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Sample records for nmr structure analysis

  1. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html.

  2. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin.

    PubMed

    Giambaşu, George M; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2015-05-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson-Crick stem and the "canonical" UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9-G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements.

  3. Computer-assisted structural analysis of regular glycopolymers on the basis of 13C NMR data.

    PubMed

    Toukach, F V; Shashkov, A S

    2001-09-28

    A computer-assisted approach to the prediction of the primary structures of regular glycopolymers is described. The analysis is based on comparing the calculated 13C NMR spectra of all the possible structures of the repeating unit (for the given monomeric composition) to an experimental 13C NMR spectrum. The spectra generation is based on the spectral database containing information on the 13C chemical shifts of monomers, di- and trimeric fragments. If the required data are missing from this database, the special database for average glycosylation effects is used. The analysis reveals those structures with the calculated 13C NMR spectrum most close to observed. The structures of repeating units of any topology containing up to six residues linked by glycosidic, amidic or phospho-diester bridges can be predicted. Unambiguous selection of the proper structure from the output list of possible structures may require additional experimental data. Testing the created program and databases on bacterial polysaccharides and their derivatives containing up to three non-sugar residues (alditols, amino acids, phosphate groups etc.) per repeating unit revealed the good convergence of prediction with independently obtained structural data.

  4. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  5. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes.

  6. Fractional Order Analysis of Sephadex Gel Structures: NMR Measurements Reflecting Anomalous Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L; Akpa, Belinda S; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-(bD)(α)], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4,000 s-mm(-2)). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  7. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 2. Hydrolyzable tannins and proanthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-02

    An unprecedented analytical method that allows simultaneous structural and quantitative characterization of all functional groups present in tannins is reported. In situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyls and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus-containing reagent (Cl-TMDP) followed by quantitative ³¹P NMR acquisition constitutes a novel fast and reliable analytical tool for the analysis of tannins and proanthocyanidins with significant implications for the fields of food and feed analyses, tannery, and the development of natural polyphenolics containing products.

  8. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 1. Model compounds.

    PubMed

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-02

    Tannins and flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants that display a wide array of biological activities. This peculiarity is related to the inhibition of extracellular enzymes that occurs through the complexation of peptides by tannins. Not only the nature of these interactions, but more fundamentally also the structure of these heterogeneous polyphenolic molecules are not completely clear. This first paper describes the development of a new analytical method for the structural characterization of tannins on the basis of tannin model compounds employing an in situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic OH, phenolic OH, and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus reagent. The ³¹P NMR analysis of ³¹P-labeled samples allowed the unprecedented quantitative and qualitative structural characterization of hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, and catechin tannin model compounds, forming the foundations for the quantitative structural elucidation of a variety of actual tannin samples described in part 2 of this series.

  9. Essential Parameters for Structural Analysis and Dereplication by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the importance of adequate precision when reporting the δ and J parameters of frequency domain 1H NMR (HNMR) data. Using a variety of structural classes (terpenoids, phenolics, alkaloids) from different taxa (plants, cyanobacteria), this study develops rationales that explain the importance of enhanced precision in NMR spectroscopic analysis and rationalizes the need for reporting Δδ and ΔJ values at the 0.1–1 ppb and 10 mHz level, respectively. Spectral simulations paired with iteration are shown to be essential tools for complete spectral interpretation, adequate precision, and unambiguous HNMR-driven dereplication and metabolomic analysis. The broader applicability of the recommendation relates to the physicochemical properties of hydrogen (1H) and its ubiquity in organic molecules, making HNMR spectra an integral component of structure elucidation and verification. Regardless of origin or molecular weight, the HNMR spectrum of a compound can be very complex and encode a wealth of structural information that is often obscured by limited spectral dispersion and the occurrence of higher order effects. This altogether limits spectral interpretation, confines decoding of the underlying spin parameters, and explains the major challenge associated with the translation of HNMR spectra into tabulated information. On the other hand, the reproducibility of the spectral data set of any (new) chemical entity is essential for its structure elucidation and subsequent dereplication. Handling and documenting HNMR data with adequate precision is critical for establishing unequivocal links between chemical structure, analytical data, metabolomes, and biological activity. Using the full potential of HNMR spectra will facilitate the general reproducibility for future studies of bioactive chemicals, especially of compounds obtained from the diversity of terrestrial and marine organisms. PMID:24895010

  10. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  11. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  12. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution.

  13. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  14. Structural analysis of complex saponins of Balanites aegyptiaca by 800 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staerk, Dan; Chapagain, Bishnu P; Lindin, Therese; Wiesman, Zeev; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-10-01

    The main saponin (1) present in the mesocarp of Balanites aegyptiaca fruit is a mixture of 22R and 22S epimers of 26-(O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-3-beta-[4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy]-22,26-dihydroxyfurost-5-ene. This structure differs from a previously reported saponin isolated from this source by the site of attachment of the rhamnosyl residue, and presumably represents a structural revision of the latter. The main saponin (2) present in the kernel is a xylopyranosyl derivative of 1. The use of high-field NMR enabled the practically complete assignment of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of these complex saponins, existing as a mixture of C-22 epimers. Moreover, the work represents a new approach to structural elucidation of saponins: direct preparative-scale HPLC-RID of crude extracts followed by high-field NMR investigations supported by ESI-MSn.

  15. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  16. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  17. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  18. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Protein Dynamics from NMR: The Slowly Relaxing Local Structure Analysis Compared with Model-Free Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E.; Polimeno, Antonino; Freed, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    15N-1H spin relaxation is a powerful method for deriving information on protein dynamics. The traditional method of data analysis is model-free (MF), where the global and local N-H motions are independent and the local geometry is simplified. The common MF analysis consists of fitting single-field data. The results are typically field-dependent, and multi-field data cannot be fit with standard fitting schemes. Cases where known functional dynamics has not been detected by MF were identified by us and others. Recently we applied to spin relaxation in proteins the Slowly Relaxing Local Structure (SRLS) approach which accounts rigorously for mode-mixing and general features of local geometry. SRLS was shown to yield MF in appropriate asymptotic limits. We found that the experimental spectral density corresponds quite well to the SRLS spectral density. The MF formulae are often used outside of their validity ranges, allowing small data sets to be force-fitted with good statistics but inaccurate best-fit parameters. This paper focuses on the mechanism of force-fitting and its implications. It is shown that MF force-fits the experimental data because mode-mixing, the rhombic symmetry of the local ordering and general features of local geometry are not accounted for. Combined multi-field multi-temperature data analyzed by MF may lead to the detection of incorrect phenomena, while conformational entropy derived from MF order parameters may be highly inaccurate. On the other hand, fitting to more appropriate models can yield consistent physically insightful information. This requires that the complexity of the theoretical spectral densities matches the integrity of the experimental data. As shown herein, the SRLS densities comply with this requirement. PMID:16821820

  20. 1H NMR assignments of apo calcyclin and comparative structural analysis with calbindin D9k and S100 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, B. C.; Carlström, G.; Okazaki, K.; Hidaka, H.; Chazin, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    The homodimeric S100 protein calcyclin has been studied in the apo state by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. Using a combination of scalar correlation and NOE experiments, sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments were obtained for all but one backbone and > 90% of the side-chain resonances. To our knowledge, the 2 x 90 residue (20 kDa) calcyclin dimer is the largest protein system for which such complete assignments have been made by purely homonuclear methods. Sequential and medium-range NOEs and slowly exchanging backbone amide protons identified directly the four helices and the short antiparallel beta-type interaction between the two binding loops that comprise each subunit of the dimer. Further analysis of NOEs enabled the unambiguous assignment of 556 intrasubunit distance constraints, 24 intrasubunit hydrogen bonding constraints, and 2 x 26 intersubunit distance constraints. The conformation of the monomer subunit was refined by distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations using the intrasubunit constraints only. Calculation of the dimer structure starting from this conformational ensemble has been reported elsewhere. The extent of structural homology among the apo calcyclin subunit, the monomer subunit of apo S100 beta, and monomeric apo calbindin D9k has been examined in detail by comparing 1H NMR chemical shifts and secondary structures. This analysis was extended to a comprehensive comparison of the three-dimensional structures of the calcyclin monomer subunit and calbindin D9k, which revealed greater similarity in the packing of their hydrophobic cores than was anticipated previously. Together, these results support the hypothesis that all members of the S100 family have similar core structures and similar modes of dimerization. Analysis of the amphiphilicity of Helix IV is used to explain why calbindin D9k is monomeric, but full-length S100 proteins form homodimers. PMID:8931135

  1. NMR-based Structural Analysis of Threonylcarbamoyl-AMP Synthase and Its Substrate Interactions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kimberly A; Bobay, Benjamin G; Sarachan, Kathryn L; Sims, Alexis F; Bilbille, Yann; Deutsch, Christopher; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Agris, Paul F

    2015-08-14

    The hypermodified nucleoside N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A37) is present in many distinct tRNA species and has been found in organisms in all domains of life. This post-transcriptional modification enhances translation fidelity by stabilizing the anticodon/codon interaction in the ribosomal decoding site. The biosynthetic pathway of t(6)A37 is complex and not well understood. In bacteria, the following four proteins have been discovered to be both required and sufficient for t(6)A37 modification: TsaC, TsaD, TsaB, and TsaE. Of these, TsaC and TsaD are members of universally conserved protein families. Although TsaC has been shown to catalyze the formation of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of t(6)A37, the details of the enzymatic mechanism remain unsolved. Therefore, the solution structure of Escherichia coli TsaC was characterized by NMR to further study the interactions with ATP and L-threonine, both substrates of TsaC in the biosynthesis of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP. Several conserved amino acids were identified that create a hydrophobic binding pocket for the adenine of ATP. Additionally, two residues were found to interact with L-threonine. Both binding sites are located in a deep cavity at the center of the protein. Models derived from the NMR data and molecular modeling reveal several sites with considerable conformational flexibility in TsaC that may be important for L-threonine recognition, ATP activation, and/or protein/protein interactions. These observations further the understanding of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by TsaC, a threonylcarbamoyl-AMP synthase, and provide structure-based insight into the mechanism of t(6)A37 biosynthesis.

  2. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  3. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  4. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  5. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Franks, W. Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids comprised of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20 – 64 fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4 – 18.8 T) and temperature (109 – 180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine sidechain conformers, unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules, and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR as an excellent tool for characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  6. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

  7. Structural analysis of N,N-diacyl-1,4-dihydropyrazine by variable-temperature NMR and DFT calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiu-qing; Tan, Hong-bo; Yan, Hong; Chang, Yu

    2017-04-01

    N,N-diacyl-1,4-dihydropyrazine derivatives (1) were prepared via an efficient microwave-assisted synthesis. 1 was isolated and unambiguously confirmed by NMR spectra and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The NMR spectra of 1 showed complicated rather than conventional spectroscopy. Variable-temperature experiments and DFT calculation (PES) were used to investigate this phenomenon. DFT calculations confirmed that the structures of the two rotamers of 1 correspond to those determined by NMR in solution, and gave the syn-anti interconversion barriers of rotamers. The results showed that two isomers exist in solution (deuterated solvent) at room temperature, resulting in complicated NMR spectra.

  8. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  9. Dipeptide Structural Analysis Using Two-Dimensional NMR for the Undergraduate Advanced Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Dolino, Drew; Schwartzenburg, Danielle; Steiger, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to introduce students in either an organic chemistry or biochemistry lab course to two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy using simple biomolecules. The goal of this experiment is for students to understand and interpret the information provided by a 2D NMR spectrum. Students are…

  10. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  11. (13)C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-06-02

    The many advantages of (13)C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, (13)C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semiautomated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE data sets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures.

  12. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  13. A unilateral NMR magnet for sub-structure analysis in the built environment: the Surface GARField.

    PubMed

    McDonald, P J; Aptaker, P S; Mitchell, J; Mulheron, M

    2007-03-01

    A new, portable NMR magnet with a tailored magnetic field profile and a complementary radio frequency sensor have been designed and constructed for the purpose of probing in situ the sub-surface porosity of cement based materials in the built environment. The magnet is a one sided device akin to a large NMR-MOUSE with the additional design specification of planes of constant field strength /B0/ parallel to the surface. There is a strong gradient G in the field strength perpendicular to these planes. As with earlier GARField magnets, the ratio G//:B0/ is a system constant although the method of achieving this condition is substantially different. The new magnet as constructed is able to detect signals 50mm (1H NMR at 3.2 MHz) away from the surface of the magnet and can profile the surface layers of large samples to a depth of 35-40 mm by moving the magnet, and hence the resonant plane of the polarising field, relative to the sample surface. The matching radio frequency excitation/detector coil has been designed to complement the static magnetic field such that the polarising B0 and sensing B1 fields are, in principal, everywhere orthogonal. Preliminary spatially resolved measurements are presented of cement based materials, including two-dimensional T1-T2 relaxation correlation spectra.

  14. Computer-assisted analysis of the structure of regular branched polysaccharides containing 2,3-disubstituted rhamnopyranose and mannopyranose residues on the basis of 13C NMR data.

    PubMed

    Lipkind, G M; Shashkov, A S; Nifant'ev, N E; Kochetkov, N K

    1992-12-31

    A computer-assisted approach to the analysis of the structure of branched polysaccharides that contain 2,3-di-O-glycosylated alpha-rhamnopyranose and alpha-mannopyranose residues is based on evaluation of the 13C NMR spectra, using glycosylation effects and their deviations from additivity (delta delta values) at the branch points. This approach, in combination with monosaccharide and methylation analysis data, has been verified on a series of bacterial polysaccharides of known structure.

  15. Folding of apomyoglobin: Analysis of transient intermediate structure during refolding using quick hydrogen deuterium exchange and NMR.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Chiaki

    2017-01-01

    The structures of apomyoglobin folding intermediates have been widely analyzed using physical chemistry methods including fluorescence, circular dichroism, small angle X-ray scattering, NMR, mass spectrometry, and rapid mixing. So far, at least two intermediates (on sub-millisecond- and millisecond-scales) have been demonstrated for apomyoglobin folding. The combination of pH-pulse labeling and NMR is a useful tool for analyzing the kinetic intermediates at the atomic level. Its use has revealed that the latter-phase kinetic intermediate of apomyoglobin (6 ms) was composed of helices A, B, G and H, whereas the equilibrium intermediate, called the pH 4 molten-globule intermediate, was composed mainly of helices A, G and H. The improved strategy for the analysis of the kinetic intermediate was developed to include (1) the dimethyl sulfoxide method, (2) data processing with the various labeling times, and (3) a new in-house mixer. Particularly, the rapid mixing revealed that helices A and G were significantly more protected at the earlier stage (400 µs) of the intermediate (former-phase intermediate) than the other helices. Mutation studies, where each hydrophobic residue was replaced with an alanine in helices A, B, E, F, G and H, indicated that both non-native and native-like structures exist in the latter-phase folding intermediate. The N-terminal part of helix B is a weak point in the intermediate, and the docking of helix E residues to the core of the A, B, G and H helices was interrupted by a premature helix B, resulting in the accumulation of the intermediate composed of helices A, B, G and H. The prediction-based protein engineering produced important mutants: Helix F in a P88K/A90L/S92K/A94L mutant folded in the latter-phase intermediate, although helix F in the wild type does not fold even at the native state. Furthermore, in the L11G/W14G/A70L/G73W mutant, helix A did not fold but helix E did, which is similar to what was observed in the kinetic

  16. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases 15N-1H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include 1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the Discriminating Power (DP) score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and 2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  17. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  18. A consensus on protein structure accuracy in NMR?

    PubMed

    Billeter, Martin

    2015-02-03

    The precision of an NMR structure may be manipulated by calculation parameters such as calibration factors. Its accuracy is, however, a different issue. In this issue of Structure, Buchner and Güntert present "consensus structure bundles," where precision analysis allows estimation of accuracy.

  19. Molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis of homovanillic acid and its sodium salt - NMR, FT-IR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Kowczyk-Sadowy, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of the electronic charge distribution in metal complex or salt allows to predict what kind of deformation of the electronic system of ligand would undergo during complexation. It also permits to make more precise interpretation of mechanism by which metals affect the biochemical properties of ligands. The influence of sodium cation on the electronic system of homovanillic acid was studied in this paper. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G** method. Mulliken, MK and ChelpG atomic charges were analyzed. The theoretical NMR and IR spectra were obtained. 1H and 13C NMR as well as FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of studied compounds were also recorded and analyzed. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental characteristics of these molecules.

  20. Molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis of homovanillic acid and its sodium salt--NMR, FT-IR and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Samsonowicz, M; Kowczyk-Sadowy, M; Regulska, E; Lewandowski, W

    2014-01-24

    The estimation of the electronic charge distribution in metal complex or salt allows to predict what kind of deformation of the electronic system of ligand would undergo during complexation. It also permits to make more precise interpretation of mechanism by which metals affect the biochemical properties of ligands. Theinfluence ofsodium cation on the electronic system of homovanillic acid was studied in this paper. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G(**) method. Mulliken, MK and ChelpG atomic charges were analyzed. The theoretical NMR and IR spectra were obtained. (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of studied compounds were also recorded and analyzed. The calculated parameters are compared with experimental characteristics of these molecules.

  1. CcpNmr AnalysisAssign: a flexible platform for integrated NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Simon P; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Ragan, Timothy J; Mureddu, Luca G; Vuister, Geerten W

    2016-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an indispensably powerful technique for the analysis of biomolecules under ambient conditions, both for structural- and functional studies. However, in practice the complexity of the technique has often frustrated its application by non-specialists. In this paper, we present CcpNmr version-3, the latest software release from the Collaborative Computational Project for NMR, for all aspects of NMR data analysis, including liquid- and solid-state NMR data. This software has been designed to be simple, functional and flexible, and aims to ensure that routine tasks can be performed in a straightforward manner. We have designed the software according to modern software engineering principles and leveraged the capabilities of modern graphics libraries to simplify a variety of data analysis tasks. We describe the process of backbone assignment as an example of the flexibility and simplicity of implementing workflows, as well as the toolkit used to create the necessary graphics for this workflow. The package can be downloaded from www.ccpn.ac.uk/v3-software/downloads and is freely available to all non-profit organisations.

  2. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  3. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint PMID:20513646

  4. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint.

  5. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  6. Molecular structure, vibrational analysis (FT-IR, FT-Raman), NMR, UV, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of N,N-Diphenyl Formamide based on DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Mathammal, R; Monisha, N R; Yasaswini, S; Krishnakumar, V

    2015-03-15

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis is carried out by using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively for N,N-Diphenyl Formamide (DPF) molecule. The optimized molecular structures, vibrational frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the title molecule are evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) with standard B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies are calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond (NBO) analysis. The possible electronic transitions are determined by HOMO-LUMO orbital shapes and their energies. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) and the first hyperpolarizability of the title compound are calculated. The Mulliken charges and electric dipole moment of the molecule are computed using DFT calculations. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of the molecules are calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results.

  7. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-12-26

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  8. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  9. Solution NMR Structure and Functional Analysis of the Integral Membrane Protein YgaP from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eichmann, Cédric; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Bordignon, Enrica; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The solution NMR structure of the α-helical integral membrane protein YgaP from Escherichia coli in mixed 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine/1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1′-rac-glycerol) micelles is presented. In these micelles, YgaP forms a homodimer with the two transmembrane helices being the dimer interface, whereas the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain includes a rhodanese-fold in accordance to its sequence homology to the rhodanese family of sulfurtransferases. The enzymatic sulfur transfer activity of full-length YgaP as well as of the N-terminal rhodanese domain only was investigated performing a series of titrations with sodium thiosulfate and potassium cyanide monitored by NMR and EPR. The data indicate the thiosulfate concentration-dependent addition of several sulfur atoms to the catalytic Cys-63, which process can be reversed by the addition of potassium cyanide. The catalytic reaction induces thereby conformational changes within the rhodanese domain, as well as on the transmembrane α-helices of YgaP. These results provide insights into a potential mechanism of YgaP during the catalytic thiosulfate activity in vivo. PMID:24958726

  10. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  11. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-01-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions. PMID:27109776

  12. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  13. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  14. Structural Analysis of Multi-Helical RNAs by NMR-SAXS/WAXS: Application to the U4/U6 di-snRNA.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Didychuk, Allison L; Rodgers, Margaret L; Michael, Lauren A; Burke, Jordan E; Montemayor, Eric J; Hoskins, Aaron A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-02-27

    NMR and SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering)/WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) are highly complementary approaches for the analysis of RNA structure in solution. Here we describe an efficient NMR-SAXS/WAXS approach for structural investigation of multi-helical RNAs. We illustrate this approach by determining the overall fold of a 92-nt 3-helix junction from the U4/U6 di-snRNA. The U4/U6 di-snRNA is conserved in eukaryotes and is part of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that comprises a major subunit of the assembled spliceosome. Helical orientations can be determined by X-ray scattering data alone, but the addition of NMR RDC (residual dipolar coupling) restraints improves the structure models. RDCs were measured in two different external alignment media and also by magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. The resulting alignment tensors are collinear, which is a previously noted problem for nucleic acids. Including WAXS data in the calculations produces models with significantly better fits to the scattering data. In solution, the U4/U6 di-snRNA forms a 3-helix junction with a planar Y-shaped structure and has no detectable tertiary interactions. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer data support the observed topology. A comparison with the recently determined cryo-electron microscopy structure of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP illustrates how proteins scaffold the RNA and dramatically alter the geometry of the U4/U6 3-helix junction.

  15. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  16. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Stereochemistry and solid-state structure of an intrinsically chiral meso-patterned porphyrin: case study by NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liguo; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Mengliang; Zhao, Luyang; Wei, Liye; Bian, Yongzhong

    2013-10-04

    A C1-symmerical meso-substituted ABCD-type porphyrin, [5-phenyl-10-(2-hydroxynaphthyl)-15-(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrinato]zinc(II) (1), has been synthesized and characterized. The molecular structure of 1 has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex 1 crystallizes in a triclinic system with one pair of enantiomeric molecules per unit cell. Resolution of the racemic mixture has been achieved by chiral HPLC techniques. In particular, the absolute configurations of the enantiomers have been assigned from NMR spectroscopic analysis with L-Phe-OMe as the chiral solvating agent (CSA). The assignments have also been unambiguously confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The present results suggest that the CSA-NMR anisotropy strategy is applicable for the stereochemistry determination of chiral host-guest complexes with multiple intermolecular interactions. In addition, the multiple intermolecular interactions between the enantiomerically pure porphyrin S-1 and L-Phe-OMe are proved in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.

  19. NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly extended the spectrum of problems that can now be addressed with this technology. In particular, studies of proteins with molecular weights on the order of 100 kDa are now possible at a level of detail that was previously reserved for much smaller systems. An example of the sort of information that is now accessible is provided in a study of malate synthase G, a 723 residue enzyme that has been a focal point of research efforts in my laboratory. Details of the labeling schemes that have been employed and optimal experiments for extraction of structural and dynamics information on this protein are described. NMR studies of protein dynamics, in principle, give insight into the relation between motion and function. A description of deuterium-based spin relaxation methods for the investigation of side chain dynamics is provided. Examples where millisecond (ms) time scale dynamics play an important role and where relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has been particularly informative, including applications involving the membrane enzyme PagP and mutants of the Fyn SH3 domain that fold on a ms time scale, are presented.

  20. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  1. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  2. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  4. Synthesis, NMR analysis and X-ray crystal structure of 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazatetraasterane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong-bo; Song, Xiu-qing; Yan, Hong; Xin, Hong-xing

    2017-02-01

    Novel 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazatetraasterane (3, Tetraethyl 3-(2-naphthoyl)-6,12-diphenyl-3,9-diazapentacyclo [6.4.0.02,7.04,11.05,10]dodecane-1,5,7,11-tetracarboxylate) was prepared by naphthoylation of 3,9-diazatetraasterane (2). The target compound was isolated and unambiguously confirmed by NMR spectra, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In order to discuss the spatial effects on the NMR of 3 by the naphthoyl group, spectra analysis (1D-NMR and 2D-NMR) of 2 and 3 was conducted in details by the shifts and assignments of signals. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction assists to explain the molecular asymmetry of 3 and elucidates the effects of naphthoyl group on the geometry of the central cage of 3,9-diazatetraasterane.

  5. Desktop NMR for structure elucidation and identification of strychnine adulteration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kawarpal; Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-03-27

    Elucidating the structure of complex molecules is difficult at low magnetic fields due to the overlap of different peak multiplets and second-order coupling effects. This is even more challenging for rigid molecules with small chemical shift differences and with prochiral centers. Since low-field NMR spectroscopy is sometimes presumed as restricted to the analysis of only small and simple molecules, this paper aims at countering this misconception: it demonstrates the use of low-field NMR spectroscopy in chemical forensics for identifying strychnine and its counterions by exploring the chemical shift as a signature in different 1D (1)H and (13)C experiments. Hereby the applied methodologies combine various 1D and 2D experiments such as 1D (1)H, (13)C, DEPT, and 2D COSY, HETCOR, HSQC, HMBC and J-resolved spectroscopy to elucidate the molecular structure and skeleton of strychnine at 1 Tesla. Strychnine is exemplified here, because it is a basic precursor in the chemistry of natural products and is employed as a chemical weapon and as a doping agent in sports including the Olympics. In our study, the molecular structure of the compound could be identified either with a 1D experiment at high magnetic field or with HMBC and HSQC experiments at 1 T. In conclusion, low-field NMR spectroscopy enables the chemical elucidation of the strychnine structure through a simple click with a computer mouse. In situations where a high-field NMR spectrometer is unavailable, compact NMR spectrometers can nevertheless generate knowledge of the structure, important for identifying the different chemical reaction mechanisms associated with the molecule. Desktop NMR is a cost-effective viable option in chemical forensics. It can prove adulteration and identify the origin of different strychnine salts, in particular, the strychnine free base, strychnine hemisulphate and strychnine hydrochloride. The chemical shift signatures report the chemical structure of the molecules due to the impact

  6. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  7. Structural elucidation of dioxa-cage compounds from tetrahydroisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one: analysis of NMR data and GIAO chemical shifts calculations.

    PubMed

    da Costa Resende, Gabriela; Alvarenga, Elson Santiago

    2016-12-01

    The polycyclic compounds, especially the dioxa-cages, have attracted considerable attention in recent years. In our work, a series of 9β-substituted 3-oxo-4,11-dioxatetracyclo[5.2.1.1(5,8) .0(2,6) ]undecane compounds were unexpectedly isolated during bromination, chlorination and epoxidation reactions of the 3-hydroxy-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one. After careful analysis of the NMR data, the chemical shifts of the isolated and the expected products were predicted by theoretical calculations using density functional theory and gauge including atomic orbitals. The best correlation between calculated and experimental data was evaluated by comparing mean absolute errors and applying DP4 probability methodology. Results from both approaches indicated a correct structural elucidation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  9. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  10. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  11. Microgram-scale protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Anklin, Clemens; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-06-01

    Using conventional triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with a 1 mm triple-resonance microcoil NMR probe, we determined near complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the 68-residue Methanosarcina mazei TRAM protein using only 72 mug (6 microl, 1.4 mM) of protein. This first example of a complete solution NMR structure determined using microgram quantities of protein demonstrates the utility of microcoil-probe NMR technologies for protein samples that can be produced in only limited quantities.

  12. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1993--December 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and dosed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and pore surface. Our current work may be divided into three areas: small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), adsorption, and NMR.

  13. Automatic analysis of quantitative NMR data of pharmaceutical compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Kolpak, Michael X; Wu, Jiejun; Leo, Gregory C

    2012-08-07

    In drug discovery, chemical library compounds are usually dissolved in DMSO at a certain concentration and then distributed to biologists for target screening. Quantitative (1)H NMR (qNMR) is the preferred method for the determination of the actual concentrations of compounds because the relative single proton peak areas of two chemical species represent the relative molar concentrations of the two compounds, that is, the compound of interest and a calibrant. Thus, an analyte concentration can be determined using a calibration compound at a known concentration. One particularly time-consuming step in the qNMR analysis of compound libraries is the manual integration of peaks. In this report is presented an automated method for performing this task without prior knowledge of compound structures and by using an external calibration spectrum. The script for automated integration is fast and adaptable to large-scale data sets, eliminating the need for manual integration in ~80% of the cases.

  14. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  15. Molecular structure, vibrational, UV, NMR, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, NLO, NBO analysis of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathammal, R.; Sangeetha, K.; Sangeetha, M.; Mekala, R.; Gadheeja, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 3,5 di tert butyl 4 hydroxy benzoic acid. The properties of title compound have been evaluated by quantum chemical calculation (DFT) using B3LYP functional and 6-31 + G (d, p) as basis set. IR Spectra has been recorded using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the region 4000-400 cm-1. The vibrational assignment of the calculated normal modes has been made on the basis set. The isotropic chemical shifts computed by 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) analyses also show good agreement with experimental observations. The theoretical UV-Vis spectrum of the compound are used to study the visible absorption maxima (λ max). The structure activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug receptor interactions. The Mullikan charges, HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital) - LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital) energy are analyzed. HOMO-LUMO energy gap and other related molecular properties are also calculated. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is carried out to investigate the various intra and inter molecular interactions of molecular system. The Non-linear optical properties such as dipole moment (μ), polarizability (αtot) and molecular first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the title compound are computed with B3LYP/6-31 + G (d,p) level of theory.

  16. Vivaldi: Visualization and validation of biomacromolecular NMR structures from the PDB

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Vivaldi (VIsualization and VALidation DIsplay; http://pdbe.org/vivaldi), a web-based service for the analysis, visualization, and validation of NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Vivaldi provides access to model coordinates and several types of experimental NMR data using interactive visualization tools, augmented with structural annotations and model-validation information. The service presents information about the modeled NMR ensemble, validation of experimental chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, distance and dihedral angle constraints, as well as validation scores based on empirical knowledge and databases. Vivaldi was designed for both expert NMR spectroscopists and casual non-expert users who wish to obtain a better grasp of the information content and quality of NMR structures in the public archive. © Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180575

  17. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  18. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  19. Advances in NMR-based biofluid analysis and metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shucha; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Significant improvements in NMR technology and methods have propelled NMR studies to play an important role in a rapidly expanding number of applications involving the profiling of metabolites in biofluids. This review discusses recent technical advances in NMR spectroscopy based metabolite profiling methods, data processing and analysis over the last three years.

  20. The dynamic duo: Combining NMR and small angle scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Sattler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Structural biology provides essential information for elucidating molecular mechanisms that underlie biological function. Advances in hardware, sample preparation, experimental methods, and computational approaches now enable structural analysis of protein complexes with increasing complexity that more closely represent biologically entities in the cellular environment. Integrated multidisciplinary approaches are required to overcome limitations of individual methods and take advantage of complementary aspects provided by different structural biology techniques. Although X-ray crystallography remains the method of choice for structural analysis of large complexes, crystallization of flexible systems is often difficult and does typically not provide insights into conformational dynamics present in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is well-suited to study dynamics at picosecond to second time scales, and to map binding interfaces even of large systems at residue resolution but suffers from poor sensitivity with increasing molecular weight. Small angle scattering (SAS) methods provide low resolution information in solution and can characterize dynamics and conformational equilibria complementary to crystallography and NMR. The combination of NMR, crystallography, and SAS is, thus, very useful for analysis of the structure and conformational dynamics of (large) protein complexes in solution. In high molecular weight systems, where NMR data are often sparse, SAS provides additional structural information and can differentiate between NMR-derived models. Scattering data can also validate the solution conformation of a crystal structure and indicate the presence of conformational equilibria. Here, we review current state-of-the-art approaches for combining NMR, crystallography, and SAS data to characterize protein complexes in solution. PMID:24687405

  1. Multinuclear NMR analysis of the antitubercular drug ethionamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale, Nuno; Correia, Alexandra; Figueiredo, Patrícia; Santos, Hélder A.

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains as the deadliest bacterial infection in developing countries, a situation that is particularly aggravated by the increasing spread of multidrug resistant mycobacteria (MDR-TB). In this view, not only new anti-tubercular drugs are urgently needed, but also a better understanding of the existing ones may aid in the future design of more efficient derivatives or surrogates. Ethionamide (ETA) is an anti-tubercular pro-drug used as second-line therapy against MDR-TB, being bio-activated by the mycobacterial monooxygenase EtA. ETA has been the focus of several research works, devoted either to the identification of ETA's metabolites or to the development of novel derivatives potentially useful to fight against tuberculosis. In either case, structural analysis of ETA and related structures is of undeniable relevance, while the presence of sulfur in ETA's structure brings about the possibility of including 33S-NMR in the toolbox of structural analysis techniques. In this work, we have engaged into a multinuclear NMR characterization of ETA, through the study of the drug's solubility in seven deuterated solvents, and of the chemical shifts for different nuclei in ETA. Results showed which are the best conditions to study ETA by NMR and provided some important evidence on the low reactivity of the drug's thioamide group, which may be of relevance for future drug derivatization approaches.

  2. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  3. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  4. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  5. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  6. Non-uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  7. Automatic structure determination of regular polysaccharides based solely on NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Magnus; Fontana, Carolina; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-11-14

    The structural analysis of polysaccharides requires that the sugar components and their absolute configurations are determined. We here show that this can be performed based on NMR spectroscopy by utilizing butanolysis with (+)- and (-)-2-butanol that gives the corresponding 2-butyl glycosides with characteristic (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts. The subsequent computer-assisted structural determination by CASPER can then be based solely on NMR data in a fully automatic way as shown and implemented herein. The method is additionally advantageous in that reference data only have to be prepared once and from a user's point of view only the unknown sample has to be derivatized for use in CASPER.

  8. Microscopic structural analysis of fractured silk fibers from Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini using 13C CP/MAS NMR with a 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Shizuo; Takahashi, Rui; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2010-07-01

    Conformational changes have been studied in silk fibers from the domestic silkworm Bombyx mori and a wild silkworm Samia cynthia ricini as a result of fractured by stretching. About 300 samples consisting of only the fractured regions of [1-13C]Ala or [1-13C]Gly labeled silk fibers were collected and observed by 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra. The total amount of these fractured fibers is only about 1mg and therefore we used a home-built 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead. A very small increase in the fraction of random coil was noted for the alanine regions of both silk fibroins and for the glycine region of B. mori silk fibroin. However, there is no difference in the spectra before and after fractured for the glycine region of S. c. ricini silk fibroin. Thus, the influence of fracture occurs exclusively at the Ala region for S. c. ricini. The relationship between sequence, fracture and structure is discussed.

  9. PDBStat: a universal restraint converter and restraint analysis software package for protein NMR.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Roberto; Snyder, David; Mao, Binchen; Aramini, James M; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2013-08-01

    The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data.

  10. Structure simulation with calculated NMR parameters - integrating COSMOS into the CCPN framework.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Olaf; Fogh, Rasmus H; Sternberg, Ulrich; Klenin, Konstantin; Kondov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Collaborative Computing Project for NMR (CCPN) has build a software framework consisting of the CCPN data model (with APIs) for NMR related data, the CcpNmr Analysis program and additional tools like CcpNmr FormatConverter. The open architecture allows for the integration of external software to extend the abilities of the CCPN framework with additional calculation methods. Recently, we have carried out the first steps for integrating our software Computer Simulation of Molecular Structures (COSMOS) into the CCPN framework. The COSMOS-NMR force field unites quantum chemical routines for the calculation of molecular properties with a molecular mechanics force field yielding the relative molecular energies. COSMOS-NMR allows introducing NMR parameters as constraints into molecular mechanics calculations. The resulting infrastructure will be made available for the NMR community. As a first application we have tested the evaluation of calculated protein structures using COSMOS-derived 13C Cα and Cβ chemical shifts. In this paper we give an overview of the methodology and a roadmap for future developments and applications.

  11. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant.

  12. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  13. COCO: a simple tool to enrich the representation of conformational variability in NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Charles A; Orozco, Modesto; Vranken, Wim

    2009-04-01

    NMR structures are typically deposited in databases such as the PDB in the form of an ensemble of structures. Generally, each of the models in such an ensemble satisfies the experimental data and is equally valid. No unique solution can be calculated because the experimental NMR data is insufficient, in part because it reflects the conformational variability and dynamical behavior of the molecule in solution. Even for relatively rigid molecules, the limited number of structures that are typically deposited cannot completely encompass the structural diversity allowed by the observed NMR data, but they can be chosen to try and maximize its representation. We describe here the adaptation and application of techniques more commonly used to examine large ensembles from molecular dynamics simulations, to the analysis of NMR ensembles. The approach, which is based on principal component analysis, we call COCO ("Complementary Coordinates"). The COCO approach analyses the distribution of an NMR ensemble in conformational space, and generates a new ensemble that fills "gaps" in the distribution. The method is very rapid, and analysis of a 25-member ensemble and generation of a new 25 member ensemble typically takes 1-2 min on a conventional workstation. Applied to the 545 structures in the RECOORD database, we find that COCO generates new ensembles that are as structurally diverse-both from each other and from the original ensemble-as are the structures within the original ensemble. The COCO approach does not explicitly take into account the NMR restraint data, yet in tests on selected structures from the RECOORD database, the COCO ensembles are frequently good matches to this data, and certainly are structures that can be rapidly refined against the restraints to yield high-quality, novel solutions. COCO should therefore be a useful aid in NMR structure refinement and in other situations where a richer representation of conformational variability is desired-for example in

  14. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  15. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-05

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication.

  16. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  17. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  18. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  19. Interplay between structure and dynamics in chitosan films investigated with solid-state NMR, dynamic mechanical analysis, and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Carmiña; López, Betty Lucy; Sierra, Ligia; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Gaborieau, Marianne

    2011-04-11

    Modern solid-state NMR techniques, combined with X-ray diffraction, revealed the molecular origin of the difference in mechanical properties of self-associated chitosan films. Films cast from acidic aqueous solutions were compared before and after neutralization, and the role of the counterion (acetate vs Cl(-)) was investigated. There is a competition between local structure and long-range order. Hydrogen bonding gives good mechanical strength to neutralized films, which lack long-range organization. The long-range structure is better defined in films cast from acidic solutions in which strong electrostatic interactions cause rotational distortion around the chitosan chains. Plasticization by acetate counterions enhances long-range molecular organization and film flexibility. In contrast, Cl(-) counterions act as a defect and impair the long-range organization by immobilizing hydration water. Molecular motion and proton exchange are restricted, resulting in brittle films despite the high moisture content.

  20. Fe57 NMR and spin structure of manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánková, H.; Sedlák, B.; Chlan, V.; Novák, P.; Šimša, Z.

    2008-03-01

    NMR of Fe57 in five MnFe2O4 single crystals with different degrees of inversion was measured in liquid He temperature. At the zero external field, two lines originating from Fe3+ ions on the octahedral sites are observed at 68.7 and 71.1MHz , while the line at 72.0MHz , the amplitude of which increases with increasing inversion, is ascribed to Fe3+ ions on the tetrahedral sites. Measurement in the external field shows that the spin structure is in accord with the Goodenough-Kanamori rules. This contradicts to an abnormal spin structure which Shim [Phys. Rev. B 75, 134406 (2007)] proposed recently on the basis of Fe57 NMR measured in polycrystalline manganese ferrite. Reinterpretation of the NMR in polycrystalline compounds is given.

