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Sample records for noble gases he-kr

  1. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  2. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  3. Trapped noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1988-01-01

    The trapped noble gases in meteorites come in two main varieties, usually referred to as solar and planetary. The solar noble gases are implanted solar-wind or solar-flare materials, and thus their relative elemental abundances provide a good estimate of those of the sun. The planetary noble gases have relative elemental abundances similar to those in the terrestrial atmosphere, but there are also important distinctions. At least one other elemental pattern (subsolar) and several isotopic patterns have also been identified.

  4. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  5. New perspectives for noble gases in oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschbach, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Conditions prevailing in regions of deep water formation imprint their signature in the concentrations of dissolved noble gases, which are conserved in the deep ocean. Such "recharge conditions" including temperature, salinity, and interactions with sea ice are important in view of ocean-atmosphere CO2 partitioning. Noble gases, especially the temperature sensitive Kr and Xe, are well-established tracers to reconstruct groundwater recharge conditions. In contrast, tracer oceanography has traditionally focused on He isotopes and the light noble gases Ne and Ar, which could be analyzed at the required high precision. Recent developments of analytical and data interpretation methods now provide fresh perspectives for noble gases in oceanography.

  6. Noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Terrestrial planets and chondrites have noble gas platforms that are sufficiently alike, especially Ne/Ar, that they may have acquired their noble gases by similar processes. Meteorites presumably obtained their noble gases during formation in the solar nebula. Adsorption onto C - the major gas carrier in chondrites - is the likely mechanism for trapping noble gases; recent laboratory simulations support this hypothesis. The story is more complex for planets. An attractive possibility is that the planets acquired their noble gases in a late accreting veneer of chondritic material. In chondrites, noble gases correlate with C, N, H, and volatile metals; by Occam's Razor, we would expect a similar coupling in planets. Indeed, the Earth's crust and mantle contain chondritic like trace volatiles and PL group metals, respectively and the Earth's oceans resemble C chondrites in their enrichment of D (8X vs 8-10X of the galactic D/H ratio). Models have been proposed to explain some of the specific noble gas patterns in planets. These include: (1) noble gases may have been directly trapped by preplanetary material instead of arriving in a veneer; (2) for Venus, irradiation of preplanetary material, followed by diffusive loss of Ne, could explain the high concentration of AR-36; (3) the Earth and Venus may have initially had similar abundances of noble gases, but the Earth lost its share during the Moon forming event; (4) noble gases could have been captured by planetestimals, possibly leading to gravitational fractionation, particularly of Xe isotopes and (5) noble gases may have been dissolved in the hot outer portion of the Earth during contact with a primordial atmosphere.

  7. Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Dan

    2013-05-29

    Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

  8. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  9. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time.

  10. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  11. Xenon and other noble gases in shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of the xenon component trapped in EETA 79001's lithologies B and C has been determined, and other noble gases were measured in some samples. The Xe component was found to have light isotope ratios indistinguishable from those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The trapped component has a Xe-129/Xe-132 ratio of about 2.4, and is enhanced in Xe-134 and Xe-136 relative to the terrestrial atmosphere or the average carbonaceous chondrite. Similarities between values for Ar-40/Ar-36, Xe-129/Xe-132, and N-15/N-14 and the corresponding Martian atmospheric values suggest Martian origin of the trapped gases.

  12. Noble Gases in the Earth's Core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jephcoat, A. P.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Heber, V.; Kelley, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Chemical inertness, surface volatility and low abundance have made the noble gases a unique trace elemental and isotopic system for constraining the formation and evolution of the solid Earth and its atmosphere. This geochemical role parallels extensive physical-property measurements on the condensed rare gases alone at the pressures equivalent to those of the Earth's deep mantle and core from diamond-anvil cell (DAC) experiments. Traditional geochemical approaches to the processes of planetary evolution have involved crystal-melt partitioning at low pressures relevant more to near-surface degassing. The degree of compatibility has fluctuated among different studies and largely rests with the conclusion that, for common upper mantle phases, the noble gases are highly incompatible. But the long-known high 3He/4He ratios for some ocean-island basalts and more recent observations for some of the rare gases (Ne, Ar and possibly Xe) that there is a solar component emanating from the Earth, continue to raise questions on the source reservoir as well as on accretionary and incorporation processes. Changes in models of mantle convection style have made it harder to rely on the deep mantle as a reservoir, and the core has remained a particularly unfavourable location either because of difficulty in constructing a retention mechanism during planetary accretion or simply because of lack of data: Partitioning studies at pressure are rare and complicated by the difficulty in reproducing not only absolute concentrations, but confinement of gas in high-pressure apparatus and post-run analysis. We have investigated noble gas solubility in silicate liquids at high pressures in a DAC (relevant to a magma-ocean model of the early Earth) that suggests that the detailed composition and structure of silicate liquids may act as an important control on the level of incompatibility. The long-held idea of partial melting as a single-stage, efficient process for extracting noble gases from

  13. Fractionated (Martian) Noble Gases — EFA, Experiments and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Barnes, G.; Bridges, J. C.; Bullock, M. A.; Chavez, C. L.; Filiberto, J.; Herrmann, S.; Hicks, L. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Miller, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Ott, U.; Smith, H. D.; Steer, E. D.; Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Noble gases are tracers for physical processes, including adsorption, dissolution and secondary mineral formation. We examine the Martian fractionated atmosphere through literature, terrestrial analogs and experiments.

  14. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases. PMID:26840881

  15. Origin of noble gases in the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Current models of the origin of noble gases in the terrestrial planets are reviewed. Primary solar system volatile sources and processes are examined along with the current data base on noble gases and its applications to evolutionary processing. Models of atmospheric evolution by hydrodynamic escape are addressed.

  16. Fullerenes and Noble Gases in the Murchison and Allende Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we report the detection of fullerenes (C60 to C250) in the Murchison and Allende meteorites. By exploiting the unique ability of these molecules to trap noble gases, we have determined that fullerene is indeed a new carrier phase for noble gases in meteorites.

  17. Solubility of noble gases in serpentine - Implications for meteoritic noble gas abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaikowski, A.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the solubilities of the noble gases from synthesis and solubility studies of the sheet silicate mineral serpentine in carbonaceous chondrites is presented. Hydrothermal synthesis and exchange experiments were made at 340C and 1 kbar with noble gas partial pressures from 2 times 10 to the -8th power to 0.1 atm. The measured distribution coefficients for noble gases are not sufficiently high to account for the trapped noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites by exchange in solar nebula if meteoritic minerals have comparable distribution coefficients. Also, serpentine gains and loses noble gases to approach equilibrium values with the terrestrial atmosphere, indicating that this exposure may have influenced the noble gas abundances in phyllosilicate minerals of these chondrites. The dispersion of K-Ar ages of carbonaceous chondrites could be the result of phyllosilicates approaching equilibrium solubility of atmospheric Ar-40.

  18. Noble gases in E-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of noble gas data for 12 E-chondrites with literature data shows K-Ar ages greater than 4 AE for 14 out of 18 meteorites, while U, Th-He ages are often shorter. Cosmic ray exposure ages are found to differ systematically between types E4 and E6, with the respective, below-16 Myr and above-30 Myr values implying that the E-chondrite parent body predominantly contains a single petrologic type on the 1 km scale of individual impacts in contrast to the mixed parent bodies of the ordinary chondrites. Amounts of planetary gas in E4-E6 chondrites fall in the range for ordinary chondrites of types 4-6, but fail to correlate with petrologic type or volatile trace element contents, in contrast to the ordinary chondrites. Analyses of mineral separates show that the planetary gases are concentrated in an HFand HCl-insoluble mineral, similar to phase Q. The subsolar gases are located in an HCl- and HNO3-resistant phase.

  19. The Noble Gases in A-Level Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests two methods of developing the study of the noble gases: first, the discovery of the elements and recent discovery of xenon show the human face of chemistry (historical development); second, the properties of noble gas compounds (particularly xenon) can be used to test the framework of conventional chemistry. (Author/JM)

  20. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms.

  1. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms. PMID:26896563

  2. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  3. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  4. Trapped noble gases indicate lunar origin for Antarctic meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    The isotopic abundances of the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are reported for Antarctic ALHA 81005. It contains solar wind-implanted gases whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to lunar regolith samples but not to other meteorites. ALHA 81005 also contains a large excess Ar-40 component which is identical to the component in lunar fines implanted from the lunar atmosphere. Large concentrations of cosmogenic Ne-21, Kr-82, and Xe-126 in ALHA 81005 indicate a total cosmic ray exposure age of at least 200 million years. The noble gas data alone are strong evidence for a lunar origin of this meteorite.

  5. [Neuroprotection by noble gases: New developments and insights].

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, A V; Rossaint, R; Coburn, M

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert elements, some of which exert biological activity. Experimental neuroprotection in particular has been widely shown for xenon, argon and helium. The underlying mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood. Besides an interference with neuronal ion-gated channels and cellular signaling pathways as well as anti-apoptotic effects, the modulation of neuroinflammation seems to play a crucial role. This review presents the current knowledge on neuroprotection by noble gases with a focus on interactions with the neuronal-glial network and neuroinflammation and the perspectives on clinical applications. PMID:26329914

  6. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  7. Noble Gases in the Hamlet Meteorite (LL4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, S.; Sabe, Y.; Shiraishi, T.; Matsuda, J.

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed noble gases in a bulk sample and an HF-HCl residue of Hamlet (LL4). The Xe composition of the residue shows that no diamond is contained in the residue. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of Hamlet Ne-Q has been determined to be 11.0 ± 0.5.

  8. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  9. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  10. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

    1998-04-28

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

  11. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Markun, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

  12. Nitrogen and light noble gases in Parsa enstatite chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar gases have been recently reported in Parsa, an EH3 chondrite. In an effort to check whether solar gases are uniformly distributed throughout Parsa or they are located in specific phases, we analyzed two additional samples of bulk Parsa and one aubritic nodule for N and noble gases. Nitrogen studies are intended for the understanding of the nitrogen components distribution in E-chondrites. The N-systematics of the nodule are entirely different from the bulk samples. The higher N contents in this nodule, as well as its complex delta(sup 15)N structure, as compared to the normal aubrites, is suggestive that the nodule is not a genuine aubrite.

  13. Noble gases as cardioprotectants – translatability and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Kirsten F; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Several noble gases, although classified as inert substances, exert a tissue-protective effect in different experimental models when applied before organ ischaemia as an early or late preconditioning stimulus, after ischaemia as a post-conditioning stimulus or when given in combination before, during and/or after ischaemia. A wide range of organs can be protected by these inert substances, in particular cardiac and neuronal tissue. In this review we summarize the data on noble gas-induced cardioprotection, focusing on the underlying protective mechanisms. We will also look at translatability of experimental data to the clinical situation. PMID:25363501

  14. Nitrogen and light noble gases in Shergotty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of Shergotty and a sample of EETA 79001's lithology A have been analyzed for N, He, Ne, and Ar abundances and isotopic composition. After correcting for spallogenic nitrogen, the nitrogen isotopic ratios were found to be close to that of the terrestrial atmosphere. The spallogenic noble gas data are consistent with cosmic ray irradiation of both Shergotty and EETA 79001 at shallow shielding depths. Cosmic ray exposure ages were estimated to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 Myr for EETA 79001, and of 2.0-5.2 Myr for Shergotty, depending on the choice of object size and shielding. Among the two Shergotty samples, the contents of Ar-40 differed by a factor of 3. This difference can be attributed to either a small-scale mineralogical inhomogeneity or a significant variation in the degree of degassing of minerals during shock, although the presence of trapped argon with a high Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio and its heterogeneous distribution cannot be ruled out.

  15. Circumstellar material in meteorites - Noble gases, carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward

    1988-01-01

    In addition to preserving a record of isotopically distinct reservoirs in the early solar system, some primitive meteorites contain discrete grains of presolar origin. Such grains are distinguished by the isotopically anomalous noble-gas components they contain. One such component consists of monoisotopic Ne-22, produced by decay of radioactive Na-22 with a 2.6 yr half-life. Two xenon components have also been identified: one synthesized apparently in a supernova, the other probably in a red giant star. Most of the grains that carry these noble-gas components are carbonaceous and contain isotopically anomalous C, N, or both. They include diamond and silicon carbide. Two unidentified carriers of isotopically anomalous nitrogen, unaccompanied by noble gases, occur in the brecciated stony iron meteorite, Bencubbin.

  16. Fullerenes: An extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bunch, Ted E.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin. PMID:10725367

  17. Fullerenes: an extraterrestrial carbon carrier phase for noble gases.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Poreda, R J; Bunch, T E

    2000-03-28

    In this work, we report on the discovery of naturally occurring fullerenes (C60 to C400) in the Allende and Murchison meteorites and some sediment samples from the 65 million-year-old Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer (KTB). Unlike the other pure forms of carbon (diamond and graphite), fullerenes are extractable in an organic solvent (e.g., toluene or 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene). The recognition of this unique property led to the detection and isolation of the higher fullerenes in the Kratschmer/Huffmann arc evaporated graphite soot and in the carbon material in the meteorite and impact deposits. By further exploiting the unique ability of the fullerene cage structure to encapsulate and retain noble gases, we have determined that both the Allende and Murchison fullerenes and the KTB fullerenes contain trapped noble gases with ratios that can only be described as extraterrestrial in origin.

  18. Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in the Wethersfield (1982) chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C.; Reeves, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    The Wethersfield (1982) chondrite was assayed for a suite of cosmogenic radionuclides shortly after fall. Data are reported for Be-7, Na-22, All-26, Sc-46, V-48, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-60. A comparison is made with predicted results based on a scaling to the Deep River Neutron Monitor. Noble gases were also assayed in a subsample. The cosmic-ray-exposure age is estimated to be 45 Myr.

