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Sample records for noble gases he-kr

  1. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  2. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  3. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  4. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  5. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  6. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    2001-03-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from noble gases in water is studied theoretically in order to clarify the reason of the distinguished feature that the luminescence is strong for all noble gases, while the other systems of cavitation luminescence are greatly enhanced by the presence of the heavy noble gas(xenon). It is clarified that in spite of the larger thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases the maximum temperature in a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases is higher due both to the segregation of water vapor and noble gas inside a SBSL bubble and the stronger acoustic drive of a SBSL bubble of lighter noble gases.

  7. New perspectives for noble gases in oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschbach, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Conditions prevailing in regions of deep water formation imprint their signature in the concentrations of dissolved noble gases, which are conserved in the deep ocean. Such "recharge conditions" including temperature, salinity, and interactions with sea ice are important in view of ocean-atmosphere CO2 partitioning. Noble gases, especially the temperature sensitive Kr and Xe, are well-established tracers to reconstruct groundwater recharge conditions. In contrast, tracer oceanography has traditionally focused on He isotopes and the light noble gases Ne and Ar, which could be analyzed at the required high precision. Recent developments of analytical and data interpretation methods now provide fresh perspectives for noble gases in oceanography.

  8. Terahertz pulse generation from noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yunqing; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Wang Mingfeng; Zhang, X.-C.

    2007-12-17

    Terahertz pulse generation in the laser-induced plasma from a series of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) was systematically investigated. Femtosecond laser pulses consisting of both a fundamental and its second-harmonic frequency were used for the terahertz generation. Experimental results reveal that terahertz generation efficiency of these noble gases increases with decreasing ionization potential.

  9. Noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Terrestrial planets and chondrites have noble gas platforms that are sufficiently alike, especially Ne/Ar, that they may have acquired their noble gases by similar processes. Meteorites presumably obtained their noble gases during formation in the solar nebula. Adsorption onto C - the major gas carrier in chondrites - is the likely mechanism for trapping noble gases; recent laboratory simulations support this hypothesis. The story is more complex for planets. An attractive possibility is that the planets acquired their noble gases in a late accreting veneer of chondritic material. In chondrites, noble gases correlate with C, N, H, and volatile metals; by Occam's Razor, we would expect a similar coupling in planets. Indeed, the Earth's crust and mantle contain chondritic like trace volatiles and PL group metals, respectively and the Earth's oceans resemble C chondrites in their enrichment of D (8X vs 8-10X of the galactic D/H ratio). Models have been proposed to explain some of the specific noble gas patterns in planets. These include: (1) noble gases may have been directly trapped by preplanetary material instead of arriving in a veneer; (2) for Venus, irradiation of preplanetary material, followed by diffusive loss of Ne, could explain the high concentration of AR-36; (3) the Earth and Venus may have initially had similar abundances of noble gases, but the Earth lost its share during the Moon forming event; (4) noble gases could have been captured by planetestimals, possibly leading to gravitational fractionation, particularly of Xe isotopes and (5) noble gases may have been dissolved in the hot outer portion of the Earth during contact with a primordial atmosphere.

  10. Biological effects of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Růzicka, J; Benes, J; Bolek, L; Markvartová, V

    2007-01-01

    Noble gases are known for their inertness. They do not react chemically with any element at normal temperature and pressure. Through that, some of them are known to be biologically active by their sedative, hypnotic and analgesic properties. Common inhalation anesthetics are characterized by some disadvantages (toxicity, decreased cardiac output, etc). Inhalation of xenon introduces anesthesia and has none of the above disadvantages, hence xenon seems to be the anesthetic gas of the future (with just one disadvantage - its cost). It is known that argon has similar anesthetic properties (under hyperbaric conditions), which is much cheaper and easily accessible. The question is if this could be used in clinical practice, in anesthesia of patients who undergo treatment in the hyperbaric chamber. Xenon was found to be organ-protective. Recent animal experiments indicated that xenon decreases infarction size after ischemic attack on brain or heart. The goal of our study is to check if hyperbaric argon has properties similar to those of xenon.

  11. Noble Gases Trace Earth's Subducted Water Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smye, A.; Jackson, C.; Konrad-Schmolke, M.; Parman, S. W.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Volatile elements are transported from Earth's surface reservoirs back into the mantle during subduction of oceanic lithosphere [e.g. 1]. Here, we investigate the degree to which the fate of slab-bound noble gases and water are linked through the subduction process. Both water and noble gases are soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole, that are common constituents of subducted oceanic lithosphere. Heating and burial during subduction liberates noble gases and water from minerals through a combination of diffusion and dissolution. Combining a kinetic model, parameterized for noble gas fractionation in amphibole [2], with thermodynamic phase equilibria calculations, we quantify the effect of subduction dehydration on the elemental composition of slab-bound noble gases. Results show that post-arc slab water and noble gas fluxes are highly correlated. Hot subduction zones, which likely dominate over geologic history, efficiently remove noble gases and water from the down-going slab; furthermore, kinetic fractionation of noble gases is predicted to occur beneath the forearc. Conversely, hydrated portions of slab mantle in cold subduction zones transport noble gases and water to depths exceeding 200 km. Preservation of seawater-like abundances of Ar, Kr and Xe in the convecting mantle [1] implies that recycling of noble gases and water occurred during cold subduction and that the subduction efficiency of these volatile elements has increased over geological time, driven by secular cooling of the mantle. [1] Holland, G. and Ballentine, C. (2006). Nature 441, 186-191. [2] Jackson et al. (2013). Nat.Geosci. 6, 562-565.

  12. Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Dan

    2013-05-29

    Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

  13. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  14. Hyperpolarized noble gases as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases ((3)He and (129)Xe) can provide NMR signal enhancements of 10,000 to 100,000 times that of thermally polarized gases and have shown great potential for applications in lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by greatly enhancing the sensitivity and contrast. These gases obtain a highly polarized state by employing a spin exchange optical pumping technique. In this chapter, the underlying physics of spin exchange optical pumping for production of hyperpolarized noble gases is explained and the basic components and procedures for building a polarizer are described. The storage and delivery strategies of hyperpolarized gases for in vivo imaging are discussed. Many of the problems that are likely to be encountered in practical experiments and the corresponding detailed approaches to overcome them are also discussed.

  15. Noble gases in pure lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-03-21

    The mechanism of how a noble gas modifies the excitability of nerve cells and how such excitability can be recovered under hyperbaric pressure remains unclear. Here we present a calorimetric study where the melting point depression of pure lipid membranes induced by noble gases and its recovery with a hydrostatic pressure is addressed. A correlation is found between the electric polarizability (α) of these gases and their effect on the melting transition of the membranes. These results concur with other findings to support the idea that general anesthesia only depends on the ability of a certain atom or molecule to increase the general disorder of the membrane.

  16. Noble gases as cardioprotectants - translatability and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smit, Kirsten F; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-04-01

    Several noble gases, although classified as inert substances, exert a tissue-protective effect in different experimental models when applied before organ ischaemia as an early or late preconditioning stimulus, after ischaemia as a post-conditioning stimulus or when given in combination before, during and/or after ischaemia. A wide range of organs can be protected by these inert substances, in particular cardiac and neuronal tissue. In this review we summarize the data on noble gas-induced cardioprotection, focusing on the underlying protective mechanisms. We will also look at translatability of experimental data to the clinical situation. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time.

  18. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  19. Xenon and other noble gases in shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of the xenon component trapped in EETA 79001's lithologies B and C has been determined, and other noble gases were measured in some samples. The Xe component was found to have light isotope ratios indistinguishable from those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The trapped component has a Xe-129/Xe-132 ratio of about 2.4, and is enhanced in Xe-134 and Xe-136 relative to the terrestrial atmosphere or the average carbonaceous chondrite. Similarities between values for Ar-40/Ar-36, Xe-129/Xe-132, and N-15/N-14 and the corresponding Martian atmospheric values suggest Martian origin of the trapped gases.

  20. Primordial Noble Gases from Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Lu, X.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent partitioning experiment suggests helium is more compatible in iron melt than in molten silicates at high pressures (> 10 GPa) (1), thus provide the possibility of the core as being the primordial noble gases warehouse that is responsible for the high primordial/radiogenic noble gas isotopic ratios observed in plume-related basalts. However, the possible transportation mechanism of the noble gases from the core to the overlying mantle is still ambiguous, understanding how this process would affect the noble gas isotopic characteristics of the mantle is critical to validate this core reservoir model. As diffusion is a dominant mass transport process that plays an important role in chemical exchange at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), we have determined the diffusion coefficients of helium, neon and argon in major lower mantle minerals, i.e. periclase (MgO), bridgemanite (MgSiO3-Pv) and post-perovskite (MgSiO3-PPv), by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT). As expected, the diffusion rate of helium is the fastest at the CMB, which is in the range of 3 × 10-10 to 1 × 10-8 m2/s. The neon diffusion is slightly slower, from 5 × 10-10 to 5 × 10-9 m2/s. Argon diffuses slowest at the rate from 1 × 10-10 to 2 × 10-10 m2/s. We have further simulated the evolution of noble gas isotopic ratios in the mantle near the CMB. Considering its close relationship with the mantle plumes and very likely to be the direct source of "hot-spot" basalts, we took a close investigation on the large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs). Under reasonable assumptions based on our diffusion parameters, the modelling results indicate that LLSVP is capable of generating all the noble gas isotope signals, e.g., 3He/4He = 55 Ra, 3He/22Ne = 3.1, 3He/36Ar = 0.82, 40Ar/36Ar = 9500, that are in good agreement with the observed values in "hot-spot" basalts (2). Therefore, this core-reservior hypothesis is a self-consistent model that can fits in multiple noble gas

  1. Constraining the recent history of the perennially ice-covered Lake Bonney, East Antarctica using He, Kr and Xe concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Chris M.; Castro, Maria Clara; Kenig, Fabien; Doran, Peter T.

    2017-07-01

    Lake Bonney is a perennially ice-covered lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDVs) that has long been studied in order to provide constraints on the paleoclimate of West Antarctica. The lake is divided into two lobes, West Lake Bonney (WLB) and East Lake Bonney (ELB) that are separated by a narrow ridge. The two lobes currently receive surface melt water during austral summers from glacier-fed ephemeral streams and this meltwater enters the lake via a narrow ring, or moat, of liquid water that forms around the lake during summer. The West Lobe also receives water from direct input of melt water from Taylor glacier and saline water from irregular subglacial discharge. Here, we combine previously published He data from Lake Bonney with new Kr and Xe concentration data to examine the signatures of water recharge via the seasonal moat and these data are used to constrain a model for He, Kr and Xe transport within both WLB and ELB over about the last 5000-6000 yrs. A detailed numerical simulation is presented that combines diffusive transport of noble gases within the stratified water column of Lake Bonney, along with ice ablation at the top of the ice cover, partitioning of noble gases between water and ice, plus exchange of noble gases between WLB and ELB. Results strongly suggest that open moats have only operated for about 2-3 centuries within the last millennium. These results are corroborated by the high concentration of He, especially within WLB, which points to a history of ice cover with no open moats operating for both lobes for at least about 5 millennia. In addition, the distribution of He, Kr and Xe suggest that a significant rise of the water level of Lake Bonney associated with a warmer period may have been interrupted by a roughly 4-5 century long cold period during which the moats were not large enough to allow air saturated water into the lake, with this cold period ending about one century ago. In addition, during this cold period, there is evidence for

  2. Fractionated (Martian) Noble Gases — EFA, Experiments and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Barnes, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Bullock, M. A.; Chavez, C. L.; Filiberto, J.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Ott, U.; Smith, H. D.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Noble gases are tracers for physical processes, including adsorption, dissolution and secondary mineral formation. We examine the Martian fractionated atmosphere through literature, terrestrial analogs and experiments.

  3. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  4. Where do noble gases hide in space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.

    Observations showing anomalous amounts of noble gas, especially in planetary atmospheres, are at the origin of a series of controversial interpretations from 1990 to nowadays (Hersant et al. (2004)). If, in a first step, we adopt a chemical point of view, we have to consider the possibility of associations of such elements (though usually considered as non reactive), with other molecules or atoms. Such complexes could trap the noble gases in some astrophysical objects at one time of their evolution, for example, in the early step of formation of protoplanetary disks. But two questions have to be answered to assert this type of hypothesis: which stable compounds could exist taking into account the environnement and which reactions could lead to such compounds? Hydrogen being by far the most abundant element in space, and neutral systems whose cohesion is driven by weak Van der Waals forces being unable to resist turbulence in space, the first and simplest association to consider is the one between the noble gas and the H3+ ion. Thus, DFT in the B3LYP, PW91 and BHandHLYP formalisms together with ab-initio methods of Coupled Cluster type have been employed to determine the equilibrium geometries, the spectroscopic constants and the bonding energies of the possible complexes between noble gases and hydrogen. We have first performed an extensive study of the associations ArnH3+ possible with Argon (the first noble gas which rose questions in the area of Jupiter's poles). We have found that several Argon atoms can be stabilized around the H3+ ion, the first complexation being in the plane of the ion. The spectroscopic data (rotational constants, dipole moments and IR signatures) were calculated (Pauzat & Ellinger (2005)) so that the laboratory experiments and spatial observations of these species could then be carried out. From our results and previous observations on this complex (Bogey et al. (1987)) we can say that the ArH3+ ion is certainly a good candidate for

  5. Absorption in transverse nanosecond discharge in He and a He/Kr mixture at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Shuaibov, A.K.; Neimet, Y.Y.; Khodanich, A.I.

    1995-09-01

    Spectra of nonstationary absorption in a transverse nanosecond discharge in pure He and in a He/Kr mixture were investigated. The pressure of gases was varied from 1 to 3 atm. The absorption in plasma was studied in the spectral range from 430 to 447 nm. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Donor acceptor complexes of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; von Hopffgarten, Moritz; Frenking, Gernot

    2009-03-25

    Donor-acceptor (DA) complexes of noble gases (Ng) of the general type A <-- Ng <-- D (A = Lewis acid, D = Lewis base) have been theoretically studied using ab initio and DFT methods. Chemical bonding in these compounds is realized via a 3-center 4-electron bond, which is formed by a lone pair of the noble gas, a lone pair of the donor molecule and a vacant orbital of the acceptor molecule. Detailed bonding analysis of the model compounds F(3)Al-Ng-NH(3) reveals that Ng-ammonia interaction is repulsive due to Pauli repulsion. Bonding interaction between Ng and N is mostly electrostatic. In contrast, strong orbital interactions are responsible for the attractive interactions between Ng and AlF(3). Due to the repulsive interactions with the donor molecule and a sizable reorganization energy of the acceptor molecule, optimization attempts of the A <-- Ng <-- D compounds, which feature individual donor and acceptor molecules, always lead to the dissociation of the complex and eventual formation of free Ng. To overcome this obstacle, the concept of a rigid C(3v) symmetric cryptand-type ligand, which features spacially separated pyramidalized donor and acceptor fragments, is introduced. Such "push-pull" ligands are predicted to exothermically form complexes with noble gases. These are the first examples of the thermodynamically stable Ar and Kr compounds. Application of the push-pull cryptand ligands featuring multiple (two and three) donor-acceptor induced chemical bonds is expected to yield stable complexes with virtually any electron-rich element in the periodic table.

  7. Fullerenes and Noble Gases in the Murchison and Allende Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we report the detection of fullerenes (C60 to C250) in the Murchison and Allende meteorites. By exploiting the unique ability of these molecules to trap noble gases, we have determined that fullerene is indeed a new carrier phase for noble gases in meteorites.

  8. Origin of noble gases in the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Current models of the origin of noble gases in the terrestrial planets are reviewed. Primary solar system volatile sources and processes are examined along with the current data base on noble gases and its applications to evolutionary processing. Models of atmospheric evolution by hydrodynamic escape are addressed.

  9. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  10. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  11. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  12. Ionization and Positronium Formation in Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, J. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Surko, C. M.

    2006-11-01

    This paper reviews key results of our recent study [Marler et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 022701 (2005)] of direct ionization and positronium formation in the noble gases from the thresholds for these processes to 90 eV. Results for argon and xenon are emphasized. The original study also reports similar results for neon and krypton. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and scattering in a strong magnetic field to make absolute cross section measurements. Comparison with a detailed set of previous measurements yields reasonably good absolute agreement. A third, independent analysis was used to resolve the remaining discrepancies to a < 5% level in argon, krypton and xenon. Key aspects of the work, comparison with available theory, and open questions for future research are discussed.

  13. Solubility of noble gases in serpentine - Implications for meteoritic noble gas abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaikowski, A.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the solubilities of the noble gases from synthesis and solubility studies of the sheet silicate mineral serpentine in carbonaceous chondrites is presented. Hydrothermal synthesis and exchange experiments were made at 340C and 1 kbar with noble gas partial pressures from 2 times 10 to the -8th power to 0.1 atm. The measured distribution coefficients for noble gases are not sufficiently high to account for the trapped noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites by exchange in solar nebula if meteoritic minerals have comparable distribution coefficients. Also, serpentine gains and loses noble gases to approach equilibrium values with the terrestrial atmosphere, indicating that this exposure may have influenced the noble gas abundances in phyllosilicate minerals of these chondrites. The dispersion of K-Ar ages of carbonaceous chondrites could be the result of phyllosilicates approaching equilibrium solubility of atmospheric Ar-40.

  14. Noble gases in E-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of noble gas data for 12 E-chondrites with literature data shows K-Ar ages greater than 4 AE for 14 out of 18 meteorites, while U, Th-He ages are often shorter. Cosmic ray exposure ages are found to differ systematically between types E4 and E6, with the respective, below-16 Myr and above-30 Myr values implying that the E-chondrite parent body predominantly contains a single petrologic type on the 1 km scale of individual impacts in contrast to the mixed parent bodies of the ordinary chondrites. Amounts of planetary gas in E4-E6 chondrites fall in the range for ordinary chondrites of types 4-6, but fail to correlate with petrologic type or volatile trace element contents, in contrast to the ordinary chondrites. Analyses of mineral separates show that the planetary gases are concentrated in an HFand HCl-insoluble mineral, similar to phase Q. The subsolar gases are located in an HCl- and HNO3-resistant phase.

  15. Noble Gases in Rumuruti-Group Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. W.; Schultz, L.

    1995-09-01

    The former Carlisle-Lakes-like chondrites are now called R-chondrites, named after Rumuruti, the only fall among the 9 members of this group [1,2,3]. We have measured concentration and isotopic composition of noble gases in Rumuruti, Acfer 217, Allan Hills (ALH) 85151, Carlisle Lakes (CL), Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91002 and 91241 to obtain information on their thermal and exposure history. It was suggested [2] that both PCA meteorites are paired. This is corroborated by their similar noble gas record. Except CL all R-chondrites contain solar noble gases and are thus regolith breccias. This is demonstrated in Fig. 1 where all points fall into a quadrangle formed by the two solar neon components SWC and SEP and the band of cosmogenic neon. The 5 measured samples of ALH85151 form a line which allows the determination of the solar 20Ne/22Ne = 13.0 +/- 0.2 as well as the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne = 1.24 +/- 0.03 (assuming a cosmogenic 20Ne/22Ne = 0.83 +/- 0.02). This value is indicative for a small preatmospheric mass of this meteorite. The highest concentration of solar Ne in this meteorite is 5.5 x 10^-5cm^3STP/g and similar to that of several solar gas containing ordinary chondrites. Characteristic for most R-chondrites are rather high values of 129Xe/132Xe. For example, most H-chondrites have values of 1.35 +/- 0.20 while those of R-chondrites are measured between 2.18 and 2.35 (an exception is again CL with a 129Xe/132Xe = 1.27). Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated from the mean chemical composition of R-chondrites [3] and procedures given in [4]. For 3He, 21Ne and 38Ar production rates (in 10^-8cm^3STP/gMa) are 2.42, 0.281 and 0.041, respectively. Three meteorites (Acfer 217, ALH85151, PCA91002/241) have similar exposure ages in the range of (39 +/- 3) Ma while those of Rumuruti (18 Ma) and CL (7 Ma) are shorter. Figure 1: Neon-isotopic compositions of Rumuruti chondrites. Indicated are the composition of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and the Solar

  16. The Noble Gases in A-Level Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests two methods of developing the study of the noble gases: first, the discovery of the elements and recent discovery of xenon show the human face of chemistry (historical development); second, the properties of noble gas compounds (particularly xenon) can be used to test the framework of conventional chemistry. (Author/JM)

  17. The Noble Gases in A-Level Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests two methods of developing the study of the noble gases: first, the discovery of the elements and recent discovery of xenon show the human face of chemistry (historical development); second, the properties of noble gas compounds (particularly xenon) can be used to test the framework of conventional chemistry. (Author/JM)

  18. Noble gases recycled into the mantle through cold subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smye, Andrew J.; Jackson, Colin R. M.; Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Hesse, Marc A.; Parman, Steve W.; Shuster, David L.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of hydrous and carbonated oceanic lithosphere replenishes the mantle volatile inventory. Substantial uncertainties exist on the magnitudes of the recycled volatile fluxes and it is unclear whether Earth surface reservoirs are undergoing net-loss or net-gain of H2O and CO2. Here, we use noble gases as tracers for deep volatile cycling. Specifically, we construct and apply a kinetic model to estimate the effect of subduction zone metamorphism on the elemental composition of noble gases in amphibole - a common constituent of altered oceanic crust. We show that progressive dehydration of the slab leads to the extraction of noble gases, linking noble gas recycling to H2O. Noble gases are strongly fractionated within hot subduction zones, whereas minimal fractionation occurs along colder subduction geotherms. In the context of our modelling, this implies that the mantle heavy noble gas inventory is dominated by the injection of noble gases through cold subduction zones. For cold subduction zones, we estimate a present-day bulk recycling efficiency, past the depth of amphibole breakdown, of 5-35% and 60-80% for 36Ar and H2O bound within oceanic crust, respectively. Given that hotter subduction dominates over geologic history, this result highlights the importance of cooler subduction zones in regassing the mantle and in affecting the modern volatile budget of Earth's interior.

  19. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms.

  20. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  1. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  2. van der Waals radii of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Jürgen; Alvarez, Santiago

    2014-09-02

    Consistent van der Waals radii are deduced for Ne-Xe, based on the noble gas···oxygen intermolecular distances found in gas phase structures. The set of radii proposed is shown to provide van der Waals distances for a wide variety of noble gas···element atom pairs that represent properly the distribution of distances both in the gas phase and in the solid state. Moreover, these radii show a smooth periodic trend down the group which is parallel to that shown by the halogens.

  3. [Neuroprotection by noble gases: New developments and insights].

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, A V; Rossaint, R; Coburn, M

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert elements, some of which exert biological activity. Experimental neuroprotection in particular has been widely shown for xenon, argon and helium. The underlying mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood. Besides an interference with neuronal ion-gated channels and cellular signaling pathways as well as anti-apoptotic effects, the modulation of neuroinflammation seems to play a crucial role. This review presents the current knowledge on neuroprotection by noble gases with a focus on interactions with the neuronal-glial network and neuroinflammation and the perspectives on clinical applications.

  4. Trapped noble gases indicate lunar origin for Antarctic meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    The isotopic abundances of the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are reported for Antarctic ALHA 81005. It contains solar wind-implanted gases whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to lunar regolith samples but not to other meteorites. ALHA 81005 also contains a large excess Ar-40 component which is identical to the component in lunar fines implanted from the lunar atmosphere. Large concentrations of cosmogenic Ne-21, Kr-82, and Xe-126 in ALHA 81005 indicate a total cosmic ray exposure age of at least 200 million years. The noble gas data alone are strong evidence for a lunar origin of this meteorite.

  5. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  6. Medical Imaging with Laser Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2000-06-01

    In the past five years, techniques of magnetic resonance imaging with laser polarized ^3He and ^129Xe have emerged along with the promise of entirely new ways to use NMR information from gas in the lungs and of xenon dissolved in tissue. This marriage of laser/optical physics and medical imaging has the potential to provide new ways to study and map function in the brain, measure physiological parameters, and diagnose diseases of the lungs, heart, and brain. Static and dynamic images of the lung air spaces already provide much greater spatial resolution than standard nuclear medicine techniques, and preliminary clinical studies of various pulmonary diseases are underway. Imaging of ^129Xe dissolved in tissue of the vital organs has potential applications to medicine as well as basic research in physiology and neuroscience. The use of ^129Xe as a magnetic tracer provides a measure of blood flow to several types of tissue in the brain and can be used to map and study neural function. Though a great deal of AMO physics research is still needed to advance noble gas polarization techniques, the rapid emergence of noble gas imaging was made possible in large part by advances motivated by basic research in nuclear and high energy physics. I will describe this remarkable new field of noble gas imaging, its beginnings in fundamental physics research, and AMO physics research that will continue to advance the field.

  7. Noble Gases in the Hamlet Meteorite (LL4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, S.; Sabe, Y.; Shiraishi, T.; Matsuda, J.

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed noble gases in a bulk sample and an HF-HCl residue of Hamlet (LL4). The Xe composition of the residue shows that no diamond is contained in the residue. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of Hamlet Ne-Q has been determined to be 11.0 ± 0.5.

  8. Investigation of radioactive noble gases distribution in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Achkasov, S.K.; Duginets, G.A.; Krylov, A.Yu.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes two tasks pertaining to the study of radioactive noble gases in the atmosphere: research of global effects, and using the results of measurements of the concentrations in the atmosphere as a specific tool for control of environmental radiation condition near nuclear facilities.

  9. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  10. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  11. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  12. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

    1998-04-28

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

  13. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Markun, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

  14. Nitrogen and light noble gases in Parsa enstatite chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar gases have been recently reported in Parsa, an EH3 chondrite. In an effort to check whether solar gases are uniformly distributed throughout Parsa or they are located in specific phases, we analyzed two additional samples of bulk Parsa and one aubritic nodule for N and noble gases. Nitrogen studies are intended for the understanding of the nitrogen components distribution in E-chondrites. The N-systematics of the nodule are entirely different from the bulk samples. The higher N contents in this nodule, as well as its complex delta(sup 15)N structure, as compared to the normal aubrites, is suggestive that the nodule is not a genuine aubrite.

  15. Ionization and positronium formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Surko, C.M.

    2005-02-01

    Absolute measurements are presented for the positron-impact cross sections for direct ionization and positronium formation of noble gas atoms in the range of energies from threshold to 90 eV. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and the technique of studying positron scattering in a strong magnetic field. The current data show generally good, quantitative agreement with previous measurements taken using a qualitatively different method. However, significant differences in the cross sections for both direct ionization and positronium formation are also observed. An analysis is presented that yields another, independent measurement of the direct ionization and positronium formation cross sections that is in agreement with the present, direct measurements to within {+-}10% for argon, krypton, and xenon. Comparison with available theoretical predictions yields good quantitative agreement for direct ionization cross sections, and qualitative agreement in the case of positronium formation.

  16. Noble gases as cardioprotectants – translatability and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Kirsten F; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Several noble gases, although classified as inert substances, exert a tissue-protective effect in different experimental models when applied before organ ischaemia as an early or late preconditioning stimulus, after ischaemia as a post-conditioning stimulus or when given in combination before, during and/or after ischaemia. A wide range of organs can be protected by these inert substances, in particular cardiac and neuronal tissue. In this review we summarize the data on noble gas-induced cardioprotection, focusing on the underlying protective mechanisms. We will also look at translatability of experimental data to the clinical situation. PMID:25363501

  17. Seeded optically driven avalanche ionization in molecular and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Pasenhow, Bernard; Driscoll, Nicholas; Scheller, Maik; Wright, Ewan M.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2012-10-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the dual laser-pulse plasma excitation in molecular and noble gases at atmospheric pressure. Dilute plasma channels generated through filamentation of ultraintense femtosecond laser pulses in air, argon, and helium are densified through the application of multijoule nanosecond heater pulses. Plasma densification in molecular gases is always accompanied by the fragmentation of the plasma channels into discrete bubbles, while in atomic gases, under certain conditions, the densified channels remain smooth and continuous. The densification effect in atomic gases persists through considerably longer delays between the femtosecond and nanosecond pulses compared to that in molecular gases. Using rate equations we trace this difference in the temporal dynamics of densification to the different cooling mechanisms operative in atomic and molecular cases.

  18. Nitrogen and light noble gases in Shergotty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of Shergotty and a sample of EETA 79001's lithology A have been analyzed for N, He, Ne, and Ar abundances and isotopic composition. After correcting for spallogenic nitrogen, the nitrogen isotopic ratios were found to be close to that of the terrestrial atmosphere. The spallogenic noble gas data are consistent with cosmic ray irradiation of both Shergotty and EETA 79001 at shallow shielding depths. Cosmic ray exposure ages were estimated to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 Myr for EETA 79001, and of 2.0-5.2 Myr for Shergotty, depending on the choice of object size and shielding. Among the two Shergotty samples, the contents of Ar-40 differed by a factor of 3. This difference can be attributed to either a small-scale mineralogical inhomogeneity or a significant variation in the degree of degassing of minerals during shock, although the presence of trapped argon with a high Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio and its heterogeneous distribution cannot be ruled out.

  19. Circumstellar material in meteorites - Noble gases, carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward

    1988-01-01

    In addition to preserving a record of isotopically distinct reservoirs in the early solar system, some primitive meteorites contain discrete grains of presolar origin. Such grains are distinguished by the isotopically anomalous noble-gas components they contain. One such component consists of monoisotopic Ne-22, produced by decay of radioactive Na-22 with a 2.6 yr half-life. Two xenon components have also been identified: one synthesized apparently in a supernova, the other probably in a red giant star. Most of the grains that carry these noble-gas components are carbonaceous and contain isotopically anomalous C, N, or both. They include diamond and silicon carbide. Two unidentified carriers of isotopically anomalous nitrogen, unaccompanied by noble gases, occur in the brecciated stony iron meteorite, Bencubbin.

  20. Fullerenes: An extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin. PMID:10725367

  1. Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in the Wethersfield (1982) chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C.; Reeves, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    The Wethersfield (1982) chondrite was assayed for a suite of cosmogenic radionuclides shortly after fall. Data are reported for Be-7, Na-22, All-26, Sc-46, V-48, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-60. A comparison is made with predicted results based on a scaling to the Deep River Neutron Monitor. Noble gases were also assayed in a subsample. The cosmic-ray-exposure age is estimated to be 45 Myr.

  2. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  3. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  4. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  5. Experiments on thermal release of implanted noble gases from minerals and their implications for noble gases in lunar soil grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futagami, T.; Ozima, M.; Nagai, S.; Aoki, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Experiments on ion implantation were performed in order to study the release mechanisms of solar particles from lunar soil grains. Helium, neon, and argon ions were implanted into olivine and ilmenite. The release temperatures of noble gases were investigated by heating samples stepwise; the results show that they depend on irradiation energy and dose. We conclude that the release temperature is related to the size of bubbles in which noble gases are trapped: noble gases in small and large bubbles are released at 400-600 C and 800-1200 C, respectively. In Ne and Ar implantation experiments into olivine, a component was released during recrystallization of amorphized surfaces. Based on these experimental results, we suggest that components released from lunar ilmenite grains at different temperatures would correspond to solar particles of different energies. We also suggest that He and Ne of solar wind energy (about 1 keV/amu) should be retained in lunar ilmenite grains, while they should be lost from olivine grains.

  6. Howardite Noble Gases as Indicators of Asteroid Surface Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The HED (Howardite, Eucrite and Diogenite) group meteorites likely or iginate from the Asteroid 4 Vesta - one of two asteroid targets of NA SA's Dawn mission. Whilst Howardites are polymict breccias of eucriti c and diogenitic material that often contain "regolithic" petrologica l features, neither their exact regolithic nature nor their formation processes are well defined. As the Solar Wind (SW) noble gas compon ent is implanted onto surfaces of solar system bodies, noble gas anal yses of Howardites provides a key indicator of regolithic origin. In addition to SW, previous work by suggested that restricted Ni (300-12 00 micro g/g) and Al2O3 (8-9 wt%) contents may indicate an ancient we ll-mixed regolith. Our research combines petrological, compositional and noble gas analyses to help improve understanding of asteroid reg olith formation processes, which will play an intergral part in the i nterpretation of Dawn mission data. Following compositional and petrological analyses, we developed a regolith grading scheme for our sampl e set of 30 Howardites and polymict Eucrites. In order to test the r egolith indicators suggested by, our 8 selected samples exhibited a r ange of Ni, Al2O3 contents and regolithic grades. Noble gas analyses were performed using furnace stepheating on our MAP 215-50 noble gas mass spectrometer. Of our 8 howardites, only 3 showed evidence of SW noble gases (e.g approaching Ne-20/Ne-22 approximately equals 13.75, Ne-21/Ne-22 approximately equals 0.033). As these samples display low regolithic grades and a range of Ni and Al2O3 contents, so far we are unable to find any correlation between these indicators and "regolit hic" origin. These results have a number of implications for both Ho wardite and Vesta formation, and may suggest complex surface stratigr aphies and surface-gardening processes.

  7. Trapping of noble gases in proton-irradiated silicate smokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. H., Jr.; Nuth, J. A., III; Hohenberg, C. M.; Olinger, C. T.; Moore, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in Si2O3 'smokes' that were condensed on Al substrates, vapor-deposited with various mixtures of CH4, NH3, H2O3 and noble gases at 10 K and subsequently irradiated with 1 MeV protons to simulate conditions during grain mantle formation in interstellar clouds. Neither Ne nor Ar is retained by the samples upon warming to room temperature, but Xe is very efficiently trapped and retained. Kr is somewhat less effectively retained, typically depleted by factors of about 10-20 relative to Xe. Isotopic fractionation favoring the heavy isotopes of Xe and Kr of about 5-10-percent/amu is observed. Correlations between the specific chemistry of the vapor deposition and heavy noble gas retention are most likely the result of competition by the various species for irradiation-produced trapping sites. The concentration of Xe retained by some of these smokes exceeds that observed in phase Q of meteorites and, like phase Q, they do not seem to be carriers of the light noble gases.

  8. On the siting of noble gases in E-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    Fractions of six E-chondrites were separated by density, grain size, and chemical resistance to determine the siting of noble gases. The samples were taken from the Qingzhen (E3), Indarch (E4), Abee and Saint Saveur (E4-5), and Yilmia and North West Forrest (E6) meteorites. The Ar-rich component of the E6s was concentrated in the enstatite-rich fraction. This subsolar component was resistant to HCl and HNO3 treatment, but could be partially dissolved by HF, implying that the subsolar component is located in the enstatite. The noble gases were transported there by metamorphism. Xe-129 was found in the same regions in the E6s, but was in areas associated with chondrules in the E4s. Additionally, the carbon-rich fraction of the E4 sample displayed Xe and Ne/CCF-Xe isotopic ratios similar to that found in C-chondrites. E3 and E4 primordial gases were analogous, with no subsolar contribution.

  9. Noble gases, K, U, Th, and Pb in native gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engster, O.; Niedermann, S.; Thalmann, C.; Frei, R.; Kramers, J.; KräHenbühl, U.; Liu, Y. Z.; Hofmann, B.; Boer, R. H.; Reimold, W. U.; Bruno, L.

    1995-12-01

    We present determinations of the noble gas and Pb isotopic abundances and of K, Th, and U concentrations of native gold. Our results demonstrate that gold is an excellent carrier for crustal volatiles, but direct dating of gold using the U, Th-4He, 40K-40Ar, and U fission Xe methods was not successful for various reasons. The main significance of this work is the great sensitivity of gold for trapped gases as well as for gases that were produced in situ which gives the prospects of using gold and its fluid and solid inclusions for the study of paleogas composition. Numerous nuclear effects characterize the noble gas inventory of placer gold from Switzerland and Italy, vein gold from Italy, South Africa, and Venezuela, and lode gold from South Africa. The degassing patterns obtained by mass spectrometry show a low-temperature release of volatiles around 500°C from fluid inclusions mainly in vein gold and a high-temperature release from solid inclusions and the gold itself. The low-temperature volatiles represent species that were trapped when the gold crystallized. We investigated the following trapped species: the isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb, and the abundances of K, U, Th, H2O, and CO2. The crustal gases trapped by gold comprise 3He from 6Li(n,α)3H → β- → 3He, 4He and 40Ar from the U, Th, and K decay, and Xe from 238U fission. We observe 4He/40Ar = 3.9 for the radiogenic trapped gases of tertiary gold and a ratio of 1.4 for Archean gold. These ratios are consistent with the production ratios from U and K at the respective times and demonstrate that gold can be used as a sampler of ancient atmospheric gases. The concentrations of U and Th range from a few parts per billion to a few parts per million, and those of K and Pb range up to some tens of parts per million. The antiquity of trapped Pb is indicated by the Pb-Pb model age of about 3000 Ma for the lead extracted from vein gold and quartz of the Lily gold mine (South Africa). Gold also

  10. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. N.; Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  12. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  13. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  14. The isotopic composition of solar flare noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The relative elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases provide insights into a number of topics related to the solar system. Neon is in many ways the most diagnostic of the noble gases. The diagnostic character is mainly related to the variation in the relative abundance of the two most abundant neon isotopes, Ne-20 and Ne-22. The available evidence suggests that trapped neon found in meteorites and in lunar samples consists of as many as five isotopically distinct components, including neon A, B, C, D, and E. Neon B has been shown to be due to solar wind neon which has been directly implanted into the material found in a meteorite. It appears that neon E is extrasolar in origin. There exist ambiguities regarding the origins of the remaining three components. The present investigation is concerned with a reexamination of the existing data in an effort to eliminate or at least clarify these ambiguities. It is found that neon C is apparently due to directly implanted, low-energy solar flare neon nuclei.

  15. Solar composition noble gases in the Washington County iron meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    A sample of the Washington County iron meteorite is analyzed for its light noble gases by a combustion technique in two steps at 1160 C. The ratio of trapped to spallogenic noble gases in the sample was high enough to allow the resolution of trapped and spallogenic components in both combustion steps. The He:Ne:Ar elemental ratios in the trapped component are comparable to present-day solar-wind ratios. The (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) ratio, while subject to some uncertainty due to possible variation in either the spallation or the trapped component between the two steps, is in the range 13.3 + or 0.5, also comparable to present-day solar wind. Unless the Washington County iron formed by some unique process in a solar-wind-irradiated regolith, the fact that the trapped gas is of solar composition has implications with regard to the compositional history of the solar wind, to conditions in the early solar nebula during grain formation or accretion, and to primordial helium in the earth.

  16. Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite - Implications for planetary gases in meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancet, M. S.; Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite were determined by growing magnetite in a noble-gas atmosphere between 450 and 700 K. Henry's law is obeyed at pressures up to .01 atm for He, Ne, Ar and up to .00001 atm for Kr, Xe, with the following distribution coefficients at 500 K: He 0.042, Ne 0.016, Ar 3.6, Kr 1.3, Xe 0.88, some 100 to 100,000 times higher than previous determinations on silicate and fluoride melts. Apparent heats of solution are in sharp contrast with earlier determinations on melts which were small and positive, but are comparable to the values for clathrates. Presumably the gases are held in anion vacancies.

  17. Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite - Implications for planetary gases in meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancet, M. S.; Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite were determined by growing magnetite in a noble-gas atmosphere between 450 and 700 K. Henry's law is obeyed at pressures up to .01 atm for He, Ne, Ar and up to .00001 atm for Kr, Xe, with the following distribution coefficients at 500 K: He 0.042, Ne 0.016, Ar 3.6, Kr 1.3, Xe 0.88, some 100 to 100,000 times higher than previous determinations on silicate and fluoride melts. Apparent heats of solution are in sharp contrast with earlier determinations on melts which were small and positive, but are comparable to the values for clathrates. Presumably the gases are held in anion vacancies.

  18. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-25

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane's lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon's strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  19. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-01-01

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane’s lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon’s strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia. PMID:26601882

  20. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane’s lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon’s strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  1. Shock Reflection in a Binary Mixture of Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, S. T.; Baganoff, D.

    1996-11-01

    The standard implementation of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for the simulation of multiple-specie flows uses single-specie transport data as input to an ad hoc combining formula to define parameters used in binary collisions between non-like species. To ascertain the suitability of this approach, we focus on the details of translational nonequilibrium in the flow of a binary mixture of noble gases. Existing experimental results for the one-dimensional reflection of a shock wave in a mixture of helium (He) and xenon (Xe) yield a standard of comparison. The molecular weight and diameter of He:Xe are sufficiently disparate so that the relevant time scales of the reflection process are distinct. Simulations are performed on the Intel Paragon using an adaptation of the DSMC method suitable for the parallel computing environment. Using the best characterizations of noble gas intermolecular potentials that have been published to date, we are able to produce simulations of the reflection process which compare favorably with experiment over a range of Xe concentrations. Investigations of various combining rules to arrive at non-like specie collision parameters indicate that any reasonable combining rule works provided that the single-specie data is physically realistic.

  2. Chemical composition of Titan's lakes and noble gases sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J.-I.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L.; Ferreira, A.

    2010-04-01

    Titan is one of the most enigmatic objects in the Solar System. The presence of hydrocarbon lakes and even a global ocean have been suspected for decades. The dark features discovered by the CASSINI spacecraft are good candidates for these expected lakes (see McEwen et al. 2005 and Stofan et al. 2007). Their chemical composition has still not been measured but numerical models can give relatively accurate predictions. In the present work, we use the recent model of Titan's lakes chemical composition elaborated by Cordier et al. (2009) in light of the recent Cassini-Huygens measurements in order to investigate the possibility of sequestration of large quantities of noble gases in these liquids. Indeed, the noble gas abundances have been found to be largely in subsolar abundances in the atmosphere of Titan and the origin of this impoverishment is still poorly understood. Our preliminary results show that, under specific circumstances, at least the atmospheric depletion in krypton could be caused by its dissolution in the Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquid phase.

  3. Noble gases in the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Nickols, R. H.; Olinger, C.; Garrison, D. H.; Goswami, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of noble gases in whole rock samples of the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta and grain-size separates of Kapoeta yield evidence for excesses of the Xe isotopes Xe-129 , Xe-131, Xe-132, Xe-134, and Xe-136 in a low-temperture component, similar to lunar excess fission Xe. Such a component may be able to provide chronometric information if the relative abundances of radioactive progenitors (I-129, Pu-244, and U-238) can be determined, but the isotopic spectra obtained are not sufficiently precise to do so. Eucritic clast BH-5 in Bholghati contains Xe produced in situ by the decay of Pu-244. Calculated fission Xe retention ages are 30-70 Ma after the formation of the solar system, consistent with the apparent presence of Sm-146 decay products. Both the clast and the matrix of Bholghati have K-Ar ages of about 2 Ga, suggesting a common thermal event at least that recently.

  4. Degassing mechanisms of noble gases from carbonado diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zashu, S.; Hiyagon, H.

    1994-01-01

    Diamonds are unique samples for inferring ancient mantle conditions, because of their enormous stability, antiquity and also of mantle origin. However, as temperatures in the mantle where diamonds have existed are very high (greater than 1000 C) and residence time of some diamonds could be more than a few billion years, it is imperative to examine whether or not diamonds have retained their pristine characteristics, especially those of noble gases, under such extreme conditions. As discussed in a review article by Ozima, there are rather large variations in the diffusivity of helium in diamonds obtained in the early determinations. The data are also limited to temperatures higher than 1200 C. In the present study, we conducted more refined diffusion experiments for He using carbonado diamonds, which have large amounts of radiogenic (4)He approximately 10(exp -2) cu cm STP/g. On the basis of the experimentally estimated diffusion coefficients, we will discuss retentivity of He in diamonds in the mantle condition.

  5. Noble gases in the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Nickols, R. H.; Olinger, C.; Garrison, D. H.; Goswami, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of noble gases in whole rock samples of the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta and grain-size separates of Kapoeta yield evidence for excesses of the Xe isotopes Xe-129 , Xe-131, Xe-132, Xe-134, and Xe-136 in a low-temperture component, similar to lunar excess fission Xe. Such a component may be able to provide chronometric information if the relative abundances of radioactive progenitors (I-129, Pu-244, and U-238) can be determined, but the isotopic spectra obtained are not sufficiently precise to do so. Eucritic clast BH-5 in Bholghati contains Xe produced in situ by the decay of Pu-244. Calculated fission Xe retention ages are 30-70 Ma after the formation of the solar system, consistent with the apparent presence of Sm-146 decay products. Both the clast and the matrix of Bholghati have K-Ar ages of about 2 Ga, suggesting a common thermal event at least that recently.

  6. Noble gases and cosmogenic radionuclides in the Eltanin Pacific meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, D D; Garrison, D H; Caffee, M W; Kyte, F; Nishiizumi, K

    2000-01-14

    A 1.5 cm long, 1.2 g specimen of the Eltanin meteorite was found at 10.97 m depth in Polarstern piston core PS2704-1. The early studies indicated that the small fragments of the Eltanin meteorite was debris from a km-sized asteroid which impacted into the deep-ocean basin. In this study, the authors measured {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar age, noble gases, and cosmogenic radionuclides in splits of specimen as a part of consortium studies of Eltanin meteorite. They concluded that the specimen was about 3 m deep from the asteroid surface. The exposure age of the Eltanin asteroid was about 20 Myr.

  7. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    Regolith grains dissolved by stepwise etching release a mixture of near-surface implanted Solar Wind gases (SW) and a deeper- sited, isotopically heavier component attributed to Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) (1,2,3). In all regolith materials examined so far the elemental abundance ratios in both components are distinctly different from the canonical solar values (4). The differences are generally explained to be owing to diffusive elemental fractionation although there is no strong evidence that upon their implantation the composition of the gases was indeed solar. In contrast, the solar noble gases present in the H3-H6 chondritic regolith breccia Acfer 111 appear to be nearly unfractionated and thus offer a unique chance for more accurate analyses. A magnetic fraction of Acfer 111 matrix, consisting of approx. 80% metal and 20% silicates, was etched with a 60 g/mol aqueous solution of HNO3 in a high-vacuum extraction line similar to that in (1). The gases released were drawn off in steps and analyzed; the experiment was stopped when ~97% of the metal and ~50% of the silicates were dissolved. As etching proceeds, the isotopic composition of the released gases changes in a pattern similar to that observed previously in other regolithic materials. The isotopic composition of solar neon decreases from ^20Ne/^22Ne=13.1 in the first step to ^20Ne/^22Ne=11.6, which can be interpreted as a change of the mixing ratio of SW (^20Ne/^22Ne=13.7) and SEP (^20Ne/^22Ne=11.3) neon. The isotopic compositions of solar He, Ar, and Kr are consistent with their also being mixtures of SW and SEP having compositions reported previously (2,3), although our data are compromised to some extent by the presence of planetary gases extracted from the silicates and, in the first steps, by atmospheric contamination probably present in terrestrial weathering products (mostly rust). The elemental composition of noble gases released from Acfer 111 was distinct from previous experiments: The (^4He

  8. Solar Noble Gases in Polymict Ureilites and an Update on Ureilite Noble Gas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Lohr, H. P.; Begemann, F.

    1993-07-01

    Ureilites are one of the least understood classes of meteorites; they show signs of being processed, but also appear to be primitive, with abundant carbon and trapped noble gases [1-6]. We have now begun to analyze a number of recently recovered specimens: one from the Saharan desert (Acfer 277) amd five from the Antarctic (LEW 85328, LEW 85440, EET 87720, FRO 90036, and FRO 90054). Analyses of Acfer 277, LEW 85328, and EET 87720 are complete (Table 1). Solar noble gases are present in polymict EET 87720, as shown by the three- isotope plot of Fig. 1. There, in contrast to the bulk data point for Acfer 277, data points for EET 87720 deviate from a mixing line between "typical" spallation Ne (as approximated here by the spallation-dominated 1800 degrees C step for EET 87720) and Ne-U [7] toward higher ^20Ne/^22Ne. A line fitted to the EET 87720 data points passes slightly below Ne-B [8]. The situation is similar for sample F1 from polymict EET 83309 [9], which is shown for comparison. Additional support for the presence of solar gases arises from the abundance of ^4He (~9 x 10^-5 cm^3 STP/g in EET 87720-F1, corrected for spallogenic contributions), which in both cases is far higher than in other ureilite bulk samples [6,10]. Also, in the ratio of spallation-corrected ^4He to trapped ^36Ar, these two polymict ureilites clearly stand out. Helium-4/argon-36 ratios in EET 87720-F1 and EET 83309-F1 are ~20 and ~28 respectively, at least 1 order of magnitude higher than in bulk monomict ureilites and 2 orders of magnitude higher than what appears typical of ureilite diamonds [6]. Nilpena, another polymict ureilite [11], also has a ^4He/^36Ar ratio (2.1 in Nilpena II-1 [7]) higher than all monomict ureilites but one (Dingo Pup Donga), indicating the presence of solar noble gases (in variable contents) as a possible general feature of polymict ureilites, similar to the presence in them of nitrogen with high delta(^15N/^14N) [12]. Monomict LEW 85328 has a very high (^22Ne

  9. Noble Gases in the LEW 88663 L7 Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y. N.; Sugiura, N.; Nagao, K.

    1995-09-01

    LEW88663 and some meteorites (e.g. Shaw) are the most highly metamorphosed meteorites among L group chondrites. Although the abundances of lithophile elements and oxygen isotopic compositions of the L7 chondrite LEW88663 (total recovered mass: 14.5g) are close to those of the range for L chondrites [1,2], metallic iron is absent and concentrations of siderophile elements are about half of typical values for L chondrites [3,4]. Petrographical and geochemical observation suggested that this meteorite has experienced partial melting [5]. As a part of our study on differentiated meteorites, we also investigated noble gases in this meteorite. We present here noble gas compositions of LEW88663 and discuss history of this meteorite. In addition, we will consider whether there is any evidence for bridging between chondrites and achondrites. Noble gases were extracted from a whole rock sample weighing 66.31 mg by total fusion, and all stable noble gas isotopes as well as cosmogenic radioactive 81Kr were analyzed using a mass spectrometer at ISEI, Okayama University. The results are summarized in the table. The concentrations of cosmogenic ^3He, ^21Ne, and ^38Ar are 7.3, 1.6 and 3.1x10^-8 cm^3STP/g, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages based on them are calculated to be 4.7, 6.9 and 8.8 m.y., respectively, using the production rates proposed by [6, 7] and mean chemical compositions of L chondrites. The shorter cosmic-ray exposure ages T(sub)3 and T(sub)21 than T(sub)38 would be due to diffusive loss of lighter noble gases from the meteorite. The concentrations of trapped Kr and Xe in LEW88663 are lower than those for L6 chondrites [8], supporting thermal metamorphism for the meteorite higher than that for L6 chondrites. The Kr and Xe are isotopically close to those of the terrestrial atmospheric Kr and Xe, and elemental abundance ratios for Ar, Kr and Xe suggest adsorbed noble gas patterns of the terrestrial atmosphere. The terrestrial atmospheric Ar, Kr and Xe (most

  10. Diffusive Separation of Noble Gases by adsorption and throat constrictions:Explaining Noble Gas patterns in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B. M.; van Soest, M. C.