  1. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  2. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Karabacak, M.; Nagabalasubramanian, P. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Periandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule.

  3. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Atac, A; Karabacak, M; Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Asiri, A M; Periandy, S

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule.

  4. On-line NMR detection of microgram quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides and their structure elucidation by microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Korir, Albert K; Larive, Cynthia K

    2007-08-01

    The isolation and purification of sufficient quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides for characterization by NMR is a tedious and time-consuming process. In addition, the structural complexity and microheterogeneity of heparin makes its characterization a challenging task. The improved mass-sensitivity of microcoil NMR probe technology makes this technique well suited for characterization of mass-limited heparin-derived oligosaccharides. Although microcoil probes have poorer concentration sensitivity than conventional NMR probes, this limitation can be overcome by coupling capillary isotachophoresis (cITP) with on-line microcoil NMR detection (cITP-NMR). Strategies to improve the sensitivity of on-line NMR detection through changes in probe design and in the cITP-NMR experimental protocol are discussed. These improvements in sensitivity allow acquisition of cITP-NMR survey spectra facilitating tentative identification of unknown oligosaccharides. Complete structure elucidation for microgram quantities of the purified material can be carried out through acquisition of 2D NMR spectra using a CapNMR microcoil probe.

  5. SPINS: a laboratory information management system for organizing and archiving intermediate and final results from NMR protein structure determinations.

    PubMed

    Baran, Michael C; Moseley, Hunter N B; Aramini, James M; Bayro, Marvin J; Monleon, Daniel; Locke, Jessica Y; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-03-01

    Recent technological advances and experimental techniques have contributed to an increasing number and size of NMR datasets. In order to scale up productivity, laboratory information management systems for handling these extensive data need to be designed and implemented. The SPINS (Standardized ProteIn Nmr Storage) Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) addresses these needs by providing an interface for archival of complete protein NMR structure determinations, together with functionality for depositing these data to the public BioMagResBank (BMRB). The software tracks intermediate files during each step of an NMR structure-determination process, including: data collection, data processing, resonance assignments, resonance assignment validation, structure calculation, and structure validation. The underlying SPINS data dictionary allows for the integration of various third party NMR data processing and analysis software, enabling users to launch programs they are accustomed to using for each step of the structure determination process directly out of the SPINS user interface.

  6. Improving the quality of protein structures derived by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Christian A E M; Linge, Jens P; Hilbers, Cornelis W; Vuister, Geerten W

    2002-03-01

    Biomolecular structures provide the basis for many studies in several research areas such as homology modelling, structure-based drug design and functional genomics. It is an important prerequisite that the structure is reliable in terms of accurate description of the experimental data, and in terms of good quality of local- and overall geometry. Recent surveys indicate that structures solved by NMR-spectroscopy normally are of lower precision than high-resolution X-ray structures. Here, we present a refinement protocol that improves the quality of protein structures determined by NMR-spectroscopy to the level of those determined by high resolution X-ray crystallography in terms of local geometry. The protocol was tested on experimental data of the proteins IL4 and Ubiquitin and on simulated data of the protein Crambin. In almost all aspects, the protocol yielded better results in terms of accuracy and precision. Independent validation of the results for Ubiquitin, using residual dipolar couplings, indicates that the ensemble of NMR structure is substantially improved by the protocol.

  7. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-02-06

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  8. A community resource of experimental data for NMR / X-ray crystal structure pairs.

    PubMed

    Everett, John K; Tejero, Roberto; Murthy, Sarath B K; Acton, Thomas B; Aramini, James M; Baran, Michael C; Benach, Jordi; Cort, John R; Eletsky, Alexander; Forouhar, Farhad; Guan, Rongjin; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Gaohua; Mani, Rajeswari; Mao, Binchen; Mills, Jeffrey L; Montelione, Alexander F; Pederson, Kari; Powers, Robert; Ramelot, Theresa; Rossi, Paolo; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Snyder, David; Swapna, G V T; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Wu, Yibing; Xiao, Rong; Yang, Yunhuang; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hunt, John F; Kennedy, Michael A; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. The NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has provided many valuable reagents, 3D structures, and technologies for structural biology. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium was one of several PSI centers. NESG used both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for protein structure determination. A key goal of the PSI was to provide experimental structures for at least one representative of each of hundreds of targeted protein domain families. In some cases, structures for identical (or nearly identical) constructs were determined by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data for 41 of these "NMR / X-ray" structure pairs determined using conventional triple-resonance NMR methods with extensive sidechain resonance assignments have been organized in an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. In addition, several NMR data sets for perdeuterated, methyl-protonated protein samples are included in this repository. As an example of the utility of this repository, these data were used to revisit questions about the precision and accuracy of protein NMR structures first outlined by Levy and coworkers several years ago (Andrec et al., Proteins 2007;69:449-465). These results demonstrate that the agreement between NMR and X-ray crystal structures is improved using modern methods of protein NMR spectroscopy. The NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository will provide a valuable resource for new computational NMR methods development.

  9. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 10, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    In the present quarter, results from {sup 129}Xe NMR experiments were made available that allowed the determination of the mean free path of a Xenon molecule within the pores of the material. The chemical shift at various loadings of Xenon was determined and the shift at zero loading was obtained by extrapolating the data to zero pressure. At zero loading, the collisions suffered by a Xenon molecule can be regarded as being entirely with the pore walls, since the concentration of Xenon molecules in the system is very low. Thus, the mean free path {lambda} is a measure of the distance travelled by a Xenon molecule before colliding with a wall, and hence is also a measure of the pore dimension. SAXS data reported in previous quarters gave the average radius of gyration R{sub g} which is also a measure of the average dimension of the pores of the material. In addition, application of the potential theory to the CO{sub 2} (274 K) adsorption data allowed the determination of a characteristic adsorption potential E, which is inversely proportional to the width of the pore. Thus, E should correlate inversely with the mean free path {lambda} as determined using {sup 129}Xe NMR. Also, E should correlate inversely with the radius of gyration R{sub g} from SAXS experiments. Another parameter obtained by analysis of the CO{sub 2} (274 K) adsorption data is the exponent n in the Dubinin-Astakhov equation. We had shown in previous quarters that this is a measure of the heterogeneity of the material.

  10. Analysis of bacterial biofilms using NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Powers, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Infectious diseases can be difficult to cure, especially if the pathogen forms a biofilm. After decades of extensive research into the morphology, physiology and genomics of biofilm formation, attention has recently been directed toward the analysis of the cellular metabolome in order to understand the transformation of a planktonic cell to a biofilm. Metabolomics can play an invaluable role in enhancing our understanding of the underlying biological processes related to the structure, formation and antibiotic resistance of biofilms. A systematic view of metabolic pathways or processes responsible for regulating this 'social structure' of microorganisms may provide critical insights into biofilm-related drug resistance and lead to novel treatments. This review will discuss the development of NMR-based metabolomics as a technology to study medically relevant biofilms. Recent advancements from case studies reviewed in this manuscript have shown the potential of metabolomics to shed light on numerous biological problems related to biofilms.

  11. High-Throughput NMR Assessment of the Tertiary Structure of Food Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, Stefano; Sancho, Ana; Vieths, Stefan; Mills, Clare E. N.; Wal, Jean-Michel; Shewry, Peter R.; Rigby, Neil; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Background In vitro component-resolved diagnosis of food allergy requires purified allergens that have to meet high standards of quality. These include the authentication of their conformation, which is relevant for the recognition by specific IgE antibodies from allergic patients. Therefore, highly sensitive and reliable screening methods for the analysis of proteins/allergens are required to assess their structural integrity. In the present study one-dimensional 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1D 1H-NMR) analysis was adopted for the assessment of overall structural and dynamic properties and authentication of a set of relevant food allergens, including non-specific lipid transfer proteins from apple, peach and hazelnut, 7/8S seed storage globulins from hazelnut and peanut, 11S seed storage globulins from hazelnut and peanut, caseins from cows' and goats' milk and tropomyosin from shrimp. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sets of 1D 1H-NMR experiments, using 700 MHz and 600 MHz instruments at 298 K were carried out to determine the presence and the extent of tertiary structure. Structural similarity among members of the individual allergen families was also assessed and changes under thermal stress investigated. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results were compared with structural information available either from the literature, Protein Data Bank entries, or derived from molecular models. Conclusions/Significance 1D 1H-NMR analysis of food allergens allowed their classification into molecules with rigid, extended and ordered tertiary structures, molecules without a rigid tertiary structure and molecules which displayed both features. Differences in thermal stability were also detected. In summary, 1D 1H-NMR gives insights into molecular fold of proteins and offers an independent method for assessing structural properties of proteins. PMID:22768312

  12. Metabolite analysis of Cannabis sativa L. by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics is an analytical platform, which has been used to classify and analyze Cannabis sativa L. cell suspension cultures and plants. Diverse groups of primary and secondary metabolites were identified by comparing NMR data with reference compounds and/or by structure elucidation using ¹H-NMR, J-resolved, ¹H-¹H COSY, and ¹H-¹³C HMBC spectroscopy. The direct extraction and the extraction by indirect fractionation are two suitable methods for the C. sativa sample preparation. Quantitative analyses could be performed without requiring fractionation or isolation procedures.

  13. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  14. NMR structure of bucandin, a neurotoxin from the venom of the Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus).

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A M; Kini, R M; Selvanayagam, N; Kuchel, P W

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution solution structure of bucandin, a neurotoxin from Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus), was determined by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The average backbone root-mean-square deviation for the 20 calculated structures and the mean structure is 0.47 A (1 A=0.1 nm) for all residues and 0.24 A for the well-defined region that spans residues 23-58. Secondary-structural elements include two antiparallel beta-sheets characterized by two and four strands. According to recent X-ray analysis, bucandin adopts a typical three-finger loop motif and yet it has some peculiar characteristics that set it apart from other common alpha-neurotoxins. The presence of a fourth strand in the second antiparallel beta-sheet had not been observed before in three-finger toxins, and this feature was well represented in the NMR structure. Although the overall fold of the NMR structure is similar to that of the X-ray crystal structure, there are significant differences between the two structures that have implications for the pharmacological action of the toxin. These include the extent of the beta-sheets, the conformation of the region spanning residues 42-49 and the orientation of some side chains. In comparison with the X-ray structure, the NMR structure shows that the hydrophobic side chains of Trp(27) and Trp(36) are stacked together and are orientated towards the tip of the middle loop. The NMR study also showed that the two-stranded beta-sheet incorporated in the first loop, as defined by residues 1-22, and the C-terminus from Asn(59), is probably flexible relative to the rest of the molecule. On the basis of the dispositions of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic side chains, the structure of bucandin is clearly different from those of cytotoxins. PMID:11736642

  15. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  16. Broadband homonuclear correlation spectroscopy driven by combined R2(n)(v) sequences under fast magic angle spinning for NMR structural analysis of organic and biological solids.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-07-01

    We recently described a family of experiments for R2n(v) Driven Spin Diffusion (RDSD) spectroscopy suitable for homonuclear correlation experiments under fast MAS conditions [G. Hou, S. Yan, S.J. Sun, Y. Han, I.J. Byeon, J. Ahn, J. Concel, A. Samoson, A.M. Gronenborn, T. Polenova, Spin diffusion drive by R-symmetry sequencs: applications to homonuclear correlation spectroscopy in MAS NMR of biological and organic solids, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 (2011) 3943-3953]. In these RDSD experiments, since the broadened second-order rotational resonance conditions are dominated by the radio frequency field strength and the phase shifts, as well as the size of reintroduced dipolar couplings, the different R2n(v) sequences display unique polarization transfer behaviors and different recoupling frequency bandwidths. Herein, we present a series of modified R2n(v) sequences, dubbed COmbined R2n(v)-Driven (CORD), that yield broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling and give rise to uniform distribution of cross peak intensities across the entire correlation spectrum. We report NMR experiments and numerical simulations demonstrating that these CORD spin diffusion sequences are suitable for broadband recoupling at a wide range of magnetic fields and MAS frequencies, including fast-MAS conditions (νr=40 kHz and above). Since these CORD sequences are largely insensitive to dipolar truncation, they are well suited for the determination of long-range distance constraints, which are indispensable for the structural characterization of a broad range of systems. Using U-(13)C,(15)N-alanine and U-(13)C,(15)N-histidine, we show that under fast-MAS conditions, the CORD sequences display polarization transfer efficiencies within broadband frequency regions that are generally higher than those offered by other existing spin diffusion pulse schemes. A 89-residue U-(13)C,(15)N-dynein light chain (LC8) protein has also been used to demonstrate that the CORD sequences exhibit uniformly high cross peak

  17. NMR structural study of the prototropic equilibrium in solution of Schiff bases as model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortegón-Reyna, David; Garcías-Morales, Cesar; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia; García-Báez, Efren; Aríza-Castolo, Armando; Peraza-Campos, Ana; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco

    2013-12-31

    An NMR titration method has been used to simultaneously measure the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and the intramolecular NHO prototropic constant ΔKNHO on a set of Schiff bases. The model compounds were synthesized from benzylamine and substituted ortho-hydroxyaldehydes, appropriately substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups to modulate the acidity of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond. The structure in solution was established by 1H-, 13C- and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The physicochemical parameters of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond (pKa, ΔKNHO and ΔΔG°) were obtained from 1H-NMR titration data and pH measurements. The Henderson-Hasselbalch data analysis indicated that the systems are weakly acidic, and the predominant NHO equilibrium was established using Polster-Lachmann δ-diagram analysis and Perrin model data linearization.

  18. Error analysis for NMR polymer microstructure measurement without calibration standards.

    PubMed

    Qiu, XiaoHua; Zhou, Zhe; Gobbi, Gian; Redwine, Oscar D

    2009-10-15

    We report an error analysis method for primary analytical methods in the absence of calibration standards. Quantitative (13)C NMR analysis of ethylene/1-octene (E/O) copolymers is given as an example. Because the method is based on a self-calibration scheme established by counting, it is a measure of accuracy rather than precision. We demonstrate it is self-consistent and neither underestimate nor excessively overestimate the experimental errors. We also show the method identified previously unknown systematic biases in a NMR instrument. The method can eliminate unnecessary data averaging to save valuable NMR resources. The accuracy estimate proposed is not unique to (13)C NMR spectroscopy of E/O but should be applicable to all other measurement systems where the accuracy of a subset of the measured responses can be established.

  19. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR.

  20. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  1. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  2. A facile method for expression and purification of 15N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Tara; Ball, K. Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with 15N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the 15N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼6 mg/L culture for 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and 1H–15N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with 15N and 13C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  3. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  4. (17)O NMR Investigation of Water Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Eric G; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-18

    The structure and dynamics of the bound water in barium chlorate monohydrate were studied with (17)O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in samples that are stationary and spinning at the magic-angle in magnetic fields ranging from 14.1 to 21.1 T. (17)O NMR parameters of the water were determined, and the effects of torsional oscillations of the water molecule on the (17)O quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) were delineated with variable temperature MAS NMR. With decreasing temperature and reduction of the librational motion, we observe an increase in the experimentally measured CQ explaining the discrepancy between experiments and predictions from density functional theory. In addition, at low temperatures and in the absence of (1)H decoupling, we observe a well-resolved (1)H-(17)O dipole splitting in the spectra, which provides information on the structure of the H2O molecule. The splitting arises because of the homogeneous nature of the coupling between the two (1)H-(17)O dipoles and the (1)H-(1)H dipole.

  5. Understanding NMR Multiplet Structure with WinDNMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampos, N.; Vidal-Ferran, A.

    2000-01-01

    Interpreting the information encoded in the structure of a multiplet representing a nucleus (e.g., a proton) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows us to construct a detailed picture of the molecule to which the nucleus belongs. To gain this understanding, we can employ interactive, user-friendly software packages (such as WinDNMR) on a conventional personal computer to investigate the effect of changing the constituent coupling constants on the appearance of a multiplet. As an example, a multiplet representing a proton coupled to three neighboring environments (four-spin system) is treated in detail. Exercises similar to those presented in this work could be incorporated into a practical component of a course dealing with the basic theoretical concepts of one-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

  6. NMR and structural features of noble-metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Gabuda, S.P.; Zemskov, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    NMR studies are reported on the structures of binary and other noble-metal fluorides. Revised measurements have been made on /sup 19/F chemical shifts and the anisotropy in them. A relationship is considered between the screening tensor for /sup 19/F and the electronic structure of the molecule or ion containing the noble-metal cation in the electronic configuration d/sup 6/, d/sup 8/, or d/sup 10/. The observed anomalous shifts in this class of compound are explained qualitatively in terms of paired electrons in filled d shells affecting the result within the framework of the classical theory of magnetic nuclear screening.

  7. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  8. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  9. Probing the surface structure of divalent transition metals using surface specific solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mason, Harris E; Harley, Stephen J; Maxwell, Robert S; Carroll, Susan A

    2012-03-06

    Environmental and geochemical systems containing paramagnetic species could benefit by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy due to the sensitivity of the spectral response to small amounts paramagnetic interactions. In this study, we apply commonly used solid-state NMR spectroscopic methods combined with chemometrics analysis to probe sorption behavior of the paramagnetic cations Cu(2+) and Ni(2+)at the amorphous silica surface. We exploit the unique properties of paramagnets to derive meaningful structural information in these systems at low, environmentally relevant cation surface loadings by comparing the NMR response of sorption samples to paramagnetic free samples. These data suggest that a simple sorption model where the cation sorbs as inner sphere complexes at negatively charged, deprotonated silanol sites is appropriate. These results help constrain sorption models that are used to describe metal fate and transport.

  10. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Erin E; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce, Kimberly L; Pines, Alexander

    2005-12-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information-rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity, using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  11. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  12. Clathrate Structure Determination by Combining Crystal Structure Prediction with Computational and Experimental (129) Xe NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selent, Marcin; Nyman, Jonas; Roukala, Juho; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Bygrave, Peter J; Laitinen, Risto; Jokisaari, Jukka; Day, Graeme M; Lantto, Perttu

    2017-01-23

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of clathrates using NMR spectroscopy of enclathrated xenon to select from a set of predicted crystal structures. Crystal structure prediction methods have been used to generate an ensemble of putative structures of o- and m-fluorophenol, whose previously unknown clathrate structures have been studied by (129) Xe NMR spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of the (129) Xe chemical shift tensor to the chemical environment and shape of the crystalline cavity makes it ideal as a probe for porous materials. The experimental powder NMR spectra can be used to directly confirm or reject hypothetical crystal structures generated by computational prediction, whose chemical shift tensors have been simulated using density functional theory. For each fluorophenol isomer one predicted crystal structure was found, whose measured and computed chemical shift tensors agree within experimental and computational error margins and these are thus proposed as the true fluorophenol xenon clathrate structures.

  13. NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shulei; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are linked to PD pathogenesis, its etiology and pathology remain to be elucidated. Metabolomics investigates metabolite changes in biofluids, cell lysates, tissues and tumors in order to correlate these metabolomic changes to a disease state. Thus, the application of metabolomics to investigate PD provides a systematic approach to understand the pathology of PD, to identify disease biomarkers, and to complement genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics studies. This review will examine current research into PD mechanisms with a focus on mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Neurotoxin-based PD animal models and the rationale for metabolomics studies in PD will also be discussed. The review will also explore the potential of NMR metabolomics to address important issues related to PD treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26078917

  14. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of STD-NMR Spectra of Reversibly Forming Ligand-Receptor Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N. Rama; Jayalakshmi, V.

    We describe our work on the quantitative analysis of STD-NMR spectra of reversibly forming ligand-receptor complexes. This analysis is based on the theory of complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix analysis of saturation transfer (CORCEMA-ST) effects. As part of this work, we have developed two separate versions of the CORCEMA-ST program. The first version predicts the expected STD intensities for a given model of a ligand-protein complex, and compares them quantitatively with the experimental data. This version is very useful for rapidly determining if a model for a given ligand-protein complex is compatible with the STD-NMR data obtained in solution. It is also useful in determining the optimal experimental conditions for undertaking the STD-NMR measurements on a given complex by computer simulations. In the second version of the CORCEMA-ST program, we have implemented a torsion angle refinement feature for the bound ligand within the protein binding pocket. In this approach, the global minimum for the bound ligand conformation is obtained by a hybrid structure refinement protocol involving CORCEMA-ST calculation of intensities and simulated annealing refinement of torsion angles of the bound ligand using STD-NMR intensities as experimental constraints to minimize a pseudo-energy function. This procedure is useful in refining and improving the initial models based on crystallography, computer docking, or other procedures to generate models for the bound ligand within the protein binding pocket compatible with solution STD-NMR data. In this chapter we describe the properties of the STD-NMR spectra, including the dependence of the intensities on various parameters. We also describe the results of the CORCEMA-ST analyses of experimental STD-NMR data on some ligand-protein complexes to illustrate the quantitative analysis of the data using this method. This CORCEMA-ST program is likely to be useful in structure-based drug design efforts.

  16. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  17. NMR-based analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Cala, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Physiological processes are mainly controlled by intermolecular recognition mechanisms involving protein-protein and protein-ligand (low molecular weight molecules) interactions. One of the most important tools for probing these interactions is high-field solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through protein-observed and ligand-observed experiments, where the protein receptor or the organic compounds are selectively detected. NMR binding experiments rely on comparison of NMR parameters of the free and bound states of the molecules. Ligand-observed methods are not limited by the protein molecular size and therefore have great applicability for analysing protein-ligand interactions. The use of these NMR techniques has considerably expanded in recent years, both in chemical biology and in drug discovery. We review here three major ligand-observed NMR methods that depend on the nuclear Overhauser effect-transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference spectroscopy and water-ligand interactions observed via gradient spectroscopy experiments-with the aim of reporting recent developments and applications for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes, including affinity measurements and structural determination.

  18. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  19. Understanding the NMR properties and conformational behavior of indole vs. azaindole group in protoberberines: NICS and NCS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Shivaji S.; Toušek, Jaromír; Maier, Lukáš; Pipíška, Matej; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2012-11-01

    We report here the preparation and the structural investigation into a series of 8-(indol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberine derivatives derived from berberine, palmatine, and coptisine. Structures of these new compounds were characterized mainly by 2D NMR spectroscopy and the conformational behavior was investigated by using methods of density-functional theory (DFT). PBE0/6-311+G** calculated NMR chemical shifts for selected derivatives correlate excellently with the experimental NMR data and support the structural conclusions drawn from the NMR experiments. An interesting role of the nitrogen atom in position N7' of the indole moiety in 8-(7-azaindol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberines as compared to other 8-indolyl derivatives is investigated in detail. The experimentally observed trends in NMR chemical shifts are rationalized by DFT calculations and analysis based on the nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs).

  20. Computer compensation for NMR quantitative analysis of trace components

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-07-22

    A computer program has been written that determines trace components and separates overlapping components in multicomponent NMR spectra. This program uses the Lorentzian curve as a theoretical curve of NMR spectra. The coefficients of the Lorentzian are determined by the method of least squares. Systematic errors such as baseline/phase distortion are compensated and random errors are smoothed by taking moving averages, so that there processes contribute substantially to decreasing the accumulation time of spectral data. The accuracy of quantitative analysis of trace components has been improved by two significant figures. This program was applied to determining the abundance of 13C and the saponification degree of PVA.

  1. Synthesis and NMR Spectral Analysis of Amine Heterocycles: The Effect of Asymmetry on the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra of N,O-Acetals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Shahrokh; Ciaccio, James A.; Espinal, Jennifer; Aman, Courtney E.

    2007-01-01

    The stereochemical investigation is conducted to give students the combined experience of chemical synthesis of amines and N-heterocycles and structural stereochemical analysis using NMR spectroscopy. Students are introduced to the concept of topicity-stereochemical relationships between ligands within a molecule by synthesizing N,O-acetals.

  2. The elusive structure of Pd2(dba)3. Examination by isotopic labeling, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis: synthesis and characterization of Pd2(dba-Z)3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Kapdi, Anant R; Whitwood, Adrian C; Williamson, David C; Lynam, Jason M; Burns, Michael J; Williams, Thomas J; Reay, Alan J; Holmes, Jordan; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2013-06-05

    Pd(0)2(dba)3 (dba = E,E-dibenzylidene acetone) is the most widely used Pd(0) source in Pd-mediated transformations. Pd(0)2(dba-Z)3 (Z = dba aryl substituents) complexes exhibit remarkable and differential catalytic performance in an eclectic array of cross-coupling reactions. The precise structure of these types of complexes has been confounding, since early studies in 1970s to the present day. In this study the solution and solid-state structures of Pd(0)2(dba)3 and Pd(0)2(dba-Z)3 have been determined. Isotopic labeling ((2)H and (13)C) has allowed the solution structures of the freely exchanging major and minor isomers of Pd(0)2(dba)3 to be determined at high field (700 MHz). DFT calculations support the experimentally determined major and minor isomeric structures, which show that the major isomer of Pd(0)2(dba)3 possesses bridging dba ligands found exclusively in a s-cis,s-trans conformation. For the minor isomer one of the dba ligands is found exclusively in a s-trans,s-trans conformation. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of Pd(0)2(dba)3·CHCl3 (high-quality data) shows that all three dba ligands are found over two positions. NMR spectroscopic analysis of Pd(0)2(dba-Z)3 reveals that the aryl substituent has a profound effect on the rate of Pd-olefin exchange and the global stability of the complexes in solution. Complexes containing the aryl substituents, 4-CF3, 4-F, 4-t-Bu, 4-hexoxy, 4-OMe, exhibit well-resolved (1)H NMR spectra at 298 K, whereas those containing 3,5-OMe and 3,4,5-OMe exhibit broad spectra. The solid-state structures of three Pd(0)2(dba-Z)3 complexes (4-F, 4-OMe, 3,5-OMe) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods, which have been compared with Goodson's X-ray structure of Pd(0)2(dba-4-OH)3.

  3. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael; Pedrini, Bill; Herrmann, Torsten; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90% of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 hours. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination. PMID:25428764

  4. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  5. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  6. Protein NMR structures refined with Rosetta have higher accuracy relative to corresponding X-ray crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Binchen; Tejero, Roberto; Baker, David; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-02-05

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5-22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10-25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function.

  7. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed.

  8. Structural investigation of aluminium doped ZnO nanoparticles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Avadhut, Yamini S; Weber, Johannes; Hammarberg, Elin; Feldmann, Claus; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2012-09-07

    The electrical conductivity of aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO, ZnO:Al) materials depends on doping induced defects and grain structure. This study aims at relating macroscopic electrical conductivity of AZO nanoparticles with their atomic structure, which is non-trivial because the derived materials are heavily disordered and heterogeneous in nature. For this purpose we synthesized AZO nanoparticles with different doping levels and narrow size distribution by a microwave assisted polyol method followed by drying and a reductive treatment with forming gas. From these particles electrically conductive, optically transparent films were obtained by spin-coating. Characterization involved energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which provided a basis for a detailed structural solid-state NMR study. A multinuclear ((27)Al, (13)C, (1)H) spectroscopic investigation required a number of 1D MAS NMR and 2D MAS NMR techniques (T(1)-measurements, (27)Al-MQMAS, (27)Al-(1)H 2D-PRESTO-III heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy), which were corroborated by quantum chemical calculations with an embedded cluster method (EEIM) at the DFT level. From the combined data we conclude that only a small part of the provided Al is incorporated into the ZnO structure by substitution of Zn. The related (27)Al NMR signal undergoes a Knight shift when the material is subjected to a reductive treatment with forming gas. At higher (formal) doping levels Al forms insulating (Al, H and C containing) side-phases, which cover the surface of the ZnO:Al particles and increase the sheet resistivity of spin-coated material. Moreover, calculated (27)Al quadrupole coupling constants serve as a spectroscopic fingerprint by which previously suggested point-defects can be identified and in their great majority be ruled out.

  9. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400 cm-1 and 3500-50 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The 1H, 13C and HMQC (1H-13C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400 nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement.

  10. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400cm(-1) and 3500-50cm(-1), respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The (1)H, (13)C and HMQC ((1)H-(13)C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement.

  11. Structural difference between group I and group II cobra cardiotoxins: X-ray, NMR, and CD analysis of the effect of cis-proline conformation on three-fingered toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Shou; Chung, Fong-Yu; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Goh, King-Siang; Huang, Wei-Ning; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Po-Long; Lin, Hua-Ching; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2005-05-24

    Natural homologues of cobra cardiotoxins (CTXs) were classified into two structural subclasses of group I and II based on the amino acid sequence and circular dichroism analysis, but the exact differences in their three-dimensional structures and biological significance remain elusive. We show by circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic analyses of a newly purified group I CTX A6 from eastern Taiwan cobra (Naja atra) venoms that its loop I conformation adopts a type VIa turn with a cis peptide bond located between two proline residues of PPxY. A similar "banana-twisted" conformation can be observed in other group I CTXs and also in cyclolinopeptide A and its analogues. By binding to the membrane environment, group I CTX undergoes a conformational change to adopt a more extended hydrophobic domain with beta-sheet twisting closer to the one adopted by group II CTX. This result resolves a discrepancy in the CTX structural difference reported previously between solution as well as crystal state and shows that, in addition to the hydrophobicity, the exact loop I conformation also plays an important role in CTX-membrane interaction. Potential protein targets of group I CTXs after cell internalization are also discussed on the basis of the determined loop I conformation.

  12. Human- and computer-accessible 2D correlation data for a more reliable structure determination of organic compounds. Future roles of researchers, software developers, spectrometer managers, journal editors, reviewers, publisher and database managers toward artificial-intelligence analysis of NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Jeannerat, Damien

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of a universal data format to report the correlation data of 2D NMR spectra such as COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra will have a large impact on the reliability of structure determination of small organic molecules. These lists of assigned cross peaks will bridge signals found in NMR 1D and 2D spectra and the assigned chemical structure. The record could be very compact, human and computer readable so that it can be included in the supplementary material of publications and easily transferred into databases of scientific literature and chemical compounds. The records will allow authors, reviewers and future users to test the consistency and, in favorable situations, the uniqueness of the assignment of the correlation data to the associated chemical structures. Ideally, the data format of the correlation data should include direct links to the NMR spectra to make it possible to validate their reliability and allow direct comparison of spectra. In order to take the full benefits of their potential, the correlation data and the NMR spectra should therefore follow any manuscript in the review process and be stored in open-access database after publication. Keeping all NMR spectra, correlation data and assigned structures together at all time will allow the future development of validation tools increasing the reliability of past and future NMR data. This will facilitate the development of artificial intelligence analysis of NMR spectra by providing a source of data than can be used efficiently because they have been validated or can be validated by future users. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  14. Prion protein NMR structures of chickens, turtles, and frogs

    PubMed Central

    Calzolai, Luigi; Lysek, Dominikus A.; Pérez, Daniel R.; Güntert, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The NMR structures of the recombinant prion proteins from chicken (Gallus gallus; chPrP), the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta; tPrP), and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis; xlPrP) are presented. The amino acid sequences of these prion proteins show ≈30% identity with mammalian prion proteins. All three species form the same molecular architecture as mammalian PrPC, with a long, flexibly disordered tail attached to the N-terminal end of a globular domain. The globular domain in chPrP and tPrP contains three α-helices, one short 310-helix, and a short antiparallel β-sheet. In xlPrP, the globular domain includes three α-helices and a somewhat longer β-sheet than in the other species. The spatial arrangement of these regular secondary structures coincides closely with that of the globular domain in mammalian prion proteins. Based on the low sequence identity to mammalian PrPs, comparison of chPrP, tPrP, and xlPrP with mammalian PrPC structures is used to identify a set of essential amino acid positions for the preservation of the same PrPC fold in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. There are additional conserved residues without apparent structural roles, which are of interest for the ongoing search for physiological functions of PrPC in healthy organisms. PMID:15647366

  15. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  16. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  17. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant N-Terminally Pyroglutamate-Modified Amyloid-β Variants and Structural Analysis by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dammers, Christina; Gremer, Lothar; Neudecker, Philipp; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Schwarten, Melanie; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by memory loss and cognitive decline. Pathological hallmark of AD brains are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques. The major component of these plaques is the highly heterogeneous amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, varying in length and modification. In recent years pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-β (pEAβ) peptides have increasingly moved into the focus since they have been described to be the predominant species of all N-terminally truncated Aβ. Compared to unmodified Aβ, pEAβ is known to show increased hydrophobicity, higher toxicity, faster aggregation and β-sheet stabilization and is more resistant to degradation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly powerful method to investigate the conformations of pEAβ isoforms in solution and to study peptide/ligand interactions for drug development. However, biophysical characterization of pEAβ and comparison to its non-modified variant has so far been seriously hampered by the lack of highly pure recombinant and isotope-enriched protein. Here we present, to our knowledge, for the first time a reproducible protocol for the production of pEAβ from a recombinant precursor expressed in E. coli in natural isotope abundance as well as in uniformly [U-15N]- or [U-13C, 15N]-labeled form, with yields of up to 15 mg/l E. coli culture broth. The chemical state of the purified protein was evaluated by RP-HPLC and formation of pyroglutamate was verified by mass spectroscopy. The recombinant pyroglutamate-modified Aβ peptides showed characteristic sigmoidal aggregation kinetics as monitored by thioflavin-T assays. The quality and quantity of produced pEAβ40 and pEAβ42 allowed us to perform heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in solution and to sequence-specifically assign the backbone resonances under near-physiological conditions. Our results suggest that the

  18. MQ NMR and SPME analysis of nonlinearity in the degradation of a filled silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Alviso, C T; Berman, E S; Harvey, C A; Maxwell, R S; Wilson, T S; Cohenour, R; Saalwachter, K; Chasse, W

    2008-10-10

    Radiation induced degradation of polymeric materials occurs via numerous, simultaneous, competing chemical reactions. Though degradation is typically found to be linear in adsorbed dose, some silicone materials exhibit non-linear dose dependence due to dose dependent dominant degradation pathways. We have characterized the effects of radiative and thermal degradation on a model filled-PDMS system, Sylgard 184 (commonly used as an electronic encapsulant and in biomedical applications), using traditional mechanical testing, NMR spectroscopy, and sample headspace analysis using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The mechanical data and {sup 1}H spin-echo NMR indicated that radiation exposure leads to predominantly crosslinking over the cumulative dose range studies (0 to 250 kGray) with a rate roughly linear with dose. {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum NMR detected a bimodal distribution in the network structure, as expected by the proposed structure of Sylgard 184. The MQ-NMR further indicated that the radiation induced structural changes were not linear in adsorbed dose and competing chain scission mechanisms contribute more largely to the overall degradation process in the range of 50 -100 kGray (though crosslinking still dominates). The SPME-GC/MS data were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which identified subtle changes in the distributions of degradation products (the cyclic siloxanes and other components of the material) as a function of age that provide insight into the dominant degradation pathways at low and high adsorbed dose.

  19. NMR Structure Note: PHD Domain from Human SHPRH

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Luciana E. F.; Pustovalova, Yulia; Kile, Andrew C.; Pozhidaeva, Alexandra; Cimprich, Karlene A.; Almeida, Fabio C. L.; Bezsonova, Irina; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    SHPRH (SNF2, histone linker, PHD, RING, helicase) is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor, and one of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for Ubc13-Mms2-dependent K63 poly-ubiquitination of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) that promotes error-free DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In contrast to its functional homologues, S. cerevisiae Rad5 and human HLTF (helicase like transcription factor), SHPRH contains a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger embedded in the ‘minor’ insert region of the core helicase-like domain. PHD fingers are often found in proteins involved in chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation, and are generally considered as ‘readers’ of methylation state of histone tails, primarily the lysine 4 (K4) residue of histone H3 (H3K4). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the SHPRH PHD domain and investigate whether this domain is capable of recognizing H3K4 modifications. The domain adopts a canonical PHD-finger fold with a central two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet flanked on both sides by the two interleaved zinc-binding sites. Despite the presence of a subset of aromatic residues characteristic for PHD-fingers that preferentially bind methylated H3K4, NMR titration experiments reveal that SHPRH PHD does not specifically interact with the H3-derived peptides irrespective of K4 methylation. This result suggests that the SHPRH PHD domain might have evolved a different function other than recognizing histone modifications. PMID:23907177

  20. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  1. NMR structure of a gemcitabine-substituted model Okazaki fragment.

    PubMed

    Konerding, David; James, Thomas L; Trump, Eric; Soto, Ana Maria; Marky, Luis A; Gmeiner, William H

    2002-01-22

    Gemcitabine (2'-deoxy-2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine; dFdC) is a potent anticancer drug that exerts cytotoxic activity, in part, through incorporation of the nucleoside triphosphate dFdCTP into DNA and perturbations to DNA-mediated processes. The structure of a model Okazaki fragment containing a single dFdC substitution, [GEM], was determined using NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics to understand structural distortions that may be induced in replicating DNA resulting from dFdC substitution. The electrostatic surface of [GEM] was also computed to determine how the geminal difluoro group of dFdC perturbs DNA electrostatics. The stability of [GEM] was investigated using temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy. dFdC adopted a C3'-endo conformation in [GEM] and decreased the melting temperature of the duplex by 4.3 degrees C. dFdC substitution did not decrease helical stacking among adjacent purines in the DNA duplex region. dFdC substitution substantially altered the electrostatic properties of the model Okazaki fragment, with increased electron density in the vicinity of the geminal difluoro group. The results are consistent with dFdC substitution altering the structural, electrostatic, and thermodynamic properties of DNA and interfering in DNA-mediated processes. Interference in DNA-mediated processes due to dFdC substitution likely contributes to the anticancer activity of dFdC.

  2. Factor analysis of 27Al MAS NMR spectra for identifying nanocrystalline phases in amorphous geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of the large interfacial area. Typically, geopolymers with specifically synthesized nanosized zeolites are a promising material for the sorption of pollutants. The structural characterization of these aluminosilicates, however, continues to be a challenge. To circumvent complications resulting from the amorphous character of the aluminosilicate matrix and from the low concentrations of nanosized crystallites, we have proposed a procedure based on factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra. The capability of the proposed method was tested on geopolymers that exhibited various tendencies to crystallize (i) completely amorphous systems, (ii) X-ray amorphous systems with nanocrystalline phases, and (iii) highly crystalline systems. Although the recorded (27)Al MAS NMR spectra did not show visible differences between the amorphous systems (i) and the geopolymers with the nanocrystalline phase (ii), the applied factor analysis unambiguously distinguished these materials. The samples were separated into the well-defined clusters, and the systems with the evolving crystalline phase were identified even before any crystalline fraction was detected by X-ray powder diffraction. Reliability of the proposed procedure was verified by comparing it with (29)Si MAS NMR spectra. Factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra thus has the ability to reveal spectroscopic features corresponding to the nanocrystalline phases. Because the measurement time of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra is significantly shorter than that of (29)Si MAS NMR data, the proposed procedure is particularly suitable for the analysis of large sets of specifically synthesized geopolymers in which the formation of the limited fractions of nanocrystalline phases is desired.