  19. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  20. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  1. Noble gases in CH 4-rich gas fields, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiyagon, H.; Kennedy, B. M.

    1992-04-01

    The elemental and isotopic compositions of helium, neon, argon, and xenon in twenty-one CH 4-rich natural gas samples from Cretaceous and Devonian reservoirs in the Alberta, Canada, sedimentary basin were measured. In all but a few cases, radiogenic ( 4He, 40Ar, and 131-136Xe) and nucleogenic ( 21,22Ne) isotopes dominated. Based solely on the noble gas composition, two types of natural gas reservoirs are identified. One (Group B) is highly enriched in radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases and varies little in composition: 3He /4He = 1.5 ± 0.5 × 10 -8, 40Ar /36Ar = 5000-6500 , 40∗Ar /4He = 0.10 , 136∗Xe /4He ~ 0.7 × 10 -9, and 21∗Ne /22∗Ne = 0.452 ± 0.041 (∗ denotes radiogenic or nucleogenic origin; all 4He is radiogenic). High nitrogen content with 4He /N 2 ~ 0.06 is also characteristic of Group B samples. The remaining samples (Group A) contain a radiogenic-nucleogenic component with a different composition and, relative to Group B samples, the extent of enrichment in this component is less and more variable: 3He /4He = 10-70 × 10 -8, 40Ar /36Ar < 1550 , and 40∗Ar /4He ~ 0.25 . The composition of Group B radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases is consistent with production in crust of average composition. Enrichment in Group B noble gases and nitrogen increases with proximity to the underlying Precambrian basement, consistent with a present-day mass flux into the overlying sedimentary basin. Inferred 40∗Ar /136∗Xe 4He ratios imply a basement source enriched in thorium relative to uranium and potassium (Th/U > 20). Combined, the overall lower total radiogenic-nucleogenic content of Group A reservoirs, the greater variability in composition, and the appearance of Group A noble gases in reservoirs higher in the sedimentary sequence relative to the underlying basement implies that the Group A radiogenic-nucleogenic noble gases are indigenous to the sediments. The most interesting aspect of the Group A noble gases are the very high 3He /4He ratios; ~ 10

  2. Novel MRI Applications of Laser-Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-04-01

    Gas-phase NMR has great potential as a probe for a variety of interesting physical and biomedical problems that are not amenable to study by water or similar liquid. However, NMR of gases was largely neglected due to the low signal obtained from the thermally-polarized gases with very low sample density. The advent of optical pumping techniques for enhancing the polarization of the noble gases 3He and 129Xe has bought new life to this field, especially in medical imaging where 3He lung inhalation imaging is approaching a clinical application. However, there are numerous applications in materials science that also benefit from the use of these gases. We review primarily non-medical applications of laser-polarized noble gases for both NMR imaging and spectroscopy, and highlight progress with examples from our laboratory including high-resolution imaging at mT applied field strength and velocity imaging of convective flow. Porous media microstucture has been probed with both thermal and laser-polarized xenon, as xenon is an ideal probe due to low surface interaction with the grains of the porous media.

  3. Howardite Noble Gases as Indicators of Asteroid Surface Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The HED (Howardite, Eucrite and Diogenite) group meteorites likely or iginate from the Asteroid 4 Vesta - one of two asteroid targets of NA SA's Dawn mission. Whilst Howardites are polymict breccias of eucriti c and diogenitic material that often contain "regolithic" petrologica l features, neither their exact regolithic nature nor their formation processes are well defined. As the Solar Wind (SW) noble gas compon ent is implanted onto surfaces of solar system bodies, noble gas anal yses of Howardites provides a key indicator of regolithic origin. In addition to SW, previous work by suggested that restricted Ni (300-12 00 micro g/g) and Al2O3 (8-9 wt%) contents may indicate an ancient we ll-mixed regolith. Our research combines petrological, compositional and noble gas analyses to help improve understanding of asteroid reg olith formation processes, which will play an intergral part in the i nterpretation of Dawn mission data. Following compositional and petrological analyses, we developed a regolith grading scheme for our sampl e set of 30 Howardites and polymict Eucrites. In order to test the r egolith indicators suggested by, our 8 selected samples exhibited a r ange of Ni, Al2O3 contents and regolithic grades. Noble gas analyses were performed using furnace stepheating on our MAP 215-50 noble gas mass spectrometer. Of our 8 howardites, only 3 showed evidence of SW noble gases (e.g approaching Ne-20/Ne-22 approximately equals 13.75, Ne-21/Ne-22 approximately equals 0.033). As these samples display low regolithic grades and a range of Ni and Al2O3 contents, so far we are unable to find any correlation between these indicators and "regolit hic" origin. These results have a number of implications for both Ho wardite and Vesta formation, and may suggest complex surface stratigr aphies and surface-gardening processes.

  4. The History of Planetary Degassing as Recorded by Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, D.; Turekian, K. K.

    2003-12-01

    Noble gases provide unique clues to the structure of the Earth and the degassing of volatiles into the atmosphere. Since the noble gases are highly depleted in the Earth, their isotopic compositions are prone to substantial changes due to radiogenic additions, even from scarce parent elements and low-yield nuclear processes. Therefore, noble gas isotopic signatures of major reservoirs reflect planetary differentiation processes that generate fractionations between these volatiles and parent elements. These signatures can be used to construct planetary degassing histories that have relevance to the degassing of a variety of chemical species as well.It has long been recognized that the atmosphere is not simply a remnant of the volatiles that surrounded the forming Earth with the composition of the early solar nebula. It was also commonly thought that the atmosphere and oceans were derived from degassing of the solid Earth over time (Brown, 1949; Suess, 1949; Rubey, 1951). Subsequent improved understanding of the processes of planet formation, however, suggests that substantial volatile inventories could also have been added directly to the atmosphere. The characteristics of the atmosphere therefore reflect the acquisition of volatiles by the solid Earth during formation (see Pepin and Porcelli, 2002; Chapter 4.12), as well as the history of degassing from the mantle. The precise connection between volatiles now emanating from the Earth and the long-term evolution of the atmosphere are key subjects of modeling efforts, and are discussed below.Major advances in understanding the behavior of terrestrial volatiles have been made based upon observations on the characteristics of noble gases that remain within the Earth. Various models have been constructed that define different components and reservoirs in the planetary interior, how materials are exchanged between them, and how the noble gases are progressively transferred to the atmosphere (see Chapter 2.06). While

  5. Trapping of noble gases in proton-irradiated silicate smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. H., Jr.; Nuth, J. A., III; Hohenberg, C. M.; Olinger, C. T.; Moore, M. H.

    1992-12-01

    We have measured Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in Si2O3 'smokes' that were condensed on Al substrates, vapor-deposited with various mixtures of CH4, NH3, H2O3 and noble gases at 10 K and subsequently irradiated with 1 MeV protons to simulate conditions during grain mantle formation in interstellar clouds. Neither Ne nor Ar is retained by the samples upon warming to room temperature, but Xe is very efficiently trapped and retained. Kr is somewhat less effectively retained, typically depleted by factors of about 10-20 relative to Xe. Isotopic fractionation favoring the heavy isotopes of Xe and Kr of about 5-10-percent/amu is observed. Correlations between the specific chemistry of the vapor deposition and heavy noble gas retention are most likely the result of competition by the various species for irradiation-produced trapping sites. The concentration of Xe retained by some of these smokes exceeds that observed in phase Q of meteorites and, like phase Q, they do not seem to be carriers of the light noble gases.

  6. Trapping of noble gases in proton-irradiated silicate smokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. H., Jr.; Nuth, J. A., III; Hohenberg, C. M.; Olinger, C. T.; Moore, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in Si2O3 'smokes' that were condensed on Al substrates, vapor-deposited with various mixtures of CH4, NH3, H2O3 and noble gases at 10 K and subsequently irradiated with 1 MeV protons to simulate conditions during grain mantle formation in interstellar clouds. Neither Ne nor Ar is retained by the samples upon warming to room temperature, but Xe is very efficiently trapped and retained. Kr is somewhat less effectively retained, typically depleted by factors of about 10-20 relative to Xe. Isotopic fractionation favoring the heavy isotopes of Xe and Kr of about 5-10-percent/amu is observed. Correlations between the specific chemistry of the vapor deposition and heavy noble gas retention are most likely the result of competition by the various species for irradiation-produced trapping sites. The concentration of Xe retained by some of these smokes exceeds that observed in phase Q of meteorites and, like phase Q, they do not seem to be carriers of the light noble gases.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  8. On the siting of noble gases in E-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    Fractions of six E-chondrites were separated by density, grain size, and chemical resistance to determine the siting of noble gases. The samples were taken from the Qingzhen (E3), Indarch (E4), Abee and Saint Saveur (E4-5), and Yilmia and North West Forrest (E6) meteorites. The Ar-rich component of the E6s was concentrated in the enstatite-rich fraction. This subsolar component was resistant to HCl and HNO3 treatment, but could be partially dissolved by HF, implying that the subsolar component is located in the enstatite. The noble gases were transported there by metamorphism. Xe-129 was found in the same regions in the E6s, but was in areas associated with chondrules in the E4s. Additionally, the carbon-rich fraction of the E4 sample displayed Xe and Ne/CCF-Xe isotopic ratios similar to that found in C-chondrites. E3 and E4 primordial gases were analogous, with no subsolar contribution.

  9. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. A preliminary survey of noble gases at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Benoit, D.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    A preliminary survey of noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions in production fluids from four high pressure separator stations providing steam to the dual flash Dixie Valley Geothermal Plant has been completed. The atmospheric noble gases are dominated by dissolved gases introduced with the injection fluid, a mixture of flashed degassed brine and condensate equilibrated with air in the cooling tower. Excess helium, however, represents a primary reservoir fluid and variations in the amount of excess can be used to monitor the changing proportion of injectate in the production fluid. The helium component associated with the reservoir fluid has an isotopic composition (0.70 - 0.76 Ra) implying that {approximately}7.5% of the helium in the 1995 Dixie Valley reservoir fluid is mantle-derived. The Dixie Valley geothermal field is closely related to the range-front normal fault of the Stillwater Range. Assuming fluid transport along the fault from deeper sources and using a one-dimensional steady-state advection model, the helium content and isotopic composition of the reservoir fluid predicts an average fluid flow rate of virgin fluid from depth of {approximately} 7 mm/yr. This is significantly less than injectate flow rates within the reservoir estimated from tracer tests (i.e. 5 - 120 m/day).

  11. Solar composition noble gases in the Washington County iron meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    A sample of the Washington County iron meteorite is analyzed for its light noble gases by a combustion technique in two steps at 1160 C. The ratio of trapped to spallogenic noble gases in the sample was high enough to allow the resolution of trapped and spallogenic components in both combustion steps. The He:Ne:Ar elemental ratios in the trapped component are comparable to present-day solar-wind ratios. The (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) ratio, while subject to some uncertainty due to possible variation in either the spallation or the trapped component between the two steps, is in the range 13.3 + or 0.5, also comparable to present-day solar wind. Unless the Washington County iron formed by some unique process in a solar-wind-irradiated regolith, the fact that the trapped gas is of solar composition has implications with regard to the compositional history of the solar wind, to conditions in the early solar nebula during grain formation or accretion, and to primordial helium in the earth.

  12. The isotopic composition of solar flare noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The relative elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases provide insights into a number of topics related to the solar system. Neon is in many ways the most diagnostic of the noble gases. The diagnostic character is mainly related to the variation in the relative abundance of the two most abundant neon isotopes, Ne-20 and Ne-22. The available evidence suggests that trapped neon found in meteorites and in lunar samples consists of as many as five isotopically distinct components, including neon A, B, C, D, and E. Neon B has been shown to be due to solar wind neon which has been directly implanted into the material found in a meteorite. It appears that neon E is extrasolar in origin. There exist ambiguities regarding the origins of the remaining three components. The present investigation is concerned with a reexamination of the existing data in an effort to eliminate or at least clarify these ambiguities. It is found that neon C is apparently due to directly implanted, low-energy solar flare neon nuclei.

  13. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  14. He, Kr and Xe diffusion in ZrN - An atomic scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukari, M.; Olsson, P.; Sandberg, N.

    2013-07-01

    The atomic scale diffusion mechanisms for He, Kr and Xe in the nitride fuel component ZrN are developed from first principles. The vacancy formation energies reveal a prevalent N vacancy concentration in the material. However, a high N self-diffusion barrier hinders vacancy-aided Kr and Xe diffusion. High, attractive binding energies of interstitial Xe and Kr to a N vacancy effectively eliminate interstitial diffusion mechanism for these gases. In comparison, He exhibits considerable degrees of freedom, as it is weekly bound to a N vacancy, enhances N-vacancy aided diffusion, has the lowest interstitial migration barrier, and has the capacity to be reintroduced into the ZrN lattice as an interstitial. N self-diffusion barriers are lowered if the diffusing N is in close proximity to a substitutional atom. The obtained results suggest a high release of He, while the majority of Kr and Xe is retained, in agreement with experiments.

  15. Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite - Implications for planetary gases in meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancet, M. S.; Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Solubilities of noble gases in magnetite were determined by growing magnetite in a noble-gas atmosphere between 450 and 700 K. Henry's law is obeyed at pressures up to .01 atm for He, Ne, Ar and up to .00001 atm for Kr, Xe, with the following distribution coefficients at 500 K: He 0.042, Ne 0.016, Ar 3.6, Kr 1.3, Xe 0.88, some 100 to 100,000 times higher than previous determinations on silicate and fluoride melts. Apparent heats of solution are in sharp contrast with earlier determinations on melts which were small and positive, but are comparable to the values for clathrates. Presumably the gases are held in anion vacancies.

