in NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking. Coinfusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist (ifenprodil) or infusion of an AMPA receptor endocytosis inhibitor (GluA23Y) before rapamycin prevented this memory impairment. Furthermore, rapamycin transiently decreased GluA1 levels at the postsynaptic density (PSD), but did not affect extrasynaptic sites. This effect at the PSD was prevented by an infusion of GluA23Y before rapamycin. Together, these data show that ongoing protein synthesis is required before memory retrieval is engaged, and suggest that this protein synthesis may be involved in the NMDAR activity-mediated trafficking of AMPA receptors that takes place during memory retrieval.

  20. Modulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors by synaptic and tonic zinc

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles T.; Radford, Robert J.; Zastrow, Melissa L.; Zhang, Daniel Y.; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    Many excitatory synapses contain high levels of mobile zinc within glutamatergic vesicles. Although synaptic zinc and glutamate are coreleased, it is controversial whether zinc diffuses away from the release site or whether it remains bound to presynaptic membranes or proteins after its release. To study zinc transmission and quantify zinc levels, we required a high-affinity rapid zinc chelator as well as an extracellular ratiometric fluorescent zinc sensor. We demonstrate that tricine, considered a preferred chelator for studying the role of synaptic zinc, is unable to efficiently prevent zinc from binding low-nanomolar zinc-binding sites, such as the high-affinity zinc-binding site found in NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we used ZX1, which has a 1 nM zinc dissociation constant and second-order rate constant for binding zinc that is 200-fold higher than those for tricine and CaEDTA. We find that synaptic zinc is phasically released during action potentials. In response to short trains of presynaptic stimulation, synaptic zinc diffuses beyond the synaptic cleft where it inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. During higher rates of presynaptic stimulation, released glutamate activates additional extrasynaptic NMDARs that are not reached by synaptically released zinc, but which are inhibited by ambient, tonic levels of nonsynaptic zinc. By performing a ratiometric evaluation of extracellular zinc levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, we determined the tonic zinc levels to be low nanomolar. These results demonstrate a physiological role for endogenous synaptic as well as tonic zinc in inhibiting extrasynaptic NMDARs and thereby fine tuning neuronal excitability and signaling. PMID:25947151

  1. Underlying mechanism for NMDA receptor antagonism by the anti-inflammatory drug, sulfasalazine, in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ji-Hyun; Gwag, Byoung-Joo; Chung, Jun-Mo

    2006-01-01

    Sulfasalazine (SULFA), of anti-inflammatory drugs, shows a protective action against NMDA-induced neuronal toxicity. Here, we used an electrophysiological study of the pharmacological effects of SULFA on NMDA receptors to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective role of SULFA. The drug acted as a typical noncompetitive inhibitor with neither agonist- nor use-dependency, and antagonized NMDA-evoked responses in a voltage-independent manner, suggesting that SULFA is not an open channel blocker. Noise and single channel analyses showed that SULFA-blocked NMDA responses by reducing the number of NMDA channels available for activation, and also reduced the channel open probability without changing single channel conductance. Moreover, SULFA accelerated NMDA desensitization without affecting the affinity of the receptor for NMDA or glutamate. Taken together, these data indicate that SULFA blocks the NMDA response by reducing the number of NMDA channels available for activation. This appears to occur via a SULFA-induced decrease in the channel open probability, and a concomitant acceleration of the desensitization response, which is likely associated with a reduced affinity for glycine. SULFA indeed decreased the glycine-potentiated NMDA response without binding directly to the glycine site. Our results suggest that SULFA acts as a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist with an allosteric glycine modulation.