  3. NMR solution structures of actin depolymerizing factor homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Goroncy, Alexander K; Koshiba, Seizo; Tochio, Naoya; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sato, Manami; Inoue, Makato; Watanabe, Satoru; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Akiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved proteins in nature. Its assembly and disassembly are regulated by many proteins, including the family of actin-depolymerizing factor homology (ADF-H) domains. ADF-H domains can be divided into five classes: ADF/cofilin, glia maturation factor (GMF), coactosin, twinfilin, and Abp1/drebrin. The best-characterized class is ADF/cofilin. The other four classes have drawn much less attention and very few structures have been reported. This study presents the solution NMR structure of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein, the first published structure of a drebrin-like domain (mammalian), and the first published structure of GMF β (mouse). We also determined the structures of mouse GMF γ, the mouse coactosin-like domain and the C-terminal ADF-H domain of mouse twinfilin 1. Although the overall fold of the five domains is similar, some significant differences provide valuable insights into filamentous actin (F-actin) and globular actin (G-actin) binding, including the identification of binding residues on the long central helix. This long helix is stabilized by three or four residues. Notably, the F-actin binding sites of mouse GMF β and GMF γ contain two additional β-strands not seen in other ADF-H structures. The G-actin binding site of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein is absent and distorted in mouse GMF β and GMF γ. PMID:19768801

  4. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  5. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  6. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR) and quantum chemical studies on molecular structure, spectroscopic analysis, NLO, NBO and reactivity descriptors of 3,5-Difluoroaniline.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S K; Srivastava, R; Sachan, A K; Prasad, O; Sinha, L; Asiri, A M; Karabacak, M

    2015-01-25

    Comprehensive investigation of geometrical and electronic structure in ground as well as the first excited state of 3,5-Difluoroaniline (C6H5NF2) was carried out. The experimentally observed spectral data (FT-TR and FT-Raman) of the title compound was compared with the spectral data obtained by DFT/B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular properties like dipole moment, polarizability, first static hyperpolarizability, molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPs), and contour map were calculated to get a better insight of the properties of the title molecule. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied to study stability of the molecule arising from charge delocalization. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as Frontier orbitals and band gap energies were measured by TD-DFT approach. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. Global and local reactivity descriptors were computed to predict reactivity and reactive sites on the molecule. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra by using gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method of studied compound were compared with experimental data obtained. Moreover, the thermodynamic properties were evaluated.

  7. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  8. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  9. Recent advances in computational predictions of NMR parameters for the structure elucidation of carbohydrates: methods and limitations.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2013-11-07

    All living systems are comprised of four fundamental classes of macromolecules--nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates (glycans). Glycans play a unique role of joining three principal hierarchical levels of the living world: (1) the molecular level (pathogenic agents and vaccine recognition by the immune system, metabolic pathways involving saccharides that provide cells with energy, and energy accumulation via photosynthesis); (2) the nanoscale level (cell membrane mechanics, structural support of biomolecules, and the glycosylation of macromolecules); (3) the microscale and macroscale levels (polymeric materials, such as cellulose, starch, glycogen, and biomass). NMR spectroscopy is the most powerful research approach for getting insight into the solution structure and function of carbohydrates at all hierarchical levels, from monosaccharides to oligo- and polysaccharides. Recent progress in computational procedures has opened up novel opportunities to reveal the structural information available in the NMR spectra of saccharides and to advance our understanding of the corresponding biochemical processes. The ability to predict the molecular geometry and NMR parameters is crucial for the elucidation of carbohydrate structures. In the present paper, we review the major NMR spectrum simulation techniques with regard to chemical shifts, coupling constants, relaxation rates and nuclear Overhauser effect prediction applied to the three levels of glycomics. Outstanding development in the related fields of genomics and proteomics has clearly shown that it is the advancement of research tools (automated spectrum analysis, structure elucidation, synthesis, sequencing and amplification) that drives the large challenges in modern science. Combining NMR spectroscopy and the computational analysis of structural information encoded in the NMR spectra reveals a way to the automated elucidation of the structure of carbohydrates.

  10. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  11. NMR Solution Structure, Stability, and Interaction of the Recombinant Bovine Fibrinogen αC-Domain Fragment†

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Robert A.; Tsurupa, Galina; Hantgan, Roy R.; Tjandra, Nico; Medved, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    According to the current hypothesis, in fibrinogen, the COOH-terminal portions of two Aα chains are folded into compact αC-domains that interact intramolecularly with each other and with the central region of the molecule; in fibrin, the αC-domains switch to an intermolecular interaction resulting in αC polymers. In agreement, our recent NMR study identified within the bovine fibrinogen Aα374-538 αC-domain fragment an ordered compact structure including a β-hairpin restricted at the base by a 423–453 disulfide linkage. To establish the complete structure of the αC-domain and to further test the hypothesis, we expressed a shorter αC-fragment, Aα406-483, and performed detailed analysis of its structure, stability, and interactions. NMR experiments on the Aα406-483 fragment identified a second loose β-hairpin formed by residues 459–476, yielding a structure consisting of an intrinsically unstable mixed parallel/anti-parallel β-sheet. Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that the Aα406-483 fragment forms soluble oligomers whose fraction increases with increasing concentration. This was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis, which also revealed that the addition of each monomer to an assembling αC oligomer substantially increases its stabilizing free energy. In agreement, unfolding experiments monitored by CD established that oligomerization of Aα406-483 results in increased thermal stability. Altogether, these experiments establish the complete NMR solution structure of the Aα406-483 αC-domain fragment, provide direct evidence for the intra- and intermolecular interactions between the αC-domains, and confirm that these interactions are thermodynamically driven. PMID:17590019

  12. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either.

  13. Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmospheres and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objective for this quarterly report were (1) to determine the limit of detection of water by NMR, (2) to determine the reproducibility of the NMR integration method using the Lab Cal {sup {trademark}} PC software, (3) to determine the amount of water in standard solutions, and (4) to determine the amount of water in a coal sample. The studies performed this last quarter have shown that the {sup 1}H NMR method for determining water in a coal sample via the reaction with 2,2-dimethoxypropane will be suitable for determining the water content in coals. The method should be most suitable for coals having low moisture content; that is, those coals which have been subjected to other drying techniques. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmospheres and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objective for this quarterly report were (1) to determine the limit of detection of water by NMR, (2) to determine the reproducibility of the NMR integration method using the Lab Cal {sup {trademark}} PC software, (3) to determine the amount of water in standard solutions, and (4) to determine the amount of water in a coal sample. The studies performed this last quarter have shown that the {sup 1}H NMR method for determining water in a coal sample via the reaction with 2,2-dimethoxypropane will be suitable for determining the water content in coals. The method should be most suitable for coals having low moisture content; that is, those coals which have been subjected to other drying techniques. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Combining (27)Al Solid-State NMR and First-Principles Simulations To Explore Crystal Structure in Disordered Aluminum Oxynitride.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bingtian; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Weimin; Zhai, Pengcheng; Fu, Zhengyi

    2016-12-19

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique gives insight into the local information in a crystal structure, while Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) sketches out the framework of a crystal lattice. In this work, first-principles calculations were combined with the solid-state NMR technique and Rietveld refinement to explore the crystal structure of a disordered aluminum oxynitride (γ-alon). The theoretical NMR parameters (chemical shift, δiso, quadrupolar coupling constants, CQ, and asymmetry parameter, η) of Al22.5O28.5N3.5, predicted by the gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) algorithm, were used to facilitate the analytical investigation of the (27)Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the as-prepared sample, whose formula was confirmed to be Al2.811O3.565N0.435 by quantitative analysis. The experimental δiso, CQ, and η of (27)Al showed a small discrepancy compared with theoretical models. The ratio of aluminum located at the 8a to 16d sites was calculated to be 0.531 from the relative integration of peaks in the (27)Al NMR spectra. The occupancies of aluminum at the 8a and 16d positions were determined through NMR investigations to be 0.9755 and 0.9178, respectively, and were used in the Rietveld refinement to obtain the lattice parameter and anion parameter of Al2.811O3.565N0.435. The results from (27)Al NMR investigations and PXRD structural refinement complemented each other. This work provides a powerful and accessible strategy to precisely understand the crystal structure of novel oxynitride materials with multiple disorder.

  16. Multivariate analysis relating oil shale geochemical properties to NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Washburn, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry has been used to provide insight into shale composition by separating relaxation responses from the various hydrogen-bearing phases present in shales in a noninvasive way. Previous low-field NMR work using solid-echo methods provided qualitative information on organic constituents associated with raw and pyrolyzed oil shale samples, but uncertainty in the interpretation of longitudinal-transverse (T1–T2) relaxometry correlation results indicated further study was required. Qualitative confirmation of peaks attributed to kerogen in oil shale was achieved by comparing T1–T2 correlation measurements made on oil shale samples to measurements made on kerogen isolated from those shales. Quantitative relationships between T1–T2 correlation data and organic geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales were determined using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Relaxometry results were also compared to infrared spectra, and the results not only provided further confidence in the organic matter peak interpretations but also confirmed attribution of T1–T2 peaks to clay hydroxyls. In addition, PLSR analysis was applied to correlate relaxometry data to trace element concentrations with good success. The results of this work show that NMR relaxometry measurements using the solid-echo approach produce T1–T2 peak distributions that correlate well with geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales.

  17. An assignment of intrinsically disordered regions of proteins based on NMR structures.

    PubMed

    Ota, Motonori; Koike, Ryotaro; Amemiya, Takayuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Romero, Pedro R; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Dunker, A Keith; Fukuchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not adopt stable three-dimensional structures in physiological conditions, yet these proteins play crucial roles in biological phenomena. In most cases, intrinsic disorder manifests itself in segments or domains of an IDP, called intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), but fully disordered IDPs also exist. Although IDRs can be detected as missing residues in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography, no protocol has been developed to identify IDRs from structures obtained by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Here, we propose a computational method to assign IDRs based on NMR structures. We compared missing residues of X-ray structures with residue-wise deviations of NMR structures for identical proteins, and derived a threshold deviation that gives the best correlation of ordered and disordered regions of both structures. The obtained threshold of 3.2Å was applied to proteins whose structures were only determined by NMR, and the resulting IDRs were analyzed and compared to those of X-ray structures with no NMR counterpart in terms of sequence length, IDR fraction, protein function, cellular location, and amino acid composition, all of which suggest distinct characteristics. The structural knowledge of IDPs is still inadequate compared with that of structured proteins. Our method can collect and utilize IDRs from structures determined by NMR, potentially enhancing the understanding of IDPs.

  18. Automated structure determination of proteins with the SAIL-FLYA NMR method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ikeya, Teppei; Güntert, Peter; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2007-01-01

    The labeling of proteins with stable isotopes enhances the NMR method for the determination of 3D protein structures in solution. Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) provides an optimal stereospecific and regiospecific pattern of stable isotopes that yields sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information, and the ability to collect rapidly and evaluate fully automatically the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins up to twice as large as those that can be analyzed using conventional methods. Here, we describe a protocol for the preparation of SAIL proteins by cell-free methods, including the preparation of S30 extract and their automated structure analysis using the FLYA algorithm and the program CYANA. Once efficient cell-free expression of the unlabeled or uniformly labeled target protein has been achieved, the NMR sample preparation of a SAIL protein can be accomplished in 3 d. A fully automated FLYA structure calculation can be completed in 1 d on a powerful computer system.

  19. Elucidation of the structures of residual and dissolved pine kraft lignins using an HMQC NMR technique.

    PubMed

    Balakshin, Mikhail Yu; Capanema, Ewellyn A; Chen, Chen-Loung; Gracz, Hanna S

    2003-10-08

    Comparative studies on the structures of residual and dissolved lignins isolated from pine kraft pulp and pulping liquor have been undertaken using the (1)H-(13)C HMQC NMR technique, GPC, and sugar analysis to elucidate the reaction mechanisms in kraft pulping and the lignin reactivity. A modified procedure for the isolation of enzymatic residual lignins has resulted in an appreciable decrease in protein contaminants in the residual lignin preparations (N content < 0.2%). The very high dispersion of HMQC spectra allows identification of different lignin moieties, which signals appear overlapped in 1D (13)C NMR spectra. Elucidation of the role of condensation reactions indicates that an increase in the degree of lignin condensation during pulping results from accumulation of original condensed lignin moieties rather than from the formation of new alkyl-aryl structures. Among aryl-vinyl type moieties, only stilbene structures are accumulated in lignin in appreciable amounts. Benzyl ether lignin-carbohydrate bonds involving primary hydroxyl groups of carbohydrates have been detected in residual and dissolved lignin preparations. Structures of the alpha-hydroxyacid type have been postulated to be among the important lignin degradation products in kraft pulping. The effect of the isolation method on the lignin structure and differences between the residual and dissolved lignins are discussed.

  20. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  1. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  2. NMR Crystallography of a Carbanionic Intermediate in Tryptophan Synthase: Chemical Structure, Tautomerization, and Reaction Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carbanionic intermediates play a central role in the catalytic transformations of amino acids performed by pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Here, we make use of NMR crystallography—the synergistic combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and computational chemistry—to interrogate a carbanionic/quinonoid intermediate analogue in the β-subunit active site of the PLP-requiring enzyme tryptophan synthase. The solid-state NMR chemical shifts of the PLP pyridine ring nitrogen and additional sites, coupled with first-principles computational models, allow a detailed model of protonation states for ionizable groups on the cofactor, substrates, and nearby catalytic residues to be established. Most significantly, we find that a deprotonated pyridine nitrogen on PLP precludes formation of a true quinonoid species and that there is an equilibrium between the phenolic and protonated Schiff base tautomeric forms of this intermediate. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the latter builds up negative charge at the substrate Cα and positive charge at C4′ of the cofactor, consistent with its role as the catalytic tautomer. These findings support the hypothesis that the specificity for β-elimination/replacement versus transamination is dictated in part by the protonation states of ionizable groups on PLP and the reacting substrates and underscore the essential role that NMR crystallography can play in characterizing both chemical structure and dynamics within functioning enzyme active sites. PMID:27779384

  3. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  4. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  5. NMR studies of ordered structures and valence states in the successive valence-transition system EuPtP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, T.; Nishitani, K.; Koyama, T.; Muta, H.; Maruyama, T.; Pristáš, G.; Ueda, K.; Kohara, T.; Mitsuda, A.; Sugishima, M.; Wada, H.

    2014-11-01

    We have studied EuPtP, which undergoes two successive valence transitions at TA˜240 K and TB˜200 K by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. From the analysis of NMR spectra, we obtained plausible ordered structures and Eu valence states in three phases divided by TA and TB. These ordered structures well explain observed inequivalent P sites and the intensity ratio of the NMR spectra arising from these P sites. The results are also in good accordance with mean Eu valence measured by the x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We also discuss Eu 4 f states and the origin of the transitions from the measurements of nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate and hyperfine coupling constant.

  6. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  7. A new laboratory approach to shale analysis using NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    kerogen, thermally degraded kerogen, and char. Integrated peak areas from the LF-NMR results representative of kerogen and bitumen were found to be well correlated with S1 and S2 parameters from Rock-Eval programmed pyrolysis. This study demonstrates that LFNMR relaxometry can provide a wide range of information on shales and other reservoir rocks that goes well beyond porosity and pore-fluid analysis.

  8. From Molecular Structure to Global Processes : NMR Spectroscopy in Analytical/Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, A.

    2009-04-01

    NMR Spectroscopy is arguably the most powerful tool to elucidate structure and probe molecular interactions. A range of NMR approaches will be introduced with emphasis on addressing and understanding structure and reactivity of soil organic matter at the molecular level. The presentation will be split into three main sections. The first section will look at evidence from advanced NMR based approaches that when considered synergistically describes the major structural components in soil organic matter. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy (1-3D NMR), automated pattern matching, spectral simulations, diffusion NMR and hybrid-diffusion NMR will be introduced in context of molecular structure. Finally the structural components in soil will be contrasted to those found in aquatic dissolved organic matter. Secondly molecular interactions of natural organic matter will be considered. Advanced structural studies have provided detailed spectral assignments which in turn permit the reactivity of various soil components to be elucidated. Aggregation and self-association of soil and dissolved organic matter will be discussed along with the structural components likely responsible for aggregation/colloid formation. Interactions of soil organic matter with anthropogenic chemicals will also be considered and NMR techniques based on "Saturation Transfer Difference" introduced. These techniques are extremely powerful and can be used to both; describe mechanistically how anthropogenic chemicals sorb to whole soils and identify the structural components (lignin, protein, cellulose, etc..) that are responsible for the binding/sorption in soil. In the last section, the "big questions" and challenges facing the field will be considered along with some novel experimental NMR based approaches that should, in future, assist in providing answers to these questions.

  9. Carbon-dot organic surface modifier analysis by solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippidis, Aggelos; Spyros, Apostolos; Anglos, Demetrios; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Zbořil, Radek; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-07-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) represent a new class of carbon-based materials that were discovered recently and have drawn the interest of the scientific community, particularly because of their attractive optical properties and their potential as fluorescent sensors. Investigation of the chemical structure of C-dots is extremely important for correlating the surface modifier composition with C-dot optical properties and allow for structure-properties fine tuning. In this article, we report the structural analysis of the surface modifiers of three different types of C-dot nanoparticles (Cwax, Cws, and Csalt) by use of 1D- and 2D-high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in solution. We unambiguously verify that the structure of the modifier chains remains chemically unchanged during the passivation procedure, and confirm the covalent attachment of the modifiers to the nanoparticle core, which contributes no signal to the solution-state NMR spectra. To our knowledge, this is the first study confirming the full structural assignment of C-dot organic surface modifiers by use of solution NMR spectroscopy.

  10. [NMR structure and dynamics of the chimeric protein SH3-F2].

    PubMed

    Kutyshenko, V P; Gushchina, L V; Khristoforov, V S; Prokhorov, D A; Timchenko, M A; Kudrevatykh, Iu A; Fediukina, D V; Filimonov, V V

    2010-01-01

    For the further elucidation of structural and dynamic principles of protein self-organization and protein-ligand interactions the design of new chimeric protein SH3-F2 was made and genetically engineered construct was created. The SH3-F2 amino acid sequence consists of polyproline ligand mgAPPLPPYSA, GG linker and the sequence of spectrin SH3 domain circular permutant S19-P20s. Structural and dynamics properties of the protein were studied by high-resolution NMR. According to NMR data the tertiary structure of the chimeric protein SH3-F2 has the topology which is typical of SH3 domains in the complex with the ligand, forming polyproline type II helix, located in the conservative region of binding in the orientation II. The polyproline ligand closely adjoins with the protein globule and is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. However the interaction of ligand and the part of globule relative to SH3 domain is not too large because the analysis of protein dynamic characteristics points to the low amplitude, high-frequency ligand tumbling in relation to the slow intramolecular motions of the main globule. The constructed chimera permits to carry out further structural and thermodynamic investigations of polyproline helix properties and its interaction with regulatory domains.

  11. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  12. A new Schiff base compound N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone): synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-10-15

    The Schiff base compound, N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone) (NDHA) is synthesized through the condensation of 2-hydroxylacetophenone and 2,2-dimethyl 1,3-amino propane in methanol at ambient temperature. The yellow crystalline precipitate is used for X-ray single-crystal determination and measuring Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. Vibrational frequencies are determined experimentally and compared with those obtained theoretically. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are also performed. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculated by all DFT methods are consistent with the experimental data. However, the NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory are in better agreement with experimental (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic absorption spectrum calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. In addition, some quantum descriptors of the molecule are calculated and conformational analysis is performed and the results were compared with the crystallographic data.

  13. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoyun; Qiu, Mengguang; Wang, Bin; Yin, Wen-Bing; Nie, Xinyi; Qin, Qiuping; Ren, Silin; Yang, Kunlong; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression (NMR) regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in A. flavus has not been previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of NMR and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi.

  14. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyun; Qiu, Mengguang; Wang, Bin; Yin, Wen-Bing; Nie, Xinyi; Qin, Qiuping; Ren, Silin; Yang, Kunlong; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression (NMR) regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in A. flavus has not been previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of NMR and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi. PMID:27933036

  15. Simultaneous single-structure and bundle representation of protein NMR structures in torsion angle space.

    PubMed

    Gottstein, Daniel; Kirchner, Donata K; Güntert, Peter

    2012-04-01

    A method is introduced to represent an ensemble of conformers of a protein by a single structure in torsion angle space that lies closest to the averaged Cartesian coordinates while maintaining perfect covalent geometry and on average equal steric quality and an equally good fit to the experimental (e.g. NMR) data as the individual conformers of the ensemble. The single representative 'regmean structure' is obtained by simulated annealing in torsion angle space with the program CYANA using as input data the experimental restraints, restraints for the atom positions relative to the average Cartesian coordinates, and restraints for the torsion angles relative to the corresponding principal cluster average values of the ensemble. The method was applied to 11 proteins for which NMR structure ensembles are available, and compared to alternative, commonly used simple approaches for selecting a single representative structure, e.g. the structure from the ensemble that best fulfills the experimental and steric restraints, or the structure from the ensemble that has the lowest RMSD value to the average Cartesian coordinates. In all cases our method found a structure in torsion angle space that is significantly closer to the mean coordinates than the alternatives while maintaining the same quality as individual conformers. The method is thus suitable to generate representative single structure representations of protein structure ensembles in torsion angle space. Since in the case of NMR structure calculations with CYANA the single structure is calculated in the same way as the individual conformers except that weak positional and torsion angle restraints are added, we propose to represent new NMR structures by a 'regmean bundle' consisting of the single representative structure as the first conformer and all but one original individual conformers (the original conformer with the highest target function value is discarded in order to keep the number of conformers in the

  16. Structure elucidation and NMR assignments of an unusual triterpene saponin derivative from Ilex kudincha.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wenjian; Wang, Qinghu; Li, Wen; Sha, Yi; Li, Xian; Wang, Jinhui

    2012-04-01

    One unusual triterpenoid derivative, ilekudinchoside E (1), was isolated from the leaves of Ilex kudincha. The structure was established by various spectroscopic techniques, including one- and two-dimensional NMR, HRTOFMS and CD spectra.

  17. Separation and analysis of trace degradants in a pharmaceutical formulation using on-line capillary isotachophoresis-NMR.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Stacie L; Almeida, Valentino K; Korir, Albert K; Larive, Cynthia K

    2007-11-15

    NMR spectroscopy is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the structure elucidation of pharmaceutical impurities, especially when coupled to a separation method, such as HPLC. However, NMR has relatively poor sensitivity compared with other techniques such as mass spectrometry, limiting its applicability in impurity analyses. This limitation is addressed here through the on-line coupling of microcoil NMR with capillary isotachophoresis (cITP), a separation method that can concentrate dilute components by 2-3 orders of magnitude. With this approach, 1H NMR spectra can be acquired for microgram (nanomole) quantities of trace impurities in a complex sample matrix. cITP-NMR was used in this work to isolate and detect 4-aminophenol (PAP) in an acetaminophen sample spiked at the 0.1% level, with no interference from the parent compound. Analysis of an acetaminophen thermal degradation sample revealed resonances of several degradation products in addition to PAP, confirming the effectiveness of on-line cITP-NMR for trace analyses of pharmaceutical formulations. Subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis provided complementary information for the structure elucidation of the unknown degradation products, which were dimers formed during the degradation process.

  18. In vivo NMR for ¹³C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roscher, Albrecht; Troufflard, Stéphanie; Taghki, Abdelghani Idrissi

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vivo NMR within the framework of Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is presented. In vivo NMR allows to visualize the active metabolic network, to determine metabolic and isotopic steady state and to measure metabolic fluxes which are not necessarily accessible by isotopic steady state (stationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. The kinetic data can be used as input for dynamic (nonstationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. Both 1D and 2D NMR methods are employed.

  19. The molecular structure and vibrational, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Hassan M; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A

    2016-01-05

    The structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate salt were investigated by B3LYP/6-311G(∗∗) calculations. The lidocaine·HCl·H2O salt is predicted to have the gauche structure as the predominant form at ambient temperature with NCCN and CNCC torsional angles of 110° and -123° as compared to 10° and -64°, respectively in the base lidocaine. The repulsive interaction between the two N-H bonds destabilized the gauche structure of lidocaine·HCl·H2O salt. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of the lidocaine salt in only one gauche conformation at room temperature. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine·HCl·H2O were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the lidocaine salt. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts for lidocaine·HCl·H2O is 2.32 and 8.21ppm, respectively.

  20. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  1. Synthesis, molecular structure and vibrational analysis of D-D-A based carbazole decorated phenothiazine-3-carbaldehyde: Experimental (FT-IR, UV and NMR) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppasamy, Ayyanar; Gokula Krishnan, Kannan; Pillai Velayutham Pillai, Muthiah; Ramalingan, Chennan

    2017-01-01

    A novel molecule, 10-(9-hexyl-9H-carbazol-3yl)-10H-phenothiazine-3-carbaldehyde (CZPTZA) has been synthesized and characterized through FT-IR, UV-Vis, NMR spectroscopic studies and molecular orbital calculations. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and NMR are computed with B3LYP method using 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The geometrical parameters of the title compound obtained from Single Crystal XRD studies have been found in accord with the calculated (DFT) values. The experimentally observed vibrational frequencies are compared with the calculated ones, which were found to be in good agreement with each other. UV-Vis spectra of the title compound have also been recorded and the electronic properties, viz. excitation energies, calculated energies, oscillator strengths, frontier orbital energies and band gap energies are computed with TD-DFT/CAM-B3LYP method using 6-311++G (d,p) as the basis set. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated by the Gauge Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental outcome. Also, the values of dipole moment, polarizabilities and first order hyperpolarizabilities have been computed.

  2. High resolution magic angle spinning NMR applied to the analysis of organic compounds bound to solid supports.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    In situ structural characterization of organic compounds attached to solid supports can be achieved by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR (HRMAS NMR), a technique that provides solution-like spectra for resin-bound molecules. This review outlines the principles of the technique, the influence of the solid support on data quality, and NMR experiments that are useful for obtaining valuable information. The review describes, with multiple examples mainly from the last 7 years, how HRMAS NMR has been applied to monitor solid-phase reactions, elucidate reaction products and quantify compound loading on a solid support. Other applications, such as conformational analysis of immobilized compounds and investigation of molecular interactions with compounds in solution, are also discussed.

  3. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  4. Glass Structure by Scattering Methods and Spectroscopy — D. SOLID STATE NMR AS A STRUCTURAL TOOL IN GLASS SCIENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Hellmut

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Fundamentals of Solid State NMR * Nuclear magnetism and resonance * Spectroscopic technique * Internal interactions * Chemical shielding interaction * Direct magnetic dipole-dipole coupling * Nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction * Experimental separation strategies * Magic-angle spinning * Multi-dimensional NMR * Structural Issues in Non-crystalline Solids and Glasses * Short-Range Order in Oxide Glasses * Local coordination number and symmetry * Bond angle distribution functions * Spatial distribution of modifier cations and structural implications of the mixed-alkali effect * Short-Range Order in Non-Oxide Glasses * Chemical bond distribution and intermediate range order * Chemical equilibria and kinetics in glassforming liquids * Future Perspectives * Towards higher resolution for quadrupolar nuclei * Recovery of dipolar interactions in MAS-NMR: site connectivities * Double resonance NMR in heteronuclear systems * Zero- and double quantum NMR in homonuclear systems * Acknowledgments * References

  5. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  6. The efficient structure elucidation of minor components in heparin digests using microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Limtiaco, John F K; Beni, Szabolcs; Jones, Christopher J; Langeslay, Derek J; Larive, Cynthia K

    2011-10-18

    The structural complexity and microheterogeneity of the glycosaminoglycans heparin and heparan sulfate make their characterization a daunting task. The methodology described herein utilizes a combination of enzymatic digestion, size-exclusion chromatography, strong anion-exchange HPLC, reverse-phase ion-pair ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and microcoil NMR for the efficient sequencing of heparin-derived tetrasaccharides. The high mass sensitivity of microcoil NMR makes this technique well suited for the characterization of mass-limited samples removing a bottleneck in the analysis workflow and permitting structural characterization of minor components isolated from a heparin enzymatic digestion. Complete characterization of one tetrasulfonated, five pentasulfonated isomers and two hexasulfonated tetrasaccharide sequences is described. To our knowledge, two of the identified minor tetrasaccharides are unique, and have not been previously reported: IdoA(2S)-GlcNS(6S)-IdoA(2S)-GlcNS(6S) and ΔUA(2S)-GlcNS(6S)-IdoA-GlcNS(6S).

  7. A novel tridentate Schiff base dioxo-molybdenum(VI) complex: synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, ¹H NMR and ¹³C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2012-09-01

    A new dioxo-molybdenum(VI) complex [MoO(2)(L)(H(2)O)] has been synthesized, using 5-methoxy 2-[(2-hydroxypropylimino)methyl]phenol as tridentate ONO donor Schiff base ligand (H(2)L) and MoO(2)(acac)(2). The yellow crystals of the compound are used for single-crystal X-ray analysis and measuring Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the UV-visible, FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are performed. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the electronic transitions of the complex. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level of theory is in agreement with experimental (1)H NMR spectra. However, the (13)C NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP level, employing a combined basis set of DGDZVP for Mo and 6-31+G(2df,p) for other atoms, are in better agreement with experimental (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic transitions calculated at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of the compound.

  8. 13C NMR study of halogen bonding of haloarenes: measurements of solvent effects and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Chen, Naijun; Wu, Hong; Knotts, Nathan; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-04-07

    Solvent effects on the NMR spectra of symmetrical (X = F (1), X = Cl (2), X = Br (3), X = I (4), X = NO2 (5), X = CN (6)) and unsymmetrical (X = I, Y = MeO (7), Y = PhO (8)) para-disubstituted acetophenone azines X-C6H4-CMe=N-N=CMe-C6H4-Y and of models X-C6H4-CMe=N-Z (X = I, Z = H (9), Z = NH2 (10)), 4-iodoacetophenone (11), and iodobenzene (12) were measured in CDCl(3), DMSO, THF, pyridine, and benzene to address one intramolecular and one intermolecular issue. Solvent effects on the (13)C NMR spectra are generally small, and this finding firmly establishes that the azine bridge indeed functions as a "conjugation stopper," an important design concept in our polar materials research. Since intermolecular halogen bonding of haloarenes do occur in polar organic crystalline materials, the NMR solution data pose the question as to whether the absence of solvent shifts indicates the absence of strong halogen bonding in solution. This question was studied by the theoretical analysis of the DMSO complexes of iodoarenes 4, 9-12, and of iodoacetylene. DFT and MP2 computations show iodine bonding, and characteristic structural and electronic features are described. The nonrelativistic complexation shifts and the change in the spin-orbit induced heavy atom effect of iodine compensate each other, and iodine bonding thus has no apparent effect on Ci in the iodoarenes. For iodides, complexation by DMSO occurs and may or may not manifest itself in the NMR spectra. The absence of complexation shifts in the NMR spectra of halides does not exclude the occurrence of halogen bonding in solution.

  9. Structural study of synthetic mica montmorillonite by means of 2D MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, M. D.; Castro, M. A.; Chain, P.; Naranjo, M.; Perdigón, A. C.

    2005-07-01

    Syn-1, is a synthetic mica montmorillonite interstratified mineral that forms one of the standard clay samples in the Clay Minerals Society Source Clays Project. However, there are still controversies regarding some structural aspects such as the interlayer composition or the location of the extra-aluminium determined by chemical analysis. The main objective of this paper is to shed light on those structural aspects that affect the reactivity of the interstratified minerals. For this purpose, we have used 1 H 29 Si and 1 H 27Al HETCOR MAS NMR to show that it is likely that the interlayer space of the beidellite part is composed of ammonium ions whereas ammonium and aluminium ions are responsible for the charge balance in the mica type layer.

  10. Watching protein structure at work in living cells using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito

    2012-12-01

    Isotope-assisted multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can now be applied to proteins inside living cells. The technique, called in-cell NMR, aims to investigate the structures, interactions and dynamics of proteins under their native conditions, ideally at an atomic resolution. The application has begun with bacterial cells but has now expanded to mammalian cultured cells, such as HeLa cells. The importance of the realization of such 'in-mammalian cell' NMR should be stressed, as these are the cells most often employed in cell biology. Hence, a substantially wide range of application would be possible in the near future once the technique has been well developed.

  11. FT-IR, UV-vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and the equilibrium structure of organic dye molecule disperse red 1 acrylate: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Mehmet; Coruh, Ali; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the characterization of disperse red 1 acrylate compound by spectral techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The spectroscopic properties were analyzed by FT-IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in methanol was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. A satisfactory consistency between the experimental and theoretical spectra was obtained and it shows that the hybrid DFT method is very useful in predicting accurate vibrational structure, especially for high-frequency region. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. A study on the electronic properties were performed by timedependent DFT (TD-DFT) and CIS(D) approach. To investigate non linear optical properties, the electric dipole moment μ, polarizability α, anisotropy of polarizability Δα and molecular first hyperpolarizability β were computed. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the compound can be a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials.

  12. 1H NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Ferguson, Dean; Culf, Adrian; Morin, Pier; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by unpredictable clinical behaviors that suggest distinct molecular subtypes. With the tumor metabolic phenotype being one of the hallmarks of cancer, we have set upon to investigate whether GBMs show differences in their metabolic profiles. 1H NMR analysis was performed on metabolite extracts from a selection of nine glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis was performed directly on spectral data and on relative concentrations of metabolites obtained from spectra using a multivariate regression method developed in this work. Both qualitative and quantitative sample clustering have shown that cell lines can be divided into four groups for which the most significantly different metabolites have been determined. Analysis shows that some of the major cancer metabolic markers (such as choline, lactate, and glutamine) have significantly dissimilar concentrations in different GBM groups. The obtained lists of metabolic markers for subgroups were correlated with gene expression data for the same cell lines. Metabolic analysis generally agrees with gene expression measurements, and in several cases, we have shown in detail how the metabolic results can be correlated with the analysis of gene expression. Combined gene expression and metabolomics analysis have shown differential expression of transporters of metabolic markers in these cells as well as some of the major metabolic pathways leading to accumulation of metabolites. Obtained lists of marker metabolites can be leveraged for subtype determination in glioblastomas. PMID:22528487

  13. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-02

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  14. NMR monitoring of the SELEX process to confirm enrichment of structured RNA.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ryo; Aoki, Kazuteru; Miyakawa, Shin; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kozu, Tomoko; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi

    2017-03-21

    RNA aptamers are RNA molecules that bind to a target molecule with high affinity and specificity using uniquely-folded tertiary structures. RNA aptamers are selected from an RNA pool typically comprising up to 10(15) different sequences generated by iterative steps of selection and amplification known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX). Over several rounds of SELEX, the diversity of the RNA pool decreases and the aptamers are enriched. Hence, monitoring of the enrichment of these RNA pools is critical for the successful selection of aptamers, and several methods for monitoring them have been developed. In this study, we measured one-dimensional imino proton NMR spectra of RNA pools during SELEX. The spectrum of the initial RNA pool indicates that the RNAs adopt tertiary structures. The structural diversity of the RNA pools was shown to depend highly on the design of the primer-binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enrichment of RNA aptamers can be monitored using NMR. The RNA pools can be recovered from the NMR tube after measurement of NMR spectra. We also can monitor target binding in the NMR tubes. Thus, we propose using NMR to monitor the enrichment of structured aptamers during the SELEX process.

  15. Towards miniaturization of a structural genomics pipeline using micro-expression and microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca; Moy, Kin; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Wilson, Ian A; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-12-01

    In structural genomics centers, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) screening is in increasing use as a tool to identify folded proteins that are promising targets for three-dimensional structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. The use of 1D 1H NMR spectra or 2D [1H,15N]-correlation spectroscopy (COSY) typically requires milligram quantities of unlabeled or isotope-labeled protein, respectively. Here, we outline ways towards miniaturization of a structural genomics pipeline with NMR screening for folded globular proteins, using a high-density micro-fermentation device and a microcoil NMR probe. The proteins are micro-expressed in unlabeled or isotope-labeled media, purified, and then subjected to 1D 1H NMR and/or 2D [1H,15N]-COSY screening. To demonstrate that the miniaturization is functioning effectively, we processed nine mouse homologue protein targets and compared the results with those from the "macro-scale" Joint Center of Structural Genomics (JCSG) high-throughput pipeline. The results from the two pipelines were comparable, illustrating that the data were not compromised in the miniaturized approach.

  16. Extraction, Purification, and NMR Analysis of Terpenes from Brown Algae.

    PubMed

    Gaysinski, Marc; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Thomas, Olivier P; Culioli, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Algal terpenes constitute a wide and well-documented group of marine natural products with structures differing from their terrestrial plant biosynthetic analogues. Amongst macroalgae, brown seaweeds are considered as one of the richest source of biologically and ecologically relevant terpenoids. These metabolites, mostly encountered in algae of the class Phaeophyceae, are mainly diterpenes and meroditerpenes (metabolites of mixed biogenesis characterized by a toluquinol or a toluquinone nucleus linked to a diterpene moiety).In this chapter, we describe analytical processes commonly employed for the isolation and structural characterization of the main terpenoid constituents obtained from organic extracts of brown algae. The successive steps include (1) extraction of lipidic content from algal samples; (2) purification of terpenes by column chromatography and semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography; and (3) structure elucidation of the isolated terpenes by means of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). More precisely, we propose a representative methodology which allows the isolation and structural determination of the monocyclic meroditerpene methoxybifurcarenone (MBFC) from the Mediterranean brown alga Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta. This methodology has a large field of applications and can then be extended to terpenes isolated from other species of the family Sargassaceae.

  17. The use of NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.; Hurtubise, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    Western Research Institute has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The objectives of this study were to develop a combined chemical dehydration/nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the moisture content of coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during drying, and to determine the effects of different drying methods on liquefaction reactivity of coals. Different methods of drying were investigated to determine whether coal drying can be accomplished without reducing the reactivity of coals toward liquefaction. Drying methods included thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration. Coals of rank lignite to high volatile bituminous were studied. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. These results are supported by the solvent swelling measurements in which the swelling ratios of thermally dried and microwave-dried coals were lower than those of premoisturized coals, indicating a greater degree of cross linking in the dried coals. The swelling ratios of the chemically dried coals were greater than those of the premoisturized coals because the pore structure remaining unchanged or increased when water was removed. These results are consistent with the NMR results, which did not show significant changes in coal chemical structure.

  18. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral IR, NMR UV-Vis investigations, NBO and NLO of 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide with use of X-ray diffractions studies along with DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Sibel; Sarioğlu, Ahmet Oral; Güler, Semih; Dege, Necmi; Sönmez, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide compound (C22H16NO3Cl) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectra. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were computed using hybrid-DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods and 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The calculated optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and 1H NMR chemical shift values are in strong agreement with experimentally measured values. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound, was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as calculated energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, dipole moments and frontier orbital energies and band gap energies were computed with TDDFT-B3LYP methodolgy and using 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non linear optical (NLO) properties were performed by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level for the title compound.