  16. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-01-01

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane's lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon's strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia. PMID:26601882

  17. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane’s lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon’s strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  18. Description, chemical composition and noble gases of the chondrite Nogata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, M.; Murayama, S.; Okada, A.; Yabuki, H.; Takaoka, N.

    1983-06-01

    Microscopic, electron-microprobe, chemical-composition, and noble-gas-isotopic-abundance studies of a 20-g sample of the ordinary chondrite Nogata are reported. The historical report of the fall of the chondrite at Nogata, Japan in the year 861 is supported by C-14 dating of the wooden box in which it has been stored in a Shinto shrine. The measurement data are presented in tables and discussed. Except for a low Fe content, the chemical composition and petrological structure of the chondrite are consistent with an L6 classification. Nogata is found to be more lightly shocked and to contain relatiely more radiogenic and spallogenic noble gases than other L chondrites. The gas-retention ages calculated for Nogata are 4.5 (He-4) and 4.7 (Ar-40) x 10 to the 9th years; the cosmic-ray-exposure age is about 4 x 10 to the 7th years. It is suggested that the metamorphism of the chondrite was completed within about 10 to the 8th years of the formation of its parent body.

  19. Chemical composition of Titan's lakes and noble gases sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J.-I.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L.; Ferreira, A.

    2010-04-01

    Titan is one of the most enigmatic objects in the Solar System. The presence of hydrocarbon lakes and even a global ocean have been suspected for decades. The dark features discovered by the CASSINI spacecraft are good candidates for these expected lakes (see McEwen et al. 2005 and Stofan et al. 2007). Their chemical composition has still not been measured but numerical models can give relatively accurate predictions. In the present work, we use the recent model of Titan's lakes chemical composition elaborated by Cordier et al. (2009) in light of the recent Cassini-Huygens measurements in order to investigate the possibility of sequestration of large quantities of noble gases in these liquids. Indeed, the noble gas abundances have been found to be largely in subsolar abundances in the atmosphere of Titan and the origin of this impoverishment is still poorly understood. Our preliminary results show that, under specific circumstances, at least the atmospheric depletion in krypton could be caused by its dissolution in the Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquid phase.

  20. Noble gases in the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Nickols, R. H.; Olinger, C.; Garrison, D. H.; Goswami, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of noble gases in whole rock samples of the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta and grain-size separates of Kapoeta yield evidence for excesses of the Xe isotopes Xe-129 , Xe-131, Xe-132, Xe-134, and Xe-136 in a low-temperture component, similar to lunar excess fission Xe. Such a component may be able to provide chronometric information if the relative abundances of radioactive progenitors (I-129, Pu-244, and U-238) can be determined, but the isotopic spectra obtained are not sufficiently precise to do so. Eucritic clast BH-5 in Bholghati contains Xe produced in situ by the decay of Pu-244. Calculated fission Xe retention ages are 30-70 Ma after the formation of the solar system, consistent with the apparent presence of Sm-146 decay products. Both the clast and the matrix of Bholghati have K-Ar ages of about 2 Ga, suggesting a common thermal event at least that recently.

  1. Degassing mechanisms of noble gases from carbonado diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zashu, S.; Hiyagon, H.

    1994-01-01

    Diamonds are unique samples for inferring ancient mantle conditions, because of their enormous stability, antiquity and also of mantle origin. However, as temperatures in the mantle where diamonds have existed are very high (greater than 1000 C) and residence time of some diamonds could be more than a few billion years, it is imperative to examine whether or not diamonds have retained their pristine characteristics, especially those of noble gases, under such extreme conditions. As discussed in a review article by Ozima, there are rather large variations in the diffusivity of helium in diamonds obtained in the early determinations. The data are also limited to temperatures higher than 1200 C. In the present study, we conducted more refined diffusion experiments for He using carbonado diamonds, which have large amounts of radiogenic (4)He approximately 10(exp -2) cu cm STP/g. On the basis of the experimentally estimated diffusion coefficients, we will discuss retentivity of He in diamonds in the mantle condition.

  2. Noble gases and cosmogenic radionuclides in the Eltanin Pacific meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, D D; Garrison, D H; Caffee, M W; Kyte, F; Nishiizumi, K

    2000-01-14

    A 1.5 cm long, 1.2 g specimen of the Eltanin meteorite was found at 10.97 m depth in Polarstern piston core PS2704-1. The early studies indicated that the small fragments of the Eltanin meteorite was debris from a km-sized asteroid which impacted into the deep-ocean basin. In this study, the authors measured {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar age, noble gases, and cosmogenic radionuclides in splits of specimen as a part of consortium studies of Eltanin meteorite. They concluded that the specimen was about 3 m deep from the asteroid surface. The exposure age of the Eltanin asteroid was about 20 Myr.

  3. Solar Noble Gases in Polymict Ureilites and an Update on Ureilite Noble Gas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Lohr, H. P.; Begemann, F.

    1993-07-01

    Ureilites are one of the least understood classes of meteorites; they show signs of being processed, but also appear to be primitive, with abundant carbon and trapped noble gases [1-6]. We have now begun to analyze a number of recently recovered specimens: one from the Saharan desert (Acfer 277) amd five from the Antarctic (LEW 85328, LEW 85440, EET 87720, FRO 90036, and FRO 90054). Analyses of Acfer 277, LEW 85328, and EET 87720 are complete (Table 1). Solar noble gases are present in polymict EET 87720, as shown by the three- isotope plot of Fig. 1. There, in contrast to the bulk data point for Acfer 277, data points for EET 87720 deviate from a mixing line between "typical" spallation Ne (as approximated here by the spallation-dominated 1800 degrees C step for EET 87720) and Ne-U [7] toward higher ^20Ne/^22Ne. A line fitted to the EET 87720 data points passes slightly below Ne-B [8]. The situation is similar for sample F1 from polymict EET 83309 [9], which is shown for comparison. Additional support for the presence of solar gases arises from the abundance of ^4He (~9 x 10^-5 cm^3 STP/g in EET 87720-F1, corrected for spallogenic contributions), which in both cases is far higher than in other ureilite bulk samples [6,10]. Also, in the ratio of spallation-corrected ^4He to trapped ^36Ar, these two polymict ureilites clearly stand out. Helium-4/argon-36 ratios in EET 87720-F1 and EET 83309-F1 are ~20 and ~28 respectively, at least 1 order of magnitude higher than in bulk monomict ureilites and 2 orders of magnitude higher than what appears typical of ureilite diamonds [6]. Nilpena, another polymict ureilite [11], also has a ^4He/^36Ar ratio (2.1 in Nilpena II-1 [7]) higher than all monomict ureilites but one (Dingo Pup Donga), indicating the presence of solar noble gases (in variable contents) as a possible general feature of polymict ureilites, similar to the presence in them of nitrogen with high delta(^15N/^14N) [12]. Monomict LEW 85328 has a very high (^22Ne

  4. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    Regolith grains dissolved by stepwise etching release a mixture of near-surface implanted Solar Wind gases (SW) and a deeper- sited, isotopically heavier component attributed to Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) (1,2,3). In all regolith materials examined so far the elemental abundance ratios in both components are distinctly different from the canonical solar values (4). The differences are generally explained to be owing to diffusive elemental fractionation although there is no strong evidence that upon their implantation the composition of the gases was indeed solar. In contrast, the solar noble gases present in the H3-H6 chondritic regolith breccia Acfer 111 appear to be nearly unfractionated and thus offer a unique chance for more accurate analyses. A magnetic fraction of Acfer 111 matrix, consisting of approx. 80% metal and 20% silicates, was etched with a 60 g/mol aqueous solution of HNO3 in a high-vacuum extraction line similar to that in (1). The gases released were drawn off in steps and analyzed; the experiment was stopped when ~97% of the metal and ~50% of the silicates were dissolved. As etching proceeds, the isotopic composition of the released gases changes in a pattern similar to that observed previously in other regolithic materials. The isotopic composition of solar neon decreases from ^20Ne/^22Ne=13.1 in the first step to ^20Ne/^22Ne=11.6, which can be interpreted as a change of the mixing ratio of SW (^20Ne/^22Ne=13.7) and SEP (^20Ne/^22Ne=11.3) neon. The isotopic compositions of solar He, Ar, and Kr are consistent with their also being mixtures of SW and SEP having compositions reported previously (2,3), although our data are compromised to some extent by the presence of planetary gases extracted from the silicates and, in the first steps, by atmospheric contamination probably present in terrestrial weathering products (mostly rust). The elemental composition of noble gases released from Acfer 111 was distinct from previous experiments: The (^4He

  5. Noble Gases in the LEW 88663 L7 Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y. N.; Sugiura, N.; Nagao, K.

    1995-09-01

    LEW88663 and some meteorites (e.g. Shaw) are the most highly metamorphosed meteorites among L group chondrites. Although the abundances of lithophile elements and oxygen isotopic compositions of the L7 chondrite LEW88663 (total recovered mass: 14.5g) are close to those of the range for L chondrites [1,2], metallic iron is absent and concentrations of siderophile elements are about half of typical values for L chondrites [3,4]. Petrographical and geochemical observation suggested that this meteorite has experienced partial melting [5]. As a part of our study on differentiated meteorites, we also investigated noble gases in this meteorite. We present here noble gas compositions of LEW88663 and discuss history of this meteorite. In addition, we will consider whether there is any evidence for bridging between chondrites and achondrites. Noble gases were extracted from a whole rock sample weighing 66.31 mg by total fusion, and all stable noble gas isotopes as well as cosmogenic radioactive 81Kr were analyzed using a mass spectrometer at ISEI, Okayama University. The results are summarized in the table. The concentrations of cosmogenic ^3He, ^21Ne, and ^38Ar are 7.3, 1.6 and 3.1x10^-8 cm^3STP/g, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages based on them are calculated to be 4.7, 6.9 and 8.8 m.y., respectively, using the production rates proposed by [6, 7] and mean chemical compositions of L chondrites. The shorter cosmic-ray exposure ages T(sub)3 and T(sub)21 than T(sub)38 would be due to diffusive loss of lighter noble gases from the meteorite. The concentrations of trapped Kr and Xe in LEW88663 are lower than those for L6 chondrites [8], supporting thermal metamorphism for the meteorite higher than that for L6 chondrites. The Kr and Xe are isotopically close to those of the terrestrial atmospheric Kr and Xe, and elemental abundance ratios for Ar, Kr and Xe suggest adsorbed noble gas patterns of the terrestrial atmosphere. The terrestrial atmospheric Ar, Kr and Xe (most

  6. Using noble gases to investigate mountain-front recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Solomon, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Mountain-front recharge is a major component of recharge to inter-mountain basin-fill aquifers. The two components of mountain-front recharge are (1) subsurface inflow from the mountain block (subsurface inflow), and (2) infiltration from perennial and ephemeral streams near the mountain front (stream seepage). The magnitude of subsurface inflow is of central importance in source protection planning for basin-fill aquifers and in some water rights disputes, yet existing estimates carry large uncertainties. Stable isotope ratios can indicate the magnitude of mountain-front recharge relative to other components, but are generally incapable of distinguishing subsurface inflow from stream seepage. Noble gases provide an effective tool for determining the relative significance of subsurface inflow, specifically. Dissolved noble gas concentrations allow for the determination of recharge temperature, which is correlated with recharge elevation. The nature of this correlation cannot be assumed, however, and must be derived for the study area. The method is applied to the Salt Lake Valley Principal Aquifer in northern Utah to demonstrate its utility. Samples from 16 springs and mine tunnels in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains indicate that recharge temperature decreases with elevation at about the same rate as the mean annual air temperature, but is on average about 2??C cooler. Samples from 27 valley production wells yield recharge elevations ranging from the valley elevation (about 1500 m) to mid-mountain elevation (about 2500 m). Only six of the wells have recharge elevations less than 1800 m. Recharge elevations consistently greater than 2000 m in the southeastern part of the basin indicate that subsurface inflow constitutes most of the total recharge in this area. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. B-spline calculations of oscillator strengths in noble gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2006-05-01

    The B-spline box-based close-coupling method [1] was applied for extensive calculations of the transition probabilities in the noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe for energy levels up to n = 12. An individually optimized, term-dependent set of non-orthogonal one-electron radial functions was used to account for the strong term dependence in the valence orbitals. The core-valence correlation was introduced through multi-channel expansions, which include the ns^2np^5, nsnp^6 and ns^2np^4(n+1)l target states. The inner-core correlation was accounted for by employing multi-configuration target states. Energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions from the np^6 ground-state configuration as well as transitions between excited states were computed in the Breit-Pauli approximation. The inner-core correlation was found to be very important for most of the transitions considered. The good agreement with the available experimental data shows that the B-spline method can be used for accurate calculations of oscillator strengths for states with intermediate n-values, i.e. exactly the region where it is difficult to apply standard MCHF methods. At the same time the accuracy for the low-lying states is close to the accuracy obtained in large-scale MCHF calculations [2]. [1] O. Zatsarinny and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 35, 4669 (2002). [2] A. Irimia and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 37, 1659 (2004).