    2002-12-01

    Literature reports of noble gas patterns in sedimentary rocks indicate a commonplace occurrence of both Xe- and Ne-enriched endmembers, which occur either separately or together. Laboratory experiments have shown that noble gases appear to rapidly and weakly physi-adsorb on natural rock material. However, the weak physi-adsorption bond quickly changes to a strong chemi-sorption mode, such that adsorption at low temperature requires a higher temperature to extract the adsorbed component. This suggests that mechanisms are operational in sedimentary rocks that appear to first adsorb and then trap noble gases. More recently, based on measurements of both Xe- and Ne-enrichment in fluids from hydrocarbon systems, it has been suggested that the light and heavy noble gas enrichments occur in the fluid due to direct transfer of noble gas enrichments from the reservoir and/or source rock to the fluid with a subsequent evolution of the fluid. We present a simple model, based on labyrinth-with-constrictions (e.g. Wacker et al., 1986), to explain noble gas enrichment patterns in sedimentary rock that does not require any special process and/or unusual conditions yet provides zeroth order explanations for noble enrichments, trapping and geologic release from/to terrestrial rocks. Using estimates of the relative (1) diffusion coefficients, (2) adsorption coefficients and (3) probabilities for noble gas passage through a constricted throat (all functions of atomic mass), we find the above three properties of noble gases combine to allow a diffusive separation of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe with a change in boundary condition. This simple theory is consistent with literature reported noble gas enrichment and concentrations in sedimentary rocks. Xe enrichments can be produced as a residual in rock following a decrease in exterior noble gas concentration; Ne enrichments can be produced by an increase in exterior noble gas concentration. The time scale for separation is governed by the above

  11. Using noble gases to investigate mountain-front recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Solomon, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Mountain-front recharge is a major component of recharge to inter-mountain basin-fill aquifers. The two components of mountain-front recharge are (1) subsurface inflow from the mountain block (subsurface inflow), and (2) infiltration from perennial and ephemeral streams near the mountain front (stream seepage). The magnitude of subsurface inflow is of central importance in source protection planning for basin-fill aquifers and in some water rights disputes, yet existing estimates carry large uncertainties. Stable isotope ratios can indicate the magnitude of mountain-front recharge relative to other components, but are generally incapable of distinguishing subsurface inflow from stream seepage. Noble gases provide an effective tool for determining the relative significance of subsurface inflow, specifically. Dissolved noble gas concentrations allow for the determination of recharge temperature, which is correlated with recharge elevation. The nature of this correlation cannot be assumed, however, and must be derived for the study area. The method is applied to the Salt Lake Valley Principal Aquifer in northern Utah to demonstrate its utility. Samples from 16 springs and mine tunnels in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains indicate that recharge temperature decreases with elevation at about the same rate as the mean annual air temperature, but is on average about 2??C cooler. Samples from 27 valley production wells yield recharge elevations ranging from the valley elevation (about 1500 m) to mid-mountain elevation (about 2500 m). Only six of the wells have recharge elevations less than 1800 m. Recharge elevations consistently greater than 2000 m in the southeastern part of the basin indicate that subsurface inflow constitutes most of the total recharge in this area. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Noble gases in 'phase Q' - Closed-system etching of an Allende residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, Rainer; Baur, Heinrich; Signer, Peter; Anders, Edward; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis, in nearly pure form, of noble gases from the 'phase-Q' in an HF/HCl residue of the Allende C3V meteorite, using the closed-system stepped etching technique developed by Wieler et al. (1986) and Benkert et al. (1988) to extract noble gases from the residue. The results yield precise values of element and isotope abundances of all five noble gases in phase-Q, which is the major carrier of the planetary gases in carbonaceous chondrites. It was found that Ne-Q and Xe-Q in Allende are very similar to trapped gases in ureilites and in oxidizable carriers in several classes of ordinary chandrites, indicating that Q-gases are present in the formation locations of all these meteorites.

  13. [A possible molecular mechanism of the narcotic action of noble gases].

    PubMed

    Dovgusha, V V; Fok, M V; Zaritskaia, G A

    2005-01-01

    A molecular mechanism of the narcotic action of noble gases is suggested, which is based on the fact that noble gas atoms change the orientation of water molecules absorbed on the surface of axon membrane. The resulting change in the transmembrane potential deteriorates the propagation of nerve pulse.

  14. Metal-organic frameworks for adsorption and separation of noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Staiger, Chad

    2017-05-30

    A method including exposing a gas mixture comprising a noble gas to a metal organic framework (MOF), including an organic electron donor and an adsorbent bed operable to adsorb a noble gas from a mixture of gases, the adsorbent bed including a metal organic framework (MOF) including an organic electron donor.

  15. Noble gases on metal surfaces: Insights on adsorption site preference

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2011-12-19

    We use a nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) approach to reexamine the problem of why noble gases are experimentally observed to adsorb on low-coordination atop sites rather than on high-coordination hollow sites for several different metal surfaces. Previous calculations using density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) ascribed the site preference to reduced Pauli repulsion at atop sites, largely due to reduced exchange repulsion within LDA-DFT. In contrast, our vdW-DF calculations show that site preference is not due to differences in the exchange repulsion at all, but rather the result of a delicate balance between the electrostatic and kinetic energies; surprisingly, exchange-correlation energies play a negligible role in determining site preference. In contrast to previous calculations, we find that experimental results cannot be explained in terms of binding energy differences between atop and hollow sites. Instead, we show that the hollow sites are transition states rather than minima on the two-dimensional potential energy surface, and therefore not likely to be observed in experiments. This phenomenon is quite general, holding for close-packed and non-close-packed metal surfaces. We show that inclusion of nonlocal vdW interactions is crucial for obtaining results in quantitative agreement with experiments for adsorption energies, equilibrium distances, and vibrational energies.

  16. The fractionation of noble gases in diamonds of CV3 Efremovka chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Semjonova, L. F.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    It was shown that in diamonds of Efremovka CV3 the noble gases with normal isotopic compositions are fractionated in different degree while the correlation of isotopic anomalous components is nearly constant. Some data for noble gases in DE-4 sample of Efremovka chondrite are considered. In contrast to DE-2 sample the DE-4 was treated except conc. HClO4, 220 C in addition with mixture of conc. H2SO4+H3PO4 (1:1), 220 C, twice. Noble gases analysis were performed in Germany at Max Plank Institute fur Chemie. Noble gases were released by oxidation of samples at stepped heating from 420 C to 810 C and by pyrolysis at 580, 590, and 680 C.

  17. The fractionation of noble gases in diamonds of CV3 Efremovka chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Semjonova, L. F.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    It was shown that in diamonds of Efremovka CV3 the noble gases with normal isotopic compositions are fractionated in different degree while the correlation of isotopic anomalous components is nearly constant. Some data for noble gases in DE-4 sample of Efremovka chondrite are considered. In contrast to DE-2 sample the DE-4 was treated except conc. HClO4, 220 C in addition with mixture of conc. H2SO4+H3PO4 (1:1), 220 C, twice. Noble gases analysis were performed in Germany at Max Plank Institute fur Chemie. Noble gases were released by oxidation of samples at stepped heating from 420 C to 810 C and by pyrolysis at 580, 590, and 680 C.

  18. Solar wind record in the lunar regolith - Nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, Urs; Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    The measured elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases and nitrogen have been measured in five different samples of lunar regolith material. It was found noble gases liberated by chemical attack on grain surfaces from two of the samples were solar. The Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio in the two grain surface reservoir is 13.5-13.6, compared to the average value of 13.7 + or - 0.3 measured in the Apollo solar wind collection foils (Gochsler and Geiss, 1977). It is suggested that the noble gases in grain interiors have suffered severe mass fractionation. The surface-sited N/Ar in an ilmenite sample exceeds the predicted solar ratio by more than a factor of 10. It is concluded that the solar system abundances of Cameron (1982) describe the elemental composition of the noble gases in the solar wind very well.

  19. The 'zero charge' partitioning behaviour of noble gases during mantle melting.

    PubMed

    Brooker, R A; Du, Z; Blundy, J D; Kelley, S P; Allan, N L; Wood, B J; Chamorro, E M; Wartho, J-A; Purton, J A

    2003-06-12

    Noble-gas geochemistry is an important tool for understanding planetary processes from accretion to mantle dynamics and atmospheric formation. Central to much of the modelling of such processes is the crystal-melt partitioning of noble gases during mantle melting, magma ascent and near-surface degassing. Geochemists have traditionally considered the 'inert' noble gases to be extremely incompatible elements, with almost 100 per cent extraction efficiency from the solid phase during melting processes. Previously published experimental data on partitioning between crystalline silicates and melts has, however, suggested that noble gases approach compatible behaviour, and a significant proportion should therefore remain in the mantle during melt extraction. Here we present experimental data to show that noble gases are more incompatible than previously demonstrated, but not necessarily to the extent assumed or required by geochemical models. Independent atomistic computer simulations indicate that noble gases can be considered as species of 'zero charge' incorporated at crystal lattice sites. Together with the lattice strain model, this provides a theoretical framework with which to model noble-gas geochemistry as a function of residual mantle mineralogy.

  20. Experimental Determination of the Partitioning Behavior of Noble Gases Between Carbonate and Silicate Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.; Koga, K. T.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonatitic melts have been identified in the earth’s upper mantle and experimental evidence suggests that such melts are stable at mantle conditions. Due to high carbonatite/silicate partition coefficients for certain trace elements, and due to the low melting points, low viscosities and low dihedral angles of carbonatite liquids, these liquids play a significant role in trace element fractionation in the mantle. However, the solubilities of the noble gases in carbonatitic liquids are poorly constrained although initial data at low pressure (1 bar) surprisingly suggest that the noble gases are poorly soluble in carbonatite liquids [1]. Partitioning of noble gases relative to the parents of radiogenic noble gases - primarily U, Th and K - has consequences for the isotopic evolution of mantle noble gases, consequently determination of noble gas solubilities in carbonatite phases is of extreme interest for mantle geodynamics. Two-liquid experimental charges consisting of nephelenite and Na2CO3 were synthesized at 1145 C and pressures between 0.6 and 2.5 GPa in sealed Au-Pd capsules in a piston cylinder apparatus. The experimental runs were c. 12h in duration and the charges were quenched at >200 C min-1 to form two immiscibly separated glasses phases. The nephelenite glass starting material had been saturated with a noble gas mixture (0.5 He, 0.02 Ne, 0.48 Ar) prior to synthesis. This procedure introduced noble gases without creating a free gas phase. The noble gases (He and Ar only) were measured in 3 stages: 1) the capsule was pierced under vacuum and the ‘free gas’ residing in the capsule pore space was analysed; 2) the entire capsule was heated to 250 C and the gases liberated were analysed and 3) the nephelenite glass was melting by a CO2 laser and the gases liberated analysed. The first stage of the analysis was to measure any noble gases (principally He) that may have diffused out of the carbonatite during the quench or between the period (of a few

  1. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Kleinfeld, Idit

    1992-01-01

    Due consideration of the probable history of the Martian atmosphere, as well as noble-gas data from the Mars-derived SNC meteorites and from laboratory tests on the trapping of noble gases in ice, are the bases of the presently hypothesized domination of noble gases in the atmospheres of all terrestrial planets by a mixture of internal components and a contribution from comets. If verified, this hypothesis would underscore the significance of impacts for these planets' volatile inventories. The sizes of the hypothesized comets are of the order of 120 km for Venus and only 80 km for that which struck the earth.

  2. Review: gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grandinetti, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This review article surveys recent experimental and theoretical advances in the gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases. Covered issues include the interaction of the noble gases with metal and non-metal cations, the conceivable existence of covalent noble-gas anions, the occurrence of ion-molecule reactions involving singly-charged xenon cations, and the occurrence of bond-forming reactions involving doubly-charged cations. Research themes are also highlighted, that are expected to attract further interest in the future.

  3. Studies of light noble gases in mineral grains from lunar soils: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, R.; Etique, P.; Signer, P.

    1986-01-01

    Among the lunar soil constituents, monomineralic grains deserve special attention. Noble gases of carefully prepared mineral separates from lunar bulk soils were studied. The major results and conclusions of these investigations are summarized, in the context of both the regolith evolution and the history of the solar corpuscular radiation. With regard to the most abundant noble gas component in the regolith samples (the solar gases) the mineral grains have mainly two properties giving these particles among all soil constituents the best characteristics as sensors for solar gases, despite the fact, that the noble gas concentrations in a mineral separate are 10 to 60 times lower that those in a bulk sample of the same grain size. The first of these properties is the mineral dependent retentivity of the light gases He and Ne, the second property concerns the relatively short time during which a mineral grain acquires it solar gases. These two points are briefly discussed.

  4. Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy with Laser Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, R. C.; Rosen, M. S.; Coulter, K. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Swanson, S. D.; Agranoff, B. W.; Prince, M. R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times smaller, but the noble gas polarization is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10-5 at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. We have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  5. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth and Mars

    PubMed

    Owen, T; Bar-Nun, A; Kleinfeld, I

    1992-07-02

    Models that trace the origin of noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (Venus, Earth and Mars) to the 'planetary component' in chondritic meteorites confront several problems. The 'missing' xenon in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth is one of the most obvious; this gas is not hidden or trapped in surface materials. On Venus, the absolute abundances of neon and argon per gram of rock are higher even than those in carbonaceous chondrites, whereas the relative abundances of argon and krypton are closer to solar than to chondritic values (there is only an upper limit on xenon). Pepin has developed a model that emphasizes hydrodynamic escape of early, massive hydrogen atmospheres to explain the abundances and isotope ratios of noble gases on all three planets. We have previously suggested that the unusual abundances of heavy noble gases on Venus might be explained by the impact of a low-temperature comet. Further consideration of the probable history of the martian atmosphere, the noble-gas data from the (Mars-derived) SNC meteorites and laboratory experiments on the trapping of noble gases in ice lead us to propose here that the noble gases in the atmospheres of all of the terrestrial planets are dominated by a mixture of an internal component and contribution from impacting icy planetesimals (comets). If true, this hypothesis illustrates the importance of impacts in determining the volatile inventories of these planets.

  6. Heavily fractionated noble gases in an acid residue from the Klein Glacier 98300 EH3 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; El Goresy, Ahmed; Nakamura, Tomoki

    2010-09-01

    Noble gases were measured both in bulk samples (stepped pyrolysis and total extraction) and in a HF/HCl residue (stepped pyrolysis and combustion) from the Klein Glacier (KLE) 98300 EH3 chondrite. Like the bulk meteorite and as seen in previous studies of bulk type 3 E chondrites ("sub-Q"), the acid residue contains elementally fractionated primordial noble gases. As we show here, isotopically these are like those in phase-Q of primitive meteorites, but elementally they are heavily fractionated relative to these. The observed noble gases are different from "normal" Q noble gases also with respect to release patterns, which are similar to those of Ar-rich noble gases in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (with also similar isotopic compositions). While we cannot completely rule out a role for parent body processes such as thermal and shock metamorphism (including a later thermal event) in creating the fractionated elemental compositions, parent body processes in general seem not be able to account for the distinct release patterns from those of normal Q noble gases. The fractionated gases may have originated from ion implantation from a nebular plasma as has been suggested for other types of primordial noble gases, including Q, Ar-rich, and ureilite noble gases. With solar starting composition, the corresponding effective electron temperature is about 5000 K. This is lower than inferred for other primordial noble gases (10,000-6000 K). Thus, if ion implantation from a solar composition reservoir was a common process for the acquisition of primordial gas, electron temperatures in the early solar system must have varied spatially or temporally between 10,000 and 5000 K. Neon and xenon isotopic ratios of the residue suggest the presence of presolar silicon carbide and diamond in abundances lower than in the Qingzhen EH3 and Indarch EH4 chondrites. Parent body processes including thermal and shock metamorphism and a late thermal

  7. Noble gases in stratospheric dust particles: confirmation of extraterrestrial origin.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B; Flynn, G J; Fraundorf, P; Hohenberg, C M; Shirck, J

    1981-01-23

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic ratios were measured in a group of 13 "chondritic" stratospheric dust particles. Neon and argon are present in "solar" proportions; xenon appears to be dominated by contributions from "planetary" sources. The apparent xenon concentration is higher than that measured in any bulk meteorite, approaching the concentration found in the noble gas-rich, acid-insoluble residues from carbonaceous chondrites.

  8. The noble gases: how their electronegativity and hardness determines their chemistry.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Jonathan; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2015-02-26

    The establishment of an internally consistent scale of noble gas electronegativities is a long-standing problem. In the present study, the problem is attacked via the Mulliken definition, which in recent years gained widespread use to its natural appearance in the context of conceptual density functional theory. Basic ingredients of this scale are the electron affinity and the ionization potential. Whereas the latter can be computed routinely, the instability of the anion makes the judicious choice of computational technique for evaluating electron affinities much more tricky. We opted for Puiatti's approach, extrapolating the energy of high ε solvent stabilized anions to the ε = 1 (gas phase) case. The results give negative electron affinity values, monotonically increasing (except for helium which is an outlier in most of the story) to almost zero at eka-radon in agreement with high level calculations. The stability of the B3LYP results is successfully tested both via improving the level of theory (CCSD(T)) and expanding the basis set. Combined with the ionization energies (in good agreement with experiment), an electronegativity scale is obtained displaying (1) a monotonic decrease of χ when going down the periodic table, (2) top values not for the noble gases but for the halogens, as opposed to most (extrapolation) procedures of existing scales, invariably placing the noble gases on top, and (3) noble gases having electronegativities close to the chalcogens. In the accompanying hardness scale (hardly, if ever, discussed in the literature) the noble gases turn out to be by far the farthest the hardest elements, again with a continuous decrease with increasing Z. Combining χ value of the halogens and the noble gases the Ng(δ+)F(δ-) bond polarity emerging from ab initio calculations naturally emerges. In conclusion, the chemistry of the noble gases is for a large part determined by their extreme hardness, equivalent to a high resistance to change in its

  9. An Atomistic Study of the Incorporation and Diffusion of Noble Gases in Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, C.; Valencia, K.; Martinez-Mendoza, C.; Allan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Trace elements are widely used to unravel magmatic processes and constrain the chemical differentiation of the Earth. Central to this enterprise is understanding the controls on trace element fractionation between solid and liquid phases and thus the energetics of incorporating trace elements into crystals. In this contribution we focus on the incorporation of noble gases into crystals, with implications for the degassing processes in the Earth and the atmosphere. We use both ab-initio and classical calculations using interatomic potentials to study the uptake of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar into solid silicates. We calculate atomic defect energies of incorporation both at vacancies and at interstitial positions in solid forsterite. We use these energies to estimate the total uptake of the noble gases bulk into the crystal as a function of temperature. Such concentrations are found to be very low (10-3 and 10-10 ppm) for He up to Ar respectively with the noble gases incorporated predicted to be more favorable at intrinsic vacancies of Si or Mg or at interstitials sites. We also look at the diffusion of these minerals within the lattice and estimate activation energies for such processes. Our results support the hypothesis that noble gases have very low solubilities in bulk solid minerals. Other mechanisms such as adsorption at internal and external interfaces, voids and grain boundaries that can play a mayor role in their storage are also briefly discussed.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring purity of noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Austin, Robert

    2008-04-01

    A device for detecting impurities in a noble gas includes a detection chamber and a source of pulsed ultraviolet light. The pulse of the ultraviolet light is transferred into the detection chamber and onto a photocathode, thereby emitting a cloud of free electrons into the noble gas within the detection chamber. The cloud of electrons is attracted to the opposite end of the detection chamber by a high positive voltage potential at that end and focused onto a sensing anode. If there are impurities in the noble gas, some or all of the electrons within the cloud will bond with the impurity molecules and not reach the sensing anode. Therefore, measuring a lower signal at the sensing anode indicates a higher level of impurities while sensing a higher signal indicates fewer impurities. Impurities in the range of one part per billion can be measured by this device.

  11. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He, /sup 40/Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar, and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic helium and argon-40 formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 to 3%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 to 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 to 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as Cl or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range.

  12. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He and 40Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water that penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic He and 40Ar formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 - 30%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 - 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 - 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as C1 or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range. ?? 1984.

  13. Biomedical magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy with laser polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, R.C.; Rosen, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Chupp, T.E.; Swanson, S.D.; Agranoff, B.W.; Prince, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10{sup {minus}5} at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. The authors have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  14. Seeded optical breakdown of molecular and noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Polynkin, Pavel; Scheller, Maik; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2012-07-30

    We report experimental results on the dual laser-pulse plasma excitation in various gases at atmospheric pressure. Dilute plasma channels generated through filamentation of ultraintense femtosecond laser pulses in air, argon, and helium are densified through the application of multi-Joule nanosecond heater pulses. Optical breakdown in atomic gases can be achieved for considerably longer delays between femtosecond and nanosecond pulses compared to that in molecular gases. The densification of the seed channel in molecular gases is always accompanied by its fragmentation into discrete bubbles, while in atomic gases the densified channel remains smooth and continuous.

  15. Growth responses of Neurospora crassa to increased partial pressures of the noble gases and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, R G; Schreiner, H R; Doebbler, G F

    1966-02-01

    Buchheit, R. G. (Union Carbide Corp., Tonawanda, N.Y.), H. R. Schreiner, and G. F. Doebbler. Growth responses of Neurospora crassa to increased partial pressures of the noble gases and nitrogen. J. Bacteriol. 91:622-627. 1966.-Growth rate of the fungus Neurospora crassa depends in part on the nature of metabolically "inert gas" present in its environment. At high partial pressures, the noble gas elements (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) inhibit growth in the order: Xe > Kr> Ar > Ne > He. Nitrogen (N(2)) closely resembles He in inhibitory effectiveness. Partial pressures required for 50% inhibition of growth were: Xe (0.8 atm), Kr (1.6 atm), Ar (3.8 atm), Ne (35 atm), and He ( approximately 300 atm). With respect to inhibition of growth, the noble gases and N(2) differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the order of effectiveness found with other biological effects, i.e., narcosis, inhibition of insect development, depression of O(2)-dependent radiation sensitivity, and effects on tissue-slice glycolysis and respiration. Partial pressures giving 50% inhibition of N. crassa growth parallel various physical properties (i.e., solubilities, solubility ratios, etc.) of the noble gases. Linear correlation of 50% inhibition pressures to the polarizability and of the logarithm of pressure to the first and second ionization potentials suggests the involvement of weak intermolecular interactions or charge-transfer in the biological activity of the noble gases.

  16. Growth Responses of Neurospora crassa to Increased Partial Pressures of the Noble Gases and Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, R. G.; Schreiner, H. R.; Doebbler, G. F.

    1966-01-01

    Buchheit, R. G. (Union Carbide Corp., Tonawanda, N.Y.), H. R. Schreiner, and G. F. Doebbler. Growth responses of Neurospora crassa to increased partial pressures of the noble gases and nitrogen. J. Bacteriol. 91:622–627. 1966.—Growth rate of the fungus Neurospora crassa depends in part on the nature of metabolically “inert gas” present in its environment. At high partial pressures, the noble gas elements (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) inhibit growth in the order: Xe > Kr> Ar ≫ Ne ≫ He. Nitrogen (N2) closely resembles He in inhibitory effectiveness. Partial pressures required for 50% inhibition of growth were: Xe (0.8 atm), Kr (1.6 atm), Ar (3.8 atm), Ne (35 atm), and He (∼ 300 atm). With respect to inhibition of growth, the noble gases and N2 differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the order of effectiveness found with other biological effects, i.e., narcosis, inhibition of insect development, depression of O2-dependent radiation sensitivity, and effects on tissue-slice glycolysis and respiration. Partial pressures giving 50% inhibition of N. crassa growth parallel various physical properties (i.e., solubilities, solubility ratios, etc.) of the noble gases. Linear correlation of 50% inhibition pressures to the polarizability and of the logarithm of pressure to the first and second ionization potentials suggests the involvement of weak intermolecular interactions or charge-transfer in the biological activity of the noble gases. PMID:5883104

  17. On the origin of noble gases in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Coltice, Nicolas; Ricard, Yanick

    2002-11-15

    The chemical differences between deep- and shallow-mantle sources of oceanic basalts provide evidence that several distinct components coexist within the Earth's mantle. Most of these components have been identified as recycled in origin. However, the noble-gas signature is still a matter of debate and questions the preservation of primitive regions in the convective mantle. We show that a model where the noble-gas signature observed in Hawaii and Iceland comes from a pristine homogeneous deep layer would imply a primitive (3)He content and (3)He/(22)Ne ratio that are very unlikely. On the contrary, mass balances show that the partly degassed peridotite of a marble-cake mantle can be the noble-gas end-member with an apparent 'primitive'-like composition. This component is mixed with recycled oceanic crust in different proportions in the plume sources and in the shallow mantle. A recycling model of the mantle, involving gravitational segregation of the oceanic crust at the bottom of the mantle, potentially satisfies trace-element as well as noble-gas constraints.

  18. Liquid scintillation counting of polycarbonates: a sensitive technique for measurement of activity concentration of some radioactive noble gases.

    PubMed

    Mitev, K; Zhivkova, V; Pressyanov, D; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Gerganov, G; Boshkova, T

    2014-11-01

    This work explores the application of the liquid scintillation counting of polycarbonates for measurement of the activity concentration of radioactive noble gases. Results from experimental studies of the method are presented. Potential applications in the monitoring of radioactive noble gases are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases in the mantle: Pete's path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Péron, Sandrine; Colin, Aurélia

    2016-04-01

    Noble gases are tracers of the origin of the volatiles on Earth and other terrestrial planets. The determination of their isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts allows discriminating between different possible scenarios for the origin of volatiles (chondritic, solar, cometary). However, oceanic basalts show a ubiquitous component having atmospheric noble gas compositions, which reflects a shallow air contamination. This component masks the mantle composition and only step crushing is able to (partially) remove it. Nevertheless, the exact mantle composition is always unconstrained due to the uncertainty on its complete removal. Developed by Pete Burnard (Burnard et al., 1997; Burnard, 1999), single vesicle analysis using laser ablation is a challenging technique to determine the mantle composition, free of atmospheric contamination. We have used this technique to measure He, Ne, Ar isotopes and CO2 in single vesicles from both MORB and OIB (Galapagos, Iceland). Vesicles are located using microtomography and the noble gases are measured using the Noblesse mass spectrometer from IPGP using an Excimer laser to open the vesicles. Both Galapagos and Iceland samples show that the 20Ne/22Ne ratio is limited to ~12.8 in the primitive mantle, suggesting that the origin of the light noble gases can be attributed to irradiated material instead of a simple dissolution of solar gases into a magma ocean (Moreira and Charnoz, 2016). Such a scenario of incorporation of light noble gases by irradiation also explains the terrestrial argon isotopic composition. However, the Kr and Xe contribution of implanted solar wind is small and these two noble gases were carried on Earth by chondrites and/or cometary material. Burnard, P., D. Graham and G. Turner (1997). "Vesicle-specific noble gas analyses of « popping rock »: implications for primordial noble gases in the Earth." Science 276: 568-571. Burnard, P. (1999). "The bubble-by-bubble volatile evolution of two mid-ocean ridge

  20. Fractionation of noble gases by thermal escape from accreting planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    Assuming solar initial elemental and isotopic ratios and a determination of the degree of fractionation occurring by competition between gravitational binding and escape, a model is developed for selective noble gas loss through escape during the growth of planetesimals to form the terrestrial planets. Of the two classes of planetesimals that can form on a time scale that is consistent with modern accretion models, one is depleted in neon while the other is neon-rich. The mechanism is noted to be capable of accounting for all known properties of the noble gas volatiles on the terrestrial planets, with only one exception, namely the Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios for Mars and the earth, which are much lower than observed.

  1. Stellar condensates in meteorites - Isotopic evidence from noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Alaerts, L.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contains three isotopically anomalous noble-gas components of apparently presolar origin: two kinds of Ne-E, (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) less than 0.6, and s-process Kr + Xe (enriched in the even isotopes 82, 84, 86, 128, 130, 132). Their carriers are tentatively identified as spinel and two carbonaceous phases, the principal high-temperature stellar condensates at low and high C/O ratios, respectively.

  2. Stellar condensates in meteorites - Isotopic evidence from noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Alaerts, L.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contains three isotopically anomalous noble-gas components of apparently presolar origin: two kinds of Ne-E, (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) less than 0.6, and s-process Kr + Xe (enriched in the even isotopes 82, 84, 86, 128, 130, 132). Their carriers are tentatively identified as spinel and two carbonaceous phases, the principal high-temperature stellar condensates at low and high C/O ratios, respectively.

  3. A portable membrane contactor sampler for analysis of noble gases in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Han, Liang-Feng; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Aggarwal, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    To enable a wider use of dissolved noble gas concentrations and isotope ratios in groundwater studies, we have developed an efficient and portable sampling device using a commercially available membrane contactor. The device separates dissolved gases from a stream of water and collects them in a small copper tube (6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length with two pinch-off clamps) for noble gas analysis by mass spectrometry. We have examined the performance of the sampler using a tank of homogeneous water prepared in the laboratory and by field testing. We find that our sampling device can extract heavier noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) more efficiently than the lighter ones (He and Ne). An extraction time of about 60 min at a flow rate of 3 L/min is sufficient for all noble gases extracted in the sampler to attain equilibrium with the dissolved phase. The extracted gas sample did not indicate fractionation of helium ((3) He/(4) He) isotopes or other noble gas isotopes. Field performance of the sampling device was tested using a groundwater well in Vienna and results were in excellent agreement with those obtained from the conventional copper tube sampling method. © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  4. Noble gases in the Bells (C2) and Sharps (H3) chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadnik, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The Bells and Sharps chondrites are of uncertain classification in virtue of their mineralogical and chemical peculiarities, prompting the present elemental and isotopic measurements of the noble gases in them, together with such quantities derivable from them as cosmogenic exposure and gas retention ages, as well as primordial gas contents. The radiogenic and, above all, the cosmogenic gases link Bells to the C2 group, while Sharps is found to lie in the second largest peak of the H-chondrite distribution.

  5. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  6. Noble gases in vent water from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M. )

    1988-07-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids collected with the DSRV Alvin from the southern limb of the Juan de Fuca Ridge are chemically unique, having chloride concentrations {approximately}2 times ambient seawater. The same fluids contain noble gases in relative abundances like 2{degree}C air-saturated seawater, the expected recharge composition. However, the absolute noble gas abundances are depleted by {approximately}30% relative to seawater. The combination of very high chloride and moderately depleted noble gases appears to require formation of a Cl-rich, gas-free brine by phase separation. This brine is mixed with recharge seawater at temperatures in excess of {approximately}340{degree}C and, therefore, deep in the hydrothermal system.

  7. Noble Gases in Nakhla and Three Nakhlites Miller Range 090030, 090032, and 090136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Park, J.; Choi, J.; Baek, J. M.; Park, C.; Lee, J. I.; Lee, M. J.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B. D.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III

    2016-08-01

    Noble gas compositions of the Miller Range nakhlites release Kr and Xe with low 84Kr/132Xe of ≤1 and high 129Xe/132Xe of 1.95-2.13 at low heating temperature (300-400°C). The gases would be heavily fractionated martian atmosphere trapped in aqueously altered materials.

  8. REMOVAL OF TITAN'S ATMOSPHERIC NOBLE GASES BY THEIR SEQUESTRATION IN SURFACE CLATHRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Hunter Waite, J. Jr.

    2011-10-10

    A striking feature of the atmosphere of Titan is that no heavy noble gases other than argon were detected by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent to Titan's surface in 2005 January. Here we provide an explanation of the mysterious absence or rarity of these noble gases in Titan's atmosphere: the thermodynamic conditions prevailing at the surface-atmosphere interface of the satellite allow the formation of multiple guest clathrates that preferentially store some species, including all heavy noble gases, over others. The clean water ice needed for the formation of these clathrates could be delivered by successive episodes of cryovolcanic lavas that have been hypothesized to regularly cover the surface of Titan. The formation of clathrates in the porous lavas and their propensity for trapping Ar, Kr, and Xe would progressively remove these species from the atmosphere of Titan over the course of its history. In some circumstances, a global clathrate crust with an average thickness not exceeding a few meters could be sufficient on Titan for a complete removal of the heavy noble gases from the atmosphere.

  9. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almlof, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Accurate static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma of the noble gases He through Xe were determined using wave functions of similar quality for each system. Good agreement with experimental data for the static polarizability gamma was obtained for Ne and Xe, but not for Ar and Kr. Calculations suggest that the experimental values for these latter ions are too low.

  10. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  11. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  12. Carbynes - Carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, A. G.; Watts, E. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1980-09-01

    Five carbynes (triply bonded allotropes of carbon) have been found by electron diffraction in the Allende and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites: carbon VI, VIII, X, XI, and (tentatively) XII. From the isotopic composition of the associated noble-gas components, it appears that the carbynes in Allende (C3V chondrite) are local condensates from the solar nebula, whereas at least two carbynes in Murchison (C2 chondrite) are of exotic, presolar origin. They may be dust grains that condensed in stellar envelopes and trapped isotropically anomalous matter from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  13. Carbynes - Carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, A. G.; Watts, E. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five carbynes (triply bonded allotropes of carbon) have been found by electron diffraction in the Allende and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites: carbon VI, VIII, X, XI, and (tentatively) XII. From the isotopic composition of the associated noble-gas components, it appears that the carbynes in Allende (C3V chondrite) are local condensates from the solar nebula, whereas at least two carbynes in Murchison (C2 chondrite) are of exotic, presolar origin. They may be dust grains that condensed in stellar envelopes and trapped isotropically anomalous matter from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  14. The nature of pristine noble gases in mantle plumes

    PubMed

    Trieloff; Kunz; Clague; Harrison; Allegre

    2000-05-12

    High-precision noble gas data show that the Hawaiian and Icelandic mantle plume sources contain uniquely primitive neon that is composed of moderately nucleogenic neon-21 and a primordial component indistinguishable from the meteoritic occurrence of solar neon. This suggests that Earth's solar-type rare gas inventory was acquired during accretion from small planetesimals previously irradiated by solar wind from the early sun. However, nonradiogenic argon, krypton, and xenon isotopes derived from the mantle display nonsolar compositions and indicate an atmosphere-like fingerprint that is not due to recent subduction.

  15. Subsurface dynamics of reactive and inert gases in the context of noble gases as environmental tracers in groundwater hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Applications of inert gases in groundwater hydrology require a profound understanding of underlying biogeochemical processes. Some of these processes are, however, not well understood and therefore require further investigation. This is the first study simultaneously investigating soil air and groundwater in the context of noble gas tracer applications, accounting for seasonal effects in different climate regions. The sampled data confirm a general reliability of common assumptions proposed in the literature. In particular, a solubility-controlled description of excess air formation and of groundwater degassing can be confirmed. This study identifies certain effects which need to be taken into account to reliably evaluate noble gas patterns. First, long-term samplings suggest a permanent temperature-driven equilibration of shallow groundwater with entrapped air bubbles, even some years after recharge. Second, minor groundwater degassing is found to challenge existing excess air model approaches, depending on the amount and the fractionation of excess air. Third, soil air composition data of this study imply a potential bias of noble gas temperatures by up to about 2℃ due to microbial oxygen depletion and a reduced sum value of O2+CO2. This effect causes systematically lower noble gas temperatures in tropical groundwater samples and in shallow mid-latitude groundwater samples after strong recharge during the warm season. However, a general bias of noble gas temperatures in mid-latitudes is probably prevented by a predominant recharge during the cold season, accompanied by nearly atmospheric noble gas mixing ratios in the soil air. Findings of this study provide a remarkable contribution to the reliability of noble gas tracer applications in hydrology, in particular with regard to paleoclimate reconstructions and an understanding of subsurface gas dynamics.

  16. The record of cosmogenic, radiogenic, fissiogenic, and trapped noble gases in recently recovered Chinese and other chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.; Niedermann, S.; Wang, D.; Yi, W.

    1993-03-01

    Noble-gas isotopic abundances were determined in 36 recently recovered chondrites including 27 chondrites recovered in China. The comparison of the release patterns of trapped noble gases from ordinary and from carbonaceous chondrites showed that the planetary trapped noble gases in ordinary chondrites were released mainly above 1200 C, whereas more than 85 percent of noble gases trapped in carbonaceous chondrites were released at or below 1200 C, indicating that the carrier phases of the trapped noble gases in ordinary and in carbonaceous chondrites may not be the same. It is suggested that the ordinary chondrites started to retain fission Xe about 48 +/- 30 Ma earlier than Angra dos Reis. No systematic differences were observed between H, L, and LL or type 5 and 6 chondrites with respect to the time of fission Xe retention. Eight chondrites displayed neutron capture effects due to secondary cosmic-ray-produced neutrons.

  17. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  18. Shock waves in noble gases and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratos, M.; Herczynski, R.

    The shock wave structures in pure monatomic gases and in binary gas mixtures are investigated in this paper using a variational approach. The idea of Mott-Smith's distribution function (generalized in the case of a gas mixture) was combined with Tamm's method of solving the Boltzmann equation. The intermolecular potential used is of the Lennard-Jones type. The relation between the dimensionless shock wave thickness and Mach number in front of the shock wave is analyzed. Special attention was paid to the determination of shock wave structures in mixtures of gases with disparate molecular masses. The calculation performed for the shock wave in the binary gas mixture, xenon-helium, confirm the existence of a 'hump' of the density profile of the lighter component. The heavy gas component temperature overshoots its downstream equilibrium value in the case of a mixture of gases with disparate molecular masses and for a small mole fraction of the heavy gas component.

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of laser-polarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, G. P.; Tseng, C.-H.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.

    1998-05-01

    We have demonstrated low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using laser-polarized noble gases. Conventional MRI requires large magnetic fields ( ~ 1 tesla) to create an observable nuclear magnetization via thermal polarization of the nuclear spins (e.g. ^1H spins in water). Alternatively, optical pumping techniques using lasers can create large nuclear spin polarizations (> 10%) in the spin-1/2 noble gases, ^3He and ^129Xe. This laser polarization technique greatly enhances the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection sensitivity of the noble gases, enabling fast, gas-phase MRI at low magnetic fields (< 100 gauss). Using a simple, wire-wound solenoid, we made images at 21 gauss of laser-polarized ^3He in a variety of samples. Each image took approximately 15 seconds to acquire, with a typical resolution of 1 mm^2. In contrast, a water (^1H) image at the same field with comparable resolution would require ~ 2 months of signal averaging. We also made images that demonstrate the efficacy of low field noble gas MRI for materials that are problematic at high magnetic fields: (i) paramagnetic materials, whose magnetic susceptibilities induce image-distorting field gradients; and (ii) conductors, which prevent high field imaging because of Faraday (i.e. RF) shielding.

  20. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Rich; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-06-01

    To facilitate the estimation of radiation doses from intake of radionuclides, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publishes dose coefficients (dose per unit intake) based on reference biokinetic and dosimetric models. The ICRP generally has not provided biokinetic models or dose coefficients for intake of noble gases, but plans to provide such information for (222)Rn and other important radioisotopes of noble gases in a forthcoming series of reports on occupational intake of radionuclides (OIR). This paper proposes a generic biokinetic model framework for noble gases and develops parameter values for radon. The framework is tailored to applications in radiation protection and is consistent with a physiologically based biokinetic modelling scheme adopted for the OIR series. Parameter values for a noble gas are based largely on a blood flow model and physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions for radon are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of its biokinetics in human subjects.

  1. Enhancement of surface NMR by laser-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Room, T.; Appelt, S.; Seydoux, R. |; Hahn, E.L. ||; Pines, A. |

    1997-05-01

    The transfer of spin polarization from laser-polarized helium and xenon to spins such as {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C on the surface of high-surface-area solids (Aerosil) is demonstrated over a temperature range from 4 to 200 K. The transfer mechanism is dipole-dipole cross relaxation between the spins of the adsorbed mobile noble gas and the surface spins (spin-polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect). The enhancement of surface proton magnetization by laser-polarized helium at 4 K and 10 K is between one and twofold. Using laser-polarized xenon, enhancement factors of up to 20 were obtained when compared to the Boltzmann polarization in a field of 4.2 T and at a temperature of 130 K. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Electrical conductivity of noble gases at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Adams, J R; Reinholz, H; Redmer, R; Mintsev, V B; Shilkin, N S; Gryaznov, V K

    2007-09-01

    Theoretical results for the electrical conductivity of noble gas plasmas are presented in comparison with experiment. The composition is determined within a partially ionized plasma model. The conductivity is then calculated using linear response theory, in which the relevant scattering mechanisms of electrons from ions, electrons, and neutral species are taken into account. In particular, the Ramsauer-Townsend effect in electron-neutral scattering is discussed and the importance of a correct description of the Coulomb logarithm in electron scattering by charged particles is shown. A detailed comparison with recent experiments on argon and xenon plasmas is given and results for helium and neon are also revisited. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is observed, showing considerable improvement upon previous calculations.

  3. Dynamics of strong-field laser-induced microplasma formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, D. A.; Compton, R.; Filin, A.; Levis, R. J.

    2010-03-15

    The ultrafast dynamics of microplasmas generated by femtosecond laser pulses in noble gases has been investigated using four-wave mixing (FWM). The time dependence of the FWM signal is observed to reach higher intensity levels faster for Xe, with progressively lower scattering intensity and longer time dynamics for the noble gas series Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne, and He. The temporal dynamics is interpreted in terms of a tunnel ionization and impact cooling mechanism. A formalism to interpret the observed phenomena is presented here with comparison to the measured laser intensity and gas pressure trends.

  4. Noble gases in twenty Yamato H-chondrites: Comparison with Allan Hills chondrites and modern falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeken, TH.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-01-01

    Concentration and isotopic composition of noble gases have been measured in 20 H-chrondrites found on the Yamato Mountains ice fields in Antarctica. The distribution of exposure ages as well as of radiogenic He-4 contents is similar to that of H-chrondrites collected at the Allan Hills site. Furthermore, a comparison of the noble gas record of Antarctic H-chrondrites and finds or falls from non-Antarctic areas gives no support to the suggestion that Antarctic H-chrondrites and modern falls derive from differing interplanetary meteorite populations.

  5. Elastic Properties of Films of Water and Noble Gases Condensed at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that there are extensive similarities between the quench-condensed noble gas films and those of amorphous water ice. In particular, both can be quite soft upon deposition and can stiffen considerably when annealed. Furthermore, this stiffening follows a logarithmic time dependence for all substances. The temperature dependence of these behaviors scales with the triple point. The results shown here show a strong thickness dependence, which has implications for any study of mechanical properties of films on substrates. The temperature dependence of the stiffening and the stiffening rate have now been characterized for the noble gases, and these observations provide a roadmap for new experiments on amorphous water ice.

  6. Elastic Properties of Films of Water and Noble Gases Condensed at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that there are extensive similarities between the quench-condensed noble gas films and those of amorphous water ice. In particular, both can be quite soft upon deposition and can stiffen considerably when annealed. Furthermore, this stiffening follows a logarithmic time dependence for all substances. The temperature dependence of these behaviors scales with the triple point. The results shown here show a strong thickness dependence, which has implications for any study of mechanical properties of films on substrates. The temperature dependence of the stiffening and the stiffening rate have now been characterized for the noble gases, and these observations provide a roadmap for new experiments on amorphous water ice.

  7. More on noble gases in Yellowstone National Park hot waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Fournier, R.O.

    1973-01-01

    Water and gas samples from research wells in hydrothermal areas of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., have been mass spectrometrically analyzed for their rare gas contents and isotopic composition. In agreement with previous findings, the rare gases have been found to originate from infiltrating run-off water, saturated with air at 10 to 20??C. The atmospheric rare gas retention values found for the water varied between 3 and 87 per cent. The fine structure of the Ar, Kr and Xe abundance pattern in the water reveals fraotionational enrichment of the heavier gases due to partial outgassing of the waters. Radiogenic He and Ar have been detected. No positive evidence for magmatic water contribution has been found. Nevertheless, additions of magmatic waters free of rare gas can not be excluded, but if present the proportion is significantly less than 13 to 36 per cent. ?? 1973.

  8. Measuring laser carrier-envelope-phase effects in the noble gases with an atomic hydrogen calibration standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurmi, Champak; Wallace, W. C.; Sainadh U, Satya; Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Tong, X. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.; Kielpinski, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present accurate measurements of carrier-envelope-phase effects on ionization of the noble gases with few-cycle laser pulses. The experimental apparatus is calibrated by using atomic hydrogen data to remove any systematic offsets and thereby obtain accurate CEP data on other generally used noble gases such as Ar, Kr, and Xe. Experimental results for H are well supported by exact time-dependent Schrödinger equation theoretical simulations; however, significant differences are observed in the case of the noble gases.

  9. Characterisation of Q-gases and other noble gas components in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, Rainer; Anders, Edward; Baur, Heinrich; Lewis, Roy S.; Signer, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Noble gases in several HF/HCl resistant residues of the CM2 chondrite Murchison were measured by closed-system stepped etching, in order to study the planetary gases in their major carrier 'Q'-an ill-defined minor phase, perhaps merely a set of adsorption sites. Neon, Ar, Kr, Xe, and probably also He in 'Q' of Murchison have the same isotopic and nearly the same elemental abundances as their counterparts in Allende (CV3). The isotopic composition of Ne-Q is consistent with mass-dependent fractionation of either solar wind Ne or Ne from solar energetic particles. Unlike Allende, Murchison during HNO3 attack release, besides Q-gases, large amounts of two other Ne-components, Ne-E and Ne-A3, a third subcomponent of Ne-A. This work confirms that Q-gases of well-defined composition were an important noble gas component in the early solar system an are now found in various classes of meteorites, such as carbonaceous chondrites, ureilites, and ordinary chondrites. Ne-Q may have played a role in the formation of noble gas reservoirs in terrestrial planets.

  10. Contribution of electron-atom collisions to the plasma conductivity of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmej, S.; Reinholz, H.; Röpke, G.

    2017-06-01

    We present an approach which allows the consistent treatment of bound states in the context of dc conductivity in dense partially ionized noble gas plasmas. Besides electron-ion and electron-electron collisions, further collision mechanisms owing to neutral constituents are taken into account. Especially at low temperatures of 104to105 K, electron-atom collisions give a substantial contribution to the relevant correlation functions. We suggest an optical potential for the description of the electron-atom scattering which is applicable for all noble gases. The electron-atom momentum-transfer cross section is in agreement with experimental scattering data. In addition, the influence of the medium is analyzed, the optical potential is advanced including screening effects. The position of the Ramsauer minimum is influenced by the plasma. Alternative approaches for the electron-atom potential are discussed. Good agreement of calculated conductivity with experimental data for noble gas plasmas is obtained.

  11. Contribution of electron-atom collisions to the plasma conductivity of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Rosmej, S; Reinholz, H; Röpke, G

    2017-06-01

    We present an approach which allows the consistent treatment of bound states in the context of dc conductivity in dense partially ionized noble gas plasmas. Besides electron-ion and electron-electron collisions, further collision mechanisms owing to neutral constituents are taken into account. Especially at low temperatures of 10^{4}to10^{5} K, electron-atom collisions give a substantial contribution to the relevant correlation functions. We suggest an optical potential for the description of the electron-atom scattering which is applicable for all noble gases. The electron-atom momentum-transfer cross section is in agreement with experimental scattering data. In addition, the influence of the medium is analyzed, the optical potential is advanced including screening effects. The position of the Ramsauer minimum is influenced by the plasma. Alternative approaches for the electron-atom potential are discussed. Good agreement of calculated conductivity with experimental data for noble gas plasmas is obtained.