  20. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  1. Structural and Nutritional Properties of Pasta from Triticum monococcum and Triticum durum Species. A Combined ¹H NMR, MRI, and Digestibility Study.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Gabriella; Greco, Fulvia; Cremonini, Mauro A; Brandolini, Andrea; Consonni, Roberto; Gussoni, Maristella

    2015-05-27

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the structure of two different types of pasta, namely Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (cv. Saragolla) and Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum (cv. Monlis), under different processing conditions. MRI analysis and NMR spectroscopy (i.e., T1 and T2 NMR relaxation times and diffusion parameters) were conducted on pasta, and (1)H NMR spectroscopic analysis of the chemical compounds released by pasta samples during the cooking process was performed. In addition, starch digestibility (enzimatically determined) was also investigated. The NMR results indicated that Saragolla pasta has a more compact structure, ascribed to pasta network and in particular to different technological gluten properties, that mainly determine the lower ability of Monlis pasta in binding water. These results correlate well with the lower rate of starch hydrolysis measured for Monlis pasta compared to Saragolla when both are dried at high temperature.

  2. Structure of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein Bactofilin by NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Variation.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Maher M; Wang, Yong; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-06-07

    Bactofilins constitute a recently discovered class of bacterial proteins that form cytoskeletal filaments. They share a highly conserved domain (DUF583) of which the structure remains unknown, in part due to the large size and noncrystalline nature of the filaments. Here, we describe the atomic structure of a bactofilin domain from Caulobacter crescentus. To determine the structure, we developed an approach that combines a biophysical model for proteins with recently obtained solid-state NMR spectroscopy data and amino acid contacts predicted from a detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of bactofilins. Our structure reveals a triangular β-helical (solenoid) conformation with conserved residues forming the tightly packed core and polar residues lining the surface. The repetitive structure explains the presence of internal repeats as well as strongly conserved positions, and is reminiscent of other fibrillar proteins. Our work provides a structural basis for future studies of bactofilin biology and for designing molecules that target them, as well as a starting point for determining the organization of the entire bactofilin filament. Finally, our approach presents new avenues for determining structures that are difficult to obtain by traditional means.

  3. Determination of the Structural Basis of Antibody Diversity Using NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-15

    1): 290. "Distances of tyruzsnc residues from a spin-label hapten in the combining site of a specific monoclonal antibody," Jacob Anglister, Tom Frey...anti-spin-label antibody," Tom Frey, Jacob Anglister and Harden M. McConnell, Biochemistry 23, 6470-6473 (1984). 298. "NMR technique for assessing...contributions of heavy and light chains to an antibody combining site," Jacob Anglister, Tom Frey and Harden M. McConnell, Nature 315, 65-67 (1985). 305

  4. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  5. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of 1H-1H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  6. Structural studies of the activation of the two component receiver domain NTRC by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Nohaile, Michael James

    1996-05-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the N-terminal domain of the transcriptional enhancer NTRC (NiTrogen Regulatory protein C). This domain belongs to the family of receiver domains of two-component regulatory systems involved in signal transduction. Phosphorylation of NTRC at D54 leads to an activated form of the molecule which stimulates transcription of genes involved in nitrogen regulation. Three and four dimensional NMR techniques were used to determine an intermediate resolution structure of the unphosphorylated, inactive form of the N-terminal domain of NTRC. The structure is comprised of five α-helices and a five-stranded β-sheet in a (β/α)5 topology. Analysis of the backbone dynamics of NTRC indicate that helix 4 and strand 5 are significantly more flexible than the rest of the secondary structure of the protein and that the loops making up the active site are flexible. The short lifetime of phospho-NTRC hampers the study of this form. However, conditions for determining the resonance assignments and, possibly, the three dimensional structure of phosphorylated NTRC have been obtained. Tentative assignments of the phosphorylated form indicate that the majority of the changes that NTRC experiences upon phosphorylation occur in helix 3, strand 4, helix 4, strand 5, and the loop between strand 5 and helix 5 (the 3445 face of NTRC) as well as near the site of phosphorylation. In order to examine a stable, activated form of the protein, constitutively active mutants of NTRC were investigated.

  7. Structural elucidation of the Brucella melitensis M antigen by high-resolution NMR at 500 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bundle, D.R.; Cherwonogrodzky, J.W.; Perry, M.B.

    1987-12-29

    The Brucella M antigen from the species type strain Brucella melitensis 16M has been identified as a component of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). O polysaccharide liberated from this LPS by mild acid hydrolysis exhibited M activity in serological tests and was shown to be a homopolymer of 4-formamido-4,6-dideoxy-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues arranged in an oligosaccharide repeating unit as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native lipopolysaccharide. Structural analysis of the O polysaccharide by NMR methods was difficult due to apparent microheterogeneity of the repeating unit, which was in fact caused by the presence of rotational isomers of the N-formyl moiety. This problem was resolved by chemical modification of the polysaccharide to its amino and N-acetyl derivatives, the 500-MHz /sup 1/H and 125-MHz /sup 13/C NMR spectra of which could be analyzed in terms of a unique structure through application of pH-dependent ..beta..-shifts and two-dimensional techniques that included COSY, relayed COSY, and NOESY experiments together with heteronuclear C/H shift correlation spectroscopy. On the basis of these experiments and supported by methylation and periodate oxidation data, the structure of the M polysaccharide was determined as a linear polymer of unbranched pentasaccharide repeating units consisting of four 1,2-linked and one 1,3-lined 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues. The marked structural similarity of the M antigen and the A antigen, which is known to be a 1,2-linked homopolysaccharide of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl units, accounts for cross-serological reactions of the two and the long-standing confusion surrounding the nature of their antigenic determinants.

  8. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  9. The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal.

  10. Simulation of NMR data reveals that proteins' local structures are stabilized by electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yan; Ji, Chang G; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-06-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR backbone relaxation order parameters have been carried out to investigate the polarization effect on the protein's local structure and dynamics for five benchmark proteins (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, immunoglobulin-binding domain (B1) of streptococcal protein G, bovine apo-calbindin D9K, human interleukin-4 R88Q mutant, and hen egg white lysozyme). In order to isolate the polarization effect from other interaction effects, our study employed both the standard AMBER force field (AMBER03) and polarized protein-specific charges (PPCs) in the MD simulations. The simulated order parameters, employing both the standard nonpolarizable and polarized force fields, are directly compared with experimental data. Our results show that residue-specific order parameters at some specific loop and turn regions are significantly underestimated by the MD simulations using the standard AMBER force field, indicating hyperflexibility of these local structures. Detailed analysis of the structures and dynamic motions of individual residues reveals that the hyperflexibility of these local structures is largely related to the breaking or weakening of relevant hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the agreement with the experimental results is significantly improved and more stable local structures are observed in the MD simulations using the polarized force field. The comparison between theory and experiment provides convincing evidence that intraprotein hydrogen bonds in these regions are stabilized by electronic polarization, which is critical to the dynamical stability of these local structures in proteins.

  11. A Unique Tool for Cellular Structural Biology: In-cell NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Conventional structural and chemical biology approaches are applied to macromolecules extrapolated from their native context. When this is done, important structural and functional features of macromolecules, which depend on their native network of interactions within the cell, may be lost. In-cell nuclear magnetic resonance is a branch of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy that allows macromolecules to be analyzed in living cells, at the atomic level. In-cell NMR can be applied to several cellular systems to obtain biologically relevant structural and functional information. Here we summarize the existing approaches and focus on the applications to protein folding, interactions, and post-translational modifications. PMID:26677229

  12. DFT molecular modeling and NMR conformational analysis of a new longipinenetriolone diester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M.; Guerra-Ramírez, Diana; Román-Marín, Luisa U.; Hernández-Hernández, Juan D.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2006-05-01

    The structure and conformational behavior of the new natural compound (4 R,5 S,7 S,8 R,9 S,10 R,11 R)-longipin-2-en-7,8,9-triol-1-one 7-angelate-9-isovalerate (1) isolated from Stevia eupatoria, were studied by molecular modeling and NMR spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo search followed by DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level provided the theoretical conformations of the sesquiterpene framework, which were in full agreement with results derived from the 1H- 1H coupling constant analysis.

  13. Structure determination of a partially ordered layered silicate material with an NMR crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Darren Henry; Cadars, Sylvian; Hotke, Kathryn; Van Huizen, Jared; Van Huizen, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Structure determination of layered materials can present challenges for conventional diffraction methods due to the fact that such materials often lack full three-dimensional periodicity since adjacent layers may not stack in an orderly and regular fashion. In such cases, NMR crystallography strategies involving a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and computational chemistry methods can often reveal structural details that cannot be acquired from diffraction alone. We present here the structure determination of a surfactant-templated layered silicate material that lacks full three-dimensional crystallinity using such an NMR crystallography approach. Through a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and advanced (29)Si solid-state NMR spectroscopy, it is revealed that the structure of the silicate layer of this layered silicate material templated with cetyltrimethylammonium surfactant cations is isostructural with the silicate layer of a previously reported material referred to as ilerite, octosilicate, or RUB-18. High-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals differences between the materials in terms of the ordering of silanol groups on the surfaces of the layers, as well as the contents of the inter-layer space.

  14. Comprehensive non-targeted analysis of contaminated groundwater of a former ammunition destruction site using 1H-NMR and HPLC-SPE-NMR/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, Markus; Heintz, Lea; Daolio, Cristina; Berset, Jean-Daniel; Muff, Daniel

    2009-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the capabilities of the combination of 1H NMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance) mixture analysis and HPLC-SPE-NMR/TOF-MS (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to solid-phase extraction and nuclear magnetic resonance and time-of-flight mass spectrometry) for the characterization of xenobiotic contaminants in groundwater samples. As an example, solid-phase extracts of two groundwater samples taken from a former ammunition destruction site in Switzerland were investigated. 1H NMR spectra of postcolumn SPE enriched compounds, together with accurate mass measurements, allowed the structural elucidation of unknowns. This untargeted approach allowed us to identify expected residues of explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (2,4,6-TNT), Hexogen (RDX) and Octogen (HMX), degradation products of TNT (1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (1,3,5-TNB), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-A-4,6-DNT), 3,5-dinitrophenol (3,5-DNP), 3,5-dinitroaniline (3,5-DNA), 2,6-dinitroanthranite, and 2-Hydroxy-4,6-dinitrobenzonitrile), benzoic acid, Bisphenol A (a known endocrine disruptor compound), and some toxicologically relevant additives for propelling charges: Centralite I (1,3-diethyl-1,3-diphenylurea), DPU (N,N-diphenylurethane), N,N-diphenylcarbamate (Acardite II), and N-methyl-N-phenylurethane. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of these additives in environmental samples. Extraction recoveries for Centralite I and DPU have been determined. Contaminants identified by our techniques were quantified based on HPLC-UV (HPLC-ultraviolet detection) and 1H NMR mixture analysis. The concentrations of the contaminants ranged between 0.1 and 48 microg/L assuming 100% recovery for the SPE step.

  15. Practical applications of hydrostatic pressure to refold proteins from inclusion bodies for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Torikai, Shinnosuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the hydrostatic pressure refolding method was reported as a practical tool for solubilizing and refolding proteins from inclusion bodies; however, there have been only a few applications for protein structural studies. Here, we report the successful applications of the hydrostatic pressure refolding method to refold proteins, including the MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger, the p62 PB1 domain, the GCN2 RWD domain, and the mTOR FRB domain. Moreover, the absence of aggregation and the correct folding of solubilized protein samples were evaluated with size exclusion chromatography and NMR experiments. The analyses of NMR spectra for MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger and GCN2 RWD further led to the determination of tertiary structures, which are consistent with those from soluble fractions. Overall, our results indicate that the hydrostatic pressure method is effective for preparing samples for NMR structural studies.

  16. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Pell, Andrew J.; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C.; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with 1H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of 15N and 13C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu+ (diamagnetic) or Cu2+ (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to 1H-1H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a Gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable. PMID:22723345

  17. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid- state NMR and computational structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Masica, David L; Ash, Jason T; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-08

    Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized.

  18. Isolation and structure elucidation of tetrameric procyanidins from unripe apples (Malus pumila cv. Fuji) by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Shohei; Oda, Chihiro; Masuda, Susumu; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2012-11-01

    Procyanidins are plant secondary metabolites widely consumed and known to have various physiological functions, but their bioavailability and mechanism of action are still unclear especially for larger oligomers. One of the reasons is scarce information about the detailed structure of oligomeric procyanidins. As for apple, structures of procyanidin components larger than trimers are scarcely known. In this study, 11 tetrameric procyanidins including two known compounds were isolated from unripe apples (Malus pumila cv. Fuji) and identified by NMR spectroscopic analysis and phloroglucinol degradation. As a result, the detailed structural diversity of tetrameric procyanidins in apple was established.

  19. An Analysis of a Commercial Furniture Refinisher: A Comprehensive Introductory NMR Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.; Cramer, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment designed to introduce undergraduate organic chemistry students to measurement/interpretation of NMR parameters. Students investigate chemical shift analysis, spin-spin coupling, peak integrations, effect of deuterium oxide extraction, and comparisons with literature spectra;…

  20. Reliability of ^1^H NMR analysis for assessment of lipid oxidation at frying temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reliability of a method using ^1^H NMR analysis for assessment of oil oxidation at a frying temperature was examined. During heating and frying at 180 °C, changes of soybean oil signals in the ^1^H NMR spectrum including olefinic (5.16-5.30 ppm), bisallylic (2.70-2.88 ppm), and allylic (1.94-2.1...

  1. Structural determination of Zn and Cd-DTPA complexes: MS, infrared, (13)C NMR and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanézia L; Carvalho, Ruy; Freitas, Matheus P; Tormena, Cláudio F; Melo, Walclée C

    2007-12-31

    The joint application of MS, infrared and (13)C NMR techniques for the determination of metal-DTPA structures (metal=Zn and Cd; DTPA=diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid) is reported. Mass spectrometry allowed determining the 1:1 stoichiometry of the complexes, while infrared analysis suggested that both nitrogen and carboxyl groups are sites for complexation. The (13)C NMR spectrum for the cadmium-containing complex evidenced the existence of free and complexed carboxyl groups, due to a straight singlet at 179.0 ppm (free carboxylic (13)C) and to two broad singlets or a broad doublet at 178.3 ppm (complexed carboxylic (13)C, (2)J(Cd-C(=O))=45.2 Hz). A similar interpretation might be given for the zinc derivative and, with the aid of DFT calculations, structures for both complexes were then proposed.

  2. Analysis of Radiation Induced Degradation in FPC-461 Fluoropolymers by Variable Temperature Multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Wilson, T S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-27

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been used to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl chloride:chlorotrifluoroethylene copolymer, FPC-461, due to exposure to {gamma}-radiation. Solid state {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra revealed structural changes of the polymer upon irradiation under both air and nitrogen atmospheres. Considerable degradation is seen with {sup 1}H NMR in the vinyl chloride region of the polymer, particularly in the samples irradiated in air. {sup 19}F MAS NMR was used to investigate speciation in the chlorotrifluoroethylene blocks, though negligible changes were seen. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR at elevated temperature revealed increased segmental mobility and decreased structural heterogeneity within the polymer, yielding significant resolution enhancement over room temperature solid state detection. The effects of multi-site exchange are manifest in both the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR spectra as a line broadening and change in peak position as a function of temperature.

  3. Spectral analysis, vibrational assignments, NBO analysis, NMR, UV-Vis, hyperpolarizability analysis of 2-aminofluorene by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jone Pradeepa, S; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-05-05

    In this present investigation, the collective experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational analysis and NBO analysis has been reported for 2-aminofluorene. FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-400 cm(-1). FT-Raman spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-50 cm(-1). The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) were calculated for 2-aminofluorene using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model chemistry. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of 2-aminofluorene were calculated using GIAO method. The computed vibrational and NMR spectra were compared with the experimental results. The total energy distribution (TED) was derived to deepen the understanding of different modes of vibrations contributed by respective wavenumber. The experimental UV-Vis spectra was recorded in the region of 400-200 nm and correlated with simulated spectra by suitably solvated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model. The HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with time dependent DFT approach. The nonlinearity of the title compound was confirmed by hyperpolarizabilty examination. Using theoretical calculation Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) was investigated.

  4. Optimized multi-step NMR-crystallography approach for structural characterization of a stable quercetin solvate.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Miclaus, Maria; Martin, Flavia; Filip, Claudiu; Grosu, Ioana Georgeta

    2017-01-31

    Herein we report the preparation and solid state structural investigation of the 1,4-dioxane-quercetin solvate. NMR crystallography methods were employed for crystal structure determination of the solvate from microcrystalline powder. The stability of the compound relative to other reported quercetin solvates is discussed and found to be in perfect agreement with the hydrogen bonding networks/supra-molecular architectures formed in each case. It is also clearly shown that NMR crystallography represents an ideal analytical tool in such cases when hydrogen-bonding networks are required to be constrained at a high accuracy level.

  5. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  6. Structural determination of larger proteins using stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.; Hernandez, G.; Springer, P.; Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.; Lidstrom, M.

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to employ stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy to study protein structures and provide insight into important biochemical problems. A methylotrophic bacterial expression system has been developed for uniform deuterium and carbon-13 labeling of proteins for structural studies. These organisms grow using methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy. Because isotopically labeled methanol is relatively inexpensive, the methylotrophs are ideal for expressing proteins labeled uniformly with deuterium and/or carbon-13. This expression system has been employed to prepare deuterated troponin C. NMR spectroscopy measurements have been made on the inhibitory peptide from troponin I (residues 96--115), both as the free peptide and the peptide complexed with deuterated troponin C. Proton-NMR spectroscopy resonance-signal assignments have been made for the free peptide.

  7. Proton–proton Overhauser NMR spectroscopy with polypeptide chains in large structures

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wider, Gerhard; Fiaux, Jocelyne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The use of 1H–1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) for structural studies of uniformly deuterated polypeptide chains in large structures is investigated by model calculations and NMR experiments. Detailed analysis of the evolution of the magnetization during 1H–1H NOE experiments under slow-motion conditions shows that the maximal 1H–1H NOE transfer is independent of the overall rotational correlation time, even in the presence of chemical exchange with the bulk water, provided that the mixing time is adjusted for the size of the structure studied. 1H–1H NOE buildup measurements were performed for the 472-kDa complex of the 72-kDa cochaperonin GroES with a 400-kDa single-ring variant of the chaperonin GroEL (SR1). These experiments demonstrate that multidimensional NOESY experiments with cross-correlated relaxation-enhanced polarization transfer and transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy elements can be applied to structures of molecular masses up to several hundred kilodaltabs, which opens new possibilities for studying functional interactions in large maromolecular assemblies in solution. PMID:17032756

  8. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  9. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure-activity relationship, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement's (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10-13, pp. 176-187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277-298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111-138). Our approach uses NVR's scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR's data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR's assignment accuracy on NVR's test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs.

  10. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data.

  11. Structural elucidation of the Brucella melitensis M antigen by high-resolution NMR at 500 MHz.

    PubMed

    Bundle, D R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Perry, M B

    1987-12-29

    The Brucella M antigen from the species type strain Brucella melitensis 16M has been identified as a component of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). O polysaccharide liberated from this LPS by mild acid hydrolysis exhibited M activity in serological tests and was shown to be a homopolymer of 4-formamido-4,6-dideoxy-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl residues arranged in an oligosaccharide repeating unit as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native lipopolysaccharide. Structural analysis of the O polysaccharide by NMR methods was difficult due to apparent microheterogeneity of the repeating unit, which was in fact caused by the presence of rotational isomers of the N-formyl moiety. This problem was resolved by chemical modification of the polysaccharide to its amino and N-acetyl derivatives, the 500-MHz 1H and 125-MHz 13C NMR spectra of which could be analyzed in terms of a unique structure through application of pH-dependent beta-shifts and two-dimensional techniques that included COSY, relayed COSY, and NOESY experiments together with heteronuclear C/H shift correlation spectroscopy. On the basis of these experiments and supported by methylation and periodate oxidation data, the structure of the M polysaccharide was determined as a linear polymer of unbranched pentasaccharide repeating units consisting of four 1,2-linked and one 1,3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl residues. The marked structural similarity of the M antigen and the A antigen, which is known to be a 1,2-linked homopolysaccharide of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl units, accounts for cross-serological reactions of the two and the long-standing confusion surrounding the nature of their antigenic determinants. Structural and serological considerations in conjuction with the sodium dodecyl sulfate banding pattern of Brucella A LPS suggest that its biosynthesis differs appreciably from that of the M antigen, which appears to be

  12. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  13. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  14. Combined Analysis of Stable Isotope, (1)H NMR, and Fatty Acid To Verify Sesame Oil Authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongeun; Jin, Gyungsu; Lee, Yunhee; Chun, Hyang Sook; Ahn, Sangdoo; Kim, Byung Hee

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to verify the authenticity of sesame oils using combined analysis of stable isotope ratio, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and fatty acid profiles of the oils. Analytical data were obtained from 35 samples of authentic sesame oils and 29 samples of adulterated sesame oils currently distributed in Korea. The orthogonal projection to latent structure discriminant analysis technique was used to select variables that most effectively verify the sesame oil authenticity. The variables include δ(13)C value, integration values of NMR peaks that signify the CH3 of n-3 fatty acids, CH2 between two C═C, protons from sesamin/sesamolin, and 18:1n-9, 18:3n-3, 18:2t, and 18:3t content values. The authenticity of 65 of 70 blind samples was correctly verified by applying the range of the eight variables found in the authentic sesame oil samples, suggesting that triple analysis is a useful approach to verify sesame oil authenticity.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of the Aβ21–30 Peptide from the Interplay of NMR Experiments and Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fawzi, Nicolas L.; Phillips, Aaron H.; Ruscio, Jory Z.; Doucleff, Michaeleen; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics simulations and new high-field NMR experiments to describe the solution structure of the Aβ21–30 peptide fragment that may be relevant for understanding structural mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s disease. By using two different empirical force-field combinations, we provide predictions of the three-bond scalar coupling constants (3JHNHα), chemical-shift values, 13C relaxation parameters, and rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) crosspeaks that can then be compared directly to the same observables measured in the corresponding NMR experiment of Aβ21–30. We find robust prediction of the 13C relaxation parameters and medium-range ROESY crosspeaks by using new generation TIP4P-Ew water and Amber ff99SB protein force fields, in which the NMR validates that the simulation yields both a structurally and dynamically correct ensemble over the entire Aβ21–30 peptide. Analysis of the simulated ensemble shows that all medium-range ROE restraints are not satisfied simultaneously and demonstrates the structural diversity of the Aβ21–30 conformations more completely than when determined from the experimental medium-range ROE restraints alone. We find that the structural ensemble of the Aβ21–30 peptide involves a majority population (~60%) of unstructured conformers, lacking any secondary structure or persistent hydrogen-bonding networks. However, the remaining minority population contains a substantial percentage of conformers with a β-turn centered at Val24 and Gly25, as well as evidence of the Asp23 to Lys28 salt bridge important to the fibril structure. This study sets the stage for robust theoretical work on Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, for which collection of detailed NMR data on the monomer will be more challenging because of aggregation and fibril formation on experimental timescales at physiological conditions. In addition, we believe that the interplay of modern molecular simulation and high

  16. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43− ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO32− range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. PMID:24273344

  17. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from (31)P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis.

    PubMed

    McElderry, John-David P; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Franceschi, Renny T; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M J; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and (31)P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse (31)P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO4(3-) ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO3(2-) range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the (31)P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  18. Stacking structure of confined 1-butanol in SBA-15 investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Chih; Chou, Hung-Lung; Sarma, Loka Subramanyam; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2009-10-12

    Understanding the complex thermodynamic behavior of confined amphiphilic molecules in biological or mesoporous hosts requires detailed knowledge of the stacking structures. Here, we present detailed solid-state NMR spectroscopic investigations on 1-butanol molecules confined in the hydrophilic mesoporous SBA-15 host. A range of NMR spectroscopic measurements comprising of (1)H spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation, (13)C cross-polarization (CP), and (1)H,(1)H two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ((1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY) with the magic angle spinning (MAS) technique as well as static wide-line (2)H NMR spectra have been used to investigate the dynamics and to observe the stacking structure of confined 1-butanol in SBA-15. The results suggest that not only the molecular reorientation but also the exchange motions of confined molecules of 1-butanol are extremely restricted in the confined space of the SBA-15 pores. The dynamics of the confined molecules of 1-butanol imply that the (1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY should be an appropriate technique to observe the stacking structure of confined amphiphilc molecules. This study is the first to observe that a significant part of confined 1-butanol molecules are orientated as tilted bilayered structures on the surface of the host SBA-15 pores in a time-average state by solid-state NMR spectroscopy with the (1)H,(1)H 2D NOESY technique.

  19. Silver metallation of hen egg white lysozyme: X-ray crystal structure and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Panzner, Matthew J; Bilinovich, Stephanie M; Youngs, Wiley J; Leeper, Thomas C

    2011-12-14

    The X-ray crystal structure, NMR binding studies, and enzyme activity of silver(I) metallated hen egg white lysozyme are presented. Primary bonding of silver is observed through His15 with secondary bonding interactions coming from nearby Arg14 and Asp87. A covalently bound nitrate completes a four coordinate binding pocket.

  20. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  1. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-06

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure.

  2. Structure elucidation and NMR assignments of two unusual monoterpene indole alkaloids from Psychotria stachyoides.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Antonia Torres Avila; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Delprete, Piero Giuseppe; de Souza, Elnatan Bezerra; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Lima, Mary Anne Sousa

    2010-09-01

    Two unusual monoterpene indole alkaloids, stachyoside (1) and nor-methyl-23-oxo-correantoside (2), have been isolated from the aerial parts of Psychotria stachyoides. The structural elucidation of both compounds was performed by the aid of HRESIMS, FT-IR, and 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques including COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY.

  3. An NMR Strategy for Unraveling Structures of Bioactive Sponge-derived Oxy-polyhalogenated Diphenyl Ethers⊥

    PubMed Central

    Calcul, Laurent; Chow, Raymond; Oliver, Allen G.; Tenney, Karen; White, Kimberly N.; Wood, Alexander W.; Fiorilla, Catherine; Crews, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    The over-expression of the Mcl-1 protein in cancerous cells results in the sequestering of Bak, a key component in the regulation of normal cell apoptosis. Our investigation of the ability of marine-derived small molecule natural products to inhibit this protein-protein interaction led to the isolation of several bioactive oxy-polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers. A semi-pure extract, previously obtained from Dysidea (Lamellodysidea) herbacea and preserved in our repository, along with an untouched Dysidea granulosa marine sponge afforded 13 distinct oxy-polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers. Among these isolates were four new compounds, 5, 6, 10, and 12. The structure elucidation of these molecules was complicated by the plethora of structural variants that exist in the literature. During dereplication, we established a systematic method for analyzing this class of compounds. The strategy is governed by trends in the 1H and 13C NMR shifts of the aromatic rings and the success of the strategy was checked by X-ray crystal structure analysis. PMID:19323567

  4. NMR strategy for unraveling structures of bioactive sponge-derived oxy-polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Calcul, Laurent; Chow, Raymond; Oliver, Allen G; Tenney, Karen; White, Kimberly N; Wood, Alexander W; Fiorilla, Catherine; Crews, Phillip

    2009-03-27

    The overexpression of the Mcl-1 protein in cancerous cells results in the sequestering of Bak, a key component in the regulation of normal cell apoptosis. Our investigation of the ability of marine-derived small-molecule natural products to inhibit this protein-protein interaction led to the isolation of several bioactive oxy-polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers. A semipure extract, previously obtained from Dysidea (Lamellodysidea) herbacea and preserved in our repository, along with an untouched Dysidea granulosa marine sponge afforded 13 distinct oxy-polyhalogenated diphenyl ethers. Among these isolates were four new compounds, 5, 6, 10, and 12. The structure elucidation of these molecules was complicated by the plethora of structural variants that exist in the literature. During dereplication, we established a systematic method for analyzing this class of compounds. The strategy is governed by trends in the (1)H and (13)C NMR shifts of the aromatic rings, and the success of the strategy was checked by X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  5. NMR-based analysis of the chemical composition of Japanese persimmon aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shoraku; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Wei, Feifei; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    Japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) is recognized as an outstanding source of biologically active compounds relating to many health benefits. In the present study, NMR spectroscopy provided a comprehensive metabolic overview of Japanese persimmon juice. Detailed signal assignments of Japanese persimmon juice were carried out using various 2D NMR techniques incorporated with broadband water suppression enhanced through T1 effects (BB-WET) or WET sequences, and 26 components, including minor components, were identified. In addition, most components were quantitatively evaluated by the integration of signals using conventional (1) H NMR and BB-WET NMR. This is the first detailed analysis combined with quantitative characterization of chemical components using NMR for Japanese persimmon. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Analysis of mass-limited mixtures using supercritical-fluid chromatography and microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; van Meerten, S Bas G J; Kentgens, Arno P M; van Bentum, P Jan M

    2015-09-21

    A protocol is presented for offline microfluidic NMR analysis hyphenated with supercritical chromatographic separation. The method demonstrates quantitative detection with good sensitivity. Typical sample amounts of 10 nanomoles can be detected in a fast and cost-effective manner.

  7. Intercalation complex of proflavine with DNA: Structure and dynamics by solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Pei; Juang, Chilong; Harbison, G.S. )

    1990-07-06

    The structure of the complex formed between the intercalating agent proflavine and fibrous native DNA was studied by one- and two-dimensional high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Carbon-13-labeled proflavine was used to show that the drug is stacked with the aromatic ring plane perpendicular to the fiber axis and that it is essentially immobile. Natural abundance carbon-13 NMR of the DNA itself shows that proflavine binding does not change the puckering of the deoxyribose ring. However, phosphorus-31 NMR spectra show profound changes in the orientation of the phosphodiester grouping on proflavine binding, with some of the phosphodiesters tilting almost parallel to the helix axis, and a second set almost perpendicular. The first group to the phosphodiesters probably spans the intercalation sites, whereas the tilting of the second set likely compensates for the unwinding of the DNA by the intercalator.

  8. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  9. NMR solution structure of Ole e 6, a major allergen from olive tree pollen.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Miguel Angel; García-Mayoral, María Flor; Barral, Patricia; Villalba, Mayte; Santoro, Jorge; Rico, Manuel; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Bruix, Marta

    2004-09-10

    Ole e 6 is a pollen protein from the olive tree (Olea europaea) that exhibits allergenic activity with a high prevalence among olive-allergic individuals. The three-dimensional structure of Ole e 6 has been determined in solution by NMR methods. This is the first experimentally determined structure of an olive tree pollen allergen. The structure of this 50-residue protein is based on 486 upper limit distance constraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effects and 24 torsion angle restraints. The global fold of Ole e 6 consists of two nearly antiparallel alpha-helices, spanning residues 3-19 and 23-33, that are connected by a short loop and followed by a long, unstructured C-terminal tail. Viewed edge-on, the structured N terminus has a dumbbell-like shape with the two helices on the outside and with the hydrophobic core, mainly composed of 3 aromatic and 6 cysteine residues, on the inside. All the aromatic rings lie on top of and pack against the three disulfide bonds. The lack of thermal unfolding, even at 85 degrees C, indicates a high conformational stability. Based on the analysis of the molecular surface, we propose five plausible epitopes for IgE recognition. The results presented here provide the structural foundation for future experiments to verify the antigenicity of the proposed epitopes, as well as to design novel hypoallergenic forms of the protein suitable for diagnosis and treatment of type-I allergies. In addition, three-dimensional structure features of Ole e 6 are discussed to provide a basis for future functional studies.

  10. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-07-20

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs. Here, we describe procedures to monitor the quality of aqueous solutions of [(2)H, (15)N]-labeled IMPs reconstituted in detergent micelles. This approach has been developed for studies of β-barrel IMPs, where it was successfully applied for numerous NMR structure determinations, and it has also been adapted for use with α-helical IMPs, in particular GPCRs, in guiding crystallization trials and optimizing samples for NMR studies (Horst et al., 2013). 2D [(15)N, (1)H]-correlation maps are used as "fingerprints" to assess the foldedness of the IMP in solution. For promising samples, these "inexpensive" data are then supplemented with measurements of the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, which give information on the shape and size of the IMP/detergent mixed micelles. Using microcoil equipment for these NMR experiments enables data collection with only micrograms of protein and detergent. This makes serial screens of variable solution conditions viable, enabling the optimization of parameters such as the detergent concentration, sample temperature, pH and the composition of the buffer.

  11. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs. Here, we describe procedures to monitor the quality of aqueous solutions of [2H, 15N]-labeled IMPs reconstituted in detergent micelles. This approach has been developed for studies of β-barrel IMPs, where it was successfully applied for numerous NMR structure determinations, and it has also been adapted for use with α-helical IMPs, in particular GPCRs, in guiding crystallization trials and optimizing samples for NMR studies (Horst et al., 2013). 2D [15N, 1H]-correlation maps are used as “fingerprints” to assess the foldedness of the IMP in solution. For promising samples, these “inexpensive” data are then supplemented with measurements of the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients, which give information on the shape and size of the IMP/detergent mixed micelles. Using microcoil equipment for these NMR experiments enables data collection with only micrograms of protein and detergent. This makes serial screens of variable solution conditions viable, enabling the optimization of parameters such as the detergent concentration, sample temperature, pH and the composition of the buffer. PMID:27077076

  12. Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Quine, J R; Achuthan, S; Asbury, T; Bertram, R; Chapman, M S; Hu, J; Cross, T A

    2006-04-01

    The solid-state NMR experiment PISEMA, is a technique for determining structures of proteins, especially membrane proteins, from oriented samples. One method for determining the structure is to find orientations of local molecular frames (peptide planes) with respect to the unit magnetic field direction, B0. This is done using equations that compute the coordinates of this vector in the frames. This requires an analysis of the PISEMA function and its degeneracies. As a measure of the sensitivity of peptide plane orientations to the data, we use these equations to derive a formula for the intensity function in the powder pattern. With this function and other measures, we investigate the effect of small changes in peptide plane orientations depending on the location of the resonances in the powder pattern spectrum. This gives us an indication of the change in lineshape due to mosaic spread and a way to interpret these in terms of an orientational error bar.

  13. Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, J. R.; Achuthan, S.; Asbury, T.; Bertram, R.; Chapman, M. S.; Hu, J.; Cross, T. A.

    2006-04-01

    The solid-state NMR experiment PISEMA, is a technique for determining structures of proteins, especially membrane proteins, from oriented samples. One method for determining the structure is to find orientations of local molecular frames (peptide planes) with respect to the unit magnetic field direction, B0. This is done using equations that compute the coordinates of this vector in the frames. This requires an analysis of the PISEMA function and its degeneracies. As a measure of the sensitivity of peptide plane orientations to the data, we use these equations to derive a formula for the intensity function in the powder pattern. With this function and other measures, we investigate the effect of small changes in peptide plane orientations depending on the location of the resonances in the powder pattern spectrum. This gives us an indication of the change in lineshape due to mosaic spread and a way to interpret these in terms of an orientational error bar.

  14. Quality evaluation and prediction of Citrullus lanatus by 1H NMR-based metabolomics and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarachiwin, Lucksanaporn; Masako, Osawa; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2008-07-23

    (1)H NMR spectrometry in combination with multivariate analysis was considered to provide greater information on quality assessment over an ordinary sensory testing method due to its high reliability and high accuracy. The sensory quality evaluation of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) was carried out by means of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics. Multivariate analyses by partial least-squares projections to latent structures-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA) and PLS-regression offered extensive information for quality differentiation and quality evaluation, respectively. The impact of watermelon and rootstock cultivars on the sensory qualities of watermelon was determined on the basis of (1)H NMR metabolic fingerprinting and profiling. The significant metabolites contributing to the discrimination were also identified. A multivariate calibration model was successfully constructed by PLS-regression with extremely high reliability and accuracy. Thus, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics with multivariate analysis was considered to be one of the most suitable complementary techniques that could be applied to assess and predict the sensory quality of watermelons and other horticultural plants.

  15. Structural changes of lipoprotein lipids by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-Korpela, M.; Oja, J.; Lounila, J.; Jokisaari, J.; Savolainen, M. J.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.

    1995-08-01

    A new procedure for detecting structural changes of lipoprotein lipids is introduced and applied to study native low (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The method involves lineshape fitting analyses of specific resonances in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra together with numerical derivation of the obtained intensity curves with respect to temperature. In addition to the well-known phase transition of the LDL core cholesterol esters, a novel structural change was revealed in the phospholipid monolayer of both native LDL and HDL particles. The attributes of this phenomenon are discussed.

  16. The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of measuring the change in moisture content of the Eagle Butte and Usebelli coals as a function of time are shown in Figure 1. As expected, the measured moisture content increases with time and reaches a maximum after about 8 hours. Two different types of sorbed water are removed sequentially. Free or surface sorbed water is rapidly removed followed by the water in the micropores of the coal as the reagents migrate into the pore structure. There appears to be an induction period of about 4 hours for the Eagle Butte coal before the moisture content increases more rapidly with time due to the reactions of the more tightly bound or pore'' water with the reagents. The chemical drying experiment was repeated twice for the Usebelli coal. In the first experiment, aliquots of the reaction mixture were removed sequentially, and in the second experiment separate coal samples were prepared and allowed to stand until the appropriate time for the NMR spectrum to be acquired. Excellent reproducibility was obtained. Both cools were thermally dried by heating to 110[degrees]C for 1 hour. The moisture content was determined by weight loss. Using the thermal drying method, the Eagle Butte coal had a moisture content of 16.6 wt % and the Usebelli coal a moisture content of 14.1 wt %. These values are near the moisture content of coal as determined by chemical drying.

  17. The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    The results of measuring the change in moisture content of the Eagle Butte and Usebelli coals as a function of time are shown in Figure 1. As expected, the measured moisture content increases with time and reaches a maximum after about 8 hours. Two different types of sorbed water are removed sequentially. Free or surface sorbed water is rapidly removed followed by the water in the micropores of the coal as the reagents migrate into the pore structure. There appears to be an induction period of about 4 hours for the Eagle Butte coal before the moisture content increases more rapidly with time due to the reactions of the more ``tightly bound or ``pore`` water with the reagents. The chemical drying experiment was repeated twice for the Usebelli coal. In the first experiment, aliquots of the reaction mixture were removed sequentially, and in the second experiment separate coal samples were prepared and allowed to stand until the appropriate time for the NMR spectrum to be acquired. Excellent reproducibility was obtained. Both cools were thermally dried by heating to 110{degrees}C for 1 hour. The moisture content was determined by weight loss. Using the thermal drying method, the Eagle Butte coal had a moisture content of 16.6 wt % and the Usebelli coal a moisture content of 14.1 wt %. These values are near the moisture content of coal as determined by chemical drying.

  18. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  19. Quantitative 2D HSQC NMR determination of polymer structures by selecting suitable internal standard references.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liming; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2007-01-01

    A new analytical method based on the 2D HSQC NMR sequence is presented, which can be applied for quantitative structural determination of complicated polymers. The influence of T1 and T2 relaxations, off-resonance effects, coupling constants and homonuclear couplings are discussed. It was found that the T2 values measured on polymeric samples with the conventional HSQC-CPMG sequence could not be used to correct the errors caused by T2 relaxations during the polarization transfer delay. A unique way of selecting the proper internal standard reference signal(s) is therefore proposed to eliminate the major errors caused by T2 relaxations, resonance offsets, coupling constant deviations and homonuclear couplings. Two polymer samples, a cellulose triacetate and an acetylated lignin, have been used to illustrate the principles. The methodology developed in this work is robust to instrument miss-setting and it can find wide-spread applications in areas where a quantitative analysis of structurally complicated polymers is necessary.