  8. Noble gases in 'phase Q' - Closed-system etching of an Allende residue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, Rainer; Baur, Heinrich; Signer, Peter; Anders, Edward; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis, in nearly pure form, of noble gases from the 'phase-Q' in an HF/HCl residue of the Allende C3V meteorite, using the closed-system stepped etching technique developed by Wieler et al. (1986) and Benkert et al. (1988) to extract noble gases from the residue. The results yield precise values of element and isotope abundances of all five noble gases in phase-Q, which is the major carrier of the planetary gases in carbonaceous chondrites. It was found that Ne-Q and Xe-Q in Allende are very similar to trapped gases in ureilites and in oxidizable carriers in several classes of ordinary chandrites, indicating that Q-gases are present in the formation locations of all these meteorites.

  9. The fractionation of noble gases in diamonds of CV3 Efremovka chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Semjonova, L. F.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    It was shown that in diamonds of Efremovka CV3 the noble gases with normal isotopic compositions are fractionated in different degree while the correlation of isotopic anomalous components is nearly constant. Some data for noble gases in DE-4 sample of Efremovka chondrite are considered. In contrast to DE-2 sample the DE-4 was treated except conc. HClO4, 220 C in addition with mixture of conc. H2SO4+H3PO4 (1:1), 220 C, twice. Noble gases analysis were performed in Germany at Max Plank Institute fur Chemie. Noble gases were released by oxidation of samples at stepped heating from 420 C to 810 C and by pyrolysis at 580, 590, and 680 C.

  10. Solar wind record in the lunar regolith - Nitrogen and noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, Urs; Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    The measured elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases and nitrogen have been measured in five different samples of lunar regolith material. It was found noble gases liberated by chemical attack on grain surfaces from two of the samples were solar. The Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio in the two grain surface reservoir is 13.5-13.6, compared to the average value of 13.7 + or - 0.3 measured in the Apollo solar wind collection foils (Gochsler and Geiss, 1977). It is suggested that the noble gases in grain interiors have suffered severe mass fractionation. The surface-sited N/Ar in an ilmenite sample exceeds the predicted solar ratio by more than a factor of 10. It is concluded that the solar system abundances of Cameron (1982) describe the elemental composition of the noble gases in the solar wind very well.

  11. Depth Profiles of Cosmogenic Noble Gases in the Chondrite Knyahinya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toe, S.; Lavielle, B.; Gilabert, E.; Simonoff, G. N.

    1993-07-01

    Concentrations and isotopic ratios of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe have been analyzed in 5-g size samples from different positions within the L5 chondrite Knyahinya. A previous work [1] has shown that Knyahinya experienced a single-stage exposure history (duration 40.5 Ma) as a meteoroid of approximately spherical shape (radius 45 cm). For these reasons, this meteorite represents a very interesting object to study depth profiles of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations and to test and improve model calculations of production rates. The procedure of extraction of noble gases adopted for this work, includes two pyrolyses respectively at about 450 degrees C and 650 degrees C, followed by a combustion step in pure O2 (15-25 torr pressure) at 650 degrees C before the complete melting of the sample [2]. This procedure allows a low-temperature extraction of a significant fraction of the Kr and Xe trapped noble gas component, leading to an enrichment of the cosmogenic component during the last temperature step. Concentration of trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe is 2-3 times lower than expected for a type 5 chondrite. The isotopic composition of the trapped Xe component analyzed in the combustion step is identical with the OC- Xe composition measured in Forest Vale [3]. Preliminary results show that concentration of cosmogenic 83Kr increases by 16% from the surface to the center when the ratio of cosmogenic 78Kr to 83Kr decreases from 0.157 to 0.136. The concentration of 81Kr has been measured in each sample. It increases from 0.0220 10^-12 cm^3 STP/g near the surface to 0.0255 10^-12 cm^3 STP/g at the center, in excellent agreement with the variations measured by Eugster [4] in other ordinary chondrites. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by C.N.R.S., by IN2P3 and by INSU (Programme National de Planetologie). References: [1] Graf Th. et al. (1990) GCA, 54, 2511-2520. [2] Gilabert E. and Lavielle B. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 337. [3] Lavielle B. and Marti K. (1992) JGR, 97, 20875-20881. [4

  12. Shock wave fractionated noble gases in the early solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2001-08-01

    Many processes in the active star-forming regions are accompanied by strong shock waves, in acceleration by which the nuclear-active particles form the power-law energy spectrum of high rigidity: F(> E0) ˜ Eγ , with the spectral index γ ≤ 1.5-2. It must affect the production rates of spallogenic components of the isotopes, whose excitation functions depend on the shape of the energy spectrum of radiation. Thus, the isotopic signatures formed in the conditions of the strong shock wave propagation must be different from those formed in the calm environment. The early solar system incorporated all the presumed processes of the starforming stage, so that its matter had to conserve such isotopic anomalies. In previous works [1] the shock wave effects in generation of extinct radionu-clides and light elements Li, Be and B were considered. In the report some results for their evidence in the noble gas signatures are presented. Modelling the Kr isotope generation in spallation of Rb, Sr, Y and Zr with the nuclear-active particles, the energy spectrum of which was variable in the range of γ= 1.1-6.0, shows the different pace of growth of abundances of the dif-ferent Kr isotopes with decreasing . It leads to the quite diverse behaviour of the various Kr isotope ratios: the 78,80 Kr/83 Kr ratios increase, and the 82,84,86 Kr/83 Kr ratios decrease for the smaller γ. According to such criteria, for instance, the isotopically heavier SEP-Kr in the lunar ilmenites was pro-duced with the accelerated particles of the more rigid energy spectrum (γ ˜ 2) in comparison with the SW-Kr. Another important feature of the shock wave acceleration of particles is the enrichment of their specrtum with heavier ions in proportion to A/Z. Clearly, the shock wave fractionation of the noble gases, favouring the heavier isotopes, had to be inevitable. Such a fractionation depends on timing episodes of shock wave acceleration: after the n-th act of the ion acceleration their fractionation is

  13. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Kleinfeld, Idit

    1992-01-01

    Due consideration of the probable history of the Martian atmosphere, as well as noble-gas data from the Mars-derived SNC meteorites and from laboratory tests on the trapping of noble gases in ice, are the bases of the presently hypothesized domination of noble gases in the atmospheres of all terrestrial planets by a mixture of internal components and a contribution from comets. If verified, this hypothesis would underscore the significance of impacts for these planets' volatile inventories. The sizes of the hypothesized comets are of the order of 120 km for Venus and only 80 km for that which struck the earth.

  14. Studies of light noble gases in mineral grains from lunar soils: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, R.; Etique, P.; Signer, P.

    1986-01-01

    Among the lunar soil constituents, monomineralic grains deserve special attention. Noble gases of carefully prepared mineral separates from lunar bulk soils were studied. The major results and conclusions of these investigations are summarized, in the context of both the regolith evolution and the history of the solar corpuscular radiation. With regard to the most abundant noble gas component in the regolith samples (the solar gases) the mineral grains have mainly two properties giving these particles among all soil constituents the best characteristics as sensors for solar gases, despite the fact, that the noble gas concentrations in a mineral separate are 10 to 60 times lower that those in a bulk sample of the same grain size. The first of these properties is the mineral dependent retentivity of the light gases He and Ne, the second property concerns the relatively short time during which a mineral grain acquires it solar gases. These two points are briefly discussed.

  15. Fullerenes, Noble Gases and the Flux of Extraterrestrial Debris to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert; Bunch, Ted

    The discovery of fullerenes in deposits associated with two separate impact events involving a large bolide with the Earth suggests that these carbon (C) molecules may also be an indicator of extraterrestrial (ET) events over geologic time. Fullerenes were detected in carbon-rich breccias (Onaping Fm.) associated with the 1.85 byr Sudbury Crater (Becker et al., Science 265, 1994) and in clay sediments within the 65 myr old Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary (Heymann et al., Science 265, 1994). To determine the origin of the Sudbury fullerenes, we searched for noble gases trapped inside the fullerene molecules (Saunders et al., Science 259, 1993). The Sudbury fullerenes contain trapped 3He/4He ratios (~5.5 times 10^{-4}) similar to those found in meteorites and some interplanetary dust particles (Becker et al., Science 272, 1996). Preliminary measurements of He in a continental K/T fullerene residue from Raton Basin (Colorado) revealed ^3He/^4He ratios some 100 times above air. A marine K/T residue from Stevns Klint, (Denmark) revealed ^3He/^4He ratios several thousand times above air in the high temperature fraction! We attribute the anomalously high ^3He/^4He ratios and high ^3He concentration in Stevns Klint to the abundance of higher fullerenes in the residue. The high ^3He/^4He ratio in the K/T fullerenes suggests that they were present in the bolide and somehow survived the impact event. Confirmation of these results could have broad implications concerning the importance of exogenous delivery in providing carbon, volatiles and perhaps other organics to the early Earth's crustal reservoir.

  16. The role of grain boundaries in the storage and transport of noble gases in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, Pete G.; Demouchy, Sylvie; Delon, Rémi; Arnaud, Nicolas O.; Marrocchi, Yves; Cordier, Patrick; Addad, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Mantle noble gases record important and ancient isotopic heterogeneities, which fundamentally influence our understanding of mantle geodynamics, yet these heterogeneities are difficult to fully interpret without understanding the basic mechanisms of noble gas storage and transport in mantle minerals. A series of annealing experiments that mimic mantle conditions (i.e. sub-solidus with natural, polycrystalline, texturally equilibrated olivines at low noble gas partial pressures) show that intergranular interfaces (grain boundaries) are major hosts for noble gases in the mantle, and that interfaces can dramatically fractionate noble gases from their radio-parents (U + Th and K). Therefore, noble gas isotopic heterogeneities in the mantle could result from grain size variations. Fine-grained lithologies (mylonites and ultramylonites, for example) with more grain boundaries will have lower U/3He ratios (compared to a coarse grained equivalent), which, over time, will preserve higher 3He/4He ratios. As predicted by theory of points defect diffusivity, these results show that noble gas diffusion along interfaces is different from those in the grain lattice itself at low temperatures. However, for grain size relevant of the Earth's mantle, the resulting effective correlated activation energies (Ea) and pre-exponential factors (Do /a2) produce similar diffusivities at mantle temperatures for interface- and lattice-hosted helium. Therefore, grain boundaries do not significantly affect helium transport at mantle conditions and length scales.

  17. The noble gases: how their electronegativity and hardness determines their chemistry.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Jonathan; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2015-02-26

    The establishment of an internally consistent scale of noble gas electronegativities is a long-standing problem. In the present study, the problem is attacked via the Mulliken definition, which in recent years gained widespread use to its natural appearance in the context of conceptual density functional theory. Basic ingredients of this scale are the electron affinity and the ionization potential. Whereas the latter can be computed routinely, the instability of the anion makes the judicious choice of computational technique for evaluating electron affinities much more tricky. We opted for Puiatti's approach, extrapolating the energy of high ε solvent stabilized anions to the ε = 1 (gas phase) case. The results give negative electron affinity values, monotonically increasing (except for helium which is an outlier in most of the story) to almost zero at eka-radon in agreement with high level calculations. The stability of the B3LYP results is successfully tested both via improving the level of theory (CCSD(T)) and expanding the basis set. Combined with the ionization energies (in good agreement with experiment), an electronegativity scale is obtained displaying (1) a monotonic decrease of χ when going down the periodic table, (2) top values not for the noble gases but for the halogens, as opposed to most (extrapolation) procedures of existing scales, invariably placing the noble gases on top, and (3) noble gases having electronegativities close to the chalcogens. In the accompanying hardness scale (hardly, if ever, discussed in the literature) the noble gases turn out to be by far the farthest the hardest elements, again with a continuous decrease with increasing Z. Combining χ value of the halogens and the noble gases the Ng(δ+)F(δ-) bond polarity emerging from ab initio calculations naturally emerges. In conclusion, the chemistry of the noble gases is for a large part determined by their extreme hardness, equivalent to a high resistance to change in its

  18. EOSN - A new TOUGH2 module for simulating transport of noble gases in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-04-02

    Noble gases widely exist in nature, and except for radon, they are stable. Modern techniques can detect noble gases to relatively low concentrations and with great precision. These factors suggest that noble gases can be useful tracers for subsurface characterization. Their applications, however, require an appropriate transport model for data analyses. A new fluid property module, EOSN, was developed for TOUGH2 to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently any of five different noble gases (except radon) as well as CO{sub 2} can be selected, two at a time. For the two selected gas components, the Crovetto et al. (1982) model is used to calculate the Henry's law coefficients; and the Reid et al. (1987) correlation is used to calculate the gas phase diffusivities. Like most other sister modules, TOUGH2/EOSN can simulate nonisothermal multiphase flow and fully coupled transport in fractured porous media. Potential applications of the new module include, but are not limited to: (a) study of different reservoir processes such as recharge, boiling, condensation, and fracture-matrix fluid exchange; (b) characterization of reservoir geometry such as fracture spacing; and (c) analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  19. Tracing a past thermal event by using atmospheric noble gases dissolved in deep Michigan Basin brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (e.g., 22Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 130Xe) are introduced into the subsurface by recharge water in solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere (Air Saturated Water - ASW). Because noble gases are chemically inert and stable in nature, they are only sensitive to subsurface physical processes. More specifically, depletion of this component in sedimentary systems commonly suggests loss to an oil or natural gas phase in the subsurface, which is originally free of atmospheric noble gases. This has been traditionally used to identify and quantify subsurface oil, gas, and water phase interactions. Alternatively, depletion of atmospheric noble gases due to subsurface boiling and steam phase separation has also been previously recorded in tectonically active areas (hydrothermal systems). Such depletion is thus indicative of the occurrence of a thermal event and can be used to trace the thermal history of stable tectonic regions. Here, we present noble gas concentrations of 38 deep brines (~0.5-3.6km) from the Michigan Basin. The atmospheric noble gas component shows a strong depletion pattern with respect to air saturated water. Depletion of lighter gases (22Ne and 36Ar) is stronger compared to the heavier ones (84Kr and 130Xe). To understand the mechanisms responsible for this overall atmospheric noble gas depletion, phase interaction models were tested. We show that this atmospheric noble gas depletion pattern is best explained by a model involving subsurface boiling and steam separation, and thus, consistent with the occurrence of a past thermal event of mantle origin as previously indicated by both high 4He/heat flux ratios and the presence of primordial mantle He and Ne signatures in the basin. Such a conceptual model is also consistent with the presence of past elevated temperatures in the Michigan Basin (e.g., ~80- 260°C) at shallow depths as suggested by previous thermal studies in the basin. We suggest that recent reactivation of the ancient mid

  20. Isotopic measurements of solar noble gases in individual micrometeorites from Greenland and Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Noble gases are studied in individual 100 micron-size particles selected from Greenland and Antarctic glacial sediments. Noble gas isotopic and elemental patterns confirm the extraterrestrial origin of 81 out of 302 particles studied. Micrometeorites in this size range are particularly interesting because they correspond to the peak of the meteoritic mass flux distribution. Many particles studied are compositionally and morphologically similar to known meteoritic materials.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring purity of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Robert

    2008-04-01

    A device for detecting impurities in a noble gas includes a detection chamber and a source of pulsed ultraviolet light. The pulse of the ultraviolet light is transferred into the detection chamber and onto a photocathode, thereby emitting a cloud of free electrons into the noble gas within the detection chamber. The cloud of electrons is attracted to the opposite end of the detection chamber by a high positive voltage potential at that end and focused onto a sensing anode. If there are impurities in the noble gas, some or all of the electrons within the cloud will bond with the impurity molecules and not reach the sensing anode. Therefore, measuring a lower signal at the sensing anode indicates a higher level of impurities while sensing a higher signal indicates fewer impurities. Impurities in the range of one part per billion can be measured by this device.