  12. Selling candles in a post-Edison world: phasing with noble gases bound within engineered sites.

    PubMed

    Quillin, Michael L; Matthews, Brian W

    2003-11-01

    The utility of noble gases for phase determination has been limited by the lack of naturally occurring binding sites in proteins. Wild-type T4 lysozyme contains one such binding site. By mutating large hydrophobic residues to alanine, additional noble-gas binding sites have been successfully introduced into this protein. Using data from xenon derivatives of the wild type, two single mutants and the corresponding double mutant, experimental phases for T4 lysozyme have been determined using standard multiple isomorphous replacement (MIR) techniques. These phases, which were obtained from room-temperature data collected on a rotating-anode source, are comparable in quality with phases calculated using selenomethionine-based multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) methods on frozen crystals at a synchrotron. In addition, this method of introducing noble-gas binding sites near specific residues should provide useful information for determining the register of amino acids within electron-density maps and the positions of molecules within the unit cell.

  13. Effect of noble gases on oxygen and glucose deprived injury in human tubular kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Maleeha; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Li, Yuantao; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2010-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been shown to be protective in preconditioning settings against renal ischemic injury. The aims of this study were to determine the protective effects of the other noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, on human tubular kidney HK2 cells in vitro. Cultured human renal tubular cells (HK2) were exposed to noble gas preconditioning (75% noble gas; 20% O(2); 5% CO(2)) for three hours or mock preconditioning. Twenty-four hours after gas exposure, cell injury was provoked with oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) culture medium for three hours. Cell viability was assessed 24 h post-OGD by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Other cohorts of cultured cells were incubated in the absence of OGD in 75% noble gas, 20% O(2) and 5% CO(2) and cellular signals phospho-Akt (p-Akt), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blotting. OGD caused a reduction in cell viability to 0.382 +/- 0.1 from 1.0 +/- 0.15 at control (P < 0.01). Neon, argon and krypton showed no protection from injury (0.404 +/- 0.03; 0.428 +/- 0.02; 0.452 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). Helium by comparison significantly enhanced cell injury (0.191 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01). Xenon alone exerted a protective effect (0.678 +/- 0.07; P < 0.001). In the absence of OGD, helium was also detrimental (0.909 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Xenon caused an increased expression of p-Akt, HIF-1alpha and Bcl-2, while the other noble gases did not modify protein expression. These results suggest that unlike other noble gases, preconditioning with the anesthetic noble gas xenon may have a role in protection against renal ischemic injury.

  14. Noble gases in gas shales : Implications for gas retention and circulating fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sudeshna; Jones, Adrian; Verchovsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Gas shales from three cores of Haynesville-Bossier formation have been analysed simultaneously for carbon, nitrogen and noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) to constrain their source compositions and identify signatures associated with high gas retention. Ten samples from varying depths of 11785 to 12223 feet from each core, retrieved from their centres, have been combusted from 200-1200°C in incremental steps of 100°C, using 5 - 10 mg of each sample. Typically, Xe is released at 200°C and is largely adsorbed, observed in two of the three cores. The third core lacked any measureable Xe. High 40Ar/36Ar ratio up to 8000, is associated with peak release of nitrogen with distinctive isotopic signature, related to breakdown of clay minerals at 500°C. He and Ne are also mostly released at the same temperature step and predominantly hosted in the pore spaces of the organic matter associated with the clay. He may be produced from the uranium related to the organic matter. The enrichment factors of noble gases defined as (iX/36Ar)sample/(iX/36Ar)air where iX denotes any noble gas isotope, show Ne and Xe enrichment observed commonly in sedimentary rocks including shales (Podosek et al., 1980; Bernatowicz et al., 1984). This can be related to interaction of the shales with circulating fluids and diffusive separation of gases (Torgersen and Kennedy, 1999), implying the possibility of loss of gases from these shales. Interaction with circulating fluids (e.g. crustal fluids) have been further confirmed using 20Ne/N2, 36Ar/N2 and 4He/N2 ratios. Deviations of measured 4He/40Ar* (where 40Ar* represents radiogenic 40Ar after correcting for contribution from atmospheric Ar) from expected values has been used to monitor gas loss by degassing. Bernatowicz, T., Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Kramer, F.E., 1984. The Atmospheric Inventory of Xenon and Noble Gases in Shales: The Plastic Bag Experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research 89, 4597-4611. Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Ozima, M., 1980

  15. Lunar meteorite Yamato-983885: Noble gases, nitrogen and cosmic ray exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases and nitrogen have been in lunar meteorite from antartcica: the polymict regolith breccias, Yamato-983885 (hereafter Y-983885). Y-983885 has highest concentration of trapped noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) among all the lunar meteorites and returned lunar samples. Noble gases and nitrogen abundances measured in two samples of the lunar meteorite Y-983885. The concentration of trapped noble gases in Y-983885 (A) are, 20Ne=3.69×10-3, 36Ar=12.6×10-4, 84kr=8.57×10-7 and 132Xe=1.63×10-7 ccSTP/g. The cosmic-ray exposure ages for Y-983885 are thus calculated to be T21 (A)=1592±232 Ma and T21 (B)=574±85 Ma for 2π geometry (using production rates as per Hohenberg et al., 1978 and bulk composition). The exposure ages of samples A and B differ, indicating that they have undergone different exposure scenarios on the lunar surface. The different irradiation ages (T21 (A)=1592±232 Ma and T21 (B)=574±85 Ma) indicates that the regolith material which constitutes the meteorite Y-983885 resided at different shielding depths on lunar surface before agglomeration into the final meteorite. Exposure ages calculated using end member compositon like norite, basalt, tractolite (1947 to 1365 and 711 to 455 for A and B respectively) indicates clearly that the two samples A and B has undergone different exposure on Moon. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of 13.60±0.01 in temperature step 400 °C of Y-983885 (A) demonstrate a clear retention of solar wind signature in this meteorite. The presence of high contents of trapped solar wind gases indicates that Y-983885 consists of mature lunar regolith material. Variable amounts of solar gases as well as cosmogenic noble gases indicate that Y-983885 (A and B) is compacted from several fragments that were exposed at the surface and/or at various depths in the regolith, before becoming part of Y-983885.

  16. Incorporation of Solar Noble Gases from a Nebula-Derived Atmosphere During Magma Ocean Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Cassen, P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Porcelli, D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of solar noble gases in the deep interior of the Earth is inferred from the Ne isotopic compositions of MORB (Mid-ocean Ridge Basalts) and OIB (Oceanic Island Basalt); Ar data may also consistent with a solar component in the deep mantle. Models of the transport and distribution of noble gases in the earth's mantle allow for the presence of solar Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne ratios and permit the calculation of lower mantle noble gas concentrations. These mantle data and models also indicate that the Earth suffered early (0.7 to 2 x 10(exp 8) yr) and large (greater than 99 percent) losses of noble gases from the interior, a result previously concluded for atmospheric Xe. We have pursued the suggestion that solar noble gases were incorporated in the forming Earth from a massive, nebula-derived atmosphere which promoted large-scale melting, so that gases from this atmosphere dissolved in the magma ocean and were mixed downward. Models of a primitive atmosphere captured from the solar nebula and supported by accretion luminosity indicate that pressures at the Earth's surface were adequate (and largely more than the required 100 Atm) to dissolve sufficient gases. We have calculated the coupled evolution of the magma ocean and the overlying atmosphere under conditions corresponding to the cessation (or severe attenuation) of the sustaining accretion luminosity, prior to the complete removal of the solar nebula. Such a condition was likely to obtain, for instance, when most of the unaccumulated mass resided in large bodies which were only sporadically accreted. The luminosity supporting the atmosphere is then that provided by the cooling Earth, consideration of which sets a lower limit to the time required to solidify the mantle and terminate the incorporation of atmospheric gases within it. In our initial calculations, we have fixed the nebula temperature at To = 300K, a value likely to be appropriate for nebular temperatures at lAU in the early planet-building epoch

  17. Incorporation of Solar Noble Gases from a Nebula-Derived Atmosphere During Magma Ocean Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Cassen, P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Porcelli, D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of solar noble gases in the deep interior of the Earth is inferred from the Ne isotopic compositions of MORB (Mid-ocean Ridge Basalts) and OIB (Oceanic Island Basalt); Ar data may also consistent with a solar component in the deep mantle. Models of the transport and distribution of noble gases in the earth's mantle allow for the presence of solar Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne ratios and permit the calculation of lower mantle noble gas concentrations. These mantle data and models also indicate that the Earth suffered early (0.7 to 2 x 10(exp 8) yr) and large (greater than 99 percent) losses of noble gases from the interior, a result previously concluded for atmospheric Xe. We have pursued the suggestion that solar noble gases were incorporated in the forming Earth from a massive, nebula-derived atmosphere which promoted large-scale melting, so that gases from this atmosphere dissolved in the magma ocean and were mixed downward. Models of a primitive atmosphere captured from the solar nebula and supported by accretion luminosity indicate that pressures at the Earth's surface were adequate (and largely more than the required 100 Atm) to dissolve sufficient gases. We have calculated the coupled evolution of the magma ocean and the overlying atmosphere under conditions corresponding to the cessation (or severe attenuation) of the sustaining accretion luminosity, prior to the complete removal of the solar nebula. Such a condition was likely to obtain, for instance, when most of the unaccumulated mass resided in large bodies which were only sporadically accreted. The luminosity supporting the atmosphere is then that provided by the cooling Earth, consideration of which sets a lower limit to the time required to solidify the mantle and terminate the incorporation of atmospheric gases within it. In our initial calculations, we have fixed the nebula temperature at To = 300K, a value likely to be appropriate for nebular temperatures at lAU in the early planet-building epoch

  18. Noble gases released by vacuum crushing of EETA 79001 glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    An EETA 79001 glass sample was crushed in a vacuum to observe the gases released. About 15 pct of the total gas concentrations were a mixture of a small amount of SPB-type gas with larger proportions of another air-like component. Less than 5 pct of the SPB gas was released by crushing, while 36-40 pct of the EETV (indigenous) gas was crush-released. The results are consistent with a siting of the EETV component in 10-100 micron vesicles seen in the glass. It is suggested that the SPB component is either in vesicles less than 6 microns in diameter or is primarily sited elsewhere.

  19. Release of radiogenic noble gases as a new signal of rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Lee, Hyunwoo

    2016-10-01

    In this study we investigate the release of radiogenic noble gas isotopes during mechanical deformation. We developed an analytical system for dynamic mass spectrometry of noble gas composition and helium release rate of gas produced during mechanical deformation of rocks. Our results indicate that rocks release accumulated radiogenic helium and argon from mineral grains as they undergo deformation. We found that the release of accumulated 4He and 40Ar from rocks follows a reproducible pattern and can provide insight into the deformation process. Increased gas release can be observed before dilation, and macroscopic failure is observed during high-pressure triaxial rock deformation experiments. Accumulated radiogenic noble gases can be released due to fracturing of mineral grains during small-scale strain in Earth materials. Helium and argon are highly mobile, conservative species and could be used to provide information on changes in the state of stress and strain in Earth materials, and as an early warning signal of macroscopic failure. These results pave the way for the use of noble gases to trace and monitor rock deformation for earthquake prediction and a variety of other subsurface engineering projects.

  20. Primordial and cosmogenic noble gases in the Sutter's Mill CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Nagao, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    The Sutter's Mill (SM) CM chondrite fell in California in 2012. The CM chondrite group is one of the most primitive, consisting of unequilibrated minerals, but some of them have experienced complex processes occurring on their parent body, such as aqueous alteration, thermal metamorphism, brecciation, and solar wind implantation. We have determined noble gas concentrations and isotopic compositions for SM samples using a stepped heating gas extraction method, in addition to mineralogical observation of the specimens. The primordial noble gas abundances, especially the P3 component trapped in presolar diamonds, confirm the classification of SM as a CM chondrite. The mineralogical features of SM indicate that it experienced mild thermal alteration after aqueous alteration. The heating temperature is estimated to be <350 °C based on the release profile of primordial 36Ar. The presence of a Ni-rich Fe-Ni metal suggests that a minor part of SM has experienced heating at >500 °C. The variation in the heating temperature of thermal alteration is consistent with the texture as a breccia. The heterogeneous distribution of solar wind noble gases is also consistent with it. The cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age for SM is calculated to be 0.059 ± 0.023 Myr based on cosmogenic 21Ne by considering trapped noble gases as solar wind, the terrestrial atmosphere, P1 (or Q), P3, A2, and G components. The CRE age lies at the shorter end of the CRE age distribution of the CM chondrite group.

  1. Noble Gas Systematics in MORBs and OIBs and Reconstitution of the Time-Evolution of Mantle Composition for Heavy Noble Gases: the Role of Subduction of Atmospheric Noble Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, C.; Moreira, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Chondrites are considered as the building rocks of the Earth as they represent remnants of the protoplanetary accretion stage. Among all chondritic classes, heavy noble gases are mainly concentrated in phase Q [1] hence it represents a likely primordial composition of the Earth. This is supported by the observation of [2] who detected this peculiar composition in CO2 well gases thanks to Kr isotopes. As CO2 well gases are supposed to derive from the same reservoir as MORBs [3], this signature should be observed in MORBs and OIBs as well. In this perspective, we will present analyses performed by mass spectrometry of MORBs and OIBs samples for all noble gases. Preliminary results are quite promising as the same trend seems to appear into OIB and MORB data for Kr isotopes. However, our analyses show that this primordial composition isn't displayed for stable isotopes of Xe as already observed by [4-5] and remains a trace in the mantle signature, which appears at first sight atmospheric. We thus propose that subduction of atmospheric noble gases has gradually covered this meteoritic imprint. In order to test this scenario, we will present a modelling performed for Ar and Xe in three distinct reservoirs: mantle, atmosphere and continental crust. The mantle is considered as homogenized by convection and similar to the MORB reservoir. Its degasing is divided in two stages: a massive early degasing followed by a decreasing one describing the cooling of the Earth's interior. Extraction of parent elements from the mantle to the continental crust is also taken into account as well as distillation of atmospheric Xe needed to explain the missing Xe paradox and the present Xe isotopic signature of the atmosphere. Finally, subduction of noble gases is assimilated to simple incorporation into the mantle of elementally fractionated air, enriched in heavy noble gases as supported by [6]. Thus, we show that starting with a chondritic composition, the present mantle composition can

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd McLean

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  3. Adsorption behavior of ternary mixtures of noble gases inside single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Nasrabadi, Amir Taghavi

    2010-09-01

    In order to study the gas-storage and gas-filtering capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles simultaneously, we considered the adsorption behavior of a ternary mixture of noble gases, including Argon (Ar), Krypton (Kr), and Xenon (Xe), i.e., Ar-Kr-Xe mixture, on (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures of (75, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300) K were performed, and adsorption energies, self-diffusion coefficients, activation energies, and radial distribution functions (RDFs) were computed to analyze the thermodynamics, transport and structural properties of the adsorption systems. It is observed that the SWCNT bundles have larger contents of heavier noble gases compared to the lighter ones. This interesting behavior of SWCNT bundles makes them proper candidates for gas-storage and gas molecular-sieving processes.

  4. On the Absorption Spectrum of Noble Gases at the Arc Spectrum Limit

    PubMed Central

    Fano, Ugo; Pupillo, Guido; Zannoni, Alberto; Clark, Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    Rydberg spectral lines of an atom are sometimes superimposed on the continuous spectrum of a different configuration. Effects of interaction among different configurations in one of these cases are theoretically investigated, and a formula is obtained that describes the behavior of absorption spectrum intensity. This offers qualitative justification of some experimental results obtained by BEUTLER in studies of absorption arc spectra of noble gases and Ib spectra of some metal vapors. PMID:27308180

  5. Numerical investigation of enhanced femtosecond supercontinuum via a weak seed in noble gases.

    PubMed

    Shanor, C; Ensley, T; Hagan, D J; Van Stryland, E W; Wright, E M; Kolesik, M

    2016-06-27

    Numerical simulations are employed to elucidate the physics underlying the enhanced femtosecond supercontinuum generation previously observed during optical filamentation in noble gases and in the presence of a weak seed pulse. Simulations based on the metastable electronic state approach are shown not only to capture the qualitative features of the experiment, but also reveal the relation of the observed enhancement to recent developments in the area of sub-cycle engineering of filaments.

  6. Primordial noble gases in chondrites: the abundance pattern was established in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Alaerts, L; Lewis, R S; Anders, E

    1977-12-02

    Ordinary chondrites, like carbonaceous chondrites, contain primordial noble gases mainly in a minor phase comprising

  7. Primordial noble gases in chondrites - The abundance pattern was established in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaerts, L.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ordinary chondrites, like carbonaceous chondrites, contain primordial noble gases mainly in a minor phase comprising not more than 0.05 percent of the meteorite, probably an iron-chromium sulfide. The neon-20/argon-36 ratios decrease with increasing argon-36 concentration, as expected if the gas pattern was established by condensation from the solar nebula, and was negligibly altered by metamorphism in the meteorite parent bodies. Meteoritic and planetary matter apparently condensed over a substantial range of temperatures.

  8. The Noble Gases in the HF-Susceptible Portion of Ivuna (CI), Analyzed by Closed System Step Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, M.; Busemann, H.; Wieler, R.

    2013-09-01

    Primordial noble gases (possibly similar to Q or HF) are released from the HF-solvable portion of Ivuna during closed system step etching, indicating that information about primordial components is lost when studied only in acid-resistant residues.

  9. High stability breakdown of noble gases with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Heins, A M; Guo, Chunlei

    2012-02-15

    In the past, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signals have been reported to have a stability independent of the pulse length in solids. In this Letter, we perform the first stability study of femtosecond LIBS in gases (to our best knowledge) and show a significant improvement in signal stability over those achieved with longer pulses. Our study shows that ultrashort-pulse LIBS has an intrinsically higher stability in gas compared to nanosecond-pulse LIBS because of a deterministic ionization process at work in the femtosecond pulse. Relative standard deviations below 1% are demonstrated and are likely only limited by our laser output fluctuations. This enhanced emission stability may open up possibilities for a range of applications, from monitoring rapid gas dynamics to high-quality broadband light sources.

  10. Terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soils.

    PubMed

    Ozima, M; Seki, K; Terada, N; Miura, Y N; Podosek, F A; Shinagawa, H

    2005-08-04

    The nitrogen in lunar soils is correlated to the surface and therefore clearly implanted from outside. The straightforward interpretation is that the nitrogen is implanted by the solar wind, but this explanation has difficulties accounting for both the abundance of nitrogen and a variation of the order of 30 per cent in the 15N/14N ratio. Here we propose that most of the nitrogen and some of the other volatile elements in lunar soils may actually have come from the Earth's atmosphere rather than the solar wind. We infer that this hypothesis is quantitatively reasonable if the escape of atmospheric gases, and implantation into lunar soil grains, occurred at a time when the Earth had essentially no geomagnetic field. Thus, evidence preserved in lunar soils might be useful in constraining when the geomagnetic field first appeared. This hypothesis could be tested by examination of lunar farside soils, which should lack the terrestrial component.

  11. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from the LEW88516 shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A glass separate from the LEW88516 shergottite was analyzed by step-wise combustion for N and noble gases to determine whether it contained trapped gas similar in composition to the martian atmosphere-like component previously observed in lithology C of EETA79001. Excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 were in fact observed in this glass, although the amounts of these excesses less than or = to 20% of those seen in the latter meteorite, and are comparable to the amounts seen in whole-rock analyses of LEW88516. The isotopic composition of N in LEW88516 does not show an enrichment in delta N-15 commensurate with the amount of isotopically-heavy N expected from the noble gases excesses. One must posit some extreme assumptions about the nature of the N components present in LEW88516 in order to allow the presence of the trapped nitrogen component. Alternatively, the N has somehow been decoupled from the noble gases, and was either never present of has been lost.

  12. The case for a Martian origin of the shergottites - Nitrogen and noble gases in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases have been measured in samples of a glass inclusion and its surrounding basaltic matrix in an Antarctic shergottite meteorite (EETA 79001). The nitrogen component was found trapped in the glass, but not the matrix, having a value of delta 15-N = +190 per mil. Ratios between abundances of Ar-40 and N-14, N-15 and N-14 in the glass are consistent with the dilution of a Martian atmospheric component. The trapped noble gases in the glass are similar to elemental and isotopic compositions measured in Mars atmosphere by the Viking lander, and are in general agreement with previous measurements. It is suggested that a sample of Martian atmosphere has been caught in the EETA 79001 glass, and that other shergottite, nakhilite, and chassignite meteorites with similar features probably also originated on Mars. A table is presented which lists the abundances of nitrogen and the noble gases found in the non-glassy matrix and in the EETA 79001 glass.

  13. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-24

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW-corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFT based methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdW-DF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the two-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the two-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments; this provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  14. Transient thermal effects in solid noble gases as materials for the detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lazanu, Ionel; Lazanu, Sorina E-mail: lazanu@infim.ro

    2011-07-01

    Noble solid gases are promising detector materials to be used in the search for dark matter. In the present paper a systematic analysis of the transient phenomena associated with the stopping of recoils in noble gases in the solid phase is performed for the first time. The investigated energy range of the recoils corresponds to the elastic scattering of WIMPs from the galactic halo in these materials. A thermal spike model, previously developed by the authors, is extended and applied to solid noble gases. Ionization, scintillation and nuclear energy loss processes are considered and included in the model, as well as the coupling between the subsystems. The development of the temperature pulse in space and time in solid Ar, Kr and Xe is analysed for different energies of the WIMP, and for different initial temperatures of the material. Phase transitions are possible in particular cases. The results of the model could be used as supplementary information in respect to ionization and scintillation, for detection and particle identification.

  15. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  16. A membrane inlet mass spectrometry system for noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples.

    PubMed

    Visser, Ate; Singleton, Michael J; Hillegonds, Darren J; Velsko, Carol A; Moran, Jean E; Esser, Bradley K

    2013-11-15

    Noble gases dissolved in groundwater can reveal paleotemperatures, recharge conditions, and precise travel times. The collection and analysis of noble gas samples are cumbersome, involving noble gas purification, cryogenic separation and static mass spectrometry. A quicker and more efficient sample analysis method is required for introduced tracer studies and laboratory experiments. A Noble Gas Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (NG-MIMS) system was developed to measure noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples. The NG-MIMS system consists of a membrane inlet, a dry-ice water trap, a carbon-dioxide trap, two getters, a gate valve, a turbomolecular pump and a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electron multiplier. Noble gases isotopes (4)He, (22)Ne, (38)Ar, (84)Kr and (132)Xe are measured every 10 s. The NG-MIMS system can reproduce measurements made on a traditional noble gas mass spectrometer system with precisions of 2%, 8%, 1%, 1% and 3% for He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, respectively. Noble gas concentrations measured in an artificial recharge pond were used to monitor an introduced xenon tracer and to reconstruct temperature variations to within 2 °C. Additional experiments demonstrated the capability to measure noble gases in gas and in water samples, in real time. The NG-MIMS system is capable of providing analyses sufficiently accurate and precise for introduced noble gas tracers at managed aquifer recharge facilities, groundwater fingerprinting based on excess air and noble gas recharge temperature, and field and laboratory studies investigating ebullition and diffusive exchange. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The solubility of noble gases in crude oil at 25-100°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Specht, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe was measured in two typical crude oils at temperatures of 25–100°C. The oil samples were obtained from the Elk Hills oil field located in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The experimental procedure consisted of placing a known amount of gas with a known volume of crude oil in a stainless steel hydrothermal pressure vessel. The vessel was housed inside an oven and the entire unit rotates providing continuous mixing. The amount of gas dissolved in oil at a measured temperature and partial pressure of gas was used to calculate the solubility constants for these gases. Results show that the solubility of He and Ne in both oils is approximately the same; solubility then increases with atomic mass, with the solubility of Xe at 25°C being two orders of magnitude higher than that of He. The gas solubilities are somewhat higher in the lower density (higher API gravity) oil. The solubility of Ar is approximately constant in the range of temperatures of this study. The solubilities of He and Ne increase, but those of Kr and Xe decrease with increasing temperatures. Solubilities of noble gases in crude oil are significantly higher than their solubilities in water. For example, the solubilities of He and Xe at 25°C in the light oil of this study are, respectively, 3 and 24 times higher than their solubilities in pure water, and they are 15 and 300 times higher than in a brine with a salinity of 350,000 mg/l dissolved solids. These large and variable differences in the solubilities of noble gases in oil and water indicate that, in sedimentary basins with oil, these gases must be partitioned between oil, water and natural gas before they are used to deduce the origin and residence time of these fluids.

  18. Subduction of Seawater-Derived Noble Gases and Halogens: Evidence from Wedge Mantle Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumino, H.; Ballentine, C. J.; Burgess, R.; Holland, G.; Mizukami, T.; Wallis, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Subduction volcanism is generally considered to form a 'subduction barrier' that efficiently recycles volatile components contained in subducted slabs back to the Earth's surface (Staudacher and Allegre, 1988). Nevertheless, subduction of sediment and seawater-dominated pore fluids to the deep mantle has recently been proposed to account for the convecting mantle heavy noble gas (Ar, Kr and Xe) non-radiogenic elemental abundance and isotopic pattern (Holland and Ballentine, 2006). To verify whether and how subduction fluids preserve a seawater signature, we have determined noble gas and halogen compositions of the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, southwest Japan, in which former water-rich inclusions exhumed from depths greater than 100 km are contained as serpentine dominated micro-inclusions (Mizukami et al., 2004). The striking similarities of the observed noble gas and halogen compositions with marine pore fluids challenge a popular concept, in which the water flux into the wedge mantle is only by hydrous minerals in altered oceanic crust and sediment (e.g., Schmidt and Poli, 1998). Subduction and closed system retention of unbound marine pore fluid to at least 100 km depth is required. The subducted halogen and noble gas elemental ratios are clearly distinct from those of arc volcanic gases. This implies that the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body has frozen in and preserved an inferred but previously unseen part of the volatile recycling process. Return of these volatiles to the atmosphere via arc volcanism requires the addition of a mantle component and fractionation during degassing. A small proportion preserved in the downgoing slab can explain the heavy noble gases observed in the convecting mantle. References: Holland G. and Ballentine C. J., Nature, 441, 186-191 (2006). Mizukami T. et al., Nature, 427, 432-436 (2004). Schmidt M.W. and Poli S., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 163, 361-379 (1998). Staudacher, T. and Allegre C

  19. Interatomic potentials for HeAr, HeKr, and HeXe from multiproperty fits

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, L.J.; Keil, M.

    1988-01-15

    Crossed molecular beam measurements of differential cross sections (DCS) are reported for elastic scattering of He by Ar, Kr, and Xe at high resolution. Interatomic potentials are determined by simultaneously fitting the DCS's, as well as mixture viscosity and interaction second virial data. Bias due to systematic and potential model errors are examined and are used to estimate the accuracy of the potential energy curves obtained. Attractive well depths are 2.59, 2.67, and 2.64 meV +- 3% for HeAr, HeKr, and HeXe, respectively, agreeing with the best available HeAr potential and a previously proposed HeKr potential, but significantly deeper than previously reported potentials for HeXe. The HeXe attractive well is also considerably broader than previously reported. Attractive minimum positions are 3.48, 3.70, and 4.00 A ( +- 0.03 A) for HeAr, HeKr, and HeXe, respectively. Including the accurate diffusion data of Dunlop and co-workers (Physica A 95, 561 (1979)) and the absolute integral cross sections of Pirani and Vecchiocattivi (J. Chem. Phys. 66, 372 (1977) and revisions thereto) verify the error bounds for all three potentials.

  20. Radiative precursors driven by converging blast waves in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Bland, S. N.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blesener, K.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A.; Hoyt, C.; Potter, W.; and others

    2014-03-15

    A detailed study of the radiative precursor that develops ahead of converging blast waves in gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The experiment is capable of magnetically driving 20 km s{sup −1} blast waves through gases of densities of the order 10{sup −5} g cm{sup −3} (see Burdiak et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 9(1), 52–62 (2013)] for a thorough description). Data were collected for Ne, Ar, and Xe gas-fills. The geometry of the setup allows a determination of the plasma parameters both in the precursor and across the shock, along a nominally uniform line of sight that is perpendicular to the propagation of the shock waves. Radiation from the shock was able to excite NeI, ArII, and XeII/XeIII precursor spectral features. It is shown that the combination of interferometry and optical spectroscopy data is inconsistent with upstream plasmas being in LTE. Specifically, electron density gradients do not correspond to any apparent temperature change in the emission spectra. Experimental data are compared to 1D radiation hydrodynamics HELIOS-CR simulations and to PrismSPECT atomic physics calculations to assist in a physical interpretation of the observations. We show that upstream plasma is likely in the process of being radiatively heated and that the emission from a small percentage of ionised atoms within a cool background plasma dominates the emission spectra. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE and COBRA pulsed-power facilities at Imperial College London and Cornell University, respectively.

  1. Noble gases as tracers of the origin and evolution of the Martian atmosphere and the degassing history of the planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    1988-01-01

    Noble gas analysis of Martian samples can provide answers to a number of crucial questions. Some of the most obvious benefits will be in Martian chronology, using techniques that have been applied to lunar samples. However, these are by no means the only relevant noble gas studies possible. Since Mars has a substantial atmosphere, noble gases can be used to study the origin and evolution of that atmosphere, including the degassing history of the planet. This type of study can provide constraints on: (1) the total noble gas inventory of the planet, (2) the number of noble gas reservoirs existing, and (3) the exchange of gases between these reservoirs. How to achieve these goals are examined.

  2. Collisions of noble gases with supercooled sulfuric acid-water solutions.

    PubMed

    Behr, Peter; Scharfenort, Ulrich; Zellner, Reinhard

    2009-09-07

    The collisions of hyperthermal noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) with supercooled binary sulfuric acid-water mixtures (57-77 wt%) were explored in the temperature range between 210 and 240 K. The experiments were performed by directing a molecular beam of the respective gases onto a continuously renewed liquid surface and monitoring the velocity of the scattered molecules by mass spectrometry. Depending on the initial translational energies and molecular masses, we observe both inelastic scattering from the surface as well as thermalization followed by subsequent desorption. The experiments indicate that the repulsive momentum transfer in the inelastic scattering channel increases with increasing mass of the impinging gas, while it is only weakly affected by the initial velocities. The final energy of the thermally desorbing atoms can always be approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution equal to the liquid bulk phase temperature. The influence of the binary composition of the liquid phase is only noticeable in the case of Ne, whilst this dependence diminishes for gases with molecular masses >or=40 amu. The probability of thermalisation relative to inelastic scattering increases with the bulk phase temperature, independent of the molecular masses of the colliding gas. In contrast, the fractional energy transfer during collision does not increase with temperature, except for Neon. These results can be interpreted in the model framework of hard-sphere collisions of noble gases with the surface, during which water and sulfuric acid molecules interact independently with the impinging gas.

  3. Noble gases in presolar diamonds I: Three distinct components and their implications for diamond origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    High-purity separates of presolar diamond were prepared from 14 primitive chondrites from 7 compositional groups. Their noble gases were measured using stepped pyrolysis. Three distinct noble gas components are present in diamonds, HL, P3, and P6, each of which is found to consist of five noble gases. P3, released between 200 C and 900 C, has a 'planetary' elemental abundance pattern and roughly 'normal' isotopic ratios. HL, consisting of isotopically anomalous Xe-HL and Kr-H, Ar with high Ar-38/Ar-36, and most of the gas making up Ne-A2 and He-A, is released between 1100 C and 1600 C. HL has 'planetary' elemental ratios, except that it has much more He and Ne than other known 'planetary' components. HL gases are carried in the bulk diamonds, not in some trace phase. P6 has a slightly higher median release temperature than HL and is not cleanly separated from HL by stepped pyrolysis. Our data suggest that P6 has roughly 'normal' isotopic compositions and 'planetary' elemental ratios. Both P3 and P6 seem to be isotopically distinct from P1, the dominant 'planetary' noble-gas component in primitive chondrites. Release characteristics suggest that HL and P6 are sited in different carriers within the diamond fractions, while P3 may be sited near the surfaces of the diamonds. We find no evidence of separability of Xe-H and Xe-L or other isotopic variations in the HL component. However, because approximately 10(exp 10) diamonds are required to measure a Xe composition, a lack of isotopic variability does not constrain diamonds to come from a single source. In fact, the high abundance of diamonds in primitive chondrites and the presence of at least three distinct noble-gas components strongly suggest that diamonds originated in many sources. Relative abundances of noble-gas components in diamonds correlate with degree of thermal processing, indicating that all meteorites sampled essentially the same mixture of diamonds. That mixture was probably inherited from the Sun

  4. Identifying Glacial Meltwater Sources in Greenland using Noble Gases as Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Aciego, S.; Hall, C. M.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.; Das, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Greenland Ice Sheet. It explores the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to GMW sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial locations where this GMW originates within the ice sheet. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the ice sheets, critical for the major role they play in climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and the temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. GMW samples were collected at five locations in southern Greenland. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples do deviate to a certain extent from ASW, with concentrations displaying two distinct patterns. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). Ne and Xe analysis suggests that about half of the samples equilibrated at a temperature of ~0°C and altitudes between 1 km and 2 km, with a few samples pointing to lower equilibration altitudes and temperatures between 2°C and 5°C. Two samples suggest an origin as melted ice and lack of equilibration with surface conditions. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between 100 and 3600 yrs, a result that is consistent with a preliminary 3H analysis. References: Warrier, R. B., Castro, M. C., and Hall, C

  5. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  6. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  7. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  8. Observations of mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Pohlman, John; Stern, Laura A.; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.; Pinkston, John C.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings are presently dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the oceanatmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the susceptibility of gas hydrates to warming climate is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sublake and subseafloor sediments, coalbeds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic data provide only a first-order characterization of methane sources, while gas hydrate can sequester any type of methane. Here, we investigate the possibility of exploiting the pattern of noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under careful laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  9. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  10. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-06-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  11. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  12. Closed System Step Etching of CI chondrite Ivuna reveals primordial noble gases in the HF-solubles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, My E. I.; Busemann, Henner; Wieler, Rainer; Maden, Colin

    2017-05-01

    We analyzed all the noble gases in HF-soluble phases in the CI chondrite Ivuna by in-vacuum gas release using the ;Closed System Step Etching; (CSSE) technique, which allows for direct noble gas measurements of acid-soluble phases. The main motivation was to investigate if there are primordial noble gases in HF-soluble phases in Ivuna, something that has not been done before in CI chondrites, as most primordial noble gases are known to reside in HF-resistant phases. The first steps under mild etching released He, Ne, and Ar with solar-like elemental and isotopic compositions, confirming that Ivuna contains implanted solar wind (SW) noble gases acquired in the parent body regolith. The SW component released in some etch steps was elementally unfractionated. This is unusual as trapped SW noble gases are elementally fractionated in most meteoritic material. In the intermediate etch steps under slightly harsher etching, cosmogenic noble gases were more prominent than SW noble gases. The HF-soluble portion of Ivuna contained primordial Ne and Xe, that was most visible in the last etch steps after all cosmogenic and most SW gases had been released. The primordial Ne and Xe in the HF-solubles have isotopic and elemental ratios readily explained as a mixture of the two most abundant primordial noble gas components in Ivuna bulk samples: HL and Q. Only small fractions of the total HL and Q in Ivuna were released during CSSE analysis; ∼3% of 20NeHL and ∼4% of 132XeQ. HL is known to reside in nanodiamond-rich separates and Q-gases are most likely carried by a carbonaceous phase known as phase Q. Q-gases were likely released from an HF-soluble portion of phase Q. However, nanodiamonds might not be the source of the HL-gases released upon etching, since nanodiamond-rich separates are very HF-resistant and the less tightly bound nanodiamond component P3 was not detected.

  13. Trace analysis of aerosol bound particulates and noble gases at the BfS in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bieringer, J; Schlosser, C; Sartorius, H; Schmid, S

    2009-05-01

    The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) performs trace analysis measurements in both the frameworks of the German Integrated Measuring and Information system as well as of the International Monitoring System for verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Therefore, different kinds of measurements of aerosol bound radionuclides as well as of radioactive noble gases in the atmosphere are performed. BfS as coordinating laboratory for trace analysis is responsible for the quality control. A quality assurance programme was set up with German institutions and expanded to European laboratories. The existing quality assurance programme of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation for measurements of aerosol bound radionuclides will be extended for noble gas measurements. Applied methods, achieved measurement results and the different kinds of quality assurance are presented and discussed.

  14. Spectral analysis of ionized noble gases and implications for astronomy and laser studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandos, J. Reyna; Bredice, F.; Raineri, M.; Gallardo, M.

    2009-05-01

    Studies of emission spectra of noble gas ions have been carried out in La Plata for more than 35 years, several of them in collaboration with other groups. Knowledge of the wavelengths, intensities and shapes of the lines of different species of neon, argon, krypton and xenon in intermediate and high degrees of ionization is important not only to study plasma conditions, but also to help in the understanding of laser emission mechanisms. With the purpose of continuing this line of work we present an overview of some studies concerning the spectral analysis of several ions of noble gases with implications for astronomy and laser studies. The spectra were recorded from the vacuum ultraviolet to infrared regions, using pulsed discharges. In some cases time-series observations were made. Earlier analyses for these ions were revised and extended. New energy levels, classified lines and oscillator strengths were established. The results of these analyses were supported by using relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations.

  15. Properties of Laser Produced TMAE Plasma Admixed with Air Constituents, Nitrogen and Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guowen; Scharer, John; Kelly, Kurt

    1999-10-01

    A high initial density (> 10^13 cm-3) and a large volume (hundreds of cm^3) plasma is created by a 193 nm laser ionization of an organic molecule, tetrakis(dimethyl-amino)ethylene(TMAE). The properties of this plasma mixed with nitrogen and noble gases are studied. Fast probe measurements which include a detailed considerations of probe structure, probe surface cleaning, shielding, probe perturbation, frequency response, temporal and spatial resolutions, dummy probe corrections and noise analysis will be described. Electron densities obtained by this method are independent on the ion species mixture. A plasma emission diagnostic is used to estimate plasma densities for the higher admixture pressures. Electron density and temperature vs. time for various TMAE, nitrogen and noble gas pressures and laser power will be presented. The role of super-excited and metastable states in the decay process will also be discussed.

  16. Subduction zone fluxes of halogens and noble gases in seafloor and forearc serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Pettke, Thomas; Scambelluri, Marco; Phillips, David; Giuliani, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Serpentinites form by hydration of ultramafic lithologies in a range of seafloor and shallow subduction zone settings. Serpentinites are recognised as major reservoirs of fluid mobile elements and H2O in subducting oceanic lithosphere, and together with forearc serpentinites formed in the mantle wedge, provide critical information about shallow-level volatile fluxes during subduction. The current study provides new Cl, as well as the first comprehensive Br, I and noble gas analyses reported for seafloor and forearc chrysotile-lizardite serpentinites. The samples were recovered from IODP drilling campaigns of mid-ocean ridge, passive margin and forearc settings (n=17), and ophiolites in the Italian Alps and Apennines (n=10). The aims of this study were to determine the compositional variability of noble gases and halogens in serpentinites entering subduction zones and evaluate the efficiency of gas loss during the early stages of serpentinite subduction. The chrysotile-lizardite serpentinites and serpentised peridotites contain 43-2300 ppm Cl and 3×10-13-2×10-11 mol g-136Ar, with the concentrations of these elements broadly related to the estimated degree of serpentinisation. The serpentinites have extremely variable Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios with many samples preserving compositions similar to organic-rich sedimentary marine pore fluids. Serpentinites from the Marianas Forearc have very high I concentrations of up to 45 ppm I and I/Cl ratios of ˜14,000 times the seawater value that is even higher than the maximum I/Cl enrichment observed in sedimentary marine pore fluids. The serpentinites have 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios that are mostly close to or above seawater values, and 20Ne/36Ar ratios that range from seawater to lower values. The serpentinites contain <10-270 ppm K and, irrespective of age (0 Ma to ˜160 Ma), are characterised by 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 300-340 that are slightly higher than the seawater value of 296, thus indicating the presence of minor

  17. Noble gases solubility models of hydrocarbon charge mechanism in the Sleipner Vest gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Meurer, W. P.; Warr, O.; Mabry, J. C.; Byrne, D. J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert and variably soluble in crustal fluids. They are primarily introduced into hydrocarbon reservoirs through exchange with formation waters, and can be used to assess migration pathways and mechanisms, as well as reservoir storage conditions. Of particular interest is the role groundwater plays in hydrocarbon transport, which is reflected in hydrocarbon-water volume ratios. Here, we present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas isotope and abundance data from the Sleipner Vest field, in the Norwegian North Sea. Sleipner Vest gases are generated from primary cracking of kerogen and the thermal cracking of oil. Gas was emplaced into the Sleipner Vest from the south and subsequently migrated to the east, filling and spilling into the Sleipner Ost fields. Gases principally consist of hydrocarbons (83-93%), CO2 (5.4-15.3%) and N2 (0.6-0.9%), as well as trace concentrations of noble gases. Helium isotopes (3He/4He) are predominantly radiogenic and range from 0.065 to 0.116 RA; reported relative to air (RA = 1.4 × 10-6; Clarke et al., 1976; Sano et al., 1988), showing predominantly (>98%) crustal contributions, consistent with Ne (20Ne/22Ne from 9.70 to 9.91; 21Ne/22Ne from 0.0290 to 0.0344) and Ar isotopes (40Ar/36Ar from 315 to 489). Air-derived noble gas isotopes (20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 132Xe) are introduced into the hydrocarbon system by direct exchange with air-saturated water (ASW). The distribution of air-derived noble gas species are controlled by phase partitioning processes; in that they preferentially partition into the gas (i.e., methane) phase, due to their low solubilities in fluids. Therefore, the extent of exchange between hydrocarbon phases and formation waters - that have previously equilibrated with the atmosphere - can be determined by investigating air-derived noble gas species. We utilize both elemental ratios to address process (i.e., open vs. closed system) and concentrations to quantify the extent of hydrocarbon

  18. Solar noble gases revealed by closed system stepped etching of a metal separate from Fayetteville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murer, CH.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1993-01-01

    Solar He, Ne, and Ar in a Fe-Ni separate from the chondrite Fayetteville are analyzed by closed system stepped oxidation. We report here data of the first 15 steps comprising 55 percent of the total solar gases. He-4/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ar-36 are quite constant at values about 20 percent below those of present day solar wind (SWC). In this, Fe-Ni differs from lunar ilmenites where He-4/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ar-36 in the first steps are several times below SWC. Thus, metal retains SW-noble gases even better than ilmenite, almost without element fractionation. Nevertheless, the isotopic composition of SW-He, -Ne, and -Ar in the first steps of the metal sample are identical to those found in a recently irradiated lunar ilmenite, indicating that ilmenites and chondritic metal both contain isotopically unfractionated SW noble gases. A preliminary analysis of a smaller Fayetteville metal separate shows Ne from solar energetic particles (SEP-Ne) with Ne-20/Ne-22 less than or equal to 11.5.

  19. Degassing and contamination of noble gases in Mid-Atlantic Ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.; Harrison, D.; Turner, G.; Nesbitt, R.

    2003-01-01

    New He, Ne, Ar and CO2 stepped-crushing data from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show that contamination of basalts by atmospheric noble gases involves three or more components: unfractionated air, fractionated air with high 36Ar/22Ne (≥45) and fractionated air with low 36Ar/22Ne (≤5). In addition, the magmatic noble gases trapped in these basaltic glasses are variably fractionated such that 4He/40Ar* (where the asterisk indicates corrected for atmospheric contamination based on all 36Ar being atmospheric in origin) is in the range 3-12. Single samples have a range in 4He/40Ar* with the highest ratios in the final crush steps, consistent with the most fractionated (highest 4He/40Ar*) volatiles trapped in the smallest vesicles. It is not possible to distinguish between batch and Rayleigh degassing mechanisms. The complexities of the contamination and magmatic fractionation processes means that it is not possible to estimate 40Ar/36Ar of the mantle source to these basalts other than it must be higher than the highest ratio measured (26,200 ± 5200). Noble gas/CO2 ratios are also variable. While some CO2 adsorption during crushing exaggerates the variations in He/CO2 and Ar/CO2, we show that it is not possible to account for the entire variation as an analytical artefact: some of the variation is present in the vesicles. Variations in He/CO2 cannot be attributed to solubility controlled degassing because of the broadly similar solubilities of He and CO2 in tholeiitic magmas. The large range in He/CO2 in these glasses (factor of 10) is not accompanied by indications of major changes in melting regime or source region chemistry, therefore is thought to reflect late-stage (magmatic) fractionation of CO2 from the noble gases. It is not possible to identify an explicit mechanism, although both CO2 reduction (e.g., to hydrocarbons or graphite) and kinetic CO2-noble gas fractionation could account for the variations.

  20. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 2: Surface origins highlighted by noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-09-01

    neon release pattern similar to our defined planetary/FSW dominated regolithic group (CM-rich samples PRA 04401, SCO 06040). Our petrological investigations found no evidence for CM fragments within EET 87513, though a single clast was reported previously (Buchanan et al., 1993). Aside from the Ne release pattern, the remaining noble gas data show more similarity with SW/FSW components. The remaining four howardites CRE 01400, EET 87518, EET 99400, and SAN 03472 and are dominated by cosmogenic noble gases, and show no evidence for a regolithic origin. Our data suggest that a CM-composition is likely present in all samples to some degree, but that this can be overprinted by SW components or cosmogenic components obtained in situ on the vestan surface or during transit to Earth respectively. The presence of CM material is an important parameter for understanding the evolution of Vesta's surface. While we have uncovered three further regolithic howardites (∼13 regolithic total, of ∼41 analysed), further noble gas analysis of HED meteorites is needed to not only determine regolithic origins, but to better characterise the abundance of carbonaceous chondrite material and its effect on the noble gas signatures of such samples.

  1. Are protonated ions efficient sequestration agents for noble gases in the primitive nebula context?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; ozgurel, Ozge; Bacchus-montabonel, Marie-christine; Mousis, Olivier; Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Institut Lumière Matière, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

    2016-10-01

    One explanation for the deficiencies of argon, krypton and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. In fact, this mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors, namely H2O, CO and N2, present in the primitive nebula, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases.Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, Xe, with all the protonated ions issued from H2O, CO and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, i.e. H3O+, HCO+, HOC+, N2H+, has been studied with quantum simulation methods, quantum dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes; the rate coefficients of their radiative associations have been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 100 °K and found ranging from 10-18 to 10-16 cm3s-1, which can be considered as high for this type of reactions and are comparable to the rates obtained with H3+.Consequently, we can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions, which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as efficient sequestration agents for all three noble gases, in addition to the original H3+ captor.

  2. Calibration of stack monitors for measurement of noble gases in nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Petr; Dryak, Pavel; Suran, Jiri; Gudelis, Arunas

    2012-09-01

    In nuclear facilities stack monitors are used for the measurement of the volumetric activity of noble gases. Spectrometric measurement is needed because the content of stack effluents is always a mixture of radionuclides. In some nuclear power plants new types of monitors were installed based on HPGe detectors. For efficiency calibration a standard with the radionuclide Xe-127 was developed and calibration curve constructed in the energy range 81 keV-1293 keV. Experiental efficiencies were checked using an MC model.

  3. Implications of isotopic signatures of noble gases for the origin and evolution of terrestrial atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, A. S. P.

    1987-01-01

    It is contented that the initial quantities of noble gases present in planetesimals were controlled by the sizes and masses of the planets, and fit with a model of successive accretion. The successive accretion model proposed for the origin of terrestrial planets is based upon: (1) the sequence of zones of condensation of solar nebula, (2) the condensation sequence of minerals, iron and nickel in different P-T regimes of the solar nebula, and (3) the sequence in the nucleation of iron cores of the terrestrial planets.

  4. Stable Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence without the presence of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, M. T.; Dam, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    We report that in spite of the commonly accepted view that stable Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence (SBSL) can only be achieved in water in the presence of a noble gas or hydrogen, long term stable SBSL can in fact be sustained with only diatomic gases like e.g. nitrogen being present. Compared to that of a stable argon bubble, the emission is much weaker and the spectrum looks much colder. Simulations support that the above quoted view, based on the dissociation hypothesis, is an erroneous inference from this theory.

  5. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  6. Highly concentrated nebular noble gases in porous nanocarbon separates from the Saratov (L4) meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2013-11-20

    The majority of heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) in primitive meteorites are stored in a poorly understood phase called Q. Although Q is thought to be carbonaceous, the full identity of the phase has remained elusive for almost four decades. In order to better characterize phase Q and, in turn, the early solar nebula, we separated carbon-rich fractions from the Saratov (L4) meteorite. We chose this meteorite because Q is most resistant in thermal alteration among carbonaceous noble gas carriers in meteorites and we hoped that, in this highly metamorphosed meteorite, Q would be present but not diamond: these two phases are very difficult to separate from each other. One of the fractions, AJ, has the highest {sup 132}Xe concentration of 2.1 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} STP g{sup –1}, exceeding any Q-rich fractions that have yet been analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the fraction AJ and a less Q-rich fraction AI indicate that they both are primarily porous carbon that consists of domains with short-range graphene orders, with variable packing in three dimensions, but no long-range graphitic order. The relative abundance of Xe and C atoms (6:10{sup 9}) in the separates indicates that individual noble gas atoms are associated with only a minor component of the porous carbon, possibly one or more specific arrangements of the nanoparticulate graphene.