  20. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924.

  1. NMR structural determination of unique invertebrate glycosaminoglycans endowed with medical properties.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-09-02

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are sulfated polysaccharides of complex structure endowed with numerous biomedical functions. Although ubiquitously distributed in vertebrates, GAGs can also occur in certain terrestrial or marine invertebrates. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been the analytical technique mostly employed in structural characterization of GAGs from any source. This review aims at illustrating the application of NMR in structural determination of few representative invertebrate GAG examples of unique structures and endowed with therapeutic actions. They are the holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, the acharan sulfate isolated from the snail Achatina fulica, the dermatan sulfates with distinct sulfation patterns extracted from ascidian species, the sulfated glucuronic acid-containing heparan sulfate isolated from the gastropode Nodipecten nodosum, and the hybrid heparin/heparan sulfate molecule obtained from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. These invertebrate GAGs exhibit distinct structures when compared to those extracted from mammalian GAGs. The distinct structures of the invertebrate GAGs lead also to different mechanisms of actions as compared to the mammalian GAG standards. Invertebrate GAGs comprise promising therapeutic candidates in fights against diseases. Solution NMR has been playing a pivotal role in this carbohydrate-based drug research, discovery and development.

  2. Stereospecific assignment of 1H resonances through chemical shift calculation and their use in structure determination by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Timothy S.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    1995-04-01

    Understanding of the factors which influence proton chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins has advanced steadily as the number of proteins, for which assignments in conjunction with high resolution structures have been obtained, has increased. Progress has been made in both the calculation of chemical shifts from given coordinates, both empirically for 1H (Williamson & Asakura J. Magn. Reson. (1991) 94, 557) and using ab initio approaches for calculation of 13C (De Dios et al. Science (1993) 260, 1491). Concomitantly Wishart et al. (J. Mol. Biol. (1992) 222, 311), using statistical methods have clarified the relationship between Hα chemical shift and regular secondary structure in proteins to a high degree of accuracy. We recently demonstrated the significant amount of structural information present in the Hα chemical shift through the use of chemical shift restrained molecular dynamics simulations (Harvey & van Gunsteren Techniques in Protein Chemistry IV (1993) 615, Academic Press). Here we apply a similar methodology to the stereospecific assignment of methylene and methyl proton resonances in proteins. Stereospecific assignment of such 1H resonances dramatically increases the degree of precision of ensembles of structures derived from NMR data. However, this is often a cumbersome process, requiring detailed analysis of large amounts of data. Furthermore, experimental considerations such as poor signal-to-noise ratios, spectral overlap and spin diffusion combine to make this process somewhat unreliable. We present calculations of the chemical shifts for the known structures of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Mw 6.5 kDa) and the α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat (Mw 8 kDa), for which stereospecific assignments and high resolution structures from both NMR and crystallographic studies are available. The methods described are also applied to the ensemble of structures obtained for protein S (Mw 19 kDa) for both structure

  3. Synthesis and structural analysis using 2-D NMR of Sialyl Lewis X (SLe{sup x}) and Lewis X (Le{sup x}) oligosaccharides: Ligands related to E-selectin [ELAM-1] binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, G.E.; Nagy, J.O.; Brown, E.G.

    1992-06-17

    The sialyl Lewis X (SLe{sup x}) determinant (NeuAc-{alpha}-2,3-Gal-{beta}-1,4-[Fuc-{alpha}-1,3]-GlcNAc), compound 1, is a ligand for E-selectin (endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule 1, or ELAM-1), a member of the selectin family of cell adhesion molecules. Interactions between E-selectin and leucocyte-bound SLe{sup x} or closely related oligosaccharides are thought to be important early events in the inflammation process. Binding analysis has shown that the sialic acid (NeuAc) and the fucose (Fuc) moieties are essential for high affinity. The related desialylated trisaccharide Le{sup x} (Gas-{beta}-1,4-[Fuc-{alpha}-1,3]-GlcNAc), for example, is not a high-affinity ligand for E-selectin. In this communication, the authors describe the syntheses of SLe{sup x} 1 and the {beta}-O-allyl glycoside of Le{sup x} 2 using a cloned fucosyltransferase and their complete NMR spectral assignments including ROESY and NOESY experiments in order to investigate the conformation of these compounds in solution. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Isoxazole derivatives of alpha-pinene isomers: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR/NMR/GC-MS) and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryılmaz, Serpil; Gül, Melek; İnkaya, Ersin; Taş, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the alpha-pinene isoxazole derivatives (3a-b-c, 4a-b) were synthesized via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and characterized with FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and GC-MS. Isoxazole (C21H23NO) compound (4a) 6,6,7a,-trimethyl-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydro-5,7-methanobenzo[d] was characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P 212121, with Z = 4. The molecular geometry of the compound was optimized by applying Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(d,p) basis sets in the ground state and geometric parameters were compared with the X-ray analysis results of the structure. Results of the experimental FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis were examined in order to determine the compliance with vibrational frequencies, 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts values by using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method calculated over the optimized structure. Besides molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), some global reactivity descriptors, thermodynamic properties, non-linear optical (NLO) behaviour and Mulliken charge analysis of the (4a) compound were computed with the same method in gas phase, theoretically.

  5. The nociceptin pharmacophore site for opioid receptor binding derived from the NMR structure and bioactivity relationships.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Michael J; Nesmelova, Irina; Young, Helen C; Hargittai, Balazs; Beavers, Mary Pat; Liu, Jingchun; Connolly, Peter J; Middleton, Steven A; Mayo, Kevin H

    2005-03-04

    Nociceptin, a 17 amino acid opioid-like peptide that has an inhibitory effect on synaptic transmission in the nervous system, is involved in learning, memory, attention, and emotion and is also implicated in the perception of pain and visual, auditory, and olfactory functions. In this study, we investigated the NMR solution structure of nociceptin in membrane-like environments (trifluoroethanol and SDS micelles) and found it to have a relatively stable helix conformation from residues 4-17 with functionally important N-terminal residues being folded aperidoically on top of the helix. In functional assays for receptor binding and calcium flux, alanine-scanning variants of nociceptin indicated that functionally important residues generally followed helix periodicity, consistent with the NMR structural model. Structure-activity relationships allowed identification of pharmacophore sites that were used in small molecule data base searches, affording hits with demonstrated nociceptin receptor binding affinities.

  6. Determination of the Structural Basis of Antibody Diversity Using NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-14

    22. Perkins, S.J. and Dwek, R.A. (1980). Comparison of Ring-Current Shifts Calculated from the Crystal Structure of Egg White Lysozyme 27 of Hen with...the first and second kind with modulus k = 2 J (4) + p) 2 + z 2 Values for the parameters a and i are giver, in Table I. The separation of the current...the sp 2 plane of the two doublely bonded nuclei. The current loops were separated from this plane by 0.638 A. Each ring was given one electron. The

  7. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  9. Ab initio crystal structure prediction of magnesium (poly)sulfides and calculation of their NMR parameters.

    PubMed

    Mali, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio prediction of sensible crystal structures can be regarded as a crucial task in the quickly-developing methodology of NMR crystallography. In this contribution, an evolutionary algorithm was used for the prediction of magnesium (poly)sulfide crystal structures with various compositions. The employed approach successfully identified all three experimentally detected forms of MgS, i.e. the stable rocksalt form and the metastable wurtzite and zincblende forms. Among magnesium polysulfides with a higher content of sulfur, the most probable structure with the lowest formation energy was found to be MgS2, exhibiting a modified rocksalt structure, in which S(2-) anions were replaced by S2(2-) dianions. Magnesium polysulfides with even larger fractions of sulfur were not predicted to be stable. For the lowest-energy structures, (25)Mg quadrupolar coupling constants and chemical shift parameters were calculated using the density functional theory approach. The calculated NMR parameters could be well rationalized by the symmetries of the local magnesium environments, by the coordination of magnesium cations and by the nature of the surrounding anions. In the future, these parameters could serve as a reference for the experimentally determined (25)Mg NMR parameters of magnesium sulfide species.

  10. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    PubMed

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  11. The application of high resolution diffusion NMR to the analysis of manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Gresley, Adam Le; Kenny, Jackie; Cassar, Claire; Kelly, Alison; Sinclair, Alex; Fielder, Mark D

    2012-12-15

    The application of DOSY (Diffusion Ordered SpectroscopY) NMR as a technique for the virtual separation of key components of manuka honey and the implications for future discriminatory analysis of honey types is reported for the first time. The scope and the limitations of DOSY NMR are considered using the recently conceived DOSY Tool Box processing software and preliminary anti-bacterial data for the different honey types is reported.

  12. Structure determination of noncanonical RNA motifs guided by 1H NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Sripakdeevong, Parin; Cevec, Mirko; Chang, Andrew T.; Erat, Michèle C.; Ziegeler, Melanie; Zhao, Qin; Fox, George E.; Gao, Xiaolian; Kennedy, Scott D.; Kierzek, Ryszard; Nikonowicz, Edward P.; Schwalbe, Harald; Sigel, Roland K. O.; Turner, Douglas H.; Das, Rhiju

    2014-01-01

    Structured non-coding RNAs underline fundamental cellular processes, but determining their 3D structures remains challenging. We demonstrate herein that integrating NMR 1H chemical shift data with Rosetta de novo modeling can consistently return high-resolution RNA structures. On a benchmark set of 23 noncanonical RNA motifs, including 11 blind targets, Chemical-Shift-ROSETTA for RNA (CS-ROSETTA-RNA) recovered the experimental structures with high accuracy (0.6 to 2.0 Å all-heavy-atom rmsd) in 18 cases. PMID:24584194

  13. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  14. Molecular structure, spectral investigation (1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR, FT-Raman), NBO, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, chemical reactivity and first hyperpolarizability analysis of formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone]: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone or 4‧-methoxy daidzein] is a soy isoflavonoid that is found abundantly in traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus mongholicus (Bunge) and Trifolium pretense L. (red clover), and in an Indian medicinal plant, Butea (B.) monosperma. Crude extract of B.monosperma is used for rapid healing of fracture in Indian traditional medicine. In this study, a combined theoretical and experimental approach is used to study the properties of formononetin. The optimized geometry was calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to explore the nonlinear optical properties of the molecule. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and observed data for the electronic absorption, IR and Raman spectra. The solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model, and the results are in good agreement with observed measurements. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about the respective bonds, have been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis set. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of formononetin. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Chemical reactivity has been measured by reactivity descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, the role of CHsbnd O intramolecular hydrogen bond in the stability of molecule is investigated on the basis of the results of topological properties of AIM theory and NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability shows

  15. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e−07) corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and 13C- and 15N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β-sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages) due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum. PMID:22837698

  16. Solution NMR structure of hypothetical protein CV_2116 encoded by a viral prophage element in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunhuang; Ramelot, Theresa A; Cort, John R; Garcia, Maite; Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kennedy, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e(-07)) corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and (13)C- and (15)N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β-sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages) due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum.

  17. Synthesis, NMR, FT-IR, X-ray structural characterization, DFT analysis and isomerism aspects of 5-(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Assem; Al-Najjar, Hany J.; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M.; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Shaik, Mohammed Rafi; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis and spectral characterization of the 5-(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione;3 was reported. The solid state molecular structure of 3 was studied using X-ray crystallography. The relative stabilities of the seven possible isomers of 3 were calculated by DFT/B3LYP method using 6-311G(d,p) basis set. The calculated total energies and thermodynamic parameters were used to predict the relative stabilities of these isomers. The effect of solvent polarity on the relative stability of these isomers was studied at the same level of theory using PCM. It was found that the keto form, (T0), is the most stable isomer both in the gaseous state and solution. In solution, the calculated total energies of all isomers are decreased indicating that all isomers are stabilized by the solvent effect. The vibrational spectra of the most stable isomer, 3(T0) are calculated using the same level of theory and the results are compared with the experimentally measured FTIR spectra. Good correlation was obtained between the experimental and calculated vibrational frequencies (R2 = 0.9992). The electronic spectra of 3(T0) in gas phase as well as in solutions were calculated using the TD-DFT method. All the predicted electronic transitions showed very little spectral shifts and increase in the intensity of absorption due to solvent effect. Also the 1H- and 13C-NMR chemical shifts of the stable isomer were calculated and the results were correlated with the experimental data. Good correlations between the experimental and calculated chemical shifts were obtained.

  18. Synthesis, NMR, FT-IR, X-ray structural characterization, DFT analysis and isomerism aspects of 5-(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Assem; Al-Najjar, Hany J; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Shaik, Mohammed Rafi; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-08-05

    The synthesis and spectral characterization of the 5-(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione;3 was reported. The solid state molecular structure of 3 was studied using X-ray crystallography. The relative stabilities of the seven possible isomers of 3 were calculated by DFT/B3LYP method using 6-311 G(d,p) basis set. The calculated total energies and thermodynamic parameters were used to predict the relative stabilities of these isomers. The effect of solvent polarity on the relative stability of these isomers was studied at the same level of theory using PCM. It was found that the keto form, (T0), is the most stable isomer both in the gaseous state and solution. In solution, the calculated total energies of all isomers are decreased indicating that all isomers are stabilized by the solvent effect. The vibrational spectra of the most stable isomer, 3(T0) are calculated using the same level of theory and the results are compared with the experimentally measured FTIR spectra. Good correlation was obtained between the experimental and calculated vibrational frequencies (R(2)=0.9992). The electronic spectra of 3(T0) in gas phase as well as in solutions were calculated using the TD-DFT method. All the predicted electronic transitions showed very little spectral shifts and increase in the intensity of absorption due to solvent effect. Also the (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of the stable isomer were calculated and the results were correlated with the experimental data. Good correlations between the experimental and calculated chemical shifts were obtained.

  19. Structure of (KIAGKIA)3 aggregates in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Toke, Orsolya; O'Connor, R D; Weldeghiorghis, Thomas K; Maloy, W Lee; Glaser, Ralf W; Ulrich, Anne S; Schaefer, Jacob

    2004-07-01

    The interchain (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling measured in a rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) experiment performed on mixtures of differently labeled KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA (K3) peptides (one specifically (13)C labeled, and the other specifically (19)F labeled) in multilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (1:1) shows that K3 forms close-packed clusters, primarily dimers, in bilayers at a lipid/peptide molar ratio (L/P) of 20. Dipolar coupling to additional peptides is weaker than that within the dimers, consistent with aggregates of monomers and dimers. Analysis of the sideband dephasing rates indicates a preferred orientation between the peptide chains of the dimers. The combination of the distance and orientation information from REDOR is consistent with a parallel (N-N) dimer structure in which two K3 helices intersect at a cross-angle of approximately 20 degrees. Static (19)F NMR experiments performed on K3 in oriented lipid bilayers show that between L/P = 200 and L/P = 20, K3 chains change their absolute orientation with respect to the membrane normal. This result suggests that the K3 dimers detected by REDOR at L/P = 20 are not on the surface of the bilayer but are in a membrane pore.

  20. XPS and NMR analysis on 12CaO•7Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, R. K.; Feng, S.; Tao, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    12CaO·7Al2O3 (C12A7) glass was prepared by the melt quenching method. The glass transition temperature (T g) and the crystallization temperature (T c) of C12A7 glass are about 1050 K and 1194 K, respectively, measured by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The structure of C12A7 glass was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR). Analysis shows that Al coordination number is about four in C12A7 glass, in which AlO4 tetrahedrons and bridging oxygens (BO) constitute the glass network. Ca2+ produces a few of non-bridging oxygens (NBO), which become neighbours of Al.

  1. Solution structures of psoralen monoadducted and cross-linked DNA oligomers by NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Dwyer, T.J.; Hearst, J.E. |

    1995-10-10

    We have used two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structures of the 4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) furanside monoadducted (MAf) and the photoisomeric HMT interstrand cross-linked (XL) DNA oligonucleotide d(t{prime}-GCGTACGC-3{prime}){sub 2}. The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for both the MAf and XL from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. 80 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Micro-spectrometer for NMR: analysis of small quantities in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Pitaval, M.; Chahboune, H.; Favre, B.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication and preliminary tests of planar microcoils associated with a micromachined channel in silicon. These microcoils are used as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coils. They allow in vitro NMR analysis of small quantities introduced into the microchannel. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystems for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volumes. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a micro total analysing system (µ-TAS) as an analysing stage. In this paper the description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoil receivers are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed in water and ethanol, using a 500 µm × 500 µm planar microcoil tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz (proton frequency at 2 T).

  3. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  4. An experimental and theoretical investigation of Acenaphthene-5-boronic acid: conformational study, NBO and NLO analysis, molecular structure and FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectra.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Sinha, Leena; Prasad, Onkar; Asiri, Abdullah M; Cinar, Mehmet

    2013-11-01

    The solid state Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Acenaphthene-5-boronic acid (AN-5-BA), have been recorded in the range 4000-400cm(-1) and 4000-10cm(-1), respectively. Density functional theory (DFT), with the B3LYP functional was used for the optimization of the ground state geometry and simulation of the infrared and Raman spectra of the molecule. The vibrational wave numbers and their assignments were examined theoretically using the Gaussian 09 set of quantum chemistry codes and the normal modes were assigned by a scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field approach. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of AN-5-BA, optimized by counterpoise correction, has also been studied by B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by Gauge-Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been applied to study stability of the molecule arising from charge delocalization. UV spectrum of the title compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as frontier orbitals, and band gap energies were measured by TD-DFT approach. The first order hyperpolarizability 〈β〉, its components and associated properties such as average polarizability and anisotropy of the polarizability (α and Δα) of AN-5-BA was calculated using the finite-field approach.

  5. Well-defined azazirconacyclopropane complexes supported on silica structurally determined by 2D NMR comparative elucidation.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Mohamad; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-05-21

    Grafting of Zr(NMe2)4 on mesoporous silica SBA-15 afforded selectively well-defined surface species [triple bond, length as m-dash]SiOZr(NMe2)(η2NMeCH2). 2D solid-state NMR ((1)H-(13)C HETCOR, Multiple Quantum) experiments have shown a unique structural rearrangement occurring on the immobilised zirconium bis methylamido ligand.

  6. Improved reliability, accuracy and quality in automated NMR structure calculation with ARIA.

    PubMed

    Mareuil, Fabien; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Nilges, Michael; Bardiaux, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    In biological NMR, assignment of NOE cross-peaks and calculation of atomic conformations are critical steps in the determination of reliable high-resolution structures. ARIA is an automated approach that performs NOE assignment and structure calculation in a concomitant manner in an iterative procedure. The log-harmonic shape for distance restraint potential and the Bayesian weighting of distance restraints, recently introduced in ARIA, were shown to significantly improve the quality and the accuracy of determined structures. In this paper, we propose two modifications of the ARIA protocol: (1) the softening of the force field together with adapted hydrogen radii, which is meaningful in the context of the log-harmonic potential with Bayesian weighting, (2) a procedure that automatically adjusts the violation tolerance used in the selection of active restraints, based on the fitting of the structure to the input data sets. The new ARIA protocols were fine-tuned on a set of eight protein targets from the CASD-NMR initiative. As a result, the convergence problems previously observed for some targets was resolved and the obtained structures exhibited better quality. In addition, the new ARIA protocols were applied for the structure calculation of ten new CASD-NMR targets in a blind fashion, i.e. without knowing the actual solution. Even though optimisation of parameters and pre-filtering of unrefined NOE peak lists were necessary for half of the targets, ARIA consistently and reliably determined very precise and highly accurate structures for all cases. In the context of integrative structural biology, an increasing number of experimental methods are used that produce distance data for the determination of 3D structures of macromolecules, stressing the importance of methods that successfully make use of ambiguous and noisy distance data.

  7. Homodecoupled 1,1- and 1,n-ADEQUATE: Pivotal NMR Experiments for the Structure Revision of Cryptospirolepine.

    PubMed

    Saurí, Josep; Bermel, Wolfgang; Buevich, Alexei V; Sherer, Edward C; Joyce, Leo A; Sharaf, Maged H M; Schiff, Paul L; Parella, Teodor; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E

    2015-08-24

    Cryptospirolepine is the most structurally complex alkaloid discovered and characterized thus far from any Cryptolepis specie. Characterization of several degradants of the original, sealed NMR sample a decade after the initial report called the validity of the originally proposed structure in question. We now report the development of improved, homodecoupled variants of the 1,1- and 1,n-ADEQUATE (HD-ADEQUATE) NMR experiments; utilization of these techniques was critical to successfully resolving long-standing structural questions associated with crytospirolepine.

  8. Nmrglue: an open source Python package for the analysis of multidimensional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Jonathan J; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-04-01

    Nmrglue, an open source Python package for working with multidimensional NMR data, is described. When used in combination with other Python scientific libraries, nmrglue provides a highly flexible and robust environment for spectral processing, analysis and visualization and includes a number of common utilities such as linear prediction, peak picking and lineshape fitting. The package also enables existing NMR software programs to be readily tied together, currently facilitating the reading, writing and conversion of data stored in Bruker, Agilent/Varian, NMRPipe, Sparky, SIMPSON, and Rowland NMR Toolkit file formats. In addition to standard applications, the versatility offered by nmrglue makes the package particularly suitable for tasks that include manipulating raw spectrometer data files, automated quantitative analysis of multidimensional NMR spectra with irregular lineshapes such as those frequently encountered in the context of biomacromolecular solid-state NMR, and rapid implementation and development of unconventional data processing methods such as covariance NMR and other non-Fourier approaches. Detailed documentation, install files and source code for nmrglue are freely available at http://nmrglue.com. The source code can be redistributed and modified under the New BSD license.

  9. Nmrglue: An Open Source Python Package for the Analysis of Multidimensional NMR Data

    PubMed Central

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Nmrglue, an open source Python package for working with multidimensional NMR data, is described. When used in combination with other Python scientific libraries, nmrglue provides a highly flexible and robust environment for spectral processing, analysis and visualization and includes a number of common utilities such as linear prediction, peak picking and lineshape fitting. The package also enables existing NMR software programs to be readily tied together, currently facilitating the reading, writing and conversion of data stored in Bruker, Agilent/Varian, NMRPipe, Sparky, SIMPSON, and Rowland NMR Toolkit file formats. In addition to standard applications, the versatility offered by nmrglue makes the package particularly suitable for tasks that include manipulating raw spectrometer data files, automated quantitative analysis of multidimensional NMR spectra with irregular lineshapes such as those frequently encountered in the context of biomacromolecular solid-state NMR, and rapid implementation and development of unconventional data processing methods such as covariance NMR and other non-Fourier approaches. Detailed documentation, install files and source code for nmrglue are freely available at http://nmrglue.com. The source code can be redistributed and modified under the New BSD license. PMID:23456039

  10. NMR Determines Transient Structure and Dynamics in the Disordered C-Terminal Domain of WASp Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Haba, Noam Y.; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H.

    2013-01-01

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIPC, a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407–503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIPC and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR13C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, 15N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446–456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468–478. The 13C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIPC polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIPC. Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIPC fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function. PMID:23870269

  11. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGES

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  12. PFG NMR and Bayesian analysis to characterise non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Thomas W.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Stitt, E. Hugh; York, Andrew P. E.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2017-01-01

    Many industrial flow processes are sensitive to changes in the rheological behaviour of process fluids, and there therefore exists a need for methods that provide online, or inline, rheological characterisation necessary for process control and optimisation over timescales of minutes or less. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a non-invasive technique for this application, without limitation on optical opacity. We present a Bayesian analysis approach using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR to enable estimation of the rheological parameters of Herschel-Bulkley fluids in a pipe flow geometry, characterised by a flow behaviour index n , yield stress τ0 , and consistency factor k , by analysis of the signal in q -space. This approach eliminates the need for velocity image acquisition and expensive gradient hardware. We investigate the robustness of the proposed Bayesian NMR approach to noisy data and reduced sampling using simulated NMR data and show that even with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 100, only 16 points are required to be sampled to provide rheological parameters accurate to within 2% of the ground truth. Experimental validation is provided through an experimental case study on Carbopol 940 solutions (model Herschel-Bulkley fluids) using PFG NMR at a 1H resonance frequency of 85.2 MHz; for SNR > 1000, only 8 points are required to be sampled. This corresponds to a total acquisition time of <60 s and represents an 88% reduction in acquisition time when compared to MR flow imaging. Comparison of the shear stress-shear rate relationship, quantified using Bayesian NMR, with non-Bayesian NMR methods demonstrates that the Bayesian NMR approach is in agreement with MR flow imaging to within the accuracy of the measurement. Furthermore, as we increase the concentration of Carbopol 940 we observe a change in rheological characteristics, probably due to shear history-dependent behaviour and the different geometries used. This behaviour highlights the need for

  13. Structural characterization of lignins isolated from Caragana sinica using FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Mohanty, Amar K

    2011-09-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass, six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic solvents and alkaline solutions. The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). FT-IR spectra revealed that the "core" of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given. The results of 1H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2, isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH, was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit. Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum, the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1, extracted with 70% ethanol, presents a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (61% of total side chains), and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as beta-beta', beta-1', and beta-5') and a lower S/G ratio. Furthermore, a small percentage (ca. 9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the gamma-carbon.

  14. NMR strategies to support medicinal chemistry workflows for primary structure determination.

    PubMed

    Oguadinma, Paul; Bilodeau, Francois; LaPlante, Steven R

    2017-01-15

    Central to drug discovery is the correct characterization of the primary structures of compounds. In general, medicinal chemists make great synthetic and characterization efforts to deliver the intended compounds. However, there are occasions which incorrect compounds are presented, such as those reported for Bosutinib and TIC10. This may be due to a variety of reasons such as uncontrolled reaction schemes, reliance on limited characterization techniques (LC-MS and/or 1D 1H NMR spectra), or even the lack of availability or knowledge of characterization strategies. Here, we present practical NMR approaches that support medicinal chemist workflows for addressing compound characterization issues and allow for reliable primary structure determinations. These strategies serve to differentiate between regioisomers and geometric isomers, distinguish between N- versus O-alkyl analogues, and identify rotamers and atropisomers. Overall, awareness and application of these available NMR methods (e.g. HMBC/HSQC, ROESY and VT experiments, to name only a few) should help practicing chemists to reveal chemical phenomena and avoid mis-assignment of the primary structures of compounds.

  15. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  16. High‐Resolution NMR Determination of the Dynamic Structure of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Villinger, Saskia; Schmidt, Christian D.; Griesinger, Christian; Becker, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract 15N spin‐relaxation rates are demonstrated to provide critical information about the long‐range structure and internal motions of membrane proteins. Combined with an improved calculation method, the relaxation‐rate‐derived structure of the 283‐residue human voltage‐dependent anion channel revealed an anisotropically shaped barrel with a rigidly attached N‐terminal helix. Our study thus establishes an NMR spectroscopic approach to determine the structure and dynamics of mammalian membrane proteins at high accuracy and resolution. PMID:27461260

  17. Structural characterization of plasma metabolites detected via LC-electrochemical coulometric array using LC-UV fractionation, MS, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Bird, Susan S; Sheldon, Diane P; Gathungu, Rose M; Vouros, Paul; Kautz, Roger; Matson, Wayne R; Kristal, Bruce S

    2012-11-20

    Liquid chromatography (LC) separation combined with electrochemical coulometric array detection (EC) is a sensitive, reproducible, and robust technique that can detect hundreds of redox-active metabolites down to the level of femtograms on column, making it ideal for metabolomics profiling. EC detection cannot, however, structurally characterize unknown metabolites that comprise these profiles. Several aspects of LC-EC methods prevent a direct transfer to other structurally informative analytical methods, such as LC-MS and NMR. These include system limits of detection, buffer requirements, and detection mechanisms. To address these limitations, we developed a workflow based on the concentration of plasma, metabolite extraction, and offline LC-UV fractionation. Pooled human plasma was used to provide sufficient material necessary for multiple sample concentrations and platform analyses. Offline parallel LC-EC and LC-MS methods were established that correlated standard metabolites between the LC-EC profiling method and the mass spectrometer. Peak retention times (RT) from the LC-MS and LC-EC system were linearly related (r(2) = 0.99); thus, LC-MS RTs could be directly predicted from the LC-EC signals. Subsequent offline microcoil-NMR analysis of these collected fractions was used to confirm LC-MS characterizations by providing complementary, structural data. This work provides a validated workflow that is transferrable across multiple platforms and provides the unambiguous structural identifications necessary to move primary mathematically driven LC-EC biomarker discovery into biological and clinical utility.

  18. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution the ability of (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T(1)((1)H) and T(1ρ)((1)H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in (19)F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around (19)F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded (19)F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way (19)F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  19. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  20. T1BT* structural study of an anti-plasmodial peptide through NMR and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background T1BT* is a peptide construct containing the T1 and B epitopes located in the 5’ minor repeat and the 3’ major repeat of the central repeat region of the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), respectively, and the universal T* epitope located in the C-terminus of the same protein. This peptide construct, with B = (NANP)3, has been found to elicit antisporozoite antibodies and gamma-interferon-screening T-cell responses in inbred strains of mice and in outbred nonhuman primates. On the other hand, NMR and CD spectroscopies have identified the peptide B’ = (NPNA)3 as the structural unit of the major repeat in the CSP, rather than the more commonly quoted NANP. With the goal of assessing the structural impact of the NPNA cadence on a proven anti-plasmodial peptide, the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T* were determined in this work. Methods NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations were used to determine the solution structures of T1BT* and T1B’T*. These structures were compared to determine the main differences and similarities between them. Results Both peptides exhibit radically different structures, with the T1B’T* showing strong helical tendencies. NMR and CD data, in conjunction with molecular modelling, provide additional information about the topologies of T1BT* and T1B’T*. Knowing the peptide structures required to elicit the proper immunogenic response can help in the design of more effective, conformationally defined malaria vaccine candidates. If peptides derived from the CSP are required to have helical structures to interact efficiently with their corresponding antibodies, a vaccine based on the T1B’T* construct should show higher efficiency as a pre-erythrocyte vaccine that would prevent infection of hepatocytes by sporozoites. PMID:23506240

  1. Development of Direct and Optical Polarized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Methods for Characterization and Engineering of Mesophased Molecular Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Baumann, T; Taylor, B

    2002-01-29

    The development of NMR methods for the characterization of structure and dynamics in mesophase composite systems was originally proposed in this LDRD. Mesophase systems are organic/inorganic hybrid materials whose size and motional properties span the definition of liquids and solids, such as highly viscous gels or colloidal suspensions. They are often composite, ill defined, macromolecular structures that prove difficult to characterize. Mesophase materials are of broad scientific and programmatic interest and include composite load bearing foams, aerogels, optical coatings, silicate oligomers, porous heterogeneous catalysts, and nanostructured materials such as semiconductor quantum dot superlattices. Since mesophased materials and precursors generally lack long-range order they have proven to be difficult to characterize beyond local, shortrange order. NMR methods are optimal for such a task since NMR observables are sensitive to wide ranges of length (0-30{angstrom}) and time (10{sup -9}-10{sup 0}sec) scales. We have developed a suit of NMR methods to measure local, intermediate, and long range structure in a series of mesophase systems and have constructed correlations between NMR observables and molecular size, topology, and network structure. The goal of this research was the development of a strong LLNL capability in the characterization of mesophased materials by NMR spectroscopy that will lead to a capability in rational synthesis of such materials and a fundamental understanding of their structure-property relationships. We demonstrate our progress towards attaining this goal by presenting NMR results on four mesophased model systems.

  2. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  3. [Optimizing the method for 31P-NMR analysis of organic phosphorus from wetland sediments].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Hai-Wen; Hao, Hong; Gao, Bo; Jia, Jian-Li

    2013-11-01

    Solution 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an analysis technology which has been an effective means for the analysis of environmental organic phosphorus. However, the method is rarely applied in the study of wetlands so that the corresponding researches about wetland sediment sample preparation method also very deficient. The present study was aimed to find the most suitable sample preparation method for 31P-NMR analysis of the artificial wetland sediments, using different extractant (NaOH or 0.25 mol x L(-1) NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant, and 1M HCl as pre-extractant or not), sample to extractant ratio (1 : 8 or 1 : 10), centrifugation conditions and scans time and so on. The results showed that the best 31P-NMR spectrum could be obtained with freeze-ried, ground and sieved sediments, 1M HCl as pre-extractant for 16 h, NaOH + 0.05 mol x L(-1) EDTA as main extractant for 16 h, extraction ratio of 1 : 8, and low temperature and high-speed centrifugation (4 degrees C, 10 000 r x min(-1) for 30 min) for avoiding hydrolysis of certain components. Besides, choosing much longer NMR scan time, as 14-16 h (scans about 25 000 times), could get more complete spectral signals spectrum. And finally, four kinds of P-compounds (orthophosphate, orthophosphate monoesters, orthophosphate diesters and pyrophosphate) were detected in the NMR spectrum. But neither polyphosphate nor phosphonates was not found in all these experiments, which need further study. Compared with the traditional chemical analysis method, 31P-NMR method of sample preparation is relatively simple. Then it is less destructive with components distinguished completely. Using 31P-NMR technology, the cognition of wetland phosphorus cycle, especially organophosphate, will be expected to get new breakthrough.

  4. NMR-based approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemical purity, specific activity, and radioactive concentration values by proton and tritium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schenk, David J; Dormer, Peter G; Hesk, David; Pollack, Scott R; Lavey, Carolee Flader

    2015-06-15

    Compounds containing tritium are widely used across the drug discovery and development landscape. These materials are widely utilized because they can be efficiently synthesized and produced at high specific activity. Results from internally calibrated (3)H and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggests that at least in some cases, this calibrated approach could supplement or potentially replace radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for radiochemical purity, dilution and scintillation counting for the measurement of radioactivity per volume, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of specific activity. In summary, the NMR-derived values agreed with those from the standard approaches to within 1% to 9% for solution count and specific activity. Additionally, the NMR-derived values for radiochemical purity deviated by less than 5%. A benefit of this method is that these values may be calculated at the same time that (3)H NMR analysis provides the location and distribution of tritium atoms within the molecule. Presented and discussed here is the application of this method, advantages and disadvantages of the approach, and a rationale for utilizing internally calibrated (1)H and (3)H NMR spectroscopy for specific activity, radioactive concentration, and radiochemical purity whenever acquiring (3)H NMR for tritium location.

  5. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy strongly enhances soil organic matter composition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Hedenström, Mattias; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool and strongly affects soil properties. With climate change, understanding SOM processes and turnover and how they could be affected by increasing temperatures becomes critical. This is particularly key for organic soils as they represent a huge carbon pool in very sensitive ecosystems, like boreal ecosystems and peatlands. Nevertheless, characterization of SOM molecular composition, which is essential to elucidate soil carbon processes, is not easily achieved, and further advancements in that area are greatly needed. Solid-state one-dimensional (1D) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often used to characterize its molecular composition, but only provides data on a few major functional groups, which regroup many different molecular fragments. For instance, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. Here we show that two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state 1H-13C NMR spectra provided much richer data on the composition of boreal plant litter and organic surface soil. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra and displayed signals from hundreds of identifiable molecular groups. For example, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Sample preparation and data acquisition were both simple and fast. Further, using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to identify specific molecular

  6. A new NMR approach for structure determination of thermally unstable biflavanones and application to phytochemicals from Garcinia buchananii.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timo D; Lösch, Sofie; Salger, Mathias; Balemba, Onesmo B; Wakamatsu, Junichiro; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Previous activity-guided phytochemical studies on Garcinia buchananii stem bark, which is traditionally used in Africa to treat various gastrointestinal and metabolic illnesses, revealed xanthones, polyisoprenylated benzophenones, flavanone-C-glycosides, biflavonoids, and/or biflavanones as bioactive key molecules. Unequivocal structure elucidation of biflavonoids and biflavanones by means of NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the hindered rotation of the monomers around the C-C axis (atropisomerism), resulting in a high spectral complexity. In order to facilitate an unrestricted rotation, NMR spectra are usually recorded at elevated temperatures, commonly over 80 °C, which effects in a single set of resonance signals. However, under these conditions, one of the target compounds of this investigation, (2R,3S,2″R,3″R)-manniflavanone (1), undergoes degradation. Therefore, we demonstrated in the present study that the 1,1-ADEQUATE could be successfully used as a powerful alternative approach to confirm the C-C connectivities in 1, avoiding detrimental conditions. However, a moderate increase in temperature up to 50 °C was sufficient to deliver sharp signals in the proton NMR experiment of (2R,3S,2″R,3″R)-isomanniflavanone (2) and (2″R,3″R)-preussianone (3). In addition, two new compounds could be isolated, namely (2R,3S,2″R,3″R)-GB-2 7″-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4) and (2R,3S,2″R,3″R)-manniflavanone-7″-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), and whose structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometry methods. The absolute configurations were determined by a combination of NMR and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy. The aforementioned compounds exhibited high anti-oxidative capacity in the H2O2 scavenging, hydrophilic Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (H-TEAC) and hydrophilic oxygen radical absorbance capacity (H-ORAC) assays.