  2. Tracing the Complex Ice Cover Evolution of Lake Vida, Antarctica Through Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, J. L.; Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Doran, P. T.; Kenig, F.; McKay, C. P.

    2008-12-01

    Unlike other lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica, Lake Vida has a very thick (~19 m) ice cover and a liquid brine body of unusually high salinity (~245 g/L). Because noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) are conservative in nature, they can be used to understand physical processes taking place during ice formation (e.g., partitioning of noble gases between the ice and residual liquid, bubble formation at the ice-liquid interface) thus, providing information with respect to the temporal evolution of the dry valley lakes. In an attempt to constrain the conditions under which the atypical Lake Vida ice cover formed and evolved, we collected 19 ice samples along a vertical profile from the surface down to a depth of ~14 m as well as three liquid brine samples from briny ice at a depth of ~16 m for analysis of all noble gases. Our results show that the broad pattern of noble gas concentrations for the Lake Vida ice cover and associated brines is fundamentally different from that expected for air saturated water (ASW). Overall, ice samples are relatively enriched in He, slightly depleted in Ne, and strongly depleted in the heavier noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) with respect to ASW. By contrast, brine samples are very enriched in heavy noble gases. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the observed noble gas distribution and fractionation in the Lake Vida cover, a conceptual three-phase (ice, brine, bubbles) partition model was tested. The model allows the lighter noble gases (He and Ne) to reside interstitially in ice while Ar, Kr, and Xe are totally excluded, causing supersaturation in the residual liquid as freezing progresses and formation of gas bubbles occurs at the ice-liquid interface. These bubbles are subsequently incorporated into the ice. While the general noble gas enrichment and depletion patterns of the model are consistent with our brine and ice data, quantitative agreement with output values is not as good under similar model conditions (e

  3. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He, /sup 40/Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar, and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic helium and argon-40 formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 to 3%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 to 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 to 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as Cl or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range.

  4. Biomedical magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy with laser polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, R.C.; Rosen, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Chupp, T.E.; Swanson, S.D.; Agranoff, B.W.; Prince, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10{sup {minus}5} at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. The authors have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  5. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He and 40Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water that penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic He and 40Ar formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 - 30%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 - 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 - 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as C1 or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range. ?? 1984.

  6. On the origin of noble gases in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Coltice, Nicolas; Ricard, Yanick

    2002-11-15

    The chemical differences between deep- and shallow-mantle sources of oceanic basalts provide evidence that several distinct components coexist within the Earth's mantle. Most of these components have been identified as recycled in origin. However, the noble-gas signature is still a matter of debate and questions the preservation of primitive regions in the convective mantle. We show that a model where the noble-gas signature observed in Hawaii and Iceland comes from a pristine homogeneous deep layer would imply a primitive (3)He content and (3)He/(22)Ne ratio that are very unlikely. On the contrary, mass balances show that the partly degassed peridotite of a marble-cake mantle can be the noble-gas end-member with an apparent 'primitive'-like composition. This component is mixed with recycled oceanic crust in different proportions in the plume sources and in the shallow mantle. A recycling model of the mantle, involving gravitational segregation of the oceanic crust at the bottom of the mantle, potentially satisfies trace-element as well as noble-gas constraints. PMID:12460484

  7. On the origin of noble gases in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Coltice, Nicolas; Ricard, Yanick

    2002-11-15

    The chemical differences between deep- and shallow-mantle sources of oceanic basalts provide evidence that several distinct components coexist within the Earth's mantle. Most of these components have been identified as recycled in origin. However, the noble-gas signature is still a matter of debate and questions the preservation of primitive regions in the convective mantle. We show that a model where the noble-gas signature observed in Hawaii and Iceland comes from a pristine homogeneous deep layer would imply a primitive (3)He content and (3)He/(22)Ne ratio that are very unlikely. On the contrary, mass balances show that the partly degassed peridotite of a marble-cake mantle can be the noble-gas end-member with an apparent 'primitive'-like composition. This component is mixed with recycled oceanic crust in different proportions in the plume sources and in the shallow mantle. A recycling model of the mantle, involving gravitational segregation of the oceanic crust at the bottom of the mantle, potentially satisfies trace-element as well as noble-gas constraints.

  8. Elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases in the mantle: Pete's path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Manuel; Péron, Sandrine; Colin, Aurélia

    2016-04-01

    Noble gases are tracers of the origin of the volatiles on Earth and other terrestrial planets. The determination of their isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts allows discriminating between different possible scenarios for the origin of volatiles (chondritic, solar, cometary). However, oceanic basalts show a ubiquitous component having atmospheric noble gas compositions, which reflects a shallow air contamination. This component masks the mantle composition and only step crushing is able to (partially) remove it. Nevertheless, the exact mantle composition is always unconstrained due to the uncertainty on its complete removal. Developed by Pete Burnard (Burnard et al., 1997; Burnard, 1999), single vesicle analysis using laser ablation is a challenging technique to determine the mantle composition, free of atmospheric contamination. We have used this technique to measure He, Ne, Ar isotopes and CO2 in single vesicles from both MORB and OIB (Galapagos, Iceland). Vesicles are located using microtomography and the noble gases are measured using the Noblesse mass spectrometer from IPGP using an Excimer laser to open the vesicles. Both Galapagos and Iceland samples show that the 20Ne/22Ne ratio is limited to ~12.8 in the primitive mantle, suggesting that the origin of the light noble gases can be attributed to irradiated material instead of a simple dissolution of solar gases into a magma ocean (Moreira and Charnoz, 2016). Such a scenario of incorporation of light noble gases by irradiation also explains the terrestrial argon isotopic composition. However, the Kr and Xe contribution of implanted solar wind is small and these two noble gases were carried on Earth by chondrites and/or cometary material. Burnard, P., D. Graham and G. Turner (1997). "Vesicle-specific noble gas analyses of « popping rock »: implications for primordial noble gases in the Earth." Science 276: 568-571. Burnard, P. (1999). "The bubble-by-bubble volatile evolution of two mid-ocean ridge

  9. Fractionation of noble gases by thermal escape from accreting planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    Assuming solar initial elemental and isotopic ratios and a determination of the degree of fractionation occurring by competition between gravitational binding and escape, a model is developed for selective noble gas loss through escape during the growth of planetesimals to form the terrestrial planets. Of the two classes of planetesimals that can form on a time scale that is consistent with modern accretion models, one is depleted in neon while the other is neon-rich. The mechanism is noted to be capable of accounting for all known properties of the noble gas volatiles on the terrestrial planets, with only one exception, namely the Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios for Mars and the earth, which are much lower than observed.

  10. Stellar condensates in meteorites - Isotopic evidence from noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Alaerts, L.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contains three isotopically anomalous noble-gas components of apparently presolar origin: two kinds of Ne-E, (Ne-20)/(Ne-22) less than 0.6, and s-process Kr + Xe (enriched in the even isotopes 82, 84, 86, 128, 130, 132). Their carriers are tentatively identified as spinel and two carbonaceous phases, the principal high-temperature stellar condensates at low and high C/O ratios, respectively.

  11. A portable membrane contactor sampler for analysis of noble gases in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Han, Liang-Feng; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Aggarwal, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    To enable a wider use of dissolved noble gas concentrations and isotope ratios in groundwater studies, we have developed an efficient and portable sampling device using a commercially available membrane contactor. The device separates dissolved gases from a stream of water and collects them in a small copper tube (6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length with two pinch-off clamps) for noble gas analysis by mass spectrometry. We have examined the performance of the sampler using a tank of homogeneous water prepared in the laboratory and by field testing. We find that our sampling device can extract heavier noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) more efficiently than the lighter ones (He and Ne). An extraction time of about 60 min at a flow rate of 3 L/min is sufficient for all noble gases extracted in the sampler to attain equilibrium with the dissolved phase. The extracted gas sample did not indicate fractionation of helium ((3) He/(4) He) isotopes or other noble gas isotopes. Field performance of the sampling device was tested using a groundwater well in Vienna and results were in excellent agreement with those obtained from the conventional copper tube sampling method.

  12. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  13. Noble gases in the Bells (C2) and Sharps (H3) chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadnik, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The Bells and Sharps chondrites are of uncertain classification in virtue of their mineralogical and chemical peculiarities, prompting the present elemental and isotopic measurements of the noble gases in them, together with such quantities derivable from them as cosmogenic exposure and gas retention ages, as well as primordial gas contents. The radiogenic and, above all, the cosmogenic gases link Bells to the C2 group, while Sharps is found to lie in the second largest peak of the H-chondrite distribution.

  14. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almlof, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Accurate static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma of the noble gases He through Xe were determined using wave functions of similar quality for each system. Good agreement with experimental data for the static polarizability gamma was obtained for Ne and Xe, but not for Ar and Kr. Calculations suggest that the experimental values for these latter ions are too low.

  15. REMOVAL OF TITAN'S ATMOSPHERIC NOBLE GASES BY THEIR SEQUESTRATION IN SURFACE CLATHRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Hunter Waite, J. Jr.

    2011-10-10

    A striking feature of the atmosphere of Titan is that no heavy noble gases other than argon were detected by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent to Titan's surface in 2005 January. Here we provide an explanation of the mysterious absence or rarity of these noble gases in Titan's atmosphere: the thermodynamic conditions prevailing at the surface-atmosphere interface of the satellite allow the formation of multiple guest clathrates that preferentially store some species, including all heavy noble gases, over others. The clean water ice needed for the formation of these clathrates could be delivered by successive episodes of cryovolcanic lavas that have been hypothesized to regularly cover the surface of Titan. The formation of clathrates in the porous lavas and their propensity for trapping Ar, Kr, and Xe would progressively remove these species from the atmosphere of Titan over the course of its history. In some circumstances, a global clathrate crust with an average thickness not exceeding a few meters could be sufficient on Titan for a complete removal of the heavy noble gases from the atmosphere.

  16. Noble Gases in Nakhla and Three Nakhlites Miller Range 090030, 090032, and 090136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Park, J.; Choi, J.; Baek, J. M.; Park, C.; Lee, J. I.; Lee, M. J.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B. D.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III

    2016-08-01

    Noble gas compositions of the Miller Range nakhlites release Kr and Xe with low 84Kr/132Xe of ≤1 and high 129Xe/132Xe of 1.95-2.13 at low heating temperature (300-400°C). The gases would be heavily fractionated martian atmosphere trapped in aqueously altered materials.

  17. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  18. Carbynes - Carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, A. G.; Watts, E. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five carbynes (triply bonded allotropes of carbon) have been found by electron diffraction in the Allende and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites: carbon VI, VIII, X, XI, and (tentatively) XII. From the isotopic composition of the associated noble-gas components, it appears that the carbynes in Allende (C3V chondrite) are local condensates from the solar nebula, whereas at least two carbynes in Murchison (C2 chondrite) are of exotic, presolar origin. They may be dust grains that condensed in stellar envelopes and trapped isotropically anomalous matter from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  19. Determination of the total electron scattering cross sections of the noble gases by a linear transmission technique in the intermediate energy range 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goains, Christopher P.

    Total electron scattering cross sections for the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe have been determined by the linear transmission technique in the intermediate energy range 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV with a random experimental error of +/-3.0%. The total electron scattering cross sections were compared to other total cross sections determined by the linear transmission technique and the Ramsauer technique previously reported in the literature. In general, the total electron scattering cross sections determined in the present agree with the previously-reported total electron scattering cross sections determined by other experimental groups using the linear transmission technique, especially with those that report relatively large random errors of +/-6. Deviations of up to 11% are, however, seen in the cross sections for He and deviations of up to 15% can be seen with experiments citing large corrections for small-angle elastically- and inelastically-scattered electrons. The total cross sections determined by the Ramsauer technique agree with the present ones to within 7% for Ne and Ar, but show deviations of up to nearly 20% for He, Kr and Xe at energies above 1000 eV.