  7. On the distribution of noble gases in Allende - A differential oxidation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Pepin, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation makes use of an oxidizing technique which is based on methods widely employed in light stable isotope analysis. The utilization of closed-system differential combustion in molecular oxygen in an ultra-high vacuum system on-line with a spectrometer makes it possible to conduct precise abundance and isotopic measurements of all gases released in progressive oxidation and/or thermal outgassing of the host phases. Attention is given to the noble gases mobilized in progressive oxidation of a carbon-rich acid residue and a fine-grained matrix separate. The progressive oxidation of the Allende matrix is discussed. Release occurred over three distinct intervals, characterized by oxidation below 600 C, gas mobilization between 630 and 750 C, and high-temperature diffusive release.

  8. Gravity effects on a gliding arc in four noble gases: from normal to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potočňáková, L.; Šperka, J.; Zikán, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Beckers, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2015-04-01

    A gliding arc in four noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) has been studied under previously unexplored conditions of varying artificial gravity, from normal 1 g gravity up to 18 g hypergravity. Significant differences, mainly the visual thickness of the plasma channel, its maximum elongation and general sensitivity to hypergravity conditions, were observed between the discharges in individual gases, resulting from their different atomic weights and related quantities, such as heat conductivity or ionisation potential. Generally, an increase of the artificial gravity level leads to a faster plasma channel movement thanks to stronger buoyant force and a decrease of maximum height reached by the channel due to more intense losses of heat and reactive species. In relation to this, an increase in current and a decrease in absorbed power was observed.

  9. Elementary and isotopic compositions of noble gases in geothermal fluids of Tuscany, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuti, S.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses were made of the major gases, as well as helium and radon, in fluids from more than 90 geothermal wells in Tuscany. The elementary and isotopic abundances of the noble gases were determined by multiple samplings in seven wells. The results show good correlations between constituents of atmospheric origin and those of deep origin, suggesting the existence of a mixing between cold waters and hot fluids, a process which takes place at considerable depth. The helium isotopic ratios indicate the presence of a radiogenic crustal component. Enrichment of radiogenic argon and excess nucleogenic neon-21 were measured in some samples. Calculations were also made of the /sup 4/He//sup 222/Rn ages of the gas sources.

  10. Noble Gases in Two Fragments of Different Lithologies from the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Zolensky, M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite, whose preat-mospheric body was the asteroid 2008 TC3, fell on October 7, 2008 in the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan [e.g., 1, 2]. Numer-ous fragments have been recovered during several expeditions organized from December 2008 [2]. The meteorite was classified as an anomalous polymict ureilite with several different kinds of chondritic fragments [e.g., 3-5]. Noble gas studies performed on several fragments from the meteorite showed cosmic-ray expo-sure ages of about 20 My [e.g., 6-8], although slightly shorter ages were also reported in [9, 10]. Concentrations of trapped heavy noble gases are variable among the fragments of different lithologies [9, 10]. We report noble gas data on two samples from the #1 and #47 fragments [2], which were the same as those re-ported by Ott et al. [9]. Experimental Procedure: Weights of bulk samples #1 and #47 used in this work were 16.1 mg and 17.6 mg, respectively. Noble gases were extracted by stepwise heating at the tempera-tures of 800, 1200 and 1800°C for #1 and 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1400, 1600 and 1800°C for #47. Concentrations and isotopic ra-tios of noble gases were measured with a modified-VG5400/MS-III at the Geochemical Research Center, University of Tokyo. Results and Discussion: Cosmogenic He and Ne are domi-nant in both #1 and #47, but trapped Ar, Kr and Xe concentra-tions are much higher in #47 than in #1, showing that noble gas compositions in #47 are similar to those of ureilites. 3He/21Ne and 22Ne/21Ne of cosmogenic He and Ne are 4.8 and 1.12 for #1 and 3.6 and 1.06 for #47, respectively, both of which plot on a Bern line [11]. This indicates negligible loss of cosmogenic 3He from #1 in our sample, unlike the low 3He/21Ne of 3.1 for #1 by Ott et al. [9]. Concentrations of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne (10-8 cc/g) are 30 and 6.3 for #1 and 32 and 9.0 for #47, respectively, which are higher than those in [9] and give cosmic-ray exposure ages of ca. 20 My depending on assumed production

  11. Bubble formation, vesicularity and fractionation of noble gases during MORB degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sator, N.; Guillot, B. B.; Aubry, G.

    2012-12-01

    The fractionation of noble gases in oceanic basalts gives information on the source region and on the transport of volatiles up to the seafloor. For instance, the large distribution (~1-1,000) of the 4He/40Ar* ratio in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), is interpreted as the signature of different degassing scenarios taking place at depth. Thus, a low value of this ratio is explained by a closed system degassing whereas a high value is assigned either to an open system degassing (where vesicles are lost in a magma chamber or at depth during magma ascent) or to a kinetic disequilibrium induced by a rapid magma ascent just prior eruption. Unfortunately, CO2 has a very low solubility in basaltic melts at pressure corresponding to the seafloor and an overwhelming majority of erupted lavas have lost their pristine volatile contents. However notable exceptions are the popping rocks characterized by a large vesicularity, a high CO2 content and a 4He/40Ar* ratio compatible with the expected U/K ratio of the upper mantle. Those samples likely have experienced a CO2 exsolution at about 35 km depth in the oceanic mantle. So, the very existence of these exceptional MORB samples suggests that CO2-rich melts could be present at a greater depth. Thus, explosive eruptions near ocean spreading centers are well documented (Hekinian et al., 2000) and are associated with volcaniclastic deposits containing highly vesicular basalts, a feature which suggests that this volcanism is driven by CO2-rich magmas (Helo et al., 2011). But how much CO2-rich are these magmas, that is the question. The objective of this study is to use molecular dynamics simulation (MD) to evaluate the vesicularity and the fractionation of noble gases in a degassing MORB melt. A previous simulation study (Guillot and Sator, 2011) has shown that the solubility of CO2 in basaltic melts increases steadily with the pressure and deviates significantly from the Henry's law at high pressures. From the CO2 solubility curve

  12. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  13. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record recycling of noble gases by deep subduction of the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; He, Huai-Yu; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of noble gases from crustal rocks into the mantle is indicated not only by oceanic basalts and mantle xenoliths, but also by ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. It is intriguing whether noble gases in continental crust were recycled into the mantle by deep subduction of the continental crust to mantle depths. Here we firstly report the He, Ne and Ar isotopic compositions of pyroxene from postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen, China. The results show that the pyroxene separates from the mafic rocks have low 3He/4He ratios of 0.002 to 1.8 Ra and air-like Ne isotope compositions. Furthermore, the pyroxene exhibits low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 393.6 to 1599.8, close to those of the air. In combination with whole-rock geochemistry it is found that pyroxene 3He/4He ratios are correlated with whole-rock (La/Yb)N and Sr/Y ratios, εNd(t) values and MgO contents. These observations demonstrate the mass transfer from the deeply subducted continental crust to the overlying mantle wedge, recording the source mixing between the crust-derived melt and the mantle peridotite in the continental subduction zone. A direct addition of the crustal He via crust-derived melt to the mantle leads to the extremely low 3He/4He ratios in the orogenic lithospheric mantle, and the dissolved atmospheric Ar and Ne in the subducted supracrustal rocks results in the air-like Ar and Ne isotope ratios. Therefore, the noble gas isotopic signatures of supracrustal rocks were carried into the mantle by the continental deep subduction to subarc depths and then transferred to the postcollisional mafic igneous rocks via the melt-peridotite reaction at the slab-mantle interface in a continental subduction channel. Our finding firstly establishes the slab-mantle interaction model for recycling of supracrustal noble gases in the continental subduction zone.

  14. Noble Gases Analyses of Samples Synthesized at High P and T in a Multi Anvil Press Device: Protocol and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, B.; Andrault, D.; Moreira, M.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.

    2007-12-01

    Noble gases (He-Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe) in mantle-derived samples allow an undisputable tracing of different sources of materials. Concerning the deep mantle part, the study of noble gases suggests that a "primordial" component (which is non or partially degassed) exists. Nevertheless, this conclusion is challenged by several observations, both geophysical and geochemical, suggesting that contrariwise the mantle is now totally depleted, degassed or renewed by convection. Furthermore, the lack of experimental data disables quantitative modelling of geochemistry processes. It is still unknown how much the fractionations are dependent on the conditions on pressure, temperature and chemical composition in the mantle. Recent studies [1-3] suggest a more incompatible behavior for noble gases in comparison to their parent element (K for Ar, U + Th for He) in very specific conditions of pressure, temperature, and chemical composition. Nevertheless, those studies focus on only particular compositions or pressures or only one single noble gas. No exhaustive studies (of all nobles gases at different pressures, temperatures and compositions) were accomplished on this subject so far. We set up a new experimental protocol allowing the analyses of rare gases in samples synthesized under mantle conditions, at high pressures and temperatures. This new protocol associates the use of a gas loading device [4], a multi-anvil press device (INSU MAP, Clermont-Ferrand, France), a laser ablation coupled to mass- spectrometer for the noble gases analysis (excimer laser, λ = 193 nm), and a 3D profilometry device to quantify the amount of ablated material. We will present an application of these methods on the noble gases partitioning between solid and liquid natural phases in the 3-5 GPa pressure range and for temperature of 1400 to 1600°C. [1] E.M. Chamorro, R.A Brooker, J.-A Wartho, B.J. Wodd, S.P. Kelley and J.D. Blundy. Ar and K partitioning between clinopyroxene and silicate melt to 8 GPa

  15. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, R Stewart; Dalton, D Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-06-30

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000-15,000 K and pressures of 15-52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn.

  16. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, R. Stewart; Dalton, D. Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000–15,000 K and pressures of 15–52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn. PMID:26080401

  17. A theoretical study of the cohesion of noble gases on graphite.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Pyper, Nicholas C

    2008-01-14

    The interactions of the noble gases with a graphene sheet are investigated theoretically. The short range repulsive interaction between the noble gas and each carbon atom is described using Hartree-Fock atomic densities and a local density functional theory with the exchange functional corrected for the finite range of the interaction by introducing a Rae-type correction depending on the effective number of electrons. The long range interactions are introduced as the sum of the Axilrod-Teller triple-dipole interaction plus the dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole dispersive attractions damped according to the theory of Jacobi and Csanak. The energy arising from the interactions between the permanent quadrupoles on the carbon atoms with the dipole they induce on the noble gas is negligible, being nonzero only on account of the atomistic structure of graphene. The mobile and delocalized nature of the graphene pi electrons causes the effective number of electrons to be around 500 rather than that of 12 appropriate for a system of entirely localized interactions with individual carbon atoms. Inclusion of the Axilrod-Teller term is required to obtain reliable predictions for the binding energies and equilibrium geometries. Absorption of a noble gas atom is predicted to occur at the site above the center of a six membered ring although this is preferred over two other sites by only about 5 meV. The methods presented for generating all the potentials can be applied to derive the interactions between any ion and carbon atom in the wall of a single-walled nanotube. Knowledge of these interactions is required to study the alkali halide nanocrystals encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes of current interest.

  18. The spectrum of density fluctuations of noble gases probed by THz neutron and x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    Approximately 50 years of inelastic scattering studies of noble gases are reviewed to illustrate the main advances achieved in the understanding of the THz dynamics of simple systems. The gradual departure of the spectral shape from the hydrodynamic regime is discussed with an emphasis on the phenomenology of fast (sub-ps) relaxation processes. This review shows that relaxation phenomena in noble gases have an essentially collisional origin, which is also revealed by the parallelism between their characteristic timescale and the interatomic collision time. In addition, recent THz spectroscopy results on noble gases at extreme thermodynamic conditions are discussed to illustrate the need for a revision of our current understanding of the supercritical phase.

  19. The spectrum of density fluctuations of noble gases probed by THz neutron and x-ray spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    Approximately 50 years of inelastic scattering studies of noble gases are reviewed to illustrate the main advances achieved in the understanding of the THz dynamics of simple systems. The gradual departure of the spectral shape from the hydrodynamic regime is discussed with an emphasis on the phenomenology of fast (sub-ps) relaxation processes. This review shows that relaxation phenomena in noble gases have an essentially collisional origin, which is also revealed by the parallelism between their characteristic timescale and the interatomic collision time. In addition, recent THz spectroscopy results on noble gases at extreme thermodynamic conditions are discussed to illustrate themore » need for a revision of our current understanding of the supercritical phase.« less

  20. The composition of lunar noble gases traped 2.5 AE and 3.5 AE ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eugster, O.

    1986-01-01

    The times when the soils 74001 and 73261 were exposed on the lunar surface were determined by the U-235 - Xe-136 dating method. The isotopic composition of the trapped noble gases in these two soils is compared with that of the surface correlated noble gases in the young soils 12001 and in the present day solar wind. The surface correlated trapped gases are a mixture of implanted solar wind particles and retrapped lunar atmospheric gases. The observed changes are interpreted as a result of decreasing outgassing of radiogenic Ar-40 and perhaps He-4 and of fissiogenic Xe from the lunar crust. The old soils probably also contain surface correlated Kr-80 and Kr-82 produced by secondary cosmic ray neutron capture of adsorbed or retrapped bromine. To some extent the isotopic composition of the trapped gases in old lunar soil may also have been altered due to diffusion loss from material of low retentivity.

  1. Laser-polarized noble gases: a powerful probe for biology, medicine, and subatomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    For over a decade, laser-polarized noble gases such as ^3He and ^129Xe have proven useful for a wide range of scientific inquiries. These include investigations of pulmonary disease using the polarized gas as a signal source for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), measurements of various aspects of nucleon structure, and tests of fundamental symmetries. Early efforts were often limited by expensive and bulky laser systems, but ongoing advancements in solid-state lasers have enabled increasingly large volumes of polarized gas to be produced with steadily improved polarization. Equally important have been advances in the fundamental understanding of spin exchange. This has led, for example, to the introduction of hybrid mixtures of alkali metals that can increase the efficiency of spin exchange by an order of magnitude. As a consequence of these advances, the figure of merit for polarized nuclear targets has increased by roughly three orders of magnitude in comparison to early accelerator-based experiments. And in MRI applications, it has become possible to pursue increasingly sophisticated imaging protocols that provide a wide range of diagnostic information. Even the earliest noble-gas MR images of the gas space of the human lung provided unprecedented resolution. More recent work includes the use of diffusion-sensitizing pulse sequences to study lung microstructure, and tagging techniques that enable the visualization (in real-time MRI movies) of gas flow during breathing. The range of applications of laser-polarized noble gases is continuing to grow, and it is notable that with an improved understanding of the underlying physics, it is quite likely that the capabilities of this useful technology will expand for some time to come.

  2. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for

  3. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  4. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. III - Sorption of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon on carbon - Elemental fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe was studied in carbon black, acridine carbon, and diamond in an attempt to understand the origin of trapped noble gases in meteorites. The results support a model in which gases are physically adsorbed on interior surfaces formed by a pore labyrinth within amorphous carbons. The data show that: (1) the adsorption/desorption times are controlled by choke points that restrict the movement of noble gas atoms within the pore labyrinth, and (2) the physical adsorption controls the temperature behavior and elemental fractionation patterns.

  5. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. III - Sorption of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon on carbon - Elemental fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe was studied in carbon black, acridine carbon, and diamond in an attempt to understand the origin of trapped noble gases in meteorites. The results support a model in which gases are physically adsorbed on interior surfaces formed by a pore labyrinth within amorphous carbons. The data show that: (1) the adsorption/desorption times are controlled by choke points that restrict the movement of noble gas atoms within the pore labyrinth, and (2) the physical adsorption controls the temperature behavior and elemental fractionation patterns.

  6. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  7. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  8. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-09-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  9. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distributionmore » functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.« less

  10. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.

  11. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-03-21

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules in the pressure range of 1-1000 bar and at a temperature of 310 K. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anaesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremors in hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of the gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor, while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar order parameter patterns for both DOPC acyl chains, which are opposite of the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the 'critical volume' hypothesis of anaesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1-100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremors at the atomic scale. The non-immobiliser neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing the monolayer undulation rate, which indicates that enhanced diffusivity rather than atomic size is the key factor.

  12. Ionization-induced laser-driven QED cascade in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, I. I.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    A formula for the ionization rate in an extremely intense electromagnetic field is proposed and used for numerical study of QED cascades in noble gases in the field of two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is shown that the number of the electron-positron pairs produced in the cascade increases with the atomic number of the gas, where the gas density is taken to be inversely proportional to the atomic number. While most of the electrons produced in the laser pulse front are expelled by the ponderomotive force from the region occupied by the strong laser field, there is a small portion of electrons staying in the laser field for a long time until the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. This mechanism is relevant for all gases. For high-Z gases there is an additional mechanism associated with the ionization of inner shells at the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. The role of both mechanisms for cascade initiation is revealed.

  13. Simultaneous analysis of noble gases, sulfur hexafluoride, and other dissolved gases in water.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, Matthias S; Hofer, Markus; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-08-06

    We developed an analytical method for the simultaneous measurement of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, SF6, N2, and O2 concentrations in a single water sample. The gases are extracted from the water using a head space technique and are transferred into a vacuum system for purification and separation into different fractions using a series of cold traps. Helium is analyzed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The remaining gas species are analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for analysis of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, and O2 and an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for SF6 analysis. Standard errors of the gas concentrations are approximately 8% for He and 2-5% for the remaining gas species. The method can be extended to also measure concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Tests of the method in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) showed that dissolved gas concentrations agree with measurements from other methods and concentrations of air saturated water. In a small artificial pond, we observed systematic gas supersaturations, which seem to be linked to adsorption of solar irradiation in the pond and to water circulation through a gravel bed.

  14. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 1: Two trends uncovered using noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Herrmann, S.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.; Peng, Z. X.; Quinn, J. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report noble gas data (helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe)), nominal gas retention ages (K-Ar, U-Th-He) and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages for the ten howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, LEW 85313, MET 00423, MET 96500, PCA 02066, PRA 04401, QUE 94200, QUE 97002, and SCO 06040, in research to better understand the regolith of the HED parent body - Vesta - through a combined petrological, compositional and noble gas study. Our main aim is to determine which howardites are truly regolithic - as defined by the presence of solar noble gas components (e.g. solar wind (SW), fractionated solar wind (FSW)) and/or by the presence of planetary components (e.g. Q, HL) associated with foreign clasts of carbonaceous chondrite material within the breccias. Of our ten howardites, four (LEW 85313, MET 00423, PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) show evidence for a regolithic origin, with noble gas ratios indicating the presence of trapped components. Howardites PRA 04401 and SCO 06040 contain significant amounts of CM type carbonaceous chondrite material, and these samples are dominated by a planetary component similar to that observed in CM meteorites Murchison and Maribo. Overall, we find evidence for two regolithic groups with different release trends: (1) SW/FSW component dominated howardites (LEW 85313 and MET 00423), where SW/FSW is dominant at low temperature releases, and less pronounced at higher temperatures; (2) Planetary component dominated howardites (PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) that also contain SW/FSW - the planetary component is associated with incorporated carbonaceous chondrite material, and is dominant at the mid-temperature release. The remaining six howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, MET 96500, PCA 02066, QUE 94200, and QUE 97002, are dominated by cosmogenic noble gases, and are not considered regolithic. Previous work by Warren et al. (2009) suggested that high siderophile element contents (specifically nickel (Ni) > 300 μg/g) were a regolith

  15. Trapping of Noble Gases by Radiative Association with H3 + in the Protosolar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Ellinger, Y.; Mousis, O.

    2016-04-01

    The heavy noble gas deficiencies observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in comets have been proposed to be related to a sequestration process by {{{H}}}3+ in the gas phase at the early protosolar nebula. Chemical thermodynamics and astrophysics modeling are favorable to this hypothesis, as presented in preceding papers. However, there is a point still to be raised, i.e., that no dynamical study of the efficiency of the collisional processes had been performed so far. Here, we show that, apart from the expected exception of Ne, the rate constants obtained, i.e., 0.7 × 10-18, 0.5 × 10-16, and 10-16 (cm3 s-1) for Ar, Kr, and Xe, respectively, are reasonably high for such processes, particularly in the case of Kr and Xe. The temperature dependence is also considered, showing a similar behavior for all noble gases with a peak efficiency in the range 50-60 K. Globally, we can conclude that the scenario of sequestration by {{{H}}}3+ is definitively comforted by the results of our quantum dynamical treatment. This process may also be responsible of the Ar impoverishment just measured in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft.

  16. Impact of artificial recharge on dissolved noble gases in groundwater in California.

    PubMed

    Cey, Bradley D; Hudson, G Bryant; Moran, Jean E; Scanlon, Bridget R

    2008-02-15

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in groundwater can provide valuable information on recharge temperatures and enable 3H-3He age-dating with the use of physically based interpretive models. This study presents a large (905 samples) data set of dissolved noble gas concentrations from drinking water supply wells throughout California, representing a range of physiographic, climatic, and water management conditions. Three common interpretive models (unfractionated air, UA; partial re-equilibration, PR; and closed system equilibrium, CE) produce systematically different recharge temperatures or ages; however, the ability of the different models to fit measured data within measurement uncertainty indicates that goodness-of-fit is not a robust indicator for model appropriateness. Therefore caution is necessary when interpreting model results. Samples from multiple locations contained significantly higher Ne and excess air concentrations than reported in the literature, with maximum excess air tending toward 0.05 cm3 STP g(-1) (deltaNe approximately 400%). Artificial recharge is the most plausible cause of the high excess air concentrations. The ability of artificial recharge to dissolve greater amounts of atmospheric gases has important implications for oxidation-reduction dependent chemical reactions. Measured gas concentration ratios suggest that diffusive degassing may have occurred. Understanding the physical processes controlling gas dissolution during groundwater recharge is critical for optimal management of artificial recharge and for predicting changes in water quality that can occur following artificial recharge.

  17. Trapping of xenon in ice - Implications for the origin of the earth's noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Anders, E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the earth's atmosphere contains Ne, Ar, and Kr in about C1,2-chondrite proportions, Xe is depleted about 20-fold. To test the suggestion that the 'missing' Xe is trapped in Antarctic ice, distribution coefficients for Xe in artifically formed frost at -20 to -60 C were measured, using Xe-127 tracer. The values are 0.098 + or - 0.004 cc STP/g atm for trapping and less than 5 cc STP/g atm for trapping plus adsorption. If these results are representative of natural ice, then the Antarctic ice cap contains less than 1 percent of the atmospheric Xe inventory, or not greater than about 0.001 the amount needed for a C1,2-chondrite pattern. Two possibilities remain for the 'missing' Xe, both on the premise that the earth's noble gases, along with other volatiles, came from chondritic material: (1) xenon is preferentially retained in the mantle and lower crust, due to the strong affinity of Xe for clean silicate surfaces and amorphous carbon; and (2) the source material of the earth's volatiles had high, relatively unfractionated, Ar/Xe and Kr/Xe ratios, like the non-carbonaceous noble gas carriers in C3O and E-chondrites.

  18. Estimating the recharge properties of the deep ocean using noble gases and helium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, Brice; Jenkins, William J.; Moriarty, Roisin; Brown, Peter; Jullion, Loic; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Torres Valdes, Sinhue; Hoppema, Mario; Ballentine, Chris; Meredith, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of noble gases and helium isotopes in the dense shelf waters of Antarctica reflects the boundary conditions near the ocean surface: air-sea exchange, sea ice formation, and subsurface ice melt. We use a nonlinear least squares solution to determine the value of the recharge temperature and salinity, as well as the excess air injection and glacial meltwater content throughout the water column and in the precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water. The noble gas-derived recharge temperature and salinity in the Weddell Gyre are -1.95°C and 34.95 psu near 5500 m; these cold, salty recharge values are a result of surface cooling as well as brine rejection during sea ice formation in Antarctic polynyas. In comparison, the global value for deep water recharge temperature is -0.44°C at 5500 m, which is 1.5°C warmer than the southern hemisphere deep water recharge temperature, reflecting a distinct contribution from the north Atlantic. The contrast between northern and southern hemisphere recharge properties highlights the impact of sea ice formation on setting the gas properties in southern sourced deep water. Below 1000 m, glacial meltwater averages 3.5‰ by volume and represents greater than 50% of the excess neon and argon found in the water column. These results indicate glacial melt has a nonnegligible impact on the atmospheric gas content of Antarctic Bottom Water.

  19. Adsorption and separation of binary mixtures of noble gases on single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Taghavi Nasrabadi, Amir

    2011-02-01

    Adsorption and separation of binary mixtures of noble gases including Argon (Ar), Krypton (Kr), and Xenon (Xe) on (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles is simulated by extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD). Adsorption energies, diffusion coefficients, activation energies, and radial distribution functions (RDFs) were calculated to address the thermodynamics, transport and structural properties of adsorption process. The simulation results of exposing Ar-Kr, Ar-Xe, and Kr-Xe mixtures on (10,10) SWCNT bundles at temperatures of 75, 150, and 300 K, show that amount of adsorption is strongly influenced by the applied temperature. On the other hand, RDF plots show obviously that separation of binary gaseous mixture is occurred, where the heavier noble gas is adsorbed more than the lighter one in a selective manner by bundle. It is seen that the increase in the applied temperature results in more separation. These findings provide us a possible application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as efficient nanomaterials for separation and storage of gas mixtures.

  20. Trapping of xenon in ice - Implications for the origin of the earth's noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Anders, E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the earth's atmosphere contains Ne, Ar, and Kr in about C1,2-chondrite proportions, Xe is depleted about 20-fold. To test the suggestion that the 'missing' Xe is trapped in Antarctic ice, distribution coefficients for Xe in artifically formed frost at -20 to -60 C were measured, using Xe-127 tracer. The values are 0.098 + or - 0.004 cc STP/g atm for trapping and less than 5 cc STP/g atm for trapping plus adsorption. If these results are representative of natural ice, then the Antarctic ice cap contains less than 1 percent of the atmospheric Xe inventory, or not greater than about 0.001 the amount needed for a C1,2-chondrite pattern. Two possibilities remain for the 'missing' Xe, both on the premise that the earth's noble gases, along with other volatiles, came from chondritic material: (1) xenon is preferentially retained in the mantle and lower crust, due to the strong affinity of Xe for clean silicate surfaces and amorphous carbon; and (2) the source material of the earth's volatiles had high, relatively unfractionated, Ar/Xe and Kr/Xe ratios, like the non-carbonaceous noble gas carriers in C3O and E-chondrites.

  1. A 223-nm KrCl excimer laser on a He-Kr-HCl mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Razhev, A M; Zhupikov, A A; Kargapol'tsev, E S

    2004-02-28

    The results of experimental studies of the parameters of a 223-nm electric-discharge KrCl excimer laser on a He-Kr-HCl mixture depending on the excitation conditions and the composition of the active gaseous medium are presented. To achieve the maximum values of the output energy and the efficiency of the KrCl laser on mixtures with buffer gaseous helium, an excitation system was used that included a circuit with an LC inverter with a high-voltage switch based on an RU-65 spark gap. An output energy of 320 mJ with an efficiency of 0.5% relative to the energy stored in the capacitors is obtained in a KrCl laser with an active medium based on the buffer He gas at a charging voltage of 30 kV. Radiation pulses with a duration of 22{+-}1 ns and a pulse power of 15 MW are obtained. (lasers)

  2. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt

    1989-01-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  3. A method for calibrating coil constants by using the free induction decay of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linlin; Zhou, Binquan; Lei, Guanqun; Wu, Wenfeng; Wang, Jing; Zhai, Yueyang; Wang, Zhuo; Fang, Jiancheng

    2017-07-01

    We propose a precise method to calibrate the coil constants of spin-precession gyroscopes and optical atomic magnetometers. This method is based on measuring the initial amplitude of Free Induction Decay (FID) of noble gases, from which the π /2 pulse duration can be calculated, since it is inversely proportional to the amplitude of the π /2 pulse. Therefore, the coil constants can be calibrated by measuring the π /2 pulse duration. Compared with the method based on the Larmor precession frequency of atoms, our method can avoid the effect of the pump and probe powers. We experimentally validated the method in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG), and the experimental results show that the coil constants are 436.63 ±0.04 nT/mA and 428.94 ±0.02 nT/mA in the x and y directions, respectively.

  4. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. I - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Trapping experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Zadnik, M. G.; Anders, E.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of Xe-127 at 5 x 10 to the -7th atm onto carbon black, pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride, and pyrolyzed acridine at 100-1000 C for 5 min-240 h is measured experimentally by gamma spectrometry. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The tightly bound Xe remaining in the samples after 4000 min pumping at temperatures above 100 C is found to comprise two components: a low-temperature component attributed to physisorption within an atomic-scale labyrinth of micropores, and a high-temperature component due to volume diffusion. The implications for the trapping of noble gases near grain surfaces of amorphous carbon in meteorites are considered.

  5. IR spectra of halothane-acetone complex in liquefied noble gases (Kr and Xe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikova, S. M.; Rutkowski, K. S.; Rospenk, M.

    2017-07-01

    IR absorption spectra of solutions of halothane (C2HBrClF3) and acetone ((CD3)2CO) mixtures in liquefied noble gases (krypton and xenon) have been recorded and analyzed. Bands due to weak hydrogenbonded complexes are identified. The complex-formation enthalpy is estimated in a series of temperature experiments on the change in the total intensity of the bands due to monomers and complexes. Second-order bands are found, which are assigned to the first overtone of stretching vibration CH of halothane and the Raman band related to simultaneous excitation of stretching vibration CH of halothane and stretching vibration CO of acetone. The results of ab initio calculation performed within the MP2/6-311++G(d, p) approximation are used to analyze the spectroscopic data.

  6. Release of noble gases and nitrogen from grain-surface sites in lunar ilmenite by closed-system oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1986-01-01

    Noble gases and nitrogen were extracted from a 100 to 150 microns ilmenite separate from lunar soil 71501 by closed system stepped heating in approx. 10 torr O2 at 300 C, 400 C, 500 C, 600 C and 630 C, followed by stepped pyrolysis at ten temperatures between 680 C and approx. 1500 C. The five oxidation steps together liberated approx. 65% of the total He-4, 45% of the Ne-20, 23% of the N-14 and Ar-36, 12% of the Kr-84 and 8% of the Xe-132 in the sample; Ne-20/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios agree with the solar wind composition experiment, and Kr-84/Ar-36 and Xe-132/Ar-36 are within approx. 10% of Cameron's estimates for the sun and solar wind. The remaining gases, released above 630 C by pyrolysis, are strongly fractionated with respect to the SWC-Cameron solar wind elemental composition. Large concentrations of fractionated noble gases in grain interiors, their virtual absence in the relatively unfractionated surface gas reservoir, and the high N/noble gas ratio all imply that most of the solar wind noble gases initially implanted in grain surfaces are eventually lost by diffusion. Loss limits can be estimated by considering two given scenarios. It is concluded tat approx. 70 to 97% or more of the Ar implanted in 71501 ilmenite grains has diffusively escaped.

  7. Determination of Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of Noble Gases for Calibration of Laser Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M. I. de la; Perez, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.

    2008-10-22

    The objective of our work is to apply two-photon polarization spectroscopy as a new calibration method for the determination of two-photon excitation cross-sections of noble gases, like Xe and Kr, which are commonly used for calibrations of MP-LIF techniques in other laboratories.

  8. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. The Efficacy of Noble Gases in the Attenuation of Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    De Deken, Julie; Rex, Steffen; Monbaliu, Diethard; Pirenne, Jacques; Jochmans, Ina

    2016-09-01

    Noble gases have been attributed to organ protective effects in ischemia reperfusion injury in a variety of medical conditions, including cerebral and cardiac ischemia, acute kidney injury, and transplantation. The aim of this study was to appraise the available evidence by systematically reviewing the literature and performing meta-analyses. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria specified any articles on noble gases and either ischemia reperfusion injury or transplantation. In vitro studies, publications without full text, review articles, and letters were excluded. Information on noble gas, organ, species, model, length of ischemia, conditioning and noble gas dose, duration of administration of the gas, endpoints, and effects was extracted from 79 eligible articles. Study quality was evaluated using the Jadad scale. Effect sizes were extracted from the articles or retrieved from the authors to allow meta-analyses using the random-effects approach. Argon has been investigated in cerebral, myocardial, and renal ischemia reperfusion injury; helium and xenon have additionally been tested in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury, whereas neon was only explored in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. The majority of studies show a protective effect of these noble gases on ischemia reperfusion injury across a broad range of experimental conditions, organs, and species. Overall study quality was low. Meta-analysis for argon was only possible in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury and did not show neuroprotective effects. Helium proved neuroprotective in rodents and cardioprotective in rabbits, and there were too few data on renal ischemia reperfusion injury. Xenon had the most consistent effects, being neuroprotective in rodents, cardioprotective in rodents and pigs, and renoprotective in rodents. Helium and xenon show organ protective effects mostly in small animal ischemia reperfusion injury models. Additional information on timing, dosing, and

  11. Atmospheric noble gases as tracers of biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katherine L.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Kipfer, Rolf; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (NGs) were used to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer impacted by a crude oil spill, near Bemidji, MN. Concentrations of 3,4He, 20,22Ne, 36,40Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined for gas- and aqueous-phase samples collected from the vadose and saturated zones, respectively. Systematic elemental fractionation of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with respect to air was observed in both of these hydrogeologic zones. Within the vadose zone, relative ratios of Ne and Ar to Kr and Xe revealed distinct process-related trends when compared to corresponding ratios for air. The degree of NG deviation from atmospheric concentrations generally increased with greater atomic mass (i.e., ΔXe > ΔKr > ΔAr > ΔNe), indicating that Kr and Xe are the most sensitive NG tracers in the vadose zone. Reactive transport modeling of the gas data confirms that elemental fractionation can be explained by mass-dependent variations in diffusive fluxes of NGs opposite to a total pressure gradient established between different biogeochemical process zones. Depletion of atmospheric NGs was also observed within a methanogenic zone of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation located below the water table. Solubility normalized NG abundances followed the order Xe > Kr > Ar > Ne, which is indicative of dissolved NG partitioning into the gas phase in response to bubble formation and possibly ebullition. Observed elemental NG ratios of Ne/Kr, Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe and a modeling analysis provide strong evidence that CH4 generation below the water table caused gas exsolution and possibly ebullition and carbon transfer from groundwater to the vadose zone. These results suggest that noble gases provide sensitive tracers in biologically active unconfined aquifers and can assist in identifying carbon cycling and transfer within the vadose zone, the capillary fringe, and below the water table.

  12. Noble gases in presolar diamonds II: Component abundances reflect thermal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the isotopic compositions derived in Huss and Lewis, 1994a, abundances of the P3, HL, and P6 noble-gas components were determined for 15 diamonds separates from primitive chondrites of 8 chondrite classes. Within a meteorite class, the relative abundances of these components correlate with the petrologic subtype of the host meteorite, indicating that metamorphism is primarily responsible for the variations. Relative abundances of P3, HL, and P6 among diamond samples can be understood in terms of thermal processing of a single mixture of diamonds like those now found in CI and CM2 chondrites. With relatively gentle heating, primitive diamonds first lose their low-temperature P3 gases and a 'labile' fraction of the HL component. Mass loss associated with release of these components produces an increase in the HL and P6 content of the remaining diamond relative to unprocessed diamond. Higher temperatures initiate destruction of the main HL carrier, while the HL content of the surviving diamonds remains essentially constant. At the same time, the P6 carrier begins to preferentially lose light noble gases. Meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures greater than or = 650 C have lost essentially all of their presolar diamond through chemical reactions with surrounding minerals. The P3 abundance seems to be a function only of the maximum temperature experienced by the diamonds and thus is independent of the nature of the surrounding environment. If all classes inherited the same mixture of primitive diamonds, then P3 abundances would tie together the metamorphic scales in different meteorite classes. However, if the P3 abundance indicates a higher temperature than do other thermometers applicable to the host meteorite, then the P3 abundance may contain information about heating prior to accretion. Diamonds in the least metamorphosed EH, CV, and CO chondrites seem to carry a record of pre-accretionary thermal processing.

  13. Are the C delta light nitrogen and noble gases located in the same carrier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Shukolyukov, Yuri A.

    1993-01-01

    Light nitrogen and the HL family noble gas components of C(sub delta) appear to be separable by high resolution pyrolysis experiments. Thus C(sub delta) is not a homogeneous material and probably consists of debris of many stars. The question of whether the N and Xe(HL) actually reside in different carriers continues to be addressed. It is well known that C(sub delta) which was identified as nanometer sized diamonds contains isotopically anamalous elements, in particular noble gases including Xe(HL) and its family and light nitrogen (delta(N-15) down to -350 percent). Before the true nature of C(sub delta) was recognized, it was easy to suppose that the Xe(HL) and light nitrogen were located in the same carrier. However, recognition that light nitrogen in diamond from different samples varies by greater than a factor of six compared to Xe(HL) fluctuations of ca. 20 percent makes such an assumption questionable. On the basis of simple arithmetic logic, the Xe and nitrogen cannot be absolutely co-located. The average diamond grain consists of only about 1000-2000 atoms of carbon; one grain among a few x 10(exp 6) contains an atom of Xe(HL) while 5-30 atoms of light nitrogen are the typical number which need to be in every diamond grain to account for observed concentrations. If some grains are devoid of N, the others have to have a higher N concentration. Even if we were able to analyze an individual grain of the diamond for noble gases and nitrogen, we would be faced with the monumental task of locating the one amongst 10(exp 6) identical grains containing the Xe atom to examine its nitrogen content. The problem can be simplified to some extent if instead of Xe, He which is 10(exp 4) times more abundant is assumed to be a member of the HL family. Attempts to fractionate the separate carriers might be attempted using He and N as guiding indicators but even experiments of this nature are for the future. Faced with apparently insoluble problems, we have returned to an

  14. Characterizing Glacial Meltwater Sources in the Athabasca Glacier, Columbia Icefield, Canada, using Noble Gases as Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, C.; Hall, C. M.; Aciego, S.; Arendt, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Athabasca Glacier (AG) in the Columbia Icefield, Canada. It constrains the relative contributions of GMW sources, water residence times, and spatial locations where the GMW originates in the alpine glacier. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows for estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for a first order estimation of water residence times. Water samples were collected on selected dates in May and July 2011 within 10 m of the terminus area at altitudes between 2 and 2.1 km. Samples were collected in six different days. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples from the AG do deviate to a certain extent from the ASW values corresponding to measured water temperature and altitude at collection points. Two patterns are observed in the concentrations of the AG samples. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). Different gases equilibrated with the atmosphere under different conditions, with Xe indicating that it equilibrated at altitudes between 2.5 and 3.4 km, values compatible with local topography. Samples present He excess of 4% to 91% with respect to ASW values and suggest average residence times varying between 90 and 200 years. References: Warrier, et al. (2012), Water Resour. Res., 48, W03508, doi:10.1029/2011WR010954. Warrier, et al. (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, doi:10.1002/grl.50610.

  15. Crustal Noble Gases in Jwaneng Diamonds With Links to Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Phillips, D.; Harris, J. W.; Yatsevich, I.

    2005-12-01

    Recent seismic tomography studies of the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton of southern Africa reveal distinct seismic velocity profiles at 150 km depth within the diamond stability field, that appear to correlate with differences in diamond paragenesis. Diamond mines with predominantly eclogitic diamond inclusions (e.g. Jwaneng, Orapa, Premier) overlie lithospheric mantle with relatively slow P-wave velocities, whereas localities with predominantly peridotitic diamond inclusions (e.g. Kimberley, Finsch) are associated with faster P-wave velocities at 150 km depth in the mantle. This distinction in P-wave velocities between the two groups can be interpreted in terms of different chemical compositions in the lithospheric mantle (Shirey, S. B. et al., Science 297, 1683-1686, 2002). Thus, the region with slower P-wave velocities could correlate with an oceanic lithospheric component and/or metasomatising fluids introduced by ancient subduction-related processes. In contrast, the region with faster P-wave velocities may reflect mid-Archean mantle depletion events initiated by craton keel formation. As the mantle beneath the Jwaneng mine is characterized by slower P-wave velocities at 150 km depth, our finding of crustal noble gases in Jwaneng diamonds (gem-quality diamond aggregates, this work; and framesites, Honda, M. et al., Chemical Geology 203, 347-358, 2004) appears to be consistent with the tomographic observations. It is noteworthy that early helium work on diamonds from the Orapa mine also showed radiogenic He-enriched 3He/4He ratios, as low as 0.16 R/Ra (Kurz, M. et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 86, 57-68, 1987), which could indicate the involvement of crustal helium; consistent with our findings from the Jwaneng diamonds. Thus, it is postulated that diamonds from eclogitic mines could clarify whether or not material subducted into the deep mantle retained crustal and atmospheric noble gases, and could quantify the influence of subducted material through time. In

  16. Noble gases in the Oceanic Crust: Preliminary results from ODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, M. D.; Curtice, J. M.; IODP Expedition 335 Science Party

    2011-12-01

    Noble gas isotopes and abundance ratios have been extensively used as tracers of oceanic mantle sources and fluxes. Most of the existing data are from seafloor basalt glasses and hydrothermal fluids, and there are very few studies of noble gases in the oceanic crust, which is an important component in global subduction flux estimates. In an effort to determine the relative contributions of mantle, radiogenic, and atmospheric/hydrothermal noble gas components in the ocean crust, we have performed helium, neon and argon measurements on a suite of gabbros and granoblastic dikes collected during IODP Expeditions 312 and 335 to Hole 1256D, a deep crustal borehole drilled into 15 Ma ocean crust formed at the East Pacific Rise during an episode of superfast spreading (>200 mm/yr). All measurements were carried out by coupled vacuum crushing and melting of whole rock samples, in order to determine the distribution of noble gases within the ocean crust. Total helium abundances in the gabbros range from 0.46 to 1.22 micro cc STP/gram, which is 2 to 5 times higher than literature data, all of which are from the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (Kumagai et al., 2003; Moreira et al., 2003). These strikingly higher helium concentrations place constraints on the thermal crustal history (due to rapid helium diffusivity) and are assumed to reflect fundamentally different emplacement/degassing processes within crust formed at a super fast spreading rate. Crushing releases 12-25 % of the total helium in the gabbros demonstrating that most of the helium resides in the solid mineral phases. Contact metamorphosed granoblastic dikes have total helium contents lower than the gabbros (typically ~ 0.15 micro cc STP/gram), but significantly higher than the assumed degassed basaltic protolith, thus suggesting that metamorphism actually adds helium to the crust, an important hypothesis that requires further testing. The helium isotopes obtained by crushing of both the gabbros and

  17. Lunar Meteorite QUE 93069: History Derived from Cosmic-Ray-Produced and Trapped Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, Ch.; Eugster, O.

    1995-09-01

    We obtained lunar meteorite QUE 93069,7 (0.304 g) from the NASA/MWG for the determination of its noble gas isotopic abundances and exposure history. The data relevant for the discussion of the exposure history and trapped noble gases are given in Tables 1 and 2. Exposure history: The duration of Moon-Earth transfer was determined by Nishiizumi et al. [1]. Based on 10Be these authors obtained 1.9 +/- 0.4 Ma for a 4 pi model (all radionuclides produced in 4 pi space) and <0.1 Ma for a 2 pi model (most radionuclides produced on the Moon). Adopting these times we find that less than one percent of the cosmogenic noble gases were produced during Moon- Earth transfer. The overwhelming amounts of 21Nec and 38Arc must have been produced during residence in the lunar regolith. Using lunar regolith production rates [2] at 5-10 g/cm2 shielding [1], we calculated the exposure times, T (2 pi), on the Moon. Table 2 gives the results and compares them with the exposure times for other anorthositic lunar meteorites (MAC 88105 and ALHA 81005). QUE 93069 shows the longest exposure to cosmic rays (1100 +/- 400 Ma) of all lunar meteorites if we compare the T38 values. Based on 21Nec we obtain 420 +/- 60 Ma. Typically for lunar surface material the T21 are lower than those based on 38Arc, 83Krc, and 126Xec due to 21Ne loss. This effect is also observed for MAC 88105 and ALHA 81005. Characteristics of the trapped noble gases: The long lunar surface residence time and the shallow shielding depth are consistent with the very large amounts of trapped solar wind particles (20Ne and 36Ar, Table 1) for QUE 93069. The concentration of trapped 36Ar is quite similar to that of Y-791197: Takaoka [3] and Ostertag et al. [4] obtained 33900 and 36600 x 10-8 cm3 STP/g, respectively. The trapped ratio 40Ar/36Ar, an antiquity indicator for lunar soil, yields information on the time when the breccia was compacted from regolith material [5]. For QUE 93069 we obtain (40Ar/36Ar)trapped = 1.9 +/- 0

  18. Regularities And Irregularities Of The Stark Parameters For Single Ionized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, R. J.; Djurovic, S.; Cirišan, M.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar S.

    2010-07-01

    Spectroscopy of ionized noble gases has a great importance for the laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Generally, spectra of inert gases are important for many physics areas, for example laser physics, fusion diagnostics, photoelectron spectroscopy, collision physics, astrophysics etc. Stark halfwidths as well as shifts of spectral lines are usually employed for plasma diagnostic purposes. For example atomic data of argon krypton and xenon will be useful for the spectral diagnostic of ITER. In addition, the software used for stellar atmosphere simulation like TMAP, and SMART require a large amount of atomic and spectroscopic data. Availability of these parameters will be useful for a further development of stellar atmosphere and evolution models. Stark parameters data of spectral lines can also be useful for verification of theoretical calculations and investigation of regularities and systematic trends of these parameters within a multiplet, supermultiplet or transition array. In the last years, different trends and regularities of Stark parameters (halwidths and shifts of spectral lines) have been analyzed. The conditions related with atomic structure of the element as well as plasma conditions are responsible for regular or irregular behaviors of the Stark parameters. The absence of very close perturbing levels makes Ne II as a good candidate for analysis of the regularities. Other two considered elements Kr II and Xe II with complex spectra present strong perturbations and in some cases an irregularities in Stark parameters appear. In this work we analyze the influence of the perturbations to Stark parameters within the multiplets.

  19. CANCELLED Molecular dynamics simulations of noble gases in liquidwater: Solvati on structure, self-diffusion, and kinetic isotopeeffect

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-05-25

    Despite their great importance in low-temperaturegeochemistry, self-diffusion coefficients of noble gas isotopes in liquidwater (D) have been measured only for the major isotopes of helium, neon,krypton and xenon. Data on the self-diffusion coefficients of minor noblegas isotopes are essentially non-existent and so typically are estimatedby a kinetic theory model in which D varies as the inverse square root ofthe isotopic mass (m): D proportional to m-0.5. To examine the validityof the kinetic theory model, we performed molecular dynamics (MD)simulations of the diffusion of noble gases in ambient liquid water withan accurate set of noble gas-water interaction potentials. Our simulationresults agree with available experimental data on the solvation structureand self-diffusion coefficients of the major noble gas isotopes in liquidwater and reveal for the first time that the isotopic mass-dependence ofall noble gas self-diffusion coefficients has the power-law form Dproportional to m-beta with 0noble gasisotopes caused by diffusion in ambient liquid water.

  20. On the difference in oscillator strengths of inner shell excitations in noble gases and their alkali neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Baltenkov, A.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the oscillator strength of resonant inner-shell excitation in a noble gas atom is considerably smaller than that in its alkali neighbor because in the latter case the effective charge acting upon excited electron is much bigger. With increase of the excitation`s principal quantum number the difference between line intensities in noble gases and their alkali neighbors rapidly disappears. The calculations are performed in the Hartree-Fock approximation and with inclusion of rearrangement effects due to inner vacancy creation and its Auger decay. A paper has been submitted for publication.

  1. A noble gas profile across a Hawaiian mantle xenolith: Coexisting accidental and cognate noble gases derived from the lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle beneath Oahu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocholl, A.; Heusser, E.; Kirsten, T.; Oehm, J.; Richter, H.

    1996-12-01

    .e., cognate to the basaltic magma from which the pyroxenite precipitated within the mantle. It is proposed that this component resides inside the mineral lattices and was trapped during magmatic crystallization. Our results indicate that the depleted lithospheric mantle source of the post-erosional host magma (Honolulu Volcanic Series) is characterized by 40Ar/36Ar ≥ 10000, R/Ra ≤ 7.5, and excesses in129Xe. Noble gas signatures of the asthenospheric mantle source parental to the pyroxenite-producing magma are less radiogenic with respect to these isotopes. Combining noble gas and strontium, neodymium, and lead isotope evidence, we propose that the asthenosphere beneath Oahu was originally similar to depleted MORB-type mantle, but became slightly modified by noble gases and other incompatible trace elements derived from the Hawaiian mantle plume prior to partial melting. This study provides evidence that noble gas isotopes and solid radiogenic isotopes are coupled in the mantle sources of basalts (e.g., Allègre et al., 1983), but decoupled in xenoliths (e.g., Vance et al., 1989).

  2. Collisional deactivation of Ba 5d7p (3)D1 by noble gases.

    PubMed

    Smedley, John E; Coulter, Sarah K; Felton, Edward J; Zomlefer, Kayla S

    2008-10-02

    Collisional deactivation of the 5d7p (3)D1 state of Ba by noble gases is studied by time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence techniques. A pulsed, frequency-doubled dye laser at 273.9 nm excites the 5d7p (3)D1 level from the ground state, and fluorescence at 364.1 and 366.6 nm from the 5d7p (3)D1 --> 6s5d (3)D1 and 5d7p (3)D1 --> 6s5d (3)D2 transitions, respectively, is monitored in real time to obtain the deactivation rate constants. At 835 K these rate constants are as follows: He, (1.69 +/- 0.08) x 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1); Ne, (3.93 +/- 0.14) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1); Ar, (4.53 +/- 0.15) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1); Kr, (4.64 +/- 0.13) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1); Xe, (5.59 +/- 0.22) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). From time-resolved 5d7p (3)D1 emission in the absence of noble gas and from the intercepts of the quenching plots, the lifetime of this state is determined to be 100 +/- 1 ns. Using time- and wavelength-resolved Ba emission with a low background pressure of noble gas, radiative lifetimes of several near-resonant states are determined from the exponential rise of the fluorescence signals. These results are as follows: 5d6d (3)D3, 28 +/- 3 ns; 5d7p (3)P1, 46 +/- 2 ns; 5d6d (3)G3, 21.5 +/- 0.8 ns; 5d7p (3)F3, 48 +/- 1 ns. Integrated fluorescence signals are used to infer the relative rate constants for population transfer from the 5d7p (3)D1 state to eleven near-resonant fine structure states.

