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Sample records for nmr solution structure

  1. Dilute Bicellar Solutions for Structural NMR Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struppe, Jochem; Vold, Regitze R.

    1998-12-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy has been employed to characterize the concentration dependence of orientational order in DMPC/DHPC bicellar solutions with molar ratiosq= [DMPC]/[DHPC] = 3.3, 2.7, and 2.3. The stability of a discotic nematic phase can, in general, be predicted from a simple Onsager picture involving the size and concentration of the mesogenic unit, but for the bicellar solutions this model is not adequate. Specifically, macroscopic alignment is observed at total lipid concentrations well below that, 1-10% (w/w) predicted by Onsager's model. Thus the discotic nematic phase is stable to ≈3-5% (w/w) forq= 3.3-2.3, and the bicellar order is highest just before phase separation occurs at the minimum total phospholipid concentration. This implies the presence of a DHPCbic⇄ DHPCsolequilibrium in establishing bicellar size, thereby extending the range of concentrations for which alignment occurs. Bicellar morphology has been verified for a wide range of concentrations, temperatures, andq-values, but as viscosity measurements demonstrate, major morphological changes take place as the temperature is reduced below 30°C.

  2. Using NMR to Determine Protein Structure in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnero, Silvia

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a marvelous spectroscopic technique that chemists, physicists, and biochemists routinely employ for their research around the world. This year half of the Nobel Prize for chemistry went to Kurt Wüthrich, who was recognized for the development of NMR-based techniques that lead to the structure determination of biomolecules in solution. In addition to implementing novel pulse sequences and software packages, Wüthrich also applied his methods to several biological systems of key importance to human health. These include the prion protein, which is heavily involved in the spongiform encephalopathy (best known as 'mad cow disease'), which recently caused numerous human deaths, particularly in the UK, due to ingestion of contaminated meat. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) is the most intriguing new NMR method recently developed by Wüthrich and coworkers. This and other closely related pulse sequences promise to play a pivotal role in the extension of NMR to the conformational analysis of very large (up to the megadalton range) macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. More exciting new developments are expected in the near future.

  3. NMR solution structures of actin depolymerizing factor homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Goroncy, Alexander K; Koshiba, Seizo; Tochio, Naoya; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sato, Manami; Inoue, Makato; Watanabe, Satoru; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Akiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved proteins in nature. Its assembly and disassembly are regulated by many proteins, including the family of actin-depolymerizing factor homology (ADF-H) domains. ADF-H domains can be divided into five classes: ADF/cofilin, glia maturation factor (GMF), coactosin, twinfilin, and Abp1/drebrin. The best-characterized class is ADF/cofilin. The other four classes have drawn much less attention and very few structures have been reported. This study presents the solution NMR structure of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein, the first published structure of a drebrin-like domain (mammalian), and the first published structure of GMF β (mouse). We also determined the structures of mouse GMF γ, the mouse coactosin-like domain and the C-terminal ADF-H domain of mouse twinfilin 1. Although the overall fold of the five domains is similar, some significant differences provide valuable insights into filamentous actin (F-actin) and globular actin (G-actin) binding, including the identification of binding residues on the long central helix. This long helix is stabilized by three or four residues. Notably, the F-actin binding sites of mouse GMF β and GMF γ contain two additional β-strands not seen in other ADF-H structures. The G-actin binding site of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein is absent and distorted in mouse GMF β and GMF γ. PMID:19768801

  4. The NMR solution structure of recombinant RGD-hirudin

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xia; Mo, Wei; Liu, Xingang; Zhu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomin; Song, Houyan . E-mail: hysong@shmu.edu.cn; Dai, Linsen . E-mail: lsdai@fudan.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    The solution structure of a new recombinant RGD-hirudin, which has the activities of anti-thrombin and anti-platelet aggregation, was determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared with the conformations of recombinant wild-type hirudin and hirudin (variant 2, Lys47) of the hirudin thrombin complex. On the basis of total 1284 distance and dihedral angle constraints derived from a series of NMR spectra, 20 conformers were computed with ARIA/CNS programs. The structure of residues 3-30 and 37-48 form a molecular core with two antiparallel {beta}-sheets as the other two hirudins. However, significant differences were found in the surface electrostatic charge distributions among the three hirudins, especially in the RGD segment of recombinant RGD-hirudin. This difference may be greatly beneficial to its additional function of anti-platelet aggregation. The difference in extended C-terminal makes its both ionic and hydrophobic interactions with the fibrinogen recognition exosite of thrombin more effective.

  5. NMR solution structure of ATTp, an Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Chae, Young Kee; Markley, John L

    2002-10-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the precursor form of the Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATT(p), GenBank entry Z46816), a 68-residue (approximately 7.5 kDa) rapeseed class proteinase inhibitor, has been determined in solution at pH 5.0 and 25 degrees C by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The protein contains one alpha-helix and two strands of antiparallel beta-sheet, with a type IV beta-turn connecting the two strands. The alpha-helix and the inhibitory loop are connected to the beta-sheet through three disulfide bridges; a fourth disulfide bridge connects the N- and C-termini. The overall structural topology of ATT(p) is similar to those of the sweet tasting protein brazzein (rmsd of 3.0 A) and the antifungal protein Rs-Afp1 [a knottin protein from radish (Raphanus sativus), rmsd of 2.7 A]. The precursor segment in ATT(p) is disordered, as visualized by the final 20-conformer ensemble and as confirmed by (15)N heteronuclear NOE analysis. The overall fold of ATT(p) is distinct from those of other classes of serine proteinase inhibitors except in the inhibitor loop; therefore, it represents a new inhibitor fold.

  6. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs. Here, we describe procedures to monitor the quality of aqueous solutions of [2H, 15N]-labeled IMPs reconstituted in detergent micelles. This approach has been developed for studies of β-barrel IMPs, where it was successfully applied for numerous NMR structure determinations, and it has also been adapted for use with α-helical IMPs, in particular GPCRs, in guiding crystallization trials and optimizing samples for NMR studies (Horst et al., 2013). 2D [15N, 1H]-correlation maps are used as “fingerprints” to assess the foldedness of the IMP in solution. For promising samples, these “inexpensive” data are then supplemented with measurements of the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, which give information on the shape and size of the IMP/detergent mixed micelles. Using microcoil equipment for these NMR experiments enables data collection with only micrograms of protein and detergent. This makes serial screens of variable solution conditions viable, enabling the optimization of parameters such as the detergent concentration, sample temperature, pH and the composition of the buffer. PMID:27077076

  7. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-07-20

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs. Here, we describe procedures to monitor the quality of aqueous solutions of [(2)H, (15)N]-labeled IMPs reconstituted in detergent micelles. This approach has been developed for studies of β-barrel IMPs, where it was successfully applied for numerous NMR structure determinations, and it has also been adapted for use with α-helical IMPs, in particular GPCRs, in guiding crystallization trials and optimizing samples for NMR studies (Horst et al., 2013). 2D [(15)N, (1)H]-correlation maps are used as "fingerprints" to assess the foldedness of the IMP in solution. For promising samples, these "inexpensive" data are then supplemented with measurements of the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, which give information on the shape and size of the IMP/detergent mixed micelles. Using microcoil equipment for these NMR experiments enables data collection with only micrograms of protein and detergent. This makes serial screens of variable solution conditions viable, enabling the optimization of parameters such as the detergent concentration, sample temperature, pH and the composition of the buffer.

  8. Comparison of the NMR solution structures of cyclosporin A determined by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachter, Ruth; Altman, Russ B.; Czaplicki, Jerzy; Jardetzky, Oleg

    An evaluation and comparison of the NMR solution structures of Cyclosporin A are presented in this study. A new structure has been calculated by the probability filtered estimate (PROFILE) technique using new NMR data, in addition to the previously reported data. The mean structure, along with explicit estimates of uncertainty in the position of each atom, satisfies the NMR constraints but does not imply a unique structure. A comparison of this structural calculation with models obtained with other computational methods shows large variations in the Ramachandran angles (φ, ψ). These differences are explained on the basis of both the calculated uncertainty in backbone atomic coordinates and the cooperative motion of the backbone dihedral angles.

  9. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  10. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes.

  11. Structure determination of the seven-helical transmembrane receptor sensory rhodopsin II by solution NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Antoine; Mott, Helen R.; Bostock, Mark J.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Nietlispach, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Seven-helical membrane proteins represent a challenge for structural biology. Here, we report the first NMR structure determination of a detergent-solubilized seven-helical transmembrane (7TM) protein, the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin II (pSRII) from Natronomonas pharaonis, as a proof of principle. The overall quality of the structure ensemble is extremely good (backbone root mean squared deviation of 0.48 Å) and agrees well with previously determined X-ray structures. Furthermore, measurements in more native-like small phospholipid bicelles indicate that the protein structure is the same as in detergent micelles, suggesting that environment specific effects are minimal when using mild detergents. We use our case study as a platform to discuss the feasibility of similar solution NMR studies for other 7TM proteins including members of the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). PMID:20512150

  12. NMR structural study of the prototropic equilibrium in solution of Schiff bases as model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortegón-Reyna, David; Garcías-Morales, Cesar; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia; García-Báez, Efren; Aríza-Castolo, Armando; Peraza-Campos, Ana; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco

    2013-12-31

    An NMR titration method has been used to simultaneously measure the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and the intramolecular NHO prototropic constant ΔKNHO on a set of Schiff bases. The model compounds were synthesized from benzylamine and substituted ortho-hydroxyaldehydes, appropriately substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups to modulate the acidity of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond. The structure in solution was established by 1H-, 13C- and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The physicochemical parameters of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond (pKa, ΔKNHO and ΔΔG°) were obtained from 1H-NMR titration data and pH measurements. The Henderson-Hasselbalch data analysis indicated that the systems are weakly acidic, and the predominant NHO equilibrium was established using Polster-Lachmann δ-diagram analysis and Perrin model data linearization.

  13. NMR solution structures of adducts derived from the binding of polycyclic aromatic diol epoxides to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M.; Patel, D.J.; Hingerty, B.E.; Amin, S.; Broyde, S.; Geacintov, N.E.

    1995-12-31

    Site-specifically modified oligonucleotides were derived from the reactions of stereoisomeric polycyclic aromatic diol epoxide metabolite model compounds with oligonucleotides of defined base composition and sequence. The NMR solution structures of ten different adducts studied so far are briefly described, and it is shown that stereochemical factors and the nature of the oligonucleotide context of the complementary strands, exert a powerful influence on the conformational features of these adducts.

  14. β2-Adrenergic receptor solutions for structural biology analyzed with microscale NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2013-01-02

    Microcoil NMR measurements were performed to determine the final composition of solutions of the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) reconstituted with a detergent and to study the hydrodynamic properties of the detergent micelles containing β(2)AR. Standards are established for the reproducible preparation of G-protein-coupled receptor solutions for crystallization trials and solution NMR studies.

  15. NMR solution structure study of one saturated sulphur-containing amides from Glycosmis lucida.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhu-Feng; Yang, Kai; Li, Yin-Ping; Guo, Shan-Shan; You, Chun-Xue; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Zhe; Du, Shu-Shan

    2017-04-01

    One sulphur-containing amide (N-[2-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl]-3-methanesulfonyl-N-methyl-propionamide) which was isolated from Glycosmis lucida Wall ex Huang had a different NMR profile with this kind of compounds' normal case. Based on the information obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance pectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), its configurations in solution were investigated. The results indicated that the compound would have two stable configurations in solution as the double bond switched between C-N and C-O in an appropriate rate. This phenomenon was clearly exposed by the one dimension selective NOE (1D-NOE) experiments. This conclusion would play an active role in the structure analysis work of this kind of compounds.

  16. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of delta-hemolysin

    SciTech Connect

    Tappin, M.J.; Pastore, A.; Norton, R.S.; Freer, J.H.; Campbell, I.D.

    1988-03-08

    The 26-residue toxin from Staphylococcus aureus delta-hemolysin, is thought to act by traversing the plasma membrane. The structure of this peptide, in methanol solution, has been investigated by using high-resolution NMR in combination with molecular dynamics calculations. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum has been completely assigned, and it is shown that residues 2-20 form a relatively stable helix while the residues at the C-terminal end appear to be more flexible. The structures were calculated only from nuclear Overhauser effect data and standard bond lengths. It is shown that the results are consistent with /sup 3/J/sub NH-..cap alpha..CH/ coupling constants and amide hydrogen exchange rates.

  17. NMR solution structure of neurotensin in membrane-mimetic environments: molecular basis for neurotensin receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Coutant, Jérome; Curmi, Patrick A; Toma, Flavio; Monti, Jean-Pierre

    2007-05-15

    Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-residue neuropeptide that exerts multiple biological functions in the central and peripheral nervous system. Little is known about the structure of this neuropeptide, and what is known only concerns its C-terminal part. We determined here for the first time the structure of the full-length NT in membrane-mimicking environments by means of classical proton-proton distance constraints derived from solution-state NMR spectroscopy. NT was found to have a structure at both its N and C termini, whereas the central region of NT remains highly flexible. In TFE and HFIP solutions, the NT C-terminus presents an extended slightly incurved structure, whereas in DPC it has a beta turn. The N-terminal region of NT possesses great adaptability and accessibility to the microenvironment in the three media studied. Altogether, our work demonstrates a structure of NT fully compatible with its NTR-bound state.

  18. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  19. Solution State Structure Determination of Silicate Oligomers by 29Si NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, Johnathan P.; Shah, Neil K.; Dixon, David A.

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by 29Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of 29Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the 29Si–29Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated crosspeaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stability of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  20. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  1. The Three Dimensional Structure and Interaction Studies of HCV p7 in DHPC by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gabriel A.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protein p7 plays an important role in the assembly and release of mature virus particles. This small 63-residue membrane protein has been shown to induce channel activity, which may contribute to its functions. p7 is highly conserved throughout the entire range of HCV genotypes, which contributes to making p7 a potential target for anti-viral drugs. The secondary structure of p7 from the J4 genotype and the tilt angles of the helices within bilayers have been previously characterized by NMR. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of p7 in short chain phospholipid (DHPC) micelles, which provide a reasonably effective membrane-mimicking environment that is compatible with solution NMR experiments. Using a combination of chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings we determined the structure of p7 using an implicit membrane potential combining both CS-Rosetta decoys and Xplor-NIH refinement. The final set of structures has a backbone RMSD of 2.18 Å. Molecular dynamic simulations in NAMD indicate that several side chain interactions might be taking place, and that these could affect the dynamics of the protein. In addition to probing the dynamics of p7, several drug-protein and protein-protein interactions were evaluated. Established channel-blocking compounds such as amantadine, hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), and long alkyl-chain iminosugar derivatives inhibit the ion channel activity of p7. It has also been shown that the protein interacts with the HCV non-structural protein 2 (NS2) at the endoplasmic reticulum, and that this interaction may be important for the infectivity of the virus. Changes in the chemical shift frequencies of solution NMR spectra identify the residues taking part in these interactions. PMID:23841474

  2. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Carver, J.A.; Boyd, J.; Campbell, I.D.

    1987-02-24

    A /sup 1/H NMR study of the peptide alamethicin, which forms voltage-gated ion channels in membranes, is described. The molecule was studied in methanol as a function of temperature and pH. A complete assignment of the spectra is given, including several stereospecific assignments. Alamethicin was found to have a structure substantially similar to the crystal although, in solution, the C-terminal dipeptide adopts a somewhat extended conformation. The overall conformation was insensitive to the ionization of the side chain of the ionizable group, Glu-18.

  3. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  4. NMR solution structure of the RED subdomain of the Sleeping Beauty transposase.

    PubMed

    Konnova, Tatiana A; Singer, Christopher M; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2017-06-01

    DNA transposons can be employed for stable gene transfer in vertebrates. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon has been recently adapted for human application and is being evaluated in clinical trials, however its molecular mechanism is not clear. SB transposition is catalyzed by the transposase enzyme, which is a multi-domain protein containing the catalytic and the DNA-binding domains. The DNA-binding domain of the SB transposase contains two structurally independent subdomains, PAI and RED. Recently, the structures of the catalytic domain and the PAI subdomain have been determined, however no structural information on the RED subdomain and its interactions with DNA has been available. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the RED subdomain and characterize its interactions with the transposon DNA. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. NMR Solution Structure, Stability, and Interaction of the Recombinant Bovine Fibrinogen αC-Domain Fragment†

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Robert A.; Tsurupa, Galina; Hantgan, Roy R.; Tjandra, Nico; Medved, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    According to the current hypothesis, in fibrinogen, the COOH-terminal portions of two Aα chains are folded into compact αC-domains that interact intramolecularly with each other and with the central region of the molecule; in fibrin, the αC-domains switch to an intermolecular interaction resulting in αC polymers. In agreement, our recent NMR study identified within the bovine fibrinogen Aα374-538 αC-domain fragment an ordered compact structure including a β-hairpin restricted at the base by a 423–453 disulfide linkage. To establish the complete structure of the αC-domain and to further test the hypothesis, we expressed a shorter αC-fragment, Aα406-483, and performed detailed analysis of its structure, stability, and interactions. NMR experiments on the Aα406-483 fragment identified a second loose β-hairpin formed by residues 459–476, yielding a structure consisting of an intrinsically unstable mixed parallel/anti-parallel β-sheet. Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that the Aα406-483 fragment forms soluble oligomers whose fraction increases with increasing concentration. This was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis, which also revealed that the addition of each monomer to an assembling αC oligomer substantially increases its stabilizing free energy. In agreement, unfolding experiments monitored by CD established that oligomerization of Aα406-483 results in increased thermal stability. Altogether, these experiments establish the complete NMR solution structure of the Aα406-483 αC-domain fragment, provide direct evidence for the intra- and intermolecular interactions between the αC-domains, and confirm that these interactions are thermodynamically driven. PMID:17590019

  6. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  7. NMR solution structure of attractin, a water-borne protein pheromone from the mollusk Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Ravindranath; Xu, Yuan; Schein, Catherine H; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Nagle, Gregg T; Painter, Sherry D; Braun, Werner

    2003-08-26

    Water-borne protein pheromones are essential for coordination of reproductive activities in many marine organisms. In this paper, we describe the first structure of a pheromone protein from a marine organism, that of attractin (58 residues) from Aplysia californica. The NMR solution structure was determined from TOCSY, NOESY, and DQF-COSY measurements of recombinant attractin expressed in insect cells. The sequential resonance assignments were done with standard manual procedures. Approximately 90% of the 949 unambiguous NOESY cross-peaks were assigned automatically with simultaneous three-dimensional structure calculation using our NOAH/DIAMOD/FANTOM program suite. The final bundle of energy-refined structures is well-defined, with an average rmsd value to the mean structure of 0.72 +/- 0.12 A for backbone and 1.32 +/- 0.11 A for heavy atoms for amino acids 3-47. Attractin contains two antiparallel helices, made up of residues Ile9-Gln16 and I30-S36. The NMR distance constraints are consistent with the three disulfide bonds determined by mass spectroscopy (C4-C41, C13-C33, and C20-C26), where the first two could be directly determined from NOESY cross-peaks between CH beta protons of the corresponding cysteines. The second helix contains the (L/I)(29)IEECKTS(36) sequence conserved in attractins from five species of Aplysia that could interact with the receptor. The sequence and structure of this region are similar to those of the recognition helix of the Er-11 pheromone of the unicellular ciliate Euplotes raikovi, suggesting a possible common pathway for intercellular communication of these two distinct pheromone families.

  8. Studies on solution NMR structure of brazzein : Secondary structure and molecular scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gao, G; Dai, J; Ding, M; Hellekant, G; Wang, J; Wang, D

    1999-08-01

    Brazzein is a sweet-tasting protein isolated from the fruit of West African plantPentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon. It is the smallest and the most water-soluble sweet protein discovered so far and is highly thermostable. The proton NMR study of brazzein at 600 MHz (pH 3.5, 300 K) is presented. The complete sequence specific assignments of the individual backbone and sidechain proton resonances were achieved using through-bond and through-space connectivities obtained from standard two-dimensional NMR techniques. The secondary structure of brazzein contains one alpha-helix (residues 21-29), one short 3(10)-helix (residues 14-17), two strands of antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 34-39, 44-50) and probably a third strand (residues 5-7) near the N-terminus. A comparative analysis found that brazzein shares a so-called 'cysteine-stabilized alpha-beta' (CSalphabeta) motif with scorpion neurotoxins, insect defensins and plant gamma - thionins. The significance of this multi-function motif, the possible active sites and the structural basis of themostability were discussed.

  9. NMR Solution Structure of a Cyanovirin Homolog from Wheat Head Blight Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Matei, Elena; Louis, John M.; Jee, JunGoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the cyanovirin-N homolog (CVNH) lectin family are found in bacteria, fungi and plants. As part of our ongoing work on CVNH structure-function studies, we determined the high-resolution NMR solution structure of the homolog from the wheat head blight disease causing ascomycetous fungus Gibberella zeae (or Fusarium graminearum), hereafter called GzCVNH. Like cyanovirin-N (CV-N), GzCVNH comprises two tandem sequence repeats and the protein sequence exhibits 30% identity with CV-N. The overall structure is similar to those of other members of the CVNH family, with the conserved pseudo-symmetric halves of the structure, domains A and B, closely resembling recently determined structures of Tuber borchii, Neurospora crassa and Ceratopteris richardii CVNH proteins. Although GzCVNH exhibits a similar glycan recognition profile to CV-N and specifically binds to Manα(1–2)Manα, its weak carbohydrate binding affinity to only one binding site is insufficient for conferring anti-HIV activity. PMID:21365681

  10. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Wemmer, David E.

    2016-03-21

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. We report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. These NMR solution results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGH β-sheet.

  11. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan; ...

    2016-03-21

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. We report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. These NMR solution results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGHmore » β-sheet.« less

  12. Structure and dynamics of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in MPG micelles by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Farrow, N A; Deber, C M; Kay, L E

    1996-04-23

    The structure and dynamics of the 53-residue filamentous bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in fully protonated myristoyllysophosphatidylglycerol (MPG) micelles were characterized using multinuclear solution NMR spectroscopy. Detergent-solubilized coat protein [sequence: see text] mimics the membrane-bound "assembly intermediate" form of the coat protein which occurs during part of the phage life cycle. NMR studies of the IKe coat protein show that the coat protein is largely alpha-helical, exhibiting a long amphipathic surface. helix (Asn 4 to Ser 26) and a shorter "micelle-spanning" C-terminal helix which begins at TRP 29 and continues at least to Phe 48. Pro 30 likely occurs in the first turn of the C-terminal helix, where it is ideally situated given the hydrogen bonding and steric restrictions imposed by this residue. The similarity of 15N relaxation values (T1, T2, and NOE and 500 MHz and T2 at 600 MHz) among much of the N-terminal helix and all of the TM helix indicates that the N-terminal helix is as closely associated with the micelle as the TM helix. The description of the protein in the micelle is supported by the observation of NOEs between lysolipid protons and protein amide protons between asn 8 and Ser 50. The N-terminal and TM helices exhibit substantial mobility on the microsecond to second time scale, which likely reflects changes in the orientation between the two helices. The overall findings serve to clarify the role of individual residues in the context of a TM alpha-helix and provide an understanding of the secondary structure, dynamics, and aqueous and micellar environments of the coat protein.

  13. Synthesis and NMR solution structure of an alpha-helical hairpin stapled with two disulfide bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, P.; Rochette, S.; Vita, C.; Roumestand, C.

    2000-01-01

    Helical coiled-coils and bundles are some of the most common structural motifs found in proteins. Design and synthesis of alpha-helical motifs may provide interesting scaffolds that can be useful as host structures to display functional sites, thus allowing the engineering of novel functional miniproteins. We have synthesized a 38-amino acid peptide, alpha2p8, encompassing the alpha-helical hairpin present in the structure of p8MTCP1, as an alpha-helical scaffold particularly promising for its stability and permissiveness of sequence mutations. The three-dimensional structure of this peptide has been solved using homonuclear two-dimensional NMR techniques at 600 MHz. After sequence specific assignment, a total of 285 distance and 29 dihedral restraints were collected. The solution structure of alpha2p8 is presented as a set of 30 DIANA structures, further refined by restrained molecular dynamics, using simulated annealing protocol with the AMBER force field. The RMSD values for the backbone and all heavy atoms are 0.65+/-0.25 and 1.51+/-0.21 A, respectively. Excised from its protein context, the alpha-hairpin keeps its native structure: an alpha-helical coiled-coil, similar to that found in superhelical structures, with two helices spanning residues 4-16 and 25-36, and linked by a short loop. This motif is stabilized by two interhelical disulfide bridges and several hydrophobic interactions at the helix interface, leaving most of its solvent-exposed surface available for mutation. This alpha-helical hairpin, easily amenable to synthetic chemistry and biological expression system, may represent a stable and versatile scaffold to display new functional sites and peptide libraries. PMID:10850804

  14. Indirect use of deuterium in solution NMR studies of protein structure and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali

    2014-02-01

    A description of the utility of deuteration in protein NMR is provided with an emphasis on quantitative evaluation of the effects of deuteration on a number of NMR parameters of proteins: (1) chemical shifts, (2) scalar coupling constants, (3) relaxation properties (R1 and R2 rates) of nuclei directly attached to one or more deuterons as well as protons of methyl groups in a highly deuterated environment, (4) scalar relaxation of 15N and 13C nuclei in 15N-D and 13C-D spin systems as a measure of hydrogen bonding strength, and (5) NOE-based applications of deuteration in NMR studies of protein structure. The discussion is restricted to the 'indirect' use of deuterium in the sense that the description of NMR parameters and properties of the nuclei affected by nearby deuterons (15N, 13C, 1H) is provided rather than those of deuterium itself. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NMR solution structure of Ole e 6, a major allergen from olive tree pollen.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Miguel Angel; García-Mayoral, María Flor; Barral, Patricia; Villalba, Mayte; Santoro, Jorge; Rico, Manuel; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Bruix, Marta

    2004-09-10

    Ole e 6 is a pollen protein from the olive tree (Olea europaea) that exhibits allergenic activity with a high prevalence among olive-allergic individuals. The three-dimensional structure of Ole e 6 has been determined in solution by NMR methods. This is the first experimentally determined structure of an olive tree pollen allergen. The structure of this 50-residue protein is based on 486 upper limit distance constraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effects and 24 torsion angle restraints. The global fold of Ole e 6 consists of two nearly antiparallel alpha-helices, spanning residues 3-19 and 23-33, that are connected by a short loop and followed by a long, unstructured C-terminal tail. Viewed edge-on, the structured N terminus has a dumbbell-like shape with the two helices on the outside and with the hydrophobic core, mainly composed of 3 aromatic and 6 cysteine residues, on the inside. All the aromatic rings lie on top of and pack against the three disulfide bonds. The lack of thermal unfolding, even at 85 degrees C, indicates a high conformational stability. Based on the analysis of the molecular surface, we propose five plausible epitopes for IgE recognition. The results presented here provide the structural foundation for future experiments to verify the antigenicity of the proposed epitopes, as well as to design novel hypoallergenic forms of the protein suitable for diagnosis and treatment of type-I allergies. In addition, three-dimensional structure features of Ole e 6 are discussed to provide a basis for future functional studies.

  16. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Hong; Yap, Damian; Zeng, Hong; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Houliston, Scott; Aparicio, Samuel; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2013-01-01

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage) along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3), the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  17. Micellar solubilization of tributylphosphate in aqueous solutions of Pluronic block copolymers. Part II. Structural characterization inferred by 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Causse, J; Lagerge, S; de Menorval, L C; Faure, S

    2006-08-15

    The solubilization of tributylphosphate (TBP), a polar oil, in various micellar solutions of Pluronic has been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Partial phase diagrams of the three components systems (Pluronic-TBP-water) have shown two characteristic temperatures, called CPT and SMT, which control the phase behavior (see Part I); Both temperature depend on the copolymer structure and, interestingly, are directly related to the TBP concentration in the medium. Monophasic microemulsions are observed only when the temperature ranges between the SMT and the CPT. Moreover, the evolution of the CPT with the TBP content clearly indicated the occurrence of a structural change of the microemulsions which allows higher quantities of TBP to be solubilized. In this second part, (1)H NMR studies of TPB/micellar systems have essentially focused on elucidating the nature of the interactions between TBP and micelle, or on the location of the solubilized species, mainly from the dependence of chemical shifts or linewidths on TBP concentration. Especially, the NMR spectra of the microemulsions before and after the structural change have been compared with those obtained for pure solution of Pluronic in D(2)O at different temperatures and in CDCl(3). The analysis of the (1)H NMR chemical shifts suggests a structural transformation of the TBP-Pluronic micelles in the sense of an hydrophobic TBP-PPO core becoming more and more dense as the TBP concentration increases. Especially, (1)H NMR data evidence an evolution of the hydration state of the hydrophobic core following addition of TBP in the micellar solutions. During the addition of TBP, the microemulsion structure turns from spherical swelled micelles to nanodroplets of pure TBP stabilized by the Pluronic (pure nanophase of TBP stabilized by the copolymer). It is shown that the structural change strongly depends on the temperatures (CPT and SMT, see Part I) and on the copolymer structure.

  18. Solution state NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John. Ralph; Jane M. Marita; Sally A. Ralph; Ronald D. Hatfield; Fachuang. Lu; Richard M. Ede; Junpeng. Peng; Larry L. Landucci

    1999-01-01

    Despite the rather random and heterogeneous nature of isolated lignins, many of their intimate structural details are revealed by diagnostic NMR experiments. 13C-NMR was recognized early-on as a high-resolution method for detailed structural characterization, aided by the almost exact agreement between chemical shifts of carbons in good low-molecular...

  19. Structural analysis of flavonoids in solution through DFT 1H NMR chemical shift calculations: Epigallocatechin, Kaempferol and Quercetin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Souza, Leonardo A.; Tavares, Wagner M. G.; Lopes, Ana Paula M.; Soeiro, Malucia M.; De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we showed that comparison between experimental and theoretical 1H NMR chemical shift patterns, calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT), can be used for the prediction of molecular structure of flavonoids in solution, what is experimentally accessible for gas phase (electron diffraction methods) and solid samples (X-ray diffraction). The best match between B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)-PCM 1H NMR calculations for B ring rotated structures and experimental spectra can provide information on the conformation adopted by polyphenols in solution (usually DMSO-d6, acetone-d6 as solvents), which may differ from solid state and gas phase observed structures, and also DFT optimized geometry in the vacuum.

  20. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M.; Cusumano, Zachary T.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J.; Frieden, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG–CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG–CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG–CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  1. NMR-Profiles of Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NMR-Profiles are quantitative one-dimensional presentations of two-dimensional [15N,1H]-correlation spectra used to monitor the quality of protein solutions prior to and during NMR structure determinations and functional studies. In our current use in structural genomics projects, a NMR-Profile is recorded at the outset of a structure determination, using a uniformly 15N-labeled micro-scale sample of the protein. We thus assess the extent to which polypeptide backbone resonance assignments can be achieved with given NMR techniques, for example, conventional triple resonance experiments or APSY-NMR. With the availability of sequence-specific polypeptide backbone resonance assignments in the course of the structure determination, an “Assigned NMR-Profile” is generated, which visualizes the variation of the 15N–1H correlation cross peak intensities along the sequence and thus maps the sequence locations of polypeptide segments for which the NMR line shapes are affected by conformational exchange or other processes. The Assigned NMR-Profile provides a guiding reference during later stages of the structure determination, and is of special interest for monitoring the protein during functional studies, where dynamic features may be modulated during physiological functions. PMID:23839514

  2. Structure determination of α-helical membrane proteins by solution-state NMR: emphasis on retinal proteins.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    The biochemical processes of living cells involve a numerous series of reactions that work with exceptional specificity and efficiency. The tight control of this intricate reaction network stems from the architecture of the proteins that drive the chemical reactions and mediate protein-protein interactions. Indeed, the structure of these proteins will determine both their function and interaction partners. A detailed understanding of the proximity and orientation of pivotal functional groups can reveal the molecular mechanistic basis for the activity of a protein. Together with X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, NMR spectroscopy plays an important role in solving three-dimensional structures of proteins at atomic resolution. In the challenging field of membrane proteins, retinal-binding proteins are often employed as model systems and prototypes to develop biophysical techniques for the study of structural and functional mechanistic aspects. The recent determination of two 3D structures of seven-helical trans-membrane retinal proteins by solution-state NMR spectroscopy highlights the potential of solution NMR techniques in contributing to our understanding of membrane proteins. This review summarizes the multiple strategies available for expression of isotopically labeled membrane proteins. Different environments for mimicking lipid bilayers will be presented, along with the most important NMR methods and labeling schemes used to generate high-quality NMR spectra. The article concludes with an overview of types of conformational restraints used for generation of high-resolution structures of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks.

  3. NMR investigations of dinuclear, single-anion bridged copper(II) metallacycles: structure and antiferromagnetic behavior in solution.

    PubMed

    Reger, Daniel L; Pascui, Andrea E; Pellechia, Perry J; Ozarowski, Andrew

    2013-11-04

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of single-anion bridged, dinuclear copper(II) metallacycles [Cu2(μ-X)(μ-L)2](A)3 (L(m) = m-bis[bis(1-pyrazolyl)methyl]benzene: X = F(-), A = BF4(-); X = Cl(-), OH(-), A = ClO4(-); L(m)* = m-bis[bis(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methyl]benzene: X = CN(-), F(-), Cl(-), OH(-), Br(-), A = ClO4(-)) have relatively sharp (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances with small hyperfine shifts due to the strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions between the two S = 1/2 metal centers. The complete assignments of these spectra, except X = CN(-), have been made through a series of NMR experiments: (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, (1)H-(13)C HMBC, T1 measurements and variable-temperature (1)H NMR. The T1 measurements accurately determine the Cu···H distances in these molecules. In solution, the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts correlate with the population of the paramagnetic triplet (S = 1) and diamagnetic singlet (S = 0) states. This correlation allows the determination of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling constants, -J (Ĥ = -JŜ1Ŝ2), in solution for the L(m) compounds 338(F(-)), 460(Cl(-)), 542(OH(-)), for the L(m)* compounds 128(CN(-)), 329(F(-)), 717(Cl(-)), 823(OH(-)), and 944(Br(-)) cm(-1), respectively. These values are of similar magnitudes to those previously measured in the solid state (-Jsolid = 365, 536, 555, 160, 340, 720, 808, and 945 cm(-1), respectively). This method of using NMR to determine -J values in solution is an accurate and convenient method for complexes with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions. In addition, the similarity between the solution and solid-state -J values of these complexes confirms the information gained from the T1 measurements: the structures are similar in the two states.

  4. (1)H NMR Study of the solution structure of sarafotoxin-S6b.

    PubMed

    Aumelas, A; Chiche, L; Mahe, E; Le-Nguyen, D; Sizun, P; Berthault, P; Perly, B

    1991-01-01

    Sarafotoxin-S6b has been synthesized and studied by (1)H NMR in 50 50 acetonitrile/water mixture. All spin systems were identified and assigned with the aid of 2D experiments. On the basis of these data, a 3D structure of sarafotoxin is proposed and compared to that of [Nle(7)]endothelin obtained in the same conditions. From this study, it appeared that sarafotoxin-S6b and [Nle(7)]endothelin roughly share the same 3D structure, the main differences being located in the 4-7 loop bearing the sequence variation.

  5. Solution NMR structure of RHE_CH02687 from Rhizobium etli: A novel flavonoid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunjie; Zhu, Jiang; Hu, Rui; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Liu, Maili; Yang, Yunhuang

    2017-05-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of RHE_CH02687 from Rhizobium etli. Its structure consists of two β-sheets that together with two short and one long α-helix form a hydrophobic cavity. This protein shows a high structural similarity to the prokaryotic protein YndB from Bacillus subtilis, and the eukaryotic protein Aha1. NMR titration experiments confirmed that RHE_CH02687, like its homolog YndB, interacted with flavonoids, giving support for a biological function as a flavonoid sensor in the symbiotic interaction between R. etli and plants. In addition, our study showed no evidence for a direct interaction between RHE_CH02687 and HtpG, the R. etli homolog of Hsp90. Proteins 2017; 85:951-956. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Solution NMR of MPS-1 reveals a random coil cytosolic domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Shi, Pan; Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134-256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity.

  7. Solution NMR of MPS-1 Reveals a Random Coil Cytosolic Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134–256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  8. Spatial structure of fibrinopeptide B in water solution with DPC micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Fayzullina, Adeliya R.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinopeptide B (GluFib) is one of the factors of thrombosis. Normal blood protein soluble, fibrinogen (fibrinopeptide A and fibrinopeptide B), is transformed into the insoluble, fibrin, which in the form of filaments adheres to the vessel wall at the site of injury, forming a grid. However, the spatial structure of this peptide has not been established till now. In this article, GluFib peptide is investigated together with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles which were used for mimicking the environment of peptide in blood vessels. The spatial structure was obtained by applying 1D and 2D 1H-1H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY, NOESY). It was shown that the fibrinopeptide B does not have a secondary structure but we can distinguish the fragment Gly 9 - Arg 14 with a good convergence (the backbone RMSD for the Gly9 - Arg14 is 0.18 ± 0.08 Å).

  9. Strategies for the use of lanthanide NMR shift probes in the determination of protein structure in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.; Sykes, B.D.

    1980-10-01

    The homologous sequences observed for many calcium binding proteins such as parvalbumin, troponin c, the myosin light chains, and calmodulin has leand to the hypothesis that these proteins have homologous structures at the level of their calcium binding sites. This paper discusses the development of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique which will enable us to test this structural hypothesis in solution. The technique involves the substitution of a paramagnetic lanthanide ion for the calcium ion which results in lanthanide induced shifts and broadening in the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of the protein. These shifts are sensitive monitors of the precise geometrical orientation of each proton nucleus relative to the metal. The interaction of the lanthanide ytterbium with parvalbumin results in high resolution NMR spectra exhibiting a series of resonances with shifts spread over the range 32 to -19 ppM. The orientation and principal elements of the ytterbium magnetic susceptibility tensor have been determined using three assigned NMR resonances, the His-26 C2 and C4 protons and the amino terminal acetyl protons, and seven methyl groups; all with known geometry relative to the EF calcium binding site. The elucidation of these parameters has allowed us to compare the observed spectrum of the nuclei surrounding the EF calcium binding site of parvalbumin with that calculated from the x-ray struture. A significant number of the calculated shifts are larger than any of the observed shifts. We feel that a refinement of the x-ray based proton coordinates will be possible utilizing the geometric information contained in the lanthanide shifted NMR spectrum.

  10. Improving NMR Structures of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Clore, G. Marius; Schwieters, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Here, we show that modern solution NMR structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  11. "Ensemble" iterative relaxation matrix approach: a new NMR refinement protocol applied to the solution structure of crambin.

    PubMed

    Bonvin, A M; Rullmann, J A; Lamerichs, R M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    1993-04-01

    The structure in solution of crambin, a small protein of 46 residues, has been determined from 2D NMR data using an iterative relaxation matrix approach (IRMA) together with distance geometry, distance bound driven dynamics, molecular dynamics, and energy minimization. A new protocol based on an "ensemble" approach is proposed and compared to the more standard initial rate analysis approach and a "single structure" relaxation matrix approach. The effects of fast local motions are included and R-factor calculations are performed on NOE build-ups to describe the quality of agreement between theory and experiment. A new method for stereospecific assignment of prochiral groups, based on a comparison of theoretical and experimental NOE intensities, has been applied. The solution structure of crambin could be determined with a precision (rmsd from the average structure) of 0.7 A on backbone atoms and 1.1 A on all heavy atoms and is largely similar to the crystal structure with a small difference observed in the position of the side chain of Tyr-29 which is determined in solution by both J-coupling and NOE data. Regions of higher structural variability (suggesting higher mobility) are found in the solution structure, in particular for the loop between the two helices (Gly-20 to Pro-22).

  12. Structure determination of a DNA octamer in solution by NMR spectroscopy. Effect of fast local motions

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T.M.G.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R. ); van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H. )

    1991-04-16

    NMR structures of biomolecules are primarily based on nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) between protons. For the interpretation of NOEs in terms of distances, usually the assumption of a single rotational correlation time corresponding to a rigid molecule approximation is made. Here the authors investigate the effect of fast internal motions of the interproton vectors in the context of the relaxation matrix approach for structure determination of biomolecules. From molecular dynamics simulations generalized order parameters were calculated for the DNA octamer d(GCGTTCGC){center dot}d(CGCAACGC), and these were used in the calculation of NOE intensities. The magnitudes of the order parameters showed some variation for the different types of interproton vectors. The interproton distances changed only slightly, with a maximum of 10%; nevertheless, the changes were significant and resulted in constraints that were better satisfied. The structure of the DNA octamer was determined by using restrained molecular dynamics simulations with H{sub 2}O as a solvent, with and without the inclusion of local internal motions. Starting from A- or B-DNA, the structures showed a high local convergence, while the global convergence for the octamer was ca. 2.6 {angstrom}.

  13. Solution structures of psoralen monoadducted and cross-linked DNA oligomers by NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Dwyer, T.J.; Hearst, J.E. |

    1995-10-10

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structures of the 4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) furanside monoadducted (MAf) and the photoisomeric HMT interstrand cross-linked (XL) DNA oligonucleotide d(t{prime}-GCGTACGC-3{prime}){sub 2}. The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for both the MAf and XL from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. 80 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-06-14

    CV{_}2116 from Chromobacterium violaceum is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV{_}2116 protein sequence as a query identified only two hits, both with amino acid sequence identities of less than 40%. After the CV{_}2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid and transformed into E. coli, the desired CV{_}2116 protein was expressed and purified. A high quality solution structure of CV{_}2116 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The tertiary structure of CV{_}2116 adopts a novel alpha + beta fold containing two anti-parallel beta sheets and one alpha helix in the C-terminal end. CV{_}2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence families and no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. To date, no function of CV{_}2116 can be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches.

  15. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e−07) corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and 13C- and 15N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β-sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages) due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum. PMID:22837698

  16. Solution NMR structure of hypothetical protein CV_2116 encoded by a viral prophage element in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A; Cort, John R; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kennedy, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e(-07)) corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and (13)C- and (15)N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β-sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages) due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum.

  17. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    PubMed

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-02

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin.

  18. Solution structures of the melanocyte-stimulating hormones by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and dynamical simulated-annealing calculations.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Lim, S K; Huh, S H; Lee, D; Lee, W

    1998-10-01

    Melanocortins, which are involved in melanocyte pigmentation control and glucocorticoid stimulation, have functional roles in various physiological mechanisms and have been shown to participate in higher cortical functions. Recently, it has also been reported that melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) are the key components of the hypothalamic response to obesity. The solution structures of both melanocyte-stimulating hormone alpha-MSH (Ac-Ser-Tyr-Ser-Met-Glu-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val-NH2) and its analog alpha-MSH-ND (Ac-Ahx-Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-NH2) (Ahx, 2-aminohexanoic acid) have been determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and simulated-annealing calculations. The NMR data revealed that alpha-MSH forms a hairpin loop conformation which includes conserved message sequences, whereas alpha-MSH-ND prefers a type I beta-turn comprising residues of Asp2-His3-DPhe4-Arg5. Final simulated-annealing structures of both alpha-MSH-ND and alpha-MSH peptides converged with rmsd of 0.07 nm for alpha-MSH-ND and 0.1 nm for alpha-MSH between backbone atoms, respectively. This result will provide the structural bases of melanocortin functions as well as valuable information for structure-based drug design involving the regulation of obesity and feeding.

  19. Molecular mobility and microscopic structure changes in κ-carrageenan solutions studied by gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuhua; Brenner, Tom; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2013-06-05

    Changes in the molecular mobility of κ-carrageenan were observed by the pulsed field gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) methods for elucidating the molecular aspect of the sol-to-gel transition. The echo signal intensity of κ-carrageenan without a gradient, Ikap(0), decreased steeply near the sol-to-gel temperature (Tsg), suggesting that κ-carrageenan chains formed aggregates and a network structure. Below Tsg, the spin-spin relaxation time T2 and the diffusion coefficient of κ-carrageenan (Dkap) increased with decreasing temperature, indicating that the solute κ-carrageenan chains have a lower molecular weight Mw than chains involved in the aggregation. The diffusion coefficient of pullulan (Dpul) added as a probe molecule in κ-carrageenan solutions was measured, and the characteristic hydrodynamic screening length, ξ, was then estimated from the degree of diffusion restriction. Below a certain temperature, Dkap reached a higher value than that of Dpul, suggesting that the Mw of solute κ-carrageenan became lower than that of pullulan. GPC measurements confirmed the presence of κ-carrageenan chains with a lower Mw than that of pullulan. A simple physical model of the structural change in κ-carrageenan solution was proposed with a bimodal distribution of κ-carrageenan with higher and lower Mw than the pullulan probe. The higher Mw chains form the gel network restricting the probe's diffusion, and the lower Mw chains increase the effective viscosity. The concentration of the high Mw solute κ-carrageenan chains in 1%, 2% and 4% κ-carrageenan solutions was estimated from Ikap(0) and the total κ-carrageenan concentration, and the relation with pullulan diffusion was studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics using CONGEN: energy refinement of the NMR solution structures of epidermal and type-alpha transforming growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, R.; Bassolino-Klimas, D.; Bruccoleri, R. E.; Montelione, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    The new functionality of the program CONGEN (Bruccoleri RE, Karplus M, 1987, Biopolymers 26:137-168; Bassolino-Klimas D et al., 1996, Protein Sci 5:593-603) has been applied for energy refinement of two previously determined solution NMR structures, murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF) and human type-alpha transforming growth factor (hTGF alpha). A summary of considerations used in converting experimental NMR data into distance constraints for CONGEN is presented. A general protocol for simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics is applied to generate NMR solution structures using CONGEN together with real experimental NMR data. A total of 730 NMR-derived constraints for mEGF and 424 NMR-derived constraints for hTGF alpha were used in these energy-refinement calculations. Different weighting schemes and starting conformations were studied to check and/or improve the sampling of the low-energy conformational space that is consistent with all constraints. The results demonstrate that loosened (i.e., "relaxed") sets of the EGF and hTGF alpha internuclear distance constraints allow molecules to overcome local minima in the search for a global minimum with respect to both distance restraints and conformational energy. The resulting energy-refined structures of mEGF and hTGF alpha are compared with structures determined previously and with structures of homologous proteins determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography. PMID:8845748

  1. Solution NMR studies provide structural basis for endotoxin pattern recognition by the innate immune receptor CD14

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Seth; Chen Bin; Holbrook, Kristen; Jain, Nitin U.