  20. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Rich; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-06-01

    To facilitate the estimation of radiation doses from intake of radionuclides, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publishes dose coefficients (dose per unit intake) based on reference biokinetic and dosimetric models. The ICRP generally has not provided biokinetic models or dose coefficients for intake of noble gases, but plans to provide such information for (222)Rn and other important radioisotopes of noble gases in a forthcoming series of reports on occupational intake of radionuclides (OIR). This paper proposes a generic biokinetic model framework for noble gases and develops parameter values for radon. The framework is tailored to applications in radiation protection and is consistent with a physiologically based biokinetic modelling scheme adopted for the OIR series. Parameter values for a noble gas are based largely on a blood flow model and physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions for radon are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of its biokinetics in human subjects. PMID:23612507

  1. Noble gases in twenty Yamato H-chondrites: Comparison with Allan Hills chondrites and modern falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeken, TH.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-01-01

    Concentration and isotopic composition of noble gases have been measured in 20 H-chrondrites found on the Yamato Mountains ice fields in Antarctica. The distribution of exposure ages as well as of radiogenic He-4 contents is similar to that of H-chrondrites collected at the Allan Hills site. Furthermore, a comparison of the noble gas record of Antarctic H-chrondrites and finds or falls from non-Antarctic areas gives no support to the suggestion that Antarctic H-chrondrites and modern falls derive from differing interplanetary meteorite populations.

  2. Elastic Properties of Films of Water and Noble Gases Condensed at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that there are extensive similarities between the quench-condensed noble gas films and those of amorphous water ice. In particular, both can be quite soft upon deposition and can stiffen considerably when annealed. Furthermore, this stiffening follows a logarithmic time dependence for all substances. The temperature dependence of these behaviors scales with the triple point. The results shown here show a strong thickness dependence, which has implications for any study of mechanical properties of films on substrates. The temperature dependence of the stiffening and the stiffening rate have now been characterized for the noble gases, and these observations provide a roadmap for new experiments on amorphous water ice.

  3. More on noble gases in Yellowstone National Park hot waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Fournier, R.O.

    1973-01-01

    Water and gas samples from research wells in hydrothermal areas of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., have been mass spectrometrically analyzed for their rare gas contents and isotopic composition. In agreement with previous findings, the rare gases have been found to originate from infiltrating run-off water, saturated with air at 10 to 20??C. The atmospheric rare gas retention values found for the water varied between 3 and 87 per cent. The fine structure of the Ar, Kr and Xe abundance pattern in the water reveals fraotionational enrichment of the heavier gases due to partial outgassing of the waters. Radiogenic He and Ar have been detected. No positive evidence for magmatic water contribution has been found. Nevertheless, additions of magmatic waters free of rare gas can not be excluded, but if present the proportion is significantly less than 13 to 36 per cent. ?? 1973.

  4. Characterisation of Q-gases and other noble gas components in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, Rainer; Anders, Edward; Baur, Heinrich; Lewis, Roy S.; Signer, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Noble gases in several HF/HCl resistant residues of the CM2 chondrite Murchison were measured by closed-system stepped etching, in order to study the planetary gases in their major carrier 'Q'-an ill-defined minor phase, perhaps merely a set of adsorption sites. Neon, Ar, Kr, Xe, and probably also He in 'Q' of Murchison have the same isotopic and nearly the same elemental abundances as their counterparts in Allende (CV3). The isotopic composition of Ne-Q is consistent with mass-dependent fractionation of either solar wind Ne or Ne from solar energetic particles. Unlike Allende, Murchison during HNO3 attack release, besides Q-gases, large amounts of two other Ne-components, Ne-E and Ne-A3, a third subcomponent of Ne-A. This work confirms that Q-gases of well-defined composition were an important noble gas component in the early solar system an are now found in various classes of meteorites, such as carbonaceous chondrites, ureilites, and ordinary chondrites. Ne-Q may have played a role in the formation of noble gas reservoirs in terrestrial planets.

  5. Noble gases released by vacuum crushing of EETA 79001 glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    An EETA 79001 glass sample was crushed in a vacuum to observe the gases released. About 15 pct of the total gas concentrations were a mixture of a small amount of SPB-type gas with larger proportions of another air-like component. Less than 5 pct of the SPB gas was released by crushing, while 36-40 pct of the EETV (indigenous) gas was crush-released. The results are consistent with a siting of the EETV component in 10-100 micron vesicles seen in the glass. It is suggested that the SPB component is either in vesicles less than 6 microns in diameter or is primarily sited elsewhere.

  6. Excitation mechanism in a hollow cathode He-Kr ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hazama, J.; Arai, T.; Goto, M.; Iijima, T.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed laser operation in the afterglow of a positive column He-Kr discharge on the 469.4 nm (6s{sup 4}P{sub 5/2} {yields} 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}) transition of Kr(II) was observed for the first time by Dana and Laure`s. It appears that the upper level of Kr(II) laser line is populated by the second kind collisions between He 2{sup 3}S metastable atoms and ground state Kr ions. CW oscillations on Kr(II) transitions have been obtained in a hollow cathode discharge. In this work, we have estimated the excitation mechanism for the upper state of 469.4 nm laser line from the measurements of the decay of endlight intensity in the hollow cathode He-Kr discharge.

  7. Cosmogenic 10Be and Noble Gases in Diogenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Lindner, L.; van der Borg, K.; Loeken, Th.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: A recent reevaluation of the 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar cosmic-ray exposure ages of eight non-Antarctic and three Antarctic diogenite falls led to a consistent set of exposure ages with a major cluster at 22 Ma and a possible second cluster around 40 Ma [1]. These clusters coincide with two major peaks in the exposure-age distributions of the genetically related eucrites and howardites [2], but the scarcity of young diogenites is remarkable [3]. An update of the exposure-age distribution for diogenites, including nine separate Antarctic falls, will be presented and possible differences in exposure history between Antarctic and non-Antarctic diogenites will be discussed. The exposure-age distributions of eucrites and howardites are still controversial [2,3], as conventional shielding corrections--on the basis of the 22Ne/21Ne ratio--cannot be applied. Therefore, the use of other shielding parameters, such as 10Be or 26Al, is considered. We examined the relation between 10Be contents and 22Ne/21Ne ratios in diogenites to obtain more insight into the shielding sensitivity of the 10Be production rate. Experimental: In addition to the existing database of more than 30 noble gas analyses [4] we carried out noble gas measurements on 5 non-Antarctic diogenites and on 12 Antarctic samples from 9 separate falls. On the same samples 10Be was measured by AMS. The experimental uncertainties in the 10Be values are 2-3%, those in the 22Ne/21Ne ratios are 0.5-1.0%. Results and Conclusions: The major exposure-age cluster at 22 Ma contains about 45% of the diogenite falls, indicating a major impact on its parent body. However, the presence of several younger diogenites suggests that this collisional event was not necessarily as destructive as previously suggested [3]. Four diogenites show exposure ages around 40 Ma, indicating a second major impact on the HED parent body. Although some Antarctic diogenites have unique mineralogical features [5,6], we didn't find any evidence

  8. Noble gases in gas shales : Implications for gas retention and circulating fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sudeshna; Jones, Adrian; Verchovsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Gas shales from three cores of Haynesville-Bossier formation have been analysed simultaneously for carbon, nitrogen and noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) to constrain their source compositions and identify signatures associated with high gas retention. Ten samples from varying depths of 11785 to 12223 feet from each core, retrieved from their centres, have been combusted from 200-1200°C in incremental steps of 100°C, using 5 - 10 mg of each sample. Typically, Xe is released at 200°C and is largely adsorbed, observed in two of the three cores. The third core lacked any measureable Xe. High 40Ar/36Ar ratio up to 8000, is associated with peak release of nitrogen with distinctive isotopic signature, related to breakdown of clay minerals at 500°C. He and Ne are also mostly released at the same temperature step and predominantly hosted in the pore spaces of the organic matter associated with the clay. He may be produced from the uranium related to the organic matter. The enrichment factors of noble gases defined as (iX/36Ar)sample/(iX/36Ar)air where iX denotes any noble gas isotope, show Ne and Xe enrichment observed commonly in sedimentary rocks including shales (Podosek et al., 1980; Bernatowicz et al., 1984). This can be related to interaction of the shales with circulating fluids and diffusive separation of gases (Torgersen and Kennedy, 1999), implying the possibility of loss of gases from these shales. Interaction with circulating fluids (e.g. crustal fluids) have been further confirmed using 20Ne/N2, 36Ar/N2 and 4He/N2 ratios. Deviations of measured 4He/40Ar* (where 40Ar* represents radiogenic 40Ar after correcting for contribution from atmospheric Ar) from expected values has been used to monitor gas loss by degassing. Bernatowicz, T., Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Kramer, F.E., 1984. The Atmospheric Inventory of Xenon and Noble Gases in Shales: The Plastic Bag Experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research 89, 4597-4611. Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Ozima, M., 1980

  9. Incorporation of Solar Noble Gases from a Nebula-Derived Atmosphere During Magma Ocean Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Cassen, P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Porcelli, D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of solar noble gases in the deep interior of the Earth is inferred from the Ne isotopic compositions of MORB (Mid-ocean Ridge Basalts) and OIB (Oceanic Island Basalt); Ar data may also consistent with a solar component in the deep mantle. Models of the transport and distribution of noble gases in the earth's mantle allow for the presence of solar Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne ratios and permit the calculation of lower mantle noble gas concentrations. These mantle data and models also indicate that the Earth suffered early (0.7 to 2 x 10(exp 8) yr) and large (greater than 99 percent) losses of noble gases from the interior, a result previously concluded for atmospheric Xe. We have pursued the suggestion that solar noble gases were incorporated in the forming Earth from a massive, nebula-derived atmosphere which promoted large-scale melting, so that gases from this atmosphere dissolved in the magma ocean and were mixed downward. Models of a primitive atmosphere captured from the solar nebula and supported by accretion luminosity indicate that pressures at the Earth's surface were adequate (and largely more than the required 100 Atm) to dissolve sufficient gases. We have calculated the coupled evolution of the magma ocean and the overlying atmosphere under conditions corresponding to the cessation (or severe attenuation) of the sustaining accretion luminosity, prior to the complete removal of the solar nebula. Such a condition was likely to obtain, for instance, when most of the unaccumulated mass resided in large bodies which were only sporadically accreted. The luminosity supporting the atmosphere is then that provided by the cooling Earth, consideration of which sets a lower limit to the time required to solidify the mantle and terminate the incorporation of atmospheric gases within it. In our initial calculations, we have fixed the nebula temperature at To = 300K, a value likely to be appropriate for nebular temperatures at lAU in the early planet-building epoch

  10. Noble Gas Systematics in MORBs and OIBs and Reconstitution of the Time-Evolution of Mantle Composition for Heavy Noble Gases: the Role of Subduction of Atmospheric Noble Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, C.; Moreira, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Chondrites are considered as the building rocks of the Earth as they represent remnants of the protoplanetary accretion stage. Among all chondritic classes, heavy noble gases are mainly concentrated in phase Q [1] hence it represents a likely primordial composition of the Earth. This is supported by the observation of [2] who detected this peculiar composition in CO2 well gases thanks to Kr isotopes. As CO2 well gases are supposed to derive from the same reservoir as MORBs [3], this signature should be observed in MORBs and OIBs as well. In this perspective, we will present analyses performed by mass spectrometry of MORBs and OIBs samples for all noble gases. Preliminary results are quite promising as the same trend seems to appear into OIB and MORB data for Kr isotopes. However, our analyses show that this primordial composition isn't displayed for stable isotopes of Xe as already observed by [4-5] and remains a trace in the mantle signature, which appears at first sight atmospheric. We thus propose that subduction of atmospheric noble gases has gradually covered this meteoritic imprint. In order to test this scenario, we will present a modelling performed for Ar and Xe in three distinct reservoirs: mantle, atmosphere and continental crust. The mantle is considered as homogenized by convection and similar to the MORB reservoir. Its degasing is divided in two stages: a massive early degasing followed by a decreasing one describing the cooling of the Earth's interior. Extraction of parent elements from the mantle to the continental crust is also taken into account as well as distillation of atmospheric Xe needed to explain the missing Xe paradox and the present Xe isotopic signature of the atmosphere. Finally, subduction of noble gases is assimilated to simple incorporation into the mantle of elementally fractionated air, enriched in heavy noble gases as supported by [6]. Thus, we show that starting with a chondritic composition, the present mantle composition can

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials, and organisms.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Boyd M

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is fundamentally limited by the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This review describes the principles and magnetic resonance applications of laser-polarized noble gases. The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across numerous disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, NMR sensitivity enhancement via polarization transfer, and low-field NMR and MRI. PMID:12036331

  13. Terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soils.

    PubMed

    Ozima, M; Seki, K; Terada, N; Miura, Y N; Podosek, F A; Shinagawa, H

    2005-08-01

    The nitrogen in lunar soils is correlated to the surface and therefore clearly implanted from outside. The straightforward interpretation is that the nitrogen is implanted by the solar wind, but this explanation has difficulties accounting for both the abundance of nitrogen and a variation of the order of 30 per cent in the 15N/14N ratio. Here we propose that most of the nitrogen and some of the other volatile elements in lunar soils may actually have come from the Earth's atmosphere rather than the solar wind. We infer that this hypothesis is quantitatively reasonable if the escape of atmospheric gases, and implantation into lunar soil grains, occurred at a time when the Earth had essentially no geomagnetic field. Thus, evidence preserved in lunar soils might be useful in constraining when the geomagnetic field first appeared. This hypothesis could be tested by examination of lunar farside soils, which should lack the terrestrial component.