  7. Solution NMR structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of influenza A M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Pielak, Rafal M.; Chou, James J.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper reports the structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of the M2 channel of influenza A virus. {yields} High quality NMR data allowed a better-defined structure for the C-terminal region of the M2 channel. {yields} Using the structure, we propose a proton transfer pathway during M2 proton conduction. {yields} Structural comparison between the wildtype, V27A and S31N variants allowed an in-depth analysis of possible modes of drug resistance. {yields} Distinct feature of the V27A channel pore also provides an explanation for its faster rate of proton conduction. -- Abstract: The M2 protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective channel that is required for viral replication. It is the target of the anti-influenza drugs, amantadine and rimantadine. Widespread drug resistant mutants, however, has greatly compromised the effectiveness of these drugs. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the highly pathogenic, drug resistant mutant V27A. The structure reveals subtle structural differences from wildtype that maybe linked to drug resistance. The V27A mutation significantly decreases hydrophobic packing between the N-terminal ends of the transmembrane helices, which explains the looser, more dynamic tetrameric assembly. The weakened channel assembly can resist drug binding either by destabilizing the rimantadine-binding pocket at Asp44, in the case of the allosteric inhibition model, or by reducing hydrophobic contacts with amantadine in the pore, in the case of the pore-blocking model. Moreover, the V27A structure shows a substantially increased channel opening at the N-terminal end, which may explain the faster proton conduction observed for this mutant. Furthermore, due to the high quality NMR data recorded for the V27A mutant, we were able to determine the structured region connecting the channel domain to the C-terminal amphipathic helices that was not determined in the wildtype structure. The new structural

  8. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  9. Regenerated silk fibers: Structural studies and solid state NMR techniques for efficient multiple distance determinations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liivak, Oskar

    2000-09-01

    Material Science is the science of understanding the relationship between the molecular level structure of a material and its macroscopic properties. Such research requires both the ability to determine molecular structure and the ability to control and modify the molecular structure. The present research into silks, especially the dragline silk from the spider Nephila clavipes , is occurring at a time when these two criteria are beginning to be met for proteins like spider silk. Genetic engineering has evolved to the point where material scientists have full control over the primary sequence of amino acids that comprise proteins. In addition, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques exist which allow us to probe molecular structure. This work applies solid state NMR to the study of the structure of silk fibers. In particular, we focus on techniques of fiber regeneration from solution. The purpose is not only to develop the techniques by which genetically engineered fibers could be spun into fibers for mass production but also as a tool into fundamental silk research. Results on these regenerated fibers show a correlation between the fraction of the silk's alanine residues which are in the β-sheet conformation and the ultimate tensile strength of the fibers. In addition, in a clever mating of the fiber regeneration technique and the solid state NMR distance measurement experiment, rotational echo double resonance (REDOR), we investigate the supramolecular topology of the alanine β-sheet crystals. Even though the REDOR technique has failings for the complicated ISn spin systems found in the silk samples, a qualitative analysis does indicate that the β-sheet crystals are intermolecular. Finally, we investigate a new class of REDOR-like experiments which are designed to overcome the failings of REDOR in ISn spin systems. Experimental data is shown to validate these ideas. An alternate pulse sequence is also introduced and verified with experimental

  10. Structural Insights into Bound Water in Crystalline Amino Acids: Experimental and Theoretical (17)O NMR.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Keeler, Eric G; Ong, Ta-Chung; Craigen, Kimberley N; Penzel, Susanne; Wren, John E C; Kroeker, Scott; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-06-25

    We demonstrate here that the (17)O NMR properties of bound water in a series of amino acids and dipeptides can be determined with a combination of nonspinning and magic-angle spinning experiments using a range of magnetic field strengths from 9.4 to 21.1 T. Furthermore, we propose a (17)O chemical shift fingerprint region for bound water molecules in biological solids that is well outside the previously determined ranges for carbonyl, carboxylic, and hydroxyl oxygens, thereby offering the ability to resolve multiple (17)O environments using rapid one-dimensional NMR techniques. Finally, we compare our experimental data against quantum chemical calculations using GIPAW and hybrid-DFT, finding intriguing discrepancies between the electric field gradients calculated from structures determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  11. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  12. Solution State Structure Determination of Silicate Oligomers by 29Si NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, Johnathan P.; Shah, Neil K.; Dixon, David A.

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by 29Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of 29Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the 29Si–29Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated crosspeaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stability of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  13. Local structure of the B-site in BNT-xBT investigated by 47,49Ti NMR: Effect of barium content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groszewicz, Pedro B.; Breitzke, Hergen; Jo, Wook; Rödel, Jürgen; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2017-03-01

    Towards a deeper understanding of the local structure of the B-site in (100-x)(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-xBaTiO3 (BNT-xBT) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the titanium isotopes 47Ti and 49Ti were investigated. The 47,49Ti NMR spectra of BNT-xBT indicate a disordered local structure for the B-site of these perovskites. The line-shape of the titanium NMR spectra of BNT-xBT samples is found to be independent on the barium content. This fact implies that the local structure of the B-site remains invariant with respect to the structural changes that result from the chemical modification with barium. The analysis of 47,49Ti NMR spectra supports the hypothesis that the main structural changes across the morphotropic phase boundary in these solid-solutions are constrained to the A-site and are related to the tilting of rigid oxygen octahedra.

  14. Dissociation behavior of Methane Hydrate presumed by NMR log analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study has been conducted with the aim of comprehending dissociation behavior of MH. The production test was operated in the Daini-Atsumi knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. We corresponded the NMR log data acquired from the three wells, which drilled before the test (AT1-MC) and after the test (AT1-LWD1 and AT1-LWD2). NMR log measures T2 relaxation time, and calculates porosity and permeability. We especially focused on the T2 distribution. It is assumed that MH occupied larger pore space in the sandy sediment because the T2 distribution in the MH bearing layer has no peak in the longer time zone at the AT1-MC. However, T2 peak appeared over 33ms zone at the AT1-LWD1 and AT1-LWD2. This phenomenon is observed in the thin MH bearing layers rather than thick one. On the other hand, nothing T2 peak appeared over the 33ms zone in the thick MH bearing layer, but T2 distribution shifts to longer relaxation time in the short time interval. Hence, it is assumed that the MH was dissociated from the contact faces with the grain. In terms of the thermal conductivity, near the grain-grain contact faces are more dissociable than the MH-grain contact; however both of dissociation zones are essentially MH-grain contact faces. Nothing or few MH was observed in the muddy layer at the coring campaign near these wells. Abovementioned, NMR logging detected various changes on the T2 distribution. It seems to indicate the dissociation of MH. And these data gets into alignment with other log data and monitoring data, which are resistivity and temperature measurement. However, as this logging data acquired from each location, there is possibility that the initial condition was originally distinct. This research was conducted as a part of the MH21 research, and the authors would like to express their sincere appreciation to MH21 and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry for providing the permission to disclose this research.

  15. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Brian Finley

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  16. NMR Investigations of Structure and Dynamics in Polymers for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Steven

    Materials innovation is needed to realize major progress in energy storage capacity for lithium batteries and capacitors. Polymers hold considerable promise as ion conducting media in batteries and electrochemical capacitors and as dielectrics in thin film capacitors. Structural studies of materials utilized in lithium battery technology are hampered by the lack of long-range order found in well-defined crystalline phases. Powder x-ray diffraction yields structural parameters that have been averaged over hundreds of lattice sites, and is unable to provide structural information about amorphous phases. Our laboratory uses solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to investigate structural and chemical aspects of lithium ion cathodes, anodes, electrolytes, interfaces and interphases. NMR is element- (nuclear-) specific and sensitive to small variations in the immediate environment of the ions being probed, for example Li+, and in most cases is a reliably quantitative spectroscopy in that the integrated intensity of a particular spectral component is directly proportional to the number of nuclei in the corresponding material phase. NMR is also a powerful tool for probing ionic and molecular motion in lithium battery electrolytes with a dynamic range spanning some ten orders of magnitude through spin-lattice relaxation and self-diffusion measurements. Broadband relaxometry based on Fast Field Cycling NMR (FFCNMR) methods can span three to four of these orders of magnitude in a single set of measurements. Results of several recent NMR investigations performed on our lab will be presented. We explore the ion transport mechanism in polyether-based and lithium polymer electrolytes and those based on other base polymers, in particular, the extent to which ionic motion is coupled to polymer segmental motion. Polycarbonates are being considered as a possible replacement for polypropylene in high power thin film capacitors due to their favorable dielectric

  17. Structural basis of a temporin 1b analogue antimicrobial activity against Gram negative bacteria determined by CD and NMR techniques in cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Malgieri, Gaetano; Avitabile, Concetta; Palmieri, Maddalena; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico; Isernia, Carla; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-04-17

    We here report an original approach to elucidate mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides and derive crucial structural requirements for the design of novel therapeutic agents. The high resolution structure of TB_KKG6A, an antimicrobial peptide designed to amplify the spectrum of action of Temporin B, bound to E. coli is here determined by means of CD and NMR methodologies. We have also defined, through STD analysis, the residues in closer proximity to the bacterial membrane.

  18. Structural modeling of Vpu from HIV-1 based on solid-state NMR observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeonJoo; Lim, GyuTae; Nam, Seungyoon; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is one of the accessory proteins of HIV-1, and is involved in viral particle release. Viral particle release is enhanced by two proposed functions of Vpu: (i) tetherin interaction and (ii) membrane polarization. Two Vpu functions in viral particle release are still controversial. Here, we investigated the proposed functions by extensive structural modeling of Vpu based on solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) observables. We found that Vpu can co-exist in two structural forms: left-handed and right-handed conformation. The co-existence of the two conformations provides a clue to reconcile the controversial issue of its two functions in virus particle release.

  19. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open.

  20. NMR analysis of staphylococcal nuclease thermal quench refolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kautz, R A; Fox, R O

    1993-05-01

    Thermally unfolded staphylococcal nuclease has been rapidly quenched to temperatures near 0 degree C and the refolding behavior examined using an NMR kinetic experiment. Unfolded protein, exhibiting random coil chemical shifts, persists following the quench and refolds in two distinct kinetic phases. A protein folding intermediate with a trans Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is transiently overpopulated and relaxes to the predominantly cis native cis-trans equilibrium. The rate of trans-->cis isomerization in the native-like nuclease intermediate is approximately 100-fold faster than that observed in a Lys-Pro model peptide. The activation enthalpy of 20 kcal/mol observed for the nuclease Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond is comparable to that observed for other X-Pro isomerizations.

  1. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 13, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  2. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  3. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, March 1 - September 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utili- zation of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NNM methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 29}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  4. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N.; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  5. NMR structure of bitistatin – a missing piece in the evolutionary pathway of snake venom disintegrins.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J; Sanz, Libia; Perez, Alicia; Calvete, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Extant disintegrins, as found in the venoms of Viperidae and Crotalidae snakes (vipers and rattlesnakes, represent a family of polypeptides that block the function of β1 and β3 integrin receptors, both potently and with a high degree of selectivity. This toxin family owes its origin to the neofunctionalization of the extracellular region of an ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) molecule recruited into the snake venom gland proteome in the Jurassic. The evolutionary structural diversification of the disintegrin scaffold, from the ancestral long disintegrins to the more recently evolved medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins, involved the stepwise loss of pairs of class-specific disulfide linkages and the processing of the N-terminal region. NMR and crystal structures of medium-sized, dimeric and short disintegrins have been solved. However, the structure of a long disintegrin remained unknown. The present study reports the NMR solution structures of two disulfide bond conformers of the long disintegrin bitistatin from the African puff adder Bitis arietans. The findings provide insight into how a structural domain of the extracellular region of an ADAM molecule, recruited into and selectively expressed in the snake venom gland proteome as a PIII metalloprotease in the Jurassic, has subsequently been tranformed into a family of integrin receptor antagonists.

  6. NMR approaches in structure-based lead discovery: recent developments and new frontiers for targeting multi-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dias, David M; Ciulli, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a pivotal method for structure-based and fragment-based lead discovery because it is one of the most robust techniques to provide information on protein structure, dynamics and interaction at an atomic level in solution. Nowadays, in most ligand screening cascades, NMR-based methods are applied to identify and structurally validate small molecule binding. These can be high-throughput and are often used synergistically with other biophysical assays. Here, we describe current state-of-the-art in the portfolio of available NMR-based experiments that are used to aid early-stage lead discovery. We then focus on multi-protein complexes as targets and how NMR spectroscopy allows studying of interactions within the high molecular weight assemblies that make up a vast fraction of the yet untargeted proteome. Finally, we give our perspective on how currently available methods could build an improved strategy for drug discovery against such challenging targets.

  7. Comprehensive NMR analysis of compositional changes of black garlic during thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tingfu; Wei, Feifei; Lu, Yi; Kodani, Yoshinori; Nakada, Mitsuhiko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-21

    Black garlic is a processed food product obtained by subjecting whole raw garlic to thermal processing that causes chemical reactions, such as the Maillard reaction, which change the composition of the garlic. In this paper, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based comprehensive analysis of raw garlic and black garlic extracts to determine the compositional changes resulting from thermal processing. (1)H NMR spectra with a detailed signal assignment showed that 38 components were altered by thermal processing of raw garlic. For example, the contents of 11 l-amino acids increased during the first step of thermal processing over 5 days and then decreased. Multivariate data analysis revealed changes in the contents of fructose, glucose, acetic acid, formic acid, pyroglutamic acid, cycloalliin, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (5-HMF). Our results provide comprehensive information on changes in NMR-detectable components during thermal processing of whole garlic.

  8. Theoretical and experimental IR, Raman and NMR spectra in studying the electronic structure of 2-nitrobenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) was studied. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by HF, B3PW91, B3LYP methods using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. The theoretical IR and NMR spectra were obtained. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-nitrobenzoic acid salts of alkali metals were also recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Characteristic shifts of band wavenumbers and changes in band intensities along the metal series were observed. Good correlation between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR and Raman spectra for 2-nitrobenzoates (2-NB) and ionic potential, electronegativity, atomic mass and affinity of metals were found. The chemical shifts of protons and carbons ( 1H, 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-nitrobenzoates were observed too. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  9. Analysis and aging of unsaturated polyester resins in contemporary art installations by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Georgios; Knuutinen, Ulla; Laitinen, Kai; Spyros, Apostolos

    2010-12-01

    Two original art installations constructed from unsaturated polyester resins (UPR) and four different reference UPR products (before and after UVB aging) were analyzed by high-resolution 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Breaking strain studies were also conducted for the four UPR model products before and after different aging procedures (moisture, UVB exposure, melt/freeze). NMR analysis of the chemical composition of the UPR resin extracts showed they contain several low MW organic compounds and oligomers rich in polar -OH groups that play a significant role in the degradation behavior of the composite UPR materials. Statistical analysis of the NMR compositional data showed that styrene and benzaldehyde contents can be used to differentiate between fresh and aged UPR samples. The phthalate and propylene glycol unit speciation (esterified, primary or secondary -OH) of the extracts provided evidence that UPR resin C was used in the construction of the two art installations, and direct comparison of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra verified this compositional similarity. UPR resin C was shown by both NMR and breaking strain studies to be the reference UPR most susceptible to degradation by different aging procedures, a characteristic attributed to the lower styrene content of resin C.

  10. The structure investigations of dehydroacetic acid and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene condensation product by NMR, MS, and X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Morawiak, M.; Kamieński, B.; Schilf, W.

    2016-05-01

    A new unexpected product of condensation reaction of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and carbonyl compound (here: dehydroacetic acid (dha)) was synthesized. Discussion about the molecular structure of possible products of this reaction was done on the base of NMR studies. The structure of the titled product in both DMSO solution and in the solid state was resolved by analysis of its spectral data (X-ray structure analysis, multinuclear NMR in solution and solid state spectra) and MS measurements. The presented studies provided clear evidence that the titled product exists in diluted DMSO solution as the mixture of two kinetic free ionic species whereas in concentrated DMSO solution as well as in the solid state this system forms associated ionic pairs bonded together by hydrogen bonds.

  11. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  12. Biosynthesis, molecular structure, and domain architecture of potato suberin: a (13)C NMR study using isotopically labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Stark, R E

    2000-08-01

    Although suberin in potato wound periderm is known to be a polyester containing long-chain fatty acids and phenolics embedded within the cell wall, many aspects of its molecular structure and polymer-polymer connectivities remain elusive. The present work combines biosynthetic incorporation of site-specifically (13)C-enriched acetates and phenylalanines with one- and two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods to monitor the developing suberin polymer. Exogenous acetate is found to be incorporated preferentially at the carboxyl end of the aliphatic carbon chains, suggesting addition during the later elongation steps of fatty acid synthesis. Carboxyl-labeled phenylalanine precursors provide evidence for the concurrent development of phenolic esters and of monolignols typical of lignin. Experiments with ring-labeled phenylalanine precursors demonstrate a predominance of sinapyl and guaiacyl structures among suberin's phenolic moieties. Finally, the analysis of spin-exchange (solid-state NOESY) NMR experiments in ring-labeled suberin indicates distances of no more than 0.5 nm between pairs of phenolic and oxymethine carbons, which are attributed to the aromatic-aliphatic polyester and the cell wall polysaccharide matrix, respectively. These results offer direct and detailed molecular information regarding the insoluble intermediates of suberin biosynthesis, indicate probable covalent linkages between moieties of its polyester and polysaccharide domains, and yield a clearer overall picture of this agriculturally important protective material.

  13. Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi; Nawa, Toyoharu; Owada, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masahito

    2013-10-15

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

  14. Design, pharmacology, and NMR structure of a minimized cystine knot with agouti-related protein activity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Pilgrim J; McNulty, Joseph C; Yang, Ying-Kui; Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biaoxin; Gantz, Ira; Barsh, Gregory S; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2002-06-18

    The agouti-related protein (AGRP) is an endogenous antagonist of the melanocortin receptors MC3R and MC4R found in the hypothalamus and exhibits potent orexigenic activity. The cysteine-rich C-terminal domain of this protein, corresponding to AGRP(87-132), exhibits receptor binding affinity and antagonism equivalent to that of the full-length protein. The NMR structure of this active domain was recently determined and suggested that melanocortin receptor contacts were made primarily by two loops presented by a well-structured cystine knot domain within AGRP(87-132) [McNulty et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 15520-15527]. This hypothesis is tested here with NMR structure and activity studies of a 34-residue AGRP analogue designed to contain only the cystine knot domain. The designed miniprotein folds to a homogeneous product, retains the desired cystine knot architecture, functions as an antagonist, and maintains the melanocortin receptor pharmacological profile of AGRP(87-132). The AGRP-like activity of this molecule supports the hypothesis that indeed the cystine knot region possesses the melanocortin receptor contact points. Moreover, this potent AGRP analogue is synthetically accessible, may serve in the development of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases related to energy balance. and may also find use as a new reagent for probing melanocortin receptor structure and function.

  15. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  16. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  17. An analysis of commerical zeolite catalysts by multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, L.

    1990-09-21

    This work involves studying two commercial hydrocracking catalysts by solid state multinuclear NMR silicon 29 and aluminum 27 with the goal of developing a method of determining the fraction zeolite in the catalysts. The zeolite fraction is known to be one of the faujasite zeolites type X or Y. The clay matrix of the catalyst is assumed to be kaolinite. Fresh, air-exposed commercial hydrocracking catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. Sample 33351-86 was known to be a physical mixture of a Y zeolite and a clay matrix. The other catalyst, 33351-20, was composed of a faujasite zeolite grown within a clay matrix. Both were suspected of being about 20 wt % zeolite. Nothing is known about the state of pretreatment or cation exchange. A portion of each catalyst was calcined in a porcelain crucible in air at 500{degree}C for two hours with a hour heating ramp preceding and a two hour cooling ramp following calcination. 64 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  19. High-throughput microcoil NMR of compound libraries using zero-dispersion segmented flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Roger A; Goetzinger, Wolfgang K; Karger, Barry L

    2005-01-01

    An automated system for loading samples into a microcoil NMR probe has been developed using segmented flow analysis. This approach enhanced 2-fold the throughput of the published direct injection and flow injection methods, improved sample utilization 3-fold, and was applicable to high-field NMR facilities with long transfer lines between the sample handler and NMR magnet. Sample volumes of 2 microL (10-30 mM, approximately 10 microg) were drawn from a 96-well microtiter plate by a sample handler, then pumped to a 0.5-microL microcoil NMR probe as a queue of closely spaced "plugs" separated by an immiscible fluorocarbon fluid. Individual sample plugs were detected by their NMR signal and automatically positioned for stopped-flow data acquisition. The sample in the NMR coil could be changed within 35 s by advancing the queue. The fluorocarbon liquid wetted the wall of the Teflon transfer line, preventing the DMSO samples from contacting the capillary wall and thus reducing sample losses to below 5% after passage through the 3-m transfer line. With a wash plug of solvent between samples, sample-to-sample carryover was <1%. Significantly, the samples did not disperse into the carrier liquid during loading or during acquisitions of several days for trace analysis. For automated high-throughput analysis using a 16-second acquisition time, spectra were recorded at a rate of 1.5 min/sample and total deuterated solvent consumption was <0.5 mL (1 US dollar) per 96-well plate.

  20. Structure of a Conserved Retroviral RNA Packaging Element by NMR Spectroscopy and Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Tolbert, Blanton; Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Iyalla, Kilali; Loeliger, Kelsey; D’Souza, Victoria; Khant, Htet; Schmid, Michael F.; Garcia, Eric; Telesnitsky, Alice; Chiu, Wah; Summers, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) of all gammaretroviruses contain a conserved “double hairpin motif” (ΨCD) that is required for genome packaging. Both hairpins (SL-C and SL-D) contain GACG tetraloops that, in isolated RNAs, are capable of forming “kissing” interactions stabilized by two intermolecular G-C base pairs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the double hairpin from the Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV) ([ΨCD]2, 132-nucleotides, 42.8 kDaltons) using a 2H-edited NMR spectroscopy-based approach. This approach enabled the detection of 1H-1H dipolar interactions that were not observed in previous studies of isolated SL-C and SL-D hairpin RNAs using traditional 1H-1H correlated and 1H-13C-edited NMR methods. The hairpins participate in intermolecular cross-kissing interactions (SL-C to SL-D’ and SLC’ to SL-D), and stack in an end-to-end manner (SL-C to SL-D and SL-C’ to SL-D’) that gives rise to an elongated overall shape (ca. 95 Å by 45 Å by 25 Å). The global structure was confirmed by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET), making [ΨCD]2 simultaneously the smallest RNA to be structurally characterized to date by cryo-ET and among the largest to be determined by NMR. Our findings suggest that, in addition to promoting dimerization, [ΨCD]2 functions as a scaffold that helps initiate virus assembly by exposing a cluster of conserved UCUG elements for binding to the cognate nucleocapsid domains of assembling viral Gag proteins. PMID:20933521

  1. Complementarity of DFT Calculations, NMR Anisotropy, and ECD for the Configurational Analysis of Brevipolides K-O from Hyptis brevipes.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ortiz, G Alejandra; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2017-01-27

    Brevipolides K-O (1-5), five new cytotoxic 6-(6'-cinnamoyloxy-2',5'-epoxy-1'-hydroxyheptyl)-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-ones (IC50 values against six cancer cell lines, 1.7-10 μM), were purified by recycling HPLC from Hyptis brevipes. The structures, containing a distinctive tetrahydrofuran ring, were established by comprehensive quantum mechanical calculations and experimental spectroscopic analysis of their NMR and ECD data. Detailed analysis of the experimental NMR (1)H-(1)H vicinal coupling constants in comparison with the corresponding DFT-calculated values at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level confirmed the absolute configuration of 3 and revealed its conformational preferences, which were further strengthened by NOESY correlations. NMR anisotropy experiments by the application of Mosher's ester methodology and chemical correlations were also used to conclude that this novel brevipolide series (1-5) share the same absolute configuration corresponding to C-6(R), C-1'(S), C-2'(R), C-5'(S), and C-6'(S).

  2. NMR Studies of the Structure and Function of the HIV-1 5'-Leader.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah C; Summers, Michael F

    2016-12-21

    The 5'-leader of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome plays several critical roles during viral replication, including differentially establishing mRNA versus genomic RNA (gRNA) fates. As observed for proteins, the function of the RNA is tightly regulated by its structure, and a common paradigm has been that genome function is temporally modulated by structural changes in the 5'-leader. Over the past 30 years, combinations of nucleotide reactivity mapping experiments with biochemistry, mutagenesis, and phylogenetic studies have provided clues regarding the secondary structures of stretches of residues within the leader that adopt functionally discrete domains. More recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy approaches have been developed that enable direct detection of intra- and inter-molecular interactions within the intact leader, providing detailed insights into the structural determinants and mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 genome packaging and function.

  3. NMR Studies of the Structure and Function of the HIV-1 5′-Leader

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Sarah C.; Summers, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The 5′-leader of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome plays several critical roles during viral replication, including differentially establishing mRNA versus genomic RNA (gRNA) fates. As observed for proteins, the function of the RNA is tightly regulated by its structure, and a common paradigm has been that genome function is temporally modulated by structural changes in the 5′-leader. Over the past 30 years, combinations of nucleotide reactivity mapping experiments with biochemistry, mutagenesis, and phylogenetic studies have provided clues regarding the secondary structures of stretches of residues within the leader that adopt functionally discrete domains. More recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy approaches have been developed that enable direct detection of intra- and inter-molecular interactions within the intact leader, providing detailed insights into the structural determinants and mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 genome packaging and function. PMID:28009832

  4. NMR solution structure of the RED subdomain of the Sleeping Beauty transposase.

    PubMed

    Konnova, Tatiana A; Singer, Christopher M; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2017-03-27

    DNA transposons can be employed for stable gene transfer in vertebrates. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon has been recently adapted for human application and is being evaluated in clinical trials, however its molecular mechanism is not clear. SB transposition is catalyzed by the transposase enzyme, which is a multi-domain protein containing the catalytic and the DNA-binding domains. The DNA-binding domain of the SB transposase contains two structurally independent subdomains, PAI and RED. Recently, the structures of the catalytic domain and the PAI subdomain have been determined, however no structural information on the RED subdomain and its interactions with DNA has been available. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the RED subdomain and characterize its interactions with the transposon DNA.

  5. TLC and 31P-NMR analysis of low polarity phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; MacKenzie, Andrew; Scott, Dawn

    2009-04-01

    High-performance TLC and (31)P-NMR were assessed as methods of observing the presence of numerous low polarity phospholipids: bis-phosphatidic acid (BPA), semi-lyso bis-phosphatidic acid (SLBPA), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxo-butyl)-phosphatidylethanolamine (diacetone adduct of PE, DOBPE), N-acetyl PE, phosphatidylmethanol (PM), phosphatidylethanol (PEt), phosphatidyl-n-propanol (PP), phosphatidyl-n-butanol (PB). Both techniques are non-discriminative and do not require the prior isolation of individual lipids. It appears that 2D TLC is superior to (31)P NMR in the analysis of low polarity phospholipids. All phosphatidylalcohols were well separated by 2D TLC. However, some compounds which can present difficulty in separation by 2D-TLC (e.g., SLBPA and NAPE; or DOBPE and N-acetyl PE) were easily distinguished using (31)P NMR so the methods are complimentary. A disadvantage of 2D TLC is that Rf values can vary with different brands and batches of TLC plates. The chemical shifts of (31)P NMR were less variable, and so a library of standards may not be necessary for peak identification. Another advantage of (31)P NMR is the ease of quantification of phospholipids. The applicability of the methods was tested on natural extracts of fish brain and cabbage stem.

  6. Probing zeolite internal structures using very low temperature {sup 129}Xe NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Labouriau, A.; Crawford, S.N.; Earl, W.L.; Pietrass, T.; Weber, W.A.; Panjabi, G.; Gates, B.C.

    1998-08-01

    In recent years, probing pore structure with {sup 129}Xe NMR has received a bad reputation. This is due to the fact that the method is more complex than was originally suggested so the data is somewhat difficult to interpret. The authors find that the use of a wide temperature range (40--350 K) allows them to interpret {sup 129}Xe chemical shifts in terms of van der Waals attraction between the xenon atom and oxygen in zeolite walls. Using rather simple models from the literature, they can extract useful pore size information as well as the van der Waals potential energy.

  7. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Carver, J.A.; Boyd, J.; Campbell, I.D.

    1987-02-24

    A /sup 1/H NMR study of the peptide alamethicin, which forms voltage-gated ion channels in membranes, is described. The molecule was studied in methanol as a function of temperature and pH. A complete assignment of the spectra is given, including several stereospecific assignments. Alamethicin was found to have a structure substantially similar to the crystal although, in solution, the C-terminal dipeptide adopts a somewhat extended conformation. The overall conformation was insensitive to the ionization of the side chain of the ionizable group, Glu-18.

  8. Oligomeric structure of a cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelle determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Rathi; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    The broad spectrum of antibacterial activities of host defense cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) arises from their ability to perturb membrane integrity of the microbes. The mechanisms are often thought to require assembly of AMPs on the membrane surface to form pores. However, three dimensional structures in the oligomeric form of AMPs in the context of lipid membranes are largely limited. Here, we demonstrate that a 22-residue antimicrobial peptide, termed VK22, derived from fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin family of AMP from chicken oligomerizes into a predominantly tetrameric state in zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. An ensemble of NMR structures of VK22 determined in 200mM perdeuterated DPC, from 755 NOE constrains including 19 inter-helical NOEs, had revealed an assembly of four helices arranged in anti-parallel fashion. Hydrogen bonds, C(α)H-O=C types, and van der Waals interactions among the helical sub-units appear to be involved in the stabilization of the quaternary structures. The central region of the barrel shaped tetrameric bundle is non-polar with clusters of aromatic residues, whereas all the cationic residues are positioned at the termini. Paramagnetic spin labeled NMR experiments indicated that the tetrameric structure is embedded into micelles such that the non-polar region located inside the lipid acyl chains. Structure and micelle localization of a monomeric version, obtained from substitution of two Tyr residues with Ala, of the peptide is also compared. The mutated peptide VK22AA has been found be localized at the surface of the micelles. The tetrameric structure of VK22 delineates a small water pore that can be larger in the higher order oligomers. As these results provide structural insights, at atomic resolution, into the oligomeric states of a helical AMP in lipid environment, the structural details may be further utilized for the design of novel self-assembled membrane protein mimics.

  9. Structure elucidation of a new isoflavone by exclusive use of ¹H NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alfredo R; Toscano, Rubén A; Hernández-Barragán, Angelina; Alvarez-Cisneros, Celina; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    The leaves of Piscidia carthagenensis provided new 7,2',5'-trimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (1), admixed with known 6,7-dimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (2), and 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,2',5'-trimethoxyisoflavone (3), which were separated by extensive fractional solubillization. Selective irradiation of the H-5 "singlet" of 2 allowed distinction of the two methoxy group signals, whose chemical shift difference is only 0.004 ppm (1.2 Hz at 300 MHz). The (1)H and (13)C NMR data of 3 were assigned with the aid of HETCOR and gHMBC measurements. Although 1 looked inhomogeneous in the solid state, its solution structure followed from (1)H NMR measurements, where it looked homogeneous. To clarify the solid state aspect and confirm the structure of 1, two types of crystals were mechanically separated and subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. This study revealed polymorphism because of the concomitant presence of orthorhombic and triclinic crystals, but showed no atropisomerism. The structure of 3 was also verified by X-ray diffraction crystallography.

  10. Synthesis and NMR structure of p41icf, a potent inhibitor of human cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Chiva, Cristina; Barthe, Philippe; Codina, Anna; Gairí, Margarida; Molina, Franck; Granier, Claude; Pugnière, Martine; Inui, Tatsuya; Nishio, Hideki; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kimura, Terutoshi; Sakakibara, Shumpei; Albericio, Fernando; Giralt, Ernest

    2003-02-12

    The total synthesis and structural characterization of the MHCII-associated p41 invariant chain fragment (P41icf) is described. P41icf plays a crucial role in the maturation of MHC class II molecules and antigen processing, acting as a highly selective cathepsin L inhibitor. P41icf synthesis was achieved using a combined solid-phase/solution approach. The entire molecule (65 residues, 7246 Da unprotected) was assembled in solution from fully protected peptides in the size range of 10 residues. After deprotection, oxidative folding in carefully adjusted experimental conditions led to the completely folded and functional P41icf with a disulfide pairing identical to that of native P41icf. CD, NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used for the structural and functional characterization of synthetic P41icf. CD thermal denaturation showed clear cooperative behavior. Tight cathepsin L binding was demonstrated by SPR. (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 800 MHz of unlabeled P41icf was used to solve the three-dimensional structure of the molecule. P41icf behaves as a well-folded protein domain with a topology very close to the crystallographic cathepsin L-bound form.

  11. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  12. Quantitative analysis of Earth's field NMR spectra of strongly-coupled heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T; Feland, Brett C; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2009-09-01

    In the Earth's magnetic field, it is possible to observe spin systems consisting of unlike spins that exhibit strongly coupled second-order NMR spectra. Such spectra result when the J-coupling between two unlike spins is of the same order of magnitude as the difference in their Larmor precession frequencies. Although the analysis of second-order spectra involving only spin-(1/2) nuclei has been discussed since the early days of NMR spectroscopy, NMR spectra involving spin-(1/2) nuclei and quadrupolar (I>(1/2)) nuclei have rarely been treated. Two examples are presented here, the tetrahydroborate anion, BH4-, and the ammonium cation, NH4+. For the tetrahydroborate anion, (1)J((11)B,(1)H)=80.9Hz, and in an Earth's field of 53.3microT, nu((1)H)=2269Hz and nu((11)B)=728Hz. The (1)H NMR spectra exhibit features that both first- and second-order perturbation theory are unable to reproduce. On the other hand, second-order perturbation theory adequately describes (1)H NMR spectra of the ammonium anion, (14)NH4+, where (1)J((14)N,(1)H)=52.75Hz when nu((1)H)=2269Hz and nu((14)N)=164Hz. Contrary to an early report, we find that the (1)H NMR spectra are independent of the sign of (1)J((14)N,(1)H). Exact analysis of two-spin systems consisting of quadrupolar nuclei and spin-(1/2) nuclei are also discussed.

  13. Measurement of protein unfolding/refolding kinetics and structural characterization of hidden intermediates by NMR relaxation dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Meinhold, Derrick W.; Wright, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed understanding of protein function and malfunction hinges on the ability to characterize transiently populated states and the transitions between them. Here, we use 15N, , and 13CO NMR R2 relaxation dispersion to investigate spontaneous unfolding and refolding events of native apomyoglobin. Above pH 5.0, dispersion is dominated by processes involving fluctuations of the F-helix region, which is invisible in NMR spectra. Measurements of R2 dispersion for residues contacted by the F-helix region in the native (N) structure reveal a transient state formed by local unfolding of helix F and undocking from the protein core. A similar state was detected at pH 4.75–4.95 and determined to be an on-pathway intermediate (I1) in a linear three-state unfolding scheme (N⇆I1⇆MG) leading to a transiently populated molten globule (MG) state. The slowest steps in unfolding and refolding are N → I1 (36 s-1) and MG → I1 (26 s-1), respectively. Differences in chemical shift between N and I1 are very small, except in regions adjacent to helix F, showing that their core structures are similar. Chemical shift changes between the N and MG states, obtained from R2 dispersion, reveal that the transient MG state is structurally similar to the equilibrium MG observed previously at high temperature and low pH. Analysis of MG state chemical shifts shows the location of residual helical structure in the transient intermediate and identifies regions that unfold or rearrange into nonnative structure during the N → MG transition. The experiments also identify regions of energetic frustration that “crack” during unfolding and impede the refolding process. PMID:21562212

  14. Expression and structural characterization of anti-T-antigen single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and analysis of their binding to T-antigen by surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Subedi, Ganesh P; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2013-12-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr), also known as Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen), is an oncofetal antigen commonly found in cancerous tissues. Availability of anti-T-antigen human antibodies could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Four groups of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were previously isolated from a phage library (Matsumoto-Takasaki et al. (2009) Isolation and characterization of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies from a phage library. BioSci Trends 3:87-95.). Here, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Group 1-4 were expressed and produced in a Drosophila S2 cell expression system. ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses confirmed the binding activity of 1E8 scFv protein to various T-antigen presenting conjugates. NMR experiments provided evidence of the folded nature of the 1E8 scFv protein. ScFv-ligand contact was identified by STD NMR, indicating that the galactose unit of T-antigen at the non-reducing end was primarily recognized by 1E8 scFv. This thus provides direct evidence of T-antigen specificity.

  15. Synergistic effect of the simultaneous chemometric analysis of ¹H NMR spectroscopic and stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, ¹⁸O, ¹³C) data: application to wine analysis.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Godelmann, Rolf; Hermann, Armin; Kuballa, Thomas; Cannet, Claire; Schäfer, Hartmut; Spraul, Manfred; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2014-06-23

    It is known that (1)H NMR spectroscopy represents a good tool for predicting the grape variety, the geographical origin, and the year of vintage of wine. In the present study we have shown that classification models can be improved when (1)H NMR profiles are fused with stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, (18)O, (13)C) data. Variable selection based on clustering of latent variables was performed on (1)H NMR data. Afterwards, the combined data of 718 wine samples from Germany were analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), factorial discriminant analysis (FDA) and independent components analysis (ICA). Moreover, several specialized multiblock methods (common components and specific weights analysis (ComDim), consensus PCA and consensus PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The best improvement in comparison with (1)H NMR data was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin (up to 100% for the fused data, whereas stable isotope data resulted only in 60-70% correct prediction and (1)H NMR data alone in 82-89% respectively). Certain enhancement was obtained also for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for (1)H NMR to 99% for the fused data), whereas in case of grape varieties improved models were not obtained. The combination of (1)H NMR data with stable isotope data improves efficiency of classification models for geographical origin and vintage of wine and can be potentially used for other food products as well.

  16. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  17. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    PubMed Central

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Ding, Yi; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential. PMID:26143069

  18. Spatial structure of fibrinopeptide B in water solution with DPC micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Fayzullina, Adeliya R.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinopeptide B (GluFib) is one of the factors of thrombosis. Normal blood protein soluble, fibrinogen (fibrinopeptide A and fibrinopeptide B), is transformed into the insoluble, fibrin, which in the form of filaments adheres to the vessel wall at the site of injury, forming a grid. However, the spatial structure of this peptide has not been established till now. In this article, GluFib peptide is investigated together with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles which were used for mimicking the environment of peptide in blood vessels. The spatial structure was obtained by applying 1D and 2D 1H-1H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY, NOESY). It was shown that the fibrinopeptide B does not have a secondary structure but we can distinguish the fragment Gly 9 - Arg 14 with a good convergence (the backbone RMSD for the Gly9 - Arg14 is 0.18 ± 0.08 Å).

  19. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  20. Determining the effects of microwave heating on the ordered structures of rice starch by NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daming; Ma, Wenrui; Wang, Liyun; Huang, Jianlian; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2013-02-15

    The effects of microwave heating on the double helices, single helix and amorphous structures and the relative crystallinity of rice starch were studied by (13)C CP/MAS NMR method, with rapid heating in an oil bath and conventional slow heating as controls. The results indicated that compared with rapid heating, microwave heating did not significantly change the ordered and disordered structures. All of the heating methods exhibited similar content changes to the double helices, V-type single helix and amorphous structures with rising temperature. The rapid heating effects caused by microwave and oil bath accelerated the destruction of the V-type single helix in the starch granules. The electromagnetic effect of microwave heating did not affect the decrease of the double helices or the amorphous content of the starch.

  1. NMR and X-ray structural characterization and conformational aspects of fluorinated (5Z)-3-benzil-5-arylidenofuran-2(5H)-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, R. R.; Barbosa, L. C. A.; Kabeshov, M. A.; Maltha, C. R. A.; Corrêa, R. S.; Doriguetto, A. C.

    2014-10-01

    Herein we describe structural insights of (5Z)-3-benzyl-5-(2-fluorobenzylidene)furan-2(5H)-one (6) and (5Z)-3-benzyl-5-(pentafluorobenzylidene)furan-2(5H)-one (7), γ-alkylidenebutenolides analogues of the natural products nostoclides. Their structures were investigated by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The stereochemistry of the exocyclic double bond of these fluorinated compounds was determined to be Z by NMR analysis and confirmed by X-ray data. Compounds 6 and 7 crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system P21/c group. A comparison between structural features of (6) and (7) and nostoclide derivatives previously published by us is described.