    2008-04-04

    CD14 functions as a key pattern recognition receptor for a diverse array of Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell-wall components in the host innate immune response by binding to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) at partially overlapping binding site(s). To determine the potential contribution of CD14 residues in this pattern recognition, we have examined using solution NMR spectroscopy, the binding of three different endotoxin ligands, lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and a PGN-derived compound, muramyl dipeptide to a {sup 15}N isotopically labeled 152-residue N-terminal fragment of sCD14 expressed in Pichia pastoris. Mapping of NMR spectral changes upon addition of ligands revealed that the pattern of residues affected by binding of each ligand is partially similar and partially different. This first direct structural observation of the ability of specific residue combinations of CD14 to differentially affect endotoxin binding may help explain the broad specificity of CD14 in ligand recognition and provide a structural basis for pattern recognition. Another interesting finding from the observed spectral changes is that the mode of binding may be dynamically modulated and could provide a mechanism for binding endotoxins with structural diversity through a common binding site.

  2. Solution NMR structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of influenza A M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Pielak, Rafal M.; Chou, James J.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper reports the structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of the M2 channel of influenza A virus. {yields} High quality NMR data allowed a better-defined structure for the C-terminal region of the M2 channel. {yields} Using the structure, we propose a proton transfer pathway during M2 proton conduction. {yields} Structural comparison between the wildtype, V27A and S31N variants allowed an in-depth analysis of possible modes of drug resistance. {yields} Distinct feature of the V27A channel pore also provides an explanation for its faster rate of proton conduction. -- Abstract: The M2 protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective channel that is required for viral replication. It is the target of the anti-influenza drugs, amantadine and rimantadine. Widespread drug resistant mutants, however, has greatly compromised the effectiveness of these drugs. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the highly pathogenic, drug resistant mutant V27A. The structure reveals subtle structural differences from wildtype that maybe linked to drug resistance. The V27A mutation significantly decreases hydrophobic packing between the N-terminal ends of the transmembrane helices, which explains the looser, more dynamic tetrameric assembly. The weakened channel assembly can resist drug binding either by destabilizing the rimantadine-binding pocket at Asp44, in the case of the allosteric inhibition model, or by reducing hydrophobic contacts with amantadine in the pore, in the case of the pore-blocking model. Moreover, the V27A structure shows a substantially increased channel opening at the N-terminal end, which may explain the faster proton conduction observed for this mutant. Furthermore, due to the high quality NMR data recorded for the V27A mutant, we were able to determine the structured region connecting the channel domain to the C-terminal amphipathic helices that was not determined in the wildtype structure. The new structural

  3. alphaB-crystallin: a hybrid solid-state/solution-state NMR investigation reveals structural aspects of the heterogeneous oligomer.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R; Noguchi, Satoshi M; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2009-02-06

    Atomic-level structural information on alphaB-Crystallin (alphaB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an approximately 580-kDa human alphaB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An approximately 100-residue alpha-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different alpha-crystallin domain constructs isolated from alphaB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length alphaB and the isolated alpha-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and C(beta) resonances have been obtained for residues 64-162 (alpha-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in alphaB and the isolated alpha-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six beta-strands in the alpha-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the alpha-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the alpha-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within alphaB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human alpha-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated alpha-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer-monomer transition over the pH range 7.5-6.8. This steep pH-dependent switch may be important for alphaB to function

  4. αB-Crystallin: A Hybrid Solid-Solution State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi R.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2009-01-01

    Summary Atomic level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small Heat Shock Protein (sHSP) family has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse, oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on ∼ 580 kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue, 20 kDa subunits. An ∼100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all sHSPs and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α-crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and the Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64-162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid- and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid- and solution-state indicating a similar structure for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of inter-subunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid- and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H-15N HSQC spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer-monomer transition over the pH range of 7.5 to 6.8. This steep pH-dependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally, e.g., to preserve the filament integrity of cardiac muscle proteins such as actin and desmin during cardiac ischemia which

  5. αB-Crystallin. A Hybrid Solid-State/Solution-State NMR Investigation Reveals Structural Aspects of the Heterogeneous Oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Jehle, Stefan; van Rossum, Barth; Stout, Joseph R.; Noguchi, Satoshi M.; Falber, Katja; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rajagopal, Ponni

    2008-11-14

    Atomic-level structural information on αB-Crystallin (αB), a prominent member of the small heat-shock protein family, has been a challenge to obtain due its polydisperse oligomeric nature. We show that magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR can be used to obtain high-resolution information on an ~580-kDa human αB assembled from 175-residue 20-kDa subunits. An ~100-residue α-crystallin domain is common to all small heat-shock proteins, and solution-state NMR was performed on two different α- crystallin domain constructs isolated from αB. In vitro, the chaperone-like activities of full-length αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain are identical. Chemical shifts of the backbone and Cβ resonances have been obtained for residues 64–162 (α-crystallin domain plus part of the C-terminus) in αB and the isolated α-crystallin domain by solid-state and solution-state NMR, respectively. Both sets of data strongly predict six β-strands in the α-crystallin domain. A majority of residues in the α-crystallin domain have similar chemical shifts in both solid-state and solution-state, indicating similar structures for the domain in its isolated and oligomeric forms. Sites of intersubunit interaction are identified from chemical shift differences that cluster to specific regions of the α-crystallin domain. Multiple signals are observed for the resonances of M68 in the oligomer, identifying the region containing this residue as existing in heterogeneous environments within αB. Evidence for a novel dimerization motif in the human α-crystallin domain is obtained by a comparison of (i) solid-state and solution-state chemical shift data and (ii) 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra as a function of pH. The isolated α-crystallin domain undergoes a dimer–monomer transition over the pH range 7.5–6.8. This steep pHdependent switch may be important for αB to function optimally (e.g., to preserve the filament integrity

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of cyclosporin A: The crystal structure and dynamic modelling of a structure in apolar solution based on NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, J.; Kessler, H.; Kaptein, R.; van Gunsteren, W. F.

    1987-10-01

    The conformation of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CPA), both in apolar solution and in crystalline state, has been studied by computer simulation techniques. Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed: one modelling the crystal structure and two modelling the structure in apolar solution, using a restrained MD approach in which data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are taken into account. The simulation of the crystalline state (MDC) concerns a system of 4 unit cells containing 16 cyclosporin A molecules and 22 water molecules, which is simulated using crystalline periodic boundary conditions. The simulations modelling the apolar solvent conformation (MDS) concern one isolated cyclosporin A molecule. In these simulations an extra term in the interatomic potential function is used, which forces the molecule to satisfy a set of 57 atom-atom distance constraints originating from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) obtained from NMR spectroscopy and one distance constraint deduced from IR spectroscopy. From a comparison of the results of the crystal simulation to those of the X-ray experiment in terms of structure, atomic fluctuations, hydrogen bond pattern, etc., it is concluded that the force field that is used yields an adequate representation of crystalline cyclosporin A. Secondly, it is shown that the dynamic modelling technique that is used to obtain a structure in a polar solution from NMR distance information works well. Starting from initial conformations which have a root mean square difference of 0.14 nm both distance restrained MD simulations converge to the same final solution structure. A comparison of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the one in apolar solution shows that there are significant differences. The overall difference in atomic positions is 0.09 nm for the Cx atoms and 0.17 nm for all atoms. In apolar solution, the molecule is slightly more bent and the side chains of 1

  7. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a D-isomerized serine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-02

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from L to D form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin D-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin D-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin D-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure–function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by D-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. - Highlights: • Humanin D-Ser14 showed the strongest inhibitory activity against Aβ40 fibrillation. • NMR structure of Humanin D-Ser14 was determined in alcohol/water mixture solution. • Humanin D-Ser14 directly bound Aβ40 stronger than Humanin wild-type and Humanin S14G. • Aβ40 and zinc ion binding sites of Humanin D-Ser14 were identified. • Structure around Ser14 of Humanin is critical for Aβ40 binding and inhibitory

  8. NMR solution structure of the peptide fragment 1-30, derived from unprocessed mouse Doppel protein, in DHPC micelles.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Oglecka, Kamila; Mäler, Lena; Jarvet, Jüri; Wright, Peter E; Dyson, H Jane; Gräslund, Astrid

    2006-01-10

    The downstream prion-like Doppel (Dpl) protein is a homologue related to the prion protein (PrP). Dpl is expressed in the brains of mice that do not express PrP, and Dpl is known to be toxic to neurons. One mode of toxicity has been suggested to involve direct membrane interactions. PrP under certain conditions of cell trafficking retains an uncleaved signal peptide, which may also hold for the much less studied Dpl. For a peptide with a sequence derived from the N-terminal part (1-30) of mouse Dpl (mDpl(1-30)) CD spectroscopy shows about 40% alpha-helical structure in DHPC and SDS micelles. In aqueous solution it is mostly a random coil. The three-dimensional solution structure was determined by NMR for mDpl(1-30) associated with DHPC micelles. 2D 1H NMR spectra of the peptide in q = 0.25 DMPC/DHPC bicelles only showed signals from the unstructured termini, indicating that the structured part of the peptide resides within the lipid bilayer. Together with 2H2O exchange data in the DHPC micelle solvent, these results show an alpha-helix protected from solvent exchange between residues 7 and 19, and suggest that the alpha-helical segment can adopt a transmembrane localization also in a membrane. Leakage studies with entrapped calcein in large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles showed that the peptide is almost as membrane perturbing as melittin, known to form pores in membranes. The results suggest a possible channel formation mechanism for the unprocessed Dpl protein, which may be related to toxicity through direct cell membrane interaction and damage.

  9. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGES

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  10. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    PubMed

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  11. Solution NMR Structure and Functional Analysis of the Integral Membrane Protein YgaP from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eichmann, Cédric; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Bordignon, Enrica; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The solution NMR structure of the α-helical integral membrane protein YgaP from Escherichia coli in mixed 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine/1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1′-rac-glycerol) micelles is presented. In these micelles, YgaP forms a homodimer with the two transmembrane helices being the dimer interface, whereas the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain includes a rhodanese-fold in accordance to its sequence homology to the rhodanese family of sulfurtransferases. The enzymatic sulfur transfer activity of full-length YgaP as well as of the N-terminal rhodanese domain only was investigated performing a series of titrations with sodium thiosulfate and potassium cyanide monitored by NMR and EPR. The data indicate the thiosulfate concentration-dependent addition of several sulfur atoms to the catalytic Cys-63, which process can be reversed by the addition of potassium cyanide. The catalytic reaction induces thereby conformational changes within the rhodanese domain, as well as on the transmembrane α-helices of YgaP. These results provide insights into a potential mechanism of YgaP during the catalytic thiosulfate activity in vivo. PMID:24958726

  12. Simultaneous use of solution NMR and X-ray data in REFMAC5 for joint refinement/detection of structural differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldelli, Mauro; Ravera, Enrico; Calderone, Vito; Parigi, Giacomo; Murshudov, Garib N.; Luchinat, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings can now be used in the program REFMAC5 from CCP4 as structural restraints together with X-ray crystallographic data. These NMR restraints can reveal differences between solid state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. The program REFMAC5 from CCP4 was modified to allow the simultaneous use of X-ray crystallographic data and paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and/or diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings. Incorporation of these long-range NMR restraints in REFMAC5 can reveal differences between solid-state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. Since NMR and X-ray data are complementary, when a single structure is consistent with both sets of data and still maintains reasonably ‘ideal’ geometries, the reliability of the derived atomic model is expected to increase. The program was tested on five different proteins: the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase 1, GB3, ubiquitin, free calmodulin and calmodulin complexed with a peptide. In some cases the joint refinement produced a single model consistent with both sets of observations, while in other cases it indicated, outside the experimental uncertainty, the presence of different protein conformations in solution and in the solid state.

  13. Solution structures of Alzheimer's amyloid Aβ13-23 peptide: NMR studies in solution and in SDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usachev, K. S.; Filippov, A. V.; Filippova, E. A.; Antzutkin, O. N.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    To be believed that interaction of amyloid peptides with the cellular membrane is one of the mechanisms for the neurotoxicity of Aβ. Therefore, structural studies of beta-amyloid in solution and in a "peptide-bio-membrane" complex are of intense interest. The aim of this study was to acquire a better understanding of the mechanism of "Aβ peptide-micelle surface" complex formation. Previous studies of Aβ peptides binding on the micelle surface show the presence of helical region between 15-24 residues and that fragment between 11-28 residues have a tendency to exit the hydrophobic environment of the micelle core and to bind to the micelle surface. In present paper we considered the fragment of Aβ from 13 to 23 residues and found that L17, F19 and F20 residues region play a great role in the process of binding of Aβ to the micelle surface.

  14. NMR Solution Structure of Rat Aβ(1–16): Toward Understanding the Mechanism of Rats' Resistance to Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to reveal the mechanism of rats' resistance to Alzheimer's disease, we determined the structure of the metal-binding domain 1–16 of rat β-amyloid (rat Aβ(1–16)) in solution in the absence and presence of zinc ions. A zinc-induced dimerization of the domain was detected. The zinc coordination site was found to involve residues His-6 and His-14 of both peptide chains. We used experimental restraints obtained from analyses of NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry data to perform structure calculations. The calculations employed an explicit water environment and a simulated annealing molecular-dynamics protocol followed by quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical optimization. We found that the C-tails of the two polypeptide chains of the rat Aβ(1–16) dimer are oriented in opposite directions to each other, which hinders the assembly of rat Aβ dimers into oligomeric aggregates. Thus, the differences in the structure of zinc-binding sites of human and rat Aβ(1–16), their ability to form regular cross-monomer bonds, and the orientation of their hydrophobic C-tails could be responsible for the resistance of rats to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22225807

  15. Solution structures of nisin A and its two major degradation products determined by n.m.r.

    PubMed

    Lian, L Y; Chan, W C; Morley, S D; Roberts, G C; Bycroft, B W; Jackson, D

    1992-04-15

    The conformations of nisin and two major degradation products, nisin-(1-32)-peptide (nisin1-32) and des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 (where delta Ala is alpha beta-didehydroalanine), in aqueous solution have been determined from n.m.r. data. Sequential assignments of the peptides using correlation spectroscopy ('COSY'), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy ('HOHAHA'), nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY), relayed NOESY and rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments are presented, including stereospecific assignments of beta-methylene protons of the lanthionine residues. ROESY experiments are also used to detect flexible regions in the polypeptide chain. A dynamic-stimulated-annealing approach is used for structural determination. It can be concluded that all these peptides are flexible in aqueous solution, with no experimental evidence of preferred overall conformations; the only defined conformational features are imposed by the presence of the lanthionine residues. Low-temperature studies also reveal that des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 adopts conformations similar to those when the ring is intact, suggesting that the loss of activity of this degradation product is due to the absence of the delta Ala5 residue rather than to the conformational consequences of ring-opening.

  16. Solution structures of nisin A and its two major degradation products determined by n.m.r.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, L Y; Chan, W C; Morley, S D; Roberts, G C; Bycroft, B W; Jackson, D

    1992-01-01

    The conformations of nisin and two major degradation products, nisin-(1-32)-peptide (nisin1-32) and des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 (where delta Ala is alpha beta-didehydroalanine), in aqueous solution have been determined from n.m.r. data. Sequential assignments of the peptides using correlation spectroscopy ('COSY'), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy ('HOHAHA'), nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY), relayed NOESY and rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments are presented, including stereospecific assignments of beta-methylene protons of the lanthionine residues. ROESY experiments are also used to detect flexible regions in the polypeptide chain. A dynamic-stimulated-annealing approach is used for structural determination. It can be concluded that all these peptides are flexible in aqueous solution, with no experimental evidence of preferred overall conformations; the only defined conformational features are imposed by the presence of the lanthionine residues. Low-temperature studies also reveal that des-delta Ala5-nisin1-32 adopts conformations similar to those when the ring is intact, suggesting that the loss of activity of this degradation product is due to the absence of the delta Ala5 residue rather than to the conformational consequences of ring-opening. PMID:1575686

  17. Solution structure of Ln(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands through theoretical evaluation of 1H NMR contact shifts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Aurora; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Botta, Mauro; Tripier, Raphaël; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-12-17

    Herein, we present a new approach that combines DFT calculations and the analysis of Tb(III)-induced (1)H NMR shifts to quantitatively and accurately account for the contact contribution to the paramagnetic shift in Ln(III) complexes. Geometry optimizations of different Gd(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands were carried out using the hybrid meta-GGA TPSSh functional and a 46 + 4f(7) effective core potential (ECP) for Gd. The complexes investigated include [Ln(Me-DODPA)](+) (H(2)Me-DODPA = 6,6'-((4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diyl)bis(methylene))dipicolinic acid, [Ln(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-) (H(4)DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate), [Ln(DOTAM)(H(2)O)](3+) (DOTAM = 1,4,7,10- tetrakis[(carbamoyl)methyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), and related systems containing pyridyl units (Ln = Gd, Tb). Subsequent all-electron relativistic calculations based on the DKH2 approximation, or small-core ECP calculations, were used to compute the (1)H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) at the ligand nuclei (A(iso) values). The calculated A(iso) values provided direct access to contact contributions to the (1)H NMR shifts of the corresponding Tb(III) complexes under the assumption that Gd and Tb complexes with a given ligand present similar HFCCs. These contact shifts were used to obtain the pseudocontact shifts, which encode structural information as they depend on the position of the nucleus with respect to the lanthanide ion. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and calculated pseudocontact shifts using the DFT-optimized geometries as structural models of the complexes in solution, which demonstrates that the computational approach used provides (i) good structural models for the complexes, (ii) accurate HFCCs at the ligand nuclei. The methodology presented in this work can be classified in the context of model-dependent methods, as it relies on the use of a specific molecular structure obtained from DFT

  18. ' q-Titration' of long-chain and short-chain lipids differentiates between structured and mobile residues of membrane proteins studied in bicelles by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Woo Sung; Park, Sang Ho; Nothnagel, Henry J.; Lu, George J.; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hua; Cook, Gabriel A.; Howell, Stanley C.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-01-01

    ' q-Titration' refers to the systematic comparison of signal intensities in solution NMR spectra of uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins solubilized in micelles and isotropic bicelles as a function of the molar ratios ( q) of the long-chain lipids (typically DMPC) to short-chain lipids (typically DHPC). In general, as q increases, the protein resonances broaden and correspondingly have reduced intensities due to the overall slowing of protein reorientation. Since the protein backbone signals do not broaden uniformly, the differences in line widths (and intensities) enable the narrower (more intense) signals associated with mobile residues to be differentiated from the broader (less intense) signals associated with "structured" residues. For membrane proteins with between one and seven trans-membrane helices in isotropic bicelles, we have been able to find a value of q between 0.1 and 1.0 where only signals from mobile residues are observed in the spectra. The signals from the structured residues are broadened so much that they cannot be observed under standard solution NMR conditions. This q value corresponds to the ratio of DMPC:DHPC where the signals from the structured residues are "titrated out" of the spectrum. This q value is unique for each protein. In magnetically aligned bilayers ( q > 2.5) no signals are observed in solution NMR spectra of membrane proteins because the polypeptides are "immobilized" by their interactions with the phospholipid bilayers on the relevant NMR timescale (˜10 5 Hz). No signals are observed from proteins in liposomes (only long-chain lipids) either. We show that it is feasible to obtain complementary solution NMR and solid-state NMR spectra of the same membrane protein, where signals from the mobile residues are present in the solution NMR spectra, and signals from the structured residues are present in the solid-state NMR spectra. With assigned backbone amide resonances, these data are sufficient to describe major features

  19. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.

  20. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.

  1. NMR solution structure of poliovirus uridylyated peptide linked to the genome (VPgpU)

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Catherine H.; Oezguen, Numan; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Filippov, Dmitri V.; Paul, Aniko; Kumar, Eric; Braun, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Picornaviruses have a 22–24 amino acid peptide, VPg, bound covalently at the 5’ end of their RNA, that is essential for replication. VPgs are uridylylated at a conserved Tyrosine to form VPgpU, the primer of RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. This first complete structure for any uridylylated VPg, of poliovirus type 1 (PV1)-VPgpU, shows that conserved amino acids in VPg stabilize the bound UMP, with the uridine atoms involved in base pairing and chain elongation projected outward. Comparing this structure to PV1-VPg and partial structures of VPg/VPgpU from other picornaviruses suggests that enteroviral polymerases require a more stable VPg structure than does the distantly related aphthovirus, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The glutamine residue at the C-terminus of PV1-VPgpU lies in back of the uridine base and may stabilize its position during chain elongation and/or contribute to base specificity. Under in vivo-like conditions with the authentic cre(2C) hairpin RNA and Mg++, 5-methylUTP cannot compete with UTP for VPg uridylyation in an in vitro uridylyation assay, but both nucleotides are equally incorporated by PV1-polymerase with Mn++ and a poly-A RNA template. This indicates the 5 position is recognized under in vivo conditions. The compact VPgpU structure docks within the active site cavity of the PV-polymerase, close to the position seen for the fragment of FMDV-VPgpU with its polymerase. This structure could aid in design of novel enterovirus inhibitors, and stabilization upon uridylylation may also be pertinent for post-translational uridylylation reactions that underlie other biological processes. PMID:20441784

  2. Differential protonation and dynamic structure of doxylamine succinate in solution using 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, B S; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ramesha, A R; Khetrapal, C L

    2004-07-01

    A protonation and dynamic structural study of doxylamine succinate, a 1:1 salt of succinic acid with dimethyl-[2-(1-phenyl-1-pyridin-2-yl-ethoxy)ethyl]amine, in solution using one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments at variable temperature and concentration is presented. The two acidic protons of the salt doxylamine succinate are in 'intermediate' exchange at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of a broad signal. This signal evolves into two distinct signals below about -30 degrees C. A two-dimensional 1H-1H double quantum filtered correlation experiment carried out at -55 degrees C shows protonation of one of the acidic protons to the dimethylamine nitrogen. A two-dimensional rotating frame 1H-1H NOE experiment at the same temperature reveals that the other proton remains with the succinate moiety. Comparison of the 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the 13C T1 relaxation times of the salt with those of the free base further substantiate the findings.

  3. Solution structure of a truncated anti-MUC1 DNA aptamer determined by mesoscale modeling and NMR.

    PubMed

    Baouendi, Meriem; Cognet, Jean A H; Ferreira, Catia S M; Missailidis, Sotiris; Coutant, Jérome; Piotto, Martial; Hantz, Edith; Hervé du Penhoat, Catherine

    2012-02-01

    Mucin 1 is a well-established target for the early diagnosis of epithelial cancers. The nucleotides of the S1.3/S2.2 DNA aptamer involved in binding to variable number tandem repeat mucin 1 peptides have been identified using footprinting experiments. The majority of these binding nucleotides are located in the 25-nucleotide variable region of the total aptamer. Imino proton and 2D NMR spectra of truncated and total aptamers in supercooled water reveal common hydrogen-bonding networks and point to a similar secondary structure for this 25-mer sequence alone or embedded within the total aptamer. NMR titration experiments confirm that the TTT triloop structure is the primary binding site and show that the initial structure of the truncated aptamers is conserved upon interaction with variable number tandem repeat peptides. The thermal dependence of the NMR chemical shift data shows that the base-paired nucleotides melt cooperatively at 47 ± 4°C. The structure of the 25-mer oligonucleotide was determined using a new combined mesoscale molecular modeling, molecular dynamics and NMR spectroscopy investigation. It contains three Watson-Crick pairs, three consecutive mispairs and four Watson-Crick pairs capped by a TTT triloop motif. The 3D model structures (PDB 2L5K) and biopolymer chain elasticity molecular models are consistent with both NMR and long unconstrained molecular dynamics (10 ns) in explicit water, respectively. Database Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank and BioMagResBank databases under the accession numbers 2L5K and 17129, respectively. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  4. Investigation into the structural composition of hydroalcoholic solutions as basis for the development of multiple suppression pulse sequences for NMR measurement of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2014-12-01

    An eight-fold suppression pulse sequence was recently developed to improve sensitivity in (1) H NMR measurements of alcoholic beverages [Magn. Res. Chem. 2011 (49): 734-739]. To ensure that only one combined hydroxyl peak from water and ethanol appears in the spectrum, adjustment to a certain range of ethanol concentrations was required. To explain this observation, the structure of water-ethanol solutions was studied. Hydroalcoholic solutions showed extreme behavior at 25% vol, 46% vol, and 83% vol ethanol according to (1) H NMR experiments. Near-infrared spectroscopy confirmed the occurrence of four significant compounds ('individual' ethanol and water structures as well as two water-ethanol complexes of defined composition - 1 : 1 and 1 : 3). The successful multiple suppression can be achieved for every kind of alcoholic beverage with different alcoholic strengths, when the final ethanol concentration is adjusted to a range between 25% vol and 46% vol (e.g. using dilution or pure ethanol addition). In this optimum region, an individual ethanol peak was not detected, because the 'individual' water structure and the 1 : 1 ethanol-water complex predominate. The nature of molecular association in ethanol-water solutions is essential to elucidate NMR method development for measurement of alcoholic beverages. The presented approach can be used to optimize other NMR suppression protocols for binary water-organic solvent mixtures, where hydrogen bonding plays a dominant role. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, CongBao

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  6. NMR solution structure of the bicoid homeodomain bound to DNA and molecular dynamics simulations of the homeodomain/DNA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird-Titus, Jamie M.

    The homeodomain is a common DNA recognition motif consisting of three helices and an N-terminal arm that serves as a valuable model for exploring the basis of specific DNA recognition by proteins. Recognition of specific DNA sites, loosely defined by a TAAT core, is dependent on the side-chains of key amino acids in the N-terminal arm and the third "recognition" helix of the homeodomain. While much is known about homeodomain/DNA recognition, key questions concerning the role of individual amino acids and the extent of side-chain, DNA, and water dynamics during recognition remain, often focusing on the dynamic role of position 50 during recognition of the two bases immediately 3' to the 5'-TAAT-3'/3'-ATTA-5' core (ATTANN). The Bicoid homeodomain provides an interesting model system for addressing these and other questions, serving as the only known homeodomain that has a dual role in both transcriptional (DNA-binding) and translational (RNA-binding) control, discriminating between these two functions by a single amino acid, arginine 54. To add to the understanding of both general protein/DNA recognition and to the specific function of the Bicoid transcription factor homeodomain, we have determined the solution structure of the Bicoid homeodomain bound to the consensus duplex B-DNA binding site 5'-TAATCC-3'/3'-ATTAGG-5'. Our structure indicates that the Bicoid homeodomain exhibits variation from other homeodomain structures at the end of helix I, and NMR resonance line broadening of the K50 and R54 side-chains, consistent with side-chain motion and supportive of the adaptive-recognition theory of protein/DNA interactions.

  7. NMR study of oligonucleotides containing base pair mismatches and a human growth hormone peptide for the determination of solution structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roongta, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Formation of unusual basepairs in DNA for random mutations in DNA was proposed in the sixties. These mismatches arise due to errors in replication, and from deamination of the 5-methylcytosine. The author's interest in studying mismatches and other oligonucleotides has been two fold. One is related to {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone structure of oligonucleotides. He wanted to find out the significance of the dispersion of {sup 31}p chemical shifts in oligonucleotides. He wished to address whether this dispersion in {sup 31}P chemical shifts is related to global structural parameters of oligonucleotides like helix twist and whether he can prove the relationship between {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angles epsilon and zeta. How does a mismatch affect {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angle The second interest is related to solving the three dimensional structure of these biopolymers by using NMR data (NOESY distances) and computer simulations. His major study of these mismatches has been in the assignments of the protons resonances and the phosphorus resonances by 2D NMR. He has also tried to answer the question about the relationships between {sup 31}P chemical shifts and global parameters for DNA such as the helix twist. He has made substantial progress in determination of J(H3{prime}-P) coupling constants by 2D NMR and also in determining the relationship between the SIP chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angles by using the mismatch dodecamer sequences and the tetradecamer sequences. The 2D NMR data for the GG and GT mismatch have been used to determine three dimensional structures by using distance restrained molecular dynamics. The second project involved studying a 28 residue synthetic peptide by NMR.

  8. Multinuclear NMR and molecular modelling investigations on the structure and equilibria of complexes that form in aqueous solutions of Ca(2+) and gluconate.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Sebok, Pál; Forgó, Péter; Jakusch, Tamás; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2010-09-03

    Complexation of d-gluconate (Gluc(-)) with Ca(2+) has been investigated via (1)H, (13)C and (43)Ca NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solutions in the presence of high concentration background electrolytes (1MI4M (NaCl) ionic strength). From the ionic strength dependence of its formation constant, the stability constant at 6pH11 and at I-->0M has been derived (logK(1,1)(0)=1.8+/-0.1). The protonation constant of Gluc(-) at I=1M (NaCl) ionic strength was also determined and was found to be logK(a)=3.24+/-0.01 ((13)C NMR) and logK(a)=3.23+/-0.01 ((1)H NMR). It was found that (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts upon complexation (both with H(+) and with Ca(2+)) do not vary in an unchanging way with the distance from the Ca(2+)/H(+) binding site. From 2D (1)H-(43)Ca NMR spectra, simultaneous binding of Ca(2+) to the alcoholic OH on C2 and C3 was deduced. Molecular modelling results modulated this picture by revealing structures in which the Gluc(-) behaves as a multidentate ligand. The five-membered chelated initial structure was found to be thermodynamically more stable than that derived from a six-membered chelated initial structure.

  9. Structural and dynamical characterization of the Miz-1 zinc fingers 5-8 by solution-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bernard, David; Bédard, Mikaël; Bilodeau, Josée; Lavigne, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz-1) is a BTB/POZ transcription factor that activates the transcription of cytostatic genes, such as p15(INK4B) or p21(CIP1). The C-terminus of Miz-1 contains 13 consensus C2H2 zinc finger domains (ZF). ZFs 1-4 have been shown to interact with SMAD3/4, while the remaining ZFs are expected to bind the promoters of target genes. We have noted unusual features in ZF 5 and the linker between ZFs 5 and 6. Indeed, a glutamate is found instead of the conserved basic residue two positions before the second zinc-coordinating histidine on the ZF 5 helix, and the linker sequence is DTDKE in place of the classical TGEKP sequence. In a canonical ββα fold, such unusual primary structure elements should cause severe electrostatic repulsions. In this context, we have characterized the structure and the dynamics of a Miz-1 construct comprising ZFs 5-8 (Miz 5-8) by solution-state NMR. Whilst ZFs 5, 7 and 8 were shown to adopt the classical ββα fold for C2H2 ZFs, the number of long-range NOEs was insufficient to define a classical fold for ZF 6. We show by using (15)N-relaxation dispersion experiments that this lack of NOEs is due to the presence of extensive motions on the μs-ms timescale. Since this negatively charged region would have to be located near the phosphodiester backbone in a DNA complex, we propose that in addition to promoting conformational searches, it could serve as a hinge region to keep ZFs 1-4 away from DNA.

  10. Solution structure of the c-terminal dimerization domain of SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein solved by the SAIL-NMR method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Chang, Chung-ke; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Chang, Yuan-hsiang; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-07-18

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid protein (NP) contains a potential RNA-binding region in its N-terminal portion and also serves as a dimerization domain by forming a homodimer with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. So far, the structure determination of the SARS-CoV NP CTD in solution has been impeded by the poor quality of NMR spectra, especially for aromatic resonances. We have recently developed the stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) method to overcome the size problem of NMR structure determination by utilizing a protein exclusively composed of stereo- and regio-specifically isotope-labeled amino acids. Here, we employed the SAIL method to determine the high-quality solution structure of the SARS-CoV NP CTD by NMR. The SAIL protein yielded less crowded and better resolved spectra than uniform (13)C and (15)N labeling, and enabled the homodimeric solution structure of this protein to be determined. The NMR structure is almost identical with the previously solved crystal structure, except for a disordered putative RNA-binding domain at the N-terminus. Studies of the chemical shift perturbations caused by the binding of single-stranded DNA and mutational analyses have identified the disordered region at the N-termini as the prime site for nucleic acid binding. In addition, residues in the beta-sheet region also showed significant perturbations. Mapping of the locations of these residues onto the helical model observed in the crystal revealed that these two regions are parts of the interior lining of the positively charged helical groove, supporting the hypothesis that the helical oligomer may form in solution.

  11. The Relationship between NMR Chemical Shifts of Thermally Polarized and Hyperpolarized (89) Y Complexes and Their Solution Structures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yixun; Jindal, Ashish K; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Le Fur, Mariane; Kervarec, Nelly; Zhao, Piyu; Kovacs, Zoltan; Valencia, Laura; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Tripier, Raphaël; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-11-07

    Recently developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technology offers the potential of increasing the NMR sensitivity of even rare nuclei for biological imaging applications. Hyperpolarized (89) Y is an ideal candidate because of its narrow NMR linewidth, favorable spin quantum number (I=1/2 ), and long longitudinal relaxation times (T1 ). Strong NMR signals were detected in hyperpolarized (89) Y samples of a variety of yttrium complexes. A dataset of (89) Y NMR data composed of 23 complexes with polyaminocarboxylate ligands was obtained using hyperpolarized (89) Y measurements or (1) H,(89) Y-HMQC spectroscopy. These data were used to derive an empirical equation that describes the correlation between the (89) Y chemical shift and the chemical structure of the complexes. This empirical correlation serves as a guide for the design of (89) Y sensors. Relativistic (DKH2) DFT calculations were found to predict the experimental (89) Y chemical shifts to a rather good accuracy. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Solution NMR structure of the NlpC/P60 domain of lipoprotein Spr from Escherichia coli: structural evidence for a novel cysteine peptidase catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Mei; Maglaqui, Melissa; Xiao, Rong; Locke, Jessica; Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-09-16

    Escherichia coli Spr is a membrane-anchored cell wall hydrolase. The solution NMR structure of the C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain of E. coli Spr described here reveals that the protein adopts a papain-like alpha+beta fold and identifies a substrate-binding cleft featuring several highly conserved residues. The active site features a novel Cys-His-His catalytic triad that appears to be a unique structural signature of this cysteine peptidase family. Moreover, the relative orientation of these catalytic residues is similar to that observed in the analogous Ser-His-His triad, a variant of the classic Ser-His-Asp charge relay system, suggesting the convergent evolution of a catalytic mechanism in quite distinct peptidase families.

  13. Solution NMR Structure of a Ligand/Hybrid-2-G-Quadruplex Complex Reveals Rearrangements that Affect Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Wirmer-Bartoschek, Julia; Bendel, Lars Erik; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Grün, J Tassilo; Papi, Francesco; Bazzicalupi, Carla; Messori, Luigi; Gratteri, Paola; Schwalbe, Harald

    2017-06-12

    Telomeric G-quadruplexes have recently emerged as drug targets in cancer research. Herein, we present the first NMR structure of a telomeric DNA G-quadruplex that adopts the biologically relevant hybrid-2 conformation in a ligand-bound state. We solved the complex with a metalorganic gold(III) ligand that stabilizes G-quadruplexes. Analysis of the free and bound structures reveals structural changes in the capping region of the G-quadruplex. The ligand is sandwiched between one terminal G-tetrad and a flanking nucleotide. This complex structure involves a major structural rearrangement compared to the free G-quadruplex structure as observed for other G-quadruplexes in different conformations, invalidating simple docking approaches to ligand-G-quadruplex structure determination. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. [NMR study of complex formation of aromatic ligands with heptadeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GCGAAGC) forming stable hairpin structure in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Veselkov, A N; Eaton, R J; Semanin, A V; Pakhomov, V I; Dymant, L N; Karavaev, L; Davies, D V

    2002-01-01

    Complex formation of hairpin-producing heptadeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GCGAAGC) with aromatic molecules: acridine dye proflavine and anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin was studied by one-dimensional 1H NMR and two-dimensional correlation 1H-1H (2M-TOCSY, 2M-NOESY), 1H-31P (2M-HMBC) NMR spectroscopy (500 and 600 MHz) in aqueous solution. Concentration and temperature dependences for the chemical shifts of ligand protons were measured, molecular models of equilibrium in solution were developed, and equilibrium thermodynamic parameters for the formation of intercalation complexes were calculated. Spatial structures of dye and antibiotic complexes with the heptamer hairpin were constructed on the basis of 2M-NOE data and the calculated values of limiting chemical shifts of ligand protons.

  15. Multinuclear NMR study of the solution structure and reactivity of tris(trimethylsilyl)methyllithium and its iodine ate complex.

    PubMed

    Reich, Hans J; Sikorski, William H; Sanders, Aaron W; Jones, Amanda C; Plessel, Kristin N

    2009-01-16

    The extreme steric bulk of tris(trimethylsilyl)methyl derivatives (1-X) provides interesting structural and dynamic behavior for study. Dynamic NMR studies on 1-SePh and 1-I showed restricted rotation around the C-Si bonds of each trimethylsilyl groups. An extensive multinuclear NMR study of natural abundance and (6)Li and (13)C enriched 1-Li revealed three species in THF-containing solvents, a dimer 1T, and two monomers, the contact ion pair 1C, and solvent separated ion pair 1S. Observed barriers for interconversion of 1-Li aggregates were unusually high (DeltaG(double dagger) ca. 9 kcal/mol for exchange of 1S and 1C, DeltaG(double dagger)(41) = 16.4 kcal/mol for exchange of 1T with 1C and 1S), allowing for study of reactivity of each aggregate individually. We can show that 1S is at least 50 times as reactive as 1C and at least 5 x 10(10) times as reactive as 1T toward MeI. The large difference in reactivity allowed further study on the mechanism of the lithium-iodine exchange of 1-I with 1-Li and characterization of the intermediate iodine ate complex 4. Additional calibrations are presented for the sensitive yet chemically inert (13)C NMR chemical shift thermometer 1-H.

  16. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  17. Simultaneous use of solution NMR and X-ray data in REFMAC5 for joint refinement/detection of structural differences

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldelli, Mauro; Ravera, Enrico; Calderone, Vito; Parigi, Giacomo; Murshudov, Garib N.; Luchinat, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The program REFMAC5 from CCP4 was modified to allow the simultaneous use of X-ray crystallographic data and paramagnetic NMR data (pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings) and/or diamagnetic residual dipolar couplings. Incorporation of these long-range NMR restraints in REFMAC5 can reveal differences between solid-state and solution conformations of molecules or, in their absence, can be used together with X-ray crystallographic data for structural refinement. Since NMR and X-ray data are complementary, when a single structure is consistent with both sets of data and still maintains reasonably ‘ideal’ geometries, the reliability of the derived atomic model is expected to increase. The program was tested on five different proteins: the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase 1, GB3, ubiquitin, free calmodulin and calmodulin complexed with a peptide. In some cases the joint refinement produced a single model consistent with both sets of observations, while in other cases it indicated, outside the experimental uncertainty, the presence of different protein conformations in solution and in the solid state. PMID:24699641

  18. Impact of C5-cytosine methylation on the solution structure of d(GAAAACGTTTTC)2. An NMR and molecular modelling investigation.

    PubMed

    Marcourt, L; Cordier, C; Couesnon, T; Dodin, G

    1999-11-01

    The solution structures of d(GAAAACGTTTTC)2 and of its methylated derivative d(GAAAAMe5CGTTTTC)2 have been determined by NMR and molecular modelling in order to examine the impact of cytosine methylation on the central CpG conformation. Detailed 1H NMR and 31P NMR investigation of the two oligomers includes quantitative NOESY, 2D homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy, double-quantum-filtered COSY and heteronuclear 1H-31P correlation. Back-calculations of NOESY spectra and simulations of double-quantum-filtered COSY patterns were performed to gain accurate information on interproton distances and sugar phase angles. Molecular models under experimental constraints were generated by energy minimization by means of the molecular mechanics program JUMNA. The MORASS software was used to iteratively refine the structures obtained. After methylation, the oligomer still has a B-DNA conformation. However, there are differences in the structural parameters and the thermal stability as compared to the unmethylated molecule. Careful structural analysis shows that after methylation CpG departs from the usual conformation observed in other ACGT tetramers with different surroundings. Subtle displacements of bases, sugars and backbone imposed by the steric interaction of the two methyl groups inside the major groove are accompanied by severe pinching of the minor groove at the C-G residues.

  19. 500-MHz proton NMR evidence for two solution structures of the common arm base-paired segment of wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The base-pair protons of the common arm duplex fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been identified and assigned by means of 500-MHz proton NMR spectroscopy. The two previously reported extra base pairs within the fragment are now explained by the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and its corresponding base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA). The present conclusions are supported by one- and two-dimensional proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements in H{sub 2}O and by temperature variation and Mg{sup 2+} titration of the downfield {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. The difference between the two conformers is most likely due to difference in helical tightness. Some additional amino proton resonances have also been assigned.

  20. Solution NMR structures of the C-domain of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal protein Tcb2 reveal distinct calcium-induced structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Honts, Jerry E; Sleister, Heidi M; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Tcb2 is a calcium-binding protein that localizes to the membrane-associated skeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila with hypothesized roles in ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Tcb2 has also been implicated in a unique calcium-triggered, ATP-independent type of contractility exhibited by filamentous networks isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton. To gain insight into Tcb2's structure-function relationship and contractile properties, we determined solution NMR structures of its C-terminal domain in the calcium-free and calcium-bound states. The overall architecture is similar to other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand calcium-binding motifs. Comparison of the two structures reveals that Tcb2-C's calcium-induced conformational transition differs from the prototypical calcium sensor calmodulin, suggesting that the two proteins play distinct functional roles in Tetrahymena and likely have different mechanisms of target recognition. Future studies of the full-length protein and the identification of Tcb2 cellular targets will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and its unique contractile properties. Proteins 2016; 84:1748-1756. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The NMR solution structure and function of RPA3313: a putative ribosomal transport protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Catazaro, Jonathan; Lowe, Austin J; Cerny, Ronald L; Powers, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Protein function elucidation often relies heavily on amino acid sequence analysis and other bioinformatics approaches. The reliance is extended to structure homology modeling for ligand docking and protein-protein interaction mapping. However, sequence analysis of RPA3313 exposes a large, unannotated class of hypothetical proteins mostly from the Rhizobiales order. In the absence of sequence and structure information, further functional elucidation of this class of proteins has been significantly hindered. A high quality NMR structure of RPA3313 reveals that the protein forms a novel split ββαβ fold with a conserved ligand binding pocket between the first β-strand and the N-terminus of the α-helix. Conserved residue analysis and protein-protein interaction prediction analyses reveal multiple protein binding sites and conserved functional residues. Results of a mass spectrometry proteomic analysis strongly point toward interaction with the ribosome and its subunits. The combined structural and proteomic analyses suggest that RPA3313 by itself or in a larger complex may assist in the transportation of substrates to or from the ribosome for further processing. Proteins 2016; 85:93-102. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The solution structure of the circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) determined by NMR and molecular mechanics calculation.

    PubMed Central

    Mooren, M M; Wijmenga, S S; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Hilbers, C W

    1994-01-01

    The 3'-5' circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) was studied by means of 1D and 2D high resolution NMR techniques and molecular mechanics calculations. Analysis of the J-couplings, obtained from the 1H and 13C-NMR spectra, allowed the determination of the conformation of the sugar rings and of the 'circular' phosphate backbone. In the course of the investigations it was found that the Karplus-equation most recently parametrized for the CCOP J-coupling constants could not account for the measured J(C4'P) of 11.1 Hz and a new parametrization for both HCOP and CCOP coupling constants is therefore presented. Subsequent analysis of the coupling constants yielded 'fixed' values for the torsion angles beta and delta (with beta = 178 degrees and delta = 139 degrees). The value of the latter angle corresponds to an S-type sugar conformation. The torsion angles gamma and epsilon are involved in a rapid equilibrium in which they are converted between the gauche(+) and trans and between the trans and gauche(-) domain respectively. We show that the occurrence of epsilon in the gauche(-) domain necessitates S-type sugar conformations. Given the aforementioned values for beta, gamma, delta and epsilon the ring closure constraints for the ring, formed by the phosphate backbone can only be fulfilled if alpha and zeta adopt some special values. After energy minimization with the CHARMm force field only two combinations of alpha and zeta result in energetically favourable structures, i.e. the combination alpha (t)/zeta(g-) in case gamma is in a gauche(+) and epsilon is in a trans conformation, and the combination alpha (t)/zeta (g+) for the combination gamma (t)/epsilon (g-). The results are discussed in relation to earlier findings obtained for cd(ApAp) and cr(GpGp), the latter molecule being a regulator of the synthesis of cellulose in Acetobacter xylinum. PMID:8041628

  3. The solution structure of the circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) determined by NMR and molecular mechanics calculation.