  3. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  4. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-04

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future.

  5. Optimized Mie potentials for phase equilibria: Application to noble gases and their mixtures with n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mick, Jason R.; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad; Jackman, Brock; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey J.

    2015-09-01

    Transferrable force fields, based on n-6 Mie potentials, are presented for noble gases. By tuning the repulsive exponent, ni, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce experimental saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures with high accuracy, from the normal boiling point to the critical point. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves for pure fluids are calculated using histogram reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. For all noble gases, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures are reproduced to within 1% and 4% of experiment, respectively. Radial distribution functions, extracted from NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, are in similarly excellent agreement with experimental data. The transferability of the optimized force fields is assessed through calculations of binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria. These mixtures include argon + krypton, krypton + xenon, methane + krypton, methane + xenon, krypton + ethane, and xenon + ethane. For all mixtures, excellent agreement with experiment is achieved without the introduction of any binary interaction parameters or multi-body interactions.

  6. Optimized Mie potentials for phase equilibria: Application to noble gases and their mixtures with n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Mick, Jason R; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad; Jackman, Brock; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-21

    Transferrable force fields, based on n-6 Mie potentials, are presented for noble gases. By tuning the repulsive exponent, ni, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce experimental saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures with high accuracy, from the normal boiling point to the critical point. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves for pure fluids are calculated using histogram reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. For all noble gases, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures are reproduced to within 1% and 4% of experiment, respectively. Radial distribution functions, extracted from NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, are in similarly excellent agreement with experimental data. The transferability of the optimized force fields is assessed through calculations of binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria. These mixtures include argon + krypton, krypton + xenon, methane + krypton, methane + xenon, krypton + ethane, and xenon + ethane. For all mixtures, excellent agreement with experiment is achieved without the introduction of any binary interaction parameters or multi-body interactions.

  7. Isotopic Composition of Trapped and Cosmogenic Noble Gases in Several Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic abundances of the noble gases were measured in the following Martian meteorites: two shock glass inclusions from EET79001, shock vein glass from Shergotty and Y793605, and whole rock samples of ALH84001 and QUE94201. These glass samples, when combined with literature data on a separate single glass inclusion from EET79001 and a glass vein from Zagami, permit examination of the isotopic composition of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe trapped from the Martian atmosphere in greater detail. The isotopic composition of Martian Ne, if actually present in these glasses, remains poorly defined. The Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of Martian atmospheric Ar may be much less than the ratio measured by Viking and possibly as low as approx. 1900. The atmospheric Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio is less than or equal to 4.0. Martian atmospheric Kr appears to be enriched in lighter isotopes by approx. 0.4%/amu compared to both solar wind Kr and to the Martian composition previously reported. The Martian atmospheric Ar-36/Xe-132 and Kr-84/Xe-132 Xe elemental ratios are higher than those reported by Viking by factors of approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5, respectively. Cosmogenic gases indicate space exposure ages of 13.9 +/- 1 Myr for ALH84001 and 2.7 +/- 0.6 Myr for QUE94201. Small amounts of Ne-21 produced by energetic solar protons may be present in QUE94201, but are not present in ALH84001 or Y793605. The space exposure age for Y793605 is 4.9 +/- 0.6 Myr and appears to be distinctly older than the ages for basaltic shergottites.

  8. Slab-derived halogens and noble gases illuminate closed system processes controlling volatile element transport into the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-01-01

    Halogen and noble gas systematics are powerful tracers of volatile recycling in subduction zones. We present halogen and noble gas compositions of mantle peridotites containing H2O-rich fluid inclusions collected at volcanic fronts from two contrasting subduction zones (the Avacha volcano of Kamchatka arc and the Pinatubo volcano of Luzon arcs) and orogenic peridotites from a peridotite massif (the Horoman massif, Hokkaido, Japan) which represents an exhumed portion of the mantle wedge. The aims are to determine how volatiles are carried into the mantle wedge and how the subducted fluids modify halogen and noble gas compositions in the mantle. The halogen and noble gas signatures in the H2O-rich fluids are similar to those of marine sedimentary pore fluids and forearc and seafloor serpentinites. This suggests that marine pore fluids in deep-sea sediments are carried by serpentine and supplied to the mantle wedge, preserving their original halogen and noble gas compositions. We suggest that the sedimentary pore fluid-derived water is incorporated into serpentine through hydration in a closed system along faults at the outer rise of the oceanic, preserving Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O values of sedimentary pore fluids. Dehydration-hydration process within the oceanic lithospheric mantle maintains the closed system until the final stage of serpentine dehydration. The sedimentary pore fluid-like halogen and noble gas signatures in fluids released at the final stage of serpentine dehydration are preserved due to highly channelized flow, whereas the original Cl/H2O and 36Ar/H2O ratios are fractionated by the higher incompatibility of halogens and noble gases in hydrous minerals.

  9. Searching for noble gases with X-ray computed tomography: New microanalytical methods for isotopic characterization of ocean island basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F.; Farley, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Noble gas isotopic ratios in mantle-derived rocks can provide valuable insight about early degassing, mixing, and stratification of the mantle. Noble gas compositions of ocean island basalts (OIB) are of particular interest due to their probable deep mantle origins. In lieu of submarine glass with gas-rich vesicles, olivine phenocrysts—with highly variable gas contents—provide the best opportunity to characterize OIB noble gas compositions. We use X-ray computed tomography (HRxCT) to characterize fluid inclusions in olivine phenocrysts. By selecting the phenocrysts with the highest inclusion volumes for noble gas isotopic analysis, we can maximize the gas yield. This enrichment provides three major advantages: (1) a greater fraction of OIB samples can potentially be analyzed; (2) the odds of measuring mantle isotopic ratios for the heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are greatly improved; and (3) inter- and intragrain noble gas distributions, as well as fluid inclusion filling pressures, can be observed with unprecedented resolution. Preliminary results from Samoa and Juan Fernandez samples have identified phenocrysts with >3000 ncc/g helium, or up to 50 times higher than the bulk separate. Inclusion-rich olivines contain the most helium, and >80% of the helium resides in inclusions >21 µm. The helium partial pressures per phenocryst range from about 20 to 150 bars. Assuming a CO2/He ratio of 4 × 104 in fluid inclusions during entrapment, the partial pressures of helium correspond to capture pressures of between 0.8 and 6 kbar. This suggests that inclusion entrapment occurred over a large range of depths, from about 2 to 20 km. In the future, these methods will enable heavy noble gas isotopic characterization of gas-poor samples and help elucidate atmospheric contamination processes.

  10. Noble Gases in the Lunar Meteorites Calcalong Creek and QUE 93069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Burkland, M. K.; Grier, J. A.

    1995-09-01

    Although the world's collections contain comparable numbers of martian and lunar meteorites (about 10 each), their ejection histories seem to be quite different [1]. We have sampled no more than four martian craters, but almost every one of the lunar meteorites apparently represents a separate cratering event. Furthermore, most lunar meteorites were apparently ejected from the top meter of the surface, unlike any of the martian meteorites. We have measured noble gases in two bulk samples of the lunar meteorite QUE93069 and three of Calcalong Creek, ranging in size from 7 to 15 mg. Averaged results are given in Table 1. Both meteorites contain solar-wind-implanted noble gas. QUE 93069, which is a mature anorthositic regolith breccia [2], contains amounts comparable to the most gas-rich lunar meteorites. The relatively low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of both meteorites suggest surface exposures no more than 2.5 Ga ago [3]. Calcalong Creek has readily observable spallogenic gas. The 131Xe/126Xe ratio of 4.8+/-0.3 corresponds to an average shielding depth of slightly more than 40 gm/cm^2 [4]. In common with many lunar breccias, Calcalong Creek has been exposed to cosmic rays for several hundred Ma (calculations based on [4] and [5]). The 3He apparent exposure age is much shorter, suggesting diffusive loss of He. To determine the detailed exposure history, it is necessary to have measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides. Our samples were too small to measure 81Kr, but [6] have measured 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. Their data are consistent with either extended exposure at <70 gm/cm^2 in the lunar regolith followed by a short (200,000 years) transit to Earth, or with ejection from several meters depth about 2 Ma ago [6]. Our data, requiring several hundred Ma of exposure at an average depth of 40-50 gm/cm^2, are clearly more consistent with the first scenario. The only other lunar meteorite which could have been ejected at the same time is MAC 88104/5 [1], but the chemical differences

  11. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: Application to noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Río, Fernando del Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J. Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  12. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almloef, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases helium through xenon were determined using large flexible one-particle basis sets in conjunction with high-level treatments of electron correlation. The electron correlation methods include single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory (CCSD), an extension of CCSD that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), and second order perturbation theory (MP2). The computed alpha and gamma values are estimated to be accurate to within a few percent. Agreement with experimental data for the static hyperpolarizability gamma is good for neon and xenon, but for argon and krypton the differences are larger than the combined theoretical and experimental uncertainties. Based on our calculations, we suggest that the experimental value of gamma for argon is too low; adjusting this value would bring the experimental value of gamma for krypton into better agreement with our computed result. The MP2 values for the polarizabilities of neon, argon, krypton and zenon are in reasonabe agreement with the CCSD and CCSD(T) values, suggesting that this less expensive method may be useful in studies of polarizabilities for larger systems.

  14. The noble gases adsorption on boron-rich boron nitride nanotubes: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Guo, Chen

    2017-07-01

    In this work, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have systematically explored the noble gases (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr) adsorption on boron-rich boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) surface with antisite boron atom. One or two nitrogen atoms of BNNTs are replaced by boron atoms, which are considered as boron-rich BNNTs for Ng adsorption. It is found that the boron-rich BNNTs can adsorb Ng in exothermic process, and the adsorption energies increase in order from He to Kr. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and noncovalent interactions (NCIs) calculations show that the interactions between boron-rich BNNTs and Ng are noncovalent, and the interactions for Ar and Kr are obviously larger than those for He and Ne. The charge transfer from Ng to boron-rich BNNTs and the changes of energy gap caused by Ng adsorption demonstrate that the boron-rich BNNTs are expected to become the Ng adsorption and sensing materials. Moreover, the 2B-BNNTs do not decrease the Ng adsorption interactions on boron-rich BNNTs, compared with 1B-BNNTs. It is expected that the present results will provide a useful guide to develop novel boron nitride nanomaterials for storage and application of Ng.

  15. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: application to noble gases.

    PubMed

    del Río, Fernando; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  16. Pressure effects on the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, C. D. R.; González-Díaz, D.; Correia, P. M. M.; Biagi, S.; Silva, A. L. M.; Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2016-12-01

    A study of the effect of gas pressure in the position resolution of an interacting X or γ-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 was calculated for several gas pressures (1-10 bar) and for photon energies between 1 and 60 keV, being possible to establish a linear relation between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in the indicated energy range, as intuitively expected. We show how, at high pressures and low photoelectron energies, this intrinsic 1/P scaling is modified due to the diffusion of the primary ionization in the direction perpendicular to the electric field. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and microscopic simulations is presented in this work and discussed. In the majority of cases, a good agreement is observed. The conditions to achieve position resolutions down to 10 μm in a realistic detector are shown and discussed.

  17. Virial based equations of state with account of three-body interaction for noble gases and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmatov, Z. A.; Khokonov, A. Kh; Khokonov, M. Kh

    2016-11-01

    Within the frame of molecular dynamics the equations of state of noble gases and their mixtures have been obtained by means of time averaging procedure for virial based equation with account of three-body interaction. It has been shown, that equations of state can be extrapolated by van-der-Waals-type equations. The corresponding parameters have been calculated. A visible foliation of Xe and Kr components of Kob-Andersen mixture has been found.

  18. Fractionated Noble Gases in Martian Meteorite ALH 84001 — An Indicator for Water-Rock Interaction, or a Sample of Ancient Atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bart, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Crowther, S. A.; Filiberto, J.; Gilmour, J. D.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Ott, U.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2017-10-01

    Noble gases in the nakhlite and ALH84001 Martian meteorites are still a mystery, but could tell us about either the history of the Martian atmosphere, Martian water rock interaction or - likely - both!

  19. A molecular description of how noble gases and nitrogen bind to a model site of anesthetic action.

    PubMed

    Trudell, J R; Koblin, D D; Eger, E I

    1998-08-01

    How some noble and diatomic gases produce anesthesia remains unknown. Although these gases have apparently minimal capacities to interact with a putative anesthetic site, xenon is a clinical anesthetic, and argon, krypton, and nitrogen produce anesthesia at hyperbaric pressures. In contrast, neon, helium, and hydrogen do not cause anesthesia at partial pressures up to their convulsant thresholds. We propose that anesthetic sites influenced by noble or diatomic gases produce binding energies composed of London dispersion and charge-induced dipole energies that are sufficient to overcome the concurrent unfavorable decrease in entropy that occurs when a gas molecule occupies the site. To test this hypothesis, we used the x-ray diffraction model of the binding site for Xe in metmyoglobin. This site offers a positively charged moiety of histidine 93 that is 3.8 A from Xe. We simulated placement of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, H2, and N2 sequentially at this binding site and calculated the binding energies, as well as the repulsive entropy contribution. We used free energies obtained from tonometry experiments to validate the calculated binding energies. We used partial pressures of gases that prevent response to a noxious stimulus (minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]) as the anesthetic endpoint. The calculated binding energies correlated with binding energies derived from the in vivo (ln) data (RTln[MAC], where R is the gas constant and T is absolute temperature) with a slope near 1.0, indicating a parallel between the Xe binding site in metmyoglobin and the anesthetic site of action of noble and diatomic gases. Nonimmobilizing gases (Ne, He, and H2) could be distinguished by an unfavorable balance between binding energies and the repulsive entropy contribution. These gases also differed in their inability to displace water from the cavity. The Xe binding site in metmyoglobin is a good model for the anesthetic sites of action of noble and diatomic gases. The

  20. Santa Lucia (2008) (L6) Chondrite, a Recent Fall: Composition, Noble Gases, Nitrogen and Cosmic Ray Exposure Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.; Varela, Maria Eugenia; Joron, Jean Louis

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Lucia (2008)—one the most recent Argentine meteorite fall, fell in San Juan province, Argentina, on 23 January 2008. Several masses (total ~6 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour. Chemical data [olivine (Fa24.4) and low-Ca pyroxene (En77.8 Fs20.7 Wo1.6)] indicate that Santa Luica (2008) is a member of the low iron L chondrite group, corresponding to the equilibrated petrologic type 6. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature Committee (NomCom) of the Meteoritical Society (Meteoritic Bulletin, no. 97). We report about the chemical composition of the major mineral phases, its bulk trace element abundance, its noble gas and nitrogen data. The cosmic ray exposure age based on cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar around 20 Ma is comparable to one peak of L chondrites. The radiogenic K-Ar age of 2.96 Ga, while the young U, Th-He are of 1.2 Ga indicates that Santa Lucia (2008) lost radiogenic 4He more recently. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c and absence of solar wind noble gases are consistent with irradiation in a large body. Heavy noble gases (Ar/Kr/Xe) indicated trapped gases similar to ordinary chondrites. Krypton and neon indicates irradiation in large body, implying large pre-atmospheric meteoroid.

  1. Measuring radioactive noble gases by absorption in polycarbonates and other organics: From radon indoors to nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S.

    2013-07-01

    The report summarizes recent research and practice of using materials with high absorption ability to noble gases to measure their radioactive isotopes. Most of the studies employ bisphenol-A based polycarbonates, because of their remarkably high absorption ability to noble gases. This is the material of which commercial CDs/DVDs are made and they may serve as serendipitous, already available in dwellings, radon and thoron detectors. We present the essence of the gathered experimental evidence that the CD/DVD method can successfully address some long-lasted problems in radon dosimetry: The first is making sufficiently precise retrospective 222Rn dosimetry for the purposes of epidemiological studies and risk estimation. The second is rapid identification of buildings with radon problem. We demonstrate how this can be used to develop an integrated approach to the radon problem. Within this approach detection, diagnostic and mitigation are considered as an unified whole, and the interval between the decision to provide disks for analysis and the complete mitigation of the building, if radon problem is identified, is short. Besides radon and thoron, bisphenol-A based polycarbonates were successfully used to measure 85Kr and 133Xe for the purposes of the effluents control and nuclear safety of nuclear installations. The perspectives to employ other organic materials in which noble gases are highly soluble for measurement of their radioactive isotopes are also discussed.

  2. Noble gases, nitrogen, and methane from the deep interior to the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    Titan's thick N2-CH4 atmosphere is unlike any in the Solar System, and its origin has been shrouded in mystery for over half a century. Here, I perform a detailed analysis of chemical and isotopic data from the Cassini-Huygens mission to develop the hypothesis that Titan's (non-photochemical) atmospheric gases came from deep within. It is suggested that Titan's CH4, N2, and noble gases originated in a rocky core buried inside the giant satellite, and hydrothermal and cryovolcanic processes were critical to the creation of Titan's atmosphere. Mass balance and chemical equilibrium calculations demonstrate that all aspects of this hypothesis can be considered geochemically plausible with respect to contemporary observational, experimental, and theoretical knowledge. Specifically, I show that a rocky core with a bulk noble gas content similar to that in CI carbonaceous meteorites would contain sufficient 36Ar and 22Ne to explain their reported abundances. I also show that Henry's law constants for noble gases in relevant condensed phases can be correlated with the size of their atoms, which leads to expected mixing ratios for 84Kr (∼0.2 ppbv) and 132Xe (∼0.01 ppbv) that can explain why these species have yet to be detected (Huygens upper limit <10 ppbv). The outgassing of volatiles into Titan's atmosphere may be restricted by the stability of clathrate hydrates in Titan's interior. The noble gas geochemistry also provides significant new insights into the origin of N2 and CH4 on Titan, as I find that Ar and N2, and Kr and CH4 should exhibit similar phase partitioning behavior on Titan. One implication is that over 95% of Titan's N2 may still reside in the interior. Another key result is that the upper limit from the Huygens GC-MS on the Kr/CH4 ratio in Titan's atmosphere is far too low to be consistent with accretion of primordial CH4 clathrate, which motivates me to consider endogenic production of CH4 from CO2 as a result of geochemical reactions between liquid

  3. Initial results of noble gases in micrometeorites from the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baecker, B.; Cordier, C.; Folco, L.; Trieloff, M.; Ott, U.

    2012-12-01

    The bulk of extraterrestrial matter collected by Earth is in the form of micrometeorites, which have a main flux onto Earth at about 220 μm in diameter [1]. According to the petrographic and geochemical data, most of the small micrometeorites have been related to CM chondrites [2]. Recent studies suggest that larger micrometeorites (> 300μm) mostly derive from ordinary chondrite sources e.g. [3-5]. Following some models [6], they may have made important contributions to the volatile inventory of the Earth. We have initiated a coupled comprehensive survey of noble gas contents and petrography in micrometeorites. While helium and neon are generally dominated by the solar wind contribution, the inventory of heavy primordial noble gases has been hardly characterized so far. In particular, useful data are lacking on the diagnostic isotopic composition of xenon. We hope to fill this gap, since huge amounts of material are available. This might make a contribution towards understanding some aspects of the formation of the solar system and in particular the terrestrial atmosphere. We will present results obtained on "large" micrometeorites from Victoria Land, Transantarctic Mountains. These were collected during a PNRA (Programma Nazionale delle Ricerche in Antartide, Italy) expedition on top of the Miller Butte micrometeorite traps #45 b and c [7]. We reported first results in [8]. Our research includes however, also material from other collections, e.g. CONCORDIA [9, 10]. [1] Love, S.G., Brownlee, D.E. (1993) Science 262, 550-553. [2] Kurat, G. et al. (1994) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 58, 3879-3904. [3] Genge, M.J. et al. (2008) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 43, 497-515. [4] Dobrica, E. et al. (2011) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 46, 1363-1375. [5] Van Ginneken M. et al. (2012) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 47, 228-247. [6] Maurette, M. et al. (2000) Planetary and Space Science 48, 1117-1137. [7] Rochette P. et al. (2008) Proceedings of the National Academy

  4. What CO2 well gases tell us about the origin of noble gases in the mantle and their relationship to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Chris J; Holland, Greg

    2008-11-28

    Study of commercially produced volcanic CO2 gas associated with the Colorado Plateau, USA, has revealed substantial new information about the noble gas isotopic composition and elemental abundance pattern of the mantle. Combined with published data from mid-ocean ridge basalts, it is now clear that the convecting mantle has a maximum (20)Ne/(22)Ne isotopic composition, indistinguishable from that attributed to solar wind-implanted (SWI) neon in meteorites. This is distinct from the higher (20)Ne/(22)Ne isotopic value expected for solar nebula gases. The non-radiogenic xenon isotopic composition of the well gases shows that 20 per cent of the mantle Xe is 'solar-like' in origin, but cannot resolve the small isotopic difference between the trapped meteorite 'Q'-component and solar Xe. The mantle primordial (20)Ne/(132)Xe is approximately 1400 and is comparable with the upper end of that observed in meteorites. Previous work using the terrestrial (129)I - (129)Xe mass balance demands that almost 99 per cent of the Xe (and therefore other noble gases) has been lost from the accreting solids and that Pu-I closure age models have shown this to have occurred in the first ca 100Ma of the Earth's history. The highest concentrations of Q-Xe and solar wind-implanted (SWI)-Ne measured in meteorites allow for this loss and these high-abundance samples have a Ne/Xe ratio range compatible with the 'recycled-air-corrected' terrestrial mantle. These observations do not support models in which the terrestrial mantle acquired its volatiles from the primary capture of solar nebula gases and, in turn, strongly suggest that the primary terrestrial atmosphere, before isotopic fractionation, is most probably derived from degassed trapped volatiles in accreting material.By contrast, the non-radiogenic argon, krypton and 80 per cent of the xenon in the convecting mantle have the same isotopic composition and elemental abundance pattern as that found in seawater with a small sedimentary Kr

  5. Noble gases preserve history of retentive continental crust in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Smye, Andrew J.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-06-01

    Budgets of 4He and 40Ar provide constraints on the chemical evolution of the solid Earth and atmosphere. Although continental crust accounts for the majority of 4He and 40Ar degassed from the Earth, degassing mechanisms are subject to scholarly debate. Here we provide a constraint on crustal degassing by comparing the noble gases accumulated in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir, New Mexico USA, with the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. A detailed geological model of the reservoir is used to provide absolute abundances and geostatistical uncertainty of 4He, 40Ar, 21Ne, 20Ne, 36Ar, and 84Kr. The present-day production rate of crustal radiogenic 4He and 40Ar, henceforth referred to as 4He* and 40Ar*, is estimated using the basement composition, surface and mantle heat flow, and seismic estimates of crustal density. After subtracting mantle and atmospheric contributions, the reservoir contains less than 0.02% of the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. This shows unequivocally that radiogenic noble gases are effectively retained in cratonic continental crust over millennial timescales. This also requires that approximately 1.5 Gt of mantle derived CO2 migrated through the crust without mobilizing the crustally accumulated gases. This observation suggests transport along a localized fracture network. Therefore, the retention of noble gases in stable crystalline continental crust allows shallow accumulations of radiogenic gases to record tectonic history. At Bravo Dome, the crustal 4He*/40Ar* ratio is one fifth of the expected crustal production ratio, recording the preferential release of 4He during the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny, 300 Ma.

  6. Degassing of Noble Gases in Mid-Ocean Ridge and Ocean-Island Basalts: A Self- Consistent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present results from numerical degassing models for H2O, CO2, He, Ne, and Ar during ascent-driven decompression of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and ocean island basalts (OIBs). Degassing is modeled for a range of decompression rates, encompassing equilibrium through disequilibrium, and for open-system loss of exsolved gas ranging from 100% through 0% (closed-system). Our calculations predict the abundances and elemental ratios of noble gases dissolved in the melt during ascent to the sea floor. The resultant degassing trajectories are compared against measured volatiles in oceanic basalt glasses. We also calculate abundances and elemental ratios of the exsolved volatiles forming bubbles within the magma and compare them against measured values from crushed basalt glasses. From a comprehensive compilation of published analyses we find that concentrations and elemental ratios of CO2, He, Ne and Ar in MORB and OIB glasses are consistent with varying degrees of open-system degassing during magma ascent. Exsolution of He and Ne are primarily controlled by their solubilities. Because solubilities are dependent on fugacities via Henry's law, exsolution of He and Ne is dependent on the CO2 content of the magma. In contrast, Ar exsolution appears to be kinetically controlled, consistent with its relatively low diffusivity. CO2 and H2O concentrations of the modeled parental magma are within the range of observed values (1000 to 5000 ppm). We find that noble gases in MORBs are explained self-consistently by degassing of a parental magma with initial noble gas concentrations that fall within the range of values derived from hydrothermal 3He/CO2 ratios and measured values in popping rock 2ΠD43. Most OIBs are best explained by degassing of a parental magma with similar radiogenic and nucleogenic noble-gases, but an enrichment in primordial 3He and ^{22}Ne, relative to MORB.

  7. Seawater-Derived Noble Gases and Halogens Preserved in Peridotite and Eclogite from the Subduction-Type Sanbagawa Metamorphic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumino, H.; Endo, S.; Wallis, S.; Mizukami, T.; Burgess, R.; Holland, G.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction volcanism is generally considered to form a 'subduction barrier' that efficiently recycles volatile components contained in subducted slabs back to the Earth's surface (Staudacher and Allegre, 1988, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 89, 173-183). Nevertheless, subduction of sediment and seawater-dominated pore fluids to the deep mantle has been proposed to account for heavy noble gas (Ar, Kr and Xe) non-radiogenic elemental abundance and isotopic pattern of the convecting mantle (Holland and Ballentine, 2006, Nature 441, 186-191). To verify whether and how subduction fluids preserve a seawater signature, we have determined noble gas and halogen compositions of the Higashi-akaishi peridotite and Western Iratsu eclogite bodies in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, southwest Japan, in which relicts of slab-derived water are contained as hydrous mineral inclusions in wedge mantle rocks exhumed from depths in excess of 100 km (Mizukami et al., 2004, Nature 427, 432-436) and aqueous fluid inclusions in associated slab-derived eclogites (Endo et al., 2009, J. Metamorphic Geol. 27, 371-384; Endo, 2010, Isl. Arc 19, 313-335). The striking similarities of the observed noble gas and halogen compositions of the Higashi-akaishi peridotite with marine pore fluids (Sumino et al., 2010, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 294, 163-172) challenge a popular concept, in which the water flux into the mantle wedge is only by hydrous minerals in altered oceanic crust and sediment (e.g., Schmidt and Poli, 1998, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 163, 361-379). The Western Iratsu eclogite also exhibits non-radiogenic noble gas elemental ratios well explained by a mixing between seawater-derived and sedimentary components. These results indicate that subduction and closed system retention of marine pore fluid occurs up to depths of at least 100 km. The subducted halogen and noble gas compositions are clearly distinct from those of arc volcanic gases. This implies that the ultramafic-mafic metamorphic rocks of

  8. Extraction of Solar Wind Nitrogen and Noble Gases From the Genesis Gold Foil Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlutter, D. J.; Pepin, R. O.

    2005-12-01

    The Genesis gold foil is a bulk solar wind collector, integrating fluences from all three of the wind regimes. Pyrolytic extraction of small foil samples at Minnesota yielded He fluences, corrected for backscatter, in good agreement with measurements by on-board spacecraft instruments, and He/Ne elemental ratios close to those implanted in collector foils deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions. Isotopic distributions of He, Ne and Ar are under study. Pyrolysis to temperatures above the gold melting point generates nitrogen blanks large enough to obscure the solar-wind nitrogen component. An alternative technique for nitrogen and noble gas extraction, by room-temperature amalgamation of the gold foil surface, will be discussed. Ne and Ar releases in preliminary tests of this technique on small foil samples were close to 100% of the amounts expected from the high-temperature pyrolysis yields, indicating that amalgamation quantitatively liberates gases from several hundred angstroms deep in the gold, beyond the implantation depth of most of the solar wind. Present work is focused on two problems currently interfering with accurate nitrogen measurements at the required picogram to sub-picogram levels: a higher than expected blank likely due to tiny air bubbles rolled into the gold sheet during fabrication, and the presence of a refractory hydrocarbon film on Genesis collector surfaces (the "brown stain") that, if left in place on the foil, shields the underlying gold from mercury attack. We have found, however, that the film is efficiently removed within tens of seconds by oxygen plasma ashing. Potential nitrogen contaminants introduced during the crash of the sample return canister are inert in amalgamation, and so are not hazards to the measurements.

  9. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from LEW88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Antarctic meteorite LEW88516 has been classified as a member of the SNC group of meteorites, specifically a shergottite. It is reported to be remarkably similar in mineralogy, petrogenesis and chemistry to the previously known ALH77005 shergottite, with both being compositionally distinct from other shergottites. LEW88516 shows pervasive shock features and has been found to contain glass veins attributable to a shock origin. In an effort to determine whether the glass in LEW88516 contains any of the isotopically-heavy trapped nitrogen component observed in EETA 79001 glass, as well as the related high-Ar-40/Ar-36 and high-Xe-129/Xe-132 components, we undertook an analysis of an 11.9 mg glass sample (LEW88516,4) provided to us by H. Y. McSween, Jr. as part of a consortium study of this meteorite. Nitrogen and noble gases were extracted from LEW88516,4 in a series of combustion steps at increasing temperatures followed by a final pyrolysis. Initial steps at 550 C were intended to remove any surface-sited nitrogen-containing contaminants, while the 700 C step was expected to show the onset of release of a trapped argon component, based on our previous data for EETA 79001. It was hoped that the bulk of any trapped gas release would be concentrated in one of two steps at 1100 C and approximately 1400 C, maximizing our analytical sensitivity. Results of the analysis are shown. Except for He and Ne, data obtained for the 550 C steps will be omitted from further consideration on the assumption that they represent terrestrial contamination.

  10. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ13C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., 4He, 20Ne, 36Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, 4He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, 36Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  11. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing.

  12. H3(+) as a trap for noble gases-3: multiple trapping of neon, argon, and krypton in X(n)H3(+) (n = 1-3).

    PubMed

    Pauzat, F; Ellinger, Y; Pilmé, J; Mousis, O

    2009-05-07

    Recent studies on the formation of XH(3)(+) noble gas complexes have shown strategic implications for the composition of the atmospheres of the giant planets as well as for the composition of comets. One crucial factor in the astrophysical process is the relative abundances of the noble gases versus H(3)(+). It is the context in which the possibility for clustering with more than one noble gas (X(n)H(3)(+) up to n = 3) has been investigated for noble gases X ranging from neon to krypton. In order to assert our results, a variety of methods have been used including ab initio coupled cluster CCSD and CCSD(T), MP2, and density functional BH&HLYP levels of theory. All complexes with one, two, and three noble gases are found to be stable in the Ne, Ar, and Kr families. These stable structures are planar with the noble gases attached to the apices of the H(3)(+) triangle. The binding energy of the nth atom, defined as the X(n)H(3)(+) --> X(n-1)H(3)(+) + X reaction energy, increases slightly with n varying from 1 to 3 in the neon series, while it decreases in the argon series and shows a minimum for n = 2 in the krypton series. The origin of this phenomenon is to be found in the variations in the respective vibrational energies. A topological analysis of the electron localization function shows the importance of the charge transfer from the noble gases toward H(3)(+) as a driving force in the bonding along the series. It is also consistent with the increase in the atomic polarizabilities from neon to krypton. Rotational constants and harmonic frequencies are reported in order to provide a body of data to be used for the detection in laboratory prior to space observations. This study strongly suggests that the noble gases could be sequestered even in an environment where the H(3)(+) abundance is small.

  13. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in 20Ne and 21Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high 3He 4He ratios. The high 20Ne 22Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO2 well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. ?? 1993.

  14. Infiltration of river water to a shallow aquifer investigated with 3H/ 3He, noble gases and CFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, U.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Hofer, M.; Imboden, D. M.; Baur, H.; Kipfer, R.

    1999-09-01

    Noble gas isotopes ( 3He, 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), tritium ( 3H), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and dissolved oxygen (O 2) were seasonally measured in a small groundwater system recharged by infiltration of river water at Linsental, northeastern Switzerland. All Groundwater samples contained an excess of atmospheric noble gases ('excess air') usually with an elemental composition equal to air. The concentrations of atmospheric noble gases in the groundwater were used to calculate the excess air component and the water temperature at recharge. The noble gas temperatures (NGTs) in the boreholes close to the river vary seasonally, however, the average NGT of all samples lies close to the mean annual temperature of the river water. Groundwater ages were calculated using the tritium/helium-3 ( 3H/ 3He) dating method. The water ages of the samples obtained near the river depend on the amount of recently infiltrated river water and are young during times of active river discharge. In contrast, the mean water age of about 3 years of the deep aquifer remained nearly constant over the sampling period. The observed CFC-11 (CFCl 3) and CFC-12 (CF 2Cl 2) concentrations are significantly higher than the atmospheric equilibrium concentrations and therefore CFCs do not provide any direct information on the residence time of the groundwater. Nevertheless, the CFC excess in the groundwater shows a linear increase with the 3H/ 3He age. Additionally, both accumulation of radiogenic He ( 4He rad) and O 2 consumption are strongly correlated with residence time. All these correlations can be interpreted either in terms of mixing of recently infiltrated river water with older groundwater or in terms of accumulation/consumption rates.

  15. Noble gases in the diamond-free ureilite, ALHA 78019 - The roles of shock and nebular processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The noble gases for unshocked ureilite ALHA 78019 and moderately shocked ureilite Kenna are measured. The preparation of the samples and the analysis procedures are described. The analyses reveal that for ALHA 78019 the residue yield equals 2.5 percent of the original mass of the meteorite and 25 percent of the gas is contained in the fine-grained amorphous carbon, and for Kenna the residue yield equals 2.9 percent and 60 percent of the noble gas is contained in the carbon. It is noted that the gases and carbon are present in the ureilites prior ot the shock that produced the diamond, and the shock has no effect on the origin of the carbon in these meteorites. The source of the gas-rich carbon in the ureilite ALHA 78019 is investigated; the Xe-130/C ratio, which equals 4.2 x 10 to the -10th, implies that the gases were acquired while the ureilite was exposed to the solar nebula.

  16. IMPACT REGIMES AND POST-FORMATION SEQUESTRATION PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF HEAVY NOBLE GASES IN TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Sylvain; Thomas, Caroline; Schmitt, Bernard

    2010-05-10

    The difference between the measured atmospheric abundances of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon for Venus, Earth, and Mars is striking. Because these abundances drop by at least 2 orders of magnitude as one moves outward from Venus to Mars, the study of the origin of this discrepancy is a key issue that must be explained if we are to fully understand the different delivery mechanisms of the volatiles accreted by the terrestrial planets. In this work, we aim to investigate whether it is possible to quantitatively explain the variation of the heavy noble gas abundances measured on Venus, Earth, and Mars, assuming that cometary bombardment was the main delivery mechanism of these noble gases to the terrestrial planets. To do so, we use recent dynamical simulations that allow the study of the impact fluxes of comets upon the terrestrial planets during the course of their formation and evolution. Assuming that the mass of noble gases delivered by comets is proportional to the rate at which they collide with the terrestrial planets, we show that the krypton and xenon abundances in Venus and Earth can be explained in a manner consistent with the hypothesis of cometary bombardment. In order to explain the krypton and xenon abundance differences between Earth and Mars, we need to invoke the presence of large amounts of CO{sub 2}-dominated clathrates in the Martian soil that would have efficiently sequestered these noble gases. Two different scenarios based on our model can also be used to explain the differences between the neon and argon abundances of the terrestrial planets. In the first scenario, cometary bombardment of these planets would have occurred at epochs contemporary with the existence of their primary atmospheres. Comets would have been the carriers of argon, krypton, and xenon, while neon would have been gravitationally captured by the terrestrial planets. In the second scenario, we consider impacting comets that contained significantly smaller amounts of argon

  17. A comprehensive study of noble gases and nitrogen in "Hypatia", a diamond-rich pebble from SW Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avice, Guillaume; Meier, Matthias M. M.; Marty, Bernard; Wieler, Rainer; Kramers, Jan D.; Langenhorst, Falko; Cartigny, Pierre; Maden, Colin; Zimmermann, Laurent; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2015-12-01

    This is a follow-up study of a work by Kramers et al. (2013) on a very unusual diamond-rich rock fragment found in the area of south west Egypt in the south-western side of the Libyan Desert Glass strewn field. This pebble, called Hypatia, is composed of almost pure carbon. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that Hypatia is mainly made of defect-rich diamond containing lonsdaleite and multiple deformation bands. These characteristics are compatible with an impact origin on Earth and/or in space. We also analyzed concentrations and isotopic compositions of all five noble gases and nitrogen in several ∼mg sized Hypatia samples. These data confirm the conclusion by Kramers et al. (2013) that Hypatia is extra-terrestrial. The sample is relatively rich in trapped noble gases with an isotopic composition being close to the Q component found in many types of meteorites. 40Ar/36Ar ratios in individual steps are as low as 0.4 ± 0.3. Cosmic-ray produced ;cosmogenic; 21Ne is present in concentrations corresponding to a nominal cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age of roughly 0.1 Myr if produced in a typical meter-sized meteoroid. Such an atypically low nominal CRE age suggests high shielding in a considerably larger body. In addition to the Xe-Q composition, an excess of radiogenic 129Xe (from the decay of short-lived radioactive 129I) is observed (129Xe /132Xe = 1.18 + / - 0.03). Two isotopically distinct N components are present, an isotopically heavy component (δ15N ∼ + 20 ‰) released at low temperatures and a major isotopically light component (δ15N ∼ - 110 ‰) at higher temperatures. This disequilibrium in N suggests that the diamonds in Hypatia were formed in space rather than upon impact on Earth (δN15atm = 0 ‰). All our data are broadly consistent with concentrations and isotopic compositions of noble gases in at least three different types of carbon-rich meteoritic materials: carbon-rich veins in ureilites

  18. Elliptical polarization favors long quantum orbits in high-order above-threshold ionization of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lai, XuanYang; Wang, ChuanLiang; Chen, YongJu; Hu, ZiLong; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, ZhiZhan; Becker, Wilhelm

    2013-01-25

    We demonstrate the significant role of long quantum orbits in strong-field atomic processes by investigating experimentally and theoretically the above-threshold ionization spectra of noble gases in intense elliptically polarized laser pulses. With increasing laser ellipticity, the yields of different energy regions of the measured electron spectrum in high-order above-threshold ionization drop at different rates. The experimental features can be reproduced by a theoretical simulation based on quantum-orbit theory, revealing that increasing ellipticity favors the contributions of the long quantum orbits in the high-order above-threshold ionization process.

  19. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  20. Theoretical calculation of transport properties of the noble gases He and Ne and their binary mixtures at low density

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiufeng; Li Xi

    1996-08-01

    Using the Tang-Toennies potential model and a set of expressions given by J. Kestin et al., we calculate the transport properties of the two noble gases He and Ne and of their binary mixtures, based upon the calculation of the interaction potential. Our calculated results for the transport properties are restricted to low densities but cover the full temperature interval extending from 50 K to the onset of ionization; the mole fraction of the binary mixtures is x{sub 1}:x{sub 2} = 0.25:0.75. Our results are comparable to the best theoretical results given by J. Kestin et al.

  1. The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in water up to the critical point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, R.W.; Clynne, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases Ar, He, Ne, Kr, and Xe in pure water was measured from 298 to 561??K. These data in turn were extrapolated to the critical point of water, thus providing a complete set of Henry's law constants from 274 to 647??K when combined with the existing literature data. Equations describing the behavior of the Henry's law constants over this temperature range are also given. The data do not confirm extrapolations of empirical correlations based on low-temperature solubility data. ?? 1978 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  2. Trapped solar wind noble gases, kr81/kr exposure ages and k/ar ages in apollo 11 lunar material.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, P; Geiss, J; Graf, H; Grögler, N; Krähenbühl, U; Schwaller, H; Schwarzmüller, J; Stettler, A

    1970-01-30

    Grain size and etching experiments show that the fine lunar material contains large amounts of trapped solar wind particles. Elemental and isotopic compositions of the noble gases in solar material and in the terrestrial atmosphere are significantly different, except for the Ar(36)/ Ar(38) and the Kr isotope ratios. Exposure ages of two rocks and of the fine material are between 380 and 510 x 10(6) years. Feldspar concentrates give K/Ar ages of 3220 and 3300 x 10(6) years, significantly higher than the unseparated rock.

  3. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  4. Composition of solar wind noble gases released by surface oxidation of a metal separate from the Weston meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on a set of experiments intended to test the feasibility of determining elemental and isotopic ratios of the noble gases and nitrogen in the solar wind in metal separates from gas-rich ordinary chondrites. Helium, neon, and argon show clear evidence of a solar wind signature, while no solar component could be identified for xenon and nitrogen. Helium, neon, and argon elemental isotopic ratios appear to depend on depth within the metal grains. The ratios derived indicate that the Weston meteorite did not acquire its solar wind gases from a recent exposure to solar wind, but more probably at a time in the past similar to or even earlier than the exposure time of Apollo 17 breccias. The Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio, in tandem with other recent determinations of this value, indicates that the solar and terrestrial values can no longer be assumed to be equivalent.

  5. Composition of solar wind noble gases released by surface oxidation of a metal separate from the Weston meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on a set of experiments intended to test the feasibility of determining elemental and isotopic ratios of the noble gases and nitrogen in the solar wind in metal separates from gas-rich ordinary chondrites. Helium, neon, and argon show clear evidence of a solar wind signature, while no solar component could be identified for xenon and nitrogen. Helium, neon, and argon elemental isotopic ratios appear to depend on depth within the metal grains. The ratios derived indicate that the Weston meteorite did not acquire its solar wind gases from a recent exposure to solar wind, but more probably at a time in the past similar to or even earlier than the exposure time of Apollo 17 breccias. The Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio, in tandem with other recent determinations of this value, indicates that the solar and terrestrial values can no longer be assumed to be equivalent.

  6. Implications of noble gases in a recently recognized Martian meteorite (ALH84001) for the degassing history of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    1994-01-01

    For terrestrial planets, atmospheric compositions are not static, but evolve with time, in part due to degassing of the interior. Unfortunately, the evolution is slow enough that it is usually not observable on human timescales, or even on the timescales of rocks that preserve samples of Earth's ancient atmosphere. Preliminary results on a recently recognized Martian meteorite, ALH84001, indicate that it is a very old rock, and has a relatively high noble gas content suggestive of atmospheric incorporation, but with an isotopic composition slightly inconsistent with currently known Martian reservoirs. Hence, this rock may provide a sample of ancient Martian atmosphere, which can be used to test models of volatile evolution (in particular, degassing) on Mars. ALH84001 is a cumulate orthopyroxenite. Although originally classified as a diogenite, its oxygen isotopes, and several chemical and petrographic features, strong suggest that it is, like the SNC meteorites, Martian. A Sm-Nd crystallization age of 4.5 Ga has been reported. The meteorite is rich in noble gases, compared to most SNC's. In many respects the noble gases are typical of SNC meteorites. However, there are some subtle differences. In particular, the Xe isotopes in SNC meteorites can be explained as a mixture of Martian atmospheric Xe (as represented by glass in EETA 79001), the Xe in the dunite Chassigny (usually assumed to be representative of the Martian interior, and with lower (129)Xe/(132)Xe, (134)Xe/(132)Xe and (136)Xe/(132)Xe ratios), and later additions from known processes like fission, spallation and terrestrial contamination. The isotopic composition of ALH84001 is inconsistent (at greater than 2-3 sigma) with any mixture of those components. Even if no accumulation of fission Xe during the age of the rock is assumed, there is too little (136)Xe and (134)Xe for the amount of (129)Xe measured.

  7. Use of IMS data and its potential for research through global noble gases concentration maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzi, Lucrezia; Kalinowski, Martin; Gueibe, Christophe; Camps, Johan; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Schoeppner, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) established for verification purposes a global monitoring system for atmospheric radioisotopes and noble gas radioactivity. Daily activity concentrations have been collected worldwide for over 15 years providing unique data sets with long term time series that can be used for atmospheric circulation dynamics analysis. In this study, we want to emphasize the value of worldwide noble gas data by reconstructing global xenon concentration maps and comparing these observations with ATM simulations. By creating a residual plot, we can improve our understanding of our source estimation level for each region.

  8. Noble Gases in Recently Found Hot and Cold Desert Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, P.; Maden, C.; Busemann, H.

    2016-08-01

    We report He-Xe noble gas data for 7 lunar meteorites. Of 4 paired and unbrecciated mare basalts 2 surprisingly contain abundant solar wind - so far unknown for mare basalts. Potential implications for our understanding of the Moon will be discussed.

  9. Noble Gases in Giant Cluster IDP U2-20GCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, R. O.; Palma, R. L.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D.

    2015-07-01

    Noble gas analyses of 15 particles from U2-20GCA reveal a suite of trapped 20Ne/22Ne ratios similar to HL-Ne, Q-Ne and SW-Ne. Highly spallogenic 21Ne/22Ne points to past residence in an environment of intense energetic proton radiation.

  10. The Electroluminescence of Pure Noble Gases Below the Threshold for Electron Avalanche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, C. A. N.; Ferreira, M. F. A.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Stauffer, A. D.

    The study of the light produced when electrons are released in a noble gas by radiation, the so-called primary scintillation, has been for a long time the subject of research (Sayres and Wu, 1957; Bennett, 1962; Leite, 1980) and has been applied to nuclear radiation detection among other fields.

  11. Noble gases in crude oils from the Paris Basin, France: Implications for the origin of fluids and constraints on oil-water-gas interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Marty, Bernard

    1995-08-01

    In order to investigate the potential of noble gases to trace the dynamics of oil reservoirs, we have analysed the abundance and isotopic composition of all noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in crude oils from the Paris Basin, France, using a new extraction and purification procedure. The main oil reservoirs are presently located in the Jurassic (Dogger) limestone and in the Triassic (Keuper) sandstone, but hydrocarbons originated from a common source rock formation located in the interbedded Liassic sequence. Despite this common origin, the abundance and isotopic ratios of the noble gases differ between the Dogger and the Keuper. The isotopic compositions of Kr and Xe are indistinguishable from that of air. 3He/ 4He ratios, higher than those predicted from radiogenic production in the sediments or in the crust, are attributed to the occurrence of mantle-derived 3He in the basin. Each sedimentary sequence is characterised by well defined and homogeneous 21Ne/ 22Ne and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, which average 0.0306 ± 0.0008 and 312 ± 10 for the Dogger and 0.0367 ± 0.0012 and 664 ± 30 for the Keuper, respectively. The main source of radiogenic noble gases appears to be the continental crust underlying the basin, with possible regional contributions of noble gas isotopes produced in the sediments. The helium and argon isotopic ratios of the Dogger oils are very similar to those observed in geothermal waters flowing in the Dogger aquifer throughout the basin, demonstrating that noble gases in oils derive from associated groundwaters. Oil reservoirs in the Paris Basin therefore accumulate noble gases from wide regions of the continental crust through cross-formational flow of groundwaters and subsequent partitioning into oil. This observation implies that noble gases cannot be directly used to date oils, but can provide time constraints if (1) water/oil interactions are quantified and (2) the residence time as well as the noble gas characteristics of associated

  12. Laboratory shock emplacement of noble gases, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide into basalt, and implications for trapped gases in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Pepin, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Basalts from the Servilleta flows, Taos, NM, described by Lofgren (1983) were analyzed by mass spectrometry for shock-implanted noble gases, N2, and CO2 (which were isotopically labeled) after an exposure to 20-60 GPa shock in the presence of 0.0045-3.0 atm of ambient gas. The results were compared with data available on the constituents of the EETA 79001 meteorite. As expected, the samples shocked in this study attained emplacement efficiencies significantly lower than those apparent for lithology C of EETA 79001. Possible explanations for this difference include atmospheric overpressure at the time of EETA 79001 exposure to shock, the trapping of gas already in vugs by the intruding melt material, or the collapse of gas-filled vugs to form gas-laden glass inclusions.