  2. Opposite Roles of NMDA Receptors in Relapsing and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Silvia; Studer, Valeria; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Motta, Caterina; Coghe, Giancarlo; Fenu, Giuseppe; Caillier, Stacy; Buttari, Fabio; Mori, Francesco; Barbieri, Francesca; Castelli, Maura; De Chiara, Valentina; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Mancino, Raffaele; Bernardi, Giorgio; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Marrosu, Maria G.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Centonze, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic transmission and plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) could modulate the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here the role of NMDARs in MS was first explored in 691 subjects carrying specific allelic variants of the NR1 subunit gene or of the NR2B subunit gene of this glutamate receptor. The analysis was replicated for significant SNPs in an independent sample of 1548 MS subjects. The C allele of rs4880213 was found to be associated with reduced NMDAR-mediated cortical excitability, and with increased probability of having more disability than the CT/TT MS subjects. MS severity was higher in the CC group among relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients, while primary progressive MS (PP-MS) subjects homozygous for the T allele had more pronounced clinical worsening. Mean time to first relapse, but not to an active MRI scan, was lower in the CC group of RR-MS patients, and the number of subjects with two or more clinical relapses in the first two years of the disease was higher in CC compared to CT/TT group. Furthermore, the percentage of relapses associated with residual disability was lower in subjects carrying the T allele. Lesion load at the MRI was conversely unaffected by the C or T allele of this SNP in RR-MS patients. Axonal and neuronal degeneration at the optical coherence tomography was more severe in the TT group of PP-MS patients, while reduced retinal nerve fiber thickness had less consequences on visual acuity in RR-MS patients bearing the T allele. Finally, the T allele was associated with preserved cognitive abilities at the Rao’s brief repeatable neuropsychological battery in RR-MS. Signaling through glutamate NMDARs enhances both compensatory synaptic plasticity and excitotoxic neurodegeneration, impacting in opposite ways on RR-MS and PP-MS pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:23840674

  3. Role of ventral hippocampal NMDA receptors in anxiolytic-like effect of morphine.

    PubMed

    Motevasseli, Tahmineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Nayer-Nouri, Touraj

    2010-12-02

    The possible role of ventral hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior in an elevated plus maze (EPM) task was investigated in the present study. Adult male mice (7 per group) with cannulas aimed at the ventral hippocampus (VH) received NMDA or a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 with or without morphine and 30min later were subjected to an EPM task. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of morphine (3-9mg/kg) increased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT) and open arm entries (%OAE), which suggested an anxiolytic-like effect. Intra-VH microinjection of NMDA (0.5-1μg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of morphine (3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased %OAT and %OAE. However, microinjections of the same doses of NMDA into the VH in the absence of morphine had no effect on %OAT and %OAE. Intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 (0.5-2μg/mouse) decreased the anxiolytic-like effect of morphine, while intra-VH microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 alone increased %OAT and %OAE, which indicated an anxiolytic response. Furthermore, intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 reversed the effect of NMDA response to the administration of a lower morphine dose as seen in the EPM task. It should be noted that intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 plus NMDA, 5min before morphine increased locomotor activity, while other treatments had no effect on this parameter. The results suggest that VH-NMDA receptors participate in the mediation of morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior.

  4. Vagal afferent-dependent cholecystokinin modulation of visceral pain requires central amygdala NMDA-NR2B receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, E M; Li, W T; Yan, X J; Chen, X; Liu, Q; Feng, C C; Cao, Z J; Fang, J Y; Chen, S L

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a gut hormone that is released during feeding, exerts gastrointestinal effects in part through vagal pathway. It is reported to be a potential trigger for increased postprandial visceral sensitivity in healthy subjects and, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. NR2B-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the central amygdala (CeA) participate in pain modulation. Systemically administered CCK activates the CeA-innervating neurons. Here, we investigated whether CCK modulation of visceral sensitivity is mediated through CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors and whether this modulation involves vagal pathway. We first examined the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD) following i.p. injection of CCK octapeptide (CCK-8) in a rat model. Next, the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil and the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 were microinjected into the CeA before systemic CCK injection. NR2B phosphorylation was detected by Western blot. To down-regulate NR2B gene expression, NR2B-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into CeA neurons by electroporation. In addition, the effects of functional deafferentation by perivagal application of capsaicin and pretreatment with the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide were investigated. CCK-8 increased VMR to CRD in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by intra-CeA administration of ifenprodil (but not NVP-AAM077) and was accompanied by phosphorylation of NR2B subunits in the CeA. CCK failed to increase VMR to CRD in NR2B siRNA-treated rats. Perivagal capsaicin application and pretreatment with devazepide prevented CCK-induced pronociception and CeA NR2B phosphorylation. The pronociception induced by systemic CCK, which is vagal afferent-dependent, requires activation of CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism impairs NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Ipe; Bath, Kevin G; Dagar, Karishma; Perez-Castro, Rosalia; Plummer, Mark R; Lee, Francis S; Chao, Moses V