    PubMed

    Mooren, M M; Wijmenga, S S; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Hilbers, C W

    1994-07-11

    The 3'-5' circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) was studied by means of 1D and 2D high resolution NMR techniques and molecular mechanics calculations. Analysis of the J-couplings, obtained from the 1H and 13C-NMR spectra, allowed the determination of the conformation of the sugar rings and of the 'circular' phosphate backbone. In the course of the investigations it was found that the Karplus-equation most recently parametrized for the CCOP J-coupling constants could not account for the measured J(C4'P) of 11.1 Hz and a new parametrization for both HCOP and CCOP coupling constants is therefore presented. Subsequent analysis of the coupling constants yielded 'fixed' values for the torsion angles beta and delta (with beta = 178 degrees and delta = 139 degrees). The value of the latter angle corresponds to an S-type sugar conformation. The torsion angles gamma and epsilon are involved in a rapid equilibrium in which they are converted between the gauche(+) and trans and between the trans and gauche(-) domain respectively. We show that the occurrence of epsilon in the gauche(-) domain necessitates S-type sugar conformations. Given the aforementioned values for beta, gamma, delta and epsilon the ring closure constraints for the ring, formed by the phosphate backbone can only be fulfilled if alpha and zeta adopt some special values. After energy minimization with the CHARMm force field only two combinations of alpha and zeta result in energetically favourable structures, i.e. the combination alpha (t)/zeta(g-) in case gamma is in a gauche(+) and epsilon is in a trans conformation, and the combination alpha (t)/zeta (g+) for the combination gamma (t)/epsilon (g-). The results are discussed in relation to earlier findings obtained for cd(ApAp) and cr(GpGp), the latter molecule being a regulator of the synthesis of cellulose in Acetobacter xylinum.

  4. Study of electrostatic potential surface distribution of wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis solution structure determined by homonuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Celda, Bernardo

    2003-10-01

    Plastocyanin is a small (approximately 10 kDa), type I blue copper protein that works as an electron donor to photosystem I from cytochrome f in both chloroplast systems and in some strains of cyanobacteria. Comparative studies of the kinetic mechanisms of plastocyanins in different organisms show that the electron transfer from photosystem I happens by simple collision in cyanobacteria but through a intermediate transition complex in green algae and superior plants. Previous work has proved that this effect cannot be explained by structural variations across the different plastocyanins but it can be explained by differences in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. In that case, minor conformational errors at the amino acid side chain level may imply an important effect in the electrostatic potential distribution calculation. In this work we present a high resolution study of side chain conformation by homonuclear NMR for the reduced wild-type plastocyanin Synechocystis using intensity ratios for 2D-NOESY and 2D-H,H-TOCSY cross peaks at different mixing times. We also present the corresponding comparison with different plastocyanin structures and the effect in the electrostatic potential distribution at the protein surface. We discuss the importance of indirect J-coupling information from TOCSY-type experiments as complement for intraresidue distances derived from NOESY experiments in the determination of side chain orientation and stereo-specific assignments.

  5. Mechanisms of amyloid formation revealed by solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Thompson, Gary S.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous elongated aggregates involved in more than fifty human diseases. Recent advances in electron microscopy and solid state NMR have allowed the characterization of fibril structures to different extents of refinement. However, structural details about the mechanism of fibril formation remain relatively poorly defined. This is mainly due to the complex, heterogeneous and transient nature of the species responsible for assembly; properties that make them difficult to detect and characterize in structural detail using biophysical techniques. The ability of solution NMR spectroscopy to investigate exchange between multiple protein states, to characterize transient and low-population species, and to study high molecular weight assemblies, render NMR an invaluable technique for studies of amyloid assembly. In this article we review state-of-the-art solution NMR methods for investigations of: (a) protein dynamics that lead to the formation of aggregation-prone species; (b) amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered proteins; and (c) protein–protein interactions on pathway to fibril formation. Together, these topics highlight the power and potential of NMR to provide atomic level information about the molecular mechanisms of one of the most fascinating problems in structural biology. PMID:26282197

  6. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, Congbao

    2010-12-03

    The human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  7. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  8. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  9. New theoretical approach for elucidating the solution structure of peptides from NMR data. Final report on DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER62490

    SciTech Connect

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    2002-05-01

    In this project we have developed a new computational methodology, based on statistical mechanics considerations, for analyzing experimental structural data of flexible peptides and segments of proteins (typically surface loops and chain ends). This methodology is applicable to multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray crystallography, and potentially fluorescence spectroscopy and other techniques. NMR is the only physical technique that can generate three dimensional structures of biomolecules in solution. It is well established for globular proteins which reside in a single microstate, i.e. a limited region of conformational space around the native structure. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) contacts indicative of structure can also be obtained from more flexible systems (e.g., peptides, carbohydrates, and DNA segments), which are expected to populate significantly several microstates in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, in this case the NOEs might become weighted averages of contributions of the individual microstates, which makes the interpretation of the data difficult, because of the need to identify the most stable microstates arid calculate their relative populations. Development of reliable analysis techniques in this field is a challenge.

  10. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  11. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  12. Solution-state NMR structure of the putative morphogene protein BolA (PFE0790c) from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Yee, Adelinda; Semesi, Anthony; Myler, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hui, Raymond

    2015-05-01

    Protozoa of the genus Plasmodium are responsible for malaria, which is perhaps the most important parasitic disease to infect mankind. The emergence of Plasmodium strains resistant to current therapeutics and prophylactics makes the development of new treatment strategies urgent. Among the potential targets for new antimalarial drugs is the BolA-like protein PFE0790c from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-BolA). While the function of BolA is unknown, it has been linked to cell morphology by regulating transcription in response to stress. Using an NMR-based method, an ensemble of 20 structures of Pf-BolA was determined and deposited in the PDB (PDB entry 2kdn). The overall topology of the Pf-BolA structure, α1-β1-β2-η1-α2/η2-β3-α3, with the β-strands forming a mixed β-sheet, is similar to the fold observed in other BolA structures. A helix-turn-helix motif similar to the class II KH fold associated with nucleic acid-binding proteins is present, but contains an FXGXXXL signature sequence that differs from the GXXG signature sequence present in class II KH folds, suggesting that the BolA family of proteins may use a novel protein-nucleic acid interface. A well conserved arginine residue, Arg50, hypothesized to play a role in governing the formation of the C-terminal α-helix in the BolA family of proteins, is too distant to form polar contacts with any side chains in this α-helix in Pf-BolA, suggesting that this conserved arginine may only serve a role in guiding the orientation of this C-terminal helix in some BolA proteins. A survey of BolA structures suggests that the C-terminal helix may not have a functional role and that the third helix (α2/η2) has a `kink' that appears to be conserved among the BolA protein structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that Pf-BolA is fairly robust, partially unfolding when heated to 353 K and refolding upon cooling to 298 K.

  13. Solution-state NMR structure of the putative morphogene protein BolA (PFE0790c) from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Yee, Adelinda; Semesi, Anthony; Myler, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Hui, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Protozoa of the genus Plasmodium are responsible for malaria, which is perhaps the most important parasitic disease to infect mankind. The emergence of Plasmodium strains resistant to current therapeutics and prophylactics makes the development of new treatment strategies urgent. Among the potential targets for new antimalarial drugs is the BolA-like protein PFE0790c from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-BolA). While the function of BolA is unknown, it has been linked to cell morphology by regulating transcription in response to stress. Using an NMR-based method, an ensemble of 20 structures of Pf-BolA was determined and deposited in the PDB (PDB entry 2kdn). The overall topology of the Pf-BolA structure, α1–β1–β2–η1–α2/η2–β3–α3, with the β-strands forming a mixed β-sheet, is similar to the fold observed in other BolA structures. A helix–turn–helix motif similar to the class II KH fold associated with nucleic acid-binding proteins is present, but contains an FXGXXXL signature sequence that differs from the GXXG signature sequence present in class II KH folds, suggesting that the BolA family of proteins may use a novel protein–nucleic acid interface. A well conserved arginine residue, Arg50, hypothesized to play a role in governing the formation of the C-terminal α-helix in the BolA family of proteins, is too distant to form polar contacts with any side chains in this α-helix in Pf-BolA, suggesting that this conserved arginine may only serve a role in guiding the orientation of this C-terminal helix in some BolA proteins. A survey of BolA structures suggests that the C-terminal helix may not have a functional role and that the third helix (α2/η2) has a ‘kink’ that appears to be conserved among the BolA protein structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that Pf-BolA is fairly robust, partially unfolding when heated to 353 K and refolding upon cooling to 298 K. PMID:25945703

  14. Selected topics in solution-phase biomolecular NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-05-01

    Solution bio-NMR spectroscopy continues to enjoy a preeminent role as an important tool in elucidating the structure and dynamics of a range of important biomolecules and in relating these to function. Equally impressive is how NMR continues to 'reinvent' itself through the efforts of many brilliant practitioners who ask increasingly demanding and increasingly biologically relevant questions. The ability to manipulate spin Hamiltonians - almost at will - to dissect the information of interest contributes to the success of the endeavor and ensures that the NMR technology will be well poised to contribute to as yet unknown frontiers in the future. As a tribute to the versatility of solution NMR in biomolecular studies and to the continued rapid advances in the field we present a Virtual Special Issue (VSI) that includes over 40 articles on various aspects of solution-state biomolecular NMR that have been published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in the past 7 years. These, in total, help celebrate the achievements of this vibrant field.

  15. Solution NMR structure, backbone dynamics, and heme-binding properties of a novel cytochrome c maturation protein CcmE from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Hamilton, Keith; Rossi, Paolo; Ertekin, Asli; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Lemak, Alexander; Wang, Huang; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Everett, John K; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2012-05-08

    Cytochrome c maturation protein E, CcmE, plays an integral role in the transfer of heme to apocytochrome c in many prokaryotes and some mitochondria. A novel subclass featuring a heme-binding cysteine has been identified in archaea and some bacteria. Here we describe the solution NMR structure, backbone dynamics, and heme binding properties of the soluble C-terminal domain of Desulfovibrio vulgaris CcmE, dvCcmE'. The structure adopts a conserved β-barrel OB fold followed by an unstructured C-terminal tail encompassing the CxxxY heme-binding motif. Heme binding analyses of wild-type and mutant dvCcmE' demonstrate the absolute requirement of residue C127 for noncovalent heme binding in vitro.

  16. Structure and reactivity of thiazolium azo dyes: UV-visible, resonance Raman, NMR, and computational studies of the reaction mechanism in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Moore, John N

    2013-03-07

    UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, allied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been used to study the structure, bonding, and alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of the cationic thiazloium azo dye, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-3-methyl-thiazolium (1a), along with a series of six related dyes with different 4-dialkylamino groups and/or other phenyl ring substituents (2a-c, 3a-c) and the related isothiazolium azo dye, 5-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-methyl-isothiazolium (4). These diazahemicyanine dyes are calculated to have a similar low-energy structure that is cis, trans at the (iso)thiazolium-azo group, and for which the calculated Raman spectra provide a good match with the experimental data; the calculations on these structures are used to assign and discuss the transitions giving rise to the experimental spectra, and to consider the bonding and its variation between the dyes. UV-visible, Raman, and NMR spectra recorded from minutes to several weeks after raising the pH of an aqueous solution of 1a to ca. 11.5 show that the dominant initial step in the reaction is loss of diethylamine to produce a quinonimine (ca. hours), with subsequent reactions occurring on longer time scales (ca. days to weeks); kinetic analyses give a rate constant of 2.6 × 10(-2) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) for reaction of 1a with OH(-). UV-visible spectra recorded on raising the pH of the other dyes in solution show similar changes that are attributed to the same general reaction mechanism, but with different rate constants for which the dependence on structure is discussed.

  17. Sensitivity Enhancement in Solution NMR: Emerging Ideas and New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Okuno, Yusuke; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Modern NMR spectroscopy has reached an unprecedented level of sophistication in the determination of biomolecular structure and dynamics at atomic resolution in liquids. However, the sensitivity of this technique is still too low to solve a variety of cutting-edge biological problems in solution, especially those that involve viscous samples, very large biomolecules or aggregation-prone systems that need to be kept at low concentration. Despite the challenges, a variety of efforts have been carried out over the years to increase sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy in liquids. This review discusses basic concepts, recent developments and future opportunities in this exciting area of research. PMID:24656077

  18. Structural and {sup 31}P NMR investigation of Bi(MM'){sub 2}PO{sub 6} statistic solid solutions: Deconvolution of lattice constraints and cationic influences

    SciTech Connect

    Colmont, Marie; Delevoye, Laurent; Ketatni, El Mostafa; Montagne, Lionel; Mentre, Olivier . E-mail: mentre@ensc-lille.fr

    2006-07-15

    Two solid solutions BiM{sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} (with M {sup 2+}=Zn or Cd) have been studied through {sup 31}P MAS NMR. The analysis has been performed on the basis of refined crystal structures through X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The BiZn {sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} does not provide direct evidence for sensitive changes in the phosphorus local symmetry. This result is in good agreement with structural data which show nearly unchanged lattices and atomic separations through the Zn{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution. On the other hand, the Cd{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution behaves differently. Indeed, up to five resonances are observed, each corresponding to one of the five first-cationic neighbour distributions, i.e. 4Mg/0Cd, 3Mg/1Cd, 2Mg/2Cd, 1Mg/3Cd and 0Mg/4Cd. Their intensities match rather well the expected weight for each configuration of the statistical Cd{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} mixed occupancy. The match is further improved when one takes into account the influence of the 2nd cationic sphere that is available from high-field NMR data (18.8 T). Finally, the fine examination of the chemical shift for each resonance versus x allows to de-convolute the mean Z/a {sup 2} effective field into two sub-effects: a lattice constraint-only term and a chemical-only term whose effects are directly quantifiable. - Graphical abstract: First (CdMg){sub 4} cationic sphere influence on the {sup 31}P NMR signal in Bi(Cd,Mg){sub 2}PO{sub 6}. Display Omitted.

  19. Structure in solution of the RNAter dot DNA hybrid (rA) sub 8 ter dot (dT) sub 8 determined by NMR and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Katahira, Masato; Lee, Sang Jong; Kobayashi, Yuji; Sugeta, Hiromu; Kyogoku, Yoshimasa ); Iwai, Shigenori; Ohtsuka, Eiko ); Benevides, J.M.; Thomas, G.J. Jr. )

    1990-05-23

    The solution structure of the hybrid RNA{center dot}DNA octamer (rA){sub 8}{center dot}(dT){sub 8} has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and laser Raman spectroscopy. The nuclear Overhauser effects resulting from irradiation of thymidine imino protons indicate a duplex structure with conventional Watson-Crick base pairs. The combined results from NMR and Raman spectra are consistent with different nucleotide backbone geometries in (rA){sub 8} and (dT){sub 8} strands. Nucleotide residues of the riboadenylate strand exhibit C3{prime} endo sugar pucker and phosphodiester conformation similar to that of aqueous RNA (the so-called A-form geometry), while residues of the thymidylate strand exhibit C2{prime} endo sugar pucker and phosphodiester conformation similar to that of aqueous DNA (B-form geometry). The solution structure of the hybrid octamer is therefore similar to that proposed previously for poly(rA){center dot}poly(dT) on the basis of fiber X-ray diffraction and solution spectroscopic studies.

  20. Solution NMR structure of Apo-calmodulin in complex with the IQ motif of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-02-11

    The function of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.5 is regulated in part by intracellular calcium signals. The ubiquitous calcium sensor protein calmodulin (CaM) is an important part of the complex calcium-sensing apparatus in Na(V)1.5. CaM interacts with an IQ (isoleucine-glutamine) motif in the large intracellular C-terminal domain of the channel. Using co-expression and co-purification, we have been able to isolate a CaM-IQ motif complex and to determine its high-resolution structure in absence of calcium using multi-dimensional solution NMR. Under these conditions, the Na(V)1.5 IQ motif interacts with the C-terminal domain (C-lobe) of CaM, with the N-terminal domain remaining free in solution. The structure reveals that the C-lobe adopts a semi-open conformation with the IQ motif bound in a narrow hydrophobic groove. Sequence similarities between voltage-gated sodium channels and voltage-gated calcium channels suggest that the structure of the CaM-Na(V)1.5 IQ motif complex can serve as a general model for the interaction between CaM and ion channel IQ motifs under low-calcium conditions. The structure also provides insight into the biochemical basis for disease-associated mutations that map to the IQ motif in Na(V)1.5.

  1. Solution NMR characterization of chemokine CXCL8/IL-8 monomer and dimer binding to glycosaminoglycans: structural plasticity mediates differential binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Prem Raj B; Mosier, Philip D; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-11-15

    Chemokine CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays a crucial role in directing neutrophils and oligodendrocytes to combat infection/injury and tumour cells in metastasis development. CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers and interaction of both forms with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate these diverse cellular processes. However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying CXCL8-GAG interactions. There are conflicting reports on the affinities, geometry and whether the monomer or dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. To resolve these issues, we characterized the binding of a series of heparin-derived oligosaccharides [heparin disaccharide (dp2), heparin tetrasaccharide (dp4), heparin octasaccharide (dp8) and heparin 14-mer (dp14)] to the wild-type (WT) dimer and a designed monomer using solution NMR spectroscopy. The pattern and extent of binding-induced chemical shift perturbation (CSP) varied between dimer and monomer and between longer and shorter oligosaccharides. NMR-based structural models show that different interaction modes coexist and that the nature of interactions varied between monomer and dimer and oligosaccharide length. MD simulations indicate that the binding interface is structurally plastic and provided residue-specific details of the dynamic nature of the binding interface. Binding studies carried out under conditions at which WT CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers provide unambiguous evidence that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. Together, our data indicate that a set of core residues function as the major recognition/binding site, a set of peripheral residues define the various binding geometries and that the structural plasticity of the binding interface allows multiplicity of binding interactions. We conclude that structural plasticity most probably regulates in vivo CXCL8 monomer/dimer-GAG interactions and function.

  2. X-ray structure, NMR and stability-in-solution study of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine - A new active compound for cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walla, Jan; Szüčová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Doležal, Karel; Greplová, Jarmila; Massino, Frank J.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine ( 1) was determined at 150(2) K. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic P2 1/ c space group with a = 10.5642(2), b = 13.6174(3), c = 10.3742(2) Å, V = 1460.78(5) Å 3, Z = 4, R( F) = for 3344 unique reflections. The purine moiety and furfuryl ring are planar and the tetrahydropyran-2-yl is disordered in the ratio 1:3, probably due to the chiral carbon atom C(17). The individual 1H and 13C NMR signals were assigned by 2D correlation experiments such as 1H- 1H COSY and ge-2D HSQC. Stability-in-solution was determined in methanol/water in acidic pH (3-7).

  3. Solution NMR Spectroscopy for the Study of Enzyme Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Lisi, George P.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a ubiquitous biological regulatory process in which distant binding sites within a protein or enzyme are functionally and thermodynamically coupled. Allosteric interactions play essential roles in many enzymological mechanisms, often facilitating formation of enzyme-substrate complexes and/or product release. Thus, elucidating the forces that drive allostery is critical to understanding the complex transformations of biomolecules. Currently, a number of models exist to describe allosteric behavior, taking into account energetics as well as conformational rearrangements and fluctuations. In the following review, we discuss the use of solution NMR techniques designed to probe allosteric mechanisms in enzymes. NMR spectroscopy is unequaled in its ability to detect structural and dynamical changes in biomolecules, and the case studies presented herein demonstrate the range of insights to be gained from this valuable method. We also provide a detailed technical discussion of several specialized NMR experiments that are ideally suited for the study of enzymatic allostery. PMID:26734986

  4. Solution-state structure by NMR of zinc-substituted rubredoxin from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, P. R.; Park, J. B.; Zhou, Z. H.; Hare, D. R.; Adams, M. W.; Summers, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional solution-state structure is reported for the zinc-substituted form of rubredoxin (Rd) from the marine hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C. Structures were generated with DSPACE by a hybrid distance geometry (DG)-based simulated annealing (SA) approach that employed 403 nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE)-derived interproton distance restraints, including 67 interresidue, 124 sequential (i-j = 1), 75 medium-range (i-j = 2-5), and 137 long-range (i-j > 5) restraints. All lower interproton distance bounds were set at the sum of the van Der Waals radii (1.8 A), and upper bounds of 2.7 A, 3.3 A, and 5.0 A were employed to represent qualitatively observed strong, medium, and weak NOE cross peak intensities, respectively. Twenty-three backbone-backbone, six backbone-sulfur (Cys), two backbone-side chain, and two side chain-side chain hydrogen bond restraints were include for structure refinement, yielding a total of 436 nonbonded restraints, which averages to > 16 restraints per residue. A total of 10 structures generated from random atom positions and 30 structures generated by molecular replacement using the backbone coordinates of Clostridium pasteurianum Rd converged to a common conformation, with the average penalty (= sum of the square of the distance bounds violations; +/- standard deviation) of 0.024 +/- 0.003 A2 and a maximum total penalty of 0.035 A2. Superposition of the backbone atoms (C, C alpha, N) of residues A1-L51 for all 40 structures afforded an average pairwise root mean square (rms) deviation value (+/- SD) of 0.42 +/- 0.07 A. Superposition of all heavy atoms for residues A1-L51, including those of structurally undefined external side chains, afforded an average pairwise rms deviation of 0.72 +/- 0.08 A. Qualitative comparison of back-calculated and experimental two-dimensional NOESY spectra indicate that the DG/SA structures are consistent with the experimental

  5. Microgram-scale protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Anklin, Clemens; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-06-01

    Using conventional triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with a 1 mm triple-resonance microcoil NMR probe, we determined near complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the 68-residue Methanosarcina mazei TRAM protein using only 72 mug (6 microl, 1.4 mM) of protein. This first example of a complete solution NMR structure determined using microgram quantities of protein demonstrates the utility of microcoil-probe NMR technologies for protein samples that can be produced in only limited quantities.

  6. Solution structure of RNA duplexes containing alternating CG base pairs: NMR study of r(CGCGCG)2 and 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 under low salt conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, M; Biala, E; Milecki, J; Adamiak, R W

    1997-01-01

    Structures of r(CGCGCG)2 and 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 have been determined by NMR spectroscopy under low salt conditions. All protons and phosphorus nuclei resonances have been assigned. Signals of H5'/5" have been assigned stereospecifically. All 3JH,H and 3JP,H coupling constants have been measured. The structures were determined and refined using an iterative relaxation matrix procedure (IRMA) and the restrained MD simulation. Both duplexes form half-turn, right-handed helices with several conformational features which deviate significantly from a canonical A-RNA structure. Duplexes are characterised as having C3'-endo sugar pucker, very low base-pair rise and high helical twist and inclination angles. Helices are overwound with <10 bp per turn. There is limited inter-strand guanine stacking for CG steps. Within CG steps of both duplexes, the planes of the inter-strand cytosines are not parallel while guanines are almost parallel. For the GC steps this pattern is reversed. The 2'-O-methyl groups are spatially close to the 5'-hydrogens of neighbouring residues from the 3'-side and are directed towards the minor groove of 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 forming a hydrophobic layer. Solution structures of both duplexes are similar; the effect of 2'-O-methylation on the parent RNA structure is small. This suggests that intrinsic properties imposed by alternating CG base pairs govern the overall conformation of both duplexes. PMID:9358170

  7. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  8. Solution NMR structure of MED25(391-543) comprising the activator-interacting domain (ACID) of human mediator subunit 25.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Ruyechan, William T; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The solution NMR structure of protein MED25(391-543), comprising the activator interacting domain (ACID) of subunit 25 of the human mediator, is presented along with the measurement of polypeptide backbone heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOEs to identify fast internal motional modes. This domain interacts with the acidic transactivation domains of Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) protein VP16 and the Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) major transactivator protein IE62, which initiate transcription of viral genes. The structure is similar to the β-barrel domains of the human protein Ku and the SPOC domain of human protein SHARP, and provides a starting point to understand the structural biology of initiation of HSV-1 and VZV gene activation. Homology models built for the two ACID domains of the prostate tumor overexpressed (PTOV1) protein using the structure of MED25(391-543) as a template suggest that differential biological activities of the ACID domains in MED25 and PTOV1 arise from modulation of quite similar protein-protein interactions by variable residues grouped around highly conserved charged surface areas.

  9. Solution NMR structure of MED25(391–543) comprising the activator-interacting domain (ACID) of human mediator subunit 25

    PubMed Central

    Eletsky, A.; Eletsky, A.; Szyperski, T.; Ruyechan, W.T; Ruyechan, W.T; Xiao, R.; Acton, T.B; Montelione, G.T; Xiao, R.; Acton, T.B; Montelione, G.T; Xiao, R.; Acton, T.B; Montelione, G.T

    2013-01-01

    The solution NMR structure of protein MED25(391–543), comprising the activator interacting domain (ACID) of subunit 25 of the human mediator, is presented along with the measurement of polypeptide backbone heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOEs to identify fast internal motional modes. This domain interacts with the acidic transactivation domains of Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) protein VP16 and the Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) major transactivator protein IE62, which initiate transcription of viral genes. The structure is similar to the β-barrel domains of the human protein Ku and the SPOC domain of human protein SHARP, and provides a starting point to understand the structural biology of initiation of HSV-1 and VZV gene activation. Homology models built for the two ACID domains of the prostate tumor overexpressed (PTOV1) protein using the structure of MED25(391–543) as a template suggest that differential biological activities of the ACID domains in MED25 and PTOV1 arise from modulation of quite similar protein–protein interactions by variable residues grouped around highly conserved charged surface areas. PMID:21785987

  10. Solution structure of a DNA decamer containing the antiviral drug ganciclovir: combined use of NMR, restrained molecular dynamics, and full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Marshalko, S; Schurter, E; Kumar, S; Beardsley, G P; Schweitzer, B I

    1997-05-06

    The nucleoside analog 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir, DHPG) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment of a variety of herpes viruses in immunocompromised patients and in a gene therapy protocol that has shown promising activity for the treatment of cancer. To probe the structural effects of ganciclovir when incorporated into DNA, we determined and compared the solution structure of a modified ganciclovir-containing decamer duplex [d(CTG)(ganciclovir)d(ATCCAG)]2 and a control duplex d[(CTGGATCCAG)]2 using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 1H and 31P resonances in both duplexes were assigned using a combination of 2-D 1H and 31P NMR experiments. Proton-proton distances determined from NOESY data and dihedral angles determined from DQF-COSY data were used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations starting from canonical A- and B-form DNA models. Both the control and ganciclovir sets of simulations converged to B-type structures. These structures were subjected to full relaxation matrix refinement to produce final structures that were in excellent agreement with the observed NOE intensities. Examination of the final ganciclovir-containing structures reveals that the base of the ganciclovir residue is hydrogen bonded to its complementary dC and is stacked in the helix; in fact, the base of ganciclovir exhibits increased stacking with the 5' base relative to the control. Interestingly, some of the most significant distortions in the structures occur 3' to the lesion site, including a noticeable kink in the sugar-phosphate backbone at this position. Further examination reveals that the backbone conformation, sugar pucker, and glycosidic torsion angle of the residue 3' to the lesion site all indicate an A-type conformation at this position. A possible correlation of these structural findings with results obtained from earlier biochemical studies will be discussed.

  11. NMR solution structure of rat aβ(1-16): toward understanding the mechanism of rats' resistance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Istrate, Andrey N; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Kozin, Sergey A; Makarov, Alexander A; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2012-01-04

    In an attempt to reveal the mechanism of rats' resistance to Alzheimer's disease, we determined the structure of the metal-binding domain 1-16 of rat β-amyloid (rat Aβ(1-16)) in solution in the absence and presence of zinc ions. A zinc-induced dimerization of the domain was detected. The zinc coordination site was found to involve residues His-6 and His-14 of both peptide chains. We used experimental restraints obtained from analyses of NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry data to perform structure calculations. The calculations employed an explicit water environment and a simulated annealing molecular-dynamics protocol followed by quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical optimization. We found that the C-tails of the two polypeptide chains of the rat Aβ(1-16) dimer are oriented in opposite directions to each other, which hinders the assembly of rat Aβ dimers into oligomeric aggregates. Thus, the differences in the structure of zinc-binding sites of human and rat Aβ(1-16), their ability to form regular cross-monomer bonds, and the orientation of their hydrophobic C-tails could be responsible for the resistance of rats to Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Solution structure of DAPI selectively bound in the minor groove of a DNA T.T mismatch-containing site: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, E; Paci, M

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of the complex between 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and DNA oligomer [d(GCGATTCGC)]2, containing a central T.T mismatch, has been characterized by combined use of proton one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics computations including relaxation matrix refinement. The results show that the DAPI molecule binds in the minor groove of the central region 5'-ATT-3' of the DNA oligomer, which predominantly adopts a duplex structure with a global right-handed B-like conformation. In the final models of the complex, the DAPI molecule is located nearly isohelical with its NH indole proton oriented towards the DNA helix axis and forming a bifurcated hydrogen bond with the carbonyl O2 groups of a mismatched T5 and the T6 residue of the opposite strand. Mismatched thymines adopt a wobble base pair conformation and are found stacked between the flanking base pairs, inducing only minor local conformational changes in global duplex structure. In addition, no other binding mechanisms were observed, showing that minor groove binding of DAPI to the mismatch-containing site is favoured in comparison with any other previously reported interaction with G.C sequences. PMID:9753740

  13. NMR Solution Structure of the Terminal Immunoglobulin-like Domain from the Leptospira Host-Interacting Outer Membrane Protein, LigB

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A number of surface proteins specific to pathogenic strains of Leptospira have been identified. The Lig protein family has shown promise as a marker in typing leptospiral isolates for pathogenesis and as an antigen in vaccines. We used NMR spectroscopy to solve the solution structure of the twelfth immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) repeat domain from LigB (LigB-12). The fold is similar to that of other bacterial Ig-like domains and comprised mainly of β-strands that form a β-sandwich based on a Greek-key folding arrangement. Based on sequence analysis and conservation of structurally important residues, homology models for the other LigB Ig-like domains were generated. The set of LigB models illustrates the electrostatic differences between the domains as well as the possible interactions between neighboring domains. Understanding the structure of the extracellular portion of LigB and related proteins is important for developing diagnostic methods and new therapeutics directed toward leptospirosis. PMID:25068811

  14. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  15. Protein Linewidth and Solvent Dynamics in Frozen Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Siemer, Ansgar B.; Huang, Kuo-Ying; McDermott, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR of proteins in frozen aqueous solution is a potentially powerful technique in structural biology, especially if it is combined with dynamic nuclear polarization signal enhancement strategies. One concern regarding NMR studies of frozen solution protein samples at low temperatures is that they may have poor linewidths, thus preventing high-resolution studies. To learn more about how the solvent shell composition and temperature affects the protein linewidth, we recorded 1H, 2H, and 13C spectra of ubiquitin in frozen water and frozen glycerol-water solutions at different temperatures. We found that the 13C protein linewidths generally increase with decreasing temperature. This line broadening was found to be inhomogeneous and independent of proton decoupling. In pure water, we observe an abrupt line broadening with the freezing of the bulk solvent, followed by continuous line broadening at lower temperatures. In frozen glycerol-water, we did not observe an abrupt line broadening and the NMR lines were generally narrower than for pure water at the same temperature. 1H and 2H measurements characterizing the dynamics of water that is in exchange with the protein showed that the 13C line broadening is relatively independent from the arrest of isotropic water motions. PMID:23077575

  16. Protein linewidth and solvent dynamics in frozen solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; Huang, Kuo-Ying; McDermott, Ann E

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR of proteins in frozen aqueous solution is a potentially powerful technique in structural biology, especially if it is combined with dynamic nuclear polarization signal enhancement strategies. One concern regarding NMR studies of frozen solution protein samples at low temperatures is that they may have poor linewidths, thus preventing high-resolution studies. To learn more about how the solvent shell composition and temperature affects the protein linewidth, we recorded ¹H, ²H, and ¹³C spectra of ubiquitin in frozen water and frozen glycerol-water solutions at different temperatures. We found that the ¹³C protein linewidths generally increase with decreasing temperature. This line broadening was found to be inhomogeneous and independent of proton decoupling. In pure water, we observe an abrupt line broadening with the freezing of the bulk solvent, followed by continuous line broadening at lower temperatures. In frozen glycerol-water, we did not observe an abrupt line broadening and the NMR lines were generally narrower than for pure water at the same temperature. ¹H and ²H measurements characterizing the dynamics of water that is in exchange with the protein showed that the ¹³C line broadening is relatively independent from the arrest of isotropic water motions.

  17. Structural plasticity of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase sFkpA is a key to its chaperone function as revealed by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Galius, Veniamin; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2006-10-03

    Intramolecular dynamics of periplasmic chaperone FkpA-deltaCT (sFkpA) and its complexes with partially structured substrates are studied by NMR in solution. The backbone amide 15N relaxation of sFkpA reveals flexibility in the relative orientation between the dimerization domain and two juxtaposed catalytic domains identified in the X-ray structure of sFkpA. This flexibility is attributed to the structural plasticity within the long alpha-helical arm (helix III) consisting of residues 84 and 91. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) indicate an absence of fixed orientation between the sFkpA domains. The substrate binding surface of sFkpA is defined on the X-ray structure by mapping of chemical shift perturbations introduced by complexation of sFkpA with its corresponding protein substrates: partially folded RNase A S-protein and reduced carboxymethylated bovine alpha-lactalbumin (RCM-la). A comparison of 15N relaxation of apo-sFkpA and its complex with RNase A S-protein indicates an increased rigidity within the long alpha-helix III and decreased interdomain mobility of the complex. We speculate that these dynamic properties may play a key role in the chaperone activity of sFkpA, since ability to bind different substrates potentially requires structural adaptations of the chaperone protein. We show that binding of sFkpA to RNase A S-protein greatly reduces the population of aggregated oligomeric species of RNase A S-protein. Finally, a molecular model, the so-called "mother's arms" model, is proposed to illustrate the mechanism of chaperone activity by FkpA.

  18. Isotope Labeling for Solution and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verardi, Raffaello; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Masterson, Larry R.; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize the isotopic labeling strategies used to obtain high-quality solution and solid-state NMR spectra of biological samples, with emphasis on integral membrane proteins (IMPs). While solution NMR is used to study IMPs under fast tumbling conditions, such as in the presence of detergent micelles or isotropic bicelles, solid-state NMR is used to study the structure and orientation of IMPs in lipid vesicles and bilayers. In spite of the tremendous progress in biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, the homogeneity and overall quality of the sample is still a substantial obstacle to overcome. Isotopic labeling is a major avenue to simplify overlapped spectra by either diluting the NMR active nuclei or allowing the resonances to be separated in multiple dimensions. In the following we will discuss isotopic labeling approaches that have been successfully used in the study of IMPs by solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23076578

  19. Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Biomass using Solution-State 2 D NMR with a Mixture of Deuterated Dimethylsulfoxide and Hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Li, Mi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2016-05-23

    Recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6 ) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18 ). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. The structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6 /HMPA-d18 ; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. It also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The secondary structure of the toxin ATX Ia from Anemonia sulcata in aqueous solution determined on the basis of complete sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Widmer, H; Wagner, G; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Wüthrich, K

    1988-01-15

    The toxin preparations ATX I, ATX Ia and ATX Ib from Anemonia sulcata were investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). High-resolution phase-sensitive two-dimensional NMR experiments were used to monitor the separation by high-performance liquid chromatography of the two isoproteins ATX Ia and ATX Ib. For ATX Ia complete sequence-specific resonance assignments were obtained and the secondary structure was determined. To obtain the NMR assignments we used a variant of the sequential assignment technique which relied extensively on cross-peak fine-structure analysis in phase-sensitive spectra, using spectrum simulations based on density matrix calculations with the program SPHINX. These procedures, which resulted in extensive amino acid spin system identifications prior to the sequential assignments, should be generally applicable for small proteins with relatively narrow 1H-NMR lines. The secondary structure of ATX I includes a beta sheet consisting of four strands. No evidence was found for the presence of regular helical segments. The four beta strands are connected by two extended loops and a tight turn, for which further characterization has to await the complete determination of the three-dimensional structure.

  2. NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly extended the spectrum of problems that can now be addressed with this technology. In particular, studies of proteins with molecular weights on the order of 100 kDa are now possible at a level of detail that was previously reserved for much smaller systems. An example of the sort of information that is now accessible is provided in a study of malate synthase G, a 723 residue enzyme that has been a focal point of research efforts in my laboratory. Details of the labeling schemes that have been employed and optimal experiments for extraction of structural and dynamics information on this protein are described. NMR studies of protein dynamics, in principle, give insight into the relation between motion and function. A description of deuterium-based spin relaxation methods for the investigation of side chain dynamics is provided. Examples where millisecond (ms) time scale dynamics play an important role and where relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has been particularly informative, including applications involving the membrane enzyme PagP and mutants of the Fyn SH3 domain that fold on a ms time scale, are presented.

  3. Solution structures of cyclosporin a and its complex with dysprosium(III) in SDS micelles: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Francesca; D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Molteni, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2008-01-24

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a cyclic naturally occurring peptide used to prevent graft rejection in organ transplantations. Its immunosuppressive activity is due to the formation of a complex with cyclophilin A (Cyp), in which the cis 9MeLeu-10MeLeu amide bond of CsA assumes a trans conformation. The mechanism of the conformational inversion has not been delineated, but it has been postulated that metal ions binding induces a conformational change that enables CsA to bind Cyp. In this work, we solved the structures of CsA in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles (which enhance its solubility and mimic the hydrophobic environment clinically used for drug delivery) and its complex with Dy(III) ion, whose coordination chemistry is frequently used to reproduce the effect of Ca(II). The paramagnetic properties of Dy(III) allowed us to build up a structure using proton relaxation enhancements, which remains stable in a MD simulation in the micelle environment.

  4. Structural and thermodynamic insight into the process of "weak" dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Goncharuk, Marina V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2012-09-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions between the single-span transmembrane domains of receptor tyrosine kinases are believed to be important for their lateral dimerization and signal transduction. Establishing structure-function relationships requires precise structural-dynamic information about this class of biologically significant bitopic membrane proteins. ErbB4 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the HER/ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases that is essential for the normal development of various adult and fetal human tissues and plays a role in the pathobiology of the organism. The dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking lipid bicelles was investigated by solution NMR. In a bicellar DMPC/DHPC environment, the ErbB4 membrane-spanning α-helices (651-678)(2) form a right-handed parallel dimer through the N-terminal double GG4-like motif A(655)GxxGG(660) in a fashion that is believed to permit proper kinase domain activation. During helix association, the dimer subunits undergo a structural adjustment (slight bending) with the formation of a network of inter-monomeric polar contacts. The quantitative analysis of the observed monomer-dimer equilibrium provides insights into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding process of the helical transmembrane domain in the model environment that may be directly relevant to the process that occurs in biological membranes. The lipid bicelles occupied by a single ErbB4 transmembrane domain behave as a true ("ideal") solvent for the peptide, while multiply occupied bicelles are more similar to the ordered lipid microdomains of cellular membranes and appear to provide substantial entropic enhancement of the weak helix-helix interactions, which may be critical for membrane protein activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Solution NMR structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain of human cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Chagot, Benjamin; Potet, Franck; Balser, Jeffrey R; Chazin, Walter J

    2009-03-06

    The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 is responsible for the initial upstroke of the action potential in cardiac tissue. Levels of intracellular calcium modulate inactivation gating of NaV1.5, in part through a C-terminal EF-hand calcium binding domain. The significance of this structure is underscored by the fact that mutations within this domain are associated with specific cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. In an effort to elucidate the molecular basis for calcium regulation of channel function, we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal EF-hand domain using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR. The structure confirms the existence of the four-helix bundle common to EF-hand domain proteins. However, the location of this domain is shifted with respect to that predicted on the basis of a consensus 12-residue EF-hand calcium binding loop in the sequence. This finding is consistent with the weak calcium affinity reported for the isolated EF-hand domain; high affinity binding is observed only in a construct with an additional 60 residues C-terminal to the EF-hand domain, including the IQ motif that is central to the calcium regulatory apparatus. The binding of an IQ motif peptide to the EF-hand domain was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The peptide binds between helices I and IV in the EF-hand domain, similar to the binding of target peptides to other EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. These results suggest a molecular basis for the coupling of the intrinsic (EF-hand domain) and extrinsic (calmodulin) components of the calcium-sensing apparatus of NaV1.5.

  6. Application of lanthanide-induced shifts in solution NMR studies of coordinated extractants. [Dibutylbutylphosphonate; butyldibutylphosphinate

    SciTech Connect

    Kalina, D.G.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    A NMR study was conducted to study the coordination of monofunctional extractants (TBP, dibutylbutylphosphonate, and butyldibutylphosphinate) and bifunctional extractants (DHDECMP). Pr, Eu, and Yb ions were used as solution structural probes. (DLC)

  7. Solid state and solution properties of lanthanide(III) complexes of a tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand. X-ray structure, 1H NMR and luminescence spectral studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Pradip; Dutta, Supriya; Flörke, Ulrich; Nag, Kamalaksha

    2008-11-01

    The lanthanide(III) complexes of composition [Ln(LH 2)(H 2O) 3Cl]Cl 2 (Ln = La-Lu and Y, 1- 15) derived from the tetraiminodiphenolate macrocyclic ligand L 2- have been prepared and characterized. In these compounds, the two uncoordinated imine nitrogens of the macrocycle are protonated and hydrogen-bonded with the metal-bound phenolate oxygens and thereby provide a zwitterionic structure to the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the compounds of La and Nd have been determined and they are found to be isostructural. The coordination polyhedra for the eight-coordinated metal centre in the complex cation [Ln(N 2O 2)(O 3Cl)] 2+ can be described as distorted square antiprism. Intermolecular hydrogen-bondings involving the three coordinated water molecules and the two uncoordinated chloride ions give rise to the 2-D network in which the chlorides are triply hydrogen-bridged and the water molecules are doubly hydrogen-bridged. Moreover, the aromatic rings in this network are involved in π-π interaction in two different ways. 1H NMR spectra of the complexes in (CD 3) 2SO have been studied. The spectral assignments for the paramagnetic complexes of Ce-Eu have been made from { 1H- 1H} COSY spectra and longitudinal relaxation time ( T1) measurements. It is inferred that the complex species [Ln(LH 2){(CD 3) 2SO} 4] 3+ that exist in solution are isostructural for the compounds of La-Eu. The contact and pseudo-contact contribution to the isotropic paramagnetic shifts in the complexes of Ce-Eu have been estimated. The luminescence spectra of the complexes of La, Sm, Eu and Tb have been studied in methanol-ethanol (1:4) glassy matrix and in the solid state at 77 K, and the quantum yields have been estimated.

  8. SedNMR: on the edge between solution and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Ravera, Enrico

    2013-09-17

    Solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) of proteins requires that those molecules be immobilized, usually by crystallization, freezing, or lyophilization. However, self-crowding can also slow molecular rotation sufficiently to prevent the nuclear interactions from averaging. To achieve self-crowding, researchers can use a centrifugal field to create a concentration gradient or use regular ultracentrifugation to produce highly concentrated, gel-like solutions. Thus sedimented solute NMR (SedNMR) provides a simple method to prepare biological samples for SS-NMR experiments with minimal perturbation. This method may also give researchers a way to investigate species that are not otherwise accessible by NMR. We induce the sedimentation in one of two ways: (1) by the extreme centrifugal force exerted during magic angle spinning (MAS-induced sedimentation or in situ) or (2) by an ultracentrifuge (UC-induced sedimentation or ex situ). Sedimentation is particularly useful in situations where it is difficult to obtain protein crystals. Furthermore, because the proteins remain in a largely hydrated state, the sedimented samples may provide SS-NMR spectra that have better resolution than the spectra from frozen solutions or lyophilized powders. If sedimentation is induced in situ, the same protein sample can be used for both solution and SS-NMR studies. Finally, we show that in situ SedNMR can be used to detect the NMR signals of large molecular adducts that have binding constants that are too weak to allow for the selective isolation and crystallization of the complexed species. We can selectively induce sedimentation for the heaviest molecular species. Because the complexed molecules are subtracted from the bulk solution, the reaction proceeds further toward the formation of complexes.

  9. Solution conformation of carbohydrates: a view by using NMR assisted by modeling.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dolores; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Structural elucidation of complex carbohydrates in solution is not a trivial task. From the NMR view point, the limited chemical shift dispersion of sugar NMR spectra demands the combination of a variety of NMR techniques as well as the employment of molecular modeling methods. Herein, a general protocol for assignment of resonances and determination of inter-proton distances within the saccharides by homonuclear and heteronuclear experiments (i.e., (1)H and (13)C) is described. In addition, several computational tools and procedures for getting a final ensemble of geometries that represent the structure in solution are presented.