  13. Noble gases, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon as tracers of flow in the Dakota aquifer, Colorado and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.F.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Macfarlane, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CI) have been analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems, presumably caused by large well screens. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were found in south-eastern Colorado where the Dakota is poorly confined. The tracer data suggest that the first group recharged locally during the last few thousand years and the second group was composed of ground water that recharged earlier during a cooler climate, presumably during the last glacial period (LGP) and mixed aged water. The paleotemperature record archived in this groundwater system indicates that south-eastern Colorado was about 5??C cooler during the LGP than during the late Holocene. Similar temperature changes derived from dissolved noble gases in other aquifer systems have been reported earlier for the south-western United States. The third water type was located down gradient of the first two in the confined Dakota in western and central Kansas. Groundwater residence time of this water mass is on the order of 104-105 yrs and its recharge location is near the Colorado and Kansas border down gradient of the other water types. The study shows the importance of using multiple tracers when investigating ground water systems.A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CL) were analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were located in south-eastern Colorado

  14. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 1; Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.; Franke, L.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade thousands of meteorites have been recovered from hot deserts in the Sahara and Oman. One of the main meteorite concentration surfaces in the Sahara is the Dar al Gani plateau in Libya, which covers a total area of 8000 km2. More than 1000 meteorites have been reported from this area. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and the meteorite density of the Dar al Gani (DaG) field are described in more detail in [1]. In this work we report concentrations of the noble gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar as well as 84Kr and 132Xe in 18 DaG meteorites. In a separate paper we will report the cosmogenic radionuclides [2]. We discuss the thermal history and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) history of these meteorites, and evaluate the effects of the hot desert environment on the noble gas record.

  15. Colloidally separated samples from Allende residues - Noble gases, carbon and an ESCA-study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Kronenbitter, J.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which strengthen the hypothesis of heterogeneity among the carbon- and nitrogen-bearing phases of the Allende meteorite. These data also highlight the possibility of performing physical separations yielding samples in which some of the noble gas- and carbon-bearing phases are extraordinarily predominant over others. The conclusion, based on mass and isotope balance arguments, that a significant portion of the carbonaceous matter in Allende is likely to be gas-poor or gas-free need not weaken the case for carbonaceous carriers for the major noble gas components. The concept that acid-soluble carbonaceous phases contain a multiplicity of components, each of which may have formed under a multiplicity of different physical-chemical conditions, is reemphasized by the results of the present study.

  16. Noble gases in planetary atmospheres - Implications for the origin and evolution of atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Black, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The radiogenic and primordial noble gas contents of the Venus, earth, and Mars atmospheres are compared with one another and with the noble gas content of other extraterrestrial samples, particularly meteorites. Key trends in the primordial noble gas content of terrestrial planetary atmospheres are shown to include: (1) a several-orders-of-magnitude decrease in Ne-20 and Ar-36 from Venus to earth to Mars; (2) a nearly constant Ne-20/Ar-36 ratio, which is comparable to that found in the more primitive carbonaceous chondrites and which is two orders of magnitude smaller than the solar ratio; (3) a sizable fractionation of Ar, Kr, and Xe from their solar ratios, though the degree of fractionation (especially for Ar-36/Xe-132) appears to decrease systematically from carbonaceous chondrites to Mars to earth to Venus; and (4) large differences in Ne and Xe isotopic ratios among earth, meteorites, and the sun. It is suggested that the grain-accretion hypothesis can explain all four trends, though the assumptions needed to achieve this agreement are far from proven.

  17. Minimum alveolar concentrations of noble gases, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride in rats: helium and neon as nonimmobilizers (nonanesthetics)

    PubMed

    Koblin, D D; Fang, Z; Eger, E I; Laster, M J; Gong, D; Ionescu, P; Halsey, M J; Trudell, J R

    1998-08-01

    We assessed the anesthetic properties of helium and neon at hyperbaric pressures by testing their capacity to decrease anesthetic requirement for desflurane using electrical stimulation of the tail as the anesthetic endpoint (i.e., the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]) in rats. Partial pressures of helium or neon near those predicted to produce anesthesia by the Meyer-Overton hypothesis (approximately 80-90 atm), tended to increase desflurane MAC, and these partial pressures of helium and neon produced convulsions when administered alone. In contrast, the noble gases argon, krypton, and xenon were anesthetic with mean MAC values of (+/- SD) of 27.0 +/- 2.6, 7.31 +/- 0.54, and 1.61 +/- 0.17 atm, respectively. Because the lethal partial pressures of nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride overlapped their anesthetic partial pressures, MAC values were determined for these gases by additivity studies with desflurane. Nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride MAC values were estimated to be 110 and 14.6 atm, respectively. Of the gases with anesthetic properties, nitrogen deviated the most from the Meyer-Overton hypothesis. It has been thought that the high pressures of helium and neon that might be needed to produce anesthesia antagonize their anesthetic properties (pressure reversal of anesthesia). We propose an alternative explanation: like other compounds with a low affinity to water, helium and neon are intrinsically without anesthetic effect.

  18. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A. ); Clague, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in [sup 20]Ne and [sup 21]Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios. The high [sup 20]Ne/[sup 22]Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO[sub 2] well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere.

  19. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  20. Examination of (e,2e) scattering models by comparison of momentum profiles of noble gases between experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yusuke; Takahashi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Noboru; Khajuria, Yugal; Udagawa, Yasuo; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2006-07-07

    Momentum profiles have been measured for the two outermost atomic orbitals of noble gases, Ar, Kr and Xe, at incident electron energy of about 2 keV using a newly developed multichannel (e,2e) spectrometer. The experimental results exhibit significantly improved statistics compared with those achieved in previous studies while covering a wide range of momenta up to 3.6 a.u. The results are compared with theoretical calculations using four (e,2e) scattering models, the plane-wave impulse and Born approximations (PWIA and PWBA), and the distorted-wave impulse and Born approximations (DWIA and DWBA). The DWIA and DWBA scattering models have been found to satisfactorily reproduce the experimental momentum profiles in terms of both shape and intensity over the entire momentum range covered, indicating the importance of distorted wave effects for quantitatively describing (e,2e) reaction.

  1. The measurement of radioactive noble gases by DWD in the frame of the Global Atmospheric Watch programme of WMO.

    PubMed

    Steinkopff, T; Dyck, W; Frank, G; Frenzel, S; Salvamoser, J

    2004-01-01

    The Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, German Meteorological Service) is integrated into the Global Atmospheric Watch programme (GAW) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). According to this programme a variety of chemical compounds and radionuclides are measured at global stations. At the research platform "Schneefernerhaus" 7Be, 222Rn, and its decay products, 14C in CO2, tritium as HTO, 85Kr and 133Xe are continuously monitored by the DWD or are sampled and then measured at the central laboratory in Offenbach. The results are used as additional information for studying atmospheric mixing processes or on the other hand as information about the background level of radioactivity. As a main subject of this paper the integration and partly the optimization of sampling and measuring procedures for the detection of noble gases are described. In particular, the methods of quality assurance are discussed for Kr and Xe.

  2. Differences of Terrestrial Alteration Effects in Ordinary Chondrites from Hot and Cold Deserts: Petrography and Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, P.; Loeken, T.; Schultz, L.

    1992-07-01

    Several differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations have been recognized that are attributed to two main causes, namely a general difference in their parent meteoroid populations and/or secondary effects like weathering or pairing (see e.g.[1]). In the last few years several hundred new meteorites have become available from hot desert areas (Nullabor Plain, Roosevelt County, Sahara Desert). Compared to Antarctic meteorites these stones are stored on Earth in very different climatic environments. Thus, both groups should show different patterns of weathering. In this paper we report petrographic observations and noble gas measurements concerning terrestrial alterations of a suite of ordinary chondrites from the Sahara desert and Antarctica. Forty thin sections of desert meteorites (Acfer, El Djouf, Illafegh, Daraj, and Roosevelt County) and 60 thin sections of Antarctic ordinary chondrites (Allan Hills and Frontier Mountain) were investigated microscopically. In addition, in some of these meteorites the concentration and isotopic composition of all noble gases were determined. In this report we will discuss the trapped Kr and Xe only. As already noted by Jull et al. [2] many desert meteorites are heavily weathered. Compared to Antarctic meteorites their proportion of metal and troilite is smaller, while iron oxides and iron hydroxides are more abundant. In Antarctic meteorites most silicates are not severely altered. H- and L-group chondri- tes from the Acfer region and Roosevelt County, however, show a remarkable weathering feature of some silicates: In many of these samples nest-like structures are found that consist of silicate fragments embedded in iron oxide or hydroxide. Different stages of their development can be observed. It starts with the filling by these iron compounds of fine cracks of the original grains. With the process of weathering proceeding these cracks grow and finally destroy larger crystals completely to smaller

  3. GAS-PHASE SEQUESTRATION OF NOBLE GASES IN THE PROTOSOLAR NEBULA: POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES ON THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ozgurel, O.; Mousis, O.; Ali Dib, M. E-mail: ellinger@lct.jussieu.fr E-mail: olivier.mousis@obs-besancon.fr

    2013-11-01

    We address the problem of the sequestration of Ar, Kr, and Xe by H{sub 3}{sup +} in the gas-phase conditions encountered during the cooling of protoplanetary disks when H{sub 3}{sup +} is competing with other species present in the same environment. Using high-level ab initio simulations, we try to quantify other sequestration possibilities involving He, H{sub 5}{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} present in the protosolar nebula. Apart from the fact that H{sub 3}{sup +} complexes formed with heavy noble gases are found to be by far much more stable than those formed with He or H{sub 2}O, we show that H{sub 2}D{sup +} and H{sub 3}O{sup +}, both products of the reactions of H{sub 3}{sup +} with HD and H{sub 2}O, can also be efficient trapping agents for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Meanwhile, the abundance profile of H{sub 3}{sup +} in the outer part of the nebula is revisited with the use of an evolutionary accretion disk model that allows us to investigate the possibility that heavy noble gases can be sequestered by H{sub 3}{sup +} at earlier epochs than those corresponding to their trapping in planetesimals. We find that H{sub 3}{sup +} might be abundant enough in the outer protosolar nebula to trap Xe and Kr prior their condensation epochs, implying that their abundances should be solar in Saturn's current atmosphere and below the observational limit in Titan. The same scenario predicts that comets formed at high heliocentric distances should also be depleted in Kr and Xe. In situ measurements, such as those planed with the Rosetta mission on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, will be critical to check the validity of our hypotheses.

  4. Shock-implanted noble gases - An experimental study with implications for the origin of Martian gases in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt H.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-implantation of gases is studied by artificially shocking whole rock and power samples of terrestrial basalt to pressures of 2-40 GPa. Ar, Kr, Xe, and Ne were implanted into the silicate. It is observed that the amount of implanted gas is linearly proportional to its partial pressure over a pressure range of 0.0001 to 0.1 atmosphere. The fractionation effect in the implanted gas and the gas diffusion properties are examined. The amounts of gas that would have been implanted with 100 percent efficiency are calculated from the measured porosities of the power samples and are compared to observed abundances. It is determined that the implantation efficiencies are approximately 0.5 percent at 2 GPa, 7 percent at 5 GPa, and greater than 50 percent at both 20 and 35 GPa. The experimental data correlate with the shock implantation of Martian gases without mass fractionation into the shock-melted phase of meteorite EETA 79001.

  5. Shock-implanted noble gases - An experimental study with implications for the origin of Martian gases in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt H.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-implantation of gases is studied by artificially shocking whole rock and power samples of terrestrial basalt to pressures of 2-40 GPa. Ar, Kr, Xe, and Ne were implanted into the silicate. It is observed that the amount of implanted gas is linearly proportional to its partial pressure over a pressure range of 0.0001 to 0.1 atmosphere. The fractionation effect in the implanted gas and the gas diffusion properties are examined. The amounts of gas that would have been implanted with 100 percent efficiency are calculated from the measured porosities of the power samples and are compared to observed abundances. It is determined that the implantation efficiencies are approximately 0.5 percent at 2 GPa, 7 percent at 5 GPa, and greater than 50 percent at both 20 and 35 GPa. The experimental data correlate with the shock implantation of Martian gases without mass fractionation into the shock-melted phase of meteorite EETA 79001.

  6. Silicon PIN diode based electron-gamma coincidence detector system for Noble Gases monitoring.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, K; Popov, V Yu; Popov, Yu S

    2017-08-01

    We present a new second generation SiPIN based electron-photon coincidence detector system developed by Lares Ltd. for use in the Noble Gas measurement systems of the International Monitoring System and the On-site Inspection verification regimes of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The SiPIN provide superior energy resolution for electrons. Our work describes the improvements made in the second generation detector cells and the potential use of such detector systems for other applications such as In-Situ Kr-85 measurements for non-proliferation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spin-polarized noble gases: A playground for geometric quantum-phase studies in magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäckerle, G.; Appelt, S.; Mehring, M.

    1998-02-01

    We report on geometric (Berry) phase experiments performed with the Stuttgart nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope utilizing highly polarized noble-gas atoms as sensor nuclei for spatial rotations. Due to the long nuclear spin-relaxation times in the gas phase and the different spin-level schemes of the different isotopes of xenon, 129Xe (I = {1}/{2}) in a rotating magnetic field and 131Xe (I = {3}/{2}) in a rotating electric field gradient, the regime of adiabatic changes to nondegenerate levels can experimentally be extended to the nonadiabatic regime for both nondegenerate and degenerate levels, which is of interest in the field on non-Abelian gauge kinematics.

  8. Diverging effects of isotopic fractionation upon molecular diffusion of noble gases in water: mechanistic insights through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pinto de Magalhães, Halua; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-03-22

    Atmospheric noble gases are routinely used as natural tracers to analyze gas transfer processes in aquatic systems. Their isotopic ratios can be employed to discriminate between different physical transport mechanisms by comparison to the unfractionated atmospheric isotope composition. In many applications of aquatic systems molecular diffusion was thought to cause a mass dependent fractionation of noble gases and their isotopes according to the square root ratio of their masses. However, recent experiments focusing on isotopic fractionation within a single element challenged this broadly accepted assumption. The determined fractionation factors of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopes revealed that only Ar follows the prediction of the so-called square root relation, whereas within the Ne, Kr and Xe elements no mass-dependence was found. The reason for this unexpected divergence of Ar is not yet understood. The aim of our computational exercise is to establish the molecular-resolved mechanisms behind molecular diffusion of noble gases in water. We make the hypothesis that weak intermolecular interactions are relevant for the dynamical properties of noble gases dissolved in water. Therefore, we used ab initio molecular dynamics to explicitly account for the electronic degrees of freedom. Depending on the size and polarizability of the hydrophobic particles such as noble gases, their motion in dense and polar liquids like water is subject to different diffusive regimes: the inter-cavity hopping mechanism of small particles (He, Ne) breaks down if a critical particle size achieved. For the case of large particles (Kr, Xe), the motion through the water solvent is governed by mass-independent viscous friction leading to hydrodynamical diffusion. Finally, Ar falls in between the two diffusive regimes, where particle dispersion is propagated at the molecular collision time scale of the surrounding water molecules.

  9. Intensive sampling of noble gases in fluids at Yellowstone: I. Early overview of the data; regional patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Lynch, M. A.; Reynolds, J. H.; Smith, S. P.

    1985-05-01

    The Roving Automated Rare Gas Analysis (RARGA) lab of Berkeley's Physics Department was deployed in Yellowstone National Park for a 19 week period commencing in June, 1983. During this time 66 gas and water samples representing 19 different regions of hydrothermal activity within and around the Yellowstone caldera were analyzed on site. Routinely, the abundances of five stable noble gases and the isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar were determined for each sample. In a few cases the isotopes of Kr and Xe were also determined and found to be of normal atmospheric constitution. Correlated variations in the isotopic compositions of He and Ar can be explained within the precision of the measurements by mixing of only three distinct components. The first component is of magmatic origin and is enriched in the primordial isotope 3He with 3He /4He ≥ 16 times the air value. This component also contains radiogenic 40Ar and possible 36Ar with 40Ar /36Ar ≥ 500 , resulting in a 3He /36Ar ratio ≥ 41,000 times the air value. The second component is assumed to be purely radiogenic 4He and 40Ar ( 4∗He /40∗Ar = 4.08 ± .33 ). This component is the probable carrier of observed excesses of 21∗Ne, attributed to the α,n reaction on 18O. Its radiogenic character implies a crustal origin in U. Th, and Krich aquifer rocks. The third component, except for possible mass fractionation, is isotopically indistinguishable from the noble gases in the atmosphere. This component originates largely from infiltrating run-off water saturated with atmospheric gases. In addition to exhibiting nucleogenic 21∗Ne, Ne data show anomalies in the ratio 20Ne /20Ne , which correlate roughly with the 21Ne /22Ne anomalies for the most part, but not as would occur from simple mass fractionation. Some exaggerated instances of the 20Ne /22Ne anomaly occur which could be explained by combined mass fractionation of Ne and Ar isotopes to a severe degree coupled with remixing with normally isotopic

  10. Comment on “Atmospheric contamination: A possible source for heavy noble gases in basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii” by D. B. Patterson, M. Honda, and I. McDougall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudacher, Thomas; Sarda, Philippe; Allègre, Claude J.

    1991-04-01

    Allègre et al. (1983), Staudacher et al. (1986) and Sarda et al. (1988) reported noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios of basalt glasses from Loihi seamount and Hualalai, Hawaii. The 4He/3He and 40Ar/36Ar ratios of ˜25,000 and 390 ± 50 respectively are different than the air ratio and typical ratios found in MORB glasses. The Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic ratios are the same as those found in air or deep seawater. Based on the different isotopic ratios and the different noble gas concentration patterns of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe compared to air, deep seawater and MORB, these authors concluded that the noble gases enclosed in vesicles from Loihi and Hualalai basalts are not significantly contaminated by atmospheric noble gases, and that the Loihi and Hualalai basalts came from a separate source, namely the lower mantle, with a distinct noble gas signature. In contrast to the upper mantle, which is highly depleted in noble gases, this lower mantle should be not or only slightly outgassed (Allègre et al., 1986).In a recent publication, Patterson et al. (1990), based on our noble gas data (Staudacher et al., 1986; Sarda et al., 1988), propose that Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe noble gas concentrations in basalt glasses could be plausibly explained by a) contamination of the Loihi plume magma prior to eruption with atmospheric noble gases disolved in deep seawater (which they model by elemental noble gas fractionation of a tholeiitic melt that was equilibrated with seawater derived noble gases), and b) elemental fractionation of noble gases during vesicle formation and vesicle loss. We completely disagree with such an interpretation and show here that their argumentation is inconsistent and incorrect.

  11. High resolution diode laser spectroscopy of H2O spectra broadened by nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitanov, Venedikt A.; Osipov, Konstantin Yu.; Protasevich, Alexander E.; Ponurovskiy, Yakov Ya.

    2014-11-01

    The absorption spectra of pure H2O with mixtures of broadening gases N2, Ar, Xe, He, Ar and air have been measured in 1.39 mμ spectral region by high resolution spectrometer based on diode laser (DFB NEL, Japan). For the processing of pure water spectra and it's mixtures with a different broadening gases in a wide pressure range we used a multispectrum fitting procedure developed at IAO. The program is based on a relatively simple Rautian-Sobel'man line profile and linear pressure dependence of the line profile parameters. H2O measured spectra bulk processing results in the retrieving of such line parameters: zero-pressure line center positions, intensities, self-broadening and self-shift coefficients of pure water, broadening and shift coefficients for other gases which are describes the experiment with the minimum residuals in a wide pressure range.

  12. Noble gases in anhydrous mantle xenoliths from Tasmania in comparison with other localities from eastern Australia: Implications for the tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuppon, György; Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Everard, John; Sutherland, Lin

    2010-11-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths from Tasmanian basalts were analysed for elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases, for greater understanding of the evolution of the underlying subcontinental lithosphere. The noble gas isotopic compositions indicate contributions of radiogenic and MORB-like components to the xenoliths. The MORB-like component is characterized by 3He/ 4He ratios between 7 and 9 Ra while the radiogenic component shows lower 3He/ 4He ratios than those in MORB (8.75 ± 2.14 Ra, Graham, 2002). The identified radiogenic component in xenoliths from Tasmania may stem from subduction events, during which the mantle wedge and subcontinental lithospheric mantle were metasomatised by U- and Th-rich fluids. As subduction processes have played important role in the evolution of Eastern Australia during the Paleozoic, the radiogenic component is probably associated with this event. Incorporation of MORB-like noble gases in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Tasmania is likely related to extensional rifting and associated opening of the Tasman Sea in the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The identified noble gas components of the xenoliths are consistent with the geochemical character of the host basalt based on the radiogenic isotope and trace element systematics. This agreement and the petrographic observations (e.g. fluid inclusion trails connected with the reaction rim of the minerals close to the host basalt, spongy texture) indicate that fluids (noble gases, CO 2) most likely propagated from the host basalts to the xenoliths forming fluid inclusions. The observed noble gas isotopic heterogeneity in mantle-derived xenoliths from Tasmanian to North Queensland reflects isotopic heterogeneity at regional scale in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Australia.

  13. Resonance Ionization of Heavy Noble Gases: The Potential of KR and Xe Measurements from Single Pre-Solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, N.

    1995-09-01

    Since the first reliable indication of the existence of non-terrestrial composition of Xe isotopes in meteorites by Reynolds [1,2], anomalies have been found in the isotopic composition of many elements in meteorites, implying a plurality of nucleosynthetic processes, and indicating that the initial conditions leading to the formation of the solar system were quite diverse [3]. Noble gases provide a unique window into the composition of the progenitor material to the solar system [4]. Stellar evolution may contribute by the s-process, r-process, p-process, etc., each with its own isotopic distribution. Kr and Xe are especially useful as the large number of isotopes (7 in the 78Kr to 86Kr range, and 9 in the 124Xe to 136Xe range) provide many clues to help unravel the multiple sources to the measured abundances. Although Xe has been measured and analyzed considerably more frequently than Kr in meteorite studies, this has only partially been due to the wealth of information derivable from Xe studies, but also, due to experimental difficulties encountered in Kr measurements. Early in the development of stellar nucleosynthesis, 86Kr was proposed as a chronometer of the s-process [5], but until recently has provided unreliable results [6]. Other interesting properties derivable from Kr isotope measurements include 78Kr as an indication of spallation history, 80Kr as a stellar thermometer, and 81Kr and 83Kr to determine cosmic ray exposure ages. Studies of highly refractory microscopic grains (diamond, graphite and SiC) separated from the much more abundant carbonaceous matrix in primitive meteorites have shown a remarkable isotopic composition diversity in a small fraction of single grains from the same meteorite, implying multiple stellar sources [4]. Ion microprobe measurements have been possible of the major constituents of single interstellar grains [7,8] and of He and Ne using a state-of-the-art static noble gas mass spectrometer [9-11]. But, a recent attempt to

  14. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; hide

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  15. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. II - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Etching and heating experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadnik, M. G.; Wacker, J. F.; Lewis, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The release of trapped Xe from amorphous-C phases of meteorites is simulated experimentally by HNO3 etching of carbon-black and pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride samples exposed to Xe-127 for 0.5-240 h at 100-1000 C and then degassed for 9 h or more at the same temperatures, as reported by Wacker et al. (1985). The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Samples exposed at 100-200 C are found to lose most of their Xe after etching to a depth of only about 20 pm, while those exposed at 800-1000 C exhibit a second more tightly bound component extending to a depth of 3 nm, indicative of diffusion of Xe during exposure and resembling planetary Xe. The higher noble-gas concentrations measured in meteorites are attributed to rate-controlled Xe uptake over a long period in the solar nebula.

  16. Irradiation history of Itokawa regolith material deduced from noble gases in the Hayabusa samples.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-26

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced (21)Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  17. Irradiation History of Itokawa Regolith Material Deduced from Noble Gases in the Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N.; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R.; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-01

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced 21Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  18. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  19. Simulating mesoscale transport and diffusion of radioactive noble gases using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Hee; Song, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Sang-Keun

    2008-10-01

    In order to simulate the impact of mesoscale wind fields and to assess potential capability of atmospheric Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) as an emergency response model for the decision supports, two different simulations of LPDM with the mesoscale prognostic model MM5 (Mesoscale Model ver. 5) were driven. The first simulation of radioactive noble gas (85Kr exponent) emitted during JCO accident occurred from 30 September to 3 October 1999 at Tokai, Japan showed that the first arriving short pulse was found in Tsukuba located at 60 km away from the accidental area. However, the released radioactive noble gas was transported back to the origin site about 2 days later due to the mesoscale meteorological wind circulation, enhancing the levels of 85Kr with the secondary peak in Tsukuba. The second simulation of atmospheric dilution factors (the ratio of concentration to the emission rate, chi/Q), during the underground nuclear test (UNT) performed by North Korea showed that high chi/Q moved to the eastward and extended toward southward in accordance with the mesoscale atmospheric circulations generated by mesoscale prognostic model MM5. In comparison with the measurements, the simulated horizontal distribution patterns of 85Kr during the JCO are well accord with that of observation in Tsukuba such as the existence of secondary peak which is associated with the mesoscale circulations. However, the simulated level of 85Kr anomaly was found to be significantly lower than the observations, and some interpretations on these discrepancies were described. Applications of LPDM to two mesoscale emergency response dispersion cases suggest the potential capability of LPDM to be used as a decision support model provided accurate emission rate of accident in case of a large accident.

  20. Analysis of groundwater dynamics in the complex aquifer system of Kazan Trona, Turkey, using environmental tracers and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Sebnem; Yazicigil, Hasan; Stute, Martin; Schlosser, Peter; Smethie, William M.

    2015-02-01

    The Eocene deposits of Kazan Basin in Turkey contain a rare trona mineral which is planned to be extracted by solution mining. The complex flow dynamics and mixing mechanisms as noted from previous hydraulic and hydrochemical data need to be augmented with environmental tracer and noble gas data to develop a conceptual model of the system for the assessment of the impacts of the mining and to develop sustainable groundwater management policies throughout the area. The tracers used include the stable isotopes of water (δ2H, δ18O), δ13C and 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), tritium (3H), the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 and CFC-12, and the noble gases He and Ne. The system studied consists of three aquifers: shallow, middle, and deep. CFC data indicate modern recharge in the shallow system. The estimates of ages through 14C dating for the deeper aquifer system are up to 34,000 years. Helium concentrations cover a wide range of values from 5 × 10-8 to 1.5 × 10-5 cm3 STP/g. 3He/4He ratios vary from 0.09RA to 1.29RA (where RA is the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.384 × 10-6), the highest found in water from the shallow aquifer. Mantle-derived 3He is present in some of the samples indicating upward groundwater movement, possibly along a NE-SW-striking fault-like feature in the basin.

  1. The Role of Noble Gases in Defining the Mean Residence Times of Fluids within Precambrian Crustal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Fellowes, J.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; McDermott, J. M.; Holland, G.; Mabry, J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Brines rich in N2, H2, CH4 and He hosted within Precambrian crustal rocks are known to sustain microbial life [1]. The geological systems containing these brines have the potential to isolate organisms over planetary timescales and so can provide unique insight into the diversity and evolution of terrestrial life [1-3]. Long considered geological outliers, the prevalence of systems containing these ancient, deep fracture waters is only now being revealed. Recent studies demonstrate the Precambrian crust which accounts for ~70% of total crustal surface area has a global hydrogen production comparable to marine systems [2]. In addition to H2-producing reactions (e.g. radiolysis and serpentinization), a diversity of CH4-producing reactions also occur in these systems through both microbial and water-rock interactions [1, 2]. However, the role these Precambrian systems have in global hydrogen and carbon cycles is poorly understood. For this we need good constraints on the origins, residence times and degree of microbial activity of the fluids within these systems as well as the degree of interaction with external systems. Fortunately, noble gases are ideal for this role [1,3]. Previous noble gas analysis of N2, H2, CH4 and He-rich fluid samples collected at 2.4 km depth from a Cu-Zn mine in Timmins, Ontario, identified isolated fracture fluids with the oldest residence times ever observed (>1.1 Ga) [3]. This study has been significantly expanded now to fluids from an even greater depth (3 km) at Timmins, and from two new mines in the Sudbury Basin. Preliminary data from the deeper Timmins level indicate a new closed system with 136Xe/130Xe ratios 93% above modern air values (20% at 2.4 km) and an early atmosphere 124Xe/130Xe signal approaching the age of the host rock (~2.7 Ga) [4]. In comparison, the Sudbury system indicates exchange with an external source, being highly enriched in helium (30% gas volume) but with a low fissiogenic 136Xe/130Xe excess (10-38% above

  2. Sedimentary halogens and noble gases within Western Antarctic xenoliths: Implications of extensive volatile recycling to the sub continental lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadley, Michael W.; Ballentine, Chris J.; Chavrit, Déborah; Dallai, Luigi; Burgess, Ray

    2016-03-01

    Recycling of marine volatiles back into the mantle at subduction zones has a profound, yet poorly constrained impact on the geochemical evolution of the Earth's mantle. Here we present a combined noble gas and halogen study on mantle xenoliths from the Western Antarctic Rift System (WARS) to better understand the flux of subducted volatiles to the sub continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) and assess the impact this has on mantle chemistry. The xenoliths are extremely enriched in the heavy halogens (Br and I), with I concentrations up to 1 ppm and maximum measured I/Cl ratios (85.2 × 10-3) being ∼2000 times greater than mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB). The Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios of the xenoliths span a range from MORB-like ratios to values similar to marine pore fluids and serpentinites, whilst the 84Kr/36Ar and 130Xe/36Ar ratios range from modern atmosphere to oceanic sediments. This indicates that marine derived volatiles have been incorporated into the SCLM during an episode of subduction related metasomatism. Helium isotopic analysis of the xenoliths show average 3He/4He ratios of 7.5 ± 0.5 RA (where RA is the 3He/4He ratio of air = 1.39 × 10-6), similar to that of MORB. The 3He/4He ratios within the xenoliths are higher than expected for the xenoliths originating from the SCLM which has been extensively modified by the addition of subducted volatiles, indicating that the SCLM beneath the WARS must have seen a secondary alteration from the infiltration and rise of asthenospheric fluids/melts as a consequence of rifting and lithospheric thinning. Noble gases and halogens within these xenoliths have recorded past episodes of volatile interaction within the SCLM and can be used to reconstruct a tectonic history of the WARS. Marine halogen and noble gas signatures within the SCLM xenoliths provide evidence for the introduction and retention of recycled volatiles within the SCLM by subduction related metasomatism, signifying that not all volatiles that survive

  3. Microstructures, mineral chemistry, noble gases and nitrogen in the recent fall, Bhuka iron (IAB) meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Ranjith, P. M.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Chattopadhyay, Basab; Shrivastava, K. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report some chemical, petrological and isotopic studies of the Bhuka iron meteorite that fell in Rajasthan, India in 2005. Numerous silicate and graphite inclusions are visible on the surface of the hand specimen. In the polished and etched surface studied, irregular patches of graphite are found as the most dominant inclusion and commonly associated with pure corundum (95 wt% Al2O3), spinel, feldspar and Si-rich phases. Apart from typical lamellar intergrowth with kamacite (i.e. the Widmänstatten pattern), taenites are also commonly found to occur as a rim of the graphite inclusions. P-rich (up to 10 wt%) taenites are also found locally within the recrystallised kamacite matrix. Based on mineralogy, texture and bulk composition, Bhuka resembles the low-Ni IAB subgroup (ungrouped). Noble gas isotope studies suggest He, Ne and Ar are mostly of cosmogenic origin, while Kr and Xe are a mixture of cosmogenic, radiogenic and trapped components. A pre-atmospheric radius of 10±1 cm and a cosmic ray exposure age of 346±52 Ma are derived based on depth dependant (3He/4He)c and 38Arc respectively, as per the production systematics of cosmogenic noble gas isotopes (Ammon et al., 2009). Cosmogenic 83Kr and 126Xe yield production rates of 12 and 0.335 (in 10-15ccSTP/g Ma) for 83Kr and 126Xe respectively. Presence of trapped Kr and Xe, with (84Kr/132Xe)t=2 and radiogenic 129Xe=120×10-12 ccSTP/g are due to presence of graphite/silicate inclusions in the analysed sample. Over ~150% excess 131Xec than expected from spallation suggests contribution from (n,ɤ) reactions from Ba from inclusions and suggests irradiation of pre-atmospheric object in a larger body, indicative of complex irradiation. Trapped N of 24 ppm, with δ15N=-10.7±0.8‰ observed in Bhuka, is heavier than the range observed hither to in IAB irons.

  4. Relationships between Noble Gases and Indicators of Geochemical Enrichment in Carbonatite Metasomatized Xenoliths from Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukolich, S.; Jackson, M. G.; Kurz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Rejuvenated lavas from oceanic hotspots can host peridotite mantle xenoliths that provide windows into the composition and history of the upper mantle. Peridotite xenoliths hosted in Samoan rejuvenated lavas from the Island of Savaiíi exhibit evidence for variable enrichment by carbonatitic melts. Some xenoliths are trace element depleted, while others host incompatible element budgets on par with enriched alkali basalts (Hauri and Hart, 1994). The most incompatible element enriched xenoliths have 87Sr/86Sr ratios (up to 0.7128) that are the highest observed in the oceanic mantle. Poreda and Farley (1992) examined the noble gas isotopic compositions of a different suite of xenoliths from the same locality. They identified a narrow range of 3He/4He ratios (8.6 to 12.04 Ra), while the neon isotopic compositions spanned an enormous range, from the Loihi-Kileaua line (unradiogenic) to the MORB line. The xenoliths with the highest 3He/4He have neon isotopes that are most unradiogenic, while samples with lower 3He/4He have MORB-like neon isotopic compositions. It is not known which xenoliths in this suite have experienced carbonatite metasomatism, as lithophile element concentrations were not reported by Poreda and Farley (1992), and the noble gas signature associated with carbonatite metasomatism beneath Samoa is unknown. We report new helium measurements on olivine and orthopyroxene separates from 14 Savaii peridotite xenoliths that were previously characterized by Hauri and Hart (1994) and Hauri et al (1993). All samples are extremely fresh. Their 3He/4He ratios span 11.6 to 12.41 Ra, at the high end of the range reported by Poreda and Farley (1992). We also report whole-rock trace element abundances on these xenoliths (trace elements on individual clinopyroxenes from each sample were reported by Hauri and Hart and Hauri et al (1993)). The xenoliths that exhibit trace element evidence for enrichment from carbonatite fluids (low Nb/U, and high La/Nd and Nb/Ta) have

  5. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  6. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.; Norman, P.; Aksela, H.; Aagren, H.

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of {approx}4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  7. Numerical study of light-induced drift of Na in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, J. E. M.; Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    We present a model for light-induced drift (LID) in the Na-noble-gas system which should enable direct comparison with experiment. In contrast to previous theories of LID based on a two-level description of the optical absorbers and on a simplified collision treatment, the present model is based on a realistic description of laser-driven Na atoms immersed in a buffer gas. Starting from the generalized Bloch equations, we introduce a rate-equation model for the velocity distributions in the four important Na levels. The velocity-changing and fine-structure-changing collisions are described using composite Keilson-Storer collision kernels in which all adjustable parameters have been eliminated by using available literature data. We apply the model in numerical calculations of LID as a function of all experimentally accessible parameters. It is found that the ground-state hyperfine splitting can have large effects on LID, whereas the excited-state fine-structure splitting has not. The paper establishes criteria for optimum LID effects; when using a single-frequency laser the maximum attainable drift velocity is predicted to be 13.8 m/s. Using a proper set of boundary conditions, we find a pressure dependence of LID qualitatively different from the predictions based on previous work. Finally, the influence of the collision model is investigated. We find that LID is independent of the shape of the collision kernel, indicating that a strong-collision model is always valid.

  8. Production Rates of Noble Gases in the Near-Surface Layers of Europa by Energetic Charged Particles and the Potential for Determining Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2003-01-01

    The surface of Europa is expected to be extremely active, undergoing tectonic and/or tidal geological activity and sputtering/ deposition, as well as impact cratering. Determination of the actual age of the surface at one or more places would greatly simplify trying to sort out what processes are occurring, and at what rate. If there is K present, as the spectral and compositional modeling discussed predict, it should be possible, in principle, to determine K-Ar crystallization ages. Whether or not there is K present, a consideration of the environment suggests we can determine an energetic particle exposure age if we can make in situ measurements of the abundances of major elements and of noble gas isotopes. This requires instrumentation that is within reach of current technology. In this paper, we calculate production rates for noble-gas isotopes in a simplified Europan surface, to quantify the amount of light noble gases produced by exposure to energetic particles.

  9. Transport of methane and noble gases during gas push-pull tests in dry porous media.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Schroth, Martin H; Zeyer, Josef

    2007-05-01

    A field method called the gas push-pull test (GPPT) was previously developed and tested for the in situ quantification of aerobic methane (CH4) oxidation by soil microorganisms. The GPPT consists of an injection followed by extraction of reactant and tracer gases into and out of the soil. Quantification of microbial activities from GPPTs requires insight in the transport of reactant and tracer gases under diverse field conditions. We investigated how the transport of differenttracer gases (He, Ne, and Ar) compares to that of the reactant gas CH4 during GPPTs conducted in a well-defined, dry porous media that mimicked an open system. Transport of gaseous components during GPPT is mainly driven by advection resulting from injection and extraction and diffusion driven by concentration gradients. Regardless of the advective component (selected injection/ extraction, flow rates 0.2-0.8 L min(-1)), diffusion was the dominant transport mechanism for gaseous components. This resulted in dissimilar transport of CH4 and the tracers He and Ne. Numerical simulations of GPPTs showed that similar transport of these components is only achieved at very high injection/extraction rates that, in practice, are not feasible since they would imply extremely short duration times of GPPTs to allow for consumption of a measurable amount of reactant(s) by soil microorganisms. However, Ar transport was similar to that of CH4. Hence, Ar may be a good tracer provided that it is injected at high concentrations (e.g., >25% [v/v]) to overcome its background concentration in soil air. Using moderate injection/ extraction rates (e.g., 0.6 L min(-1)) with injected volumes of 10-30 L will result in GPPT durations of 1-3 h, which would suffice to attain a measurable consumption of reactant(s) in soils having relatively high (e.g., first-order rate constants >0.3 h(-1)) microbial activities.

  10. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  11. Stratification of discharge in noble gases from the viewpoint of the discrete dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Golubovskii, Yu. Pelyukhova, E.; Sigeneger, F.; Nekuchaev, V.

    2015-03-15

    Based on the analysis of electron phase trajectories in sinusoidal electric fields, a new point of view on discharge stratification is proposed. It is shown that the positive column can be considered as a spatial resonator in which electric fields with a fundamental period length L{sub S} or higher mode length q/p L{sub S} establish, where p and q are integers and p > q. The fundamental mode length L{sub S} is equivalent to the distance on which electrons gain energy equal to the lowest excitation threshold. This distance determines a length of the S-striation. Unlike kinetic theory, in the presented model resonance properties of the discharge column are not connected with elastic collision energy losses. A point map is used to obtain the resonance trajectories of electrons in the phase plane. Stable points for the positions of inelastic collisions in the resonance trajectories have been found at the positions of field maxima in the case of integer ratios p/q . For non-integer ratios p/q , multiple resonance trajectories arise according to a more complex stability criterion. From this point of view, S-, P-, and R-striations in noble gas discharges can be explained. Due to energy losses in elastic collisions, initial electron energy distribution functions converge to the resonance trajectories (the so-called “bunch effect”). The findings of the discrete model agree with results of kinetic theory and experiment. The new approach avoids difficulties of the kinetic theory in the case of exceptionally large relaxation lengths which can even exceed the positive column length.

  12. Noble gases fingerprint a metasedimentary fluid source in the Macraes orogenic gold deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R. J.; Burgess, Ray; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-02-01

    The world-class Macraes orogenic gold deposit (˜10 Moz resource) formed during the late metamorphic uplift of a metasedimentary schist belt in southern New Zealand. Mineralising fluids, metals and metalloids were derived from within the metasedimentary host. Helium and argon extracted from fluid inclusions in sulphide mineral grains (three crush extractions from one sample) have crustal signatures, with no evidence for mantle input (R/Ra = 0.03). Xenon extracted from mineralised quartz samples provides evidence for extensive interaction between fluid and maturing organic material within the metasedimentary host rocks, with 132Xe/36Ar ratios up to 200 times greater than air. Similarly, I/Cl ratios for fluids extracted from mineralised quartz are similar to those of brines from marine sediments that have interacted with organic matter and are ten times higher than typical magmatic/mantle fluids. The Macraes mineralising fluids were compositionally variable, reflecting either mixing of two different crustal fluids in the metasedimentary pile or a single fluid type that has had varying degrees of interaction with the host metasediments. Evidence for additional input of meteoric water is equivocal, but minor meteoric incursion cannot be discounted. The Macraes deposit formed in a metasedimentary belt without associated coeval magmatism, and therefore represents a purely crustal metamorphogenic end member in a spectrum of orogenic hydrothermal processes that can include magmatic and/or mantle fluid input elsewhere in the world. There is no evidence for involvement of minor intercalated metabasic rocks in the Macraes mineralising system. Hydrothermal fluids that formed other, smaller, orogenic deposits in the same metamorphic belt have less pronounced noble gas and halogen evidence for crustal fluid-rock interaction than at Macraes, but these deposits also formed from broadly similar metamorphogenic processes.

  13. A density functional theory study of magneto-electric Jones birefringence of noble gases, furan homologues, and mono-substituted benzenes.

    PubMed

    Fahleson, Tobias; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia; Rizzo, Antonio; Rikken, Geert L J A

    2013-11-21

    We report on the results of a systematic ab initio study of the Jones birefringence of noble gases, of furan homologues, and of monosubstituted benzenes, in the gas phase, with the aim of analyzing the behavior and the trends within a list of systems of varying size and complexity, and of identifying candidates for a combined experimental/theoretical study of the effect. We resort here to analytic linear and nonlinear response functions in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. A correlation is made between the observable (the Jones constant) and the atomic radius for noble gases, or the permanent electric dipole and a structure/chemical reactivity descriptor as the para Hammett constant for substituted benzenes.

  14. A density functional theory study of magneto-electric Jones birefringence of noble gases, furan homologues, and mono-substituted benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Fahleson, Tobias; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia; Rizzo, Antonio; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.

    2013-11-21

    We report on the results of a systematic ab initio study of the Jones birefringence of noble gases, of furan homologues, and of monosubstituted benzenes, in the gas phase, with the aim of analyzing the behavior and the trends within a list of systems of varying size and complexity, and of identifying candidates for a combined experimental/theoretical study of the effect. We resort here to analytic linear and nonlinear response functions in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. A correlation is made between the observable (the Jones constant) and the atomic radius for noble gases, or the permanent electric dipole and a structure/chemical reactivity descriptor as the para Hammett constant for substituted benzenes.

  15. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of 3He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum 3He relaxation rate of 3.83 × 10-3 s-1 (T1 = 4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T1 would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T1 of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius.

  16. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gradient-induced Longitudinal Relaxation of Hyperpolarized Noble Gases in the Fringe Fields of Superconducting Magnets Used for Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of 3He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum 3He relaxation rate of 3.83 × 10−3 s−1 (T1 = 4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T1 would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T1 of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. PMID:21134771

  18. Proton affinities of maingroup-element hydrides and noble gases: trends across the periodic table, structural effects, and DFT validation.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Rösler, Ernst; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2006-10-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of the gas-phase basicity of archetypal neutral bases across the periodic system using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of the density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. First, we validate DFT as a reliable tool for computing proton affinities and related thermochemical quantities: BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P is shown to yield a mean absolute deviation of 2.0 kcal/mol for the proton affinity at 298 K with respect to experiment, and 1.2 kcal/mol with high-level ab initio benchmark data. The main purpose of this work is to provide the proton affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of the neutral bases constituted by all maingroup-element hydrides of groups 15-17 and the noble gases, that is, group 18, and periods 1-6. We have also studied the effect of step-wise methylation of the protophilic center of the second- and third-period bases. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. QED effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of the noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niskanen, J.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present calculations on the quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of noble gases from Ne to Rn as perturbations on relativistic four-component Dirac-Fock wavefunctions. The most dominant effect originates from the self-energy of the core-electron that yields corrections of similar order as the transverse interaction. For 1s ionization potentials, a match within few eV against the known experimental values is obtained, and our work reveals considerable QED effects in the photoelectron binding energies across the periodic table—most strikingly even for Ne. We perform power-law fits for the corrections as a function of Z and interpolate the QED correction of ˜-0.55 eV for S1s. Due to this, the K-edge electron spectra of the third row and below need QED for a match in the absolute energy when using state-of-the-art instrumentation.

  20. Noble gases and halogens in Graves Nunataks 06129: The complex thermal history of a felsic asteroid crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claydon, Jennifer L.; Crowther, Sarah A.; Fernandes, Vera A.; Gilmour, Jamie D.

    2015-06-01

    The meteorite Graves Nunataks 06128/06129 is a rare example of felsic asteroidal crust. Knowledge of its history can help shed light on the evolution processes of planetesimals. The noble gases can be used to constrain both the chronology of meteorites and the processes that result in movements of volatile elements on asteroidal bodies. We have examined the I-Xe and Ar-Ar systems of the plagioclase-rich achondrite, Graves Nunataks 06129 by high-resolution laser step-heating of irradiated samples. Iodine and 129Xe∗ are both present but are released at different temperatures and do not show a correlation, therefore the I-Xe system in GRA 06129 has no chronological significance. We propose that radiogenic 129Xe∗ was lost from primary phases and parentless 129Xe∗ was later introduced into the rock by interaction with a fluid sourced from a reservoir that evolved with a high I/Xe ratio. This could have been the same halogen-rich fluid that induced the conversion of merrillite and pyroxene into chlorapatite. Inherited 40Ar (i.e. not generated by in situ decay of 40K) is also present in one of three fragments studied here and may have been introduced at the same time as parentless 129Xe∗.

  1. Above-threshold ionization of noble gases in elliptically polarized fields: Effects of atomic polarization on photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, YanLan; Yu, ShaoGang; Lai, XuanYang; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the atomic polarization effect on photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in above-threshold ionization of noble gases with elliptically polarized laser fields at wavelength of 800 nm, ellipticity of 0.25, and intensity of 1.5 ×1014W/cm2 . Simulations based on a semiclassical model that includes both the ionic Coulomb potential and the atomic polarization effect show surprisingly little difference between PADs for Ar, Kr, and Xe, which is in good agreement with recent experimental observations. Our calculations reveal that the atomic polarization effect increases the distance of the tunnel exit point of the photoelectron to the parent ion and weakens the strength of the interaction between the parent ion and the photoelectron on its subsequent classical propagation. As a result, the forward-scattering electrons which contribute to the main lobes in PADs are substantially suppressed. Our results indicate that the insensitivity of PADs for Ar, Kr, and Xe may be closely related to the influence of the atomic polarization effect on the photoelectron dynamics in the strong laser field.

  2. Superelectrophilic Behavior of an Anion Demonstrated by the Spontaneous Binding of Noble Gases to [B12 Cl11 ]().

    PubMed

    Rohdenburg, Markus; Mayer, Martin; Grellmann, Max; Jenne, Carsten; Borrmann, Tobias; Kleemiss, Florian; Azov, Vladimir A; Asmis, Knut R; Grabowsky, Simon; Warneke, Jonas

    2017-06-26

    It is common and chemically intuitive to assign cations electrophilic and anions nucleophilic reactivity, respectively. Herein, we demonstrate a striking violation of this concept: The anion [B12 Cl11 ](-) spontaneously binds to the noble gases (Ngs) xenon and krypton at room temperature in a reaction that is typical of "superelectrophilic" dications. [B12 Cl11 Ng](-) adducts, with Ng binding energies of 80 to 100 kJ mol(-1) , contain B-Ng bonds with a substantial degree of covalent interaction. The electrophilic nature of the [B12 Cl11 ](-) anion is confirmed spectroscopically by the observation of a blue shift of the CO stretching mode in the IR spectrum of [B12 Cl11 CO](-) and theoretically by investigation of its electronic structure. The orientation of the electric field at the reactive site of [B12 Cl11 ](-) results in an energy barrier for the approach of polar molecules and facilitates the formation of Ng adducts that are not detected with reactive cations such as [C6 H5 ](+) . This introduces the new chemical concept of "dipole-discriminating electrophilic anions." © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. QED effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Huttula, M; Föhlisch, A

    2017-04-14

    We present calculations on the quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of noble gases from Ne to Rn as perturbations on relativistic four-component Dirac-Fock wavefunctions. The most dominant effect originates from the self-energy of the core-electron that yields corrections of similar order as the transverse interaction. For 1s ionization potentials, a match within few eV against the known experimental values is obtained, and our work reveals considerable QED effects in the photoelectron binding energies across the periodic table-most strikingly even for Ne. We perform power-law fits for the corrections as a function of Z and interpolate the QED correction of ∼-0.55 eV for S1s. Due to this, the K-edge electron spectra of the third row and below need QED for a match in the absolute energy when using state-of-the-art instrumentation.

  4. Composition of solar flare noble gases preserved in meteorite parent body regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Badhwar, G.; Murali, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    Isotopic composition of solar-flare (SF) Ne was determined in acid-etched pyroxene mineral separates from the Kapoeta meteorite, a brecciated meteorite known to contain implanted solar gases. The results yield the SF Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of 11.6 +/-0.2, confirming previous determinations of this SF ratio in lunar and meteoritic samples. The same SF Ne composition was also obtained by applying an ordinate intercept technique to the same data set. The ordinate intercept technique was then applied to the Ar and He data. The results are SF Ar-36/Ar-38 = 4.9 +/-0.1 and SF He-4/He-3 = 3800 +/-200. These values are significantly different from the solar-wind (SW) Ar and He values. It is estimated that the concentration of the SF component in Kapoeta pyroxenes is about 20 percent that of the SW component, orders of magnitude higher than expected from SW and SF proton flux measurements.