    2010-06-30

    The Val66Met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene results in a defect in regulated release of BDNF and affects episodic memory and affective behaviors. However, the precise role of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity has not yet been studied. Therefore, we examined synaptic properties in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses of BDNF(Met/Met) mice and matched wild-type mice. Although basal glutamatergic neurotransmission was normal, both young and adult mice showed a significant reduction in NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation. We also found that NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression was decreased in BDNF(Met/Met) mice. However, mGluR-dependent long-term depression was not affected by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Consistent with the NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity impairment, we observed a significant decrease in NMDA receptor neurotransmission in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of BDNF(Met/Met) mice. Thus, these results show that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has a direct effect on NMDA receptor transmission, which may account for changes in synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  6. Desensitization of AMPA receptors and AMPA-NMDA receptor interaction: an in vivo cyclic GMP microdialysis study in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, E.; Raiteri, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Desensitization is an important characteristic of glutamate receptors of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type. 2. Stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or AMPA receptors in cerebellum results in increased production of cyclic GMP. We have investigated AMPA receptor desensitization in vivo by monitoring extracellular cyclic GMP during intracerebellar microdialysis in conscious unrestrained adult rats. 3. Local infusion of AMPA (10 to 100 microM) caused dose-related elevations of cyclic GMP levels. The effect of AMPA was prevented by the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG). 4. In the absence of AMPA, DNQX lowered the basal levels of cyclic GMP whereas the NMDA receptor channel antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) was ineffective. 5. Cyclothiazide, a blocker of AMPA receptor desensitization, potentiated the cyclic GMP response to exogenous AMPA. Moreover, cyclothiazide (100-300 microM) produced on its own dose-dependent elevations of extracellular cyclic GMP. The cyclothiazide-induced response was prevented not only by DNQX but also by MK-801. 6. While the cyclic GMP response elicited by AMPA was totally insensitive to MK-801, the response produced by AMPA (10 microM) plus cyclothiazide (30 microM) was strongly attenuated by the NMDA receptor antagonist (30 microM). 7. The results suggest that (a) AMPA receptors linked to the NO-cyclic GMP pathway in the cerebellum can undergo desensitization in vivo during exposure to exogenous AMPA; cyclothiazide inhibits such desensitization; (b) AMPA receptors (but not NMDA receptors) are 'tonically' activated and kept in a partly desensitized state by endogenous glutamate; (c) if cyclothiazide is present, activation of AMPA receptors may permit endogenous activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:8882607

  7. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase. PMID:25954808

  8. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase.

  9. Dopamine promotes NMDA receptor hypofunction in the retina through D1 receptor-mediated Csk activation, Src inhibition and decrease of GluN2B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Socodato, Renato; Santiago, Felipe N.; Portugal, Camila C.; Domith, Ivan; Encarnação, Thaísa G.; Loiola, Erick C.; Ventura, Ana L. M.; Cossenza, Marcelo; Relvas, João B.; Castro, Newton G.; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine and glutamate are critical neurotransmitters involved in light-induced synaptic activity in the retina. In brain neurons, dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) and the cytosolic protein tyrosine kinase Src can, independently, modulate the behavior of NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Here we studied the interplay between D1Rs, Src and NMDARs in retinal neurons. We reveal that dopamine-mediated D1R stimulation provoked NMDAR hypofunction in retinal neurons by attenuating NMDA-gated currents, by preventing NMDA-elicited calcium mobilization and by decreasing the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit GluN2B. This dopamine effect was dependent on upregulation of the canonical D1R/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/PKA pathway, of PKA-induced activation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and of Src inhibition. Accordingly, knocking down Csk or overexpressing a Csk phosphoresistant Src mutant abrogated the dopamine-induced NMDAR hypofunction. Overall, the interplay between dopamine and NMDAR hypofunction, through the D1R/Csk/Src/GluN2B pathway, might impact on light-regulated synaptic activity in retinal neurons. PMID:28098256

  10. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  11. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  12. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: Role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Paul J.; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A.; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5–2.5 mg/kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg/kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg/kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 μM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1–10 ng/side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug. PMID:18418357

  13. Selective Regulation of NR2B by Protein Phosphatase-1 for the Control of the NMDA Receptor in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2012-01-01

    An imbalance between pro-surviva