  10. Solution structure of horse heart ferricytochrome c and detection of redox-related structural changes by high-resolution 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Qi, P X; Beckman, R A; Wand, A J

    1996-09-24

    A model for the solution structure of horse heart ferricytochrome c has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy combined with hybrid distance geometry-simulated annealing calculations. Forty-four highly refined structures were obtained using a total of 1671 distance constraints based on the observed magnitude of nuclear Overhauser effects and 58 torsion angle restrains based on the magnitude of determined J-coupling constants. The model incorporates six long-lived water molecules detected by pseudo-two-dimensional NOESY-TOCSY spectra. The all-residue root mean square deviation about the average structure is 0.33 +/- 0.04 A for the backbone N, C alpha, and C' atoms and 0.83 +/- 0.05 A for all heavy atoms. The overall topology of the model for solution structure is very similar to that seen in previously reported models for crystal structures of homologous c-type cytochromes though there are a number of significant differences in detailed aspects of the structure. Two of the three main helices display localized irregularities in helical hydrogen bonding resulting in bifurcation of main chain hydrogen bond acceptor carbonyls. The N- and C-terminal helices are tightly packed and display several interhelical interactions not seen in reported crystal models. To provide an independent measure of the accuracy of the model for the oxidized protein, the expected pseudocontact shifts induced by the spin 1/2 iron were compared to the observed redox-dependent chemical shift changes. These comparisons confirm the general accuracy of the model for the oxidized protein and its observed differences with the structure of the reduced protein. The structures of the reduced and oxidized states of the protein provide a template to explain a range of physical and biological data spanning the redox properties, folding, molecular recognition, and stability of the cytochrome c molecule. For example, a redox-dependent reorganization of surface residues at the heme edge can

  11. Allochromatium vinosum DsrC: solution-state NMR structure, redox properties, and interaction with DsrEFH, a protein essential for purple sulfur bacterial sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cort, John R; Selan, Ute; Schulte, Andrea; Grimm, Frauke; Kennedy, Michael A; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-10-10

    Sequenced genomes of dissimilatory sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria containing genes coding for DsrAB, the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, inevitably also contain the gene coding for the 12-kDa DsrC protein. DsrC is thought to have a yet unidentified role associated with the activity of DsrAB. Here we report the solution structure of DsrC from the sulfur-oxidizing purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum determined with NMR spectroscopy in reducing conditions, and we describe the redox behavior of two conserved cysteine residues upon transfer to an oxidizing environment. In reducing conditions, the DsrC structure is disordered in the highly conserved carboxy-terminus. We present multiple lines of evidence that, in oxidizing conditions, a strictly conserved cysteine (Cys111) at the penultimate position in the sequence forms an intramolecular disulfide bond with Cys100, which is conserved in DsrC in all organisms with DsrAB. While an intermolecular Cys111-Cys111 disulfide-bonded dimer is rapidly formed under oxidizing conditions, the intramolecularly disulfide-bonded species (Cys100-Cys111) is the thermodynamically stable form of the protein under these conditions. Treatment of the disulfidic forms with reducing agent regenerates the monomeric species that was structurally characterized. Using a band-shift technique under nondenaturing conditions, we obtained evidence for the interaction of DsrC with heterohexameric DsrEFH, a protein encoded in the same operon. Mutation of Cys100 to serine prevented formation of the DsrC species assigned as an intramolecular disulfide in oxidizing conditions, while still allowing formation of the intermolecular Cys111-Cys111 dimer. In the reduced form, this mutant protein still interacted with DsrEFH. This was not the case for the Cys111Ser and Cys100Ser/Cys111Ser mutants, both of which also did not form protein dimers. Our observations highlight the central importance of the carboxy-terminal DsrC cysteine

  12. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. NMR investigations of protein-carbohydrate interactions binding studies and refined three-dimensional solution structure of the complex between the B domain of wheat germ agglutinin and N,N', N"-triacetylchitotriose.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J F; Asensio, J L; García, J L; Laynez, J; Bruix, M; Wright, C; Siebert, H C; Gabius, H J; Cañada, F J; Jiménez-Barbero, J

    2000-07-01

    The specific interaction of the isolated B domain of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-B) with N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose has been analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The association constants for the binding of WGA-B to this trisaccharide have been determined from both 1H-NMR titration experiments and microcalorimetry methods. Entropy and enthalpy of binding have been obtained. The driving force for the binding process is provided by a negative DeltaH which is partially compensated by negative DeltaS. These negative signs indicate that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces are the major interactions stabilizing the complex. NOESY NMR experiments in water solution provided 327 protein proton-proton distance constraints. All the experimental constraints were used in a refinement protocol including restrained molecular dynamics in order to determine the refined solution conformation of this protein/carbohydrate complex. With regard to the NMR structure of the free protein, no important changes in the protein NOEs were observed, indicating that carbohydrate-induced conformational changes are small. The average backbone rmsd of the 35 refined structures was 1.05 A, while the heavy atom rmsd was 2.10 A. Focusing on the bound ligand, two different orientations of the trisaccharide within WGA-B binding site are possible. It can be deduced that both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts confer stability to both complexes. A comparison of the three-dimensional structure of WGA-B in solution to that reported in the solid state and to those deduced for hevein and pseudohevein in solution has also been performed.

  14. Structure and dynamics of alpha-tocopherol in model membranes and in solution: a broad-line and high-resolution NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiel, I.H.; Hughes, L.; Burton, G.W.; Jovall, P.A.; Ingold, K.U.; Smith, I.C.

    1988-03-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to study the conformational dynamics of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) in solution and in model membranes. In nonviscous solution, /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that alpha-tocopherol is in rapid equilibrium between two or more puckered conformers of its heterocyclic ring. The most likely conformers to be so involved are the two half-chair forms. Deuterium NMR spectra of specifically deuteriated alpha-tocopherol in multilamellar dispersions of egg phosphatidylcholine, measured in the liquid-crystalline state, were characteristic of axially symmetric motional averaging. The orientation of the rotational axis within the molecular framework was determined. Studies on oriented multilamellar membranes revealed that this axis is perpendicular to the surface of the membrane. The profile of quadrupolar splittings along the hydrophobic tail does not have a plateau, in contrast to that of the fatty acyl chains of the membrane lipids. Longitudinal relaxation times (T1) were short. The presence of a minimum in their temperature dependence shows that molecular motion with an effective correlation time tau eff approximately equal to 3 X 10(-9)s is responsible for relaxation. However, the temperatures and absolute values of the minima depend on the position of the deuterium in the molecule, demonstrating that tau eff represents a complex blend of motions.

  15. Solution structure of the 3'-5' cyclic dinucleotide d. A combined NMR, UV melting, and molecular mechanics study

    SciTech Connect

    Blommers, M.J.J.; Haasnoot, C.A.G.; Walters, J.A.L.I.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Hilbers, C.W.

    1988-11-01

    The 3'-5' cyclic dinucleotide dNMR experiments, UV-melting experiments, and molecular mechanics calculations. The /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra were analyzed by means of 2-dimensional NMR experiments. J-Coupling analysis of the 1D and 2D /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spectra was used to determine the conformation of the ring systems in the molecule. It appeared that at low temperature (283 K) the deoxyribose sugars adopt a N-type conformation. The geometry is best described by an intermediate between the /sup 3//sub 2/T and /sup 3/E forms. In addition, the authors were able to derive all other torsion angles in the phosphate backbone ring system, i.e., ..cap alpha../sup +/, ..beta../sup t/, ..gamma../sup +/, delta (=89/degrees/), epsilon/sup t/ and /zeta//sup +/. When the molecule is subjected to an energy minimization procedure (using the program AMBER), the sugar ring system retains, practically speaking, the torsion angles found from the NMR experiments, while the torsion angles around the glycosidic bond adopt a value of 175/degrees/ in the minimum energy conformation. UV-melting experiments indicate that two molecules can form a dimer in which the adenine bases are intercalated. The feasibility of this structure is indicated by molecular mechanics calculations. At higher temperatures the dimer is converted into separate monomers. In the monomer form the sugars exhibit S-pucker 20% of the time. Concomitantly with the conversion of the N- to the S-conformation, the torsion angles ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. change.

  16. Synthesis and structure of tridentate bis(phosphinic amide)-phosphine oxide complexes of yttrium nitrate. Applications of 31P,89Y NMR methods in structural elucidation in solution.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Cristinel; Fernández, Ignacio; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Roces, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; Ortiz, Fernando López

    2011-07-07

    The synthesis and characterisation of a tridentate ligand containing two diphenylphosphinic amide side-arms connected through the ortho position to a phenylphosphine oxide moiety and the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes formed with yttrium nitrate are reported for the first time. The free ligand (R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11 is obtained diastereoselectively by reaction of ortho-lithiated N,N-diisopropyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amide with phenylphosphonic dichloride. Complexes [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(NO(3))(3)] and [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(2)(NO(3))](NO(3))(2) were isolated by mixing ligand 11 with Y(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O in acetonitrile at room temperature in a ligand to metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The 1:1 derivative is the product of thermodynamic control when a molar ratio of ligand to yttrium salt of 1:1 is used. The new compounds have been characterised both as the solid (X-ray diffraction) and in solution (multinuclear magnetic resonance). In both yttrium complexes the ligand acts as a tridentate chelate. The arrangement of the two ligands in the 2:1 complex affords a pseudo-meso structure. Tridentate chelation of yttrium(III) in both complexes is retained in solution as evidenced by (89)Y NMR data obtained via(31)P,(89)Y-HMQC, and (89)Y,(31)P-DEPT experiments. The investigation of the solution behaviour of the Y(III) complexes through PGSE NMR diffusion measurements showed that average structures in agreement with the 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries are retained in acetonitrile.

  17. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  18. The preliminary solution structure of human p13MTCP1, an oncogenic protein encoded by the MTCP1 gene, using 2D homonuclear NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, L.; Yang, Y.-S.; Padilla, A.; Boiteau, C.; Strub, M.-P.; Hoh, F.; Stern, M.-H.; Roumestand, C.

    1998-02-01

    The human oncogenic protein p13 is coded by the gene MTCP1 which is expressed on mature prolymphocytic leukemias. We investigate its 3D structure using 2D homonuclear NMR. The main secondary structure elements found in p13MTCP1 are antiparallel β-sheets which fold in an eight-stranded orthogonal β-barrel. La protéine oncogénique humaine est codée par le gène MTCP1, exprimé dans des leucémies prolymphocytaires à phénotype mature. Sa structure 3D a été résolue par RMN 2D homonucléaire. p13MTCP1 est essentiellement composée de feuillets β antiparallèles qui s'organisent en un tonneau β orthogonal a huit brins.

  19. Structure determination of membrane proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Opella, S.J.; Nevzorov, A.; Mesleh, M.F.; Marassi, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Current strategies for determining the structures of membrane proteins in lipid environments by NMR spectroscopy rely on the anisotropy of nuclear spin interactions, which are experimentally accessible through experiments performed on weakly and completely aligned samples. Importantly, the anisotropy of nuclear spin interactions results in a mapping of structure to the resonance frequencies and splittings observed in NMR spectra. Distinctive wheel-like patterns are observed in two-dimensional 1H–15N heteronuclear dipolar/15N chemical shift PISEMA (polarization inversion spin-exchange at the magic angle) spectra of helical membrane proteins in highly aligned lipid bilayer samples. One-dimensional dipolar waves are an extension of two-dimensional PISA (polarity index slant angle) wheels that map protein structures in NMR spectra of both weakly and completely aligned samples. Dipolar waves describe the periodic wave-like variations of the magnitudes of the heteronuclear dipolar couplings as a function of residue number in the absence of chemical shift effects. Since weakly aligned samples of proteins display these same effects, primarily as residual dipolar couplings, in solution NMR spectra, this represents a convergence of solid-state and solution NMR approaches to structure determination. PMID:12440700

  20. DNA hairpin structures in solution: 500-MHz two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR studies on d(CGCCGCAGC) and d(CGCCGTAGC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Sarma, M.H.; Sarma, R.H.

    1987-12-01

    A hairpin structure contains two conformationally distinct domains: a double-helical stem with Watson-Crick base pairs and a single-stranded loop that connects the two arms of the stem. By extensive 1D and 2D 500-MHz /sup 1/H NMR studies in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O, it has been demonstrated that the DNA oligomers d(CGCCGCAGC) and d(CGCCGTAGC) form hairpin structures under conditions of low concentration, 0.5 mM in DNA strand, and low salt (20 mM NaCl, pH 7). From examination of the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) between base protons H8/H6 and sugar protons H1' and H2'/H2'', it was concluded that in D(CGCCGCAGC) and d(CGCCCTAGC) all the nine nucleotides display average (C2'-endo,anti) geometry. The NMR data in conjunction with molecular model building and solvent accessibility studies were used to derive a working model for the hairpins

  1. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  2. NMR study of mesomorphic solutions of cellulose derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dayan, S.; Fried, F.; Gilli, J.M.; Sixou, P.

    1983-01-01

    Highly concentrated solutions of hydroxypropylcellulose and cellulose acetate give mesomorphic phases in a precise range of temperatures and concentrations. The existence of an orientational anisotropy in such solutions induces typical parameters of the high-resolution NMR spectra (chemical shift, splitting) that are similar to those of liquid crystal spectra. In the present work, the high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei belonging to the solute molecules (D/sub 2/O and trifluoroacetic acid) were recorded as a function of various physical parameters such as temperature, concentration, and temporal change of the solutions. The specific variation of the orientational degree of order for each mesophase is described. In the case of the cellulose acetate/trifluoroacetic acid solution, an order parameter is calculated and a model for the orientational organization of the solution is described. 34 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  3. Photoprotein Aequorin Structure Determination by NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-09

    AD-A267 066 July 9, 1993 Final Rept. 15 Apr. 1992-31 Dec. 1992 Photoprotein Aequorin Structure Determination by NMR Spectroscopy Grant # N00014-92-J...specific assignments of proteins using homo- and heteronuclear 2D-NMR. Assignments were made for approximately 95% of the 1H and 15N atoms of Bacillus... structure of r-aequorin is included. 028 93-1584993 7 . -,I m!,,•slil Aequorin, bioluminescence, nuclear magnetic reburndie, 3D structure . Unclassified

  4. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  5. Boric acid, “carbonic” acid, and N-containing oxyacids in aqueous solution: Ab initio studies of structure, pKa, NMR shifts, and isotopic fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    B(OH) 3 and CO 2 are acidic species of considerable geochemical importance, yet the microscopic nature of the acid dissociation reactions for these B and C species is not well understood. Quantum mechanical methods have recently been applied to the direct ab initio calculation of p Ka values for many organic and inorganic weak acids, but the B and C acids have not yet been considered in detail. In the present study, p Ka values are calculated quantum mechanically for the oxyacids B(OH) 3, H 2CO 3 and HNO 3, which have experimental first p Ka values of 9.2, 6.4 and -1.3, respectively. We calculate the gas-phase reaction free energies at the highly accurate CBS-QB3 ab initio quantum mechanical level and reaction free energies of hydration using a polarizable continuum method. Using a thermodynamic cycle corresponding to the simple dissociation process HA A - + H +, in aqueous solution, we calculate p Ka values of 21.6, 3.8 to 2.2 and -0.8 for the three oxyacids mentioned above, closely matching experiment only for HNO 3. The discrepancies with experiment arise from the more complex nature of the acid dissociation process for B(OH) 3, which involves the addition of H 2O to B(OH) 3 and formation of the B(OH) 4- anion, and from the instability of hypothetical H 2CO 3 compared to the proper hydrated reactant complex CO 2. . . H 2O. When the proper microscopic description of the reactants and products is used the calculated p Ka values for the three acids become 11.1, 7.2 and -0.8, in considerably better agreement with experiment for B(OH) 3 and CO 2. . . H 2O. Thus p Ka calculations using this approach are accurate enough to give information on the actual acid species present in solution and the details of their acid dissociation processes at the microscopic level. 11B and 13C-NMR chemical shifts are also calculated for the various species and compared to experiment. By comparison of our calculations with experiment it is apparent that the 13C-NMR chemical shift has

  6. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice.

  7. Solution structure of human calcitonin gene-related peptide by sup 1 H NMR and distance geometry with restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Breeze, A.L.; Harvey, T.S.; Bazzo, R.; Campbell, I.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The structure of human calcitonin gene-related peptide 1 (hCGRP-1) has been determined by {sup 1}H NMR in a mixed-solvent system of 50{percent} trifluoroethanol/50{percent} H{sub 2}O at pH 3.7 and 27 {degree}C. Complete resonance assignment was achieved by using two-dimensional methods. Distance restraints for structure calculations were obtained by semiquantitative analysis of intra- and interresidue nuclear Overhauser effects; in addition, stereospecific or {chi}{sup 1} rotamer assignments were obtained for certain side chains. Structures were generated from the distance restraints by distance geometry, followed by refinement using molecular dynamics, and were compared with experimental NH-C{alpha}H coupling constants and amide hydrogen exchange data. The structure of hCGRP-1 in this solvent comprises an amino-terminal disulfide-bonded loop (residues 2-7) leading into a well-defined {alpha}-helix between residues 8 and 18; thereafter, the structure is predominantly disordered, although there are indications of a preference for a turn-type conformation between residues 19 and 21. Comparison of spectra for the homologous hCGRP-2 with those of hCGRP-1 indicates that the conformations of these two forms are essentially identical.

  8. High-resolution solution-state NMR of unfractionated plant cell walls

    Treesearch

    John Ralph; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Dino Ress; Daniel J. Yelle; Kenneth E. Hammel; Sally A. Ralph; Bernadette Nanayakkara; Armin Wagner; Takuya Akiyama; Paul F. Schatz; Shawn D. Mansfield; Noritsugu Terashima; Wout Boerjan; Bjorn Sundberg; Mattias Hedenstrom

    2009-01-01

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With recent methods for dissolution of, admittedly, finely divided plant cell wall material, the wall can...

  9. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant N-Terminally Pyroglutamate-Modified Amyloid-β Variants and Structural Analysis by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dammers, Christina; Gremer, Lothar; Neudecker, Philipp; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Schwarten, Melanie; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by memory loss and cognitive decline. Pathological hallmark of AD brains are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques. The major component of these plaques is the highly heterogeneous amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, varying in length and modification. In recent years pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-β (pEAβ) peptides have increasingly moved into the focus since they have been described to be the predominant species of all N-terminally truncated Aβ. Compared to unmodified Aβ, pEAβ is known to show increased hydrophobicity, higher toxicity, faster aggregation and β-sheet stabilization and is more resistant to degradation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly powerful method to investigate the conformations of pEAβ isoforms in solution and to study peptide/ligand interactions for drug development. However, biophysical characterization of pEAβ and comparison to its non-modified variant has so far been seriously hampered by the lack of highly pure recombinant and isotope-enriched protein. Here we present, to our knowledge, for the first time a reproducible protocol for the production of pEAβ from a recombinant precursor expressed in E. coli in natural isotope abundance as well as in uniformly [U-15N]- or [U-13C, 15N]-labeled form, with yields of up to 15 mg/l E. coli culture broth. The chemical state of the purified protein was evaluated by RP-HPLC and formation of pyroglutamate was verified by mass spectroscopy. The recombinant pyroglutamate-modified Aβ peptides showed characteristic sigmoidal aggregation kinetics as monitored by thioflavin-T assays. The quality and quantity of produced pEAβ40 and pEAβ42 allowed us to perform heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in solution and to sequence-specifically assign the backbone resonances under near-physiological conditions. Our results suggest that the

  10. Effects of nucleotide binding to LmrA: A combined MAS-NMR and solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    ABC transporters are fascinating examples of fine-tuned molecular machines that use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate a multitude of substrates across biological membranes. While structural details have emerged on many members of this large protein superfamily, a number of functional details are still under debate. High resolution structures yield valuable insights into protein function, but it is the combination of structural, functional and dynamic insights that facilitates a complete understanding of the workings of their complex molecular mechanisms. NMR is a technique well-suited to investigate proteins in atomic resolution while taking their dynamic properties into account. It thus nicely complements other structural techniques, such as X-ray crystallography, that have contributed high-resolution data to the architectural understanding of ABC transporters. Here, we describe the heterologous expression of LmrA, an ABC exporter from Lactococcus lactis, in Escherichia coli. This allows for more flexible isotope labeling for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and the easy study of LmrA's multidrug resistance phenotype. We use a combination of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) on the reconstituted transporter and solution NMR on its isolated nucleotide binding domain to investigate consequences of nucleotide binding to LmrA. We find that nucleotide binding affects the protein globally, but that NMR is also able to pinpoint local dynamic effects to specific residues, such as the Walker A motif's conserved lysine residue.

  11. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  12. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  13. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  14. Lanthanide(III) complexes with a tetrapyridine pendant-armed macrocyclic ligand: 1H NMR structural determination in solution, X-ray diffraction, and density-functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Del C Fernandez-Fernandez, M; Bastida, R; Macías, A; Pérez-Lourido, P; Platas-Iglesias, C; Valencia, L

    2006-05-29

    Complexes between the tetrapyridyl pendant-armed macrocyclic ligand (L) and the trivalent lanthanide ions have been synthesized, and structural studies have been made both in the solid state and in aqueous solution. The crystal structures of the La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Er, and Tm complexes have been determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. In the solid state, all the cation complexes show a 10-coordinated geometry close to a distorted bicapped antiprism, with the pyridine pendants situated alternatively above and below the main plane of the macrocycle. The conformations of the two five-membered chelate rings present in the complexes change along the lanthanide series. The La(III) and Ce(III) complexes show a lambdadelta (or deltalambda) conformation, while the complexes of the heavier lanthanide ions present lambdalambda (or deltadelta) conformation. The cationic [Ln(L)]3+ complexes (Ln = La, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Tm) were also characterized by theoretical calculations at the density-functional theory (DFT) B3LYP level. The theoretical calculations predict a stabilization of the lambdalambda (or deltadelta) conformation on decreasing the ionic radius of the Ln(III) ion, in agreement with the experimental evidence. The solution structures show a good agreement with the calculated ones, as demonstrated by paramagnetic NMR measurements (lanthanide induced shifts and relaxation rate enhancements). The 1H NMR spectra indicate an effective D2 symmetry of the complexes in D2O solution. The 1H lanthanide induced shifts (LIS) observed for the Ce(III), Tm(III), and Yb(III) complexes can be fit to a theoretical model assuming that dipolar contributions are dominant for all protons. The resulting calculated values are consistent with highly rhombic magnetic susceptibility tensors with the magnetic axes being coincident with the symmetry axes of the molecule. In contrast with the solid-state structure, the analysis of the LIS data indicates that the Ce(III) complexes present a

  15. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  16. Discovery and structural characterization of a new inhibitor series of HIV-1 nucleocapsid function: NMR solution structure determination of a ternary complex involving a 2:1 inhibitor/NC stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Goudreau, Nathalie; Hucke, Oliver; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Grand-Maître, Chantal; Lepage, Olivier; Bonneau, Pierre R; Mason, Stephen W; Titolo, Steve

    2013-06-12

    The nucleocapsid (NC) protein is an essential factor with multiple functions within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle. In this study, we describe the discovery of a novel series of inhibitors that targets HIV-1 NC protein by blocking its interaction with nucleic acids. This series was identified using a previously described capsid (CA) assembly assay, employing a recombinant HIV-1 CA-NC protein and immobilized TG-rich deoxyoligonucleotides. Using visible absorption spectroscopy, we were able to demonstrate that this new inhibitor series binds specifically and reversibly to the NC with a peculiar 2:1 stoichiometry. A fluorescence-polarization-based binding assay was also developed in order to monitor the inhibitory activities of this series of inhibitors. To better characterize the structural aspect of inhibitor binding onto NC, we performed NMR studies using unlabeled and (13)C,(15)N-double-labeled NC(1-55) protein constructs. This allowed the determination of the solution structure of a ternary complex characterized by two inhibitor molecules binding to the two zinc knuckles of the NC protein. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of a high-resolution structure of a small-molecule inhibitor bound to NC, demonstrating sub-micromolar potency and moderate antiviral potency with one analogue of the series. This structure was compared with available NC/oligonucleotide complex structures and further underlined the high flexibility of the NC protein, allowing it to adopt many conformations in order to bind its different oligonucleotide/nucleomimetic targets. In addition, analysis of the interaction details between the inhibitor molecules and NC demonstrated how this novel inhibitor series is mimicking the guanosine nucleobases found in many reported complex structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  18. An investigation of the structure and bond rotational potential of some fluorinated ethanes by NMR spectroscopy of solutions in nematic liquid crystalline solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsley, J. W.; Longeri, M.; Merlet, D.; Pileio, G.; Suryaprakash, N.

    2006-06-01

    NMR spectra of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane and 1-bromo-2-iodo-tetrafluoroethane dissolved in nematic liquid crystalline solvents have been analysed to yield the magnitudes and signs of the scalar couplings, Jij, and total anisotropic couplings, Tij, between all the 1H, 19F, and 13C nuclei, except for those between two 13C nuclei. The values obtained for Tij in principle contain a contribution from Jijaniso, the component along the static applied magnetic field of the anisotropic part of the electron-mediated spin-spin coupling. Neglecting this contribution allows partially averaged dipolar couplings, Dij, to be extracted from the Tij, and these were used to determine the structure, orientational order, and the conformational distribution generated by rotation about the C-C bond. The values obtained are compared with the results of calculations by ab initio and density functional methods. The differences found are no greater than those obtained for similar compounds which do not contain fluorine, so that there is no definitive evidence for significant contributions from JCFaniso or JFFaniso in the two compounds studied.

  19. Recent Advances in Characterization of Lignin Polymer by Solution-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Long; Xue, Bai-Liang; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-01-01

    The demand for efficient utilization of biomass induces a detailed analysis of the fundamental chemical structures of biomass, especially the complex structures of lignin polymers, which have long been recognized for their negative impact on biorefinery. Traditionally, it has been attempted to reveal the complicated and heterogeneous structure of lignin by a series of chemical analyses, such as thioacidolysis (TA), nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO), and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC). Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology undoubtedly have made solution-state NMR become the most widely used technique in structural characterization of lignin due to its versatility in illustrating structural features and structural transformations of lignin polymers. As one of the most promising diagnostic tools, NMR provides unambiguous evidence for specific structures as well as quantitative structural information. The recent advances in two-dimensional solution-state NMR techniques for structural analysis of lignin in isolated and whole cell wall states (in situ), as well as their applications are reviewed. PMID:28809313

  20. DNA Nanotubes for NMR Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A.; Chou, James J; Shih, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of integral membrane proteins by solution NMR represents one of the most important challenges of structural biology. A Residual-Dipolar-Coupling-based refinement approach can be used to solve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, however, a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant is required. Previously, availability of media suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins was severely limited. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400nm-long six-helix bundles each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, towards collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes via counter ions and small DNA binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal media offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility, and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for 4–5 NMR experiments can be completed in one week by a single individual. PMID:23518667

  1. 13C NMR studies of the molecular dynamics of chlorpromazine in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishii, Tomoko; Kurokawa, Noriko; Aoki, Toshikazu; Ohshima, Shigeru

    1996-02-01

    The optimum structure, which is expected to lead to biological activity, of chlorpromazine hydrochloride salt (compound ( I)) in solution was determined on the basis of NMR data and molecular orbital calculations; compound ( I) favours a bent structure in which the side-chain tilts toward the chlorinated benzene ring. The molecular mobility of compound ( I) in CDCl 3 and D 2O was also examined on the basis of 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1). T1 depends on the magnetic field strength and the solvent. The dependence indicates that the molecular mobility of compound ( I) is larger in D 2O than in CDCl 3

  2. The Local Structural State of Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions: An Investigation of Grospydite Garnet from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite Using Paramagnetically Shifted 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most rock-forming silicates are substitutional solid solutions. Over the years extensive research has been done to determine their structural and crystal chemical properties. Here, the distribution of cations, or order-disorder behavior, is of central importance. In the case of aluminosilicate garnet solid solutions (X3Al2Si3O12 with X = Mg, Fe2+, Mn2+ and Ca) it has been shown that both synthetic and natural crystals have random long-range X-cation disorder in space group Ia-3d, as given by X-ray single-crystal diffraction measurements. However, the structural state of natural garnets at the local scale is not known. Garnet from a grospydite xenolith from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, South Africa, was studied by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. The research thrust was placed on measuring and analyzing paramagnetically shifted resonances to determine the local (short range) structural state of the X-cations in a grossular-rich ternary aluminosilicate garnet solid solution. The garnet crystals are compositionally homogeneous based on microprobe analysis, showing no measurable zoning, and have the formula Grs46.7Prp30.0Alm23.3. The garnet is cubic with the standard garnet space group Ia-3d. The 27Al MAS NMR spectrum shows a very broad asymmetric resonance located between about 100 and -50 ppm. It consists of a number of individual overlapping paramagnetically shifted resonances, which are difficult to analyze quantitatively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectrum, showing better resolution, has two observable resonances termed S0 and S4. S0 is located between about -60 ppm and -160 ppm and S4 is centered at roughly 95 ppm. Both S0 and S4 are composite resonances in nature containing many overlapping individual peaks. S0 contains information on local cation configurations whereby an isolated SiO4 group in the garnet structure does not have an edge-shared Fe2+-containing dodecahedron. S4 involves local configurations where there is one edge-shared dodecahedron containing Fe2

  3. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  4. Protein NMR structures refined with Rosetta have higher accuracy relative to corresponding X-ray crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Binchen; Tejero, Roberto; Baker, David; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-02-05

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5-22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10-25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function.

  5. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding X-ray Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5–22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10–25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function. PMID:24392845

  6. 1H NMR spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies on a poly(ester amide) model compound: Nalpha-benzoyl-L-argininate ethyl ester chloride. Structural preferences for the isolated molecule and in solution.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A C; Jarmelo, S; Carvalho, R A; Fausto, R; Gil, M H; Simões, P N

    2010-05-13

    The molecular structure of the L-arginine derivative, N(alpha)-benzoyl-L-argininate ethyl ester chloride (BAEEH(+).Cl(-)), was characterized by combining quantum chemical methods and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. A conformational search on the potential energy surfaces of the three lowest-energy tautomers of BAEEH(+) [A: R-N(+)H=(NH(2))(2); B: R-NH-C(=NH)N(+)H(3); C: R-N(+)H(2)-C(=NH)NH(2); R = C(6)H(5)C(=O)NH-CH(COOCH(2)CH(3))CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)-] was carried out using the semiempirical PM3 method. The lowest-energy conformations obtained using this method were then optimized at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. For all tautomers, it was found that all low-energy conformers present folded structures, in which a H-bond interaction between the guanidinium group and the amide carbonyl oxygen atom appears to be the most relevant stabilizing factor. (1)H NMR spectra of BAEEH(+).Cl(-) in DMF-D(7) were acquired in the temperature range [-55 to 75 degrees C], providing information about the rotational motions in the guanidinium group and showing that the tautomeric form of BAEEH(+) that exists in solution is tautomer A. The interpretation of the experimental findings was supported by (1)H NMR chemical shifts obtained theoretically at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-31++G(d,p) level of approximation, using both the polarized continuum model and a BAEEH(+)-water complex model.

  7. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. NMR spectroscopy of hydroxyl protons in aqueous solutions of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G; Wüthrich, K

    1992-09-01

    Hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine, and to some extent also tyrosine are usually located on or near the surface of proteins. NMR observations of the hydroxyl protons is therefore of interest to support investigations of the protein surface in solution, and knowledge of the hydroxyl NMR lines is indispensable as a reference for studies of protein hydration in solution. In this paper, solvent suppression schemes recently developed for observation of hydration water resonances were used to observe hydroxyl protons of serine, threonine and tyrosine in aqueous solutions of small model peptides and the protein basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The chemical shifts of the hydroxyl protons of serine and threonine were found to be between 5.4 and 6.2 ppm, with random-coil shifts at 4 degrees C of 5.92 ppm and 5.88 ppm, respectively, and those of tyrosine between 9.6 and 10.1 ppm, with a random-coil shift of 9.78 ppm. Since these spectral regions are virtually free of other polypeptide 1H NMR signals, cross peaks with the hydroxyl protons are usually well separated even in homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR spectra. To illustrate the practical use of hydroxyl proton NMR in polypeptides, the conformations of the side-chain hydroxyl groups in BPTI were characterized by measurements of nuclear Overhauser effects and scalar coupling constants involving the hydroxyl protons. In addition, hydroxyl proton exchange rates were measured as a function of pH, where simple first-order rate processes were observed for both acid- and base-catalysed exchange of all but one of the hydroxyl-bearing residues in BPTI. For the conformations of the individual Ser, Thr and Tyr side chains characterized in the solution structure with the use of hydroxyl proton NMR, both exact coincidence and significant differences relative to the corresponding BPTI crystal structure data were observed.

  10. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  11. Methanol and acetonitrile associates in aqueous and chloroform solutions according to 1H NMR spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhova, Y. B.; Mushtakova, S. P.

    2014-05-01

    Association of methanol and acetonitrile in a nonpolar (CDCl3) and polar (H2O and D2O) solvents was studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The results were compared with the data obtained by decomposition of the spectral curves in the range 800-1100 nm by the independent component analysis (ICA) technique. The content of homoassociates consisting of four and two or three molecules in the case of methanol and acetonitrile, respectively, gradually increased with the amount of the organic solvent in solution. The aqueous solutions under study consisted of few associates of compositions 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 4.5 for acetonitrile and 1: 1 and 1: 3 for methanol (water: organic solvent). The quantum-chemical calculation of the NMR spectra of the particles existing in solution confirmed our conclusions about the structure of the solutions.

  12. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  14. NMR in Chevrel-phase solid solution Mo 6Se 8- xTe x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamard, C.; Le Floch, M.; Peña, O.; Wojakowski, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Mo 6Se 8-Mo 6Te 8 solid solution was studied by X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility and 77Se and 125Te NMR. Dynamic studies show that substitution occurs differently when Se replaces Te in Mo 6Te 8 than when Te replaces Se in Mo 6Se 8. Selenium first fills the high-symmetry sites and then it becomes statistically distributed on the 6f positions of the R3¯ symmetry. In the second case, Te occupies randomly the 8 X sites of the Mo 6X 8 structure, creating large perturbations of the 125Te NMR spectra over the whole range of x.

  15. Solid-state structure and solution conformation of the nootropic agent N[2-( N,N-Diisopropylamino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate. X-ray and homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandoli, Giuliano; Nicolini, Marino; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno

    1987-04-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the nootropic agent N-[2-( N,N-diisopropyl-amino)ethyl]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinacetamide sulphate was determined by X-ray analysis. The conformational properties in the solution state were deduced from the 1H-NMR spectrum run in 2H 2O at 500 MHz. Spectral assignments were made with the aid of the COSY 45 shift correlation experiment. Crystals were triclinic with unit cell dimensions a = 13.410(10), b = 11.382(8), c = 6.697(4) », α = 83.80(3), β = 88.61(3)and γ = 72.25(6)° ; space group Poverline1. The structure was determined from 1047 three-dimensional counter data and refined to a value of 7.5% for the conventional discrepancy factor R. One molecule of the solvent acetonitrile is incorporated per two of the (C 14H 28N 3O 2) +-(HSO 4) -. The five-membered heterocyclic ring is in an envelope ( Cs) conformation and the "flap" atom deviates by 0.31 » from the plane of the other four. This plane forms a dihedral angle of 71.4° with the amide group, with the CO fragment directed toward the ring. All bond angles and distances are in good agreement with expected standard values. A strong OH⋯O intermolecular bond (2.61 ») links the cation of the hydrogen-sulphate anion, while the loosely held MeCN molecule is trapped in the polar pockets. The molecular conformation in the solid was compared with results from 1H NMR spectral analysis which showed that in solution wide torsional oscillations can occur about the bonds of the chain bonded to the N(1) atom.

  16. The dynamic duo: Combining NMR and small angle scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Sattler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Structural biology provides essential information for elucidating molecular mechanisms that underlie biological function. Advances in hardware, sample preparation, experimental methods, and computational approaches now enable structural analysis of protein complexes with increasing complexity that more closely represent biologically entities in the cellular environment. Integrated multidisciplinary approaches are required to overcome limitations of individual methods and take advantage of complementary aspects provided by different structural biology techniques. Although X-ray crystallography remains the method of choice for structural analysis of large complexes, crystallization of flexible systems is often difficult and does typically not provide insights into conformational dynamics present in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is well-suited to study dynamics at picosecond to second time scales, and to map binding interfaces even of large systems at residue resolution but suffers from poor sensitivity with increasing molecular weight. Small angle scattering (SAS) methods provide low resolution information in solution and can characterize dynamics and conformational equilibria complementary to crystallography and NMR. The combination of NMR, crystallography, and SAS is, thus, very useful for analysis of the structure and conformational dynamics of (large) protein complexes in solution. In high molecular weight systems, where NMR data are often sparse, SAS provides additional structural information and can differentiate between NMR-derived models. Scattering data can also validate the solution conformation of a crystal structure and indicate the presence of conformational equilibria. Here, we review current state-of-the-art approaches for combining NMR, crystallography, and SAS data to characterize protein complexes in solution. PMID:24687405

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure, dynamics, and binding properties of the kringle IV type 8 module of apolipoprotein(a).

    PubMed

    Chitayat, Seth; Kanelis, Voula; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Smith, Steven P

    2007-02-20

    The plasma lipoprotein lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] comprises a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-like particle covalently attached to the glycoprotein apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. Apo(a) consists of multiple tandem repeating kringle modules, similar to plasminogen kringle IV (designated KIV1-KIV10), followed by modules homologous to the kringle V module and protease domain of plasminogen. The apo(a) KIV modules have been classified on the basis of their binding affinity for lysine and lysine analogues. The strong lysine-binding apo(a) KIV10 module mediates lysine-dependent interactions with fibrin and cell-surface receptors. Weak lysine-binding apo(a) KIV7 and KIV8 modules display a 2-3-fold difference in lysine affinity and play a direct role in the noncovalent step in Lp(a) assembly through binding to unique lysine-containing sequences in apolipoproteinB-100 (apoB-100). The present study describes the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of apo(a) KIV8 and its solution dynamics properties, the first for an apo(a) kringle module, and compares the effects of epsilon-aminocaproic acid (epsilon-ACA) binding on the backbone and side-chain conformation of KIV7 and KIV8 on a per residue basis. Apo(a) KIV8 adopts a well-ordered structure that shares the general tri-loop kringle topology with apo(a) KIV6, KIV7, and KIV10. Mapping of epsilon-ACA-induced chemical-shift changes on KIV7 and KIV8 indicate that the same residues are affected, despite a 2-3-fold difference in epsilon-ACA affinity. A unique loop conformation within KIV8, involving hydrophobic interactions with Tyr40, affects the positioning of Arg35 relative to the lysine-binding site (LBS). A difference in the orientation of the aromatic side chains comprising the hydrophobic center of the LBS in KIV8 decreases the size of the hydrophobic cleft compared to other apo(a) KIV modules. An exposed hydrophobic patch contiguous with the LBS in KIV8 and not conserved in other weak lysine-binding apo(a) kringle modules

  18. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Solution structure and dynamics of lanthanide complexes of the macrocyclic polyamino carboxylate DTPA-dien. NMR study and crystal structures of the lanthanum(III) and europium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, S.J.; Raymond, K.N.

    1994-12-07

    An 18-membered macrocyclic DTPA-bis(amide) ligand (DTPA = diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) containing a heteroatom in the amide link has been prepared via the condensation of DTPA-dianhydride and diethylenetriamine. The solution structures of the two isomeric pairs present in the Ln(III) complexes of DTPA-dien have been investigated by {sup 1}H NMR. The structures of the lanthanum(III) and europium(III) DTPA-dien complexes have been determined by X-ray analysis. [La(DTPA-dienH{sup +})H{sub 2}O]{sub 2}(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -}){sub 2}{center_dot}18H{sub 2}O (I) crystallizes as a carboxylate-bridged dimer about a center of inversion in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with a = 12.626(2) {angstrom}, b = 21.405(3) {angstrom}, c = 26.422(9) {angstrom}, and Z = 8. Each lanthanum ion is 11-coordinate with octadentate ligand coordination, an {eta}{sup 2} bridging carboxylate, and one water. [Eu(DTPA-dienH{sup +})]{sub 4}(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -}){sub 4}{center_dot}6NaCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{center_dot}20H{sub 2}O (II) crystallizes as a carboxylate-bridged tetramer with two crystallographically independent Eu(III) positions (Z = 8 for each) in the monoclinic space group C2/c: a = 30.94(1) {angstrom}, b = 23.456(3) {angstrom}, c = 22.611(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.78(2){degrees}. The coordination geometries about Eu1 and Eu2 are nearly identical and are described as a nine-coordinate tricapped trigonal prism with octadentate ligand coordination plus an {eta}{sup 1} bridging carboxylate. The tendency to oligomerize is attributed to the constraints imposed by the macrocycle and the hydrogen bonding available with the link heteroatom. The structural differences between the two complexes are attributed to a difference in La(III) and Eu(III) ionic size.

  1. Combined high resolution NMR and 1H and 17O relaxometric study sheds light on the solution structure and dynamics of the lanthanide(III) complexes of HPDO3A.

    PubMed

    Delli Castelli, Daniela; Caligara, Maria C; Botta, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo; Aime, Silvio

    2013-06-17

    GdHPDO3A is one of the most used MRI contrast agents (CAs) for clinical use. However, unlike most of the other commercially available Gd-based CAs, only limited information is available on its solution structure and dynamics. 600 MHz high resolution (1)H NMR spectra of nine LnHPDO3A complexes (Ln = Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb) have been recorded at 298 K and neutral pH. Because of the low symmetry of the Ln-chelates, each proton gives rise to a different peak. Despite the very crowded spectra, it is possible to detect the presence of two sets of resonances associated with different isomers in solution in slow exchange in the NMR time scale. In principle, the LnHPDO3A complexes may be present in solution as eight isomeric forms (four enantiomeric pairs) differing in the layout of the acetate arms (Δ or Λ), in the conformation of the macrocyclic ring (δδδδ or λλλλ) and in the configuration of the chiral center (R or S). 1D- and 2D proton NMR spectra were measured as a function of temperature across the Lanthanide series. The data allow identifying the nature of the most abundant isomeric species in solution (e.g., Λ(λλλλ)-R/Λ(δδδδ)-R and their enantiomeric forms Δ(δδδδ)-S/Δ(λλλλ)-S) and their interconversion process. Analysis of the data led us to identify the presence in solution of a third isomeric species, lacking the coordinated water molecule (q = 0), whose population becomes more relevant for the heavier lanthanides (Ln = Er-Lu). Moreover, we have introduced an innovative way of modeling the thermodynamic equilibrium between the various isomeric forms of LnHPDO3A that can be extended to a number of other systems. This analysis enabled us to calculate the molar fractions of the two isomeric forms for GdHPDO3A (χ = 0.7 and 0.30, for SAP and TSAP, respectively). This information has allowed interpreting the slightly anomalous relaxometric properties of GdHPDO3A. In particular, we observed that the temperature dependence of

  2. NMR structural studies of intramolecular (Y+) sub n ter dot (R+) sub n (Y minus ) sub n DNA triplexes in solution: Imino and amino proton and nitrogen markers of Gter dot TA base triple formation

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, I.; de los Santos, C.; Patel, D.J. ); Gao, Xiaolian ); Live, D. )

    1991-09-17

    The authors reported previously on NMR studies of (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n}DNA triple helices containing one oligopurine strand (R){sub n} and two oligopyrimidine strands (Y){sub n} stabilized by T{center dot}AT and C{sup +}{center dot}GC base triples. Recently, it has been established that guanosine can recognize a thymidine{center dot}adenosine base pair to form a G{center dot}TA triple in an otherwise (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triple-helix motif. The present study extends the NMR research to the characterization of structural features of a 31-mer deoxyoligonucleotide that folds intramolecularly into a 7-mer (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triplex with the strands linked through two T{sub 5} loops and that contains a central G{center dot}TA triple flanked by T{center dot}AT triples. The NMR data are consistent with the proposed pairing alignment for the G{center dot}TA triple where the guanosine in an anti orientation pairs through a single hydrogen bond from one of its 2-amino protons to the 4-carbonyl group of thymidine in the Watson-Crick TA pair. They detect a set of NOEs between adjacent triples that establishes that the G{center dot}TA triple stacks between flanking T{center dot}AT triples in the G{center dot}TA triplex. These results demonstrate the capabilities of the NMR approach in monitoring individual base triples and their pairing alignments, as well as establishing that the G{center dot}TA triple can be readily accommodated in an otherwise intramolecular (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triple helix in solution.

  3. Carbon-dot organic surface modifier analysis by solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippidis, Aggelos; Spyros, Apostolos; Anglos, Demetrios; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Zbořil, Radek; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-07-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) represent a new class of carbon-based materials that were discovered recently and have drawn the interest of the scientific community, particularly because of their attractive optical properties and their potential as fluorescent sensors. Investigation of the chemical structure of C-dots is extremely important for correlating the surface modifier composition with C-dot optical properties and allow for structure-properties fine tuning. In this article, we report the structural analysis of the surface modifiers of three different types of C-dot nanoparticles (Cwax, Cws, and Csalt) by use of 1D- and 2D-high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in solution. We unambiguously verify that the structure of the modifier chains remains chemically unchanged during the passivation procedure, and confirm the covalent attachment of the modifiers to the nanoparticle core, which contributes no signal to the solution-state NMR spectra. To our knowledge, this is the first study confirming the full structural assignment of C-dot organic surface modifiers by use of solution NMR spectroscopy.

  4. The Use of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles in Solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallick, D. A.; Tessmer, M. R.; Watts, C. R.; Li, C. Y.

    Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles are useful as a model membrane system for solution NMR. Several new observations on dodecylphosphocholine micelles and their interactions with opioid peptides are described. The optimal lipid concentration has been investigated for small peptide NMR studies in DPC micelles for two opioid peptides, a 5-mer and a 17-mer. In contrast to reports in the literature, identical 2D spectra have been observed at low and high lipid concentrations. The chemical shift of resolved peptide proton resonances has been followed as a function of added lipid and indicates that there are changes in the chemical shifts above the critical micelle concentration and up to a ratio of 7:1 (lipid:peptide) for the 17-mer, and 9.6:1 for the 5-mer. These results suggest that conformational changes occur in the peptide significantly above the critical micelle concentration, up to a lipid:peptide ratio which is dependent upon the peptide, here ranging from 7:1 to 9.6:1. To address the stoichiometry more directly, the diffusion coefficients of the lipid alone and the lipid with peptide have been measured using pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR experiments. These data have been used to calculate the hydrodynamic radius and the aggregation number of the micelle with and without peptide and show that the aggregation number of the peptide-lipid complex increases at high lipid concentrations without a concomitant change in the peptide conformation. Last, several protonated impurities have been observed in the commercial preparation of DPC which resonate in the amide proton region of the NMR spectrum. These results are significant for researchers using DPC micelles and illustrate that both care in sample preparation and the stoichiometry are important issues with the use of DPC as a model membrane.