  2. High-resolution solid-state NMR structure of Alanyl-Prolyl-Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Andreas, Loren B.; Huber, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramesh; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G.; Mehta, Manish A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a de novo high-resolution structure of the peptide Alanyl-Prolyl-Glycine using a combination of sensitive solid-state NMR techniques that each yield precise structural constraints. High-quality 13C–13C distance constraints are extracted by fitting rotational resonance width (R2W) experiments using Multimode Multipole Floquet Theory and experimental chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) orientations. In this strategy, a structure is first calculated using DANTE-REDOR and torsion angle measurements and the resulting relative CSA orientations are used as an input parameter in the 13C–13C distance calculations. Finally, a refined structure is calculated using all the constraints. We investigate the effect of different structural constraints on structure quality, as determined by comparison to the crystal structure and also self-consistency of the calculated structures. Inclusion of all or subsets of these constraints into CNS calculations resulted in high-quality structures (0.02 Å backbone RMSD using all 11 constraints). PMID:19596601

  3. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to relate signal patterns in the 2D spectra and intensities of identifiable molecular moieties to variability in the temperature response of organic matter decomposition, as assessed by Q10. In conclusion, the characterization of SOM composition at the molecular level by solution-state 2D NMR spectroscopy is highly promising; it offers unprecedented possibilities to link SOM molecular composition to ecosystem processes, and their responses to environmental changes.

  4. NMR Crystallography of Enzyme Active Sites: Probing Chemically-Detailed, Three-Dimensional Structure in Tryptophan Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus NMR crystallography – the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry – offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically-detailed structure. From its initial role in refining diffraction data of organic and inorganic solids, NMR crystallography is now being developed for application to active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically-rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate that is not achievable when X-ray, NMR, or computational methodologies are applied in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5 to 2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate, but do not directly identify the protonation state of either. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them, only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but rely on chemical details that must be specified. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which models of the active site can be developed using computational chemistry; these models can be distinguished by comparison of their calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at highest resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of NMR

  5. Solid-state NMR investigations of cellulose structure and interactions with matrix polysaccharides in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the 3D architecture of plant cell walls was poorly understood due to the lack of high-resolution techniques for characterizing the molecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular interactions of the wall polysaccharides in these insoluble biomolecular mixtures. We introduced multidimensional solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, coupled with (13)C labelling of whole plants, to determine the spatial arrangements of macromolecules in near-native plant cell walls. Here we review key evidence from 2D and 3D correlation NMR spectra that show relatively few cellulose-hemicellulose cross peaks but many cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that cellulose microfibrils are not extensively coated by hemicellulose and all three major polysaccharides exist in a single network rather than two separate networks as previously proposed. The number of glucan chains in the primary-wall cellulose microfibrils has been under active debate recently. We show detailed analysis of quantitative (13)C SSNMR spectra of cellulose in various wild-type (WT) and mutant Arabidopsis and Brachypodium primary cell walls, which consistently indicate that primary-wall cellulose microfibrils contain at least 24 glucan chains.

  6. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis C104: A 600-MHz NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-09-03

    Specific lectin-carbohydrate interactions between certain oral streptococci and actinomyces contribute to the microbial colonization of teeth. The receptor molecules of Streptococcus oralis, 34, ATCC 10557, and Streptococcus mitis J22 for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii are antigenically distinct polysaccharides, each formed by a different phosphodiester-linked oligosaccharide repeating unit. Receptor polysaccharide was isolated form S. oralis C104 cells and was shown to contain galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, ribitol, and phosphate with molar ratios of 4:1:1:1. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the polysaccharide shows that it contains a repeating structure. The individual sugars in the repeating unit were identified by {sup 1}H coupling constants observed in E-COSY and DQF-COSY spectra. NMR methods included complete resonance assignments ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) by various homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation experiments that utilize scalar couplings. Sequence and linkage assignments were obtained from the heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectrum. This analysis shows that the receptor polysaccharide of S. oralis C104 is a ribitol teichoic acid polymer composed of a linear hexasaccharide repeating unit containing two residues each of galactopyranose and galactofuranose and a residue each of GalNAc and ribitol joined end to end by phosphodiester linkages.

  7. NMR structure and dynamics of the agonist dynorphin peptide bound to the human kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey; White, Kate L.; Doncescu, Nathalie; Didenko, Tatiana; Roth, Bryan L.; Czaplicki, Georges; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Milon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the dynorphin (1–13) peptide (dynorphin) bound to the human kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been determined by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 15N chemical shift variations indicated that free and bound peptide is in fast exchange in solutions containing 1 mM dynorphin and 0.01 mM KOR. Radioligand binding indicated an intermediate-affinity interaction, with a Kd of ∼200 nM. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of bound dynorphin. The N-terminal opioid signature, YGGF, was observed to be flexibly disordered, the central part of the peptide from L5 to R9 to form a helical turn, and the C-terminal segment from P10 to K13 to be flexibly disordered in this intermediate-affinity bound state. Combining molecular modeling with NMR provided an initial framework for understanding multistep activation of a G protein-coupled receptor by its cognate peptide ligand. PMID:26372966

  8. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  9. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    PubMed

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  10. Chimeric Avidin--NMR structure and dynamics of a 56 kDa homotetrameric thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A E; Kähkönen, Niklas; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Hytönen, Vesa P; Kulomaa, Markku S; Permi, Perttu

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD) is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin-bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of this and the biotin-free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl-detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model-free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin-bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding.

  11. Differences in Human Meibum Lipid Composition with Meibomian Gland Dysfunction Using NMR and Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foulks, Gary N.; Yappert, Marta C.; Milliner, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to quantify lipid wax, cholesterol ester terpenoid and glyceride composition, saturation, oxidation, and CH2 and CH3 moiety distribution. This tool was used to measure changes in human meibum composition with meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Methods. 1H-NMR spectra of meibum from 39 donors with meibomian gland dysfunction (Md) were compared to meibum from 33 normal donors (Mn). Results. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the CH2/CH3 regions of a set of training NMR spectra of human meibum. PCA discriminated between Mn and Md with an accuracy of 86%. There was a bias toward more accurately predicting normal samples (92%) compared with predicting MGD samples (78%). When the NMR spectra of Md were compared with those of Mn, three statistically significant decreases were observed in the relative amounts of CH3 moieties at 1.26 ppm, the products of lipid oxidation above 7 ppm, and the ═CH moieties at 5.2 ppm associated with terpenoids. Conclusions. Loss of the terpenoids could be deleterious to meibum since they exhibit a plethora of mostly positive biological functions and could account for the lower level of cholesterol esters observed in Md compared with Mn. All three changes could account for the higher degree of lipid order of Md compared with age-matched Mn. In addition to the power of NMR spectroscopy to detect differences in the composition of meibum, it is promising that NMR can be used as a diagnostic tool. PMID:22131391

  12. Structural models of activated γ-alumina surfaces revisited: Thermodynamics, NMR and IR spectroscopies from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ary R.; Küçükbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Souza, Wladmir F.; Chiaro, Sandra Shirley X.; Konstantinova, Elena; Leitão, Alexandre A.

    2013-09-01

    The activation of highly catalytic γ-alumina surfaces by thermal treatment and the description of the related chemical processes at atomic scale is a topical issue. According to a recent study [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 (2012) 14430], the enhanced reactivity of γ-alumina has been associated to tri-coordinated aluminum sites which supposedly are exposed exclusively on the (1 1 0) surfaces of this oxide. In this work, we explore this possibility by modeling the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) terminations using Krokidis et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 5121] bulk structure and performing an extensive search of the most stable hydrated surface models at conditions consistent with experiment. Among the 156 structures analyzed, we identify several “metastable” models for the (1 1 0) surface with a considerable probability of containing the AlIII centers at OH coverages of 9.0 and 6.0 OH/nm2. We then test the reactivity of these sites through their Lewis acidity by simulating the CO adsorbtion on the surface and our results confirm the high reactivity of AlIII centers. Based on the Gibbs free energy of the explored structures, we carry on a thermodynamical analysis at varying hydroxylation degrees and pretreatment temperatures and simulate the experimental volcano-type behavior reported in [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 (2012) 14430] and predict the optimum pretreatment temperature as 700 °C, in very good agreement with experimental findings. We further use infrared and solid state MAS NMR spectroscopies and reproduce the 1H MAS NMR spectra under high vacuum conditions (10-5 Torr). The strong resemblance of spectra to the experimental ones in the literature [J. Phys. Chem. C 116 (2012) 834] validate further the structural models we have generated in this study.

  13. NMR screening and crystal quality of bacterially expressed prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins in a structural genomics pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang; Wilson, Ian A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In the Joint Center for Structural Genomics, one-dimensional (1D) 1H NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to characterize the folded state of protein targets and, thus, serves to guide subsequent crystallization efforts and to identify proteins for NMR structure determination. Here, we describe 1D 1H NMR screening of a group of 79 mouse homologue proteins, which correlates the NMR data with the outcome of subsequent crystallization experiments and crystallographic structure determination. Based on the 1D 1H NMR spectra, the proteins are classified into four groups, “A” to “D.” A-type proteins are candidates for structure determination by NMR or crystallography; “B”-type are earmarked for crystallography; “C” indicates folded globular proteins with broadened line shapes; and “D” are nonglobular, “unfolded” polypeptides. The results obtained from coarse- and fine-screen crystallization trials imply that only A- and B-type proteins should be used for extensive crystallization trials in the future, with C and D proteins subjected only to coarse-screen crystallization trials. Of the presently studied 79 soluble protein targets, 63% yielded A- or B-quality 1D 1H NMR spectra. Although similar yields of crystallization hits were obtained for all four groups, A to D, crystals from A- and B-type proteins diffracted on average to significantly higher resolution than crystals produced from C- or D-type proteins. Furthermore, the output of refined crystal structures from this test set of proteins was 4-fold higher for A- and B-type than for C- and D-type proteins. PMID:15677718

  14. The Relationship between NMR Chemical Shifts of Thermally Polarized and Hyperpolarized (89) Y Complexes and Their Solution Structures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yixun; Jindal, Ashish K; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Le Fur, Mariane; Kervarec, Nelly; Zhao, Piyu; Kovacs, Zoltan; Valencia, Laura; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Tripier, Raphaël; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-11-07

    Recently developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technology offers the potential of increasing the NMR sensitivity of even rare nuclei for biological imaging applications. Hyperpolarized (89) Y is an ideal candidate because of its narrow NMR linewidth, favorable spin quantum number (I=1/2 ), and long longitudinal relaxation times (T1 ). Strong NMR signals were detected in hyperpolarized (89) Y samples of a variety of yttrium complexes. A dataset of (89) Y NMR data composed of 23 complexes with polyaminocarboxylate ligands was obtained using hyperpolarized (89) Y measurements or (1) H,(89) Y-HMQC spectroscopy. These data were used to derive an empirical equation that describes the correlation between the (89) Y chemical shift and the chemical structure of the complexes. This empirical correlation serves as a guide for the design of (89) Y sensors. Relativistic (DKH2) DFT calculations were found to predict the experimental (89) Y chemical shifts to a rather good accuracy.

  15. Solid state (13)C NMR analysis of human gallstones from cancer and benign gall bladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, K; Sonkar, Kanchan; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, V K; Sinha, Neeraj

    2009-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C cross polarized (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of human gall bladder stones collected from patients suffering from malignant and benign gall bladder disease was carried out which revealed different polymorphs of cholesterol in these stones. All gall bladder stones in present study had cholesterol as their main constituent. (13)C CP-MAS NMR analysis revealed three forms of cholesterol molecules in these stones, which are anhydrous form, monohydrate crystalline with amorphous form and monohydrate crystalline form. Our study revealed that stones collected from patients associated with chronic cholecystitis (CC) disease have mostly different polymorph of cholesterol than stones collected from patients associated with gall bladder cancer (GBC). Such study will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of formation of gallstones which are associated with different gall bladder diseases. This is the first study by solid state NMR revealing different crystal polymorphism of cholesterol in human gallstones, extending the applicability of (13)C CP-MAS NMR technique for the routine study of gallstones.

  16. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  17. 1H-NMR Spectral Analysis: Phenoxanthiin-1-oxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Robert F. X.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a case, a heterocyclic sulfoxide, which is useful for an introduction to first-order four-spin data analysis. Background of this technique for use with undergraduate students is given including a sample analysis, a list of supplementary materials, and experimental procedures. (CW)

  18. Comparison of the structure of human recombinant short form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Axel, M G; Caldwell, C G; Hagmann, W K; Becker, J W

    1996-01-01

    Stromelysin-1 is a matrix metalloprotease that has been implicated in a number of degenerative diseases. Here we present the refined NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with a small inhibitor and compare it to the X-ray crystal structure of the same complex. The structures are similar in global fold and show an unusual bottomless S1' subsite. There are differences, however, in the least well defined regions, Phe83-Ile89, His224-Phe232 and Pro249- Pro250, reflecting the lack of NOE data and large B-factors. The region His224-Phe232 contains residues of the S1' subsite and, consequently, small differences are observed in this subsite. Hydrogen-bond data show that, in contrast to the crystal structure, the solution structure lacks a hydrogen bond between the amide of Tyr223 and the carbonyl of the P3' residue. Analysis of bound water shows two tightly bound water molecules both in the solution and the crystal structure; neither of these waters are in the inhibitor binding site.

  19. The structure of polycaprolactone-clay nanocomposites investigated by 1H NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana S S B; Rodrigues, Claudia Lopes; Neto, Roberto P C; Tavares, Maria Inês Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polycaprolactone (PCL), containing concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 wt% of sodium montmorillonite (NT-25) and organo-modified montmorillonite clay, with three different salts (Viscogel B7, Viscogel S4 and Viscogel B8), were prepared employing the solution intercalation method using chloroform. The PCL nanocomposites were characterized by relaxometry, through determination of the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation times using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Conventional X-ray diffraction (XDR) was also used to measure the basal space of the nanoclay. The proton spin-lattice relaxation parameters showed that hybrid nanocomposites were formed, containing different parts of intercalated and exfoliated organoclay. The proton T1rhoH also indicated changes in the microstructure, organization and the molecular mobility of the hybrid materials. NMR relaxometry is a good way to evaluate nanomaterials because it provides complementary information, since it is measured in a different time scale. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis were also used to investigate the crystallization and thermal behavior of the nanocomposites, respectively. All materials had low crystallization temperature (Tc) and the melting temperature (Tm) were very close to that of the PCL matrix, but the degree of crystallinity of the nanocomposites decreased. TGA analysis demonstrated that montmorillonite accelerates PCL's decomposition while unmodified montmorillonite has the opposite effect.

  20. The structure, dynamics and orientation of antimicrobial peptides in membranes by multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bechinger, B

    1999-12-15

    Linear peptide antibiotics have been isolated from amphibians, insects and humans and used as templates to design cheaper and more potent analogues for medical applications. Peptides such as cecropins or magainins are < or = 40 amino acids in length. Many of them have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis with isotopic labels incorporated at selected sites. Structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques indicates that these peptide antibiotics strongly interact with lipid membranes. In bilayer environments they exhibit amphipathic alpha-helical conformations and alignments of the helix axis parallel to the membrane surface. This contrasts the transmembrane orientations observed for alamethicin or gramicidin A. Models that have been proposed to explain the antibiotic and pore-forming activities of membrane-associated peptides, as well as other experimental results, include transmembrane helical bundles, wormholes, carpets, detergent-like effects or the in-plane diffusion of peptide-induced bilayer instabilities.

  1. 1H-NMR METABONOMICS ANALYSIS OF SERA DIFFERENTIATES BETWEEN MAMMARY TUMOR-BEARING MICE AND HEALTHY CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global analysis of 1H-NMR spectra of serum is an appealing approach for the rapid detection of cancer. To evaluate the usefulness of this method in distinguishing between mammary tumor-bearing mice and healthy controls, we conducted 1H-NMR metabonomic analyses on serum samples ob...

  2. Comprehensive structural and dynamical view of an unfolded protein from the combination of single-molecule FRET, NMR, and SAXS

    PubMed Central

    Aznauryan, Mikayel; Delgado, Leonildo; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Huang, Jie-rong; Labhardt, Alexander M.; Grzesiek, Stephan; Schuler, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The properties of unfolded proteins are essential both for the mechanisms of protein folding and for the function of the large group of intrinsically disordered proteins. However, the detailed structural and dynamical characterization of these highly dynamic and conformationally heterogeneous ensembles has remained challenging. Here we combine and compare three of the leading techniques for the investigation of unfolded proteins, NMR spectroscopy (NMR), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), with the goal of quantitatively testing their consistency and complementarity and for obtaining a comprehensive view of the unfolded-state ensemble. Using unfolded ubiquitin as a test case, we find that its average dimensions derived from FRET and from structural ensembles calculated using the program X-PLOR-NIH based on NMR and SAXS restraints agree remarkably well; even the shapes of the underlying intramolecular distance distributions are in good agreement, attesting to the reliability of the approaches. The NMR-based results provide a highly sensitive way of quantifying residual structure in the unfolded state. FRET-based nanosecond fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows long-range distances and chain dynamics to be probed in a time range inaccessible by NMR. The combined techniques thus provide a way of optimally using the complementarity of the available methods for a quantitative structural and dynamical description of unfolded proteins both at the global and the local level. PMID:27566405

  3. NMR Insight into Myosin-Binding Subunit Coiled Coil Structure Reveals Binding Interface with Protein Kinase G-Iα Leucine Zipper in Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel G; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-03-09

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-Iα has remained limited. Here, we report the three-dimensional NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which aa 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. 15N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation-enhancement (PRE) and CSP NMR guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the hetero-tetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS-LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow re-evaluation of the role(s) of MLCP partner polypeptides in regulation of VSMC contractility.

  4. Assessment of the structure of pegylated-recombinant protein therapeutics by the NMR fingerprint assay.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Derek J; Aubin, Yves

    2017-05-10

    A number of recombinant protein therapeutic products, such as filgrastim (methionyl granulocyte colony stimulating factor [Met-GCSF] used to boost the immune system in chemotherapy treated cancer patients), and interferon alpha-2 (used for the treatment of various viral infections), have been chemically modified with the addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. This modification prolongs residency of the drug in the body and reduces metabolic degradation, which allows less frequent administration of the products. Here we show how NMR spectroscopy methods can assess the higher order structure (HOS) of pegylated-filgrastim (Neulasta®), pegylated interferon-α2a (Pegasys®) pegylated interferon-α2b (PEG-Intron®) purchased from the marketplace. The addition of the PEG moiety effectively doubles the molecular weight of the three products. This presents a significant challenge for the application of NMR techniques. Nevertheless, the results showed that high-resolution spectra could be recorded for two of the three products. Comparison of the spectra of the pegylated protein and the non-pegylated protein shows that the chemical modification did not alter the HOS of these proteins.

  5. 29Si NMR study of structural ordering in aluminosilicate geopolymer gels.

    PubMed

    Duxson, Peter; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; Separovic, Frances; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2005-03-29

    A systematic series of aluminosilicate geopolymer gels was synthesized and then analyzed using 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) in combination with Gaussian peak deconvolution to characterize the short-range ordering in terms of T-O-T bonds (where T is Al or Si). The effect of nominal Na2O/(Na2O + K2O) and Si/Al ratios on short-range network ordering was quantified by deconvolution of the 29Si MAS NMR spectra into individual Gaussian peaks representing different Q4(mAl) silicon centers. The deconvolution procedure developed in this work is applicable to other aluminosilicate gel systems. The short-range ordering observed here indicates that Loewenstein's Rule of perfect aluminum avoidance may not apply strictly to geopolymeric gels, although further analyses are required to quantify the degree of aluminum avoidance. Potassium geopolymers appeared to exhibit a more random Si/Al distribution compared to that of mixed-alkali and sodium systems. This work provides a quantitative account of the silicon and aluminum ordering in geopolymers, which is essential for extending our understanding of the mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability, and fundamental structure of these systems.

  6. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction.

  7. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  8. Polymer Molecular Weight Analysis by [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izunobi, Josephat U.; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of molecular weight and molecular weight distribution remain matters of fundamental importance for the characterization and physical properties of polymers. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) is the most routinely used method for the molecular weight determination of polymers whereas matrix-assisted laser…

  9. A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative using NMR spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Rosniza; Bakar, Mohamad Abu; Khairuddean, Melati; Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Adnan, Rohana

    2012-09-12

    A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative was carried out using NMR spectroscopy techniques. The overlapping (1)H-NMR signals of ENR-50 at δ 1.56, 1.68-1.70, 2.06, 2.15-2.17 ppm were successfully assigned. In this work, the <(13)C-NMR chemical shift assignments of ENR-50 were consistent to the previously reported work. A cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative of ENR-50 was synthesized from the reaction of purified ENR-50 with carbon disulfide (CS(2)), in the presence of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst at reflux temperature. The cyclic dithiocarbonate formation involved the epoxide ring opening of the ENR-50. This was followed by insertion of the C-S moiety of CS(2) at the oxygen attached to the quaternary carbon and methine carbon of epoxidized isoprene unit, respectively. The bands due to the C=S and C-O were clearly observed in the FTIR spectrum while the (1)H-NMR spectrum of the derivative revealed the peak attributed to the methylene protons had split. The (13)C-NMR spectrum of the derivative further indicates two new carbon peaks arising from the >C=S and quaternary carbon of cyclic dithiocarbonate. All other (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of the derivative remain unchanged with respect to the ENR-50.

  10. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M.; Cusumano, Zachary T.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J.; Frieden, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG–CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG–CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG–CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  11. Mesh size analysis of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels using solute exclusion and PFG-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jowkarderis, Leila; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-12-21

    The pore structure of TEMPO-mediated oxidized CNF hydrogels, chemically cross-linked with water-soluble diamines, is studied. A solute exclusion method and pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used to estimate the mesh size distribution in the gel network in its hydrated state. Dextran fractions with the nominal molecular weights in the range of 10-2000 kDa are used as probes. The results show a nonuniform network structure, consisting of a group of large openings that contain ∼50% of water, and regions with a more compact structure and smaller mesh units that restrict the diffusivity of the dextran molecules. A biexponential model is proposed for the NMR echo amplitude decay due to the probe diffusion into the gel network. A typical single exponential model does not fit the experimental data when the probe molecular size is comparable to the network mesh size. The results obtained with NMR, using the proposed biexponential model, are in very good agreement with those determined with solute exclusion. Precise mesh size estimation with solute exclusion using pore models is subject to restrictions, and vary with the assumed pore geometry. The average mesh size obtained using a spherical pore model, ∼35 nm, in the compact regions of the hydrogel, is in good agreement with the theoretical value in a network of rodlike particles. Neglecting the wall effects leads to underestimation of the mesh size with both techniques.

  12. Metabolomic differentiation of maca (Lepidium meyenii) accessions cultivated under different conditions using NMR and chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianping; Avula, Bharathi; Chan, Michael; Clément, Céline; Kreuzer, Michael; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2012-01-01

    To gain insights on the effects of color type, cultivation history, and growing site on the composition alterations of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walpers) hypocotyls, NMR profiling combined with chemometric analysis was applied to investigate the metabolite variability in different maca accessions. Maca hypocotyls with different colors (yellow, pink, violet, and lead-colored) cultivated at different geographic sites and different areas were examined for differences in metabolite expression. Differentiations of the maca accessions grown under the different cultivation conditions were determined by principle component analyses (PCAs) which were performed on the datasets derived from their ¹H NMR spectra. A total of 16 metabolites were identified by NMR analysis, and the changes in metabolite levels in relation to the color types and growing conditions of maca hypocotyls were evaluated using univariate statistical analysis. In addition, the changes of the correlation pattern among the metabolites identified in the maca accessions planted at the two different sites were examined. The results from both multivariate and univariate analysis indicated that the planting site was the major determining factor with regards to metabolite variations in maca hypocotyls, while the color of maca accession seems to be of minor importance in this respect.

  13. Determination of magnetic and structural properties in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled metal centers using NMR methods. Magneto-structural correlations in anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G.C.; Haw, J.F.

    1988-10-19

    A new approach to the investigation of magneto-structural correlations in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled transition-metal centers is described that illustrates the potential of NMR spectroscopy in such work. The results of a variable-temperature (VT) /sup 13/C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR investigation of anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate, (Cu(C/sub 3/H/sub 7/COO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/ are reported. Isotropic shifts are found to be primarily contact in origin, and a statistical analysis of their temperature dependence allows the calculation of singlet-triplet energy level separations (-2J), diamagnetic shifts (delta/sub dia/), and electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling constants (A), which are shown to give insight into the mechanisms of electron delocalization along the superexchange pathway. Signal multiplicity can be related to compound structure, which was determined by using x-ray crystallography. The title compound is triclinic and has a space group of P/anti 1/ with a = 9.035 (2) /angstrom/, b = 5.192 (2) /angstrom/, c = 11.695 (3) /angstrom/, ..cap alpha.. = 85.88 (2)/degrees/, ..gamma.. = 109.32 (2)/degrees/, Z = 1, and V = 515.2 (3) /angstrom//sup 3/; the final weighted R value for 2169 reflections was 0.048. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  14. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Spatial Variation in Soft Corals

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Sun, Ruiqi; Liu, Huijuan; Geng, Zhufeng; Chen, Dawei; Li, Yinping; Han, Jiao; Lin, Wenhan; Du, Shushan; Deng, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Soft corals are common marine organisms that inhabit tropical and subtropical oceans. They are shown to be rich source of secondary metabolites with biological activities. In this work, soft corals from two geographical locations were investigated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis at the metabolic level. A partial least-squares discriminant analysis showed clear separation among extracts of soft corals grown in Sanya Bay and Weizhou Island. The specific markers that contributed to discrimination between soft corals in two origins belonged to terpenes, sterols and N-containing compounds. The satisfied precision of classification obtained indicates this approach using combined 1H-NMR and chemometrics is effective to discriminate soft corals collected in different geographical locations. The results revealed that metabolites of soft corals evidently depended on living environmental condition, which would provide valuable information for further relevant coastal marine environment evaluation. PMID:24686560

  15. Rapid milk group classification by 1H NMR analysis of Le and H epitopes in human milk oligosaccharide donor samples.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sander S; Schoemaker, Ruud J W; Gerwig, Gerrit J; van Leusen-van Kan, Ellen J M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2014-08-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a major constituent of human breast milk and play an important role in reducing the risk of infections in infants. The structures of these HMOs show similarities with blood group antigens in protein glycosylation, in particular in relation to fucosylation in Lewis blood group-type epitopes, matching the maternal pattern. Previously, based on the Secretor and Lewis blood group system, four milk groups have been defined, i.e. Lewis-positive Secretors, Lewis-positive non-Secretors, Lewis-negative Secretors and Lewis-negative non-Secretors. Here, a rapid one-dimensional (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis method is presented that identifies the presence/absence of (α1-2)-, (α1-3)- and (α1-4)-linked fucose residues in HMO samples, affording the essential information to attribute different HMO samples to a specific milk group. The developed method is based on the NMR structural-reporter-group concept earlier established for glycoprotein glycans. Further evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of 36 HMO samples shows that within each of the four milk groups the relative levels of the different fucosylation epitopes can greatly vary. The data also allow a separation of the Lewis-positive Secretor milk group into two sub-groups.

  16. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, B. F.; Nunes, L. M. S.; Lobo, C. M. S.; Carvalho, A. S.; Cabeça, L. F.; Colnago, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu2+ concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors.

  17. High-resolution microcoil NMR for analysis of mass-limited, nanoliter samples.

    PubMed

    Olson, D L; Lacey, M E; Sweedler, J V

    1998-02-01

    An improved nanoliter-volume NMR probe design places the microcoil and capillary at the magic angle (57.7 degrees) with respect to the external magnetic field. Using an NMR probe which requires a total sample volume of just 200 nL, high-resolution 300-MHz 1H-NMR spectra (line width, 0.6 Hz) are presented of 10 mM alpha-bag cell peptide for an observe quantity of 45 ng (50 pmol in 5 nL). For the volume of sample inside the microcoil (the observe volume, Vobs), the 3 sigma limit of detection (LOD) is 9 ng (10 pmol, 2mM) for data obtained in 15 h. To reduce the data acquisition time, a probe with a greater Vobs is developed. As an example of a rapid, mass-limited analysis, a concentration corresponding to 400 ng of menthol dissolved in Vobs = 31 nL (82.6 mM) yields a spectrum in 9 min (LOD = 6.9 ng, 44 pmol, 1.4 mM). To illustrate improvements in concentration sensitivity, a spectrum is acquired in 45 min for 400 ng of menthol dissolved in a total sample volume of 200 nL (12.8 mM). Compared to a commercial nanoprobe for the same mass of menthol, these two examples reduce data acquisition time by at least 95%. Both model compounds demonstrate substantially improved concentration LODs compared to those obtained in previous high-resolution, microcoil NMR work. These advances illustrate the utility of enhanced sensitivity provided by NMR microcoils applied to nanoliter volumes of mass-limited samples.

  18. NMR Solution Structure of a Cyanovirin Homolog from Wheat Head Blight Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Matei, Elena; Louis, John M.; Jee, JunGoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the cyanovirin-N homolog (CVNH) lectin family are found in bacteria, fungi and plants. As part of our ongoing work on CVNH structure-function studies, we determined the high-resolution NMR solution structure of the homolog from the wheat head blight disease causing ascomycetous fungus Gibberella zeae (or Fusarium graminearum), hereafter called GzCVNH. Like cyanovirin-N (CV-N), GzCVNH comprises two tandem sequence repeats and the protein sequence exhibits 30% identity with CV-N. The overall structure is similar to those of other members of the CVNH family, with the conserved pseudo-symmetric halves of the structure, domains A and B, closely resembling recently determined structures of Tuber borchii, Neurospora crassa and Ceratopteris richardii CVNH proteins. Although GzCVNH exhibits a similar glycan recognition profile to CV-N and specifically binds to Manα(1–2)Manα, its weak carbohydrate binding affinity to only one binding site is insufficient for conferring anti-HIV activity. PMID:21365681

  19. NMR-based structural modeling of graphite oxide using multidimensional 13C solid-state NMR and ab initio chemical shift calculations.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Leah B; Shaibat, Medhat A; Cai, Weiwei W; Park, Sungjin; Piner, Richard; Ruoff, Rodney S; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-28

    Chemically modified graphenes and other graphite-based materials have attracted growing interest for their unique potential as lightweight electronic and structural nanomaterials. It is an important challenge to construct structural models of noncrystalline graphite-based materials on the basis of NMR or other spectroscopic data. To address this challenge, a solid-state NMR (SSNMR)-based structural modeling approach is presented on graphite oxide (GO), which is a prominent precursor and interesting benchmark system of modified graphene. An experimental 2D (13)C double-quantum/single-quantum correlation SSNMR spectrum of (13)C-labeled GO was compared with spectra simulated for different structural models using ab initio geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations. The results show that the spectral features of the GO sample are best reproduced by a geometry-optimized structural model that is based on the Lerf-Klinowski model (Lerf, A. et al. Phys. Chem. B 1998, 102, 4477); this model is composed of interconnected sp(2), 1,2-epoxide, and COH carbons. This study also convincingly excludes the possibility of other previously proposed models, including the highly oxidized structures involving 1,3-epoxide carbons (Szabo, I. et al. Chem. Mater. 2006, 18, 2740). (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) patterns measured by a 2D (13)C CSA/isotropic shift correlation SSNMR were well reproduced by the chemical shift tensor obtained by the ab initio calculation for the former model. The approach presented here is likely to be applicable to other chemically modified graphenes and graphite-based systems.

  20. Biosimilar structural comparability assessment by NMR: from small proteins to monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Japelj, Boštjan; Ilc, Gregor; Marušič, Jaka; Senčar, Jure; Kuzman, Drago; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Biosimilar drug products must have a demonstrated similarity with respect to the reference product’s molecules in order to ensure both the effectiveness of the drug and the patients’ safety. In this paper the fusion framework of a highly sensitive NMR fingerprinting approach for conformational changes and mathematically-based biosimilarity metrics is introduced. The final goal is to translate the complex spectral information into biosimilarity scores, which are then used to estimate the degree of similarity between the biosimilar and the reference product. The proposed method was successfully applied to a small protein, i.e., filgrastim (neutropenia treatment), which is the first biosimilar approved in the United States, and a relatively large protein, i.e., monoclonal antibody rituximab (lymphoma treatment). This innovative approach introduces a new level of sensitivity to structural changes that are induced by, e.g., a small pH shift or other changes in the protein formulation. PMID:27578487

  1. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  2. Porous Structure of Pharmaceutical Tablets Studied Using PGSTE-NMR Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porion, Patrice; Tchoreloff, Pierre; Busignies, Virginie; Leclerc, Bernard; Evesque, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of pharmaceutical tablets at high pressure (250 MPa) is a complex process that depends on the nature of the chemical compound. The purpose of this work is to characterize the porous structure of tablets obtained by uniaxial compaction, the most used process in pharmaceutical technology. First, three pharmaceutical excipients (microcrystalline cellulose, lactose and anhydrous calcium phosphate) were compacted and their compressibility properties determined. Secondly, the study of the self-diffusion process of a molecular fluid inside the pore space was performed by using pulsed-gradient stimulated-echo (PGSTE) NMR method, for tablets compacted under various pressure, in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the compaction axis. The results are used to determine the tortuosity factor and the anisotropy of the porous space of such compacted materials.

  3. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  4. Biosimilar structural comparability assessment by NMR: from small proteins to monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, Boštjan; Ilc, Gregor; Marušič, Jaka; Senčar, Jure; Kuzman, Drago; Plavec, Janez

    2016-08-01

    Biosimilar drug products must have a demonstrated similarity with respect to the reference product’s molecules in order to ensure both the effectiveness of the drug and the patients’ safety. In this paper the fusion framework of a highly sensitive NMR fingerprinting approach for conformational changes and mathematically-based biosimilarity metrics is introduced. The final goal is to translate the complex spectral information into biosimilarity scores, which are then used to estimate the degree of similarity between the biosimilar and the reference product. The proposed method was successfully applied to a small protein, i.e., filgrastim (neutropenia treatment), which is the first biosimilar approved in the United States, and a relatively large protein, i.e., monoclonal antibody rituximab (lymphoma treatment). This innovative approach introduces a new level of sensitivity to structural changes that are induced by, e.g., a small pH shift or other changes in the protein formulation.

  5. Solid state NMR and IR characterization of wood polymer structure in relation to tree provenance.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Ilaria; Callone, Emanuela; Sandak, Anna; Sandak, Jakub; Dirè, Sandra

    2015-03-06

    (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and mid-infrared spectroscopies were used for characterizing changes in the chemical structure of wood polymers (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in relation to the tree growth location. Samples of three provenances in Europe (Finland, Poland and Italy) were selected for studies. The requirement was to use untreated solid wood samples to minimize any manipulation to the nanostructure of native wood. The results confirm that the chemical and physical properties of samples belonging to the same wood species (Picea abies Karst.) differ due to the origin. Both FT-IR and dynamic NMR spectroscopies were able to correctly discriminate samples originating from three different provenances in Europe. Such methods might be very useful for both, research and understanding of wood microstructure and its variability due to the growth conditions.

  6. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  7. Secondary structure and zinc ligation of human recombinant short-form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; Johnson, B A; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Hagmann, W K; Esser, C K; Springer, J P

    1993-12-07

    Stromelysin-1, a member of the matrix metalloendoprotease family, is a zinc protease involved in the degradation of connective tissue in the extracellular matrix. As a step toward determining the structure of this protein, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR experiments have been applied to an inhibited truncated form of human stromelysin-1. Extensive 1H, 13C, and 15N sequential assignments have been obtained with a combination of three- and four-dimensional experiments. On the basis of sequential and short-range NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, two helices have been delineated, spanning residues Asp-111 to Val-127 and Leu-195 to Ser-206. A third helix spanning residues Asp-238 to Gly-247 is characterized by sequential NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, but not short-range NOEs. The lack of the latter NOEs suggests that this helix is either distorted or mobile. Similarly, sequential and interstrand NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts characterize a four-stranded beta-sheet with three parallel strands (Arg-100 to Ile-101, Ile-142 to Ala-147, Asp-177 to Asp-181) and one antiparallel strand (Ala-165 to Tyr-168). Two zinc sites have been identified in stromelysin [Salowe et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4535-4540]. The NMR spectral properties, including chemical shift, pH dependence, and proton coupling of the imidazole nitrogens of six histidine residues (151, 166, 179, 201, 205, and 211), invariant in the matrix metalloendoprotease family, suggest that these residues are zinc ligands. NOE data indicate that these histidines form two clusters: one ligates the catalytic zinc (His-201, -205, and -211), and the other ligates a structural zinc (His-151, -166, and -179). Heteronuclear multiple quantum correlated spectra and specific labeling experiments indicate His-151, -179, -201, -205, and -211 are in the N delta 1H tautomer and His-166 is in the N epsilon 2H tautomer.

  8. Structure and dynamics of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in MPG micelles by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Farrow, N A; Deber, C M; Kay, L E

    1996-04-23

    The structure and dynamics of the 53-residue filamentous bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in fully protonated myristoyllysophosphatidylglycerol (MPG) micelles were characterized using multinuclear solution NMR spectroscopy. Detergent-solubilized coat protein [sequence: see text] mimics the membrane-bound "assembly intermediate" form of the coat protein which occurs during part of the phage life cycle. NMR studies of the IKe coat protein show that the coat protein is largely alpha-helical, exhibiting a long amphipathic surface. helix (Asn 4 to Ser 26) and a shorter "micelle-spanning" C-terminal helix which begins at TRP 29 and continues at least to Phe 48. Pro 30 likely occurs in the first turn of the C-terminal helix, where it is ideally situated given the hydrogen bonding and steric restrictions imposed by this residue. The similarity of 15N relaxation values (T1, T2, and NOE and 500 MHz and T2 at 600 MHz) among much of the N-terminal helix and all of the TM helix indicates that the N-terminal helix is as closely associated with the micelle as the TM helix. The description of the protein in the micelle is supported by the observation of NOEs between lysolipid protons and protein amide protons between asn 8 and Ser 50. The N-terminal and TM helices exhibit substantial mobility on the microsecond to second time scale, which likely reflects changes in the orientation between the two helices. The overall findings serve to clarify the role of individual residues in the context of a TM alpha-helix and provide an understanding of the secondary structure, dynamics, and aqueous and micellar environments of the coat protein.

  9. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  10. Chemical tagging of chlorinated phenols for their facile detection and analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A.; Leif, Roald N.

    2015-03-22

    A derivatization method that employs diethyl (bromodifluoromethyl) phosphonate (DBDFP) to efficiently tag the endocrine disruptor pentachlorophenol (PCP) and other chlorinated phenols (CPs) along with their reliable detection and analysis by NMR is presented. The method accomplishes the efficient alkylation of the hydroxyl group in CPs with the difluoromethyl (CF2H) moiety in extremely rapid fashion (5 min), at room temperature and in an environmentally benign manner. The approach proved successful in difluoromethylating a panel of 18 chlorinated phenols, yielding derivatives that displayed unique 1H, 19F NMR spectra allowing for the clear discrimination between isomerically related CPs. Due to its biphasic nature, the derivatization can be applied to both aqueous and organic mixtures where the analysis of CPs is required. Furthermore, the methodology demonstrates that PCP along with other CPs can be selectively derivatized in the presence of other various aliphatic alcohols, underscoring the superiority of the approach over other general derivatization methods that indiscriminately modify all analytes in a given sample. The present work demonstrates the first application of NMR on the qualitative analysis of these highly toxic and environmentally persistent species.