  5. Composition of solar flare noble gases preserved in meteorite parent body regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Badhwar, G.; Murali, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    Isotopic composition of solar-flare (SF) Ne was determined in acid-etched pyroxene mineral separates from the Kapoeta meteorite, a brecciated meteorite known to contain implanted solar gases. The results yield the SF Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of 11.6 +/-0.2, confirming previous determinations of this SF ratio in lunar and meteoritic samples. The same SF Ne composition was also obtained by applying an ordinate intercept technique to the same data set. The ordinate intercept technique was then applied to the Ar and He data. The results are SF Ar-36/Ar-38 = 4.9 +/-0.1 and SF He-4/He-3 = 3800 +/-200. These values are significantly different from the solar-wind (SW) Ar and He values. It is estimated that the concentration of the SF component in Kapoeta pyroxenes is about 20 percent that of the SW component, orders of magnitude higher than expected from SW and SF proton flux measurements.

  6. Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation in confined plasmas: Comparison of noble and molecule gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, June Young; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-03-15

    Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation is performed in argon and oxygen gas inductively coupled plasmas from the measurements of both the spatial electron currents (as a fluid approach) and the electron energy probability functions (EEPFs, as a kinetic approach). At a low gas pressure of 10 mTorr, the measured electron currents are spatially uniform, and the EEPFs in the total electron energy scale are identical, which indicate that the Boltzmann relation is valid at both the argon and oxygen gases. As the gas pressure increases to 30-40 mTorr, however, the Boltzmann relation is broken in the oxygen gas discharge, while the Boltzmann relation is still valid in the argon gas discharge. This different variation in the oxygen gas discharge is mainly due to the presence of various inelastic collisions in the entire electron energy region, which causes the transition of the electron kinetics from a non-local to a local regime.

  7. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  8. Halogens and noble gases in Mathematician Ridge meta-gabbros, NE Pacific: implications for oceanic hydrothermal root zones and global volatile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Vanko, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Six variably amphibolitised meta-gabbros cut by quartz-epidote veins containing high-salinity brine, and vapour fluid inclusions were investigated for halogen (Cl, Br, I) and noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations. The primary aims were to investigate fluid sources and interactions in hydrothermal root zones and determine the concentrations and behaviours of these elements in altered oceanic crust, which is poorly known, but has important implications for global volatile (re)cycling. Amphiboles in each sample have average concentrations of 0.1-0.5 wt% Cl, 0.5-3 ppm Br and 5-68 ppb I. Amphibole has Br/Cl of ~0.0004 that is about ten times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions and seawater, and I/Cl of 2-44 × 10-6 that is 3-5 times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions but higher than seawater. The amphibole and fluid compositions are attributed to mixing halogens introduced by seawater with a large halogen component remobilised from mafic lithologies in the crust and fractionation of halogens between fluids and metamorphic amphibole formed at low water-rock ratios. The metamorphic amphibole and hydrothermal quartz are dominated by seawater-derived atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and mantle-derived He, with 3He/4He of ~9 R/Ra (Ra = atmospheric ratio). The amphibole and quartz preserve high 4He concentrations that are similar to MORB glasses and have noble gas abundance ratios with high 4He/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar that are greater than seawater and air. These characteristics result from the high solubility of light noble gases in amphibole and suggest that all the noble gases can behave similarly to `excess 40Ar' in metamorphic hydrothermal root zones. All noble gases are therefore trapped in hydrous minerals to some extent and can be inefficiently lost during metamorphism implying that even the lightest noble gases (He and Ne) can potentially be subducted into the Earth's mantle.

  9. Analysis of accommodation coefficients of noble gases on aluminum surface with an experimental/computational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, Nathaniel; Gimelshein, Natalia; Gimelshein, Sergey; Ketsdever, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    A method that connects measurements of radiometric forces on a heated vane in the transitional flow regime with the kinetic modeling of the flow, and derives the accommodation coefficients through the successive analysis of measured and computed results, is proposed. The method utilizes the fact that radiometric forces exerted on heated objects immersed in rarefied gases are governed by the interaction of gas molecules with the surface. Experimental results on radiometric forces on a 0.11 m diameter circular vane are obtained on a nano-Newton thrust stand in a 3 m long vacuum chamber for pressures ranging from approximately 0.01 to 1 Pa. The vane was heated to 419 K on the hot side and 396 K on the cold side. The numerical modeling is conducted using a combined ellipsoidal statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook/direct simulation Monte Carlo approach that allows accurate and time efficient analysis of radiometric forces on a vane in large vacuum chambers filled with rarefied gas. Accommodation coefficients for the Maxwell model are estimated for argon, xenon, and helium on a machined aluminum surface, and found to be 0.81, 0.86, and 0.53, respectively.

  10. Mean ocean temperature change over the last glacial transition based on heavy noble gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Severinghaus, Jeff; Shackleton, Sarah; Baggenstos, Daniel; Kawamura, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    On paleo-climatic timescales heavy noble gases (krypton and xenon) are conserved in the atmosphere-ocean system and are passively cycled through this system without interaction with any biogeochemical process. Due to the characteristic temperature dependency of the gas solubility factors in sea water, the atmospheric noble gas content is unambiguously linked to mean global ocean temperature (MOT). Here we use this proxy to reconstruct MOT over the course of the last glacial transition based on measurements of trapped air in the WAIS Divide ice core. We analyzed 78 ice samples with a recently developed method that yields the isotopic ratios of N2, Ar, Kr and the elemental ratios of Kr/N2, Xe/N2 and Xe/Kr in the trapped air with the required precision. Based on the isotopic ratios we correct the elemental ratios for the fractionation processes in the firn column to obtain the true atmospheric values. On the basis of a 4-box model that incorporates effects of sea-level change, different saturation states of the water and different temperature distributions in the global ocean, we infer MOT based on the three elemental ratio pairs and assess its uncertainty. On average, the uncertainty of our MOT record is +/- 0.27°C, which is a significant improvement to earlier studies that reached about +/- 1°C uncertainty. This allows an unprecedented assessment of the glacial-interglacial MOT difference, as well as a direct comparison between MOT and climate change for the first time. We find a LGM-Holocene difference of 2.6°C, which is on the lower end of what earlier studies have suggested (3 +/- 1°C) and provides a new constraint on ocean heat uptake over the last glacial transition. Furthermore, we find a very close relation between MOT and Antarctic temperatures which shows for the first time the effect of Atlantic overturning circulation changes on global ocean heat uptake. Finally, our record shows a MOT warming rate during the Younger Dryas that is almost double to

  11. Composition of solar flare noble gases preserved in meteorite parent body regolith.

    PubMed

    Rao, M N; Garrison, D H; Bogard, D D; Badhwar, G; Murali, A V

    1991-11-01

    The isotopic composition (long-term average) of solar flare (SF) Ne has been determined by three isotope correlation techniques applied to data measured on chemically etched pyroxene separates prepared from the Kapoeta meteorite, which is known to contain implanted solar gases. The SF 20Ne/22Ne ratio obtained is 11.6 +/- 0.2 and confirms previous determinations of this SF ratio in lunar and meteoritic samples. The same SF Ne composition is also obtained by applying an ordinate intercept technique to the same data set. The ordinate intercept technique was also applied to the Ar and He data, on which the three-isotope correlation technique cannot be applied. The isotopic composition of SF Ar and SF He so obtained are SF 36Ar/38Ar = 4.9 +/- 0.1 and SF 4He/3He = 3800 +/- 200, which are significantly different from the solar wind (SW) Ar and SW He values of approximately 5.35 and approximately 2500, respectively. Correlation between 20Ne/22Ne and 36Ar/38Ar for the same data set also gives a similar SF 36Ar/38Ar ratio of 4.8 +/- 0.2. The determined SF He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios differ from those in SW by 52%, 17% and 9%, respectively, but the elemental compositions of 4He/36Ar and 20Ne/36Ar do not show obvious differences between SF and SW. The concentration of the SF component in Kapoeta pyroxenes is approximately 20% that of the SW component, which is orders of magnitude higher than expected from SW and SF proton flux measurements. Variations in elemental and isotopic composition of He, Ne and Ar in SF relative to SW are found to correlate well with a (Z/A)2 dependence, indicating a rigidity-dependent particle spectrum in solar flares.

  12. H(3) (+) as a trap for noble gases--2: structure and energetics of XH(3) (+) complexes from X=neon to xenon.

    PubMed

    Pauzat, F; Ellinger, Y

    2007-07-07

    The affinity of H(3) (+) to combine with noble gases X has been investigated from neon to xenon using ab initio coupled cluster [CCSD and CCSD(T)] and density functional BH&HLYP levels of theory. For all noble gases, the stable structures belong to a C(2v) symmetry with an apex of the H(3) (+) triangle pointing to the noble gas. The structure of the complexes changes gradually from a practically pure Ne-H(3) (+) arrangement to a situation close to XeH(+)-H(2). A topological analysis of the electron localization function is used to illustrate the changes in the bonding along the series. The lowest dissociation energies of NeH(3) (+) and ArH(3) (+) ( approximately 1 and approximately 7 kcalmol) correspond to the breaking of the complexes according to X+H(3) (+), while the lowest dissociation energies of KrH(3) (+) and XeH(3) (+) ( approximately 8 and approximately 3 kcalmol) correspond to the breaking according to XH(+)+H(2). Rotational constants and harmonic frequencies are reported. Apart from XeH(3) (+) whose dipole moment (mu=2.6 D) may not be large enough, all the other complexes with dipole moments in the range of 6-8 D should be reasonable targets for detection by microwave spectroscopy. The present calculations are intended to stimulate both laboratory experiments and spatial observations since the possible sequestration of noble gases by H(3) (+) may have strong implications on the composition of astrophysical objects.

  13. Using 81Kr and noble gases to characterize and date groundwater and brines in the Baltic Artesian Basin on the one-million-year timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Christoph; Vaikmäe, Rein; Aeschbach, Werner; Babre, Alise; Jiang, Wei; Leuenberger, Markus; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mokrik, Robert; Müller, Peter; Raidla, Valle; Saks, Tomas; Waber, H. Niklaus; Weissbach, Therese; Zappala, Jake C.; Purtschert, Roland

    2017-05-01

    Analyses for 81Kr and noble gases on groundwater from the deepest aquifer system of the Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB) were performed to determine groundwater ages and uncover the flow dynamics of the system on a timescale of several hundred thousand years. We find that the system is controlled by mixing of three distinct water masses: Interglacial or recent meteoric water (δ18O ≈ -10.4‰) with a poorly evolved chemical and noble gas signature, glacial meltwater (δ18O ⩽ -18‰) with elevated noble gas concentrations, and an old, high-salinity brine component (δ18O ⩾ -4.5‰, ⩾ 90 g Cl-/L) with strongly depleted atmospheric noble gas concentrations. The 81Kr measurements are interpreted within this mixing framework to estimate the age of the end-members. Deconvoluted 81Kr ages range from 300 ka to 1.3 Ma for interglacial or recent meteoric water and glacial meltwater. For the brine component, ages exceed the dating range of the ATTA-3 instrument of 1.3 Ma. The radiogenic noble gas components 4He∗ and 40Ar∗ are less conclusive but also support an age of > 1 Ma for the brine. Based on the chemical and noble gas concentrations and the dating results, we conclude that the brine originates from evaporated seawater that has been modified by later water-rock interaction. As the obtained tracer ages cover several glacial cycles, we discuss the impact of the glacial cycles on flow patterns in the studied aquifer system.

  14. Light noble gases in Jilin: More of the same and something new

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begemann, F.; Fan, Caiyun; Weber, H. W.; Wang, Xianbin

    1996-09-01

    Results are reported for documented samples from two drill cores and for specimens from the strewn field of the largest known stone meteorite, the H chondrite Jilin. Core B was found to have been parallel to the surface of Jilin during its first stage of irradiation, in 2π geometry. Core A was normal to the 2π surface; in it the mean attenuation length for the production by galactic cosmic rays of 38Ar from metal and of 21Ne from Mg, Al, Si in silicates was found to be the same. A numerical value for the mean attenuation length of (71 ± 4) cm or (246 ± 14) g × cm-2 follows if corrections for the contribution from the second stage of exposure are based on T2 = 0.32 Ma; agreement with the lower values of ˜180 g × cm-2 obtained from lunar studies and target data requires T2 to be about twice as long. Previous results are confirmed that in specimens with high contents of stable spallogenic gases the ratio 21Nebulk/38Armetal is low. The suggestion had been, and is, mat this is a transition effect in near-surface samples where the secondary cascade of nuclear-active particles, and hence the production of 21Ne, was not yet fully developed. This suggestion is borne out by the present results on two samples that, based on cosmic-ray tracks and 60Co content, are certified near-surface samples (although, strictly speaking, this is true only for the depth of burial during the second stage of irradiation). Cosmic-ray produced 60Co is positively correlated with 4He content, indicating that significant losses of 4He occurred when the Jilin meteoroid had acquired already its final size and shape and that the losses were more severe for near-surface samples than for such from the 4π interior. Presumably, the losses were caused by a thermal spike associated with the excavation of Jilin from its parent body. The same event caused losses of part of the 3He produced during the first irradiation stage. From the systematics of the 3He/21Ne vs. 4He correlation, we derive for the

  15. Solubility and Partitioning of Noble Gases in Anorthite, Diopside, Forsterite, Spinel, and Synthetic Basaltic Melts: Implications for the Origin and Evolution of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadhurst, Catherine Leigh

    The noble gas abundances and isotopic ratios of the terrestrial planets differ from each other and from the average of chondritic meteorites. These different abundance patterns result from primordial heterogeneities or different degassing histories. Magmatic transport is the only degassing mechanism that can be demonstrated to occur on Venus, Earth, and Mars, and is presently the dominant form of volatile transport to a planet's free surface. An alternative technique was developed to determine the partitioning and solubility of noble gases in mineral/melt systems. Natural end member minerals and synthetic melts known to be in equilibrium were held in separate crucibles in a one bar flowing noble gas atmosphere. Experiments were run 7-18 days at 1300 or 1332^circ C, in 99.95% Ar or a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe mix. Gas concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. The solubility of noble gases in minerals was surprisingly high, and individual samples of a particular mineral composition are distinct in their behavior. The data is consistent with lattice vacancy defect siting. Noble gas solubility in the minerals increases with increasing atomic number; this may be related to polarizability. Noble gas solubilities in melts decrease with increasing atomic number. Solubility is directly proportional to melt molar volume; values overlap the lower end of the range defined for natural basalts. The lower solubilities are related to the higher MgO and CaO concentrations and lower degree of polymerization and Fe^{3+ } concentration in synthetic vs. natural melts. Partition coefficient patterns show a clear trend of increasing compatibility with increasing noble gas atomic number, but many individual values are >1. Calculations show that the terrestrial planet atmospheres cannot have formed from partial melting of a common chondritic source. When results are examined with isotopic constraints and MOR and hot-spot activities, there is no compelling evidence that the Earth is

  16. Diffusive fractionation of noble gases in mantle with magma channels: Origin of low He/Ar in mantle-derived rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Junji; Nishimura, Koshi; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Takemura, Keiji; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji

    2009-04-01

    By crushing olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts in volcanic rocks from Kyushu Island, Japan, we determined 3He/ 4He of 3-7 Ra and 40Ar/ 36Ar of up to 1750. These values are lower than those of MORB. 4He/ 40Ar* (down to 0.1) is much lower than the production ratio of 4He/ 40Ar* (1-5), where an asterisk denotes correction for the atmospheric contribution. Such values are typical of mantle-derived samples from the island arcs and active continental margins. Although the origin of the low 3He/ 4He and 40Ar/ 36Ar of subcontinental mantle has been widely discussed, low 4He/ 40Ar* has been given little attention. Actually, 3He/ 4He and 4He/ 40Ar* of phenocrysts overlap with those of subcontinental mantle xenoliths. Although noble gas compositions of phenocrysts are affected considerably by diffusive fractionation in ascending magma, they have little effect on the noble gases in the mantle xenoliths because it takes 100 years for He/Ar fractionation of ca. 15% for a mantle xenolith with 5 cm diameter. Therefore, the low 4He/ 40Ar* of the mantle xenoliths is inferred to result from another kinetic fractionation in the mantle. During generation and migration of magma in the mantle, lighter noble gases diffuse rapidly out into the magma. This diffusive fractionation can explain low 4He/ 40Ar* and somewhat low 3He/ 4He in the residual mantle. Furthermore, the combination of the diffusive fractionation and subsequent radiogenic ingrowth explain the fact that data from subcontinental mantle xenoliths have extremely low 3He/ 4He and various 4He/ 40Ar*. Consequently, 4He/ 40Ar* and 3He/ 4He in mantle-derived materials are proposed as indicators of the degree of noble gas depletion of the source mantle.

  17. Using 81Kr and noble gases to characterize and date groundwater and brines in the Baltic Artesian Basin on the one-million-year timescale

    DOE PAGES

    Gerber, Christoph; Vaikmae, Rein; Aeschbach, Werner; ...

    2017-01-31

    Analyses for 81Kr and noble gases on groundwater from the deepest aquifer system of the Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB) were performed to determine groundwater ages and uncover the flow dynamics of the system on a timescale of several hundred thousand years. We find that the system is controlled by mixing of three distinct water masses: Interglacial or recent meteoric water (δ18O ≈ –10.4‰) with a poorly evolved chemical and noble gas signature, glacial meltwater (δ18O ≤ –18‰) with elevated noble gas concentrations, and an old, high-salinity brine component (δ18O ≥ –4.5‰, ≥ 90 g Cl–/L) with strongly depleted atmospheric noblemore » gas concentrations. The 81Kr measurements are interpreted within this mixing framework to estimate the age of the end-members. Deconvoluted 81Kr ages range from 300 ka to 1.3 Ma for interglacial or recent meteoric water and glacial meltwater. For the brine component, ages exceed the dating range of the ATTA-3 instrument of 1.3 Ma. The radiogenic noble gas components 4He* and 40Ar* are less conclusive but also support an age of > 1 Ma for the brine. Based on the chemical and noble gas concentrations and the dating results, we conclude that the brine originates from evaporated seawater that has been modified by later water–rock interaction. Furthermore, as the obtained tracer ages cover several glacial cycles, we discuss the impact of the glacial cycles on flow patterns in the studied aquifer system.« less

  18. Estimation of self-absorption effect on aluminum emission in the presence of different noble gases: comparison between thin and thick plasma emission.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, F; Karimi, P; Tavassoli, S H

    2013-07-20

    Aluminum spectra in the noble gases of helium and argon at initial delay times after plasma formation are numerically calculated. Temporal behavior of plasma emissions up to 200 ns after laser irradiation is investigated. Plasma parameters are computed by coupling the thermal model of laser ablation, hydrodynamic of plasma expansion, and Saha-Eggert equations. A spectrum is constructed from the superposition of 13 strong lines of aluminum and several strong lines of ambient gases. Spectral radiations are superimposed on a continuous emission composed of bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation. The self-absorption effect on plasma radiation at 1 atm gas pressure is studied. In this paper, a comparison between thin and thick aluminum radiation is done. Furthermore, the self-absorption coefficient of each strong line at laser energies of 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 GW/cm(2) is estimated. Results show that at specific laser energy, the self-absorption effect in argon is more significant than in helium. For most of the spectral lines in both noble gases, the self-absorption coefficient will diminish with the delay time. As indicated with passing time, the line widths of the self-absorbed lines will rise. More intense continuous emissions are observed at higher wavelengths, and these radiations will be increased with laser energy.

  19. Absolute cross sections for electron loss, electron capture, and multiple ionization in collisions of C{sup 3+} with noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Montenegro, E. C.; Sigaud, G. M.; Melo, W. S.

    2010-07-15

    Absolute charge-state-correlated cross sections for projectile electron loss, electron capture, and target multiple ionization in collisions between C{sup 3+} ions and noble gases have been measured for energies between 1.3 and 3.5 MeV. The data have been compared with other similar absolute cross sections existent in the literature for several projectiles. Calculations for the single-loss-multiple-ionization channel have been performed for the screening mode, using both an extended version of the classical-impulse free-collision model and the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA), and for the antiscreening mode within the PWBA. The energy dependence of the average number of target active electrons which contribute to the antiscreening has been described by means of a simple function, which is ''universal'' for noble gases but, in principle, projectile dependent. A method has been developed to obtain the number of active target electrons for each subshell in the high-velocity regime, which presented physically reasonable results. Analyses of the dependences of the single-capture and transfer-ionization (SC and TI, respectively) processes on the projectile charge states showed that, for He, equally charged bare and dressed projectiles have very similar cross sections; the latter thus acting as structureless point charges. A behavior similar to that in the SC has been observed for the pure single ionization of He by projectiles with different charge states and of the other noble gases by singly charged projectiles. It has been shown that the q{sup 2} dependence of the pure-single and total-ionization cross sections, predicted by first-order models, is only valid for high-collision velocities. For slower collisions, the electron capture process becomes more relevant and competes with the ionization channel, a feature which grows in importance as the projectile charge state increases.

  20. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-28

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ε) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ε{sup ∞}) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σ{sub s}, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σ{sub s} obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at

  1. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-28

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ɛ) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ɛ(∞)) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σs, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σs obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at the core of

  2. Ab initio molecular orbital studies of the vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes of boron trifluoride with the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Ford, Thomas A

    2005-05-01

    The molecular structures, interaction energies, charge transfer properties and vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes formed between boron trifluoride and the noble gases neon, argon, krypton and xenon have been computed using second and fourth order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANL2DZ basis set. The complexes are all symmetric tops, with the noble gas atom acting as a sigma electron donor along the C3 axis of the BF3 molecule. The interaction energies are all vanishingly small, and the amount of charge transferred in each case is of the order of 0.01e. The directions of the wavenumber shifts of the symmetric bending (nu2) and antisymmetric stretching (nu3) modes of the BF3 fragment confirm those determined experimentally, and the shifts are shown to correlate well with the polarizability of the noble gas atom and the inverse sixth power of the intermonomer separation. The nu2 mode is substantially more sensitive to complexation than the nu3 vibration.

  3. Using noble gases in the pore water of ocean sediments to characterize CH4 seepage off the coast of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Newly developed analytical techniques to determine the abundances of noble gases in sediment pore water [1, 5] allow noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios to be measured easily and routinely in unconsolidated lacustrine sediments [6, 7]. We applied these techniques for the first time to ocean sediments to investigate an active cold methane seepage system located in the South Pacific off the coast of New Zealand using 3He-4He ratios determined in the sediment pore water. Our results [8] show that more 3He-rich fluids are released in the vicinity of the Pacific-Australian subduction zone than at the forearc stations located closer to the New Zealand coast. However, the 3He-4He isotope signature in the sediment column indicates that only a minor part of the He emanating from deeper strata originates from a (depleted) mantle source. Hence, most He in the pore water is produced locally by the radioactive decay of U and Th in the sediment minerals or in the underlying crustal rocks. Such an occurrence of isotopically heavy crustal He also suggests that the source of the largest fraction of methane is a near-surface geochemical reservoir. This finding is in line with a previous δ13C study in the water column which concluded that the emanating methane is most likely of biological origin and is formed in the upper few meters of the sediment column [2]. The prevalence of isotopically heavy He agrees well with the outcome of other previous studies on island arc systems [3, 4] which indicate that the forearc regions are characterized by crustal He emission, whereas the volcanic arc region is characterized by the presence of mantle He associated with rising magma. References [1] Brennwald, M. S., Hofer, M., Peeters, F., Aeschbach-Hertig, W., Strassmann, K., Kipfer, R., and Imboden, D. M. (2003). Analysis of dissolved noble gases in the pore water of lacustrine sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 1, 51-62. [2] Faure, K., Greinert, J., Schneider von Deimling, J., Mc

  4. Noble gases without anesthetic properties protect myocardium against infarction by activating prosurvival signaling kinases and inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Paul S; Krolikowski, John G; Shim, Yon Hee; Venkatapuram, Suneetha; Kersten, Judy R; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Phillip F

    2007-09-01

    The anesthetic noble gas, xenon, produces cardioprotection. We hypothesized that other noble gases without anesthetic properties [helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar)] also produce cardioprotection, and further hypothesized that this beneficial effect is mediated by activation of prosurvival signaling kinases [including phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and 70-kDa ribosomal protein s6 kinase] and inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in vivo. Rabbits (n = 98) instrumented for hemodynamic measurement and subjected to a 30-min left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion and 3 h reperfusion received 0.9% saline (control), three cycles of 70% He-, Ne-, or Ar-30% O2 administered for 5 min interspersed with 5 min of 70% N2-30% O2 before LAD occlusion, or three cycles of brief (5 min) ischemia interspersed with 5 min reperfusion before prolonged LAD occlusion and reperfusion (ischemic preconditioning). Additional groups of rabbits received selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (wortmannin; 0.6 mg/kg), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PD 098059; 2 mg/kg), or 70-kDa ribosomal protein s6 kinase (rapamycin; 0.25 mg/kg) or mPTP opener atractyloside (5 mg/kg) in the absence or presence of He pretreatment. He, Ne, Ar, and ischemic preconditioning significantly (P < 0.05) reduced myocardial infarct size [23% +/- 4%, 20% +/- 3%, 22% +/- 2%, 17% +/- 3% of the left ventricular area at risk (mean +/- sd); triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining] versus control (45% +/- 5%). Wortmannin, PD 098059, rapamycin, and atractyloside alone did not affect infarct size, but these drugs abolished He-induced cardioprotection. The results indicate that noble gases without anesthetic properties produce cardioprotection by activating prosurvival signaling kinases and inhibiting mPTP opening in rabbits.

  5. Effect of the pump intensity on the efficiency of a KrF excimer electric-discharge laser on a He-Kr-F{sub 2} mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Razhev, A M; Zhupikov, A A; Shchedrin, A I; Kalyuzhnaya, Anna G; Ryabtsev, Andrei V

    2004-10-31

    The effect of the pump parameters on the efficiency of operation of a KrF gas-discharge excimer laser on a He-Kr-F{sub 2} mixture is studied. A theoretical model of the excitation system and the kinetic processes in the plasma of this laser is developed. A pump system based on an LC inverter with a spark gap as a high-voltage switch, automatic UV preionisation, and a low-inductance discharge circuit is created. To increase the efficiency and the output energy of the KrF laser based on a He-Kr-F{sub 2} mixture, it is proposed to enhance the pump intensity to 4 MW cm{sup -3} by increasing the inductance between the LC inverter and the discharge circuit to 100 nH. An output energy of 1 J at an efficiency of 2% is achieved for the first time for the KrF laser operating on this mixture. (lasers)

  6. Noble gases and nitrogen in Martian meteorites Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005 and Lewis Cliff 88516: EFA and extra neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Ratan K.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Herrmann, Siegfried; Murty, S. V. S.; Ott, Ulrich; Gilmour, Jamie D.

    2009-03-01

    Meteorite "finds" from the terrestrial hot deserts have become a major contributor to the inventory of Martian meteorites. In order to understand their nitrogen and noble gas components, we have carried out stepped heating experiments on samples from two Martian meteorites collected from hot deserts. We measured interior and surface bulk samples, glassy and non-glassy portions of Dar al Gani 476 and Sayh al Uhaymir 005. We have also analyzed noble gases released from the Antarctic shergottite Lewis Cliff 88516 by crushing and stepped heating. For the hot desert meteorites significant terrestrial Ar, Kr, Xe contamination is observed, with an elementally fractionated air (EFA) component dominating the low temperature releases. The extremely low Ar/Kr/Xe ratios of EFA may be the result of multiple episodes of trapping/loss during terrestrial alteration involving aqueous fluids. We suggest fractionation processes similar to those in hot deserts to have acted on Mars, with acidic weathering on the latter possibly even more effective in producing elementally fractionated components. Addition from fission xenon is apparent in DaG 476 and SaU 005. The Ar-Kr-Xe patterns for LEW 88516 show trends as typically observed in shergottites - including evidence for a crush-released component similar to that observed in EETA 79001. A trapped Ne component most prominent in the surface sample of DaG 476 may represent air contamination. It is accompanied by little trapped Ar ( 20Ne/ 36Ar > 50) and literature data suggest its presence also in some Antarctic finds. Data for LEW 88516 and literature data, on the other hand, suggest the presence of two trapped Ne components of Martian origin characterized by different 20Ne/ 22Ne, possibly related to the atmosphere and the interior. Caution is recommended in interpreting nitrogen and noble gas isotopic signatures of Martian meteorites from hot deserts in terms of extraterrestrial sources and processes. Nevertheless our results provide hope

  7. Searching for Indigenous Noble Gases in the Moon: Vacuum Crushing of Vesicular Basalt 15016 and Stepwise Heating of Anorthosites 60025, 60215 and 65315 Aliquots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Avice, G.; Marty, B.; Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts during the last four decades, no primordial signature of lunar xenon has been found. In order to further investigate the possible occurrence of indigenous volatiles in the Moon, we have analysed the noble gas and nitrogen isotopic compositions in two different sets of samples. Vacuum crushing of highly vesicular (~50% by volume) basalt 15016 (3.4 b.y. old, 300 m.y. exposure age) releases large amounts of spallation-produced gases that overshadow any other component. Lunar anorthosites 60025, 60215 and 65315 have the lowest exposure duration (~2m.y.) among Apollo samples. Consequently, they contain only limited cosmogenic (e.g. 124,126Xe) and solar wind noble gases. Furthermore, anorthosite is poor in U and Pu, leading to negligible contribution of fissiogenic Xe isotopes. These properties make these samples ideal for searching for lunar primordial noble gases. As observed in previous studies [1-3], lunar anorthosite Xe presents an isotopic composition very close to that of terrestrial atmosphere, which has been previously attributed to "abnormal adsorption" of terrestrial Xe after sample return. This presumed atmospheric Xe contamination can only be removed by heating the samples at medium to high temperature under vacuum, and is therefore different from common adsorption. In order to investigate this abnormal adsorption, uncrushed gravels of lunar anorthosite were exposed to a neutral Xe-rich atmosphere. Infrared reflectance spectrometry of processed, and unprocessed, samples shows a shift in the anorthosite's peak of the former, possibly corresponding to chemical Xe bonding. This phenomenon could explain the difficulties met for forty years when investigating a lunar primordial xenon component in anorthosites. However, our high precision Xe isotope analysis shows a systematic trend toward depletion in the heavy Xe isotopes (134Xe and 136Xe) not seen before. This leads us to make a tantalising parallel between the indigenous component in

  8. Itqiy: A study of noble gases and oxygen isotopes including its terrestrial age and a comparison with Zaklodzie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, Andrea; Hill, Dolores H.; Boynton, William V.; Franke, Luitgard; Schultz, Ludolf; Jull, A. J. Timothy; McHargue, Lanny R.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2002-06-01

    We report noble gas, oxygen isotope, 14C and 10Be data of Itqiy as well as noble gas, 14C and 10Be results for Zaklodzie. Both samples have been recently classified as anomalous enstatite meteorites and have been compared in terms of their mineralogy and chemical composition. The composition of enstatite and kamacite and the occurrence of specific sulfide phases in Itqiy indicate it formed under similar reducing conditions to those postulated for enstatite chondrites. The new results now seem to point at a direct spatial link. The noble gas record of Itqiy exhibits the presence of a trapped subsolar component, which is diagnostic for petrologic types 4-6 among enstatite chondrites. The concentration of radiogenic 4He is very low in Itqiy and indicates a recent thermal event. Its 21Ne cosmic-ray exposure age is 30.1 ~ 3.0 Ma and matches the most common age range of enstatite chondrites (mostly EL6 chondrites) but not that of Zaklodzie. Itqiy's isotopic composition of oxygen is in good agreement with that observed in Zaklodzie as well as those found in enstatite meteorites suggesting an origin from a common oxygen pool. The noble gas results, on the other hand, give reason to believe that the origin and evolution of Itqiy and Zaklodzie are not directly connected. Itqiy's terrestrial age of 5800 ~ 500 years sheds crucial light on the uncertain circumstances of its recovery and proves that Itqiy is not a modern fall, whereas the 14C results from Zaklodzie suggest it hit Earth only recently.

  9. Anionic chemistry of noble gases: formation of Mg-NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) compounds under pressure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Li; Brgoch, Jakoah; Spera, Frank; Jackson, Matthew G; Kresse, Georg; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-11

    While often considered to be chemically inert, the reactivity of noble gas elements at elevated pressures is an important aspect of fundamental chemistry. The discovery of Xe oxidation transformed the doctrinal boundary of chemistry by showing that a complete electron shell is not inert to reaction. However, the reductive propensity, i.e., gaining electrons and forming anions, has not been proposed or examined for noble gas elements. In this work, we demonstrate, using first-principles electronic structure calculations coupled to an efficient structure prediction method, that Xe, Kr, and Ar can form thermodynamically stable compounds with Mg at high pressure (≥125, ≥250, and ≥250 GPa, respectively). The resulting compounds are metallic and the noble gas atoms are negatively charged, suggesting that chemical species with a completely filled shell can gain electrons, filling their outermost shell(s). Moreover, this work indicates that Mg2NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) are high-pressure electrides with some of the electrons localized at interstitial sites enclosed by the surrounding atoms. Previous predictions showed that such electrides only form in Mg and its compounds at very high pressures (>500 GPa). These calculations also demonstrate strong chemical interactions between the Xe 5d orbitals and the quantized interstitial quasiatom (ISQ) orbitals, including the strong chemical bonding and electron transfer, revealing the chemical nature of the ISQ.

  10. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable.

  11. Noble Gases in Alpine Gold: U/Th-He Dating and Excesses of Radiogenic He and AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Krahenbuhl, U.; Neuenschwander, J.

    1992-07-01

    quantity of trapped atmospheric noble gases we estimate atmospheric ^4He in the gold samples to be three to five orders of magnitude below the observed ^4He concentration. Placer gold is finely distributed in rock material and might be exposed to an alpha-particle irradiation from neighboring U/Th-rich minerals. An alternative He source are inclusions of U/Th-rich minerals, such as zircon, either within the gold material or mechanically worked into the spangles as they were part of the river detritus. Acknowledgement: We thank the Swiss NSF for their support. References: Diamond L.W. (1990) Am. J. of Science 290, 912-958. Schmid K. (1973) Schw. Min. Petr. Mitt. 53, 125-156. Table 1, which in the hard copy appears here, shows concentrations of He, Ne, and Ar (10^-8 cm^3 STP/g) and of K, Th, and U (ppm) in vein-type free gold, placer gold, and quartz. The ^3He and ^21Ne signals were below detection limits, that is ^4He/^3He in gold is >100'000. Average ^20Ne/^22Ne ratios in gold and quartz are 10.2 +- 0.2, that is about 4% larger than in the terrestrial atmosphere. Average ^36Ar/^38Ar = 5.2 +- 0.2 (within errors identical to ^36Ar/^38Ar in air). 1) Sample sizes 50-100 mg. 2) Radiogenic ^40Ar = ^40Ar-295.5 x ^36Ar. 3) Calculated from U/Th and ^40K decay.

  12. Combined action of the bound-electron nonlinearity and the tunnel-ionization current in low-order harmonic generation in noble gases.

    PubMed

    Sapaev, Usman; Husakou, Anton; Herrmann, Joachim

    2013-10-21

    We study numerically low-order harmonic generation in noble gases pumped by intense femtosecond laser pulses in the tunneling ionization regime. We analyze the influence of the phase-mismatching on this process, caused by the generated plasma, and study in dependence on the pump intensity the origin of harmonic generation arising either from the bound-electron nonlinearity or the tunnel-ionization current. It is shown that in argon the optimum pump intensity of about 100 TW/cm² leads to the maximum efficiency, where the main contribution to low-order harmonics originates from the bound-electron third and fifth order susceptibilities, while for intensities higher than 300 TW/cm² the tunnel-ionization current plays the dominant role. Besides, we predict that VUV pulses at 133 nm can be generated with relatively high efficiency of about 1.5 × 10⁻³ by 400 nm pump pulses.

  13. Noble Gases in Iddingsite from the Lafayette Meteorite: Evidence for Liquid Water on Mars in the Last Few Hundred Million Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Brkland, M. K.; Cohen, B. A.; Grier, J. A.; Li, B.; Olson, E. K.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases from 18 samples of weathering products ("iddingsite") from the Lafayette meteorite. Potassium-argon ages of 12 samples range from near zero to 670 +/- 91 Ma. These ages confirm the martian origin of the iddingsite, but it is not clear whether any or all of the ages represent iddingsite formation as opposed to later alteration or incorporation of martian atmospheric Ar-40. In any case, because iddingsite formation requires liquid water, this data requires the presence of liquid water near the surface of Mars at least as recently as 1300 Ma ago, and probably as recently as 650 Ma ago. Krypton and Xe analysis of a single 34 microg sample indicates the presence of fractionated martian atmosphere within the iddingsite. This also confirms the martian origin of the iddingsite. The mechanism of incorporation could either be through interaction with liquid water during iddingsite formation or a result of shock implantation of adsorbed atmospheric gas.

  14. Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well mimicking the Lennard-Jones fluid and a comparison with noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bárcenas, M; Reyes, Y; Romero-Martínez, A; Odriozola, G; Orea, P

    2015-02-21

    Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well (TW) fluid are obtained with the aim of mimicking the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and approach the properties of noble gases. For this purpose, the scope of the TW is varied to match vapor-liquid densities and surface tension. Surface tension and coexistence curves of TW systems with different ranges were calculated with replica exchange Monte Carlo and compared to those data previously reported in the literature for truncated and shifted (STS), truncated (ST), and full Lennard-Jones (full-LJ) potentials. We observed that the scope of the TW potential must be increased to approach the STS, ST, and full-LJ properties. In spite of the simplicity of TW expression, a remarkable agreement is found. Furthermore, the variable scope of the TW allows for a good match of the experimental data of argon and xenon.

  15. Noble Gases in Iddingsite from the Lafayette Meteorite: Evidence for Liquid Water on Mars in the Last Few Hundred Million Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Brkland, M. K.; Cohen, B. A.; Grier, J. A.; Li, B.; Olson, E. K.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases from 18 samples of weathering products ("iddingsite") from the Lafayette meteorite. Potassium-argon ages of 12 samples range from near zero to 670 +/- 91 Ma. These ages confirm the martian origin of the iddingsite, but it is not clear whether any or all of the ages represent iddingsite formation as opposed to later alteration or incorporation of martian atmospheric Ar-40. In any case, because iddingsite formation requires liquid water, this data requires the presence of liquid water near the surface of Mars at least as recently as 1300 Ma ago, and probably as recently as 650 Ma ago. Krypton and Xe analysis of a single 34 microg sample indicates the presence of fractionated martian atmosphere within the iddingsite. This also confirms the martian origin of the iddingsite. The mechanism of incorporation could either be through interaction with liquid water during iddingsite formation or a result of shock implantation of adsorbed atmospheric gas.

  16. Using carbon and water isotopes and noble gases to assess the origin of methane in fresh water aquifers in the south of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, Hans Peter; de Weert, Jasperien; Vonhof, Hubert; Janssen, Renee; Sueltenfuss, Juergen; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Castelijns, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater in the Dutch subsurface is known to contain substantial concentrations of methane of which the origin is not always clear. The Dutch subsurface contains relatively high organic matter contents which makes a biogenic origin plausible, however few studies have used water and carbon isotopes to deduce the origin of methane. In relation to possible future exploitation of deep shale gas resources, it is now considered important to assess base line quality of fresh groundwater in overlying aquifers from which drinking water is produced. Therefore, we sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields in the south of the Netherlands which represents a mixture of groundwater of different ages and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13C-DIC and 13C-CH4 and the full range of noble gases. 13C-CH4 measurements were carried out using a Picarro G2201-i CRDS analyser. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources and included carbonate dissolution and methanogenesis as the defining processes. The 13C-CH4 measurements showed a range of δ-values between -70 and -100‰, which give a clear indication for biogenic methane. No clear relations between 13C-CH4 and 13C-DIC or the 4He/CH4 ratio were observed. However, clear spatial patterns indicated that more depleted values are grouped in specific areas. The 13δCH4 values did not show a clear relation with the age distribution of the pumped water, even though a large range of age distributions was observed including old water with an age of > 25 k yrs. We believe that spatial differences in organic matter contents, origin of the geological deposits and/or the

  17. Origins of volatile elements (H, C, N, noble gases) on Earth and Mars in light of recent results from the ROSETTA cometary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard; Avice, Guillaume; Sano, Yuji; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Hässig, Myrtha; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Mousis, Olivier; Rubin, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements of the volatile composition of the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter 67P) allow constraints to be set on the origin of volatile elements (water, carbon, nitrogen, noble gases) in inner planets' atmospheres. Analyses by the ROSINA mass spectrometry system onboard the Rosetta spacecraft indicate that 67P ice has a D/H ratio three times that of the ocean value (Altwegg et al., 2015) and contains significant amounts of N2, CO, CO2, and importantly, argon (Balsiger et al., 2015). Here we establish a model of cometary composition based on literature data and the ROSINA measurements. From mass balance calculations, and provided that 67P is representative of the cometary ice reservoir, we conclude that the contribution of cometary volatiles to the Earth's inventory was minor for water (≤1%), carbon (≤1%), and nitrogen species (a few % at most). However, cometary contributions to the terrestrial atmosphere may have been significant for the noble gases. They could have taken place towards the end of the main building stages of the Earth, after the Moon-forming impact and during either a late veneer episode or, more probably, the Terrestrial Late Heavy Bombardment around 4.0-3.8 billion years (Ga) ago. Contributions from the outer solar system via cometary bodies could account for the dichotomy of the noble gas isotope compositions, in particular xenon, between the mantle and the atmosphere. A mass balance based on 36Ar and organics suggests that the amount of prebiotic material delivered by comets could have been quite considerable - equivalent to the present-day mass of the biosphere. On Mars, several of the isotopic signatures of surface volatiles (notably the high D/H ratios) are clearly indicative of atmospheric escape processes. Nevertheless, we suggest that cometary contributions after the major atmospheric escape events, e.g., during a Martian Late Heavy Bombardment towards the end of the Noachian era, could account for the

  18. Petrography, classification, oxygen isotopes, noble gases, and cosmogenic records of Kamargaon (L6) meteorite: The latest fall in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D.; Mahajan, R. R.; Shukla, A. D.; Goswami, T. K.; Chakraborty, S.

    2017-08-01

    A single piece of meteorite fell on Kamargaon village in the state of Assam in India on November 13, 2015. Based on mineralogical, chemical, and oxygen isotope data, Kamargaon is classified as an L-chondrite. Homogeneous olivine (Fa: 25 ± 0.7) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fs: 21 ± 0.4) compositions with percent mean deviation of <2, further suggest that Kamargaon is a coarsely equilibrated, petrologic type 6 chondrite. Kamargaon is thermally metamorphosed with an estimated peak metamorphic temperature of 800 °C as determined by two-pyroxene thermometry. Shock metamorphism studies suggest that this meteorite include portions of different shock stages, e.g., S3 and S4 (Stöffler et al.; however, local presence of quenched metal-sulfide melt within shock veins/pockets suggest disequilibrium melting and relatively higher shock stage of up to S5 (Bennett and McSween). Based on noble gas isotopes, the cosmic-ray exposure age is estimated as 7.03 ± 1.60 Ma and nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N = 18‰) also correspond well with the L-chondrite group. The He-U, Th, and K-Ar yield younger ages (170 ± 25 Ma 684 ± 93, respectively) and are discordant. A loss of He during the resetting event is implied by the lower He-U and Th age. Elemental ratios of trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe can be explained through the presence of a normal Q noble gas component. Relatively low activity of 26Al (39 dpm/kg) and the absence of 60Co activity suggest a likely low shielding depth and envisage a small preatmospheric size of the meteoroid (<10 cm in radius). The Kr isotopic ratios (82Kr/84Kr) further argue that the meteorite was derived from a shallow depth.

  19. A randomized trial of the effects of the noble gases helium and argon on neuroprotection in a rodent cardiac arrest model.

    PubMed

    Zuercher, Patrick; Springe, Dirk; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L; Grossholz, Marius; Jakob, Stephan; Takala, Jukka; Haenggi, Matthias

    2016-04-04

    The noble gas xenon is considered as a neuroprotective agent, but availability of the gas is limited. Studies on neuroprotection with the abundant noble gases helium and argon demonstrated mixed results, and data regarding neuroprotection after cardiac arrest are scant. We tested the hypothesis that administration of 50% helium or 50% argon for 24 h after resuscitation from cardiac arrest improves clinical and histological outcome in our 8 min rat cardiac arrest model. Forty animals had cardiac arrest induced with intravenous potassium/esmolol and were randomized to post-resuscitation ventilation with either helium/oxygen, argon/oxygen or air/oxygen for 24 h. Eight additional animals without cardiac arrest served as reference, these animals were not randomized and not included into the statistical analysis. Primary outcome was assessment of neuronal damage in histology of the region I of hippocampus proper (CA1) from those animals surviving until day 5. Secondary outcome was evaluation of neurobehavior by daily testing of a Neurodeficit Score (NDS), the Tape Removal Test (TRT), a simple vertical pole test (VPT) and the Open Field Test (OFT). Because of the non-parametric distribution of the data, the histological assessments were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis test. Treatment effect in repeated measured assessments was estimated with a linear regression with clustered robust standard errors (SE), where normality is less important. Twenty-nine out of 40 rats survived until day 5 with significant initial deficits in neurobehavioral, but rapid improvement within all groups randomized to cardiac arrest. There were no statistical significant differences between groups neither in the histological nor in neurobehavioral assessment. The replacement of air with either helium or argon in a 50:50 air/oxygen mixture for 24 h did not improve histological or clinical outcome in rats subjected to 8 min of cardiac arrest.

  20. Origin and Processes Highlighted By Noble Gases Geochemistry of Submarine Gas Emissions from Seeps at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay):

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, A.; Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Bignon, L.; Pujol, M.; Levaché, D.

    2014-12-01

    Noble gases are widely used as tracers to both determine fluid origin and identify transfer processes governing fluid flow in natural systems. This work presents the preliminary results and interpretations from submarine gas samples collected during the GAZCOGNE2 cruise (2013). The seepage activity and the spatial distribution of the widespread emission sites encountered at this area are described by (Dupré et al. 2014). Gas composition shows that methane is the dominant species compared to the C2+. The associated δ13C and δD signatures point to a biogenic origin- through CO2 reduction- of the gas. Helium concentrations are very low, ranging from 0.1 and 2.3 ppm, indicating a low residence time of the fluids in the subsurface. However, the resulting helium isotopic ratios are mostly crustal fingerprinted (around 0.02). The R/Ra values sometimes exhibit higher value of 0.2, indicative either an ASW (air saturated water) value, or the fingerprint of ancient mantle helium, the later in agreement with the geological structural context of the Parentis Basin. Most of the samples exhibit a mixing between ASW and air, probably by excess air addition to the initial ASW concentration. The elemental Ne/Ar ratio is remarkably constant for the totality of the samples, with a value typical of ASW (0.2). This result implies that the migrating gas phase is "stripping" the original water matrix from its noble gas content, as described by Gillfillian et al., 2008. This further indicates that an intermediate reservoir of biogenic gas should be present at depth. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References: Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or the expression of hydrocarbon leakage?, Continental Shelf Research, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2014.07.004. Gilfillan S

  1. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Monahans H5 chondrite, Zolensky et al. report the first occurrence of grains of halite (NaCl), which contain minor sylvite (KCl) and tiny inclusions of liquid water. Here we report Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of Monahans light (4.53 Ga) and dark phases and of the halite (>4.33 Ga). We report the presence of trapped solar gases in the dark phase, demonstrating that it represents a prior regolith on the Monahans parent body, We also report the cosmic-ray exposure age of Monahans and the neutron fluence experienced by the regolith component. Because the halite grains are apparently located only in the regolith phase, they may have formed by early hydrous activity within the Monahans parent body regolith, or they may have been introduced from outside.

  2. On the size and structure of helium snowballs formed around charged atoms and clusters of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx(+) ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He20(84)Kr2(+) and the isobaric, nonmagic He41(84)Kr(+). Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr(+), which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa(+) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7300] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx(+) (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx(+) suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr(+) to Kr3(+). Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2(+) and He12Kr3(+) [Kim , J. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214301] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex(+) (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr(+) and HenXe(+) show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr(+); differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions.

  3. On the Size and Structure of Helium Snowballs Formed around Charged Atoms and Clusters of Noble Gases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx+ ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He2084Kr2+ and the isobaric, nonmagic He4184Kr+. Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr+, which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa+ [J. Phys. Chem. A2011, 115, 730021568337] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx+ (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx+ suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr+ to Kr3+. Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2+ and He12Kr3+ [KimJ. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys.2006, 124, 21430116774401] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex+ (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr+ and HenXe+ show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr+; differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions. PMID:24128371

  4. Escape and fractionation of volatiles and noble gases: from Mars-sized planetary embryos to growing protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odert, Petra; Lammer, Helmut; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Nikolaou, Athanasia; Lichtenegger, Herbert I. M.; Johnstone, Colin P.; Kislyakova, Kristina G.; Leitzinger, Martin; Tosi, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Planetary embryos form larger planetary objects via collisions. Such Moon- to Mars-sized bodies can have magma oceans. During the solidification of their magma oceans planetary embryos may therefore degas significant amounts of their volatiles, forming H2O/CO2 dominated steam atmospheres. Such atmospheres may escape efficiently due to the low gravity of these objects and the high EUV emission of the young host star. Planets forming from such building blocks could therefore be drier than expected. We model the energy-limited outflow of hydrogen which is able to drag along heavier species such as O and CO2. We take into account different stellar EUV evolution tracks to investigate the loss of steam atmospheres from Mars-sized planetary embryos at different orbital distances. We find that the estimated envelopes are typically lost within a few to a few tens of Myr. Moreover, we address the influence on protoplanet evolution using Venus as an example. We investigate different early evolution scenarios and constrain realistic cases by comparing modeled noble gas isotope ratios with presently observed ones. We are able to reproduce current ratios by assuming either a pure steam atmosphere or a mixture with accreted hydrogen from the protoplanetary nebula. Despite being able to find solutions for different parameter combinations, our results favor a low-activity Sun with possibly a small amount of residual H from the protoplanetary nebula. In other cases too much CO2 is lost during evolution, which is inconsistent with Venus' present atmosphere. A critical issue is likely the time at which the initial steam atmosphere is outgassed.