  5. Structural characterization of triple transmembrane domain containing fragments of a yeast G protein-coupled receptor in an organic : aqueous environment by solution-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fracchiolla, Katrina E; Cohen, Leah S; Arshava, Boris; Poms, Martin; Zerbe, Oliver; Becker, Jeffrey M; Naider, Fred

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes recent biophysical and protein expression experiments on polypeptides containing the N-terminus, the first, second, and third transmembrane (TM) domains and the contiguous loops of the α-factor receptor Ste2p, a G protein-coupled receptor. The 131-residue polypeptide Ste2p(G31-R161), TM1-TM3, was investigated by solution NMR in trifluoroethanol/water. TM1-TM3 contains helical TM domains at the predicted locations, supported by continuous sets of medium-range NOEs. In addition, a short helix N-terminal to TM1 was detected, as well as a short helical stretch in the first extracellular loop. Two 161-residue polypeptides, [Ste2p(M1-R161), NT-TM1-TM3], that contain the entire N-terminal sequence, one with a single mutation, were directly expressed and isolated from Escherichia coli in yields as high as 30 mg/L. Based on its increased stability, the L11P mutant will be used in future experiments to determine long-range interactions. The study demonstrated that 3-TM domains of a yeast G protein-coupled receptor can be produced in isotopically labeled form suitable for solution NMR studies. The quality of spectra is superior to data recorded in micelles and allows more rapid data analysis. No tertiary contacts have been determined, and if present, they are likely transient. This observation supports earlier studies by us that secondary structure was retained in smaller fragments, both in organic solvents and in detergent micelles, but that stable tertiary contacts may only be present when the protein is imbedded in lipids.

  6. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  7. Comparing NMR and X-ray protein structure: Lindemann-like parameters and NMR disorder.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Dunker, A Keith; Sussman, Joel L; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-08-08

    Disordered protein chains and segments are fast becoming a major pathway for our understanding of biological function, especially in more evolved species. However, the standard definition of disordered residues: the inability to constrain them in X-ray derived structures, is not easily applied to NMR derived structures. We carry out a statistical comparison between proteins whose structure was resolved using NMR and using X-ray protocols. We start by establishing a connection between these two protocols for obtaining protein structure. We find a close statistical correspondence between NMR and X-ray structures if fluctuations inherent to the NMR protocol are taken into account. Intuitively this tends to lend support to the validity of both NMR and X-ray protocols in deriving biomolecular models that correspond to in vivo conditions. We then establish Lindemann-like parameters for NMR derived structures and examine what order/disorder cutoffs for these parameters are most consistent with X-ray data and how consistent are they. Finally, we find critical value of [Formula: see text] for the best correspondence between X-ray and NMR derived order/disorder assignment, judged by maximizing the Matthews correlation, and a critical value [Formula: see text] if a balance between false positive and false negative prediction is sought. We examine a few non-conforming cases, and examine the origin of the structure derived in X-ray. This study could help in assigning meaningful disorder from NMR experiments.

  8. /sup 19/F NMR studies of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli transfer RNAs: solution structure and codon-anticodon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gollnick, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 19/F NMR was used to study E. coli tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/, tRNA/sub f//sup Met/, and tRNA/sub m//Met/, in which 5-fluorouracil (FUra) has replaced uracil and uracil-derived minor bases. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of these tRNAs resolve resonances from nearly all the incorporated FUra residues. Each of the three tRNAs can be resolved into two isoaccepting species, termed forms A and B, whose /sup 19/F spectra differ in the shift of one /sup 19/F peak from ca. 4.5 ppm in form B, upfield to -15 ppm in form A. Because the two isoacceptors of each tRNA differ only at one position, the peaks at 4.5 ppm in the spectra of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ and (FUra)tRNA/sub m//sup Met/; are assigned to FUra 17 and Fura 20 respectively. Bisulfate modification and pH dependence indicate that /sup 19/F signals in the central region of the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ correspond to fluorouracils in non-base-paired regions. Photoreaction with psoralen indicates upfield /sup 19/F signals arise from residues in helical environments. Removal of magnesium or addition of NaCl produces major, reversible changes in the /sup 19/F spectrum of fluorinated tRNAs. Studies of manganese and spermine binding to (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ allow localization of several resonances in the /sup 18/F spectrum to regions near putative binding sites for these ions. Binding of the codon G/sub p/U/sub p/A causes an upfield shift of a /sup 19/F resonance at 3.9 ppm in the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/. G/sub p/U/sub p/A/sub p/A, which is complementary to the anticodon and 5'-adjacent FUra 33, shifts an additional /sup 19/F peak at 4.5 ppm. /sup 1/H NMR and RNase H digestion studies show that the oligonucleotides bind to the anticodon.

  9. NMR characterization of membrane protein-detergent micelle solutions by use of microcoil equipment.

    PubMed

    Stanczak, Pawel; Horst, Reto; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-12-30

    Using microcoil NMR technology, the uniformly (2)H,(15)N-labeled integral membrane protein OmpX, and the phosphocholine derivative detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine), we investigated solutions of mixed protein-detergent micelles to determine the influence of the detergent concentration on the NMR spectra of the protein. In a first step, we identified key parameters that influence the composition of the micelle solutions, which resulted in a new protocol for the preparation of well-defined concentrated protein solutions. This led to the observation that high-quality 2D [(15)N,(1)H]-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) spectra of OmpX reconstituted in mixed micelles with Fos-10 were obtained only in a limited range of detergent concentrations. Outside of this range from about 90-180 mM, we observed a significant decrease of the average peak intensity. Relaxation-optimized NMR measurements of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of the OmpX/Fos-10 mixed micelles, D(r) and D(t), respectively, then showed that the stoichiometry and the effective hydrodynamic radius of the protein-containing micelles are not significantly affected by high Fos-10 concentrations and that the deterioration of NMR spectra is due to the increased viscosity at high detergent concentrations. The paper thus provides a basis for refined guidelines on the preparation of integral membrane proteins for structural studies.

  10. NMR characterization of membrane protein–detergent micelle solutions using microcoil equipment

    PubMed Central

    Stanczak, Pawel; Horst, Reto; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Using microcoil NMR technology, the uniformly 2H,15N-labeled integral membrane protein OmpX and the phosphocholine derivative detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine), we investigated solutions of mixed protein–detergent micelles to determine the influence of the detergent concentration on the NMR spectra of the protein. In a first step, we identified key parameters that influence the composition of the micelle solutions, which resulted in a new protocol for the preparation of well-defined concentrated protein solutions. This led to the observation that high-quality 2D [15N,1H]-TROSY spectra of OmpX reconstituted in mixed micelles with Fos-10 were obtained only in a limited range of detergent concentrations. Outside of this range from about 90 mM to 180 mM, we observed a significant decrease of the average peak intensity. Relaxation-optimized NMR measurements of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of the OmpX/Fos-10 mixed micelles, Dr and Dt, respectively, then showed that the stoichiometry and the effective hydrodynamic radius of the protein-containing micelles are not significantly affected by high Fos-10 concentrations, and that the deterioration of NMR spectra is due to the increased viscosity at high detergent concentrations. The paper thus provides a basis for refined guidelines on the preparation of integral membrane proteins for structural studies. PMID:19950959

  11. Direct observation of minimum-sized amyloid fibrils using solution NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Lee, Young-Ho; Ikegami, Takahisa; Chatani, Eri; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to investigate the structure and dynamics of amyloid fibrils at the residue and atomic resolution because of their high molecular weight and heterogeneous properties. Here, we used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the conformation and flexibility of amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), for which direct observation of solution NMR could not be made. Ultrasonication led to fragmentation producing a solution of minimum-sized fibrils with a molecular weight of around 6 MDa. In 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum correlation measurements, five signals, derived from N-terminal residues (i.e., Ile1, Gln2, Arg3, Thr4, and Lys6), were newly detected. Signal strength decreased with the distance from the N-terminal end. Capping experiments with the unlabeled β2m monomer indicated that the signals originated from molecules located inside the fibrils. Ultrasonication makes the residues with moderate flexibility observable by reducing size of the fibrils. Thus, solution NMR measurements of ultrasonicated fibrils will be promising for studying the structure and dynamics of fibrils. PMID:20936689

  12. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  13. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement. PMID:25737244

  14. Solution NMR studies on Helicobacter pylori proteins for antibiotic target discovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Young; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a well-known widespread pathogenic bacterium that survives in the extremely acidic conditions of the human gastric mucosa. The global prevalence of H. pylori-resistant antibiotics has become an emerging issue in the 21st century and has necessitated the development of novel antibiotic drugs. Many efforts have aimed to discover antibiotic target proteins of H. pylori based on its genome of more than 1600 genes. This article highlights NMR spectroscopy as a valuable tool for determining the structure and dynamics of potential antibiotic-targeted proteins of H. pylori and evaluating their modes of interaction with native or synthetic binding partners. The residue-specific information on binding in solution provides a structural basis to identify and optimize lead compounds. NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for obtaining details of biomolecular interactions with a broad range of binding affinities. This strength facilitates the identification of the binding interface of the encounter complex that plays an integral role in a variety of biological functions. This low-affinity complex is difficult to crystallize, which impedes structure determination using X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the relative binding affinities can be predicted from the type of spectral change upon binding. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy in combination with advanced computer simulation would provide more confidence in complex structures. The application of NMR to studies of the H. pylori protein could contribute to the development of these targeted novel antibiotics.

  15. Characterizing RNA Dynamics at Atomic Resolution Using Solution-state NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Nikolova, Evgenia N.; Eichhorn, Catherine D.; Chugh, Jeetender; Hansen, Alexandar L.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2012-01-01

    Many recently discovered non-coding RNAs do not fold into a single native conformation, but rather, sample many different conformations along their free energy landscape to carry out their biological function. Unprecedented insights into the RNA dynamic structure landscape are provided by solution-state NMR techniques that measure the structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic characteristics of motions spanning picosecond to second timescales at atomic resolution. From these studies a basic description of the RNA dynamic structure landscape is emerging, bringing new insights into how RNA structures change to carry out their function as well as applications in RNA-targeted drug discovery and RNA bioengineering. PMID:22036746

  16. Mesh size analysis of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels using solute exclusion and PFG-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jowkarderis, Leila; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-12-21

    The pore structure of TEMPO-mediated oxidized CNF hydrogels, chemically cross-linked with water-soluble diamines, is studied. A solute exclusion method and pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used to estimate the mesh size distribution in the gel network in its hydrated state. Dextran fractions with the nominal molecular weights in the range of 10-2000 kDa are used as probes. The results show a nonuniform network structure, consisting of a group of large openings that contain ∼50% of water, and regions with a more compact structure and smaller mesh units that restrict the diffusivity of the dextran molecules. A biexponential model is proposed for the NMR echo amplitude decay due to the probe diffusion into the gel network. A typical single exponential model does not fit the experimental data when the probe molecular size is comparable to the network mesh size. The results obtained with NMR, using the proposed biexponential model, are in very good agreement with those determined with solute exclusion. Precise mesh size estimation with solute exclusion using pore models is subject to restrictions, and vary with the assumed pore geometry. The average mesh size obtained using a spherical pore model, ∼35 nm, in the compact regions of the hydrogel, is in good agreement with the theoretical value in a network of rodlike particles. Neglecting the wall effects leads to underestimation of the mesh size with both techniques.

  17. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-06-21

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy-heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP-APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the beta-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed.

  18. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  19. Structure and stability of a DNA triple helix in solution: NMR studies on d(T) sub 6 ter dot d(T) sub 6 and its complex with a minor groove binding drug

    SciTech Connect

    Umemoto, Kimiko; Sarma, Mukti H.; Gupta, Goutam; Luo, Jia; Sarma, Ramaswamy H. )

    1990-05-23

    The possibility of both Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A{center dot}T pairs can result in a triple helical structure for d(T){sub 6}{center dot}d(A){sub 6}{center dot}d(T){sub 6} in solution. In the triple helix the Watson-Crick paired T strand can run antiparallel, while the Hoogsteen paired T strand can run parallel to the A strand. On the basis of 1D/2D NMR studies, we have characterized the structural properties of the triple helix in terms of (a) nature of H-bonding, (b) chain conformations and relative chain orientations, (c) location of triplets T{center dot}A{center dot}T with respect to the helix axis, and (d) effects of NaCl and MgCl{sub 2}. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate that a minor groove specific drug Dst2 (a distamycin analogue) can bind to the triple helix. We show that the nature of thermal transition is altered by Dst2 binding; i.e., the host triple helix shows triple {yields} coil (monophasic) transition in the absence of Dst2, while in its presence the helix shows a triplex {yields} duplex {yields} coil (biphasic) transition.

  20. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  1. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  2. Assignment and conformation of neurotensin in aqueous solution by 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Nieto, J L; Rico, M; Santoro, J; Herranz, J; Bermejo, F J

    1986-09-01

    A complete assignment of exchangeable and unexchangeable proton resonances of neurotensin 1-13 in aqueous solution has been carried out with the help of its 1-8 and 8-13 fragments. To detect formation of a secondary structure, the effects of peptide fragmentation, temperature decrease, pH changes and addition of denaturing agents on the neurotensin 1H NMR spectrum were investigated. The small changes observed in all cases support the conclusion that neurotensin exists mainly as a flexible random coiled polypeptidic chain in aqueous solution in agreement with previous CD studies.

  3. Non-uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  4. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  5. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR OF UNFRACTIONATED PLANT CELL WALLS: POTENTIAL FOR BIOMASS SELECTION AND PROCESS OPTIMIZATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With new methods for dissolution of,...

  7. NMR structure of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:tren-microgonotropen-b:Zn(II) complex and solution studies of metal ion complexes of tren-microgonotropen-b interacting with DNA.

    PubMed

    Blaskó, A; Browne, K A; Bruice, T C

    1995-06-01

    The solution structure of a 1:1 complex of zinc tren-microgonotropen-b [6b:Zn(II)] with d(CGCAAATTTGCG)2 has been determined by 2D nuclear Overhauser effect 1H NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular modeling. The exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton resonances of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) indicate that the Zn(II) is interacting in the A+T-rich region of the dsDNA and the tren region of 6b, while 31P NMR shows interaction of the Zn(II) with the phosphate backbone. Proton chemical shift differences between d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) and d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b are in agreement with the polyamino substituent of 6b [-(CH2)4N(CH2CH2)N-(CH2CH2NH2)2] forming a four-coordinated Zn(II) complex similar to that found in the X-ray structure of 'tren-chloride':Zn(II). The P9 and P10 phosphate oxygens that are held by hydrogen bonding to the tren substituent of 6b in the DNA:6b complex become ligands to the tren-complexed Zn(II) in DNA:6b:Zn(II). To do so there is a 2 A decrease in the adjacent phosphate-to-phosphate distance at the Zn(II) binding site. This motion brings about an increased bend of 14.6 degrees in the helical axis of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) compared to that found in d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b. Single stranded cleavage of linear DNA fragments was not observed in the presence of 6b and Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), La(III) or Ce(III); this is likely due to the metal ion being sequestered as in the structure of d(CGCA3T3GCG)2:6b:Zn(II) complex. Supercoiled DNA was susceptible to cleavage by 6b:Cu(II) in the presence of O2 and a reducing agent.

  8. Investigation of the solution structure of the human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) by sup 1 H NMR spectroscopy, distance geometry, and molecular dynamics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus, W.; Dieckmann, T.; Wray, V.; Schomburg, D.; Wingender, E.; Mayer, H. )

    1991-07-16

    The structure of human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) in a solvent mixture of water and trifluoroethanol has been determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a combination of distance geometry and molecular dynamic simulations. After complete assignment of the {sup 1}H signals, the nuclear Overhauser enhancement data imply the existence of two {alpha}-helics, comprising residues 3-9 and 17-28, joined by a nonstructured region. The absence of any long-range NOEs and the relative magnitudes of the sequential NOEs and the {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub alpha}) values reflect an inherent flexibility within the entire fragment. The final structures refined by molecular dynamics further support the above results and allow discussion of structural-activity relationships.

  9. Solution structure of nucleic acid photoadduct, deoxy-m5HO6-uridylyl(5-5)(3'-5')deoxyuridine by NMR and restrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J K; Soni, S D; Wallace, J C; Alderfer, J L

    1993-01-01

    Sensitized UV-B irradiation (sunlamps) of the dinucleoside monophosphate, d-TpF (F = fluorouracil), produces the usual cyclobutane-type photodimer and an additional defluorinated 5-5 photoadduct, d-T5p5U. In d-T5p5U, the original C5 = C6 structure is modified such that the C5 (d-T5p-) is covalently bonded with the C5 (-p5U) (where the fluorine had been) and the C6 (d-T5p-) acquires an OH group. 2D NOE data and the results of J-coupling analysis are used as constraints to refine structures of d-T5p5U in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The structures obtained show the most probable chiralities of the C5 and C6 atoms of the Thy-portion to be 5R and 6R, respectively. The orientation of the CH3- and uracil-groups are pseudo-axial and pseudo-equatorial, respectively, with respect to the C5 atom. Glycosidic angles are high-anti and anti for the d-T5p- and the -p5U residue, respectively. C3'-endo like sugar puckering is predominant in the d-T5p- residue while C2'-endo like puckering is predominant at the -p5U residue. PMID:8332471

  10. Solution NMR characterization of Sgf73(1-104) indicates that Zn ion is required to stabilize zinc finger motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chaohua; Wu, Minhao; Li, Pan; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Zang, Jianye

    2010-07-02

    Zinc finger motif contains a zinc ion coordinated by several conserved amino acid residues. Yeast Sgf73 protein was identified as a component of SAGA (Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase) multi-subunit complex and Sgf73 protein was known to contain two zinc finger motifs. Sgf73(1-104), containing the first zinc finger motif, was necessary to modulate the deubiquitinase activity of SAGA complex. Here, Sgf73(1-104) was over-expressed using bacterial expression system and purified for solution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) structural studies. Secondary structure and site-specific relaxation analysis of Sgf73(1-104) were achieved after solution NMR backbone assignment. Solution NMR and circular dichroism analysis of Sgf73(1-104) after zinc ion removal using chelation reagent EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid) demonstrated that zinc ion was required to maintain stable conformation of the zinc finger motif.

  11. Ionic Liquid-Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W

    2015-07-23

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru(2+)(bpy)3 solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {(1)H-(19)F} HOESY and {(1)H-(1)H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru(2+)(bpy)3 solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru(2+)(bpy)3 solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  12. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  13. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulkmore » IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  14. Solution NMR of a 463-Residue Phosphohexomutase: Domain 4 Mobility, Substates, and Phosphoryl Transfer Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Akella V. S.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Kelm, Allek; Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Wei, Yirui; Qin, Peiwu; Lee, Yingying; Berjanskii, Mark V.; Mick, Jacob A.; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2012-01-05

    Phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase contributes to the infectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, retains and reorients its intermediate by 180°, and rotates domain 4 to close the deep catalytic cleft. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the backbone of wild-type and S108C-inactivated enzymes were assigned to at least 90%. 13C secondary chemical shifts report excellent agreement of solution and crystallographic structure over the 14 α-helices, C-capping motifs, and 20 of the 22 β-strands. Major and minor NMR peaks implicate substates affecting 28% of assigned residues. These can be attributed to the phosphorylation state and possibly to conformational interconversions. The S108C substitution of the phosphoryl donor and acceptor slowed transformation of the glucose 1-phosphate substrate by impairing kcat. Addition of the glucose 1,6-bisphosphate intermediate accelerated this reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude, somewhat bypassing the defect and apparently relieving substrate inhibition. The S108C mutation perturbs the NMR spectra and electron density map around the catalytic cleft while preserving the secondary structure in solution. Diminished peak heights and faster 15N relaxation suggest line broadening and millisecond fluctuations within four loops that can contact phosphosugars. 15N NMR relaxation and peak heights suggest that domain 4 reorients slightly faster in solution than domains 1–3, and with a different principal axis of diffusion. Finally, this adds to the crystallographic evidence of domain 4 rotations in the enzyme, which were previously suggested to couple to reorientation of the intermediate, substrate binding, and product release.

  15. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  16. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 41-kDa homohexamer: backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, solution secondary structure, and location of active site residues by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Stivers, J. T.; Abeygunawardana, C.; Whitman, C. P.; Mildvan, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), a homohexamer consisting of 62 residues per subunit, catalyzes the isomerization of unsaturated alpha-keto acids using Pro-1 as a general base (Stivers et al., 1996a, 1996b). We report the backbone and side-chain 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR assignments and the solution secondary structure for 4-OT using 2D and 3D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. The subunit secondary structure consists of an alpha-helix (residues 13-30), two beta-strands (beta 1, residues 2-8; beta 2, residues 39-45), a beta-hairpin (residues 50-57), two loops (I, residues 9-12; II, 34-38), and two turns (I, residues 30-33; II, 47-50). The remaining residues form coils. The beta 1 strand is parallel to the beta 2 strand of the same subunit on the basis of cross stand NH(i)-NH(j) NOEs in a 2D 15N-edited 1H-NOESY spectrum of hexameric 4-OT containing two 15N-labeled subunits/hexamer. The beta 1 strand is also antiparallel to another beta 1 strand from an adjacent subunit forming a subunit interface. Because only three such pairwise interactions are possible, the hexamer is a trimer of dimers. The diffusion constant, determined by dynamic light scattering, and the rotational correlation time (14.5 ns) estimated from 15N T1/T2 measurements, are consistent with the hexameric molecular weight of 41 kDa. Residue Phe-50 is in the active site on the basis of transferred NOEs to the bound partial substrate 2-oxo-1,6-hexanedioate. Modification of the general base, Pro-1, with the active site-directed irreversible inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate, significantly alters the amide 15N and NH chemical shifts of residues in the beta-hairpin and in loop II, providing evidence that these regions change conformation when the active site is occupied. PMID:8845763

  17. COCO: a simple tool to enrich the representation of conformational variability in NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Charles A; Orozco, Modesto; Vranken, Wim

    2009-04-01

    NMR structures are typically deposited in databases such as the PDB in the form of an ensemble of structures. Generally, each of the models in such an ensemble satisfies the experimental data and is equally valid. No unique solution can be calculated because the experimental NMR data is insufficient, in part because it reflects the conformational variability and dynamical behavior of the molecule in solution. Even for relatively rigid molecules, the limited number of structures that are typically deposited cannot completely encompass the structural diversity allowed by the observed NMR data, but they can be chosen to try and maximize its representation. We describe here the adaptation and application of techniques more commonly used to examine large ensembles from molecular dynamics simulations, to the analysis of NMR ensembles. The approach, which is based on principal component analysis, we call COCO ("Complementary Coordinates"). The COCO approach analyses the distribution of an NMR ensemble in conformational space, and generates a new ensemble that fills "gaps" in the distribution. The method is very rapid, and analysis of a 25-member ensemble and generation of a new 25 member ensemble typically takes 1-2 min on a conventional workstation. Applied to the 545 structures in the RECOORD database, we find that COCO generates new ensembles that are as structurally diverse-both from each other and from the original ensemble-as are the structures within the original ensemble. The COCO approach does not explicitly take into account the NMR restraint data, yet in tests on selected structures from the RECOORD database, the COCO ensembles are frequently good matches to this data, and certainly are structures that can be rapidly refined against the restraints to yield high-quality, novel solutions. COCO should therefore be a useful aid in NMR structure refinement and in other situations where a richer representation of conformational variability is desired-for example in

  18. Characterization of the insertase BamA in three different membrane mimetics by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Leonor; Zeth, Kornelius; Burmann, Björn M; Maier, Timm; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The insertase BamA is the central protein of the Bam complex responsible for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria. BamA features a 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel and five periplasmic POTRA domains, with a total molecular weight of 88 kDa. Whereas the structure of BamA has recently been determined by X-ray crystallography, its functional mechanism is not well understood. This mechanism comprises the insertion of substrates from a dynamic, chaperone-bound state into the bacterial outer membrane, and NMR spectroscopy is thus a method of choice for its elucidation. Here, we report solution NMR studies of different BamA constructs in three different membrane mimetic systems: LDAO micelles, DMPC:DiC7PC bicelles and MSP1D1:DMPC nanodiscs. The impact of biochemical parameters on the spectral quality was investigated, including the total protein concentration and the detergent:protein ratio. The barrel of BamA is folded in micelles, bicelles and nanodiscs, but the N-terminal POTRA5 domain is flexibly unfolded in the absence of POTRA4. Measurements of backbone dynamics show that the variable insertion region of BamA, located in the extracellular lid loop L6, features high local flexibility. Our work establishes biochemical preparation schemes for BamA, which will serve as a platform for structural and functional studies of BamA and its role within the Bam complex by solution NMR spectroscopy.

  19. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  20. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    PubMed

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  1. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases 15N-1H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include 1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the Discriminating Power (DP) score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and 2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  2. Structural analysis of N,N-diacyl-1,4-dihydropyrazine by variable-temperature NMR and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiu-qing; Tan, Hong-bo; Yan, Hong; Chang, Yu

    2017-04-01

    N,N-diacyl-1,4-dihydropyrazine derivatives (1) were prepared via an efficient microwave-assisted synthesis. 1 was isolated and unambiguously confirmed by NMR spectra and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The NMR spectra of 1 showed complicated rather than conventional spectroscopy. Variable-temperature experiments and DFT calculation (PES) were used to investigate this phenomenon. DFT calculations confirmed that the structures of the two rotamers of 1 correspond to those determined by NMR in solution, and gave the syn-anti interconversion barriers of rotamers. The results showed that two isomers exist in solution (deuterated solvent) at room temperature, resulting in complicated NMR spectra.

  3. NMR studies of the conformational interconversion of butaclamol in solution.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, M G; Craik, D J; Lloyd, E J

    1991-07-01

    1H NMR experiments at 300 MHz have been carried out to determine the identity and study the interconversion of two conformations of butaclamol in solution. The hydrochloride salt in DMSO exists as an equilibrium mixture of two conformations, which differ in their stereochemistry about the ring junction that contains the single nitrogen atom in butaclamol. The trans form has a relative population of 80% and the cis I form 20%. In CDCl3 only the trans form is observed, while in CDCl3-DMSO mixtures, both forms are detected in a ratio (trans:cis I) that decreases as the percentage of CDCl3 decreases. For the free base in either CD2Cl2 or DMSO, only a single set of resonances is observed at room temperature, but as temperature is lowered, peaks from methine protons H4a and H13b near the ring junction broaden and (for samples in CD2Cl2) eventually split into two resonances corresponding to the cis and trans forms. It is suggested that nitrogen inversion is the dynamic process responsible for the interconversion of the two forms. Line shape analysis as a function of temperature yielded an energy barrier of 9.6 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol for the interconversion, in good agreement with values obtained from saturation transfer experiments. In the hydrochloride salt, the barrier in DMSO was somewhat higher, i.e., 17.3 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol, as determined by saturation transfer and variable-temperature measurements.

  4. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J.; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy–heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP–APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the β-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed. PMID:15956183

  5. Residual dipolar couplings: synergy between NMR and structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2002-01-01

    Structural genomics is on a quest for the structure and function of a significant fraction of gene products. Current efforts are focusing on structure determination of single-domain proteins, which can readily be targeted by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and computational homology modeling. However, comprehensive association of gene products with functions also requires systematic determination of more complex protein structures and other biomolecules participating in cellular processes such as nucleic acids, and characterization of biomolecular interactions and dynamics relevant to function. Such NMR investigations are becoming more feasible, not only due to recent advances in NMR methodology, but also because structural genomics is providing valuable structural information and new experimental and computational tools. The measurement of residual dipolar couplings in partially oriented systems and other new NMR methods will play an important role in this synergistic relationship between NMR and structural genomics. Both an expansion in the domain of NMR application, and important contributions to future structural genomics efforts can be anticipated.

  6. Solution Structure of Proinsulin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanwu; Hua, Qing-xin; Liu, Jin; Shimizu, Eri H.; Choquette, Meredith H.; Mackin, Robert B.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The folding of proinsulin, the single-chain precursor of insulin, ensures native disulfide pairing in pancreatic β-cells. Mutations that impair folding cause neonatal diabetes mellitus. Although the classical structure of insulin is well established, proinsulin is refractory to crystallization. Here, we employ heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to characterize a monomeric analogue. Proinsulin contains a native-like insulin moiety (A- and B-domains); the tethered connecting (C) domain (as probed by {1H}-15N nuclear Overhauser enhancements) is progressively less ordered. Although the BC junction is flexible, residues near the CA junction exhibit α-helical-like features. Relative to canonical α-helices, however, segmental 13Cα/β chemical shifts are attenuated, suggesting that this junction and contiguous A-chain residues are molten. We propose that flexibility at each C-domain junction facilitates prohormone processing. Studies of protease SPC3 (PC1/3) suggest that C-domain sequences contribute to cleavage site selection. The structure of proinsulin provides a foundation for studies of insulin biosynthesis and its impairment in monogenic forms of diabetes mellitus. PMID:20106974

  7. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  8. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  9. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  10. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  11. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J; Giedroc, David P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-06-01

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  12. Isotropic solutions of phospholipid bicelles: a new membrane mimetic for high-resolution NMR studies of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Vold, R R; Prosser, R S; Deese, A J

    1997-04-01

    In order to illustrate the utility of phospholipid bicelles [Sanders, C.R. and Schwonek, J.P. (1992) Biochemistry, 31, 8898-8905] as a membrane mimetic for high-resolution NMR studies, we have recorded two-dimensional 1H NMR spectra of the tetradecameric peptide mastoparan Vespula lewisii in an isotropic aqueous solution of dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine. Mastoparan is largely unstructured in water, but assumes a well-defined helical conformation in association with the bilayers. A pronounced periodicity of the sequential NH chemical shifts provides strong evidence that the helix axis of this short peptide is parallel, rather than perpendicular, to the bilayer plane. The bicellar solutions still require in-depth morphological characterization, but they appear to be ideal media for NMR determination of the mode of binding and the structure of membrane-associated peptides and proteins.

  13. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed.

  14. Carbon-13 chemical shift anisotropy in DNA bases from field dependence of solution NMR relaxation rates.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in nucleotide bases is important for the interpretation of solution-state NMR relaxation data in terms of local dynamic properties of DNA and RNA. Accurate knowledge of the CSA becomes particularly important at high magnetic fields, prerequisite for adequate spectral resolution in larger oligonucleotides. Measurement of (13)C relaxation rates of protonated carbons in the bases of the so-called Dickerson dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2), at 500 and 800 MHz (1)H frequency, together with the previously characterized structure and diffusion tensor yields CSA values for C5 in C, C6 in C and T, C8 in A and G, and C2 in A that are closest to values previously reported on the basis of solid-state FIREMAT NMR measurements, and mostly larger than values obtained by in vacuo DFT calculations. Owing to the noncollinearity of dipolar and CSA interactions, interpretation of the NMR relaxation rates is particularly sensitive to anisotropy of rotational diffusion, and use of isotropic diffusion models can result in considerable errors.

  15. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  16. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  17. Crystal structure and dynamic NMR studies of octaacetyl-tetra(propyl)calix[4]resorcinarene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez-Silva, Astrid; Cortés, Brian; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J.; Pérez-Redondo, Adrián; Maldonado, Mauricio

    2017-06-01

    The reaction between C-tetra(propyl)calix[4]resorcinarene (1) and acetic anhydride in pyridine results in the formation of octaacetyl-tetra(propyl)calix[4]resorcinarene (2). The structure was determined using FT-IR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The dynamic 1H-NMR of acetylated resorcinarene was studied by means of variable temperature in a CDCl3 solution and revealed that two conformers are formed in the solution. Boat conformations for acetylated resorcinarene exhibited a rapid interconversion at low temperatures, and the activation barrier for the pseudorotation was determined (54.72 kJmol-1). The acetylated resorcinarene 2 was also characterized by an X-ray crystal structure determination. This analysis indicated a boat configuration for the macrocycle skeleton in the solid state. Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions were observed in the packing of compound.

  18. NMR solution structure of an N2-guanine DNA adduct derived from the potent tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene: Intercalation from the minor groove with ruptured Watson-Crick base pairing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yijin; Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Lin, Chin H.; Cai, Yuqin; Rodriguez, Fabian A.; Sayer, Jane M.; Jerina, Donald M.; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    The most potent tumorigen identified among the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is the non-planar fjord region dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). It is metabolically activated in vivo through the widely-studied diol epoxide (DE) pathway to form covalent adducts with DNA bases, predominantly guanine and adenine. The (+)-11S,12R,13R,14S DE enantiomer forms adducts via its C14-position with the exocyclic amino group of guanine. Here, we present the first NMR solution structure of a DB[a,l]P-derived adduct, the 14R (+)-trans-anti-DB[a,l]P–N2-dG (DB[a,l]P-dG) lesion in double-stranded DNA. In contrast to the stereochemically identical benzo[a]pyrene-derived N2-dG adduct (B[a]P-dG) in which the B[a]P rings reside in the B-DNA minor groove on the 3’-side of the modifed deoxyguanosine, in the DB[a,l]P-derived adduct the DB[a,l]P rings intercalate into the duplex on the 3’-side of the modified base from the sterically crowded minor groove. Watson-Crick base pairing of the modified guanine with the partner cytosine is broken, but these bases retain some stacking with the bulky DB[a,l]P ring system. This new theme in PAH DE - DNA adduct conformation differs from: (1) the classical intercalation motif where Watson-Crick base-pairing is intact at the lesion site, and (2) the base-displaced intercalation motif in which the damaged base and its partner are extruded from the helix . The structural considerations that lead to the intercalated conformation of the DB[a,l]P-dG lesion in contrast to the minor groove alignment of the B[a]P-dG adduct, and the implications of the DB[a,l]P-dG conformational motif for the recognition of such DNA lesions by the human nucleotide excision repair apparatus, are discussed. PMID:23121427

  19. A consensus on protein structure accuracy in NMR?

    PubMed

    Billeter, Martin

    2015-02-03

    The precision of an NMR structure may be manipulated by calculation parameters such as calibration factors. Its accuracy is, however, a different issue. In this issue of Structure, Buchner and Güntert present "consensus structure bundles," where precision analysis allows estimation of accuracy.

  20. Solution NMR Spectroscopic Characterization of Human VDAC-2 in Detergent Micelles and Lipid Bilayer Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Raschle, Thomas; Hiller, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Three isoforms of the human voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, are crucial regulators of mitochondrial function. Numerous studies have been carried out to elucidate biochemical properties, as well as the three-dimensional structure of VDAC-1. However, functional and structural studies of VDAC-2 and VDAC-3 at atomic resolution are still scarce. VDAC-2 is highly similar to VDAC-1 in amino acid sequence, but has substantially different biochemical functions and expression profiles. Here, we report the reconstitution of functional VDAC-2 in lauryldimethylamine-oxide (LDAO) detergent micelles and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer nanodiscs. We find that VDAC-2 is probably folded in both membrane-mimicking systems and that structural and functional characterization by solution NMR spectroscopy is feasible. PMID:22119777

  1. The NMR solution structure of a mutant of the Max b/HLH/LZ free of DNA: insights into the specific and reversible DNA binding mechanism of dimeric transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Simon; Tremblay, Luc; Lavigne, Pierre

    2004-09-17

    Basic region-helix1-loop-helix2-leucine zipper (b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ) transcription factors bind specific DNA sequence in their target gene promoters as dimers. Max, a b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ transcription factor, is the obligate heterodimeric partner of the related b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ proteins of the Myc and Mad families. These heterodimers specifically bind E-box DNA sequence (CACGTG) to activate (e.g. c-Myc/Max) and repress (e.g. Mad1/Max) transcription. Max can also homodimerize and bind E-box sequences in c-Myc target gene promoters. While the X-ray structure of the Max b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ/DNA complex and that of others have been reported, the precise sequence of events leading to the reversible and specific binding of these important transcription factors is still largely unknown. In order to provide insights into the DNA binding mechanism, we have solved the NMR solution structure of a covalently homodimerized version of a Max b/H(1)LH(2)/LZ protein with two stabilizing mutations in the LZ, and characterized its backbone dynamics from (15)N spin-relaxation measurements in the absence of DNA. Apart from minor differences in the pitch of the LZ, possibly resulting from the mutations in the construct, we observe that the packing of the helices in the H(1)LH(2) domain is almost identical to that of the two crystal structures, indicating that no important conformational change in these helices occurs upon DNA binding. Conversely to the crystal structures of the DNA complexes, the first 14 residues of the basic region are found to be mostly unfolded while the loop is observed to be flexible. This indicates that these domains undergo conformational changes upon DNA binding. On the other hand, we find the last four residues of the basic region form a persistent helical turn contiguous to H(1). In addition, we provide evidence of the existence of internal motions in the backbone of H(1) that are of larger amplitude and longer time-scale (nanoseconds) than the ones in the H(2) and LZ domain

  2. Summation solute hydrogen bonding acidity values for hydroxyl substituted flavones determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Whaley, William L; Okoso-amaa, Ekua M; Womack, Cody L; Vladimirova, Anna; Rogers, Laura B; Risher, Margaret J; Abraham, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    The flavonoids are a structurally diverse class of natural products that exhibit a broad spectrum of biochemical activities. The flavones are one of the most studied flavonoid subclasses due to their presence in dietary plants and their potential to protect human cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several flavone compounds also mediate beneficial actions by direct binding to protein receptors and regulatory enzymes. There is current interest in using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) to guide drug development based on flavone lead structures. This approach is most informative when it involves the use of accurate physical descriptors. The Abraham summation solute hydrogen bonding acidity (A) is a descriptor in the general solvation equation. It defines the tendency of a molecule to act as a hydrogen bond donor, or acid, when surrounded by solvent molecules that are hydrogen bonding acceptors, or bases. As a linear free energy relationship, it is useful for predicting the absorption and uptake of drug molecules. A previously published method, involving nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to evaluate A for the monohydroxyflavones (MHFs). Values of A ranged from 0.02, for 5-hydroxyflavone, to 0.69 for 4'-hydroxyflavone. The ability to examine separate NMR signals for individual hydroxyl groups allowed the investigation of intramolecular interactions between functional groups. The value of A for the position 7 hydroxyl group of 7-hydroxyflavone was 0.67. The addition of a position 5 hydroxyl group (in 5,7-dihydroxyflavone) increased the value of A for the position 7 hydroxyl group to 0.76. Values of A for MHFs were also calculated by the program ACD-Absolve and these agreed well with values measured by NMR. These results should facilitate more accurate estimation of the values of A for structurally complex flavones with pharmacological activities.

  3. Reline aqueous solutions behaving as liquid mixtures of H-bonded co-solvents: microphase segregation and formation of co-continuous structures as indicated by Brillouin and (1)H NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Posada, E; López-Salas, N; Jiménez Riobóo, R J; Ferrer, M L; Gutiérrez, M C; Del Monte, F

    2017-07-14

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) offer a suitable alternative to conventional solvents in terms of both performance and cost-effectiveness. Some DESs also offer certain green features, the greenness of which is notoriously enhanced when combined with water. Aqueous DES dilutions are therefore attracting great attention as a novel green medium for biotechnological processes, with the aqueous dilutions of reline - a DES composed of urea and choline chloride - being one of the most studied systems. Despite their macroscopic homogeneous appearance, both (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies and molecular dynamics simulations have revealed the occurrence of certain dynamic heterogeneity at a microscopic molecular level. Ultrasonic measurements were also used with the aim of getting further insights but nonconclusive results were obtained. Herein, we have studied aqueous reline dilutions by Brillouin spectroscopy given its proved suitability for detecting local structure rearrangements in liquid mixtures of H-bonded co-solvents. Brillouin spectroscopy revealed the formation of a co-continuous structure resulting from local structure rearrangements and micro-segregation into aqueous and DES phases. Interestingly, there is agreement between (1)H NMR and Brillouin spectroscopy when pointing to the DES content where microphase segregation and formation of co-continuous structures occurred.

  4. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Solid-, solution-, and gas-state NMR monitoring of ¹³C-cellulose degradation in an anaerobic microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Shino, Amiu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-07-29

    Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. ¹³C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and ¹³C-¹³C/¹³C-¹²C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of ¹³C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  6. Solution-state (15)N NMR spectroscopic study of alpha-C-phycocyanin: implications for the structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Janina; Kühne, Ronald; Schmieder, Peter

    2007-12-17

    The detailed structure of the chromophore-binding pocket in phytochrome proteins and the structural changes associated with its photocycle are still matters of debate. Insight into the structure and dynamics of the binding pocket has been gained through the comparison of a (15)N NMR spectrum of alpha-C-phycocyanin, which is often used as a model system for the study of phytochromes, with the previously described (15)N NMR spectrum of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The former spectrum supports the hypothesis that all four nitrogen atoms of the alpha-C-phycocyanin chromophore are protonated, in analogy with the proposed protonation state for the P(r) and P(fr) forms of Cph1. The spectra show that the chromophores in both proteins exhibit a distinct dynamic behavior, as also indicated by a NOESY spectrum of Cph1. Finally, stereochemical arguments and a Cph1 homology model support the hypothesis that the chromophore in Cph1 is most likely in the ZZZssa conformation in the P(r) form of the protein.

  7. Probing systems in solution by NMR using sulfur hexafluoride as a spy molecule.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2009-05-28

    The use of SF6 as a spy molecule in solution-state NMR is investigated as an alternative to 129Xe NMR. 19F chemical shift, longitudinal relaxation time, and integral measurements, as well as intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects, are reported for SF6 dissolved in simple deuterated solvents and/or in various solutions among which are aqueous solutions of cucurbit[6]uril (CB) and alpha-cyclodextrin (alphaCD). Both CB and alphaCD form a 1:1 inclusion complex with SF6. In a 0.2 M D2SO4-D2O solution, the affinity of CB for SF6 is 2.9x10(5) L mol(-1) at 298 K; it is the largest value ever found for the inclusion of a neutral guest into the CB cavity. It is one order of magnitude larger than in a 0.2 M Na2SO4-D2O solution, and the role of the cation is evidenced. In D2O, the affinity of alphaCD for SF6 is about 25 L mol(-1). With CB, the kinetics is slow on both the 1H and 19F chemical shift time scales, while with alphaCD fast exchange is observed. The 19F chemical shift of SF6 is much less sensitive to medium effects than the chemical shift of 129Xe. This might be a limitation if minute structural changes are to be investigated but, in the present study, turned out to be an advantage for determining the affinity of alphaCD for SF6. With CB, the 19F chemical shift of included SF6 is found to be sensitive to the nature of the cation bound at the portals. The 19F relaxation time of SF6 dissolved in deuterated solvents is dominated by the spin-rotation mechanism and is orders of magnitude shorter that the 129Xe relaxation time. It is found to be rather sensitive to the environment and was used to determine the affinity of alphaCD for SF6. The detection limit of SF6 by 19F NMR is lower than the NMR detection limit of thermally polarized 129Xe by more than three orders of magnitude. It lies in the micromolar range, and SF6 concentrations of the order of 10 microM were determined by 19F NMR signal integral measurements and used to quantify the affinity of CB for SF6

  8. Glycolaldehyde monomer and oligomer equilibria in aqueous solution: comparing computational chemistry and NMR data.

    PubMed

    Kua, Jeremy; Galloway, Melissa M; Millage, Katherine D; Avila, Joseph E; De Haan, David O

    2013-04-11

    A computational protocol utilizing density functional theory calculations, including Poisson-Boltzmann implicit solvent and free energy corrections, is applied to study the thermodynamic and kinetic energy landscape of glycolaldehyde in solution. Comparison is made to NMR measurements of dissolved glycolaldehyde, where the initial dimeric ring structure interconverts among several species before reaching equilibrium where the hydrated monomer is dominant. There is good agreement between computation and experiment for the concentrations of all species in solution at equilibrium, that is, the calculated relative free energies represent the system well. There is also relatively good agreement between the calculated activation barriers and the estimated rate constants for the hydration reaction. The computational approach also predicted that two of the trimers would have a small but appreciable equilibrium concentration (>0.005 M), and this was confirmed by NMR measurements. Our results suggest that while our computational protocol is reasonable and may be applied to quickly map the energy landscape of more complex reactions, knowledge of the caveats and potential errors in this approach need to be taken into account.

  9. Refined solution structure of human profilin I.

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, W. J.; Farmer, B. T.; Constantine, K. L.; Friedrichs, M. S.; Lavoie, T.; Mueller, L.