  14. Numerical investigation of enhanced femtosecond supercontinuum via a weak seed in noble gases.

    PubMed

    Shanor, C; Ensley, T; Hagan, D J; Van Stryland, E W; Wright, E M; Kolesik, M

    2016-06-27

    Numerical simulations are employed to elucidate the physics underlying the enhanced femtosecond supercontinuum generation previously observed during optical filamentation in noble gases and in the presence of a weak seed pulse. Simulations based on the metastable electronic state approach are shown not only to capture the qualitative features of the experiment, but also reveal the relation of the observed enhancement to recent developments in the area of sub-cycle engineering of filaments. PMID:27410662

  15. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from the LEW88516 shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A glass separate from the LEW88516 shergottite was analyzed by step-wise combustion for N and noble gases to determine whether it contained trapped gas similar in composition to the martian atmosphere-like component previously observed in lithology C of EETA79001. Excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 were in fact observed in this glass, although the amounts of these excesses less than or = to 20% of those seen in the latter meteorite, and are comparable to the amounts seen in whole-rock analyses of LEW88516. The isotopic composition of N in LEW88516 does not show an enrichment in delta N-15 commensurate with the amount of isotopically-heavy N expected from the noble gases excesses. One must posit some extreme assumptions about the nature of the N components present in LEW88516 in order to allow the presence of the trapped nitrogen component. Alternatively, the N has somehow been decoupled from the noble gases, and was either never present of has been lost.

  16. The case for a Martian origin of the shergottites - Nitrogen and noble gases in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases have been measured in samples of a glass inclusion and its surrounding basaltic matrix in an Antarctic shergottite meteorite (EETA 79001). The nitrogen component was found trapped in the glass, but not the matrix, having a value of delta 15-N = +190 per mil. Ratios between abundances of Ar-40 and N-14, N-15 and N-14 in the glass are consistent with the dilution of a Martian atmospheric component. The trapped noble gases in the glass are similar to elemental and isotopic compositions measured in Mars atmosphere by the Viking lander, and are in general agreement with previous measurements. It is suggested that a sample of Martian atmosphere has been caught in the EETA 79001 glass, and that other shergottite, nakhilite, and chassignite meteorites with similar features probably also originated on Mars. A table is presented which lists the abundances of nitrogen and the noble gases found in the non-glassy matrix and in the EETA 79001 glass.

  17. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  18. Radiative precursors driven by converging blast waves in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Bland, S. N.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blesener, K.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A.; Hoyt, C.; Potter, W.; and others

    2014-03-15

    A detailed study of the radiative precursor that develops ahead of converging blast waves in gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The experiment is capable of magnetically driving 20 km s{sup −1} blast waves through gases of densities of the order 10{sup −5} g cm{sup −3} (see Burdiak et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 9(1), 52–62 (2013)] for a thorough description). Data were collected for Ne, Ar, and Xe gas-fills. The geometry of the setup allows a determination of the plasma parameters both in the precursor and across the shock, along a nominally uniform line of sight that is perpendicular to the propagation of the shock waves. Radiation from the shock was able to excite NeI, ArII, and XeII/XeIII precursor spectral features. It is shown that the combination of interferometry and optical spectroscopy data is inconsistent with upstream plasmas being in LTE. Specifically, electron density gradients do not correspond to any apparent temperature change in the emission spectra. Experimental data are compared to 1D radiation hydrodynamics HELIOS-CR simulations and to PrismSPECT atomic physics calculations to assist in a physical interpretation of the observations. We show that upstream plasma is likely in the process of being radiatively heated and that the emission from a small percentage of ionised atoms within a cool background plasma dominates the emission spectra. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE and COBRA pulsed-power facilities at Imperial College London and Cornell University, respectively.

  19. The solubility of noble gases in crude oil at 25-100°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Specht, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe was measured in two typical crude oils at temperatures of 25–100°C. The oil samples were obtained from the Elk Hills oil field located in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The experimental procedure consisted of placing a known amount of gas with a known volume of crude oil in a stainless steel hydrothermal pressure vessel. The vessel was housed inside an oven and the entire unit rotates providing continuous mixing. The amount of gas dissolved in oil at a measured temperature and partial pressure of gas was used to calculate the solubility constants for these gases. Results show that the solubility of He and Ne in both oils is approximately the same; solubility then increases with atomic mass, with the solubility of Xe at 25°C being two orders of magnitude higher than that of He. The gas solubilities are somewhat higher in the lower density (higher API gravity) oil. The solubility of Ar is approximately constant in the range of temperatures of this study. The solubilities of He and Ne increase, but those of Kr and Xe decrease with increasing temperatures. Solubilities of noble gases in crude oil are significantly higher than their solubilities in water. For example, the solubilities of He and Xe at 25°C in the light oil of this study are, respectively, 3 and 24 times higher than their solubilities in pure water, and they are 15 and 300 times higher than in a brine with a salinity of 350,000 mg/l dissolved solids. These large and variable differences in the solubilities of noble gases in oil and water indicate that, in sedimentary basins with oil, these gases must be partitioned between oil, water and natural gas before they are used to deduce the origin and residence time of these fluids.

  20. Noble gases and halogens in altered MORB and implications for seawater recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavrit, D.; Burgess, R.; Weston, B.; Abbott, L.; Ballentine, C. J.; Teagle, D. A.; Droop, G.; Pawley, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggested that the heavy noble gases and halogens are significantly recycled into the mantle through the subduction zone, since a seawater derived signature has been recorded in the mantle [1,2]. However, the processes of how these elements preserve the unique elemental composition of seawater from the ocean floor to the subduction process are unknown. Thus, we propose here a study of altered oceanic crust to identify the respective major host phases of both noble gases and halogens in pre-subducted material. Ten altered MORB coming from the ODP sites 504, 896 and 1256 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (5.9 and 15 Ma) are being studied. Noble gas isotopes and abundances have been determined using an upgraded VG5400 mass spectrometer. Halogens (Cl, Br, I) are obtained by measuring noble gases on irradiated samples using a MS1 mass spectrometer. The analyses were all obtained from in vacuo crushing release of whole rock samples. Preliminary results show Ne to Xe isotopically identical to air. 3He/4He ratios vary from 4.5±0.5 (R/RA) to MORB-like values. Heavy noble gas elemental ratios for 9 samples fall within a narrow range, with 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios varying respectively by 10% and 30%. They range from values close to seawater (± air) to values enriched in Xe and Kr going towards mantle values [1]. One altered MORB shows 130Xe/36Kr and 84Kr/36Ar ratios respectively 2 and 5 times greater than the average of the other samples, which suggests the contribution of a sediment component in this sample. Halogen data obtained on 4 samples are in accordance with noble gases results. The Br/Cl molar ratio is constant (1.97±0.15.10-3) while the I/Cl molar ratio varies significantly by up to one order of magnitude, ranging from 1.2±0.3.10-6 to 9.9±0.8.10-6. These results are in favour of a mixing between a seawater endmember and a sediment pore fluid endmember, which remains to be identified. The measurements will be extended to gabbros and sediments

  1. Noble gases as tracers of the origin and evolution of the Martian atmosphere and the degassing history of the planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    1988-01-01

    Noble gas analysis of Martian samples can provide answers to a number of crucial questions. Some of the most obvious benefits will be in Martian chronology, using techniques that have been applied to lunar samples. However, these are by no means the only relevant noble gas studies possible. Since Mars has a substantial atmosphere, noble gases can be used to study the origin and evolution of that atmosphere, including the degassing history of the planet. This type of study can provide constraints on: (1) the total noble gas inventory of the planet, (2) the number of noble gas reservoirs existing, and (3) the exchange of gases between these reservoirs. How to achieve these goals are examined.

  2. Noble gases in presolar diamonds I: Three distinct components and their implications for diamond origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    High-purity separates of presolar diamond were prepared from 14 primitive chondrites from 7 compositional groups. Their noble gases were measured using stepped pyrolysis. Three distinct noble gas components are present in diamonds, HL, P3, and P6, each of which is found to consist of five noble gases. P3, released between 200 C and 900 C, has a 'planetary' elemental abundance pattern and roughly 'normal' isotopic ratios. HL, consisting of isotopically anomalous Xe-HL and Kr-H, Ar with high Ar-38/Ar-36, and most of the gas making up Ne-A2 and He-A, is released between 1100 C and 1600 C. HL has 'planetary' elemental ratios, except that it has much more He and Ne than other known 'planetary' components. HL gases are carried in the bulk diamonds, not in some trace phase. P6 has a slightly higher median release temperature than HL and is not cleanly separated from HL by stepped pyrolysis. Our data suggest that P6 has roughly 'normal' isotopic compositions and 'planetary' elemental ratios. Both P3 and P6 seem to be isotopically distinct from P1, the dominant 'planetary' noble-gas component in primitive chondrites. Release characteristics suggest that HL and P6 are sited in different carriers within the diamond fractions, while P3 may be sited near the surfaces of the diamonds. We find no evidence of separability of Xe-H and Xe-L or other isotopic variations in the HL component. However, because approximately 10(exp 10) diamonds are required to measure a Xe composition, a lack of isotopic variability does not constrain diamonds to come from a single source. In fact, the high abundance of diamonds in primitive chondrites and the presence of at least three distinct noble-gas components strongly suggest that diamonds originated in many sources. Relative abundances of noble-gas components in diamonds correlate with degree of thermal processing, indicating that all meteorites sampled essentially the same mixture of diamonds. That mixture was probably inherited from the Sun

  3. Identifying Glacial Meltwater Sources in Greenland using Noble Gases as Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Castro, M. C.; Aciego, S.; Hall, C. M.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.; Das, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Greenland Ice Sheet. It explores the information noble gases can provide in glacial environments with respect to GMW sources, relative source contributions, water residence times, and spatial locations where this GMW originates within the ice sheet. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the dynamics of the ice sheets, critical for the major role they play in climate change. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and the temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. GMW samples were collected at five locations in southern Greenland. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples do deviate to a certain extent from ASW, with concentrations displaying two distinct patterns. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). Ne and Xe analysis suggests that about half of the samples equilibrated at a temperature of ~0°C and altitudes between 1 km and 2 km, with a few samples pointing to lower equilibration altitudes and temperatures between 2°C and 5°C. Two samples suggest an origin as melted ice and lack of equilibration with surface conditions. He concentrations vary between 1.1 and 7 times that of ASW and suggest glacial meltwater ages between 100 and 3600 yrs, a result that is consistent with a preliminary 3H analysis. References: Warrier, R. B., Castro, M. C., and Hall, C

  4. Production of noble gases near the surface of Europa and the prospects for in situ chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Masarik, J.; Kollár, D.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2005-03-01

    The age of the surface of Europa is probably tens of Myr or less, but is poorly constrained. Two different geochronology schemes could potentially be applied to near-surface samples to provide far more precise ages. First, the surface salts apparently contain enough potassium to make potassium-argon dating feasible. Second, the bombardment of the surface with both galactic cosmic rays and protons trapped within the jovian magnetosphere will cause nuclear reactions that can lead to measurable buildups of cosmogenic noble gases, which can be used to determine both cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion, deposition, or mixing rates for surface modification. The major differences between Europa's salt-rich ice and the rocks (meteorites, lunar samples and terrestrial rocks) in which cosmogenic noble gases are normally measured are that the abundance of target elements for nuclear reactions creating neon and argon are lower (because of the high water content), but neutron-capture reactions, particularly 35Cl( n, γ) 36Cl( β-) 36Ar, are enhanced because of the thermalizing effects of the water. As well as presenting calculations of noble gas production near the surface of Europa, we also show that the measurements required to determine ages are within reach of technology in the near future, if an instrument can be landed on the surface of Europa.

  5. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  6. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  7. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  8. Equilibrium and Transport Properties of Gas Mixtures at Low Density: Eleven Polyatomic Gases and Five Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, J.; Kestin, J.; Mason, E. A.; Uribe, F. J.

    1990-09-01

    This paper uses results from statistical-mechanical theory, applied through a combination of an extended principle of corresponding states with some knowledge of intermolecular potentials, to the calculation of the transport and equilibrium properties of gas mixtures at low density. The gases involved are: N2, O2, NO, CO, CO2, N2O, CH4, CF4, SF6, C2H4, C2H6, and He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe. The properties included are: second virial coefficient, viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion, but not thermal conductivity. The calculations are internally, thermodynamically consistent and the resulting algorithms, which are fully programmable, operate in an entirely predictive mode by means of validated combination rules. This paper is a sequel to one on the five noble gases and all their possible mixtures and a second on the above eleven polyatomic gases. The paper contains ten tables (mainly intended for the checking of computer codes) and 201 graphs of deviation and comparison plots. An additional 98 tables have been deposited with the Physics Auxiliary Publication Service (PAPS) of the AIP. The algorithms presented in this paper, together with those mentioned above, make it possible to program calculations for a wide range of low-density equilibrium and transport properties of 16 gases and of all possible multicomponent mixtures formed with them, for a total of 65,535 systems. For each system, the program would cover the full range of compositions.