  11. NMR metabolomic analysis of fecal water from subjects on a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Jenny; Karlsson, Pernilla Christina; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Rafter, Joseph James; Bohlin, Lars

    2008-06-01

    A vegetarian diet rich in phytochemicals may prevent colon carcinogenesis by affecting biochemical processes in the colonic mucosa. Compounds passing the digestive system reaching the colon could potentially be detected in fecal water. We previously reported that intact fecal water samples from human volunteers significantly decreased prostaglandin production and COX-2 protein expression in colonic cells. The aim with the present study was to further study the composition of the fecal waters, using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis, and to trace the COX-2 inhibiting activity. Intact fecal water samples and fractions thereof were analyzed for their ability to inhibit prostaglandin E2 production in the human colon cell line HT-29. The majority of the tested aqueous phases derived from intact fecal water showed ability to inhibit prostaglandin production in cells (13.8+/-1.34% inhibition, p=0.01). NMR analysis indicated the presence of significant quantities of amino acids and fatty acids. Major metabolites included; acetic acid, butanoic acid, propanoic acid, glutamic acid and alanine. Smaller amounts of glycine and fumaric acid, which are known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, were also detected. This study describes for the first time NMR metabolomic analysis of fecal water from subjects on a vegetarian diet.

  12. The solution structure of the circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) determined by NMR and molecular mechanics calculation.

    PubMed Central

    Mooren, M M; Wijmenga, S S; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Hilbers, C W

    1994-01-01

    The 3'-5' circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) was studied by means of 1D and 2D high resolution NMR techniques and molecular mechanics calculations. Analysis of the J-couplings, obtained from the 1H and 13C-NMR spectra, allowed the determination of the conformation of the sugar rings and of the 'circular' phosphate backbone. In the course of the investigations it was found that the Karplus-equation most recently parametrized for the CCOP J-coupling constants could not account for the measured J(C4'P) of 11.1 Hz and a new parametrization for both HCOP and CCOP coupling constants is therefore presented. Subsequent analysis of the coupling constants yielded 'fixed' values for the torsion angles beta and delta (with beta = 178 degrees and delta = 139 degrees). The value of the latter angle corresponds to an S-type sugar conformation. The torsion angles gamma and epsilon are involved in a rapid equilibrium in which they are converted between the gauche(+) and trans and between the trans and gauche(-) domain respectively. We show that the occurrence of epsilon in the gauche(-) domain necessitates S-type sugar conformations. Given the aforementioned values for beta, gamma, delta and epsilon the ring closure constraints for the ring, formed by the phosphate backbone can only be fulfilled if alpha and zeta adopt some special values. After energy minimization with the CHARMm force field only two combinations of alpha and zeta result in energetically favourable structures, i.e. the combination alpha (t)/zeta(g-) in case gamma is in a gauche(+) and epsilon is in a trans conformation, and the combination alpha (t)/zeta (g+) for the combination gamma (t)/epsilon (g-). The results are discussed in relation to earlier findings obtained for cd(ApAp) and cr(GpGp), the latter molecule being a regulator of the synthesis of cellulose in Acetobacter xylinum. PMID:8041628

  13. The solution structure of the circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) determined by NMR and molecular mechanics calculation.

    PubMed

    Mooren, M M; Wijmenga, S S; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Hilbers, C W

    1994-07-11

    The 3'-5' circular trinucleotide cr(GpGpGp) was studied by means of 1D and 2D high resolution NMR techniques and molecular mechanics calculations. Analysis of the J-couplings, obtained from the 1H and 13C-NMR spectra, allowed the determination of the conformation of the sugar rings and of the 'circular' phosphate backbone. In the course of the investigations it was found that the Karplus-equation most recently parametrized for the CCOP J-coupling constants could not account for the measured J(C4'P) of 11.1 Hz and a new parametrization for both HCOP and CCOP coupling constants is therefore presented. Subsequent analysis of the coupling constants yielded 'fixed' values for the torsion angles beta and delta (with beta = 178 degrees and delta = 139 degrees). The value of the latter angle corresponds to an S-type sugar conformation. The torsion angles gamma and epsilon are involved in a rapid equilibrium in which they are converted between the gauche(+) and trans and between the trans and gauche(-) domain respectively. We show that the occurrence of epsilon in the gauche(-) domain necessitates S-type sugar conformations. Given the aforementioned values for beta, gamma, delta and epsilon the ring closure constraints for the ring, formed by the phosphate backbone can only be fulfilled if alpha and zeta adopt some special values. After energy minimization with the CHARMm force field only two combinations of alpha and zeta result in energetically favourable structures, i.e. the combination alpha (t)/zeta(g-) in case gamma is in a gauche(+) and epsilon is in a trans conformation, and the combination alpha (t)/zeta (g+) for the combination gamma (t)/epsilon (g-). The results are discussed in relation to earlier findings obtained for cd(ApAp) and cr(GpGp), the latter molecule being a regulator of the synthesis of cellulose in Acetobacter xylinum.

  14. Conformational Analysis of Triazine Dendrimers: Using NMR Spectroscopy To Probe the Choreography of a Dendrimer's Dance.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karlos X; Simanek, Eric E

    2008-06-24

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies are used to probe the conformation of a melamine dendrimer bearing unique NMR signals from the core to the periphery. Four conceptual anchors for dendrimer conformation emerge from these experiments. First, changes in isomer populations observed by (1)H NMR reveal the onset of globular structure. Second, NOE complexity emerges with globular structure: variable temperature NOESY studies show that the peripheral groups, BOC-protected aliphatic amines, fold back into the globular core of the macromolecule at 75 degrees C in DMSO-d(6). Third, variable temperature coefficients measured for NH protons suggest that solvent is largely excluded from the interior of the dendrimer: the carbamate NH groups of the periphery are most sensitive to temperature while the NHs nearest the core show little temperature dependence. Conformation is influenced by solvent choice: backfolding is observed in DMSO-d(6), but not in either CDCl(3) or CD(3)OD. Finally, relaxation studies show that peripheral groups are more dynamic than groups at the core. These anchors consolidate observations made by many groups on disparate systems within a common architecture.

  15. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  17. The (1)H NMR structure of bovine Pb(2+)-osteocalcin and implications for lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dowd, T L; Li, L; Gundberg, C M

    2008-11-01

    Structural information on the effect of Pb(2+) on proteins under physiologically relevant conditions is largely unknown. We have previously shown that low levels of lead increased the amount of osteocalcin bound to hydroxyapatite (BBA 1535:153). This suggested that lead induced a more compact structure in the protein. We have determined the 3D structure of Pb(2+)-osteocalcin (49 amino acids), a bone protein from a target tissue, using (1)H 2D NMR techniques. Lead, at a stoichiometry of only 1:1, induced a similar fold in the protein as that induced by Ca(2+) at a stoichiometry of 3:1. The structure consisted of an unstructured N-terminus and an ordered C-terminal consisting of a hydrophobic core (residues 16-49). The genetic algorithm-molecular dynamics simulation predicted the lead ion was coordinated by the Gla 24 and Gla 21 residues. It is proposed that mineral binding occurs via uncoordinated Gla oxygen ions binding to calcium in hydroxyapatite. A comparison of Pb(2+)- and Ca(2+)-osteocalcin suggests Pb(2+), at a lower stoichiometry, may induce similar conformational changes in proteins and subsequent molecular processes normally controlled by calcium alone. This may contribute to a molecular mechanism of lead toxicity for calcium binding proteins. Lead exposure may alter the amount of mineral bound osteocalcin and contribute to abnormal bone remodeling.

  18. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil.

    PubMed

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Furdui, Vasile I; Reiner, Eric J; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-08-27

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined.

  19. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lankadurai, Brian P.; Furdui, Vasile I.; Reiner, Eric J.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2013-01-01

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined. PMID:24958147

  20. Protein structure refinement based on paramagnetic NMR shifts: applications to wild-type and mutant forms of cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, M.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach to NMR solution structure refinement is introduced that uses paramagnetic effects on nuclear chemical shifts as constraints in energy minimization or molecular dynamics calculations. Chemical shift differences between oxidized and reduced forms of horse cytochrome c for more than 300 protons were used as constraints to refine the structure of the wild-type protein in solution and to define the structural changes induced by a Leu 94 to Val mutation. A single round of constrained minimization, using the crystal structure as the starting point, converged to a low-energy structure with an RMS deviation between calculated and observed pseudo-contact shifts of 0.045 ppm, 7.5-fold lower than the starting structure. At the same time, the procedure provided stereospecific assignments for more than 45 pairs of methylene protons and methyl groups. Structural changes caused by the mutation were determined to a precision of better than 0.3 A. Structure determination based on dipolar paramagnetic (pseudocontact) shifts is applicable to molecules containing anisotropic paramagnetic centers with short electronic relaxation times, including numerous naturally occurring metalloproteins, as well as proteins or nucleic acids to which a paramagnetic metal ion or ligand may be attached. The long range of paramagnetic shift effects (up to 20 A from the iron in the case of cytochrome c) provides global structural constraints, which, in conjunction with conventional NMR distance and dihedral angle constraints, will enhance the precision of NMR solution structure determination. PMID:7757018

  1. Study of pharmaceutical coatings by means of NMR cryoporometry and SEM image analysis.

    PubMed

    Boissier, Catherine; Feidt, François; Nordstierna, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis have been used to investigate the size and shape distribution of pores in pharmaceutical coatings. The coatings were made from a mixture of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and ethylcellulose (EC). Upon solvent evaporation from a solution consisting of both the polymers, a solid polymer film is formed, which after removal of the water-soluble HPC consists of a skeleton of EC. A change in the amount of HPC enables modification of the water permeability through the films. By means of NMR cryoporometry, the presence of small pores (radius below 400 nm) was revealed with no significant change in the pore size distribution (PSD) as the HPC content in the films were changed. NMR cryoporometry showed the presence of channels of a characteristic 30-nm length scale in the films that contained more than 22% HPC. Below this threshold, the lack of interconnecting channels seems to prevent complete HPC dissolution and thereby the water permeability. SEM image analysis showed pore sizes that ranged from hundreds of nanometers up to few micrometers. Above the 22% threshold, further increase of HPC in the films resulted in an increased pore volume and wider PSD.

  2. (1)H NMR metabonomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma: a possible diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Zira, Athina N; Theocharis, Stamatios E; Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Migdalis, Vasilios; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2010-08-06

    (1)H NMR based metabonomic approach was applied in order to monitor the alterations of plasma metabolic profile in Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) patients and controls. (1)H NMR spectra of plasma samples from 32 RCC patients and 13 controls (patients exhibiting benign urologic disease) were recorded and analyzed using multivariate statistical techniques. Alterations in the levels of LDL/VLDL, NAC, lactate, and choline were observed between RCC patients and controls discriminating these groups in Principal Component Analysis (PCA) plots. Post OSC PLS-DA presented a satisfactory clustering between T1 with T3 RCC patients. Decrease in plasma lipid concentrations in RCC patients was verified using conventional clinical chemistry analysis. The results suggest that combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy with PCA has potential in cancer diagnosis; however, a limitation of the method to monitor RCC is that major biomarkers revealed (lipoproteins and choline) in this metabolic profile are not unique to RCC but may be the result of the presence of any malignancy.

  3. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C.

    2008-05-01

    A live in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled-growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuels production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study showed the Eubacterium aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations – a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics / systems biology methods are discussed.

  4. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C. M.

    2008-05-01

    A live, in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuel production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study also showed that E. aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations—a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics/systems biology methods are discussed.

  5. TCA Cycle Turnover And Serum Glucose Sources By Automated Bayesian Analysis Of NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Burgess, Shawn; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2004-04-01

    Changes in sources of serum glucose are indicative of a variety of pathological metabolic states. It is possible to measure the sources of serum glucose by the administration of deuterated water to a subject followed by analysis of the 2H enrichment levels in glucose extracted from plasma from a single blood draw by 2H NMR. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior probability densities may then be used to evaluate the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and the Kreb's cycle to serum glucose. Experiments with simulated NMR spectra show that in spectra with a S/N of 20 to 1, the resulting metabolic information may be evaluated with an accuracy of about 4 percent.

  6. Solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated troponin C monomer determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Slupsky, C. M.; Reinach, F. C.; Smillie, L. B.; Sykes, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    The solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated skeletal troponin C (TnC) in the presence of 15% (v/v) trifluoroethanol (TFE), which has been shown to exist predominantly as a monomer (Slupsky CM, Kay CM, Reinach FC, Smillie LB, Sykes BD, 1995, Biochemistry 34, forthcoming), has been investigated using multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR chemical shift values for TnC in the presence of TFE are very similar to values obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC (residues 1-90 of skeletal TnC), calmodulin, and synthetic peptide homodimers. Moreover, the secondary structure elements of TnC are virtually identical to those obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC, calmodulin, and the synthetic peptide homodimers, suggesting that 15% (v/v) TFE minimally perturbs the secondary and tertiary structure of this stably folded protein. Comparison of the solution structure of calcium-saturated TnC with the X-ray crystal structure of half-saturated TnC reveals differences in the phi/psi angles of residue Glu 41 and in the linker between the two domains. Glu 41 has irregular phi/psi angles in the crystal structure, producing a kink in the B helix, whereas in calcium-saturated TnC, Glu 41 has helical phi/psi angles, resulting in a straight B helix. The linker between the N and C domains of calcium-saturated TnC is flexible in the solution structure. PMID:7670371

  7. NMR Spectroscopy and Structural Characterization of Dithiophosphinates Relevant to Minor Actinide Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Daly; Kevin S. Boland; John R. Klaehn; Stosh A. Kozimor; Molly M. MacInnes; Dean R. Peterman; Brian L. Scott

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic routes to alkyl and aryl substituted dithiophosphinate salts that contain non-coordinating PPh{sub 4}{sup 1+} counter cations are reported. In general, these compounds can be prepared via a multi-step procedure that starts with reacting secondary phosphines, i.e. HPR{sub 2}, with two equivalents elemental S. This transformation proceeds in two steps - first oxidation of the phosphine and second insertion of S into the H-P bond - and has been used to synthesize a series of dithiophoshinic acids, which were fully characterized, namely HS{sub 2}P(p-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, HS{sub 2}P(m-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, HS{sub 2}P(o-MeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, and HS{sub 2}P(o-MeOC{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}. Although the insertion step was found to be much slower than the oxidation reaction, the formation of (NH{sub 4})S{sub 2}PR{sub 2} from HPSR{sub 2} occurs almost instantaneous upon addition of NH{sub 4}OH. Subsequent cation exchange reactions proceed readily with PPh{sub 4}Cl in water, under air, and at ambient conditions to provide analytically pure samples of [PPh{sub 4}][S{sub 2}PR{sub 2}] (R = p-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, m-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-MeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}, o-MeOC{sub 6}H{sub 4}, Ph, and Me, 1b-7b, respectively), which were characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR, and IR spectroscopy. In addition the S{sub 2}PMe{sub 2}{sup 1-}, S{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}{sup 1-}, and dithiophosphinates with ortho-substituted arene rings were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Structural analysis show that, as opposed to the acids which have short P=S double bonds and long P-SH single bonds, the metric parameters for the S atoms in S{sub 2}PR{sub 2}{sup 1-} are equivalent. In addition, the presence of large non-coordinating PPh{sub 4}{sup 1+} cations guard against intermolecular P-S {hor_ellipsis} X interactions and insure that the P-S bond is isolated. Overall, this synthetic procedure provides high

  8. Deuterium NMR study of structural and dynamic properties of horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    La Mar, G.N.; Thanabal, V.; Johnson, R.D.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.

    1989-04-05

    High field deuterium NMR spectra have been recorded for various horseradish peroxidase complexes reconstituted with hemins possessing specific 2H labels. The line width of the 2H NMR signals of deuteroheme reconstituted-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its cyano complex for the immobilized skeletal 2-2H and 4-2H labels yield the overall protein rotational correlation time (22 ms at 55 degrees C), which is consistent with expectations based on molecular weight. Meso-2H4 labels yield broad (1.3 kHz) signals just upfield from the diamagnetic protein envelope for HRP, and in the central portion of the protein envelope for the CN- ligated resting state HRP. Meso-2H4-labeled mesohemin-reconstituted HRP exhibits a similar signal but shifted further upfield by approximately 10 ppm. The net upfield meso-H hyperfine shifts confirm a five-coordinate structure for resting state HRP. 2Ha resonances for essentially rotationally immobile vinyl groups were detected in both resting state HRP and CN- ligated resting state HRP. Heme methyl-2H-labeling yields relatively narrow lines (approximately 80 Hz) indicative of effective averaging of the quadrupolar relaxation by rapid methyl rotation. Thus the 2H line width of rapidly rotating methyls in hemoproteins can be used effectively to determine the overall protein tumbling rate. Preliminary 2H experiments in meso-2H4-labeled compound I do not support large pi spin density at these positions on the porphyrin cation radical, and argue for a a1u rather than a a2u orbital ground state.

  9. NMR metabolomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate of asthmatic patients at two different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Motta, Andrea; Paris, Debora; D'Amato, Maria; Melck, Dominique; Calabrese, Cecilia; Vitale, Carolina; Stanziola, Anna A; Corso, Gaetano; Sofia, Matteo; Maniscalco, Mauro

    2014-12-05

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection is a noninvasive method to investigate lung diseases. EBC is usually collected with commercial/custom-made condensers, but the optimal condensing temperature is often unknown. As such, the physical and chemical properties of exhaled metabolites should be considered when setting the temperature, therefore requiring validation and standardization of the collecting procedure. EBC is frequently used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, which unambiguously recognizes different pulmonary pathological states. Here we applied NMR-based metabolomics to asthmatic and healthy EBC samples collected with two commercial condensers operating at -27.3 and -4.8 °C. Thirty-five mild asthmatic patients and 35 healthy subjects were included in the study, while blind validation was obtained from 20 asthmatic and 20 healthy different subjects not included in the primary analysis. We initially analyzed the samples separately and assessed the within-day, between-day, and technical repeatabilities. Next, samples were interchanged, and, finally, all samples were analyzed together, disregarding the condensing temperature. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis of NMR spectra correctly classified samples, without any influence from the temperature. Input variables were either integral bucket areas (spectral bucketing) or metabolite concentrations (targeted profiling). We always obtained strong regression models (95%), with high average-quality parameters for spectral profiling (R(2) = 0.84 and Q(2) = 0.78) and targeted profiling (R(2) = 0.91 and Q(2) = 0.87). In particular, although targeted profiling clustering is better than spectral profiling, all models reproduced the relative metabolite variations responsible for class differentiation. This warrants that cross comparisons are reliable and that NMR-based metabolomics could attenuate some specific problems linked to standardization of EBC collection.

  10. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  11. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  12. NMR structural determination of viscotoxin A3 from Viscum album L.

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, S; Ugolini, R; Fogolari, F; Schaller, G; Urech, K; Giannattasio, M; Ragona, L; Molinari, H

    2000-01-01

    The high-resolution three-dimensional structure of the plant toxin viscotoxin A3, from Viscum album L., has been determined in solution by (1)H NMR spectroscopy at pH 3.6 and 12 degrees C (the structure has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank under the id. code 1ED0). Experimentally derived restraints including 734 interproton distances from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, 22 hydrogen bonds, 32 φ angle restraints from J coupling measurements, together with three disulphide bridge constraints were used as input in restrained molecular dynamics, followed by minimization, using DYANA and Discover. Backbone and heavy atom root-mean-square deviations were 0.47+/-0.11 A (1 A=10(-10) m) and 0.85+/-0.13 A respectively. Viscotoxin A3 consists of two alpha-helices connected by a turn and a short stretch of antiparallel beta-sheet. This fold is similar to that found in other thionins, such as crambin, hordothionin-alpha and -beta, phoratoxin A and purothionin-alpha and -beta. The difference in the observed biological activity for thionins of known structure is discussed in terms of the differences in the calculated surface potential distribution, playing an important role in their function through disruption of cell membranes. In addition, the possible role in DNA binding of the helix-turn-helix motif of viscotoxin A3 is discussed. PMID:10947973

  13. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  14. Two-dimensional 1H-NMR study of the spatial structure of neurotoxin II from Naja naja oxiana.

    PubMed

    Golovanov, A P; Lomize, A L; Arseniev, A S; Utkin, Y N; Tsetlin, V I

    1993-05-01

    The spatial structure of neurotoxin II from the venom of the central Asian cobra Naja naja oxiana was determined by two-dimensional 1H-NMR techniques and computational analysis. Nearly complete proton resonance assignments for 61 amino acid residues have been made using two-dimensional (2D) homonuclear total correlated spectroscopy, 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filtered correlated spectroscopy and 2D homonuclear NOE spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. The cross-peak volumes in NOESY spectra spin-spin coupling constants of vicinal protons NH-C alpha H and C alpha H-C beta H and the observation of slow deuterium exchange of amide protons were used to define local structure and a set of constraints for distance geometry program DIANA. The average root-mean-square deviations are 53 pm for backbone heavy atoms and 118 pm for all heavy atoms of 19 final neurotoxin II conformations. The spatial structure is characterized by a short double-stranded (residues 1-5 and 13-17) and a triple-stranded (residues 22-30, 33-41 and 50-54) antiparallel beta-sheets.

  15. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  16. Infrared and NMR spectra, tautomerism, vibrational assignment, normal coordinate analysis, and quantum mechanical calculations of 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, Mahmoud S.; Farag, Rabei S.; Shaaban, Ibrahim A.; Wilson, Lee D.; Zoghaib, Wajdi M.; Mohamed, Tarek A.

    2013-07-01

    The infrared (4000-200 cm-1) spectrum for 4-amino-5-pyrimidinecarbonitrile (APC, C5H4N4) was acquired in the solid phase. In addition, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of APC were obtained in DMSO-d6 along with its mass spectrum. Initially, six isomers were hypothesized and then investigated by means of DFT/B3LYP and MP2(full) quantum mechanical calculations using a 6-31G(d) basis set. Moreover, the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were predicted using a GIAO approximation at the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and the B3LYP method with (and without) solvent effects using PCM method. The correlation coefficients showed good agreement between the experimental/theoretical chemical shift values of amino tautomers (1 and 2) rather than the eliminated imino tautomers (3-6), in agreement with the current quantum mechanical calculations. Structures 3-6 are less stable than the amino tautomers (1 and 2) by about 5206-8673 cm-1 (62.3-103.7 kJ/mol). The MP2(full)/6-31G(d) computational results favor the amino structure 1 with a pyramidal NH2 moiety and calculated real vibrational frequencies, however; structure 2 is considered a transition state owing to the calculated imaginary frequency. It is worth mentioning that, the calculated structural parameters suggest a strong conjugation between the amino nitrogen and pyrimidine ring. Aided by frequency calculations, normal coordinate analysis, force constants and potential energy distributions (PEDs), a complete vibrational assignment for the observed bands is proposed herein. Finally, NH2 internal rotation barriers for the stable non-planar isomer (1) were carried out using MP2(full)/6-31G(d) optimized structural parameters. Our results are discussed herein and compared to structural parameters for similar molecules whenever appropriate.

  17. Solution structure of Ln(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands through theoretical evaluation of 1H NMR contact shifts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Aurora; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Botta, Mauro; Tripier, Raphaël; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2012-12-17

    Herein, we present a new approach that combines DFT calculations and the analysis of Tb(III)-induced (1)H NMR shifts to quantitatively and accurately account for the contact contribution to the paramagnetic shift in Ln(III) complexes. Geometry optimizations of different Gd(III) complexes with macrocyclic ligands were carried out using the hybrid meta-GGA TPSSh functional and a 46 + 4f(7) effective core potential (ECP) for Gd. The complexes investigated include [Ln(Me-DODPA)](+) (H(2)Me-DODPA = 6,6'-((4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diyl)bis(methylene))dipicolinic acid, [Ln(DOTA)(H(2)O)](-) (H(4)DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate), [Ln(DOTAM)(H(2)O)](3+) (DOTAM = 1,4,7,10- tetrakis[(carbamoyl)methyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), and related systems containing pyridyl units (Ln = Gd, Tb). Subsequent all-electron relativistic calculations based on the DKH2 approximation, or small-core ECP calculations, were used to compute the (1)H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) at the ligand nuclei (A(iso) values). The calculated A(iso) values provided direct access to contact contributions to the (1)H NMR shifts of the corresponding Tb(III) complexes under the assumption that Gd and Tb complexes with a given ligand present similar HFCCs. These contact shifts were used to obtain the pseudocontact shifts, which encode structural information as they depend on the position of the nucleus with respect to the lanthanide ion. An excellent agreement was observed between the experimental and calculated pseudocontact shifts using the DFT-optimized geometries as structural models of the complexes in solution, which demonstrates that the computational approach used provides (i) good structural models for the complexes, (ii) accurate HFCCs at the ligand nuclei. The methodology presented in this work can be classified in the context of model-dependent methods, as it relies on the use of a specific molecular structure obtained from DFT

  18. Probing Structure Property Relationships in Complex Engineering Silicones by 1H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Gjersing, E L; Maxwell, R S; Eastwood, E; Bowen, D; Stephens, T

    2006-07-14

    It is generally accepted that the properties of polymeric materials are controlled by the network structure and the reactions by which they have been constructed. These properties include the bulk moduli at creation, but also the properties as a function of age during use. In order to interpret mechanical properties and predict the time dependent changes in these properties, detailed knowledge of the effect of structural changes must be obtained. The degree and type of crosslinking, the molecular weight between crosslinks, the number of elastically ineffective chains (loops, dangling chain ends, sol-fraction) must be characterized. A number of theoretical and experimental efforts have been reported in the last few years on model networks prepared by endlinking reactions and the relationships of those structures with the ultimate mechanical properties. A range of experimental methods have been used to investigate structure including rheometric, scattering, infrared, {sup 29}Si MAS and CPMAS, {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, and recently {sup 1}H multiple quantum methods. Characterization of the growth of multiple quantum coherences have recently been shown to provide detailed insight into silicone network structure by the ability to selective probe the individual components of the polymer network, such as the polymer-filler interface or network chains. We have employed recently developed MQ methods to investigate the structure-property relationships in a series of complex, endlinked filled-PDMS blends. Here, a systematic study of the relationship between the molecular formulation, as dictated by the amount and type of crosslinks present and by the remaining network chains, and the segmental dynamics as observed by MQ NMR was performed.

  19. Binding analysis between L-histidine immobilized and oligonucleotides by SPR and NMR.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Carla; Santos, Sandra D; Cabrita, Eurico J; Queiroz, João A

    2013-05-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR technique and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are used to study amino acid affinity supports-nucleotides interactions with L-histidine amino acid immobilized on a surface as model support. We have immobilized L-histidine ligand on a carboxymethyldextran-modified gold surface intended for surface plasmon resonance and we analyze the binding profiles of synthetic polynucleotides (1-6 base, sugar and backbone) by determining the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD). The SPR binding profile (square-shaped) is identical for all the complexes and the highest binding affinity can be found for polyA₆ followed by polyG₆. As expected, the 5'-mononucleotides have the lowest affinity. To further study the structural aspects of the interaction we investigate the polynucleotide binding preferences to L-histidine chromatography support by STD-NMR spectroscopy. These results revealed that an increase in the number of bases and backbone to 6 units leads to more contacts with the support, where the main driving force for the interaction with polynucleotides are through the base, except for polyC₆, which is mainly through sugar-phosphate backbone. Therefore, the combination of SPR measurements with STD-NMR technique allowed to establish fine details of the molecular recognition process involved in amino acid affinity supports-nucleotides complexes.

  20. The NMR Structure of Human Obestatin in Membrane-Like Environments: Insights into the Structure-Bioactivity Relationship of Obestatin

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Álvarez-Pérez, Juan C.; Otero-Alén, María; Camiña, Jesús P.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Martín-Pastor, Manuel; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Pazos, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    The quest for therapeutic applications of obestatin involves, as a first step, the determination of its 3D solution structure and the relationship between this structure and the biological activity of obestatin. On this basis, we have employed a combination of circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and modeling techniques to determine the solution structure of human obestatin (1). Other analogues, including human non-amidated obestatin (2) and the fragment peptides (6–23)-obestatin (3), (11–23)-obestatin (4), and (16–23)-obestatin (5) have also been scrutinized. These studies have been performed in a micellar environment to mimic the cell membrane (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). Furthermore, structural-activity relationship studies have been performed by assessing the in vitro proliferative capabilities of these peptides in the human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, Ki67 expression, and cellular proliferation). Our findings emphasize the importance of both the primary structure (composition and size) and particular segments of the obestatin molecule that posses significant α-helical characteristics. Additionally, details of a species-specific role for obestatin have also been hypothesized by comparing human and mouse obestatins (1 and 6, respectively) at both the structural and bioactivity levels. PMID:23056203

  1. Probing structure and dynamics of bulk and confined crude oils by multiscale NMR spectroscopy, diffusometry, and relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Korb, Jean-Pierre; Louis-Joseph, Alain; Benamsili, Lyès

    2013-06-13

    We propose using a set of noninvasive multiscale NMR techniques for probing the structure and dynamics of bulk and confined crude oils with and without asphaltene. High-field 1D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopies evidence the proton species and the amount of asphaltene and give an average chain length for the hydrocarbon aliphatic chains. Two-dimensional (1)H diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra allow us to identify two populations of hydrocarbons characterized by two distributions of translational diffusion coefficients in the presence of asphaltene and a single one without asphaltene. A detailed analysis of the distributions of longitudinal, T1, relaxation times measured at different magnetic fields is proposed in terms of highly skewed bimodal (or monomodal) log-normal distributions, confirming the two environments in the presence of asphaltene and a single one without asphaltene. We show that these distributions are similar to the gas and gel permeation chromatography distributions, thus showing a connection of the hydrocarbon dynamics with their chain lengths. The remarkable observed features of the nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of <1/T1> for bulk and confined crude oils with and without asphaltene are interpreted with an original relaxation model of intermittent surface dynamics of proton species at the proximity of asphaltene nanoaggregates and bulk dynamics in between clusters of these nanoaggregates. This allows us to probe the 2D translational diffusion correlation time and the time of residence of hydrocarbons in the proximity of the asphaltene nanoaggregates. Provided that the diffusion of the hydrocarbons close to the asphaltene nanoaggregates is three times smaller than the bulk diffusion, as the DOSY experiments show, this time of residence gives an average radius of exploration for the 2D hydrocarbon diffusion, r2D ≈ 3.9 nm, of the same order of magnitude as the aggregate sizes found by J. Eyssautier with SAXS

  2. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  3. β2-Adrenergic receptor solutions for structural biology analyzed with microscale NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2013-01-02

    Microcoil NMR measurements were performed to determine the final composition of solutions of the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) reconstituted with a detergent and to study the hydrodynamic properties of the detergent micelles containing β(2)AR. Standards are established for the reproducible preparation of G-protein-coupled receptor solutions for crystallization trials and solution NMR studies.

  4. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments.

  5. Application of Data Mining Tools for Classification of Protein Structural Class from Residue Based Averaged NMR Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun. V.; Ali, Rehana F.M.; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue’s averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80 % accuracy measured by Matthew Correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with > 90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. PMID:25758094

  6. Structure determination of α-helical membrane proteins by solution-state NMR: emphasis on retinal proteins.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    The biochemical processes of living cells involve a numerous series of reactions that work with exceptional specificity and efficiency. The tight control of this intricate reaction network stems from the architecture of the proteins that drive the chemical reactions and mediate protein-protein interactions. Indeed, the structure of these proteins will determine both their function and interaction partners. A detailed understanding of the proximity and orientation of pivotal functional groups can reveal the molecular mechanistic basis for the activity of a protein. Together with X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, NMR spectroscopy plays an important role in solving three-dimensional structures of proteins at atomic resolution. In the challenging field of membrane proteins, retinal-binding proteins are often employed as model systems and prototypes to develop biophysical techniques for the study of structural and functional mechanistic aspects. The recent determination of two 3D structures of seven-helical trans-membrane retinal proteins by solution-state NMR spectroscopy highlights the potential of solution NMR techniques in contributing to our understanding of membrane proteins. This review summarizes the multiple strategies available for expression of isotopically labeled membrane proteins. Different environments for mimicking lipid bilayers will be presented, along with the most important NMR methods and labeling schemes used to generate high-quality NMR spectra. The article concludes with an overview of types of conformational restraints used for generation of high-resolution structures of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks.

  7. Amino acid analysis of spider dragline silk using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-09-15

    The amino acid composition of Nephila clavipes dragline silk fiber was determined by conducting ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments on acid-hydrolyzed material. N. clavipes dragline silk was found to consist of 43.0±0.6% Gly, 29.3±0.2% Ala, 9.1±0.1% Glx, 4.0±0.1% Leu, 3.3±0.1% Tyr, 3.4±0.2% Ser, 2.7±0.1% Pro, 2.1±0.1% Arg, 1.07±0.05% Asx, 0.96±0.05% Val, 0.48±0.03% Thr, 0.35±0.03% Phe, and 0.28±0.03% Ile. Compared with standard chromatography-based amino acid analysis (AAA), the chemical resolution of NMR allows for an amino acid solution to be characterized without separation and is shown to provide considerably higher precision. This allows for more accurate statistics on the variability of amino acids in spider dragline silk. In general, this ¹H NMR AAA technique is applicable to a large range of proteins and peptides for precise composition characterization, especially when the precise content of a minor component is critical and relatively large amounts of sample are available (microgram to milligram quantities).

  8. Filtering and parameter estimation of surface-NMR data using singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanati, Reza; Kazem Hafizi, Mohammad; Mahmoudvand, Rahim; Fallahsafari, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Ambient electromagnetic interferences at the site of investigation often degrade the signal quality of the Surface-NMR measurements leading to inaccurate estimation of the signal parameters. This paper proposes a new powerful de-noising method based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA), which is a nonparametric method for analyzing time series. SSA is a relatively simple method and can be understood using basic algebra notations. Singular value decomposition (SVD) plays a crucial role in SSA. As the length of recordings increases, the computational time required for computing SVD raises which restricts the usage of SSA in long-term time series. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a randomized version of the singular value decomposition to accelerate the decomposition step of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the proposed strategy, the method is tested on synthetic signals corrupted by both simulated noise (including Gaussian white noise, spiky events and harmonic noise) and real noise recordings obtained from surface-NMR field surveys and a real data set. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can enhance the signal to noise ratio significantly, and gives an improvement in estimation of the surface-NMR signal parameters.

  9. High-resolution quantitative metabolome analysis of urine by automated flow injection NMR.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Laeticia; Godejohann, Markus; Martin, François-Pierre J; Collino, Sebastiano; Bürkle, Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bernhardt, Jürgen; Toussaint, Olivier; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Gonos, Efstathios S; Sikora, Ewa; Grune, Tilman; Breusing, Nicolle; Franceschi, Claudio; Hervonen, Antti; Spraul, Manfred; Moco, Sofia

    2013-06-18

    Metabolism is essential to understand human health. To characterize human metabolism, a high-resolution read-out of the metabolic status under various physiological conditions, either in health or disease, is needed. Metabolomics offers an unprecedented approach for generating system-specific biochemical definitions of a human phenotype through the capture of a variety of metabolites in a single measurement. The emergence of large cohorts in clinical studies increases the demand of technologies able to analyze a large number of measurements, in an automated fashion, in the most robust way. NMR is an established metabolomics tool for obtaining metabolic phenotypes. Here, we describe the analysis of NMR-based urinary profiles for metabolic studies, challenged to a large human study (3007 samples). This method includes the acquisition of nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy one-dimensional and J-resolved two-dimensional (J-Res-2D) (1)H NMR spectra obtained on a 600 MHz spectrometer, equipped with a 120 μL flow probe, coupled to a flow-injection analysis system, in full automation under the control of a sampler manager. Samples were acquired at a throughput of ~20 (or 40 when J-Res-2D is included) min/sample. The associated technical analysis error over the full series of analysis is 12%, which demonstrates the robustness of the method. With the aim to describe an overall metabolomics workflow, the quantification of 36 metabolites, mainly related to central carbon metabolism and gut microbial host cometabolism, was obtained, as well as multivariate data analysis of the full spectral profiles. The metabolic read-outs generated using our analytical workflow can therefore be considered for further pathway modeling and/or biological interpretation.

  10. High-Resolution Quantitative Metabolome Analysis of Urine by Automated Flow Injection NMR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism is essential to understand human health. To characterize human metabolism, a high-resolution read-out of the metabolic status under various physiological conditions, either in health or disease, is needed. Metabolomics offers an unprecedented approach for generating system-specific biochemical definitions of a human phenotype through the capture of a variety of metabolites in a single measurement. The emergence of large cohorts in clinical studies increases the demand of technologies able to analyze a large number of measurements, in an automated fashion, in the most robust way. NMR is an established metabolomics tool for obtaining metabolic phenotypes. Here, we describe the analysis of NMR-based urinary profiles for metabolic studies, challenged to a large human study (3007 samples). This method includes the acquisition of nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy one-dimensional and J-resolved two-dimensional (J-Res-2D) 1H NMR spectra obtained on a 600 MHz spectrometer, equipped with a 120 μL flow probe, coupled to a flow-injection analysis system, in full automation under the control of a sampler manager. Samples were acquired at a throughput of ∼20 (or 40 when J-Res-2D is included) min/sample. The associated technical analysis error over the full series of analysis is 12%, which demonstrates the robustness of the method. With the aim to describe an overall metabolomics workflow, the quantification of 36 metabolites, mainly related to central carbon metabolism and gut microbial host cometabolism, was obtained, as well as multivariate data analysis of the full spectral profiles. The metabolic read-outs generated using our analytical workflow can therefore be considered for further pathway modeling and/or biological interpretation. PMID:23718684

  11. Effects of temperature on the structures of silicate liquids: 29Si NMR results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandriss, Mark E.; Stebbins, Jonathan F.

    1988-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the structures of three silicate liquids has been studied by 29Si NMR spectroscopy on glass samples prepared with different glass transition temperatures. The compositions studied are (Na 2O) .34(SiO 2) .66 and (CaO) .10(Na 2O) .15(SiO 2) .75 and (CaO) .25(MgO) .25(SiO 2) .50. In the first two, the abundance of SiO 4 tetrahedra with four bridging oxygens ( Q 4) increases significantly with temperature. This change results from the disproportionation reaction 2Q 3ái Q 2 + Q 4 ( Q n is a SiO 4 tetrahedron with n bridging oxygens), with the observed increase in disproportionation at higher temperatures implying increased randomization of the anionic structure. In the (Na 2O) .34(SiO 2) .66 composition, the temperature dependence of Q 4 abundance enables us to estimate ΔH 0 for this reaction to be 30 ± 15 kJ per mole of Si. Although this reaction thus makes only a minor contribution to the conngurational heat capacity of each liquid, it probably has a major influence on the thermodynamic activity of SiO 2. Widening of the (CaO) .25(MgO) .25(SiO 2) .50 spectral peak with increasing temperature likewise implies increasing randomization of the anionic structure, although specific structural contributions to this widening are not identified. Models of melt structures at liquidus temperatures will be limited in accuracy if they assume that the speciation observed in glasses is unaffected by temperature change.

  12. NMR structure of the human prion protein with the pathological Q212P mutation reveals unique structural features.