    1995-01-01

    Profilin is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein that binds to both cytosolic actin and the phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. These dual competitive binding capabilities of profilin suggest that profilin serves as a link between the phosphatidyl inositol cycle and actin polymerization, and thus profilin may be an essential component in the signaling pathway leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement. The refined three-dimensional solution structure of human profilin I has been determined using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Twenty structures were selected to represent the solution conformational ensemble. This ensemble of structures has root-mean-square distance deviations from the mean structure of 0.58 A for the backbone atoms and 0.98 A for all non-hydrogen atoms. Comparison of the solution structure of human profilin to the crystal structure of bovine profilin reveals that, although profilin adopts essentially identical conformations in both states, the solution structure is more compact than the crystal structure. Interestingly, the regions that show the most structural diversity are located at or near the actin-binding site of profilin. We suggest that structural differences are reflective of dynamical properties of profilin that facilitate favorable interactions with actin. The global folding pattern of human profilin also closely resembles that of Acanthamoeba profilin I, reflective of the 22% sequence identity and approximately 45% sequence similarity between these two proteins. PMID:7795529

  10. NMR Structure Note: PHD Domain from Human SHPRH

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Luciana E. F.; Pustovalova, Yulia; Kile, Andrew C.; Pozhidaeva, Alexandra; Cimprich, Karlene A.; Almeida, Fabio C. L.; Bezsonova, Irina; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    SHPRH (SNF2, histone linker, PHD, RING, helicase) is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor, and one of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for Ubc13-Mms2-dependent K63 poly-ubiquitination of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) that promotes error-free DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In contrast to its functional homologues, S. cerevisiae Rad5 and human HLTF (helicase like transcription factor), SHPRH contains a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger embedded in the ‘minor’ insert region of the core helicase-like domain. PHD fingers are often found in proteins involved in chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation, and are generally considered as ‘readers’ of methylation state of histone tails, primarily the lysine 4 (K4) residue of histone H3 (H3K4). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the SHPRH PHD domain and investigate whether this domain is capable of recognizing H3K4 modifications. The domain adopts a canonical PHD-finger fold with a central two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet flanked on both sides by the two interleaved zinc-binding sites. Despite the presence of a subset of aromatic residues characteristic for PHD-fingers that preferentially bind methylated H3K4, NMR titration experiments reveal that SHPRH PHD does not specifically interact with the H3-derived peptides irrespective of K4 methylation. This result suggests that the SHPRH PHD domain might have evolved a different function other than recognizing histone modifications. PMID:23907177

  11. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid- state NMR and computational structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Masica, David L; Ash, Jason T; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-08

    Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards understanding cellular structure biology: In-cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safikur; Byun, Younhwa; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Kim, Jihoe; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-05-01

    To watch biological macromolecules perform their functions inside the living cells is the dream of any biologists. In-cell nuclear magnetic resonance is a branch of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy that can be used to observe the structures, interactions and dynamics of these molecules in the living cells at atomic level. In principle, in-cell NMR can be applied to different cellular systems to achieve biologically relevant structural and functional information. In this review, we summarize the existing approaches in this field and discuss its applications in protein interactions, folding, stability and post-translational modifications. We hope this review will emphasize the effectiveness of in-cell NMR for studies of intricate biological processes and for structural analysis in cellular environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mg NMR in DNA solutions: Dominance of site binding effects.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Bleam, M L; Record, M T; Bryant, R G

    1980-11-01

    (25)Mg NMR spectroscopy is applied to a study of magnesium ion interactions with DNA, which is considered as a model for a linear polyelectrolyte. It is demonstrated that the magnesium ion spectrum is complicated by a non-Lorent-zian line shape and is dominated by the effects of chemical exchange with macromolecule binding sites. A distinction is made between specific-site interactions in which the magnesium ion loses a water molecule from the first coordination sphere on binding and those interactions, referred to as territorial binding, in which the ion maintains its first coordination sphere complement of solvent. The first type of site-binding interactions are shown to dominate the magnesium ion NMR spectrum, based on a consideration of the magnitudes of the observed (25)Mg relaxation rates compared with (23)Na relaxation rates, the clear contributions of chemical exchange-limited relaxation, and an ion displacement experiment employing sodium.

  14. Facile backbone structure determination of human membrane proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klammt, Christian; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Bayrhuber, Monika; Eichmann, Cédric; Vajpai, Navratna; Chiu, Ellis Jeremy Chua; Blain, Katherine Y; Esquivies, Luis; Kwon, June Hyun Jung; Balana, Bartosz; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Slesinger, Paul A; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Riek, Roland; Choe, Senyon

    2013-01-01

    Although nearly half of today’s major pharmaceutical drugs target human integral membrane proteins (hIMPs), only 30 hIMP structures are currently available in the Protein Data Bank, largely owing to inefficiencies in protein production. Here we describe a strategy for the rapid structure determination of hIMPs, using solution NMR spectroscopy with systematically labeled proteins produced via cell-free expression. We report new backbone structures of six hIMPs, solved in only 18 months from 15 initial targets. Application of our protocols to an additional 135 hIMPs with molecular weight <30 kDa yielded 38 hIMPs suitable for structural characterization by solution NMR spectroscopy without additional optimization. PMID:22609626

  15. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of the B domain of staphylococcal protein A: Structural changes between the free B domain in solution and the Fc-bound B domain in crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji ); Saito, Akiko; Sato, Moriyuki )

    1990-09-18

    The recombinant B domain (FB) of staphylococcal protein A, which specifically binds to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG), has been investigated with the use of two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All backbone and side-chain proton resonances of FB (60 amino acid residues), except the amide proton resonance of Ala2, were assigned by the sequential assignment procedures by using double-quantum-filtered correlated spectroscopy (DQF-COSY), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy (HOHAHA), and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY). On the basis of the NOESY data, three helical regions, Glu9-His19, Glu25-Asp37, and Ser42-Ala55, were identified in the free FB in solution. Existence of two of the three helical regions, Glu9-His19 and Glu25-Asp37, is consistent with the X-ray crystallographic structure of the Fc-bound FB. By contrast, in the Fc-bound FB as revealed by the X-ray analysis, the Ser42-Glu48 segment and no structural information has been available in the Ala49-Ala55 segment. The authors suggest that a significant conformation change is induced in the C-terminal region of FB when it is bound to the Fc portion of IgG.

  17. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fe57 NMR and spin structure of manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánková, H.; Sedlák, B.; Chlan, V.; Novák, P.; Šimša, Z.

    2008-03-01

    NMR of Fe57 in five MnFe2O4 single crystals with different degrees of inversion was measured in liquid He temperature. At the zero external field, two lines originating from Fe3+ ions on the octahedral sites are observed at 68.7 and 71.1MHz , while the line at 72.0MHz , the amplitude of which increases with increasing inversion, is ascribed to Fe3+ ions on the tetrahedral sites. Measurement in the external field shows that the spin structure is in accord with the Goodenough-Kanamori rules. This contradicts to an abnormal spin structure which Shim [Phys. Rev. B 75, 134406 (2007)] proposed recently on the basis of Fe57 NMR measured in polycrystalline manganese ferrite. Reinterpretation of the NMR in polycrystalline compounds is given.

  19. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used.

  20. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used.

  1. SedNMR: a web tool for optimizing sedimentation of macromolecular solutes for SSNMR.

    PubMed

    Ferella, Lucio; Luchinat, Claudio; Ravera, Enrico; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    We have proposed solid state NMR (SSNMR) of sedimented solutes as a novel approach to sample preparation for biomolecular SSNMR without crystallization or other sample manipulations. The biomolecules are confined by high gravity--obtained by centrifugal forces either directly in a SSNMR rotor or in a ultracentrifugal device--into a hydrated non-crystalline solid suitable for SSNMR investigations. When gravity is removed, the sample reverts to solution and can be treated as any solution NMR sample. We here describe a simple web tool to calculate the relevant parameters for the success of the experiment.

  2. Characterization of nonderivatized plant cell walls using high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2008-01-01

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been modified to use perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-NMR-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide-d6 and 1-methylimidazole-d6 in a ratio of 4:1 (v/...

  3. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  4. On-line NMR detection of microgram quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides and their structure elucidation by microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Korir, Albert K; Larive, Cynthia K

    2007-08-01

    The isolation and purification of sufficient quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides for characterization by NMR is a tedious and time-consuming process. In addition, the structural complexity and microheterogeneity of heparin makes its characterization a challenging task. The improved mass-sensitivity of microcoil NMR probe technology makes this technique well suited for characterization of mass-limited heparin-derived oligosaccharides. Although microcoil probes have poorer concentration sensitivity than conventional NMR probes, this limitation can be overcome by coupling capillary isotachophoresis (cITP) with on-line microcoil NMR detection (cITP-NMR). Strategies to improve the sensitivity of on-line NMR detection through changes in probe design and in the cITP-NMR experimental protocol are discussed. These improvements in sensitivity allow acquisition of cITP-NMR survey spectra facilitating tentative identification of unknown oligosaccharides. Complete structure elucidation for microgram quantities of the purified material can be carried out through acquisition of 2D NMR spectra using a CapNMR microcoil probe.

  5. Microstructure variations with concentration of propylene glycol-water solution probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Hu, Kai; Shen, Junfeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2009-03-01

    The solution microstructure variations with concentration of propylene glycol (PG)-water mixture were investigated using NMR technique. PG has an apparent critical point at around χPG = 0.3, this biphasic behavior of alkyl protons in PG-water mixture is different from the monotonous increase or decrease of other alcohol-water mixtures. At water-rich region, water molecules are in the vicinity of PG, forming weak C-H⋯O H-bonds with PG alkyl protons and strong O-H⋯O H-bonds with PG hydroxyls. PG gradually aggregates in the order of CH 3, CH and CH 2 with PG concentration increasing. At PG-rich region, the solution forms regions enriched in either hydrocarbons or hydroxyl groups, which results in the formation of microheterogeneous solution, where water is expelled from alkyl tail and accumulated in the region of PG hydroxyls head. In addition, the T1 and NOE results of PG aqueous solutions also support the weak hydrogen bond and microheterogeneous structural variations with concentration at molecular level. These results offer not only new insights into the mechanism of the outstanding capability of PG as cryoprotectant, but also provide possible reason of the anomalous thermodynamic behavior in the PG-water mixture.

  6. Engineered solubility tag for solution NMR of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ruschak, Amy M; Rose, Justine D; Coughlin, Michael P; Religa, Tomasz L

    2013-01-01

    The low solubility of many proteins hinders large scale expression and purification as well as biophysical measurements. Here, we devised a general strategy to solubilize a protein by conjugating it at a solvent-exposed position to a 6 kDa protein that was re-engineered to be highly soluble. We applied this method to the CARD domain of Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), which represents one member of a class of proteins that are notoriously prone to aggregation. Attachment of the tag to a cysteine residue, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at its self-association interface, improved the solubility of the ASC CARD over 50-fold under physiological conditions. Although it is not possible to use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to obtain a high quality 2D correlation spectrum of the wild type domain under physiological conditions, we demonstrate that NMR relaxation parameters of the solubilized variant are sufficiently improved to facilitate virtually any demanding measurement. The method shown here represents a straightforward approach for dramatically increasing protein solubility, enabled by ease of labeling as well as flexibility in tag placement with minimal perturbation to the target. © 2013 The Protein Society PMID:23963792

  7. Engineered solubility tag for solution NMR of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruschak, Amy M; Rose, Justine D; Coughlin, Michael P; Religa, Tomasz L

    2013-11-01

    The low solubility of many proteins hinders large scale expression and purification as well as biophysical measurements. Here, we devised a general strategy to solubilize a protein by conjugating it at a solvent-exposed position to a 6 kDa protein that was re-engineered to be highly soluble. We applied this method to the CARD domain of Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), which represents one member of a class of proteins that are notoriously prone to aggregation. Attachment of the tag to a cysteine residue, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at its self-association interface, improved the solubility of the ASC CARD over 50-fold under physiological conditions. Although it is not possible to use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to obtain a high quality 2D correlation spectrum of the wild type domain under physiological conditions, we demonstrate that NMR relaxation parameters of the solubilized variant are sufficiently improved to facilitate virtually any demanding measurement. The method shown here represents a straightforward approach for dramatically increasing protein solubility, enabled by ease of labeling as well as flexibility in tag placement with minimal perturbation to the target. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  8. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15)N/(13)C/(1)H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  9. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  10. NMR relaxation and water self-diffusion studies in whey protein solutions and gels.

    PubMed

    Colsenet, Roxane; Mariette, François; Cambert, Mireille

    2005-08-24

    The changes in water proton transverse relaxation behavior induced by aggregation of whey proteins are explained in terms of the simple molecular processes of diffusion and chemical exchange. The water self-diffusion coefficient was measured in whey protein solutions and gels by the pulsed field gradient NMR method. As expected, water self-diffusion was reduced with increased protein concentrations. Whatever the concentration, the water molecules were free to diffuse over distances varying from 15 to 47 mum. Water diffusion was constant over these distances, demonstrating that no restrictions were found to explain the water hindrance. The modification in protein structure by gelation induced a decrease in water diffusion. The effects of protein concentration on water diffusion are discussed and modeled. Two approaches were compared, the obstruction effect induced by a spherical particle and the cell model, which considered two water compartments with specific self-diffusion coefficients.

  11. NMR structure of bucandin, a neurotoxin from the venom of the Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus).

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A M; Kini, R M; Selvanayagam, N; Kuchel, P W

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution solution structure of bucandin, a neurotoxin from Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus), was determined by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The average backbone root-mean-square deviation for the 20 calculated structures and the mean structure is 0.47 A (1 A=0.1 nm) for all residues and 0.24 A for the well-defined region that spans residues 23-58. Secondary-structural elements include two antiparallel beta-sheets characterized by two and four strands. According to recent X-ray analysis, bucandin adopts a typical three-finger loop motif and yet it has some peculiar characteristics that set it apart from other common alpha-neurotoxins. The presence of a fourth strand in the second antiparallel beta-sheet had not been observed before in three-finger toxins, and this feature was well represented in the NMR structure. Although the overall fold of the NMR structure is similar to that of the X-ray crystal structure, there are significant differences between the two structures that have implications for the pharmacological action of the toxin. These include the extent of the beta-sheets, the conformation of the region spanning residues 42-49 and the orientation of some side chains. In comparison with the X-ray structure, the NMR structure shows that the hydrophobic side chains of Trp(27) and Trp(36) are stacked together and are orientated towards the tip of the middle loop. The NMR study also showed that the two-stranded beta-sheet incorporated in the first loop, as defined by residues 1-22, and the C-terminus from Asn(59), is probably flexible relative to the rest of the molecule. On the basis of the dispositions of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic side chains, the structure of bucandin is clearly different from those of cytotoxins. PMID:11736642

  12. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-02

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  13. High-field Solution NMR Spectroscopy as a Tool for Assessing Protein Interactions with Small Molecule Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andria L.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a small molecule to bind and modify the activity of a protein target at a specific site greatly impacts the success of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. One of the most important tools for evaluating these interactions has been high-field solution NMR because of its unique ability to examine even weak protein-drug interactions at high resolution. NMR can be used to evaluate the structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of a binding reaction. The basis of NMR screening experiments is that binding causes a perturbation in the physical properties of both molecules. Unique properties of small and macromolecules allow selective detection of either the protein target or ligand, even in a mixture of compounds. This review outlines current methodologies for assessing protein-ligand interactions from the perspectives of the protein target and ligand and delineates the fundamental principles for understanding NMR approaches in drug research. Advances in instrumentation, pulse sequences, isotopic labeling strategies, and the development of competition experiments support the study of higher molecular weight protein targets, facilitate higher-throughput and expand the range of binding affinities that can be evaluated, enhancing the utility of NMR for identifying and characterizing potential therapeutics to druggable protein targets. PMID:18351634

  14. Structural studies of. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin. 1. Sequence-specific /sub 1/H NMR resonance assignments

    SciTech Connect

    Basus, V.J.; Billeter, M.; Love, R.A.; Stroud, R.M.; Kuntz, I.D.

    1988-04-19

    The authors report the complete sequence-specific assignment of the backbone resonances and most of the side-chain resonances in the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin by two-dimensional NMR. Problems with resonance overlap were resolved with the assistance of the HRNOESY experiment described in an accompanying paper. Significant differences exist between the solution structure described here and the crystal structure of ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, on the basis of the proton to proton distances obtained by nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) and the corresponding distances from the X-ray crystal structure. These differences include a larger ..beta..-sheet in solution and a different orientation of the invariant tryptophan, Trp-28, making the solution structure more consistent with the crystal structure of the homologous neurotoxin ..cap alpha..-cobratoxin. Four errors in the order of the amino acids in the primary sequence were indicated by the NMR data. These errors were confirmed by chemical means, as described in an accompanying paper.

  15. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; York, Darrin M.; Case, David A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson–Crick stem and the “canonical” UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9–G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. PMID:25805858

  16. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a /sup 13/C NMR relaxation study

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-02-04

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using /sup 13/C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent mice

  17. Characterizing monoclonal antibody formulations in arginine glutamate solutions using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kheddo, Priscilla; Cliff, Matthew J.; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Assessing how excipients affect the self-association of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) requires informative and direct in situ measurements for highly concentrated solutions, without sample dilution or perturbation. This study explores the application of solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterization of typical mAb behavior in formulations containing arginine glutamate. The data show that the analysis of signal intensities in 1D 1H NMR spectra, when compensated for changes in buffer viscosity, is invaluable for identifying conditions where protein-protein interactions are minimized. NMR-derived molecular translational diffusion rates for concentrated solutions are less useful than transverse relaxation rates as parameters defining optimal formulation. Furthermore, NMR reports on the solution viscosity and mAb aggregation during accelerated stability study assessment, generating data consistent with that acquired by size-exclusion chromatography. The methodology developed here offers NMR spectroscopy as a new tool providing complementary information useful to formulation development of mAbs and other large therapeutic proteins. PMID:27589351

  18. A community resource of experimental data for NMR / X-ray crystal structure pairs.

    PubMed

    Everett, John K; Tejero, Roberto; Murthy, Sarath B K; Acton, Thomas B; Aramini, James M; Baran, Michael C; Benach, Jordi; Cort, John R; Eletsky, Alexander; Forouhar, Farhad; Guan, Rongjin; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Gaohua; Mani, Rajeswari; Mao, Binchen; Mills, Jeffrey L; Montelione, Alexander F; Pederson, Kari; Powers, Robert; Ramelot, Theresa; Rossi, Paolo; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Snyder, David; Swapna, G V T; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Wu, Yibing; Xiao, Rong; Yang, Yunhuang; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hunt, John F; Kennedy, Michael A; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. The NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has provided many valuable reagents, 3D structures, and technologies for structural biology. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium was one of several PSI centers. NESG used both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for protein structure determination. A key goal of the PSI was to provide experimental structures for at least one representative of each of hundreds of targeted protein domain families. In some cases, structures for identical (or nearly identical) constructs were determined by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data for 41 of these "NMR / X-ray" structure pairs determined using conventional triple-resonance NMR methods with extensive sidechain resonance assignments have been organized in an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. In addition, several NMR data sets for perdeuterated, methyl-protonated protein samples are included in this repository. As an example of the utility of this repository, these data were used to revisit questions about the precision and accuracy of protein NMR structures first outlined by Levy and coworkers several years ago (Andrec et al., Proteins 2007;69:449-465). These results demonstrate that the agreement between NMR and X-ray crystal structures is improved using modern methods of protein NMR spectroscopy. The NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository will provide a valuable resource for new computational NMR methods development. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  19. NMR spectroscopy of some electrolyte solutions to 1.9 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Gerardo; Colla, Christopher A.; Klavins, Peter; Augustine, Matthew P.; Casey, William H.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of CsCl and LaCl3 in D2O/H2O solutions were collected up to pressures of 1.9 GPa using a new NMR probe design that considerably extends the pressure range available for geochemical experiments. The longitudinal-relaxation times (T1) for 2H compare well with those reported in the previous studies of Lee et al. (1974), who examined lower pressures, and indicate that the probe functions properly. In some experiments, 133Cs and 1H NMR spectra could be taken on solutions to pressures well beyond the nominal freezing pressure of D2O or H2O to form Ice VI (near 0.9 GPa). Freezing to form the high-pressure ice is kinetically slow on an experimental time scale (minutes to hours). The data indicate that the electrolyte concentrations increase the freezing pressure of the solution. This result means that solution NMR spectra can be collected at pressures that are nearly twice the nominal freezing pressure of pure D2O or H2O. Pulsed-magnetic-field-gradient NMR methods are used to independently measure the self-diffusion coefficient of H2O in these solutions, which yields estimates of solution viscosity via the Stokes-Einstein relation. The increased viscosity accounts for the pressure variation of T1 values as rates of molecular tumbling are affected. Accounting for such changes is essential if NMR spectral line widths are used to infer pressure-enhanced rates of geochemical reactions, such as interconversion of aqueous complexes.

  20. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe.

  1. Improving the quality of protein structures derived by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Christian A E M; Linge, Jens P; Hilbers, Cornelis W; Vuister, Geerten W

    2002-03-01

    Biomolecular structures provide the basis for many studies in several research areas such as homology modelling, structure-based drug design and functional genomics. It is an important prerequisite that the structure is reliable in terms of accurate description of the experimental data, and in terms of good quality of local- and overall geometry. Recent surveys indicate that structures solved by NMR-spectroscopy normally are of lower precision than high-resolution X-ray structures. Here, we present a refinement protocol that improves the quality of protein structures determined by NMR-spectroscopy to the level of those determined by high resolution X-ray crystallography in terms of local geometry. The protocol was tested on experimental data of the proteins IL4 and Ubiquitin and on simulated data of the protein Crambin. In almost all aspects, the protocol yielded better results in terms of accuracy and precision. Independent validation of the results for Ubiquitin, using residual dipolar couplings, indicates that the ensemble of NMR structure is substantially improved by the protocol.

  2. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  3. NMR solution structure of Cn12, a novel peptide from the Mexican scorpion Centruroides noxius with a typical beta-toxin sequence but with alpha-like physiological activity.

    PubMed

    del Río-Portilla, Federico; Hernández-Marín, Elizabeth; Pimienta, Genaro; Coronas, Fredy V; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Wanke, Enzo; Possani, Lourival D

    2004-06-01

    Cn12 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius has 67 amino-acid residues, closely packed with four disulfide bridges. Its primary structure and disulfide bridges were determined. Cn12 is not lethal to mammals and arthropods in vivo at doses up to 100 microg per animal. Its 3D structure was determined by proton NMR using 850 distance constraints, 36 phi angles derived from 36 coupling constants obtained by two different methods, and 22 hydrogen bonds. The overall structure has a two and half turn alpha-helix (residues 24-32), three strands of antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 2-4, 37-40 and 45-48), and a type II turn (residues 41-44). The amino-acid sequence of Cn12 resembles the beta scorpion toxin class, although patch-clamp experiments showed the induction of supplementary slow inactivation of Na(+) channels in F-11 cells (mouse neuroblastoma N18TG-2 x rat DRG2), which means that it behaves more like an alpha scorpion toxin. This behaviour prompted us to analyse Na(+) channel binding sites using information from 112 Na(+) channel gene clones available in the literature, focusing on the extracytoplasmic loops of the S5-S6 transmembrane segments of domain I and the S3-S4 segments of domain IV, sites considered to be responsible for binding alpha scorpion toxins.

  4. A solid state and solution NMR study of the tautomerism in hydroxyquinoline carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Gudat, Dietrich; Nycz, Jacek E; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    Some hydroxyquinoline carboxylic acids and their conjugate acids and bases were characterized by 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state. Differences in 13C and, in particular, 15N chemical shift patterns allow to distinguish between individual tautomers and confirm the presence of zwitterionic species in the solid state. Solution NMR spectra in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) show effects resulting as a consequence of dynamic exchange and suggest the presence of an equilibrium mixture of hydroxyquinoline carboxylic acid and zwitterionic hydroxyquinolinium carboxylate tautomers.

  5. Singular Hopf bifurcation to unstable periodic solutions in a NMR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braza, Peter A.; Erneux, Thomas

    1989-09-01

    We apply recent developments in the study of singular Hopf bifurcations to describe the complete bifurcation diagram of a simple NMR laser with an injected signal. The branch of periodic solutions appears at a Hopf bifurcation point and may or may not disappear at a homoclinic point. The bifurcation is always subcritical, which suggests that the periodic solutions are all unstable. Our asymptotic analysis is based on the relative values of the fixed parameters in the problem. Our results complement earlier investigations by Holzner et al. [Phys. Rev. A 36, 1280 (1987)] and by Baugher, Hammack, and Lin [Phys. Rev. A 39, 1549 (1989)] on the subcritical Hopf bifurcation in a NMR laser.

  6. Bis-tridentate Chelates of an Asymmetric Ligand: X-ray Structures and Solution NMR Characterization of Divalent Zinc Triad Metal Ion Complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-(2-(methylthio)ethyl)amine.

    PubMed

    Bebout, Deborah C; Lai, Wei; Stamps, Sarah M; Berry, Steven M; Butcher, Raymond J

    2008-04-25

    Divalent zinc triad metal ion complexes of type M(L)(2)(ClO(4))(2) (L = N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-(2-(methylthio)ethyl)amine) with N(4)S(2) metal coordination spheres were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and variable temperature proton NMR. Although bis-tridentate chelates have nine geometric isomers, the crystallographically characterized complexes of all three metal ions had trans facial octahedral coordination geometry with C(i) symmetry. Despite the low coordination number and geometric preferences of d(10) metal ions, which facilitate inter- and intramolecular exchange processes, dilute solutions of these bis-tridentate chelates exhibited slow geometric isomerization. Symmetry, sterics and shielding arguments supported specific isomeric assignments for the major and minor chemical shift environments observed at low temperature. At elevated temperature, rapid intramolecular exchange occurred for all three complexes but slow intermolecular exchange on the coupling constant time scale was evidenced through detection of J(HgH) interactions for Hg(L)(2) (2+). These unusual observations are discussed in the context of the zinc triad metal ion coordination chemistry of related bis-tridentate chelates.

  7. A two-dimensional NMR study of the solution structure of a DNA dodecamer comprising the concensus sequence for the specific DNA-binding sites of the glucocorticoid receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Clore, G M; Lauble, H; Frenkiel, T A; Gronenborn, A M

    1984-12-17

    A two-dimensional 500-MHz 1H-NMR study on the non-self-complementary double-stranded DNA dodecamer 5'd(C-C-A-G-A-A-C-A-G-T-G-G)5'd(C-C-A-C-T-G-T-T-C-T-G-G), is presented. This oligonucleotide contains the consensus octanucleotide sequence 5'd(A-G-A-A-C-A-G-T) for the specific DNA-binding sites of the glucocorticoid receptor protein [Payvar, F. et al. (1984) Cell 35, 381-392]. Using a combination of two-dimensional pure phase absorption nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOESY) and homonuclear J-correlated (COSY) spectroscopy all non-exchangeable base (with the exception fo the adenine H2 protons), methyl and deoxyribose H1', H2', H2", H3' and H4' resonances are assigned unambiguously using a sequential resonance assignment strategy. From the relative intensities of the cross peaks in the pure phase absorption NOESY spectra at two mixing times it is shown that the dodecamer adopts a B-type conformation in solution.

  8. NMR structural determination of unique invertebrate glycosaminoglycans endowed with medical properties.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-09-02

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are sulfated polysaccharides of complex structure endowed with numerous biomedical functions. Although ubiquitously distributed in vertebrates, GAGs can also occur in certain terrestrial or marine invertebrates. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been the analytical technique mostly employed in structural characterization of GAGs from any source. This review aims at illustrating the application of NMR in structural determination of few representative invertebrate GAG examples of unique structures and endowed with therapeutic actions. They are the holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, the acharan sulfate isolated from the snail Achatina fulica, the dermatan sulfates with distinct sulfation patterns extracted from ascidian species, the sulfated glucuronic acid-containing heparan sulfate isolated from the gastropode Nodipecten nodosum, and the hybrid heparin/heparan sulfate molecule obtained from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. These invertebrate GAGs exhibit distinct structures when compared to those extracted from mammalian GAGs. The distinct structures of the invertebrate GAGs lead also to different mechanisms of actions as compared to the mammalian GAG standards. Invertebrate GAGs comprise promising therapeutic candidates in fights against diseases. Solution NMR has been playing a pivotal role in this carbohydrate-based drug research, discovery and development.

  9. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure-activity relationship, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement's (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10-13, pp. 176-187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277-298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111-138). Our approach uses NVR's scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR's data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR's assignment accuracy on NVR's test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs.

  10. {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

  11. Desktop NMR for structure elucidation and identification of strychnine adulteration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kawarpal; Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-03-27

    Elucidating the structure of complex molecules is difficult at low magnetic fields due to the overlap of different peak multiplets and second-order coupling effects. This is even more challenging for rigid molecules with small chemical shift differences and with prochiral centers. Since low-field NMR spectroscopy is sometimes presumed as restricted to the analysis of only small and simple molecules, this paper aims at countering this misconception: it demonstrates the use of low-field NMR spectroscopy in chemical forensics for identifying strychnine and its counterions by exploring the chemical shift as a signature in different 1D (1)H and (13)C experiments. Hereby the applied methodologies combine various 1D and 2D experiments such as 1D (1)H, (13)C, DEPT, and 2D COSY, HETCOR, HSQC, HMBC and J-resolved spectroscopy to elucidate the molecular structure and skeleton of strychnine at 1 Tesla. Strychnine is exemplified here, because it is a basic precursor in the chemistry of natural products and is employed as a chemical weapon and as a doping agent in sports including the Olympics. In our study, the molecular structure of the compound could be identified either with a 1D experiment at high magnetic field or with HMBC and HSQC experiments at 1 T. In conclusion, low-field NMR spectroscopy enables the chemical elucidation of the strychnine structure through a simple click with a computer mouse. In situations where a high-field NMR spectrometer is unavailable, compact NMR spectrometers can nevertheless generate knowledge of the structure, important for identifying the different chemical reaction mechanisms associated with the molecule. Desktop NMR is a cost-effective viable option in chemical forensics. It can prove adulteration and identify the origin of different strychnine salts, in particular, the strychnine free base, strychnine hemisulphate and strychnine hydrochloride. The chemical shift signatures report the chemical structure of the molecules due to the impact

  12. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Joseph M.; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D.; Watt, Eric D.; Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D 13C-13C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins—GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor—and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure. PMID:26365800

  13. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-06

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure.

  14. NMR Water Self–Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J.; Briber, Robert M.; Horkay, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca2+ and Na+. Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na+ on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca2+ strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced. PMID:24409001

  15. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced.

  16. Understanding the Mechanism of Prosegment-catalyzed Folding by Solution NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenlin; Horimoto, Yasumi; Dee, Derek R.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2014-01-01

    Multidomain protein folding is often more complex than a two-state process, which leads to the spontaneous folding of the native state. Pepsin, a zymogen-derived enzyme, without its prosegment (PS), is irreversibly denatured and folds to a thermodynamically stable, non-native conformation, termed refolded pepsin, which is separated from native pepsin by a large activation barrier. While it is known that PS binds refolded pepsin and catalyzes its conversion to the native form, little structural details are known regarding this conversion. In this study, solution NMR was used to elucidate the PS-catalyzed folding mechanism by examining the key equilibrium states, e.g. native and refolded pepsin, both in the free and PS-bound states, and pepsinogen, the zymogen form of pepsin. Refolded pepsin was found to be partially structured and lacked the correct domain-domain structure and active-site cleft formed in the native state. Analysis of chemical shift data revealed that upon PS binding refolded pepsin folds into a state more similar to that of pepsinogen than to native pepsin. Comparison of pepsin folding by wild-type and mutant PSs, including a double mutant PS, indicated that hydrophobic interactions between residues of prosegment and refolded pepsin lower the folding activation barrier. A mechanism is proposed for the binding of PS to refolded pepsin and how the formation of the native structure is mediated. PMID:24265313

  17. Elucidation by NMR solution of neurotensin in small unilamellar vesicle environment: molecular surveys for neurotensin receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Grégory; Bondon, Arnaud; Delalande, Olivier; Mouret, Liza; Monti, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide, hormone in the periphery and neurotransmitter in the brain. We used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to resolve the three-dimensional structure of NT in a small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) environment. We demonstrate that if the dynamic of the association-dissociation processes of peptide to SUV binding is rapid enough, structural determination can be obtained by solution NMR experiments. Thus, according to the global dynamic of the system, SUVs seem to be an effective model to mimic biological membranes, especially since the lipid composition can be modified or sterols may be added to closely mimic the biological membranes studied. An animated Interactive 3D Complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:2.

  18. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  19. NMR approaches in structure-based lead discovery: recent developments and new frontiers for targeting multi-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dias, David M; Ciulli, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a pivotal method for structure-based and fragment-based lead discovery because it is one of the most robust techniques to provide information on protein structure, dynamics and interaction at an atomic level in solution. Nowadays, in most ligand screening cascades, NMR-based methods are applied to identify and structurally validate small molecule binding. These can be high-throughput and are often used synergistically with other biophysical assays. Here, we describe current state-of-the-art in the portfolio of available NMR-based experiments that are used to aid early-stage lead discovery. We then focus on multi-protein complexes as targets and how NMR spectroscopy allows studying of interactions within the high molecular weight assemblies that make up a vast fraction of the yet untargeted proteome. Finally, we give our perspective on how currently available methods could build an improved strategy for drug discovery against such challenging targets.

  20. Unfolding the mechanism of the AAA+ unfoldase VAT by a combined cryo-EM, solution NMR study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Ripstein, Zev A.; Augustyniak, Rafal; Lazniewski, Michal; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Kay, Lewis E.; Rubinstein, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) enzymes play critical roles in a variety of homeostatic processes in all kingdoms of life. Valosin-containing protein-like ATPase of Thermoplasma acidophilum (VAT), the archaeal homolog of the ubiquitous AAA+ protein Cdc48/p97, functions in concert with the 20S proteasome by unfolding substrates and passing them on for degradation. Here, we present electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) maps showing that VAT undergoes large conformational rearrangements during its ATP hydrolysis cycle that differ dramatically from the conformational states observed for Cdc48/p97. We validate key features of the model with biochemical and solution methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopY (TROSY) NMR experiments and suggest a mechanism for coupling the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to substrate unfolding. These findings illustrate the unique complementarity between cryo-EM and solution NMR for studies of molecular machines, showing that the structural properties of VAT, as well as the population distributions of conformers, are similar in the frozen specimens used for cryo-EM and in the solution phase where NMR spectra are recorded. PMID:27402735

  1. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  2. Comparison of phosphorus forms in three extracts of dairy feces by solution 31P NMR analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using solution 31P NMR spectroscopy, we compared three extractants, deionized water, sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) with fresh sodium dithionite (NaAc-SD), and 0.25 M NaOH-0.05 M EDTA (NaOH-EDTA), for the profile of P compounds in two dairy fecal samples. Phosphorus extracted was 35% for water, and...

  3. New class of aggregates in aqueous solution: an NMR, thermodynamic, and dynamic light scattering study.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Cecilia; La Mesa, Camillo; Mannina, Luisa; Stano, Pasquale; Viel, Stéphane; Segre, Annalaura

    2006-07-04

    We investigated the aggregation properties of two classes of aromatic and hydrophobic compounds, namely chloroacetamides and ethyl 3-phenyl-2-nitropropionates, in moderately concentrated aqueous solution (millimolar range). The identification of all species present in solution under specific experimental conditions was performed by 1D and 2D NMR, pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR, and dynamic light scattering techniques. Some physical-chemical properties (viscosity, surface tension, and colligative properties) of the aqueous solutions were also determined. Both classes of compounds behave quite similarly: in solution, three distinct species, namely a monomeric species, small and mobile aggregates, and large and stiff aggregates, are observed. The results give insight into a new class of aggregates, held together by pi-pi interactions, which show an unusual associative behavior in water.

  4. The nociceptin pharmacophore site for opioid receptor binding derived from the NMR structure and bioactivity relationships.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Michael J; Nesmelova, Irina; Young, Helen C; Hargittai, Balazs; Beavers, Mary Pat; Liu, Jingchun; Connolly, Peter J; Middleton, Steven A; Mayo, Kevin H

    2005-03-04

    Nociceptin, a 17 amino acid opioid-like peptide that has an inhibitory effect on synaptic transmission in the nervous system, is involved in learning, memory, attention, and emotion and is also implicated in the perception of pain and visual, auditory, and olfactory functions. In this study, we investigated the NMR solution structure of nociceptin in membrane-like environments (trifluoroethanol and SDS micelles) and found it to have a relatively stable helix conformation from residues 4-17 with functionally important N-terminal residues being folded aperidoically on top of the helix. In functional assays for receptor binding and calcium flux, alanine-scanning variants of nociceptin indicated that functionally important residues generally followed helix periodicity, consistent with the NMR structural model. Structure-activity relationships allowed identification of pharmacophore sites that were used in small molecule data base searches, affording hits with demonstrated nociceptin receptor binding affinities.

  5. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  6. [Lys(-2)-Arg(-1)]endothelin-1 solution structure by two-dimensional 1H-NMR: possible involvement of electrostatic interactions in native disulfide bridge formation and in biological activity decrease.

    PubMed

    Aumelas, A; Chiche, L; Kubo, S; Chino, N; Tamaoki, H; Kobayashi, Y

    1995-04-11

    Addition of the Lys(-2)-Arg(-1) dipeptide, present in the precursor protein, to the N-terminus of endothelin-1 (ET-1), to form a 23-residue peptide (KR-ET-1) has been shown to greatly improve formation of native disulfide bridges and to dramatically decrease biological activity. Conformational analysis was carried out on this peptide. During protonation of the carboxyl groups, CD spectra showed a decrease in the helical contribution, and NMR spectra displayed strong chemical shift modifications, suggesting the importance of electrostatic interactions in the KR-ET-1 conformation. CD spectra and two-dimensional NMR experiments were performed to investigate the KR-ET-1 three-dimensional structure in water in the carboxylic acid and carboxylate states. Distance and angle constraints were used as input for distance geometry calculations. The KR-ET-1 carboxylic acid conformation was found to be very similar to ET-1, with a helix spanning residues 9-15 and an unconstrained C-terminal part. In contrast, in the carboxylate state, large changes in Arg(-1) and Phe14 chemical shifts and long-range NOEs were consistent with a conformation characterized by a helix extension to Leu17 and a stabilized C-terminal section folded back toward the N-terminus. In addition, thanks to NOEs with Cys11 and Phe14, the Arg(-1) side chain appeared well-defined. Simulated annealing and molecular dynamics calculations, supported an Arg(-1)-Glu10 salt bridge and an electrostatic network involving the charged groups of Trp21, Asp18, and Lys(-2). Moreover, stabilization of the KR-ET-1 C-terminal part is probably reinforced by hydrophobic interactions involving the Val12, Tyr13, Phe14, Leu17, Ile19, Ile20, and Trp21 side chains. In vitro, native disulfide bond formation improvement observed for KR-ET-1 could be ascribed to electrostatic interactions and more specifically to the Arg(-1)-Glu10 salt bridge. In vivo, similar interactions could play an important role in the native folding of the ET-1

  7. Solution Structure of LC4 Transmembrane Segment of CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2011-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific co-receptor allowing the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The LC4 region in CCR5 is required for HIV-1 entry into the cells. In this study, the solution structure of LC4 in SDS micelles was elucidated by using standard 1H two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and fluorescdence quenching. The LC4 structure adopts two helical structures, whereas the C-terminal part remains unstructured. The positions in which LC4 binds to the HIV-1 inhibitory peptide LC5 were determined by docking calculations in addition to NMR data. The poses showed the importance of the hydrophobic interface of the assembled structures. The solution structure of LC4 elucidated in the present work provides a structural basis for further studies on the HIV-1 inhibitory function of the LC4 region. PMID:21647380

  8. NMR and restrained molecular dynamics study of the three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel, isolated from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M J; Pascaud, F; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1995-05-02

    The three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a 60-residue polypeptide isolated from the venom of black mamba snake (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis), has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using 600 NOE constraints and 55 dihedral angle constraints, a set of 20 structures obtained from distance-geometry calculations was further refined by molecular dynamics calculations using a combined simulated annealing-restrained MD protocol. The resulting 20 conformers, taken to represent the solution structure, give an average rmsd of 1.2 A for their backbone atoms, relative to the average structure. The overall resulting three-fingered structure is similar to those already observed in several postsynaptic neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and fasciculins, which all share with toxin FS2 the same network of four disulfide bridges. The overall concavity of the molecule, considered as a flat bottomed dish, is oriented toward the C-terminal loop of the molecule. This orientation is similar to that of fasciculins and cardiotoxins but opposite to that of neurotoxins. On the basis of the local rms displacements between the 20 conformers, the structure of the first loop appears to be less well defined in FS2 than in the previously reported neurotoxin structures, but fasciculin 1 shows a similar trend with particularly high temperature factors for this part of the X-ray structure. The concave side which presents most of the positively charged residues is quite similar in FS2 and fasciculin 1. The main difference is shown by the convex side of the third loop, mostly hydrophobic in FS2, in contrast to the pair of negatively charged aspartates in fasciculin 1. This difference could be one of the factors leading to the distinct pharmacological properties-L-type calcium channel blocker for FS2 and cholinesterase inhibitor for fasciculin--observed for these two subgroups of the "angusticeps-type" toxins.

  9. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of

  10. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole.

  11. Understanding NMR Multiplet Structure with WinDNMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampos, N.; Vidal-Ferran, A.

    2000-01-01

    Interpreting the information encoded in the structure of a multiplet representing a nucleus (e.g., a proton) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows us to construct a detailed picture of the molecule to which the nucleus belongs. To gain this understanding, we can employ interactive, user-friendly software packages (such as WinDNMR) on a conventional personal computer to investigate the effect of changing the constituent coupling constants on the appearance of a multiplet. As an example, a multiplet representing a proton coupled to three neighboring environments (four-spin system) is treated in detail. Exercises similar to those presented in this work could be incorporated into a practical component of a course dealing with the basic theoretical concepts of one-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Cadmium(II) complex formation with selenourea and thiourea in solution: an XAS and 113Cd NMR study.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Amini, Zahra; Parmar, Karnjit

    2012-10-15

    The complexes formed in methanol solutions of Cd(CF(3)SO(3))(2) with selenourea (SeU) or thiourea (TU), for thiourea also in aqueous solution, were studied by combining (113)Cd NMR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At low temperature (~200 K), distinct (113)Cd NMR signals were observed, corresponding to CdL(n)(2+) species (n = 0-4, L = TU or SeU) in slow ligand exchange. Peak integrals were used to obtain the speciation in the methanol solutions, allowing stability constants to be estimated. For cadmium(II) complexes with thione (C═S) or selone (C═Se) groups coordinated in Cd(S/Se)O(5) or Cd(S/Se)(2)O(4) (O from MeOH or CF(3)SO(3)(-)) environments, the (113)Cd chemical shifts were quite similar, within 93-97 ppm and 189-193 ppm, respectively. However, the difference in the chemical shift for the Cd(SeU)(4)(2+) (578 pm) and Cd(TU)(4)(2+) (526 ppm) species, with CdSe(4) and CdS(4) coordination, respectively, shows less chemical shielding for the coordinated Se atoms than for S, in contrast to the common trend with increasing shielding in the following order: O > N > Se > S. In solutions dominated by mono- and tetra-thiourea/selenourea complexes, their coordination and bond distances could be evaluated by Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At ~200 K and high excess of thiourea, a minor amount (up to ~30%) of [Cd(TU)(5-6)](2+) species was detected by an upfield shift of the (113)Cd NMR signal (up to 423 ppm) and an amplitude reduction of the EXAFS oscillation. The amount was estimated by fitting linear combinations of simulated EXAFS spectra for [Cd(TU)(4)](2+) and [Cd(TU)(6)](2+) complexes. At room temperature, [Cd(TU)(4)](2+) was the highest complex formed, also in aqueous solution. Cd L(3)-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of cadmium(II) thiourea solutions in methanol were used to follow changes in the CdS(x)O(y) coordination. The correlations found from the current and previous studies between (113

  13. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Selenourea and Thiourea in Solution: An XAS and 113Cd NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Amini, Zahra; Parmar, Karnjit

    2012-01-01

    The complexes formed in methanol solutions of Cd(CF3SO3)2 with selenourea (SeU) or thiourea (TU), for thiourea also in aqueous solution, were studied by combining 113Cd NMR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At low temperature (~200 K) distinct 113Cd NMR signals were observed, corresponding to CdLn2+ species (n = 0 - 4, L = TU or SeU) in slow ligand exchange. Peak integrals were used to obtain the speciation in the methanol solutions, allowing stability constants to be estimated. For cadmium(II) complexes with thione (C=S) or selone (C=Se) groups coordinated in Cd(S/Se)O5 or Cd(S/Se)2O4 (O from MeOH or CF3SO3-) environments the 113Cd chemical shifts were quite similar, within 93-97 ppm and 189 – 193 ppm, respectively. However, the difference in the chemical shift for the Cd(SeU)42+ (578 pm) and Cd(TU)42+ (526 ppm) species, with CdSe4 and CdS4 coordination, respectively, shows less chemical shielding for the coordinated Se atoms than for S, in contrast to the common trend with increasing shielding in the order: O > N > Se >S. In solutions dominated by mono- and tetra-thiourea / selenourea complexes, their coordination and bond distances could be evaluated by Cd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At ~200 K and high excess of thiourea a minor amount (up to ~30%) of [Cd(TU)5-6]2+ species was detected by an upfield shift of the 113Cd NMR signal (up to 423 ppm) and an amplitude reduction of the EXAFS oscillation. The amount was estimated by fitting linear combinations of simulated EXAFS spectra for [Cd(TU)4]2+ and [Cd(TU)6]2+ complexes. At room temperature, [Cd(TU)4]2+ was the highest complex formed, also in aqueous solution. Cd L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of cadmium(II) thiourea solutions in methanol were used to follow changes in the CdSxOy coordination at room temperature. The correlations found from the current and previous studies between 113Cd NMR chemical shifts and different Cd(II) coordination

  14. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  15. NMR and structural features of noble-metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Gabuda, S.P.; Zemskov, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    NMR studies are reported on the structures of binary and other noble-metal fluorides. Revised measurements have been made on /sup 19/F chemical shifts and the anisotropy in them. A relationship is considered between the screening tensor for /sup 19/F and the electronic structure of the molecule or ion containing the noble-metal cation in the electronic configuration d/sup 6/, d/sup 8/, or d/sup 10/. The observed anomalous shifts in this class of compound are explained qualitatively in terms of paired electrons in filled d shells affecting the result within the framework of the classical theory of magnetic nuclear screening.