  5. Three-dimensional distribution function theory for the prediction of protein-ligand binding sites and affinities: application to the binding of noble gases to hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takashi; Hiraoka, Ryusuke; Seto, Tomoyoshi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2007-10-04

    The three-dimensional distribution function theory of molecular liquids is applied to lysozyme in mixtures of water and noble gases. The results indicate that the theory has the capability of predicting the protein-ligand binding sites and affinities. First, it is shown that the theory successfully reproduces the binding sites of xenon found by X-ray crystallography. Then, the ability of the theory to predict the size selectivity of noble gases is demonstrated. The effect of water on the selectivity is clarified by a theoretical analysis. Finally, it is demonstrated that the dose-response curve, which is employed in experiments for examining the binding affinity, is realized by the theory.

  6. The evolution of Devonian hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers of the northern Appalachian Basin: Insights from integrating noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Whyte, Colin J.; Walsh, Talor B.; Kondash, Andrew J.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    groundwater (P(CH4) = ∼1 atmosphere) and elevated [Cl] and [Ba]. These data suggest that 4He is dominated by an exogenous (i.e., migrated) crustal source for these hydrocarbon gas- and salt-rich fluids. In combination with published inorganic geochemistry (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr, Sr/Ba, Br-/Cl-), new noble gas and hydrocarbon isotopic data (e.g., 20Ne/36Ar, C2+/C1, δ13C-CH4) suggest that a hydrocarbon-rich brine likely migrated from the Marcellus Formation (via primary hydrocarbon migration) as a dual-phase fluid (gas + liquid) and was fractionated by solubility partitioning during fluid migration and emplacement into conventional UD traps (via secondary hydrocarbon migration). Based on the highly fractionated 4He/CH4 data relative to Marcellus and UD production gases, we propose an additional phase of hydrocarbon gas migration where natural gas previously emplaced in UD hydrocarbon traps actively diffuses out into and equilibrates with modern shallow groundwater (via tertiary hydrocarbon migration) following uplift, denudation, and neotectonic fracturing. These data suggest that by integrating noble gas geochemistry with hydrocarbon and dissolved ion chemistry, one can better determine the source and migration processes of natural gas in the Earth's crust, which are two critical factors for understanding the presence of hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers.

  7. Thermal metamorphism of primitive meteorites. VIII - Noble gases, carbon and sulfur in Allende /C3/ meteorite heated at 400-1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Noble gases, C and S, are lost from Allende samples heated for 1 week at temperatures of 400-1000 C in a low pressure environment. In the extreme, losses of He-3 and He-4 are about 100 x while for C, S and Ne, Ar and Kr isotopes and Xe-132 these are less than or equal to 10 x. Except for He, these losses are less severe than those of Bi or Tl from samples heated in the same runs. Significant He, Ne and Ar isotopic fractionation during heating indicates preferential outgassing of specific reservoirs. Next to He, Ar-40 is the most labile of those species considered here but still less so than Bi or Tl. L-group (but not H- or LL-group) chondrites may have lost mobile elements like Tl while being outgassed after late impact-associated heating. A less likely alternative involving a collateral relation between condensation conditions and depth in a parent object may also explain the L-group trend.

  8. Noble gases in oxidized residue prepared from the Saratov L4 chondrite and Raman spectroscopic study of residues to characterize phase Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Jun-Ichi; Morishita, Kazuhiko; Nara, Masayuki; Amari, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases in an oxidized residue prepared from a HF-HCl residue of the Saratov L4 chondrite. The Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations in the oxidized residue are two orders of magnitude lower than those in the HF-HCl residue, and they are close to concentrations in the bulk. The He and Ne concentrations are similar in the three samples. The Ne isotopic ratios are almost purely cosmogenic, indicating absence of presolar diamonds (the carrier of the HL component). Thus, Saratov contains phase Q without presolar diamond. A study of the Raman spectroscopic parameters for the HF-HCl residue and the oxidized residue shows large changes due to oxidation. The directions of these changes are the same as observed in Allende, except oxidation increased the ID/IG (intensity ratio of the D band to the G band) in Saratov but decreased in Allende. This difference may be attributed to the different crystalline stages of carbon in both meteorites. The shifts in the Raman parameters to a discrete and/or more expanded region suggest that (1) oxidation changes the crystalline condition of graphitic carbon, (2) phase Q is not a dissolved site, and (3) the release of Q-gas is simply related to the rearrangement of the carbon structure during oxidation.

  9. Adsorption of inert gases including element 118 on noble metal and inert surfaces from ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic calculations.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2008-10-14

    The interaction of the inert gases Rn and element 118 with various surfaces has been studied on the basis of fully relativistic ab initio Dirac-Coulomb CCSD(T) calculations of atomic properties. The calculated polarizability of element 118, 46.3 a.u., is the largest in group 18, the ionization potential is the lowest at 8.91 eV, and the estimated atomic radius is the largest, 4.55 a.u. These extreme values reflect, in addition to the general trends in the Periodic Table, the relativistic expansion and destabilization of the outer valence 7p(3/2) orbital. Van der Waals coefficients C(3) and adsorption enthalpies DeltaH(ads) of Ne through element 118 on noble metals and inert surfaces, such as quartz, ice, Teflon, and graphite, were calculated in a physisorption model using the atomic properties obtained. The C(3) coefficients were shown to steadily increase in group 18, while the increase in DeltaH(ads) from Ne to Rn does not continue to element 118: The large atomic radius of the latter element is responsible for a decrease in the interaction energy. We therefore predict that experimental distinction between Rn and 118 by adsorption on these types of surfaces will not be feasible. A possible candidate for separating the two elements is charcoal; further study is needed to test this possibility.

  10. Thermal metamorphism of primitive meteorites. VIII - Noble gases, carbon and sulfur in Allende /C3/ meteorite heated at 400-1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Noble gases, C and S, are lost from Allende samples heated for 1 week at temperatures of 400-1000 C in a low pressure environment. In the extreme, losses of He-3 and He-4 are about 100 x while for C, S and Ne, Ar and Kr isotopes and Xe-132 these are less than or equal to 10 x. Except for He, these losses are less severe than those of Bi or Tl from samples heated in the same runs. Significant He, Ne and Ar isotopic fractionation during heating indicates preferential outgassing of specific reservoirs. Next to He, Ar-40 is the most labile of those species considered here but still less so than Bi or Tl. L-group (but not H- or LL-group) chondrites may have lost mobile elements like Tl while being outgassed after late impact-associated heating. A less likely alternative involving a collateral relation between condensation conditions and depth in a parent object may also explain the L-group trend.

  11. Isotopic anomalies of noble gases in meteorites and their origins. VI Presolar components in the Murchison C2 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaerts, L.; Lewis, R. S.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Rare gases were analyzed by stepped heating in five fractions of a chemically resistant residue from Murchison that had been separated according to grain size and resistance to HClO4. Nine gas components were recognized, of which three appear to be presolar: (1) Ne-E(H) released at 1000-1600 C and located in spinel; (2) Ne-E(L) released at less than 800 C and apparently located in a carbonaceous phase of grain size up to 10 microns; and (3) s-process Xe and Kr released at 1200-1600 C and located in a poorly characterized, possibly carbonaceous phase, distinct from the host phase of Ne-E(L).

  12. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  13. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl4 and CF4. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl4 and Ng-CF4 and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF4, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl4, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the

  14. Basin scale natural gas source, migration and trapping traced by noble gases and major elements: the Pakistan Indus basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, Anne; Sarda, Philippe; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2000-08-01

    He, Ne and Ar concentrations, He and Ar isotopic ratios, carbon isotopic ratios and chemical compositions of hydrocarbon gases were measured in natural gas samples from gas-producing wells in the Indus basin, Pakistan, where no oil has ever been found. 3He/ 4He ratios are in the range 0.01-0.06 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric value of 1.38×10 -6) indicating the absence of mantle-derived helium despite the Trias extension. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios range from 296 to 800, consistent with variable additions of radiogenic argon to atmospheric, groundwater-derived argon. Rare gas concentrations show large variations, from 6×10 -5 to 1×10 -3 mol/mol for 4He and from 3×10 -7 to 3×10 -5 mol/mol for 36Ar. In general, 36Ar concentrations are high compared to literature data for natural gas. CO 2 and N 2 concentrations are variable, ranging up to 70 and 20%, respectively. Mantle-derived He is not observed, therefore CO 2 and N 2 are not mantle-derived either. Hydrocarbon gas maturity is high, but accumulation efficiency is small, suggesting that early-produced hydrocarbons, including oil, were lost as well as mantle helium. This is consistent with the generally late, Pliocene, trap formation, and explains the high N 2 concentrations, since N 2 is the final species generated at the end of organic matter maturation. Based on δ 13C data, CO 2 originates from carbonate decomposition. Very elevated 20Ne/ 36Ar ratios are found, reaching a maximum of 1.3 (compared to 0.1-0.2 for air-saturated water and 0.5 for air), and these high values are related to the lowest rare gas concentrations. We suggest that this highly fractionated signature is the trace of the past presence of oil in the basin and appeared in groundwater. We propose a model where oil-water contact is followed by gas-water contact, both with Rayleigh distillation for rare gas abundance ratios, thereby generating the fractionated 20Ne/ 36Ar signature in groundwater first and transferring it to gas later. Assuming the gas

  15. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  16. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  17. Revealing the magmas degassing below closed-conduit active volcanoes: noble gases in volcanic rocks versus fumarolic fluids at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandarano, Michela; Paonita, Antonio; Martelli, Mauro; Viccaro, Marco; Nicotra, Eugenio; Millar, Ian L.

    2016-04-01

    With the aim to constrain the nature of magma currently feeding the fumarolic field of Vulcano, we measured the elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases (He, Ne, and Ar) in olivine- and clinopyroxene-hosted fluid inclusions in high-K calcalcaline-shoshonitic and shoshonitic-potassic series so as to cover the entire volcanological history of Vulcano Island (Italy). The major and trace-element concentrations and the Sr- and Pb-isotope compositions for whole rocks were integrated with data obtained from the fluid inclusions. 3He/4He in fluid inclusions is within the range of 3.30 and 5.94 R/Ra, being lower than the value for the deep magmatic source expected for Vulcano Island (6.0-6.2 R/Ra). 3He/4He of the magmatic source is almost constant throughout the volcanic record of Vulcano. Integration of the He- and Sr-isotope systematics leads to the conclusion that a decrease in the He-isotope ratio of the rocks is mainly due to the assimilation of 10-25% of a crustal component similar to the Calabrian basement. 3He/4He shows a negative correlation with Sr isotopes except for the last-emitted Vulcanello latites (Punta del Roveto), which have high He- and Sr-isotope ratios. This anomaly has been attributed to a flushing process by fluids coming from the deepest reservoirs. Indeed, an input of deep magmatic volatiles with high 3He/4He values increases the He-isotope ratio without changing 87Sr/86Sr. A comparison of the He isotope ratios between fluid inclusions and fumarolic gases showed that only the basalts of La Sommata and the latites of Vulcanello have comparable values. Taking into account that the latites of Vulcanello relate to one of the most-recent eruptions at Vulcano (in the 17th century), we infer that that the most probable magma which actually feeds the fumarolic emissions is a latitic body ponding at about 3-3.5 km of depth and flushed by fluids coming from a deeper and basic magma.

  18. Using noble gases measured in spring discharge to trace hydrothermal processes in the Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, W.P.; Susong, D.D.; Solomon, D.K.; Heasler, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in springs are used to investigate boiling of hydrothermal water and mixing of hydrothermal and shallow cool water in the Norris Geyser Basin area. Noble gas concentrations in water are modeled for single stage and continuous steam removal. Limitations on boiling using noble gas concentrations are then used to estimate the isotopic effect of boiling on hydrothermal water, allowing the isotopic composition of the parent hydrothermal water to be determined from that measured in spring. In neutral chloride springs of the Norris Geyser Basin, steam loss since the last addition of noble gas charged water is less than 30% of the total hydrothermal discharge, which results in an isotopic shift due to boiling of ?? 2.5% ??D. Noble gas concentrations in water rapidly and predictably change in dual phase systems, making them invaluable tracers of gas-liquid interaction in hydrothermal systems. By combining traditional tracers of hydrothermal flow such as deuterium with dissolved noble gas measurements, more complex hydrothermal processes can be interpreted. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Atmospheric Ar and Ne trapped in coesite eclogite during Late Miocene (U)HP metamorphism: implications for the recycling of noble gases in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Das, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    suggesting the absence of excess 40Ar in these samples. Omphacite outgassed at high temperature (>1400°C) also yielded atmospheric 20Ne/22Ne. Results indicate that atmospheric Ar and Ne were trapped when minerals crystallized at ~8 Ma during (U)HP metamorphism. The survival of trapped atmospheric Ar and Ne in minerals formed during (U)HP metamorphism supports models that call for recycling of noble gases from the atmosphere back into the mantle at subduction zones.

  20. MASCOT: a new mass-spectrometer facility dedicated to the analysis of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) from terrestrial samples (Institute of Geological Sciences - University of Bern, Switzerland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Enderli, Patrick; Jenni, Hans-Erich; Leya, Ingo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In the past years, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been successfully used for dating exposure history of landforms and measuring erosional processes on Earth's surface. In this context, quantifications of landscape change have mainly been accomplished through the use of radioactive cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al, but their application has generally been restricted to Quaternary time scales because of their relatively short half-lives. The results are 10Be and 26Al concentrations that are below the detection limit of available accelerator mass spectrometers if the samples have a Late Miocene or even a Pliocene age. Contrariwise, cosmogenic noble gases such as 3He and 21Ne do not experience any radioactive decay through time, which places these isotopes in an unbeatable position for measuring paleo-denudation rates preserved in detrital material even if the ages of these deposits are up to 10 Ma and even older. These isotopes are thus keys for assessing the interplays between tectonic, climate and surface processes involved in the long-term evolution of mountain belts. Here we report the technical specifications of a noble gas analytical system that we have developed and set up at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, Switzerland, with the motivations to get dates and rates of erosion processes from the measurement of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) concentrations from terrestrial samples. This new facility, hosted at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, combines a MAP215-50 mass spectrometer fitted with a new high-sensitivity channel electron multiplier with an all-metal extraction and purification line. This later system thus comprises: (i) a double vacuum resistance furnace loaded by a 22-samples carrousel, (ii) three in-vacuo crushers (iii) an ultra high vacuum pumping system (<10-8 mbar) composed of turbo-molecular, ion-getter pumps and backed by a scroll pump, (iv) the line itself made

  1. The chemical bond between Au(I) and the noble gases. Comparative study of NgAuF and NgAu+ (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) by density functional and coupled cluster methods.

    PubMed

    Belpassi, Leonardo; Infante, Ivan; Tarantelli, Francesco; Visscher, Lucas

    2008-01-23

    The nature of the chemical bond between gold and the noble gases in the simplest prototype of Au(I) complexes (NgAuF and NgAu+, where Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe), has been theoretically investigated by state of art all-electron fully relativistic DC-CCSD(T) and DFT calculations with extended basis sets. The main properties of the molecules, including dipole moments and polarizabilities, have been computed and a detailed study of the electron density changes upon formation of the Ng-Au bond has been made. The Ar-Au dissociation energy is found to be nearly the same in both Argon compounds. It almost doubles along the NgAuF series and nearly triples in the corresponding NgAu+ series. The formation of the Ng-Au(I) bonds is accompanied by a large and very complex charge redistribution pattern which not only affects the outer valence region but reaches deep into the core-electron region. The charge transfer from the noble gas to Au taking place in the NgAu+ systems is largely reduced in the fluorides but the Ng-Au chemical bond in the latter systems is found to be tighter near the equilibrium distance. The density difference analysis shows, for all three noble gases, a qualitatively identical nature of the Ng-Au bond, characterized by the pronounced charge accumulation in the middle of the Ng-Au internuclear region which is typical of a covalent bond. This bonding density accumulation is more pronounced in the fluorides, where the Au-F bond is found to become more ionic, while the overall density deformation is more evident and less localized in the NgAu+ systems. Accurate density difference maps and charge-transfer curves help explain very subtle features of the chemistry of Au(I), including its peculiar preference for tight linear bicordination.

  2. Nitrogen and noble gases in the 71501 bulk soil and ilmenite as records of the solar wind exposure: Which is correct?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, P.; Baur, H.; Etique, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The N determination in mg sized mineral separates from lunar soils by static mass spectrometry is an experimental break-through likely to contribute to the deciphering of the records left in the mineral grains by the exposure to the solar wind. In this discussion some comparisons of the results of N and noble gas analyses of the 71501 bulk soil and an ilmenite separate thereof are focussed on. Conclusions from noble gas data obtained on mineral separates from some 20 soils are summarized in a companion paper and are also discussed herein.

  3. The temperature and precipitation reconstructions on Swiss stalagmites with a special emphasis on altitude gradient using noble-gases, δO-18 and δD of fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Elaheh; Brennwald, Matthias; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of an application of 'Combined Vacuum Crushing and Sieving (CVCS)' system (e.g., allowing to crush samples to defined grain size in vacuum) for the first time to stalagmites grown in cold climates during the last glacial-interglacial transition, but at different altitudes. Recently, concentrations of dissolved atmospheric noble gases in fluid inclusions of stalagmites were used to reconstruct past ambient cave temperatures, the annual mean temperature and hydrological conditions when the water was trapped. To reconstruct temperatures from noble gases (noble gas temperature: NGT) in water-filled inclusions, we processed samples from Swiss stalagmites M6 from Milandre cave (400 m.a.s.l) and GEF1 from Grotte aux Fées cave (895 m.a.s.l) covering the climatic transitions Allerød-Younger Dryas-Holocene. Water content. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of calcite fabric (e.g., 'water yield': WT) was shown to be a measure of the total water content. The data shows that the WT systematically changes with δ18Ocalcite of the calcite. We therefore conclude that WT records can be linked on changes in drip rates and thus can be used to track changes of past precipitation even in cold regions. Noble gases. Noble gas analysis shows that the annual mean temperatures in Milandre cave were 2.2±2.0°C during the late Allerød and dropped to 0±2°C at the Younger Dryas. Such temperatures close 0°C indicate that drip water supply stopped in response to the formation of permafrost conditions around the cave preventing further stalagmite growth. However, one late Holocene sample gave a cave temperature of 8.7±1.4°C agreeing generally with present day annual mean temperature. The annual mean temperature of 5.7±1.3°C from GEF1 was determined for the early Holocene. The observed data show systematic variations with sample elevation, e.g., higher temperature from lower altitude and vice versa. Combining the isotopic composition of water in fluid

  4. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  5. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  6. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  7. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = 3He, 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6-7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the accuracy of the

  8. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = (3)He, (4)He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6-7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the accuracy of

  9. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6–7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the

  10. Effect of the medium on intramolecular H-atom tunneling: cis-trans conversion of formic acid in solid matrixes of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid I; Fokeyev, Anatoly A; Zyubin, Alexander S; Mebel, Alexander M; Lin, S H

    2010-12-30

    Intramolecular tunneling of a hydrogen atom in formic acid at low temperatures has been studied theoretically on the basis of quantum-chemical modeling of HCOOH@Nb(12) clusters. Three noble matrixes (Ar, Kr, and Xe) are considered. Energetic and geometric parameters as well as vibrational frequencies for the formic acid in cis and trans configurations surrounded by 12 Nb atoms are calculated within the frame of the MP2 approach with extended basis sets. The rate constant of HCOOH cis-trans conversion is analyzed by taking into account matrix reorganization and the change of HCOOH position in the cluster. The matrix reorganization is considered within the Debye model of lattice vibrations, whereas the external motion of HCOOH in the cluster is treated using the Einstein model of solids. It has been shown that the literature experimental data on the cis to trans tunneling reaction in the formic acid can be accounted for within the proposed mechanism, which describes the matrix reorganization and the change of the HCOOH position in the noble gas matrix, with fitting parameters of the suggested theoretical model attaining reasonable values.

  11. Planetary noble gas components in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Moniot, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    In the reported investigation, the approach employed by Jeffery and Anders (1970) and Eberhardt (1974), who used colloidal suspensions in separating minerals of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite (C1), was extended to an application involving the enrichment of a planetary noble gas carrier in several C1 and C2 meteorites. The thermal release pattern of Orgueil 'carbon' is considered, taking into account elemental effects, a comparison of noble gas release from 'carbon' separates and bulk meteorite samples, isotopic effects, and a comparison with Murray 'carbon'. An evaluation is conducted of the noble gas components in carbonaceous chondrites. The origin of primordial noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites is also discussed, giving attention to the origin of solar gases, the role of 'carbon' as the novel vehicle for planetary gases, and plausible astrophysical sites for the production of anomalous krypton and xenon.

  12. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  13. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  14. Prediction of Superhalogen-Stabilized Noble Gas Compounds.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Devleena

    2014-09-18

    The discovery of HArF has generated renewed interest in the chemistry of noble gases, particularly their hydrides. Though many weak complexes of noble gases bound by van der Waals interactions are known, the number of halogenated noble gas compounds, HNgX (Ng = noble gas; X = halogen), where the noble gas atom is chemically bound, is limited. These molecules are metastable, and their specialty is that there is substantial ionic bonding between the noble gas atom and the halogen atom. In this Letter, it is shown using density functional theory and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory that by replacing the halogen atoms by superhalogens (Y), whose electron affinities are much larger than those of halogens, more ionic bonds between Ng and Y can be attained. Moreover, the superhalogen-containing noble gas hydrides, HNgY, are more stable compared to their halogenated counterparts.

  15. A geochemical study of alkaline and tholeitic lavas from the Hyblean Plateau (Italy): inferences from noble gases, trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, Alessandra; Martelli, Mauro; Paonita, Antonio; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Scribano, Vittorio; Arienzo, Ilenia

    2017-04-01

    Eight Plio-Pleistocenic lavas from the Hyblean volcanic province, south-eastern Sicily (Italy), were investigated for the noble gas geochemistry, for the first time. Major element composition classified these products as tholeiite basalts, basanites and nephelinites. Noble gas content of fluid inclusions from their olivine and/or orthopyroxene phenocrysts was analyzed for He, Ne and Ar and ranges between 45×10-15-3.78×10-11, 2.12×10-16-1.13×10-14 and 5.13×10-13-4.48×10-11 mol/g, respectively. Most samples display 3He/4He ratios of about 7Ra (where Ra is the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.38×10-6) except for two lavas characterized by low He abundance and showing 3He/4He = 3.53 and 8.35Ra, respectively. Such a wide deviation from the most recurrent value (7Ra) is attributed to external inputs of 4He and 3He by secondary phenomena (i.e. magma aging, crustal contamination and cosmogenic processes, respectively). The isotopic signature of He, together with Sr and Nd isotope data (87Sr/86Sr=0.70274-0.70331; 143Nd/144Nd =0,51293-0,513162) evidenced a strict relation with mantle harzburgite xenoliths found in Miocenic diatremes from the same volcanic province, suggesting that a depleted mantle source with an 3He/4He of about 7Ra fed the Plio-Pleistocenic volcanism. In this respect, the wide compositional spectrum of the samples, ranging from nephelinite to tholeiite, could derive from the different P-T conditions during partial melting and/or different partial melting degrees of this common mantle source. Contrarily, trace elements did not highlight the close relation between the Plio-Pleistocenic lavas and mantle xenoliths from diatremes, as cryptic metasomatism seems to modify the primordial trace elements feature of xenoliths after their entrapment in the diatreme eruptive systems.

  16. Noble Gases from Fluid Inclusions of Stalagmite and Their Contribution to Reconstruct the Variability of Paleotemperature in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FANG, Nianqiao; HU, Chaoyong

    A new method to estimate paleotemperature change is reported in this article. The authors successfully exploit the Xe/Ar ratio trapped in the fluid inclusion of stalagmites for reconstructing climatic evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River, where the East Asian monsoon prevails. A logarithmic expression namely ln( CXe/ CAr) proves to be bound up with warm/cold cycles. The δ 13C and Mg/Ca curves drawn from the investigated stalagmites mostly follow the fluctuation of regional paleotemperature, but may be overprinted by other climatic signals. This study clearly states that among the diverse proxies, the Xe/Ar ratio recorded in the fluid inclusion is probably the best indicator, constantly mirroring the temperature variation. The ln( CXe/ CAr) profile on the whole shows an identification with those curves oscillating essentially between the warm and cold phases. After integrating the noble gas profile with the δ 13C and Mg/Ca signals, the authors underline eight warm/cold cyclothems developed in the region under study since LGM. The pattern of the climate variation displayed by the integration is reasonable for interpreting the regional environment evolution during the last 20,000 years.

  17. Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812—Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieler, R.; Huber, L.; Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Leya, I.; Maden, C.; Masarik, J.; Meier, M. M. M.; Nagao, K.; Trappitsch, R.; Irving, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present noble gas data for 16 shergottites, 2 nakhlites (NWA 5790, NWA 10153), and 1 angrite (NWA 7812). Noble gas exposure ages of the shergottites fall in the 1-6 Ma range found in previous studies. Three depleted olivine-phyric shergottites (Tissint, NWA 6162, NWA 7635) have exposure ages of ~1 Ma, in agreement with published data for similar specimens. The exposure age of NWA 10153 (~12.2 Ma) falls in the range of 9-13 Ma reported for other nakhlites. Our preferred age of ~7.3 Ma for NWA 5790 is lower than this range, and it is possible that NWA 5790 represents a distinct ejection event. A Tissint glass sample contains Xe from the Martian atmosphere. Several samples show a remarkably low (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratio < 0.80, as previously observed in a many shergottites and in various other rare achondrites. This was explained by solar cosmic ray-produced Ne (SCR Ne) in addition to the commonly found galactic cosmic ray-produced Ne, implying very low preatmospheric shielding and ablation loss. We revisit this by comparing measured (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratios with predictions by cosmogenic nuclide production models. Indeed, several shergottites, acalpulcoites/lodranites, angrites (including NWA 7812), and the Brachina-like meteorite LEW 88763 likely contain SCR Ne, as previously postulated for many of them. The SCR contribution may influence the calculation of exposure ages. One likely reason that SCR nuclides are predominantly detected in meteorites from rare classes is because they usually are analyzed for cosmogenic nuclides even if they had a very small (preatmospheric) mass and hence low ablation loss.

  18. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction.

  19. Ancient carbon and noble gas fractionation. [in carbonaceous meteorites and terrestrial kerogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Chang, S.

    1977-01-01

    Noble gases in ancient terrestrial kerogen and meteoritic carbonaceous residues are compared in terms of their elemental fractionation with respect to atmospheric and the cosmic reservoirs, respectively. Fractionation factors for the heavy noble gases are almost identical in both types of samples. Therefore, some features of the interaction between carbon phases and noble gases in very different environments of origin appear to be similar. These findings underscore the plausibility of the meteoritic carbonaceous residues as a noble gas carrier and as a novel vehicle for achieving the elemental fractionation required to derive the planetary noble gas pattern from cosmic abundances.

  20. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  1. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  2. Noble gas partitioning between metal and silicate under high pressures.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Sudo, M; Ozima, M; Ito, K; Ohtaka, O; Ito, E

    1993-02-05

    Measurements of noble gas (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) partitioning between silicate melt and iron melt under pressures up to 100 kilobars indicate that the partition coefficients are much less than unity and that they decrease systematically with increasing pressure. The results suggest that the Earth's core contains only negligible amounts of noble gases if core separation took place under equilibrium conditions.

  3. Noble gases in ancient asteroidal atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical and numerical results presented here suggest that acceleration of photoions by the solar wind motional field is a significant loss process for Xe on asteroids about 200 km in radius or larger, if the Xe is thermalized by its interactions with the surface. For Ar, photoion acceleration can only become important for asteroids nearly 500 km in radius. Thus photoion acceleration, previously invoked for lunar samples, could be responsible for excess fission-produced Xe found associated with solar wind Xe in howarditic meteorites. The lack of such Xe in other types of meteorites may reflect either smaller parent bodies or later times of regolith exposure. Similarly, the failure to observe solar-wind-associated radiogenic Ar-40 in meteorites is consistent with the much smaller likelihood that Ar will be photoionized.

  4. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-10-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  5. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  6. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  7. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  8. LaRC results on nuclear pumped noble gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The recent experiment and theoretical results obtained for noble gas nuclear laser systems are presented. It is shown that the noble gas lasers are among the easiest systems to pump by nuclear excitation and as a result, all of the noble gases except He have lased under nuclear excitation. The noble gas systems are not ideal for high-power applications but they do give valuable insight into the operation and pumping mechanisms associated with nuclear lasers. At present, the Ar-Xe system is the best noble gas candidate for (U-235)F6 pumping. It appears that the quenching of Ar-Xe lasing is a result of the fluorine and not the uranium or fission fragments themselves. Thus, to achieve lasing with UF6, a fluorine compatible system must be found.

  9. Noble Gas Signatures in Snow: a New Experimental Investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Hall, C. M.; Castro, C.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved noble gases in groundwater (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) have been widely used to improve our knowledge of surface and groundwater dynamics. However, a recent rainwater study [1] recorded noble gas concentration anomalies originating from conditions at high altitude. Potential anomaly sources might include fog, orographic rain, synoptic rain and snow, depending on the region considered. Here, we outline a methodology for measuring noble gases in freshly collected snow samples. Their fine-grained nature leads to significant experimental challenges. Overall, our results (Fig. 1) show that snow has elevated He concentrations with depleted concentrations of all other noble gases. Similar results have been recorded in ice [2, 3]. In addition, our results show relatively homogeneous (< 14%) He and Ne concentrations while Ar, Kr and Xe display large concentration variability (> 80%). These observations led us to investigate the structure of snow and potential host-sites (available empty space) within the crystal structure. Noble gases are chemically inert and do not form bonds that could affect the ice crystal structure. Therefore, host-sites control the solubility of each noble gas. Our results show that He and Ne, which are known to have small atomic radii, are likely dissolved into the ice/snow crystal lattice, while heavy noble gas (Ar, Kr and Xe) are likely accommodated into defects. Consequently, smaller variability recorded in light noble gases, may result from He and Ne being hosted within the crystal lattice, whereas heavy noble gases rely on the presence of defects, which may randomly appear within the structure during snow formation. These new results can be used to better constrain the source of ground ice [3], groundwater systems and to investigate the structural transition mechanisms from snow to firn and ice. Figure 1: Noble gas concentrations (C) in snow (filled circles symbols) and ice (half-filled square symbols) normalized to air saturated water

  10. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  11. An Air Noble Gas Component in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarda, P.

    2005-12-01

    Noble gas geochemistry has for long attempted to recover isotopic signatures of mantle components through analyses of basalt glass or xenoliths, but this quest has been plagued by the occurrence of a conspicuous air component, which appears to have both the isotopic and elemental composition of air (except for helium). It is classically considered to be air added to samples close to the surface, in a poorly understood process called "contamination", due to the interaction of rocks and melts with air or water on emplacement. Focusing on Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (and Ocean Island Basalts), gases are mostly borne by vesicles and a number of puzzling observations can be made: - vesicles appear to be heterogeneous at the scale of a centimeter, as shown by stepwise crushing experiments, some vesicles having air, some having mantle gases, some having mixtures of both, - vesicles appear over-pressured (P > 1 bar) in fresh samples, as shown by highly vesiculous samples such as Popping Rocks, - the air component appears to be borne by the largest vesicles, as it is recovered in the first steps of stepwise crushing analyses, - larger samples seem to have more of the air component than smaller ones, - in Popping Rocks, the air component borne by the largest vesicles is overwhelming, - the isotopic composition of Pb-Sr-Nd in Popping Rocks was interpreted as indicating a recycled component (related to the HIMU and EM1 mantle end-members). The air noble gas component was suggested recently to be not seawater, but modern air located in fractures of the glass, which should have opened on cooling and resealed immediately [1]. This model faces some difficulties, such as keeping pressure high in the vesicles. I suggest another interpretation, namely that a large part of the air noble gases in oceanic basalts is recycled in origin [2]. It would have been carried down into the mantle at subduction zones, even if most (typically 90%) of the air noble gases in the slab returns to the

  12. Real-time noble gas release signaling rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; Gardner, W. P.; Lee, H.

    2016-12-01

    We present empirical results/relationships of rock strain, microfracture density, acoustic emissions, and noble gas release from laboratory triaxial experiments for a granite and basalt. Noble gases are contained in most crustal rock at inter/intra granular sites, their release during natural and manmade stress and strain changes represents a signal of brittle/semi brittle deformation. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history and age, fluids present, and uranium, thorium and potassium-40 concentrations in the rocks that affect radiogenic noble gases (helium, argon) production. Noble gas emission and its relationship to crustal processes have been studied, including correlations to tectonic velocities and qualitative estimates of deep permeability from surface measurements, finger prints of nuclear weapon detonation, and as potential precursory signals to earthquakes attributed to gas release due to pre-seismic stress, dilatancy and/or rock fracturing. Helium emission has been shown as a precursor of volcanic activity. Real-time noble gas release is observed using an experimental system utilizing mass spectrometers to measure gases released during triaxial rock deformation. Noble gas release is shown to represent a sensitive precursor signal of rock deformation by relating real-time noble gas release to stress-strain state changes and acoustic emissions. We propose using noble gas release to also signal rock deformation in boreholes, mines and nuclear waste repositories. We postulate each rock exhibits a gas release signature which is microstructure, stress/strain state, and or permanent deformation dependent. Such relationships, when calibrated, may be used to sense rock deformation and then develop predictive models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under

  13. Noble Gas Proxy Evidence Of Holocene Climate Fluctuations In The Elwha Watershed, Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleotempertures retrieved from the groundwater archives in the largest watershed (≈800 km2) in the Olympic Mountains suggest asynchronous Olympic Peninsula climate responses during the Everson interstade period after the last continental glacial maximum. Dissolved noble gases fr...

  14. Noble Gas Proxy Evidence Of Holocene Climate Fluctuations In The Elwha Watershed, Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleotempertures retrieved from the groundwater archives in the largest watershed (≈800 km2) in the Olympic Mountains suggest asynchronous Olympic Peninsula climate responses during the Everson interstade period after the last continental glacial maximum. Dissolved noble gases fr...

  15. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  16. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  17. Electric-dipole polarizabilities of molecules of CFxCl4- x ( x=1-4) Freons. Coefficients of dispersion interaction between different freons and between freons and noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanin, M. O.; Kislyakov, I. M.

    2002-07-01

    Average values of dynamic electric-dipole polarizabilities of molecules of CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CF3Cl, and CF4 Freons in a wide frequency range (from near-infrared to far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum) were calculated on the basis of the latest data on the distributions of oscillator strengths in the absorption spectra of these Freons. An accurate analytical approximation of the polarizability dispersion is suggested for these Freons. Values of polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies were calculated. Coefficients of dispersion interaction of different Freon molecules with each other and with noble-gas atoms were determined for the first time. The high accuracy of the geometric mean combination rule used to estimate interaction constants for pairs of unlike particles is demonstrated.

  18. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  19. Determining noble gas partitioning within a CO2-H2O system at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Oliver; Rochelle, Christopher A.; Masters, Andrew; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2015-06-01

    Quantifying the distribution of noble gases between phases is essential for using these inert trace gases to track the processes controlling multi-phase subsurface systems. Here we present experimental data that defines noble gas partitioning for two phase CO2-water systems. These are at the pressure and temperature range relevant for engineered systems used for anthropogenic carbon capture and geological storage (CCS) technologies, and CO2-rich natural gas reservoirs (CO2 density range 169-656 kg/m3 at 323-377 K and 89-134 bar). The new partitioning data are compared to predictions of noble gas partitioning determined in low-pressure, pure noble gas-water systems for all noble gases except neon and radon. At low CO2 density there was no difference between measured noble gas partitioning and that predicted in pure noble gas-water systems. At high CO2 density, however, partition coefficients express significant deviation from pure noble gas-water systems. At 656 kg/m3, these deviations are -35%, 74%, 113% and 319% for helium, argon, krypton and xenon, respectively. A second order polynomial fit to the data for each noble gas describes the deviation from the pure noble gas-water system as a function of CO2 density. We argue that the difference between pure noble gas-water systems and the high density CO2-water system is due to an enhanced degree of molecular interactions occurring within the dense CO2 phase due to the combined effect of inductive and dispersive forces acting on the noble gases. As the magnitude of these forces are related to the size and polarisability of each noble gas, xenon followed by krypton and argon become significantly more soluble within dense CO2. In the case of helium repulsive forces dominate and so it becomes less soluble as a function of CO2 density.

  20. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Greenhouse Gases Come From Outlook for Future ... greenhouse effect that results in global warming and climate change. Many gases exhibit these greenhouse properties. Some ...

  1. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  2. Determination of Natural In Vivo Noble-Gas Concentrations in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Livingstone, David M.; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  3. Seawater subduction controls the heavy noble gas composition of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Holland, Greg; Ballentine, Chris J

    2006-05-11

    The relationship between solar volatiles and those now in the Earth's atmosphere and mantle reservoirs provides insight into the processes controlling the acquisition of volatiles during planetary accretion and their subsequent evolution. Whereas the light noble gases (helium and neon) in the Earth's mantle preserve a solar-like isotopic composition, heavy noble gases (argon, krypton and xenon) have an isotopic composition very similar to that of the modern atmosphere, with radiogenic and (in the case of xenon) solar contributions. Mantle noble gases in a magmatic CO2 natural gas field have been previously corrected for shallow atmosphere/groundwater and crustal additions. Here we analyse new data from this field and show that the elemental composition of non-radiogenic heavy noble gases in the mantle is remarkably similar to that of sea water. We challenge the popular concept of a noble gas 'subduction barrier'--the convecting mantle noble gas isotopic and elemental composition is explained by subduction of sediment and seawater-dominated pore fluids. This accounts for approximately 100% of the non-radiogenic argon and krypton and 80% of the xenon. Approximately 50% of the convecting mantle water concentration can then be explained by this mechanism. Enhanced recycling of subducted material to the mantle plume source region then accounts for the lower ratio of radiogenic to non-radiogenic heavy noble gas isotopes and higher water content of plume-derived basalts.

  4. Consent Decree for Noble Energy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Noble Energy, Inc. (Noble) that comprehensively identifies and addresses issues with vapor control systems at Noble’s condensate storage tank batteries in the Denver-area 8-hour ozone marginal nonattainment area (nonattainment area).

  5. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-08-05

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies.

  6. The Noble Savage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1993-01-01

    Traces the history of the "noble savage" concept, from the romantic view of the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries of American Indians as holdovers from the "golden age," to current media images of the medicine man or the Indian princess. Discusses how this patronizing stereotype continues to undermine Indian identity. (SV)

  7. Defining Noble Gas Partitioning for Carbon Capture and Storage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Masters, A.; Rochelle, C.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    For viable CCS implementation variables such as CO2 dissolution rates, reactions with the host rock and the extent of groundwater interaction must be accurately constrained. Noble gases play an important role in these systems [e.g. 1,2]. Their application, however, requires accurate Henry's constants within dense CO2-H2O systems. Current interpretations use pure noble gas-H2O partitioning data [3,4] and assume CO2-noble gas interactions are negligible, even at high (>700 kg/m3) CO2 densities [2]. To test this assumption we experimentally determined noble gas CO2-H2O partitioning for the 170-656 kg/m3 CO2 density range; representative of most CCS environments. Contrary to assumption, CO2 density significantly affected noble gas partition coefficients. For helium, increasing CO2 density resulted in a negative deviation trend from CO2-free values whilst for argon, krypton and xenon strong, positive deviations were observed. At 656 kg/m3 these deviations were -35%, 74%, 114% and 321% respectively. This is interpreted as the CO2 phase acting as a polar solvent inducing polarisation in the noble gases. Deviation trends are well defined using a 2nd order polynomial. The effect of a dense CO2 phase can now be incorporated into existing noble gas models. We also present results from a Gibbs-Ensemble Monte Carlo molecular simulation to model partitioning for this binary system. This fundamental technique makes predictions based on the pair-potentials of interaction between the molecules. Here it gives the phase compositions and Henry coefficients for noble gases. With a proven ability in accurately replicating both the CO2-H2O system and low pressure noble gas Henry constants the focus is now on fully optimising the model to match high pressure observations. [1] Gilfillan et al. (2009) Nature 458 614-618 [2] Gilfillan et al. (2008) GCA 72 1174-1198 [3] Crovetto et al. (1982) J.Chem.Phys. 76 1077-1086 [4] Ballentine et al. in Porcelli et al. (eds.) (2002) Rev.Min.Geo. 47 539-614.

  8. Pressure broadening and frequency shift of the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 and 5S1/2 → 7S1/2 two photon transitions in 85Rb by the noble gases and N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Hager, Gordon D.; Erickson, Christopher J.; Burke, John H.

    2014-11-01

    Doppler free two photon absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the pressure broadening and frequency shift rates of the 5S1/2 (F = 3) → 5D5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) (778.105 nm) and the 5S1/2 (F = 2) → 7S1/2 (F = 2) (760.126 nm) two photon transitions in 85Rb by the noble gases and N2. To our knowledge, these rates are reported on for the first time. The self-broadening and shift rate of the 5S1/2 (F = 3) → 5D5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) transition and self -broadening rate of the 5S1/2 (F = 2) → 7S1/2 (F = 2) transition were also measured. The temperature dependence of the self-frequency shift (Rb-Rb collisions) of these transitions is presented. Helium diffusion rates through Quartz and Pyrex cells are also calculated and the implication of helium diffusion through glass vapor cells is discussed in regards to atomic frequency standards based on these transitions. Experimental pressure broadening and shift rates are compared to theoretically calculated rates assuming a 6, 8 or 6, 8, 10 difference potential and pseudo potential model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between experimental and theoretical values.

  9. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years.

  10. Noble gas isotopic composition as a key reference parameter in a planetary atmospheric evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.

    2010-12-01

    The isotopic composition of noble gases is a key reference parameter in discussing the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Currently, two widely occurring noble gas components are identified in the early solar system, one is the Solar Wind noble gas (SW-noble gas, hereafter) and another is the Q-noble gas in unaltered meteorites: both noble gases are characterized by their ubiquitous occurrence and high isotopic homogeneity. Since the SW-noble gas is directly ejected from the Sun, it has been assumed to be a good proxy of the average noble gas isotopic composition in the Sun, namely the solar noble gas. The systematic enrichment of the heavier isotopes in the Q-noble gas relative to the SW-noble gas is then commonly attributed to its isotopic fractionation from the SW-noble gas. However, the isotopic compositions of the SW-noble gas either implanted on lunar soils or trapped by artificial targets show considerable isotopic variation depending on the velocity of the Solar Wind. Therefore, it is important to examine how closely the SW-noble gas represents the indigenous solar noble gas component or the mean isotopic composition of noble gases of the Sun. Here we show that the isotopic composition of the SW-noble gas is substantially fractionated relative to the solar value, and therefore should not be used as a reference parameter. We further suggest that the post D-burning Q-noble gas (see below) is the better proxy of the solar noble gas, and this should be used as a reference of the Solar noble gas isotopic composition in discussing the planetary atmospheric evolution. The most distinct difference between the Q- and the SW-noble gas is apparent in a 3He/4He isotopic ratio: 4.64e-4 in Q-He [1], but 1.23e-4 in SW-He[2]. The difference is attributed to the conversion of deuteron (D) to 3He in the Sun, namely the D-burning [3], due to high temperature during the pre-main sequence stage of the Sun. With the use of recent data on D/H ratios from helio-seismology [4] and

  11. Noble gas loss may indicate groundwater flow across flow barriers in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; Bryant, Hudson G.; Stute, M.; Clark, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Average calculated noble gas temperatures increase from 10 to 22oC in groundwater from recharge to discharge areas in carbonate-rock aquifers of southern Nevada. Loss of noble gases from groundwater in these regional flow systems at flow barriers is the likely process that produces an increase in recharge noble gas temperatures. Emplacement of low permeability rock into high permeability aquifer rock and the presence of low permeability shear zones reduce aquifer thickness from thousands to tens of meters. At these flow barriers, which are more than 1,000 m lower than the average recharge altitude, noble gases exsolve from the groundwater by inclusion in gas bubbles formed near the barriers because of greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure. However, re-equilibration of noble gases in the groundwater with atmospheric air at the low altitude spring discharge area, at the terminus of the regional flow system, cannot be ruled out. Molecular diffusion is not an important process for removing noble gases from groundwater in the carbonate-rock aquifers because concentration gradients are small.

  12. Fullerenes and the Nature of Planetary Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Nuth, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, two issues have dominated the discussion of planetary noble gas patterns: 1) the general resemblance of the noble gas abundances in carbonaceous chondrites to those measured in the Earth s atmosphere and; 2) atmospheric inventories of argon and neon that fall off significantly with increasing distance from the Sun. The recognition of the latter has led to the conclusion that the planetary component is not found on planets. In particular, the inability to explain the missing xenon reservoir, once thought to be sequestered in crustal rocks has been extremely troublesome. Some models have focused on various fractionations of solar wind rather than condensation as the process for the evolution of noble gases in the terrestrial planets. However, these models cannot explain the observed gradient of the gases, nor do they account for the similar Ne/Ar ratios and the dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have focused on hydrodynamic escape to explain the fractionation of gases, like neon, in the atmosphere and the mantle. Escape theory also seems to explain, in part, the isotopically heavy argon on Mars, however, it does not explain the discrepancies observed for the abundances of argon and neon on Venus and the Earth. This has led to the assumption that some combination of solar wind implantation, absorption and escape are needed to explain the nature of planetary noble gases.

  13. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  14. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  15. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  16. Noble Gas Signatures in Greenland - Tracing Glacial Meltwater Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    This study is meant to explore the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to glacial meltwater sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial location where this glacial meltwater originates in the ice sheet. Ultimately, we seek to improve our understanding on the dynamics of these massive ice sheets, critical for the major role they play on climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) allowing for calculation of noble gas temperatures (NGTs) and, under certain assumptions, estimation of the altitude at which glacial meltwater originated. In addition, crustally produced isotopes such as He accumulate in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. Glacial meltwater samples were collected and analyzed for noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios at five different locations in southern Greenland, between sea level and 1221 m. All samples are enriched in He with respect to ASW and are depleted in all other noble gases. Two patterns are apparent. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, a pattern first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands. The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, a pattern first observed in Michigan rainwater samples. Most samples point to equilibration temperatures at ~0°C and altitudes between 1000 m and 2000 m, values which are consistent with both temperatures and elevations in Greenland. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between ~170 and 1150 yrs, a result which is consistent with a preliminary tritium analysis. He isotopes point to surface (precipitation as snow and rainfall) contributions for most samples between ~60% and 90% with a ~10% - 40% crustal contribution from groundwater.

  17. First-principles study of noble gas stability in ThO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Kuan; Han, Han; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Chang-Ying; Guo, Yong-Liang; Ren, Cui-Lan; Huai, Ping

    2017-07-01

    The stability of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) in thorium dioxide is studied by means of density functional theory. The computations are performed considering insertion sites of ThO2, including the interstitial sites, the thorium vacancies, the oxygen-thorium di-vacancy and three types of Schottky defects. Our results show that there is an approximately linear relation between the energies and the atomic radii. As the size of the noble gas atom increases, the noble gas atoms energetically prefer to incorporate into large vacancy defects rather than into interstitial positions. Moreover, the binding energy of Kr or Xe interstitial in a Schottky defect is larger than the formation energy of a Schottky defect, suggesting the Schottky defects are thermodynamically favorable in the presence of these noble gas atoms. The charged defects are also considered for noble gas atoms trapped in Th and O vacancies.

  18. Photon-echo studies of collisional relaxation in weakly ionized noble-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, M R

    1983-06-01

    Photon-echo relaxation rates are measured in weakly ionized plasmas of binary mixtures of noble gases, in which the photon echo generated on a transition in one noble-gas species is damped primarily by atoms of the second species. The special cases of pure krypton and xenon are extensions of previous work in pure helium, neon, and argon. With the exception of mixtures with helium as the perturber, measured relaxation rates are consistent with collisional line-broadening calculations.

  19. Study of performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouple materials to 2000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeze, P. D.; Thomas, D.; Edelman, S.; Stern, J.

    1972-01-01

    Three performance characteristics of noble metal thermocouples in various environments are discussed. Catalytic effects cause significant errors when noble metal thermocouple materials are exposed to air containing unburned gases in temperature ranges from 25 C to 1500 C. The thermoelectric stability of the iridium 40 rhodium to iridium thermocouple system at 2000 C in an oxidizing medium is described. The effects of large and small temperature gradients on the accuracy and stability of temperature measurements are analyzed.

  20. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M.L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed. PMID:23290627

  1. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp (3)He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with (129)Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp (83)Kr MRI is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  3. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by f