  16. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  17. NMR structure of the cathelin-like domain of the protegrin-3 precursor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinshan; Sanchez, Jean Frédéric; Strub, Marie-Paule; Brutscher, Bernhard; Aumelas, André

    2003-04-29

    In mammals, numerous precursors of antibacterial peptides with unrelated sequences share a similar prosequence of 94-114 residues, termed the cathelin-like domain. The cathelin-like domain of protegrin-3 (ProS) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and uniformly labeled with (15)N or (15)N and (13)C, and its three-dimensional structure was determined by heteronuclear NMR at pH 6.2. Under these conditions and due to the cis-trans isomerization of the R(87)-P(88) and D(118)-P(119) amide bonds, the ProS structure was found to adopt four almost equally populated conformations in slow exchange on the NMR chemical shift time scale. The ProS structure consists of an N-terminal alpha-helix (Y(34)-N(48)) cradled by a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet (beta1, N(53)-L(60); beta2, K(74)-P(86); beta3, V(104)-V(111); and beta4, I(122)-C(124)). The solution structure of ProS, which is monomeric, allowed us to determine the structure of the L1 and L2 loops, which are too mobile in the crystal structure. The regions common to the solution and X-ray structures were found to be very similar. Finally, since the overall fold of ProS is very similar to that of cystatins despite a low degree of sequence identity, the ProS solution structure was compared to the solution and X-ray structures of the chicken cystatin. This comparison revealed that the structures of the L1 and L2 loops as well as that of the appending domain are quite different in the two proteins. These differences are mainly due to the high proline residue content (10%) which disorganizes the hydrogen bond network of a part of the ProS beta-sheet in contrast to that of the chicken cystatin structure.

  18. NMRe: a web server for NMR protein structure refinement with high-quality structure validation scores.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyojung; Lim, GyuTae; Sung, Bong Hyun; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2016-02-15

    Protein structure refinement is a necessary step for the study of protein function. In particular, some nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures are of lower quality than X-ray crystallographic structures. Here, we present NMRe, a web-based server for NMR structure refinement. The previously developed knowledge-based energy function STAP (Statistical Torsion Angle Potential) was used for NMRe refinement. With STAP, NMRe provides two refinement protocols using two types of distance restraints. If a user provides NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Effect) data, the refinement is performed with the NOE distance restraints as a conventional NMR structure refinement. Additionally, NMRe generates NOE-like distance restraints based on the inter-hydrogen distances derived from the input structure. The efficiency of NMRe refinement was validated on 20 NMR structures. Most of the quality assessment scores of the refined NMR structures were better than those of the original structures. The refinement results are provided as a three-dimensional structure view, a secondary structure scheme, and numerical and graphical structure validation scores. NMRe is available at http://psb.kobic.re.kr/nmre/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Databases of Conformations and NMR Structures of Glycan Determinants.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anita; Drouillard, Sophie; Rivet, Alain; Perez, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization and a systematic conformational sampling of the conformational preferences of 170 glycan moieties of glycosphingolipids as produced in large-scale quantities by bacterial fermentation. These glycans span across a variety of families including the blood group antigens (A, B and O), core structures (Types 1, 2 and 4), fucosylated oligosaccharides (core and lacto-series), sialylated oligosaccharides (Types 1 and 2), Lewis antigens, GPI-anchors and globosides. A complementary set of about 100 glycan determinants occurring in glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans has also been structurally characterized using molecular mechanics-based computation. The experimental and computational data generated are organized in two relational databases that can be queried by the user through a user-friendly search engine. The NMR ((1)H and (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC correlation) spectra and 3D structures are available for visualization and download in commonly used structure formats. Emphasis has been given to the use of a common nomenclature for the structural encoding of the carbohydrates and each glycan molecule is described by four different types of representations in order to cope with the different usages in chemistry and biology. These web-based databases were developed with non-proprietary software and are open access for the scientific community available at http://glyco3d.cermav.cnrs.fr. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Quantum chemical 13Cα chemical shift calculations for protein NMR structure determination, refinement, and validation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Aramini, James M.; Rossi, Paolo; Kuzin, Alexandre; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A recently determined set of 20 NMR-derived conformations of a 48-residue all-α-helical protein, (PDB ID code 2JVD), is validated here by comparing the observed 13Cα chemical shifts with those computed at the density functional level of theory. In addition, a recently introduced physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distance constraints together with observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, was applied to determine a new set of 10 conformations, (Set-bt), as a blind test for the same protein. A cross-validation of these two sets of conformations in terms of the agreement between computed and observed 13Cα chemical shifts, several stereochemical quality factors, and some NMR quality assessment scores reveals the good quality of both sets of structures. We also carried out an analysis of the agreement between the observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts for a slightly longer construct of the protein solved by x-ray crystallography at 2.0-Å resolution (PDB ID code 3BHP) with an identical amino acid residue sequence to the 2JVD structure for the first 46 residues. Our results reveal that both of the NMR-derived sets, namely 2JVD and Set-bt, are somewhat better representations of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution than the 3BHP crystal structure. In addition, the 13Cα-based validation analysis appears to be more sensitive to subtle structural differences across the three sets of structures than any other NMR quality-assessment scores used here, and, although it is computationally intensive, this analysis has potential value as a standard procedure to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. PMID:18787110

  1. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  2. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-09-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having -Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed (1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0-28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution.

  3. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having −Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed 1H-15N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0–28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution. PMID:27524944

  4. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  5. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  6. Clathrate Structure Determination by Combining Crystal Structure Prediction with Computational and Experimental (129) Xe NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selent, Marcin; Nyman, Jonas; Roukala, Juho; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Bygrave, Peter J; Laitinen, Risto; Jokisaari, Jukka; Day, Graeme M; Lantto, Perttu

    2017-01-23

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of clathrates using NMR spectroscopy of enclathrated xenon to select from a set of predicted crystal structures. Crystal structure prediction methods have been used to generate an ensemble of putative structures of o- and m-fluorophenol, whose previously unknown clathrate structures have been studied by (129) Xe NMR spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of the (129) Xe chemical shift tensor to the chemical environment and shape of the crystalline cavity makes it ideal as a probe for porous materials. The experimental powder NMR spectra can be used to directly confirm or reject hypothetical crystal structures generated by computational prediction, whose chemical shift tensors have been simulated using density functional theory. For each fluorophenol isomer one predicted crystal structure was found, whose measured and computed chemical shift tensors agree within experimental and computational error margins and these are thus proposed as the true fluorophenol xenon clathrate structures.

  7. Solution structure of leptospiral LigA4 Big domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Song; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2015-11-13

    Pathogenic Leptospiraspecies express immunoglobulin-like proteins which serve as adhesins to bind to the extracellular matrices of host cells. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein A (LigA), a surface exposed protein containing tandem repeats of bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, has been proved to be involved in the interaction of pathogenic Leptospira with mammalian host. In this study, the solution structure of the fourth Big domain of LigA (LigA4 Big domain) from Leptospira interrogans was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structure of LigA4 Big domain displays a similar bacterial immunoglobulin-like fold compared with other Big domains, implying some common structural aspects of Big domain family. On the other hand, it displays some structural characteristics significantly different from classic Ig-like domain. Furthermore, Stains-all assay and NMR chemical shift perturbation revealed the Ca{sup 2+} binding property of LigA4 Big domain. - Highlights: • Determining the solution structure of a bacterial immunoglobulin-like domain from a surface protein of Leptospira. • The solution structure shows some structural characteristics significantly different from the classic Ig-like domains. • A potential Ca{sup 2+}-binding site was identified by strains-all and NMR chemical shift perturbation.

  8. T1BT* structural study of an anti-plasmodial peptide through NMR and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background T1BT* is a peptide construct containing the T1 and B epitopes located in the 5’ minor repeat and the 3’ major repeat of the central repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), respectively, and the universal T* epitope located in the C-terminus of the same protein. This peptide construct, with B = (NANP)3, has been found to elicit antisporozoite antibodies and gamma-interferon-screening T-cell responses in inbred strains of mice and in outbred nonhuman primates. On the other hand, NMR and CD spectroscopies have identified the peptide B’ = (NPNA)3 as the structural unit of the major repeat in the CSP, rather than the more commonly quoted NANP. With the goal of assessing the structural impact of the NPNA cadence on a proven anti-plasmodial peptide, the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T* were determined in this work. Methods NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations were used to determine the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T*. These structures were compared to determine the main differences and similarities between them. Results Both peptides exhibit radically different structures, with the T1B’T* showing strong helical tendencies. NMR and CD data, in conjunction with molecular modelling, provide additional information about the topologies of T1BT* and T1B’T*. Knowing the peptide structures required to elicit the proper immunogenic response can help in the design of more effective, conformationally defined malaria vaccine candidates. If peptides derived from the CSP are required to have helical structures to interact efficiently with their corresponding antibodies, a vaccine based on the T1B’T* construct should show higher efficiency as a pre-erythrocyte vaccine that would prevent infection of hepatocytes by sporozoites. PMID:23506240

  9. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin.

    PubMed

    Giambaşu, George M; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2015-05-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson-Crick stem and the "canonical" UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9-G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. © 2015 Giambaşu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Direct observation and characterization of DMPC/DHPC aggregates under conditions relevant for biological solution NMR.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Lorens; Karlsson, Göran; Edwards, Katarina

    2004-08-30

    We have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for inspection of aggregates formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in aqueous solution at total phospholipid concentrations cL < or = 5% and DMPC/DHPC ratios q < or = 4.0. In combination with ocular inspections, we are able to sketch out this part of phase-diagram at T = 14-80 degrees C. The temperature and the ratio q are the dominating variables for changing sample morphology, while cL to a lesser extent affects the aggregate structure. At q = 0.5, small, possibly disc-shaped, aggregates with a diameter of approximately 6 nm are formed. At higher q-values, distorted discoidal micelles that tend to short cylindrical micelles are observed. The more well-shaped discs have a diameter of around 20 nm. Upon increasing q or the temperature, long slightly flattened cylindrical micelles that eventually branch are formed. A holey lamellar phase finally appears upon further elevation of q or temperature. The implications for biological NMR work are two. First, discs prepared as membrane mimics are frequently much smaller than predicted by current "ideal bicelle" models. Second, the q approximately 3 preparations used for aligning water-soluble biomolecules in magnetic fields consist of perforated lamellar sheets. Furthermore, the discovered sequence of morphological transitions may have important implications for the development of bicelle-based membrane protein crystallization methods.

  11. Identification and localization of bound internal water in the solution structure of interleukin 1. beta. by heteronuclear three-dimensional sup 1 H rotating-frame Overhauser sup 15 N- sup 1 H multiple quantum coherence NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Clore, G.M.; Bax, A.; Wingfield, P.T.; Gronenborn, A.M. )

    1990-06-19

    The presence and location of bound internal water molecules in the solution structure of interleukin 1{beta} have been investigated by means of three-dimensional {sup 1}H rotating-frame Overhauser {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy (ROESY-HMQC). In this experiment through-space rotating-frame Overhauser (ROE) interactions between NH protons and bound water separated by {le}3.5{angstrom} are clearly distinguished from chemical exchange effects, as the cross-peaks for these two processes are of opposite sign. The identification of ROEs between NH protons and water is rendered simple by spreading out the spectrum into a third dimensional according to the {sup 15}N chemical shift of the directly bonded nitrogen atoms. By this means, the problems that prevent, in all but a very few limited cases, the interpretation, identification, and assignment of ROE peaks between NH protons and water in a 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H ROESY spectrum of a large protein such as interleukin 1{beta}, namely, extensive NH chemical shift degeneracy and ROE peaks obscured by much stronger chemical exchange peaks, are completely circumvented. We demonstrate the existence of 15 NH protons that are close to bound water molecules. From an examination of the crystal structure of interleukin, the results can be attributed to 11 water molecules that are involved in interactions bridging hydrogen-bonding interactions with backbone amide and carbonyl groups which stabilize the 3-fold pseudosymmetric topology of interleukin 1{beta} and thus constitute an integral part of the protein structure in solution.

  12. NMR characterisation of a highly conserved secondary structural RNA motif of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    King, John; Shammas, Christos; Nareen, Misbah; Lelli, Moreno; Ramesh, Vasudevan

    2013-05-28

    The highly conserved 29-mer RNA motif corresponding to the peptidyl transferase central circle region of the domain V of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA has been characterised by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure has a good all atom average RMSD of 1.28 Å and a stable A-form helical conformation. The NMR structure differs from the X-ray crystal structure of an analogous motif, contained within the Escherichia coli ribosome, as none of the bases are flipped out and a number of non-canonical base pairs are formed in the solution structure. Thus in the observed NMR structure, the predicted A7 to U30 base pair is not seen and a non-canonical U6 to U30 base pair was formed in its place. Similarly the predicted A9 to U26 base pair was also not observed and another non-canonical A9 to A27 base pair was formed. It was also seen from the conformational analysis that the steps near the bulges had the greatest deviation from the canonical Watson-Crick base pair step parameters. Despite these differences, the 29-mer structure provides a working model of the RNA within the ribosome in a more natural solution state than that observed in the intact ribosome crystal structures, particularly around the A27 residue. The NMR structure determination of the 29-mer RNA motif provides a solid foundation for determining the NMR structure of the RNA-amicetin complex in the next step. To extend the above study, a fully (13)C and (15)N isotopically labelled 37-mer RNA version of the Halobacterium halobium RNA sample has been characterised using ultra high field 1 GHz spectroscopy. The results have been used to demonstrate the advantages conferred by the use of a 1 GHz spectrometer frequency over 800 MHz in terms of superior sensitivity and greater spectral dispersion achieved in the spectrum of the RNA.

  13. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  14. The (15)N NMR chemical shift in the characterization of weak halogen bonding in solution.

    PubMed

    Hakkert, Sebastiaan B; Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Erdelyi, Mate

    2017-07-21

    We have studied the applicability of (15)N NMR spectroscopy in the characterization of the very weak halogen bonds of nonfluorinated halogen bond donors with a nitrogenous Lewis base in solution. The ability of the technique to detect the relative strength of iodine-, bromine- and chlorine-centered halogen bonds, as well as solvent and substituent effects was evaluated. Whereas computations on the DFT level indicate that (15)N NMR chemical shifts reflect the diamagnetic deshielding associated with the formation of a weak halogen bond, the experimentally observed chemical shift differences were on the edge of detectability due to the low molar fraction of halogen-bonded complexes in solution. The formation of the analogous yet stronger hydrogen bond of phenols have induced approximately ten times larger chemical shift changes, and could be detected and correlated to the electronic properties of substituents of the hydrogen bond donors. Overall, (15)N NMR is shown to be a suitable tool for the characterization of comparably strong secondary interactions in solution, but not sufficiently accurate for the detection of the formation of thermodynamically labile, weak halogen bonded complexes.

  15. Solution NMR spectroscopy of supra-molecular systems, why bother? A methyl-TROSY view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-06-01

    With the development of appropriate labeling schemes and the associated experiments that exploit them it has become possible to record high quality solution NMR spectra of supra-molecular complexes with molecular masses extending to 1 MDa. One such approach involves selective 13CH 3 methyl labeling in highly deuterated proteins using experiments that make use of a methyl-TROSY effect that significantly improves both resolution and sensitivity in spectra. The utility of this methodology has been demonstrated on a growing number of interesting particles. It seems appropriate at this juncture, therefore, to 'step back' and evaluate the role that solution NMR spectroscopy can play in what has traditionally been the domain of X-ray crystallography and more recently cryo-electron microscopy. It is argued here that solution NMR can make a critical contribution to our understanding of how dynamics regulate function in these high molecular weight systems. Several examples from work in my laboratory on the proteasome are presented as an illustration.

  16. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  17. NMR discrimination in nonrigid prochiral solutes dissolved in chiral liquid crystals: symmetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Luz, Zeev; Aroulanda, Christie; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    Enantiodiscrimination in the NMR spectra of flexible prochiral solutes dissolved in chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) is reviewed and compared with the analog phenomenon in such rigid solutes. In rigid prochiral solutes, the discrimination is brought about by the cancellation of improper symmetry elements upon dissolving in CLC within the frame of solute-solvent ordering mechanisms. If this reduction in symmetry renders the ordering of enantiotopic sites dissimilar, spectral discrimination may be observed. Symmetry considerations indicate that this is only possible for improper nonaxial groups lacking inversion symmetry. Nonrigid prochiral solutes consist of rapidly (on the NMR timescale) interconverting enantiomers, in which the racemization is accompanied by exchange of nonequivalent sites. These sites become, on the average, enantiotopically related, and in CLC, they exhibit spectral discrimination. The mechanism of the effect and the symmetry selection rules are different for the two cases. Specifically, the discrimination in flexible prochiral compounds results from the different ordering of the interchanging enantiomers in CLC. Using Altman's definition of average symmetry (Proc. R. Soc. A, 1967, 298, 184), selection rules for the phenomenon are derived. It follows that chiral discrimination in nonrigid prochiral solutes is much more abundant and can occur in all symmetry types except those possessing inversion. In particular, contrary to earlier thoughts, the effect can occur in compounds with axial symmetry. Illustrative examples of such studies with particular emphasis on compounds with average axial symmetry of the type D(3h), C(3v) and C(3h) are reviewed in this contribution.

  18. Structural characterization of lignins isolated from Caragana sinica using FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Mohanty, Amar K

    2011-09-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass, six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic solvents and alkaline solutions. The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). FT-IR spectra revealed that the "core" of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given. The results of 1H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2, isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH, was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit. Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum, the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1, extracted with 70% ethanol, presents a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (61% of total side chains), and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as beta-beta', beta-1', and beta-5') and a lower S/G ratio. Furthermore, a small percentage (ca. 9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the gamma-carbon.

  19. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF NON-DERIVATIZED PLANT CELL WALLS USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recently described plant cell wall dissolution system has been logically modified to utilize perdeuterated solvents to allow direct in-nmr-tube dissolution and high-resolution solution-state NMR of the whole cell wall without derivatization. Finely ground cell wall material dissolves in a solvent ...

  1. Automated structure determination of proteins with the SAIL-FLYA NMR method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2007-01-01

    The labeling of proteins with stable isotopes enhances the NMR method for the determination of 3D protein structures in solution. Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) provides an optimal stereospecific and regiospecific pattern of stable isotopes that yields sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information, and the ability to collect rapidly and evaluate fully automatically the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins up to twice as large as those that can be analyzed using conventional methods. Here, we describe a protocol for the preparation of SAIL proteins by cell-free methods, including the preparation of S30 extract and their automated structure analysis using the FLYA algorithm and the program CYANA. Once efficient cell-free expression of the unlabeled or uniformly labeled target protein has been achieved, the NMR sample preparation of a SAIL protein can be accomplished in 3 d. A fully automated FLYA structure calculation can be completed in 1 d on a powerful computer system.

  2. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Brian Finley

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  3. Protein structure refinement based on paramagnetic NMR shifts: applications to wild-type and mutant forms of cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, M.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach to NMR solution structure refinement is introduced that uses paramagnetic effects on nuclear chemical shifts as constraints in energy minimization or molecular dynamics calculations. Chemical shift differences between oxidized and reduced forms of horse cytochrome c for more than 300 protons were used as constraints to refine the structure of the wild-type protein in solution and to define the structural changes induced by a Leu 94 to Val mutation. A single round of constrained minimization, using the crystal structure as the starting point, converged to a low-energy structure with an RMS deviation between calculated and observed pseudo-contact shifts of 0.045 ppm, 7.5-fold lower than the starting structure. At the same time, the procedure provided stereospecific assignments for more than 45 pairs of methylene protons and methyl groups. Structural changes caused by the mutation were determined to a precision of better than 0.3 A. Structure determination based on dipolar paramagnetic (pseudocontact) shifts is applicable to molecules containing anisotropic paramagnetic centers with short electronic relaxation times, including numerous naturally occurring metalloproteins, as well as proteins or nucleic acids to which a paramagnetic metal ion or ligand may be attached. The long range of paramagnetic shift effects (up to 20 A from the iron in the case of cytochrome c) provides global structural constraints, which, in conjunction with conventional NMR distance and dihedral angle constraints, will enhance the precision of NMR solution structure determination. PMID:7757018

  4. Improved Accuracy from Joint X-ray and NMR Refinement of a Protein-RNA Complex Structure.

    PubMed

    Carlon, Azzurra; Ravera, Enrico; Hennig, Janosch; Parigi, Giacomo; Sattler, Michael; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-02-10

    Integrated experimental approaches play an increasingly important role in structural biology, taking advantage of the complementary information provided by different techniques. In particular, the combination of NMR data with X-ray diffraction patterns may provide accurate and precise information about local conformations not available from average-resolution X-ray structures alone. Here, we refined the structure of a ternary protein-protein-RNA complex comprising three domains, Sxl and Unr, bound to a single-stranded region derived in the msl2 mRNA. The joint X-ray and NMR refinement reveals that-despite the poor quality of the fit found for the original structural model-the NMR data can be largely accommodated within the uncertainty in the atom positioning (structural noise) from the primary X-ray data and that the overall domain arrangements and binding interfaces are preserved on passing from the crystalline state to the solution. The refinement highlights local conformational differences, which provide additional information on specific features of the structure. For example, conformational dynamics and heterogeneity observed at the interface between the CSD1 and the Sxl protein components in the ternary complex are revealed by the combination of NMR and crystallographic data. The joint refinement protocol offers unique opportunities to detect structural differences arising from various experimental conditions and reveals static or dynamic differences in the conformation of the biomolecule between the solution and the crystals.

  5. 17O NMR study of diamagnetic and paramagnetic lanthanide(III)-DOTA complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-08-18

    The complexes between the polyaminocarboxylate DOTA ligand and the whole series of stable lanthanide(III) metal ions, except Gd(3+), were studied in aqueous solution by (17)O NMR. For all of the paramagnetic systems, the (17)O NMR signals of both the nonchelating (O1) and chelating (O2) oxygen atoms could be detected, and for some of them, the signals of both the SAP and TSAP (TSAP') conformational isomers were also observed. Line width data analysis reveals that signal broadening is not dominated by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, as it was believed to be. The data indicate that quadrupole relaxation and, for some complexes, chemical exchange between the SAP and TSAP isomers are the major contributions to the (17)O NMR line width at 25 °C. Besides, the Fermi contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed lanthanide-induced shifts could be extracted. The (17)O hyperfine coupling constants determined for O2 in the SAP and TSAP isomers are similar to each other and to the values reported for several Gd(III) complexes comprising fast-exchanging ligands. Interestingly, the results suggest that (17)O NMR should prove to be useful for the study of highly paramagnetic Gd(III) complexes of nonlabile ligands.

  6. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  7. Improved reliability, accuracy and quality in automated NMR structure calculation with ARIA.

    PubMed

    Mareuil, Fabien; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Nilges, Michael; Bardiaux, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    In biological NMR, assignment of NOE cross-peaks and calculation of atomic conformations are critical steps in the determination of reliable high-resolution structures. ARIA is an automated approach that performs NOE assignment and structure calculation in a concomitant manner in an iterative procedure. The log-harmonic shape for distance restraint potential and the Bayesian weighting of distance restraints, recently introduced in ARIA, were shown to significantly improve the quality and the accuracy of determined structures. In this paper, we propose two modifications of the ARIA protocol: (1) the softening of the force field together with adapted hydrogen radii, which is meaningful in the context of the log-harmonic potential with Bayesian weighting, (2) a procedure that automatically adjusts the violation tolerance used in the selection of active restraints, based on the fitting of the structure to the input data sets. The new ARIA protocols were fine-tuned on a set of eight protein targets from the CASD-NMR initiative. As a result, the convergence problems previously observed for some targets was resolved and the obtained structures exhibited better quality. In addition, the new ARIA protocols were applied for the structure calculation of ten new CASD-NMR targets in a blind fashion, i.e. without knowing the actual solution. Even though optimisation of parameters and pre-filtering of unrefined NOE peak lists were necessary for half of the targets, ARIA consistently and reliably determined very precise and highly accurate structures for all cases. In the context of integrative structural biology, an increasing number of experimental methods are used that produce distance data for the determination of 3D structures of macromolecules, stressing the importance of methods that successfully make use of ambiguous and noisy distance data.

  8. Direct NMR Monitoring of Phase Separation Behavior of Highly Supersaturated Nifedipine Solution Stabilized with Hypromellose Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2017-07-03

    We investigated the phase separation behavior and maintenance mechanism of the supersaturated state of poorly water-soluble nifedipine (NIF) in hypromellose (HPMC) derivative solutions. Highly supersaturated NIF formed NIF-rich nanodroplets through phase separation from aqueous solution containing HPMC derivative. Dissolvable NIF concentration in the bulk water phase was limited by the phase separation of NIF from the aqueous solution. HPMC derivatives stabilized the NIF-rich nanodroplets and maintained the NIF supersaturation with phase-separated NIF for several hours. The size of the NIF-rich phase was different depending on the HPMC derivatives dissolved in aqueous solution, although the droplet size had no correlation with the time for which NIF supersaturation was maintained without NIF crystallization. HPMC acetate and HPMC acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) effectively maintained the NIF supersaturation containing phase-separated NIF compared with HPMC. Furthermore, HPMC-AS stabilized NIF supersaturation more effectively in acidic conditions. Solution (1)H NMR measurements of NIF-supersaturated solution revealed that HPMC derivatives distributed into the NIF-rich phase during the phase separation of NIF from the aqueous solution. The hydrophobicity of HPMC derivative strongly affected its distribution into the NIF-rich phase. Moreover, the distribution of HPMC-AS into the NIF-rich phase was promoted at lower pH due to the lower aqueous solubility of HPMC-AS. The distribution of a large amount of HPMC derivatives into NIF-rich phase induced the strong inhibition of NIF crystallization from the NIF-rich phase. Polymer distribution into the drug-rich phase directly monitored by solution NMR technique can be a useful index for the stabilization efficiency of drug-supersaturated solution containing a drug-rich phase.

  9. Insights into Domain–Domain Motions in Proteins and RNA from Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Many multidomain proteins and ribonucleic acids consist of domains that autonomously fold and that are linked together by flexible junctions. This architectural design allows domains to sample a wide range of positions with respect to one another, yet do so in a way that retains structural specificity, since the number of sampled conformations remains extremely small compared to the total conformations that would be sampled if the domains were connected by an infinitely long linker. This “tuned” flexibility in interdomain conformation is in turn used in many biochemical processes. There is great interest in characterizing the dynamic properties of multidomain systems, and moving beyond conventional descriptions in terms of static structures, toward the characterization of population-weighted ensembles describing a distribution of many conformations sampled in solution. There is also great interest in understanding the design principles and underlying physical and chemical interactions that specify the nature of interdomain flexibility. NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques for characterizing motions in complex biomolecules and has contributed greatly toward our basic understanding of dynamics in proteins and nucleic acids and its role in folding, recognition, and signaling. Here, we review methods that have been developed in our laboratories to address these challenges. Our approaches are based on the ability of one domain of the molecule to self-align in a magnetic field, or to dominate the overall orientation of the molecule, so that the conformational freedom of other domains can be assessed by their degree of alignment induced by the aligned part. In turn, this self-alignment ability can be intrinsic or can be caused by tagging appropriate constructs to the molecule of interest. In general, self-alignment is due to magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. Nucleic acids with elongated helices have this feature, as well as several

  10. Bridging experiment and theory: a template for unifying NMR data and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M L; Cho, Herman; de Jong, Wibe A

    2016-01-01

    The testing of theoretical models with experimental data is an integral part of the scientific method, and a logical place to search for new ways of stimulating scientific productivity. Often experiment/theory comparisons may be viewed as a workflow comprised of well-defined, rote operations distributed over several distinct computers, as exemplified by the way in which predictions from electronic structure theories are evaluated with results from spectroscopic experiments. For workflows such as this, which may be laborious and time consuming to perform manually, software that could orchestrate the operations and transfer results between computers in a seamless and automated fashion would offer major efficiency gains. Such tools also promise to alter how researchers interact with data outside their field of specialization by, e.g., making raw experimental results more accessible to theorists, and the outputs of theoretical calculations more readily comprehended by experimentalists. An implementation of an automated workflow has been developed for the integrated analysis of data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and electronic structure calculations. Kepler (Altintas et al. 2004) open source software was used to coordinate the processing and transfer of data at each step of the workflow. This workflow incorporated several open source software components, including electronic structure code to compute NMR parameters, a program to simulate NMR signals, NMR data processing programs, and others. The Kepler software was found to be sufficiently flexible to address several minor implementation challenges without recourse to other software solutions. The automated workflow was demonstrated with data from a [Formula: see text] NMR study of uranyl salts described previously (Cho et al. in J Chem Phys 132:084501, 2010). The functional implementation of an automated process linking NMR data with electronic structure predictions demonstrates that modern software

  11. Overestimation of orthophosphate monoesters in lake sediment by solution (31)P-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Jin, Xin; Tang, Wenzhong; Shan, Baoqing

    2017-09-30

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) is a useful method for analyzing organic phosphorus (Po). Unfortunately, the extraction conditions, which are highly alkaline and require long extraction times, make this analysis less effective. In this research, according to the lability of orthophosphate monoesters (mono-Po) and orthophosphate diesters (diesters-Po), we verified the hypothesized overestimation of mono-Po in lake sediment using solution (31)P-NMR. We set three scenes to redistribute the mono-Po and diesters-Po. Six components, including eight mono-Po species, were detected in the NaOH-EDTA extracts of sediment samples using (31)P-NMR. The results showed that mono-Po (212.7 mg kg(-1)) was the dominant Po in the surface sediment. In the three scenes, mono-Po decreased from 212.7 to 112.0 mg kg(-1), and diesters-Po increased from 31.9 to 132.7 mg kg(-1). The ratio of mono-Po to diesters-Po increased from 6.7 to 0.8. Therefore, we deduced that the concentration of mono-Po was overestimated, while that of diesters-Po was underestimated, in most research because of the high pH and long extraction process. Diesters-Po might be an important labile P source during the P "exhausted" period.

  12. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  13. (19)F labelled glycosaminoglycan probes for solution NMR and non-linear (CARS) microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; M Viana, Gustavo; Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Rudd, Timothy R; Skidmore, Mark A; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A

    2016-08-15

    Studying polysaccharide-protein interactions under physiological conditions by conventional techniques is challenging. Ideally, macromolecules could be followed by both in vitro spectroscopy experiments as well as in tissues using microscopy, to enable a proper comparison of results over these different scales but, often, this is not feasible. The cell surface and extracellular matrix polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) lack groups that can be detected selectively in the biological milieu. The introduction of (19)F labels into GAG polysaccharides is explored and the interaction of a labelled GAG with the heparin-binding protein, antithrombin, employing (19)F NMR spectroscopy is followed. Furthermore, the ability of (19)F labelled GAGs to be imaged using CARS microscopy is demonstrated. (19)F labelled GAGs enable both (19)F NMR protein-GAG binding studies in solution at the molecular level and non-linear microscopy at a microscopic scale to be conducted on the same material, essentially free of background signals.

  14. Thermal effects of added propanol on the helix-coil transition of (Pro-Pro-Gly) 10 in D 2O solution: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Tsutomu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nishi, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Tetsuo

    2010-05-01

    The conformational transition of collagen model peptide, (Pro-Pro-Gly) 10, from the triple helical structure to the statistical coil was observed in various aqueous alcohol solutions by NMR measurements. In methanol or ethanol solution, the thermal transition temperature, Tm, of the peptide increased regularly with the concentration of alcohols. In 1- or 2-propanol, however, Tm first decreased and then increased steeply, in apparent contrast to the general trend that the addition of alcohol on aqueous solution increases the stability of ordered structure of polypeptides. This exceptional behavior of the collagen model peptide in propanols might provide a clue to investigate the mechanism of stabilization of protein conformation.

  15. A Novel MHC-I Surface Targeted for Binding by the MCMV m06 Immunoevasin Revealed by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; May, Nathan A; Boyd, Lisa F; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad; Margulies, David H

    2015-11-27

    As part of its strategy to evade detection by the host immune system, murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes three proteins that modulate cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules: the MHC-I homolog m152/gp40 as well as the m02-m16 family members m04/gp34 and m06/gp48. Previous studies of the m04 protein revealed a divergent Ig-like fold that is unique to immunoevasins of the m02-m16 family. Here, we engineer and characterize recombinant m06 and investigate its interactions with full-length and truncated forms of the MHC-I molecule H2-L(d) by several techniques. Furthermore, we employ solution NMR to map the interaction footprint of the m06 protein on MHC-I, taking advantage of a truncated H2-L(d), "mini-H2-L(d)," consisting of only the α1α2 platform domain. Mini-H2-L(d) refolded in vitro with a high affinity peptide yields a molecule that shows outstanding NMR spectral features, permitting complete backbone assignments. These NMR-based studies reveal that m06 binds tightly to a discrete site located under the peptide-binding platform that partially overlaps with the β2-microglobulin interface on the MHC-I heavy chain, consistent with in vitro binding experiments showing significantly reduced complex formation between m06 and β2-microglobulin-associated MHC-I. Moreover, we carry out NMR relaxation experiments to characterize the picosecond-nanosecond dynamics of the free mini-H2-L(d) MHC-I molecule, revealing that the site of interaction is highly ordered. This study provides insight into the mechanism of the interaction of m06 with MHC-I, suggesting a structural manipulation of the target MHC-I molecule at an early stage of the peptide-loading pathway.

  16. Solution NMR studies of iron(II) spin-crossover complexes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Birgit; Walker, F Ann

    2007-08-06

    The 1H NMR spectra of a series of mono- and dinuclear pyridine complexes [FeL1(R1/R2)(py)2] and [Fe2L2(R1/R2)(py)4] have been investigated in a mixed toluene-d8/pyridine-d5 solution. The equatorial tetradentade Schiff base like ligands L1(R1/R2) and L2(R1/R2) with a N2O22- coordination sphere for each metal center have been obtained by condensation of a substituted malonodialdehyde (R1/R2 are Me/COOEt, Me/COMe, or OEt/COOEt) with o-phenylenediamine (L1(R1/R2)) or 1,2,4,5-tetraaminobenzene (L2(R1/R2)). The 1H NMR resonances were assigned by comparison of differently substituted complexes in combination with a line-width comparison. The 1H NMR shifts from 188 to 358 K show a strong influence of the spin state of the iron center. The behavior of the pure high-spin iron(II) complexes is close to ideal Curie behavior. Analysis of the resonance shifts of the spin-transition complexes can be used for determining the high-spin mole fraction of the complex in solution at different temperatures. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in solution using the Evans method were made for all six complexes. Significant differences between the spin-transition behavior of the complexes in solution of those in the solid state were found. However, the plots of microeff as a function of temperature obtained using the Evans method and those obtained by interpretation of the NMR shifts were virtually identical. The isotropic shifts of protons in the complexes proved to be suitable tools for following a spin transition in solution. Comparison of the microeff plots of the mono- and dinuclear complexes in solution reveals slight differences between the steepness of the curves that may be attributable to cooperative interactions between the metal centers in the case of the dinuclear complexes.

  17. NMR structural studies of the antibiotic lipopeptide daptomycin in DHPC micelles.

    PubMed

    Scott, Walter R P; Baek, Seung-Bin; Jung, David; Hancock, Robert E W; Straus, Suzana K

    2007-12-01

    Daptomycin is a cyclic anionic lipopeptide that exerts its rapid bactericidal effect by perturbing the bacterial cell membrane, a mode of action different from most other currently commercially available antibiotics (except e.g. polymyxin and gramicidin). Recent work has shown that daptomycin requires calcium in the form of Ca2+ to form a micellar structure in solution and to bind to bacterial model membranes. This evidence sheds light on the initial steps in the mechanism of action of this novel antibiotic. To understand how daptomycin goes on to perturb bacterial membranes, its three-dimensional structure has been determined in the presence of 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) micelles. NMR spectra of daptomycin in DHPC were obtained under two conditions, namely in the presence of Ca2+ as used by Jung et al. [D. Jung, A. Rozek, M. Okon, R.E.W. Hancock, Structural transitions as determinants of the action of the calcium-dependent antibiotic daptomycin, Chem. Biol. 11 (2004) 949-57] to solve the calcium-conjugated structure of daptomycin in solution and in a phosphate buffer as used by Rotondi and Gierasch [K.S. Rotondi, L.M. Gierasch, A well-defined amphipathic conformation for the calcium-free cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic, daptomycin, in aqueous solution, Biopolymers 80 (2005) 374-85] to solve the structure of apo-daptomycin. The structures were calculated using molecular dynamics time-averaged refinement. The different sample conditions used to obtain the NMR spectra are discussed in light of fluorescence data, lipid flip-flop and calcein release assays in PC liposomes, in the presence and absence of Ca2+ [D. Jung, A. Rozek, M. Okon, R.E.W. Hancock, Structural transitions as determinants of the action of the calcium-dependent antibiotic daptomycin, Chem. Biol. 11 (2004) 949-57]. The implications of these results for the membrane perturbation mechanism of daptomycin are discussed.

  18. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  19. Multinuclear NMR study of the solvated electron in lithium-methylamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, D.M.; Edwards, P.P.; McFarlane, W.; Wood, B.

    1983-04-20

    We report a multinuclear NMR study of lithium-methylamine solutions. NMR Knight shift data for solvent (/sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N) and metal (/sup 6/Li, /sup 7/Li) nuclei are reported for concentrations from 2 mol % lithium to saturation at ca 200 K. The NMR results have been used in conjunction with recent magnetic susceptibility measurements on the title system to provide a precise description of the unpaired-electron spin-density distribution in both the solvated electron, e/sub s//sup -/, and lithium monomer species, Li/sup +//sub s/e/sup -//sub s/. For both species, the vast majority of the unpaired-electron spin density resides in the nitrogen fragment of the solvent molecule. As with metal-ammonia solutions, we also find a small, negative spin density in the /sup 1/H is orbital. The occupancy of the /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li 2s orbital in the electron-cation aggregate species Li/sup +//sub s/e/sub s//sup -/ corresponds to approximately 0.5% of the lithium free-atom value for a 7 mol % metal solution. We conclude that the excess-electron species in lithium-methylamine solutions resides in a ground-state orbital which is composed of a simple 1s-like orbital for the electron within a solvent cavity in combination with a set of Rydberg-like orbitals derived from the 3s orbitals of the host solvent matrix.

  20. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: nitroxide radicals in solution.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Meier, R; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-01-14

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the (1)H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)] with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for (14)N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to (15)N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)]). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data-(1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of (14)N and (15)N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in (1)H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  1. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  2. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  3. An algebraic geometry approach to protein structure determination from NMR data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lincong; Mettu, Ramgopal R; Donald, Bruce Randall

    2005-01-01

    Our paper describes the first provably-efficient algorithm for determining protein structures de novo, solely from experimental data. We show how the global nature of a certain kind of NMR data provides quantifiable complexity-theoretic benefits, allowing us to classify our algorithm as running in polynomial time. While our algorithm uses NMR data as input, it is the first polynomial-time algorithm to compute high-resolution structures de novo using any experimentally-recorded data, from either NMR spectroscopy or X-Ray crystallography. Improved algorithms for protein structure determination are needed, because currently, the process is expensive and time-consuming. For example, an area of intense research in NMR methodology is automated assignment of nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) restraints, in which structure determination sits in a tight inner-loop (cycle) of assignment/refinement. These algorithms are very time-consuming, and typically require a large cluster. Thus, algorithms for protein structure determination that are known to run in polynomial time and provide guarantees on solution accuracy are likely to have great impact in the long-term. Methods stemming from a technique called "distance geometry embedding" do come with provable guarantees, but the NP-hardness of these problem formulations implies that in the worst case these techniques cannot run in polynomial time. We are able to avoid the NP-hardness by (a) some mild assumptions about the protein being studied, (b) the use of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) instead of a dense network of NOEs, and (c) novel algorithms and proofs that exploit the biophysical geometry of (a) and (b), drawing on a variety of computer science, computational geometry, and computational algebra techniques. In our algorithm, RDC data, which gives global restraints on the orientation of internuclear bond vectors, is used in conjunction with very sparse NOE data to obtain a polynomial-time algorithm for protein structure

  4. Rapid global structure determination of large RNA and RNA complexes using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Xing; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Jinbu; Yu, Ping; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2013-01-01

    Among the greatest advances in biology today are the discoveries of various roles played by RNA in biological processes. However, despite significant advances in RNA structure determination using X-ray crystallography [1] and solution NMR [2–4], the number of bona fide RNA structures is very limited, in comparison with the growing number of known functional RNAs. This is because of great difficulty in growing crystals or/and obtaining phase information, and severe size constraints on structure determination by solution NMR spectroscopy. Clearly, there is an acute need for new methodologies for RNA structure determination. The prevailing approach for structure determination of RNA in solution is a “bottom-up” approach that was basically transplanted from the approach used for determining protein structures, despite vast differences in both structural features and chemical compositions between these two types of biomacromolecules. In this chapter, we describe a new method, which has been reported recently, for rapid global structure determination of RNAs using solution-based NMR spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. The method treats duplexes as major building blocks of RNA structures. By determining the global orientations of the duplexes and the overall shape, the global structure of an RNA can be constructed and further regularized using Xplor-NIH. The utility of the method was demonstrated in global structure determination of two RNAs, a 71-nt and 102-nt RNAs with an estimated backbone RMSD ~3.0 Å. The global structure opens door to high-resolution structure determination in solution. PMID:20554045

  5. Synthesis and NMR structure of p41icf, a potent inhibitor of human cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Chiva, Cristina; Barthe, Philippe; Codina, Anna; Gairí, Margarida; Molina, Franck; Granier, Claude; Pugnière, Martine; Inui, Tatsuya; Nishio, Hideki; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kimura, Terutoshi; Sakakibara, Shumpei; Albericio, Fernando; Giralt, Ernest

    2003-02-12

    The total synthesis and structural characterization of the MHCII-associated p41 invariant chain fragment (P41icf) is described. P41icf plays a crucial role in the maturation of MHC class II molecules and antigen processing, acting as a highly selective cathepsin L inhibitor. P41icf synthesis was achieved using a combined solid-phase/solution approach. The entire molecule (65 residues, 7246 Da unprotected) was assembled in solution from fully protected peptides in the size range of 10 residues. After deprotection, oxidative folding in carefully adjusted experimental conditions led to the completely folded and functional P41icf with a disulfide pairing identical to that of native P41icf. CD, NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used for the structural and functional characterization of synthetic P41icf. CD thermal denaturation showed clear cooperative behavior. Tight cathepsin L binding was demonstrated by SPR. (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 800 MHz of unlabeled P41icf was used to solve the three-dimensional structure of the molecule. P41icf behaves as a well-folded protein domain with a topology very close to the crystallographic cathepsin L-bound form.

  6. Solid-state NMR analysis of the PGLa peptide orientation in DMPC bilayers: structural fidelity of 2H-labels versus high sensitivity of 19F-NMR.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Tremouilhac, Pierre; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-03-01

    The structure and alignment of the amphipathic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide PGLa in a lipid membrane is determined with high accuracy by solid-state 2H-NMR. Orientational constraints are derived from a series of eight alanine-3,3,3-d3-labeled peptides, in which either a native alanine is nonperturbingly labeled (4x), or a glycine (2x) or isoleucine (2x) is selectively replaced. The concentration dependent realignment of the alpha-helix from the surface-bound "S-state" to a tilted "T-state" by 30 degrees is precisely calculated using the quadrupole splittings of the four nonperturbing labels as constraints. The remaining, potentially perturbing alanine-3,3,3-d3 labels show only minor deviations from the unperturbed peptide structure and help to single out the unique solution. Comparison with previous 19F-NMR constraints from 4-CF3-phenylglycine labels shows that the structure and orientation of the PGLa peptide is not much disturbed even by these bulky nonnatural side chains, which contain CF3 groups that offer a 20-fold better NMR sensitivity than CD3 groups.

  7. WAXS studies of the structural diversity of hemoglobin in solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Bardhan, J.; Gore, D.; Lal, J.; Mandava, S.; Park, S.; Rodi, D. J.; Ho, N. T.; Ho, C.; Fischetti, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Specific ligation states of hemoglobin are, when crystallized, capable of taking on multiple quaternary structures. The relationship between these structures, captured in crystal lattices, and hemoglobin structure in solution remains uncertain. Wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) is a sensitive probe of protein structure in solution that can distinguish among similar structures and has the potential to contribute to these issues. We used WAXS to assess the relationships among the structures of human and bovine hemoglobins in different liganded forms in solution. WAXS data readily distinguished among the various forms of hemoglobins. WAXS patterns confirm some of the relationships among hemoglobin structures that have been defined through crystallography and NMR and extend others. For instance, methemoglobin A in solution is, as expected, nearly indistinguishable from HbCO A. Interestingly, for bovine hemoglobin, the differences between deoxy-Hb, methemoglobin and HbCO are smaller than the corresponding differences in human hemoglobin. WAXS data were also used to assess the spatial extent of structural fluctuations of various hemoglobins in solution. Dynamics has been implicated in allosteric control of hemoglobin, and increased dynamics has been associated with lowered oxygen affinity. Consistent with that notion, WAXS patterns indicate that deoxy-Hb A exhibits substantially larger structural fluctuations than HbCO A. Comparisons between the observed WAXS patterns and those predicted on the basis of atomic coordinate sets suggest that the structures of Hb in different liganded forms exhibit clear differences from known crystal structure.

  8. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Cryobiology studies the effect of low temperatures on living systems such as microorganisms and plants. In particular, plants growing in cold or frozen environments can survive such extreme conditions due to the cold hardening process. Hardening is a three step process during which, first, translocation of polysaccharides to the plant roots affects water structure in the cell-soil surface. For this reason, increase of cell-membrane permeability and resistance to temperatures from -5°C to -10°C is achieved. In a second step, chemical alteration of cell membrane arises and resistance to temperatures up to -20°C is obtained. The last hardening step consists in the vitrification of the plant tissues which allow plants to survive at temperatures as low as -50°C. Since polysaccharides play a very important role in the initial part of the cold hardening process, it is of paramount importance to study the effect of such natural biopolymers on water structure. Here, we present preliminary data obtained by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry on the effect of hyaluronan (an anionic, non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan) on water structure at different concentrations of the polysaccharide. Although hyaluronan is a polysaccharide found exceptionally in animal, human or bacterial bodies, in the present work it was used as a model "pilot" compound. In fact, it has an unique ability to hold water and it contains both polysaccharide and protein-like acetamido functionalities. For this reason, hyaluronan promotes the future research on other plant biopolymers such as, for instance, starch and other very specific proteins. Results revealed that different water-structure systems surround the molecule of hyaluronan in diluted and semidiluted systems. Namely, at the lowest hyaluronan concentration, three hydration shells can be recognized. The first hydration shell is made by bound water (BW) which is strongly fixed to the hyaluronan surface mainly through electrostatic interactions. A

  9. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results.

  10. Solvation and hydrogen bonding in alanine- and glycine-containing dipeptides probed using solution- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Manasi P; Woodard, Jaie C; Mehta, Manish A

    2009-07-15

    The NMR chemical shift is a sensitive reporter of peptide secondary structure and its solvation environment, and it is potentially rich with information about both backbone dihedral angles and hydrogen bonding. We report results from solution- and solid-state (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of four zwitterionic model dipeptides, L-alanyl-L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, glycyl-L-alanine, and glycyl-glycine, in which we attempt to isolate structural and environmental contributions to the chemical shift. We have mapped hydrogen-bonding patterns in the crystalline states of these dipeptides using the published crystal structures and correlated them with (13)C and (15)N magic angle spinning chemical shift data. To aid in the interpretation of the solvated chemical shifts, we performed ab initio quantum chemical calculations to determine the low-energy conformers and their chemical shifts. Assuming low energy barriers to interconversion between thermally accessible conformers, we compare the Boltzmann-averaged chemical shifts with the experimentally determined solvated-state shifts. The results allow us to correlate the observed differences in chemical shifts between the crystalline and solvated states to changes in conformation and hydrogen bonding that occur upon solvation.

  11. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  12. NMR structure of bitistatin – a missing piece in the evolutionary pathway of snake venom disintegrins.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Sanz, Libia; Perez, Alicia; Calvete, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Extant disintegrins, as found in the venoms of Viperidae and Crotalidae snakes (vipers and rattlesnakes, represent a family of polypeptides that block the function of β1 and β3 integrin receptors, both potently and with a high degree of selectivity. This toxin family owes its origin to the neofunctionalization of the extracellular region of an ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) molecule recruited into the snake venom gland proteome in the Jurassic. The evolutionary structural diversification of the disintegrin scaffold, from the ancestral long disintegrins to the more recently evolved medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins, involved the stepwise loss of pairs of class-specific disulfide linkages and the processing of the N-terminal region. NMR and crystal structures of medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins have been solved. However, the structure of a long disintegrin remained unknown. The present study reports the NMR solution structures of two disulfide bond conformers of the long disintegrin bitistatin from the African puff adder Bitis arietans. The findings provide insight into how a structural domain of the extracellular region of an ADAM molecule, recruited into and selectively expressed in the snake venom gland proteome as a PIII metalloprotease in the Jurassic, has subsequently been tranformed into a family of integrin receptor antagonists.

  13. Solution NMR studies of the plant peptide hormone CEP inform function.

    PubMed

    Bobay, Benjamin G; DiGennaro, Peter; Scholl, Elizabeth; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A; Mck Bird, David

    2013-12-11

    The C-terminally Encoded Peptide (CEP) family of regulatory peptides controls root development in vascular plants. Here, we present the first NMR structures of CEP. We show that root-knot nematode (RKN: Meloidogyne spp.) also encodes CEP, presumably to mimic plant CEP as part of their stereotypic, parasitic interaction with vascular plants. Molecular dynamics simulations of plant- and nematode-encoded CEP displaying known posttranslational modifications (PTM) provided insight into the structural effects of PTM and the conformational plasticity and rigidity of CEP. Potential mechanisms of action are discussed with respect to the structure and sampling of conformational space.

  14. Recent advances in computational predictions of NMR parameters for the structure elucidation of carbohydrates: methods and limitations.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2013-11-07

    All living systems are comprised of four fundamental classes of macromolecules--nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates (glycans). Glycans play a unique role of joining three principal hierarchical levels of the living world: (1) the molecular level (pathogenic agents and vaccine recognition by the immune system, metabolic pathways involving saccharides that provide cells with energy, and energy accumulation via photosynthesis); (2) the nanoscale level (cell membrane mechanics, structural support of biomolecules, and the glycosylation of macromolecules); (3) the microscale and macroscale levels (polymeric materials, such as cellulose, starch, glycogen, and biomass). NMR spectroscopy is the most powerful research approach for getting insight into the solution structure and function of carbohydrates at all hierarchical levels, from monosaccharides to oligo- and polysaccharides. Recent progress in computational procedures has opened up novel opportunities to reveal the structural information available in the NMR spectra of saccharides and to advance our understanding of the corresponding biochemical processes. The ability to predict the molecular geometry and NMR parameters is crucial for the elucidation of carbohydrate structures. In the present paper, we review the major NMR spectrum simulation techniques with regard to chemical shifts, coupling constants, relaxation rates and nuclear Overhauser effect prediction applied to the three levels of glycomics. Outstanding development in the related fields of genomics and proteomics has clearly shown that it is the advancement of research tools (automated spectrum analysis, structure elucidation, synthesis, sequencing and amplification) that drives the large challenges in modern science. Combining NMR spectroscopy and the computational analysis of structural information encoded in the NMR spectra reveals a way to the automated elucidation of the structure of carbohydrates.

  15. Accurate and molecular-size-tolerant NMR quantitation of diverse components in solution

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nagata, Takashi; Kigawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Determining the amount of each component of interest in a mixture is a fundamental first step in characterizing the nature of the solution and to develop possible means of utilization of its components. Similarly, determining the composition of units in complex polymers, or polymer mixtures, is crucial. Although NMR is recognized as one of the most powerful methods to achieve this and is widely used in many fields, variation in the molecular sizes or the relative mobilities of components skews quantitation due to the size-dependent decay of magnetization. Here, a method to accurately determine the amount of each component by NMR was developed. This method was validated using a solution that contains biomass-related components in which the molecular sizes greatly differ. The method is also tolerant of other factors that skew quantitation such as variation in the one-bond C–H coupling constant. The developed method is the first and only way to reliably overcome the skewed quantitation caused by several different factors to provide basic information on the correct amount of each component in a solution. PMID:26883279

  16. Solution-State One- and Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy of High-Molecular-Weight Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Holding, Ashley J; Mäkelä, Valtteri; Tolonen, Lasse; Sixta, Herbert; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; King, Alistair W T

    2016-04-21

    High-molecular-weight celluloses (which even include bacterial cellulose) can be dissolved fully in methyltrioctylphosphonium acetate/[D6 ]DMSO solutions to allow the measurement of resonance-overlap-free 1 D and 2 D NMR spectra. This is achieved by a simple and non-destructive dissolution method, without solvent suppression, pre-treatment or deuteration of the ionic component. We studied a range of cellulose samples by using various NMR experiments to make an a priori assignment of the cellulose resonances. Chain-end resonances are also visible in the (1) H NMR spectrum. This allows the rough determination of the degree of polymerisation (DP) of a sample for low-DP celluloses by the integration of non-reducing chain ends C1 versus polymeric cellobiose C1. Low-DP celluloses show a good agreement with the gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) values, but high-DP pulps show more deviation. For high-purity pulps (pre-hydrolysis kraft and sulfite), residual xyloses and mannoses can also be identified from the (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra. Resonances are thus assigned for the common polymeric polysaccharides found in chemical pulps.

  17. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David Joel

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy ≤20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*2Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P2PtH2complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*2YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P2PtH)2 complexes from cis-P2PtH2 complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*2Yb with phosphines, R3PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*2Yb with H2, CH4, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C6H6, and toluene.

  18. High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid and Solution Biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, A.B.; Paëpe, G. De; van der Wel, P.C.A.; Hu, K.-N.; Joo, C.-G.; Bajaj, V.S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Herzfeld, J.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) results in a substantial nuclear polarization enhancement through a transfer of the magnetization from electrons to nuclei. Recent years have seen considerable progress in the development of DNP experiments directed towards enhancing sensitivity in biological nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This review covers the applications, hardware, polarizing agents, and theoretical descriptions that were developed at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for high-field DNP experiments. In frozen dielectrics, the enhanced nuclear polarization developed in the vicinity of the polarizing agent can be efficiently dispersed to the bulk of the sample via 1H spin diffusion. This strategy has been proven effective in polarizing biologically interesting systems, such as nanocrystalline peptides and membrane proteins, without leading to paramagnetic broadening of the NMR signals. Gyrotrons have been used as a source of high-power (5–10 W) microwaves up to 460 GHz as required for the DNP experiments. Other hardware has also been developed allowing in situ microwave irradiation integrated with cryogenic magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR. Advances in the quantum mechanical treatment are successful in describing the mechanism by which new biradical polarizing agents yield larger enhancements at higher magnetic fields. Finally, pulsed methods and solution experiments should play a prominent role in the future of DNP. PMID:19194532

  19. Prion protein NMR structures of chickens, turtles, and frogs

    PubMed Central

    Calzolai, Luigi; Lysek, Dominikus A.; Pérez, Daniel R.; Güntert, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The NMR structures of the recombinant prion proteins from chicken (Gallus gallus; chPrP), the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta; tPrP), and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis; xlPrP) are presented. The amino acid sequences of these prion proteins show ≈30% identity with mammalian prion proteins. All three species form the same molecular architecture as mammalian PrPC, with a long, flexibly disordered tail attached to the N-terminal end of a globular domain. The globular domain in chPrP and tPrP contains three α-helices, one short 310-helix, and a short antiparallel β-sheet. In xlPrP, the globular domain includes three α-helices and a somewhat longer β-sheet than in the other species. The spatial arrangement of these regular secondary structures coincides closely with that of the globular domain in mammalian prion proteins. Based on the low sequence identity to mammalian PrPs, comparison of chPrP, tPrP, and xlPrP with mammalian PrPC structures is used to identify a set of essential amino acid positions for the preservation of the same PrPC fold in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. There are additional conserved residues without apparent structural roles, which are of interest for the ongoing search for physiological functions of PrPC in healthy organisms. PMID:15647366

  20. 1H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G.; Pîrnau, Adrian

    2009-08-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  1. Oxygen-17 NMR Shifts Caused by Cr{Sup ++} in Aqueous Solutions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jackson, J. A.; Lemons, J. F.; Taube, H.

    1962-01-01

    Cr{sup ++} in solution produces a paramagnetic shift in the NMR absorption of O{sup 17} in ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, as well as the expected paramagnetic shift for O{sup 17} in H{sub 2}O. As the concentration of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} increases, the shift in the H{sub 2}O{sup 17} absorption is diminished, and eventually changes sign. The effects are ascribed to preferential replacement by ClO{sub 4}{sup -} of water molecules from the axial positions in the first coordination sphere about Cr{sup ++}.

  2. A View into the Blind Spot: Solution NMR Provides New Insights into Signal Transduction Across the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Call, Matthew E.; Chou, James J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in cell biology concerns how cells communicate with their surroundings through surface receptors. The last few decades have seen major advances in understanding the mechanisms of receptor-ligand recognition and the biochemical consequences of such encounters. This review describes the emergence of solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the structural characterization of membrane-associated protein domains involved in transmembrane signaling. We highlight particularly instructive examples from the fields of immunoreceptor biology, growth hormone signaling, and cell adhesion. These signaling complexes comprise multiple subunits each spanning the membrane with a single helical segment that links extracellular ligand-binding domains to the cell interior. The apparent simplicity of this domain organization belies the complexity involved in cooperative assembly of functional structures that translate information across the cellular boundary. PMID:21134635

  3. Solution Structure of the Conserved Hypothetical Protein Rv2302 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Kim, Chang Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2006-08-01

    The hypothetical Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein RV2302 (80 residues, MW = 8.6 kDa) has been characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy suggest that RV2302 is as a monomer is solution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates the protein is structured in solution, but, irreversible unfolds upon heating with an inflection point of {approx}48 C. Using NMR based methods we determined the solution structure of RV2302. The protein contains a five strand, anti-parallel b-sheet core with one C-terminal a-helix (A65-A75) nestled against its side. Dali searches using the structure closest to the average structure did not identify any high similarities to any other known protein structure. Consequently, the structure of Rv2302 may potentially represent a novel protein fold.

  4. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  5. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  6. NMR structure of a gemcitabine-substituted model Okazaki fragment.

    PubMed

    Konerding, David; James, Thomas L; Trump, Eric; Soto, Ana Maria; Marky, Luis A; Gmeiner, William H

    2002-01-22

    Gemcitabine (2'-deoxy-2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine; dFdC) is a potent anticancer drug that exerts cytotoxic activity, in part, through incorporation of the nucleoside triphosphate dFdCTP into DNA and perturbations to DNA-mediated processes. The structure of a model Okazaki fragment containing a single dFdC substitution, [GEM], was determined using NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics to understand structural distortions that may be induced in replicating DNA resulting from dFdC substitution. The electrostatic surface of [GEM] was also computed to determine how the geminal difluoro group of dFdC perturbs DNA electrostatics. The stability of [GEM] was investigated using temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy. dFdC adopted a C3'-endo conformation in [GEM] and decreased the melting temperature of the duplex by 4.3 degrees C. dFdC substitution did not decrease helical stacking among adjacent purines in the DNA duplex region. dFdC substitution substantially altered the electrostatic properties of the model Okazaki fragment, with increased electron density in the vicinity of the geminal difluoro group. The results are consistent with dFdC substitution altering the structural, electrostatic, and thermodynamic properties of DNA and interfering in DNA-mediated processes. Interference in DNA-mediated processes due to dFdC substitution likely contributes to the anticancer activity of dFdC.

  7. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  8. Solute diffusion in ionic liquids, NMR measurements and comparisons to conventional solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2013-10-03

    Diffusion coefficients of a variety of dilute solutes in the series of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides ([Prn1][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), trihexyltetracedecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [P14,666][Tf2N], and assorted imidazolium ionic liquids are measured using pulsed field gradient (1)H NMR. These data, combined with available literature data, are used to try to uncover the solute and solvent characteristics most important in determining tracer diffusion rates. Discussion is framed in terms of departures from simple hydrodynamic predictions for translational friction using the ratio ζobs/ζSE, where ζobs is the observed friction, determined from the measured diffusion coefficient D via ζobs = kBT/D, and ζSE = 6πηR is the Stokes friction on a sphere of radius R (determined from the solute van der Waals volume) in a solvent with viscosity η. In the case of neutral solutes, the primary determinant of whether hydrodynamic predictions are accurate is the relative size of solute versus solvent molecules. A single correlation, albeit with considerable scatter, is found between ζobs/ζSE and the ratio of solute-to-solvent van der Waals volumes, ζobs/ζSE = {1 + a(VU/VV)(-p)}, with constants a = 1.93 and p = 1.88. In the case of small solutes, the observed friction is over 100-fold smaller than predictions of hydrodynamic models. The dipole moment of the solute has little effect on the friction, whereas solute charge has a marked effect. For monovalent solutes of size comparable to or smaller than the solvent ions, the observed friction is comparable to or even greater than what is predicted by hydrodynamics. These general trends are shown to be quite similar to what is observed for tracer diffusion in conventional solvents.

  9. Myochrysine Solution Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, William B.; Zhao, Zheng; Dorsey, John G.; Tepperman, Katherine

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the framework structure of Myochrysine (disodium gold(I)thiomalate) in the solid state and extremely concentrated aqueous solution, previously. It consists of an open chain polymer with linear gold coordination to two thiolates from the thiomalic acid moieties which bridge between pairs of gold atoms providing an Au-S-Au angle of 95°. The question remained: was this structure relevant to the dilute solutions of drugs administered and the still lower concentrations of gold found in the bodies of patients (typically 1 ppm Au in blood and urine or 5 μM in Au). We have provided an answer to that question using extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). EXAFS studies confirm that the polymeric structure with two sulfur atoms per gold atom persists from molar concentrations down to millimolar concentrations. CZE is able to separate and detect Myochrysine at millimolar levels. More importantly, at micromolar levels Myochrysine solutions exhibit identical CZE behavior to that measured at millimolar levels. Thus, aqueous solutions of the drug remain oligomeric at concentrations commensurate with those found in patient blood and urine. The reactivity of Myochrysine with cyanide, a species especially prevalent in smoking patients, was explored using CZE. Cyanide freely replaces thiomalic acid to form [Au(CN)2]- and thiomalic acid via a mixed ligand intermediate. The overall apparent equilibrium constant (Kapp) for the reaction is 6×10-4M-1. Further reaction of [Au(CN)2]- with a large excess of L, where L is cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, or glutathione, shows that these amino acids readily replace cyanide to form [AuL2]-. These species are thus potential metabolites and could possibly be active forms of gold in vivo. That all of these species are readily separated and quantified using CZE demonstrates that capillary electrophoresis is an accessible and powerful tool to add to those used for the study of gold

  10. NMR structure of DREAM: Implications for Ca(2+)-dependent DNA binding and protein dimerization.

    PubMed

    Lusin, Jacqueline D; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Li, Congmin; Valiveti, Aswani; Ames, James B

    2008-02-26

    DREAM (calsenilin/KChIP3) is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein that binds to specific DNA sequences and regulates Ca2+-induced transcription of prodynorphin and c-fos genes. Here, we present the atomic-resolution structure of Ca2+-bound DREAM in solution determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Pulsed-field gradient NMR diffusion experiments and 15N NMR relaxation analysis indicate that Ca2+-bound DREAM forms a stable dimer in solution. The structure of the first 77 residues from the N-terminus could not be determined by our NMR analysis. The C-terminal DREAM structure (residues 78-256) contains four EF-hand motifs arranged in a tandem linear array, similar to that seen in KChIP1, recoverin, and other structures of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) branch of the calmodulin superfamily. Mg2+ is bound at the second EF-hand, whereas Ca2+ is bound functionally at the third and fourth sites. The first and second EF-hands form an exposed hydrophobic groove on the protein surface lined by side-chain atoms of L96, F100, F114, I117, Y118, F121, F122, Y151, L155, L158, and L159 that are highly conserved in all NCS proteins. An exposed leucine near the C-terminus (L251) is suggested to form intermolecular contacts with leucine residues in the hydrophobic groove (L155, L158, and L159). Positively charged side chains of Arg and Lys (Lys87, Lys90, Lys91, Arg98, Lys101, Arg160, and Lys166) are clustered on one side of the protein surface and may mediate electrostatic contacts with DNA targets. We propose that Ca2+-induced dimerization of DREAM may partially block the putative DNA-binding site, which may suggest as to how Ca2+ abolishes DREAM binding to DNA to activate the transcription of prodynorphin and other downstream genes in pain control.

  11. Translational diffusion measurements by microcoil NMR in aqueous solutions of the Fos-10 detergent-solubilized membrane protein OmpX.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2012-06-14

    Aqueous solutions of the detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine) without and with addition of the integral membrane protein (IMP) OmpX (outer membrane protein X) have been characterized using pulsed field gradient-stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments for measurements of translational diffusion coefficients. Effective diffusion coefficients for Fos-10 micelles in the absence of OmpX were obtained by observation of NMR signals from 10-bromodecan-1-ol that had been inserted into the micelles, and in the presence of OmpX by NMR observation of the protein. It is thus shown that solutions of Fos-10-reconstituted OmpX can be quantitatively described as a mixture of Fos-10 monomers, uniform Fos-10 micelles, and uniform OmpX-containing Fos-10 micelles, with Fos-10 monomers in fast exchange between the pools of these three species. This result establishes an avenue for efficient determination of the effective translational diffusion coefficients of IMP-containing detergent micelles based on observation of the intense detergent NMR signals, which is also applicable with unlabeled IMPs. This monitoring of the species present in a given IMP solution contributes to improved guidelines for rational selection of detergent and buffer conditions in structural studies of integral membrane proteins.

  12. How Ions Arrange in Solution: Detailed Insight from NMR Spectroscopy of Paramagnetic Ion Pairs.

    PubMed

    Damjanović, Marko; Morita, Takaumi; Horii, Yoji; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2016-11-04

    Ion pairing between the paramagnetic anion [Tb(obPc)2 ](-) (obPc=2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octabutoxyphthalocyaninato), which has a very large magnetic anisotropy, with various diamagnetic counterions [P(Ph)4 ](+) (1 a), [As(Ph)4 ](+) (1 b), bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium ([PPN](+) , 1 c) and tetra-n-butylammonium ([TBA](+) , 1 d) was studied by means of (1) H, (13) C, (14) N, and (31) P NMR spectroscopy in solution at various temperatures. The influence of the paramagnetic anion on the NMR spectroscopy properties of the diamagnetic cations allowed a detailed insight into the distances and relative orientations of the paired ions. Isotropic tumbling models for the description of the quaternary cations are inaccurate, particularly for [TBA](+) with its flexible butyl chains. The effects of temperature and concentration were also assessed. The advantage of this technique is that relatively large distances and the orientation between molecules or ions in solution can be studied. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An NMR study of macromolecular aggregation in a model polymer-surfactant solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoum, Suliman; Yethiraj, Anand

    2010-01-01

    A model complex-forming nonionic polymer-anionic surfactant system in aqueous solution has been studied at different surfactant concentrations. Using pulsed-field-gradient diffusion NMR spectroscopy, we obtain the self-diffusion coefficients of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEO) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) simultaneously and as a function of SDS concentration. In addition, we obtain NMR relaxation rates and chemical shifts as a function of SDS concentration. Within the context of a simple model, our experimental results yield the onset of aggregation of SDS on PEO chains (CAC=3.5 mM), a crossover concentration (C2=60 mM) which signals a sharp change in relaxation behavior, as well as an increase in free surfactant concentration and a critical concentration (Cm=145 mM) which signals a distinct change in diffusion behavior and a crossover to a solution containing free micelles. Cm also marks the concentration above which obstruction effects are definitely important. In addition, we obtain the concentration of SDS in monomeric form and in the form of free micelles, as well as the average number of SDS molecules in a PEO-SDS aggregate (NAggr). Taken together, our results suggests continuous changes in the aggregation phenomenon over much of the concentration but with three distinct concentrations that signal changes in the nature of the aggregates.

  14. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  15. NMR studies of molecular structure in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Qiu, F; Yan, B; Wang, H; Mort, A J; Stark, R E

    2001-07-01

    The cuticle of higher plants functions primarily as a protective barrier for the leaves and fruits, controlling microbial attack as well as the diffusion of water and chemicals from the outside environment. Its major chemical constituents are waxes (for waterproofing) and cutin (a structural support polymer). However, the insolubility of cutin has hampered investigations of its covalent structure and domain architecture, which are viewed as essential for the design of crop protection strategies and the development of improved synthetic waterproofing materials. Recently developed strategies designed to meet these investigative challenges include partial depolymerization using enzymatic or chemical reagents and spectroscopic examination of the intact polyesters in a solvent-swelled form. The soluble oligomers from degradative treatments of lime fruit cutin are composed primarily of the expected 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic and 16-hydroxy-10-oxo-hexadecanoic acids; low-temperature HF treatments also reveal sugar units that are covalently attached to the hydroxyfatty acids. Parallel investigations of solvent-swollen cutin using 2D NMR spectroscopy assisted by magic-angle spinning yield well-resolved spectra that permit detailed comparisons to be made among chemical moieties present in the intact biopolymer, the soluble degradation products, and the unreacted solid residue.

  16. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  17. Using Complementary NMR Data Sets To Detect Inconsistencies and Model Flaws in the Structure Determination of Human Interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2017-07-27

    The derivation of protein structure from values of observable quantities measured in NMR experiments is a rather nontrivial task due to (i) the limited number of data compared to degrees of freedom of a protein, (ii) the uncertainty inherent to the function connecting an observable quantity to molecular structure, (iii) the finite quality of biomolecular models and force fields used in structure refinement, and (iv) the conformational freedom of a protein in aqueous solution, which requires extensive conformational sampling and appropriate conformational averaging when calculating or restraining to sets of NMR data. The protein interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been taken as a test case using NOE distances, S(2) order parameters, and (3)J-couplings as test data and the former two types of data as restraints. It is shown that, by combining sets of different, complementary NMR data as restraints in MD simulations, inconsistencies in the data or flaws in the model and procedures used to derive protein structure from NMR data can be detected. This leads to an improved structural interpretation of such data particularly in more mobile loop regions.

  18. Structure elucidation of a new isoflavone by exclusive use of ¹H NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alfredo R; Toscano, Rubén A; Hernández-Barragán, Angelina; Alvarez-Cisneros, Celina; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    The leaves of Piscidia carthagenensis provided new 7,2',5'-trimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (1), admixed with known 6,7-dimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (2), and 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,2',5'-trimethoxyisoflavone (3), which were separated by extensive fractional solubillization. Selective irradiation of the H-5 "singlet" of 2 allowed distinction of the two methoxy group signals, whose chemical shift difference is only 0.004 ppm (1.2 Hz at 300 MHz). The (1)H and (13)C NMR data of 3 were assigned with the aid of HETCOR and gHMBC measurements. Although 1 looked inhomogeneous in the solid state, its solution structure followed from (1)H NMR measurements, where it looked homogeneous. To clarify the solid state aspect and confirm the structure of 1, two types of crystals were mechanically separated and subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. This study revealed polymorphism because of the concomitant presence of orthorhombic and triclinic crystals, but showed no atropisomerism. The structure of 3 was also verified by X-ray diffraction crystallography.

  19. Structural analysis of 5-fluorouracil and thymine solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frederick G.; Vena, Joseph A.; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Strohmeier, Mark; Barnett, Maria E.

    2009-08-01

    Solid-state analysis with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), solid-state NMR (SSNMR), and other spectroscopic and physical methods can provide detailed structural information about organic and pharmaceutical cocrystals. In this study, a range of solid-state analysis methods are used to characterize co-crystallized solid solutions of 5-fluorouracil and thymine. 1H, 13C and 19F SSNMR and PXRD methods are used to study the structure and disorder present in a solid solution previously prepared by solution evaporation methods; here the solid solution is prepared over a wider stoichiometric range by solvent-drop grinding techniques. Long-range perturbations of key chemical shifts are detectable by SSNMR, indicating that the solid solution is not random. Cross-polarization and heteronuclear correlation SSNMR experiments between 1H, 13C, and 19F nuclei offer insight into the structure of this solid solution, and density functional theory (DFT) methods are applied to calculate lattice energies and NMR properties in order to understand the population of the two primary disordered sites in the crystal structure. In addition, a second solid solution of 5-fluorouracil and thymine is reported and analyzed. This solid solution, which was produced by solvent-drop grinding experiments and characterized by SSNMR and powder X-ray diffraction methods, is determined to be an isostructural phase to that of anhydrous thymine with the inclusion of 5-fluorouracil defects. A similar effect does not occur under excess 5-fluorouracil conditions; instead, phase-separated Form 1 of 5-fluorouracil and anhydrous thymine are obtained. DFT calculations are applied to offer a possible explanation for this disparity.

  20. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  1. Transition state structures in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bertran, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Gonzalez-Lafont, A.; Dillet, V.; Perez, V.

    1995-04-05

    In the present paper the location of transition state structures for reactions in solution has been studied. Continuum model calculations have been carried out on the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and a proton transfer through a water molecule between two oxygen atoms in formic acid. In this model the separation between the chemical system and the solvent has been introduced. On the other hand, the discrete Monte Carlo methodology has also been used to simulate the solvent effect on dissociative electron transfer processes. In this model, the hypothesis of separability is not assumed. Finally, the validity of both approaches is discussed.

  2. Transition state structures in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrán, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Gonzàlez-Lafont, A.; Dillet, V.; Pérez, V.

    1995-04-01

    In the present paper the location of transition state structures for reactions in solution has been studied. Continuum model calculations have been carried out on the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and a proton transfer through a water molecule between two oxygen atoms in formic acid. In this model the separation between the chemical system and the solvent has been introduced. On the other hand, the discrete Monte Carlo methodology has also been used to simulate the solvent effect on dissociative electron transfer processes. In this model, the hypothesis of separability is not assumed. Finally, the validity of both approaches is discussed.

  3. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  4. Solution NMR studies reveal the location of the second transmembrane domain of the human sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Amin, Nader T.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91–107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation. PMID:25647032

  5. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Vranken, Wim; Fogh, Rasmus H; Ragan, Timothy J; Tejero, Roberto; Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kennedy, Michael; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T; Vuister, Geerten W

    2015-08-01

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100% of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90% of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged.

  6. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  7. Conformational analysis of Ramipril (HOE 498) in a solution by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishii, Tomoko; Oonishi, Isao; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-05-01

    Conformations of Ramipril (Hoe 498, 2-[ N-(S)-1-ethoxycarbonyl-3-phenylpropyl]-L-alanyl-(1S, 3S, 5S)-2-azabicyclo (3,3,0) octane-3-carboxylic acid), a non-sulfhydryl angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in CD 3OD, to account for their specific biological activity and long-lasting effectiveness. The preferred optimum structures of the cis and trans forms are postulated. The identification of the two conformers is based on NMR measurements and classical energy calculations. The cis conformation should be preferred for biological activity.

  8. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  9. Vivaldi: Visualization and validation of biomacromolecular NMR structures from the PDB

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Vivaldi (VIsualization and VALidation DIsplay; http://pdbe.org/vivaldi), a web-based service for the analysis, visualization, and validation of NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Vivaldi provides access to model coordinates and several types of experimental NMR data using interactive visualization tools, augmented with structural annotations and model-validation information. The service presents information about the modeled NMR ensemble, validation of experimental chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, distance and dihedral angle constraints, as well as validation scores based on empirical knowledge and databases. Vivaldi was designed for both expert NMR spectroscopists and casual non-expert users who wish to obtain a better grasp of the information content and quality of NMR structures in the public archive. © Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180575

  10. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  11. An assignment of intrinsically disordered regions of proteins based on NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Ota, Motonori; Koike, Ryotaro; Amemiya, Takayuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Romero, Pedro R; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Dunker, A Keith; Fukuchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not adopt stable three-dimensional structures in physiological conditions, yet these proteins play crucial roles in biological phenomena. In most cases, intrinsic disorder manifests itself in segments or domains of an IDP, called intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), but fully disordered IDPs also exist. Although IDRs can be detected as missing residues in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography, no protocol has been developed to identify IDRs from structures obtained by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Here, we propose a computational method to assign IDRs based on NMR structures. We compared missing residues of X-ray structures with residue-wise deviations of NMR structures for identical proteins, and derived a threshold deviation that gives the best correlation of ordered and disordered regions of both structures. The obtained threshold of 3.2Å was applied to proteins whose structures were only determined by NMR, and the resulting IDRs were analyzed and compared to those of X-ray structures with no NMR counterpart in terms of sequence length, IDR fraction, protein function, cellular location, and amino acid composition, all of which suggest distinct characteristics. The structural knowledge of IDPs is still inadequate compared with that of structured proteins. Our method can collect and utilize IDRs from structures determined by NMR, potentially enhancing the understanding of IDPs.

  12. A solution NMR study of the interactions of oligomannosides and the anti-HIV-1 2G12 antibody reveals distinct binding modes for branched ligands.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Marradi, Marco; Padro, Daniel; Angulo, Jesús; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-02-01

    The structural and affinity details of the interactions of synthetic oligomannosides, linear (di-, tri-, and tetra-) and branched (penta- and hepta-), with the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody 2G12 (HIV=human immunodeficiency virus) have been investigated in solution by using ligand-based NMR techniques, specifically saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and transferred NOE experiments. Linear oligomannosides show similar binding modes to the antibody, with the nonreducing terminal disaccharide Manα(1→2)Man (Man=mannose) making the closest protein/ligand contacts in the bound state. In contrast, the branched pentamannoside shows two alternate binding modes, involving both ligand arms (D2- and D3-like), a dual binding description of the molecular recognition of this ligand by 2G12 in solution that differs from the single binding mode deduced from X-ray studies. On the contrary, the antibody shows an unexpected selectivity for one arm (D1-like) of the other branched ligand (heptamannoside). This result explains the previously reported lack of affinity enhancement relative to that of the D1-like tetramannoside. Single-ligand STD NMR titration experiments revealed noticeable differences in binding affinities among the linear and branched ligands in solution, with the latter showing decreased affinity. Among the analyzed series of ligands, the strongest 2G12 binders were the linear tri- and tetramannosides because both show similar affinity for the antibody. These results demonstrate that NMR spectroscopic techniques can deliver abundant structural, dynamics, and affinity information for the characterization of oligomannose-2G12 binding in solution, thus complementing, and, as in the case of the pentamannoside, extending, the structural view from X-ray crystallography. This information is of key importance for the development of multivalent synthetic gp120 high-mannose glycoconjugate mimics in the context of vaccine development.

  13. Chimeric Avidin – NMR Structure and Dynamics of a 56 kDa Homotetrameric Thermostable Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin–bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin–free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl–detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model–free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin–bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding. PMID:24959850

  14. Chimeric Avidin--NMR structure and dynamics of a 56 kDa homotetrameric thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A E; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P; Kulomaa, Markku S; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin-bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin-free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl-detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model-free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin-bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding.

  15. NMR structure and dynamics of the agonist dynorphin peptide bound to the human kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey; White, Kate L.; Doncescu, Nathalie; Didenko, Tatiana; Roth, Bryan L.; Czaplicki, Georges; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Milon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the dynorphin (1–13) peptide (dynorphin) bound to the human kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been determined by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 15N chemical shift variations indicated that free and bound peptide is in fast exchange in solutions containing 1 mM dynorphin and 0.01 mM KOR. Radioligand binding indicated an intermediate-affinity interaction, with a Kd of ∼200 nM. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of bound dynorphin. The N-terminal opioid signature, YGGF, was observed to be flexibly disordered, the central part of the peptide from L5 to R9 to form a helical turn, and the C-terminal segment from P10 to K13 to be flexibly disordered in this intermediate-affinity bound state. Combining molecular modeling with NMR provided an initial framework for understanding multistep activation of a G protein-coupled receptor by its cognate peptide ligand. PMID:26372966

  16. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  17. Solution structure of an antifreeze protein CfAFP-501 from Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Li, Congmin; Guo, Xianrong; Jia, Zongchao; Xia, Bin; Jin, Changwen

    2005-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are widely employed by various organisms as part of their overwintering survival strategy. AFPs have the unique ability to suppress the freezing point of aqueous solution and inhibit ice recrystallization through binding to the ice seed crystals and restricting their growth. The solution structure of CfAFP-501 from spruce budworm has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our result demonstrates that CfAFP-501 retains its rigid and highly regular structure in solution. Overall, the solution structure is similar to the crystal structure except the N- and C-terminal regions. NMR spin-relaxation experiments further indicate the overall rigidity of the protein and identify a collection of residues with greater flexibilities. Furthermore, Pro91 shows a cis conformation in solution instead of the trans conformation determined in the crystal structure.

  18. Mechanistic Insight into Nanoparticle Surface Adsorption by Solution NMR Spectroscopy in an Aqueous Gel

    DOE PAGES

    Egner, Timothy K.; Naik, Pranjali; Nelson, Nicholas C.; ...

    2017-06-22

    Engineering nanoparticle (NP) functions at the molecular level requires a detailed understanding of the dynamic processes occurring at the NP surface. Herein we show that a combination of dark-state exchange saturation transfer (DEST) and relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments on gel-stabilized NP samples enables the accurate determination of the kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption. We used the former approach to describe the interaction of cholic acid (CA) and phenol (PhOH) with ceria NPs with a diameter of approximately 200 nm. Whereas CA formed weak interactions with the NPs, PhOH was tightly bound to the NP surface. Interestingly, we found thatmore » the adsorption of PhOH proceeds via an intermediate, weakly bound state in which the small molecule has residual degrees of rotational diffusion. Here we believe the use of aqueous gels for stabilizing NP samples will increase the applicability of solution NMR methods to the characterization of nanomaterials.« less

  19. Gelation of Na-alginate aqueous solution: A study of sodium ion dynamics via NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Congxian; Zhang, Chao; Kang, Hongliang; Xia, Yanzhi; Sui, Kunyan; Liu, Ruigang

    2017-08-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) hydrogels have a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, drug delivery and formulations for preventing gastric reflux. The dynamics of sodium ions during the gelation process of SA solution is critical for clarification of the gelation procedure. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusometry were used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium ions during the gelation of SA alginate. We find that sodium ions are in two different states with the addition of divalent calcium ions, corresponding to Ca(2+) crosslinked and un-crosslinked regions in the hydrogels. The sodium ions within the un-crosslinked regions are those released from the alginate chains without Ca(2+) crosslinking. The relative content of sodium ions within the Ca(2+) crosslinked regions decreased with the increase in the content of calcium ions in the system. The relaxation time T2 of sodium ions within the Ca(2+) crosslinked and un-crosslinked regions shift to shorter and longer relaxation time with the increase in concentration of calcium ion, which indicates the closer package of SA chains and the larger space for the diffusion of free sodium ions. This work clarifies the dynamics of (23)Na(+) in a calcium alginate gel at the equilibrium state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments.

  1. Application of Data Mining Tools for Classification of Protein Structural Class from Residue Based Averaged NMR Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun. V.; Ali, Rehana F.M.; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue’s averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80 % accuracy measured by Matthew Correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with > 90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. PMID:25758094

  2. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  3. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  4. Solute-solvent interactions of acid-1,4-dioxane mixtures-By dielectric, FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, G; Parthipan, G; Thenappan, T

    2009-11-01

    Results of the dielectric studies carried out on the binary mixture of n-butyric and caprylic acids with 1,4-dioxane over the entire composition range and at temperatures 303K, 308K, 313K and 318K, and FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectral studies are presented in this paper. The excess permittivity and excess free energy were fitted with the Redlich-Kister polynomial. The variation of Kirkwood correlation factors, excess permittivity and excess free energy of mixing with the concentration and temperature has been investigated in view of understanding the ordering of dipoles of solute and solvent molecules. The FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectral analysis reveals the formation of complex between solute and solvent molecules. The parallel alignment of electric dipoles of the complex predicted by dielectric studies is well supported by UV-vis spectral analysis. The structure of the complex molecule present in the clusters has been deduced.

  5. Complexations of Hg(CN)(2) with imidazolidine-2-thione and its derivatives: solid state, solution NMR and antimicrobial activity studies.

    PubMed

    Wazeer, Mohamed I M; Isab, Anvarhusein A

    2007-12-31

    The preparation and characterization of new mercuric complexes of formula L(2)Hg(CN)(2) with L being imidazolidine-2-thione (Imt) and its substituted derivatives, 1,3-diazinane-2-thione (Diaz), 1,3-diazipane-2-thione (Diap), are described. The solution and solid-state (13)C NMR show a significant shift of the CS carbon resonance of the ligands, while the other resonances are relatively unaffected, indicating that most likely the solid-state structure is maintained in solution as well. The principal components of the (199)Hg shielding tensors were determined from solid-state NMR data. Antimicrobial activity studies of the free ligands and their complexes show that ligands exhibit substantial antibacterial activities compare to their Hg(II) complexes.

  6. A Grid-enabled web portal for NMR structure refinement with AMBER.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Case, David A; Ferella, Lucio; Giachetti, Andrea; Rosato, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    The typical workflow for NMR structure determination involves collecting thousands of conformational restraints, calculating a bundle of 20-40 conformers in agreement with them and refining the energetics of these conformers. The structure calculation step employs simulated annealing based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with very simplified force fields. The value of refining the calculated conformers using restrained MD (rMD) simulations with state-of-art force fields is documented. This refinement however presents various subtleties, from the proper formatting of conformational restraints to the definition of suitable protocols. We describe a web interface to set up and run calculations with the AMBER package, which we called AMPS-NMR (AMBER-based Portal Server for NMR structures). The interface allows the refinement of NMR structures through rMD. Some predefined protocols are provided for this purpose, which can be personalized; it is also possible to create an entirely new protocol. AMPS-NMR can handle various restraint types. Standard rMD refinement in explicit water of the structures of three different proteins are shown as examples. AMPS-NMR additionally includes a workspace for the user to store different calculations. As an ancillary service, a web interface to AnteChamber is available, enabling the calculation of force field parameters for organic molecules such as ligands in protein-ligand adducts. AMPS-NMR is embedded within the NMR services of the WeNMR project and is available at http://py-enmr.cerm.unifi.it/access/index/amps-nmr; its use requires registration with a digital certificate. ivanobertini@cerm.unifi.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. From Molecular Structure to Global Processes : NMR Spectroscopy in Analytical/Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, A.

    2009-04-01

    NMR Spectroscopy is arguably the most powerful tool to elucidate structure and probe molecular interactions. A range of NMR approaches will be introduced with emphasis on addressing and understanding structure and reactivity of soil organic matter at the molecular level. The presentation will be split into three main sections. The first section will look at evidence from advanced NMR based approaches that when considered synergistically describes the major structural components in soil organic matter. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy (1-3D NMR), automated pattern matching, spectral simulations, diffusion NMR and hybrid-diffusion NMR will be introduced in context of molecular structure. Finally the structural components in soil will be contrasted to those found in aquatic dissolved organic matter. Secondly molecular interactions of natural organic matter will be considered. Advanced structural studies have provided detailed spectral assignments which in turn permit the reactivity of various soil components to be elucidated. Aggregation and self-association of soil and dissolved organic matter will be discussed along with the structural components likely responsible for aggregation/colloid formation. Interactions of soil organic matter with anthropogenic chemicals will also be considered and NMR techniques based on "Saturation Transfer Difference" introduced. These techniques are extremely powerful and can be used to both; describe mechanistically how anthropogenic chemicals sorb to whole soils and identify the structural components (lignin, protein, cellulose, etc..) that are responsible for the binding/sorption in soil. In the last section, the "big questions" and challenges facing the field will be considered along with some novel experimental NMR based approaches that should, in future, assist in providing answers to these questions.

  8. Ca(2+) modulating α-synuclein membrane transient interactions revealed by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeting; Dai, Chenye; Bai, Jia; Xu, Guohua; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2014-03-01

    α-Synuclein is involved in Parkinson's disease and its interaction with cell membrane is crucial to its pathological and physiological functions. Membrane properties, such as curvature and lipid composition, have been shown to affect the interactions by various techniques, but ion effects on α-synuclein membrane interactions remain elusive. Ca(2+) dynamic fluctuation in neurons plays important roles in the onset of Parkinson's disease and its influx is considered as one of the reasons to cause cell death. Using solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, here we show that Ca(2+) can modulate α-synuclein membrane interactions through competitive binding to anionic lipids, resulting in dissociation of α-synuclein from membranes. These results suggest a negative modulatory effect of Ca(2+) on membrane mediated normal function of α-synuclein, which may provide a clue, to their dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating the Mechanisms of Amylolysis of Starch Granules by Solution-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a prominent component of the human diet and is hydrolyzed by α-amylase post-ingestion. Probing the mechanism of this process has proven challenging, due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of individual starch granules. By means of solution-state NMR, we demonstrate that flexible polysaccharide chains protruding from the solvent-exposed surfaces of waxy rice starch granules are highly mobile and that during hydrothermal treatment, when the granules swell, the number of flexible residues on the exposed surfaces increases by a factor of 15. Moreover, we show that these flexible chains are the primary substrates for α-amylase, being cleaved in the initial stages of hydrolysis. These findings allow us to conclude that the quantity of flexible α-glucan chains protruding from the granule surface will greatly influence the rate of energy acquisition from digestion of starch. PMID:25815624

  10. Structure of supersaturated zincate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrenko, V.E.; Balyakina, N.N.; Baulov, V.I.; Kotov, A.V.; Zubov, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    During the discharge of chemical power sources with zinc electrodes, supersaturated zincate solution (SZS) is formed from which zinc oxide or hydroxide precipitates as a function of time. The deposit detracts from the functioning of these power sources. In view of the model suggested for the structure of SZS, it is expected that a stabilizing effect would be exerted on SZS by compounds having proton-donating groups which do not give off the protons in the strongly alkaline medium and are not discharged in this medium. For a check of this, the authors chose to use xylitol and molasses in their experiments. The SZS were produced with a mock-up silver-zinc battery using the procedure previously described.

  11. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  12. NMR solution structure of a nonanucleotide duplex with a dG mismatch opposite a 10R adduct derived from trans addition of a deoxyadenosine N6-amino group to (-)-(7S,8R,9R,10S)-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10- tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Schurter, E J; Yeh, H J; Sayer, J M; Lakshman, M K; Yagi, H; Jerina, D M; Gorenstein, D G

    1995-01-31

    A nonanucleotide in which (-)-(7S,8R,9R,10S)-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy- 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (7-hydroxy group and epoxide oxygen are trans) is covalently bonded to the exocyclic N6-amino group of deoxyadenosine through trans addition at C10 of the epoxide (10R adduct) has been synthesized. The modified oligonucleotide d(GGTCA*CGAG) was incorporated into the duplex d(GGTCA*CGAG).d(CTCGGGACC), co