  9. Solar noble gases revealed by closed system stepped etching of a metal separate from Fayetteville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murer, CH.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1993-01-01

    Solar He, Ne, and Ar in a Fe-Ni separate from the chondrite Fayetteville are analyzed by closed system stepped oxidation. We report here data of the first 15 steps comprising 55 percent of the total solar gases. He-4/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ar-36 are quite constant at values about 20 percent below those of present day solar wind (SWC). In this, Fe-Ni differs from lunar ilmenites where He-4/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ar-36 in the first steps are several times below SWC. Thus, metal retains SW-noble gases even better than ilmenite, almost without element fractionation. Nevertheless, the isotopic composition of SW-He, -Ne, and -Ar in the first steps of the metal sample are identical to those found in a recently irradiated lunar ilmenite, indicating that ilmenites and chondritic metal both contain isotopically unfractionated SW noble gases. A preliminary analysis of a smaller Fayetteville metal separate shows Ne from solar energetic particles (SEP-Ne) with Ne-20/Ne-22 less than or equal to 11.5.

  10. Evaluation of theoretical cross sections for electron scattering from noble gases for plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Leanne; Zatsarinny, O.; Bartschat, K.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Alves, L. L.; Biagi, S.

    2013-09-01

    Can state-of-the-art theory now provide complete sets of cross sections for electron scattering from noble gases suitable for use in Boltzmann calculations of swarm parameters and to the accuracy required for plasma modeling? The answer is a qualified ``yes'' for He, Ne, and Ar, but ``not yet'' for Kr and Xe. Purely theoretical cross section sets for electron scattering from these species are presently available on the LXCat website in the BRAY database for He (calculated using the convergent close-coupling technique, formulated in momentum space) and in the BSR database for the other rare gases (obtained with a convergent B-spline R-matrix with pseudo-states method, formulated in coordinated space). Although significant differences occasionally appear in some of the cross sections between experiment and theory, the calculated ionization rate coefficients as a function of reduced electric field strength, E/N, for He, Ne and Ar agree with experiment to within a few percent for the three lighter noble gases. This work is supported, in part, by the United States National Science Foundation.

  11. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 2: Surface origins highlighted by noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-09-01

    neon release pattern similar to our defined planetary/FSW dominated regolithic group (CM-rich samples PRA 04401, SCO 06040). Our petrological investigations found no evidence for CM fragments within EET 87513, though a single clast was reported previously (Buchanan et al., 1993). Aside from the Ne release pattern, the remaining noble gas data show more similarity with SW/FSW components. The remaining four howardites CRE 01400, EET 87518, EET 99400, and SAN 03472 and are dominated by cosmogenic noble gases, and show no evidence for a regolithic origin. Our data suggest that a CM-composition is likely present in all samples to some degree, but that this can be overprinted by SW components or cosmogenic components obtained in situ on the vestan surface or during transit to Earth respectively. The presence of CM material is an important parameter for understanding the evolution of Vesta’s surface. While we have uncovered three further regolithic howardites (∼13 regolithic total, of ∼41 analysed), further noble gas analysis of HED meteorites is needed to not only determine regolithic origins, but to better characterise the abundance of carbonaceous chondrite material and its effect on the noble gas signatures of such samples.

  12. Are protonated ions efficient sequestration agents for noble gases in the primitive nebula context?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; ozgurel, Ozge; Bacchus-montabonel, Marie-christine; Mousis, Olivier; Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Institut Lumière Matière, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

    2016-10-01

    One explanation for the deficiencies of argon, krypton and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. In fact, this mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors, namely H2O, CO and N2, present in the primitive nebula, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases.Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, Xe, with all the protonated ions issued from H2O, CO and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, i.e. H3O+, HCO+, HOC+, N2H+, has been studied with quantum simulation methods, quantum dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes; the rate coefficients of their radiative associations have been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 100 °K and found ranging from 10-18 to 10-16 cm3s-1, which can be considered as high for this type of reactions and are comparable to the rates obtained with H3+.Consequently, we can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions, which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as efficient sequestration agents for all three noble gases, in addition to the original H3+ captor.

  13. Implications of isotopic signatures of noble gases for the origin and evolution of terrestrial atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, A. S. P.

    1987-01-01

    It is contented that the initial quantities of noble gases present in planetesimals were controlled by the sizes and masses of the planets, and fit with a model of successive accretion. The successive accretion model proposed for the origin of terrestrial planets is based upon: (1) the sequence of zones of condensation of solar nebula, (2) the condensation sequence of minerals, iron and nickel in different P-T regimes of the solar nebula, and (3) the sequence in the nucleation of iron cores of the terrestrial planets.

  14. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  15. Selling candles in a post-Edison world: phasing with noble gases bound within engineered sites.

    PubMed

    Quillin, Michael L; Matthews, Brian W

    2003-11-01

    The utility of noble gases for phase determination has been limited by the lack of naturally occurring binding sites in proteins. Wild-type T4 lysozyme contains one such binding site. By mutating large hydrophobic residues to alanine, additional noble-gas binding sites have been successfully introduced into this protein. Using data from xenon derivatives of the wild type, two single mutants and the corresponding double mutant, experimental phases for T4 lysozyme have been determined using standard multiple isomorphous replacement (MIR) techniques. These phases, which were obtained from room-temperature data collected on a rotating-anode source, are comparable in quality with phases calculated using selenomethionine-based multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) methods on frozen crystals at a synchrotron. In addition, this method of introducing noble-gas binding sites near specific residues should provide useful information for determining the register of amino acids within electron-density maps and the positions of molecules within the unit cell. PMID:14573947

  16. Highly concentrated nebular noble gases in porous nanocarbon separates from the Saratov (L4) meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2013-11-20

    The majority of heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) in primitive meteorites are stored in a poorly understood phase called Q. Although Q is thought to be carbonaceous, the full identity of the phase has remained elusive for almost four decades. In order to better characterize phase Q and, in turn, the early solar nebula, we separated carbon-rich fractions from the Saratov (L4) meteorite. We chose this meteorite because Q is most resistant in thermal alteration among carbonaceous noble gas carriers in meteorites and we hoped that, in this highly metamorphosed meteorite, Q would be present but not diamond: these two phases are very difficult to separate from each other. One of the fractions, AJ, has the highest {sup 132}Xe concentration of 2.1 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} STP g{sup –1}, exceeding any Q-rich fractions that have yet been analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the fraction AJ and a less Q-rich fraction AI indicate that they both are primarily porous carbon that consists of domains with short-range graphene orders, with variable packing in three dimensions, but no long-range graphitic order. The relative abundance of Xe and C atoms (6:10{sup 9}) in the separates indicates that individual noble gas atoms are associated with only a minor component of the porous carbon, possibly one or more specific arrangements of the nanoparticulate graphene.

  17. On the distribution of noble gases in Allende - A differential oxidation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Pepin, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation makes use of an oxidizing technique which is based on methods widely employed in light stable isotope analysis. The utilization of closed-system differential combustion in molecular oxygen in an ultra-high vacuum system on-line with a spectrometer makes it possible to conduct precise abundance and isotopic measurements of all gases released in progressive oxidation and/or thermal outgassing of the host phases. Attention is given to the noble gases mobilized in progressive oxidation of a carbon-rich acid residue and a fine-grained matrix separate. The progressive oxidation of the Allende matrix is discussed. Release occurred over three distinct intervals, characterized by oxidation below 600 C, gas mobilization between 630 and 750 C, and high-temperature diffusive release.

  18. Gravity effects on a gliding arc in four noble gases: from normal to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potočňáková, L.; Šperka, J.; Zikán, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Beckers, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2015-04-01

    A gliding arc in four noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) has been studied under previously unexplored conditions of varying artificial gravity, from normal 1 g gravity up to 18 g hypergravity. Significant differences, mainly the visual thickness of the plasma channel, its maximum elongation and general sensitivity to hypergravity conditions, were observed between the discharges in individual gases, resulting from their different atomic weights and related quantities, such as heat conductivity or ionisation potential. Generally, an increase of the artificial gravity level leads to a faster plasma channel movement thanks to stronger buoyant force and a decrease of maximum height reached by the channel due to more intense losses of heat and reactive species. In relation to this, an increase in current and a decrease in absorbed power was observed.

  19. Noble Gases in Two Fragments of Different Lithologies from the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Zolensky, M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite, whose preat-mospheric body was the asteroid 2008 TC3, fell on October 7, 2008 in the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan [e.g., 1, 2]. Numer-ous fragments have been recovered during several expeditions organized from December 2008 [2]. The meteorite was classified as an anomalous polymict ureilite with several different kinds of chondritic fragments [e.g., 3-5]. Noble gas studies performed on several fragments from the meteorite showed cosmic-ray expo-sure ages of about 20 My [e.g., 6-8], although slightly shorter ages were also reported in [9, 10]. Concentrations of trapped heavy noble gases are variable among the fragments of different lithologies [9, 10]. We report noble gas data on two samples from the #1 and #47 fragments [2], which were the same as those re-ported by Ott et al. [9]. Experimental Procedure: Weights of bulk samples #1 and #47 used in this work were 16.1 mg and 17.6 mg, respectively. Noble gases were extracted by stepwise heating at the tempera-tures of 800, 1200 and 1800°C for #1 and 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1400, 1600 and 1800°C for #47. Concentrations and isotopic ra-tios of noble gases were measured with a modified-VG5400/MS-III at the Geochemical Research Center, University of Tokyo. Results and Discussion: Cosmogenic He and Ne are domi-nant in both #1 and #47, but trapped Ar, Kr and Xe concentra-tions are much higher in #47 than in #1, showing that noble gas compositions in #47 are similar to those of ureilites. 3He/21Ne and 22Ne/21Ne of cosmogenic He and Ne are 4.8 and 1.12 for #1 and 3.6 and 1.06 for #47, respectively, both of which plot on a Bern line [11]. This indicates negligible loss of cosmogenic 3He from #1 in our sample, unlike the low 3He/21Ne of 3.1 for #1 by Ott et al. [9]. Concentrations of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne (10-8 cc/g) are 30 and 6.3 for #1 and 32 and 9.0 for #47, respectively, which are higher than those in [9] and give cosmic-ray exposure ages of ca. 20 My depending on assumed production

  20. Noble gases in high-pressure silicate liquids: A computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Bertrand; Sator, Nicolas

    2012-03-01

    The test particle method has been used in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the solubility of noble gases in silicate melts of various composition. At low pressure the calculated solubility constants (the inverse of the Henry's constant) are in excellent agreement with data of the literature. In particular it is found that the solubility constant (i) decreases when the size of the noble gas increases, (ii) decreases from silica-rich to silica-poor composition of the melt, and (iii) is positively correlated with the temperature. Moreover it is shown that the solubility is governed primarily by the entropic cost of cavity formation for inserting the noble gas into the melt and secondarily by its solvation energy. Interestingly, the behaviour of these two contributions differ from each other as the entropic cost of cavity formation increases strongly with the size of the solute atom to insert whereas large atoms are better solvated than small ones. Considerations of thermodynamics show that the weight fraction of a noble gas in a silicate melt coexisting with its parent fluid at T and P is equal to ngγm/nmγg, where ng and nm are the densities of the two coexisting phases (gas and melt, respectively) and where the solubility parameters γm and γg express the probability of inserting the noble gas atom in the melt and in the parent fluid, respectively. The γm and γg decrease drastically when the pressure is increased and the noble gas solubility at high pressure is the result of a balance between these two quantities. Here again, the pressure behaviour of γm and γg is dominated by the pressure dependence of the entropic cost of cavity formation, the energetic contribution being of minor importance but not negligible at high pressures. With all melt composition investigated here (silica, rhyolite, MORB and olivine), the calculated solubility curves exhibit the same qualitative behaviour with pressure; a steep rise culminating in a broad

  1. High power external cavity laser diode arrays for the generation of hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasche, Gregory Paul

    Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging promises to be a useful medical diagnostic tool due to its ability to image airways and brain function. A current limitation to widespread use is the time needed to generate gas quantities large enough for clinical patient imaging. Here I investigate line-narrowing of laser diode arrays in order to optimize the generation of hyperpolarized noble gases. Hyperpolarized noble gases are nuclear spin-½ isotopes that are polarized externally to have a large excess population of metastable spin up nuclei. When inhaled and imaged, they provide a novel tool for scientific studies and medical diagnosis in the human body. The gases are generated through a spin-exchange process via the spin-conserving hyperfine interaction of noble gas nuclei and optically pumped alkali metals. The net amount of polarized gas is limited by the optical power which is absorbed by the alkali metals as this is the first stage in the spin-exchange process. Laser diode arrays are typically used because they have a high available power for relatively low cost. Unfortunately, they are optically inefficient due to the factor of twenty larger inherent linewidth relative to the pressure broadened absorption linewidth of the alkali metal. In order to increase the efficiency of the system, I have designed and built an external cavity around the laser diode array consisting of a diffraction grating which acts as a wavelength dependent mirror tuned to the alkali metal rubidium absorption frequency. This causes the laser to operate solely at the desired wavelength, reducing the linewidth. External cavities have long been used for single element laser diodes. I extend this technique to laser diode arrays by imaging the diodes onto the grating using a set of imaging lenses forming individual cavities. I discuss the limitations on the power and linewidth achievable due to the optics of the cavity, as well as limitations caused by non-uniform heating effects

  2. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record recycling of noble gases by deep subduction of the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; He, Huai-Yu; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of noble gases from crustal rocks into the mantle is indicated not only by oceanic basalts and mantle xenoliths, but also by ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. It is intriguing whether noble gases in continental crust were recycled into the mantle by deep subduction of the continental crust to mantle depths. Here we firstly report the He, Ne and Ar isotopic compositions of pyroxene from postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen, China. The results show that the pyroxene separates from the mafic rocks have low 3He/4He ratios of 0.002 to 1.8 Ra and air-like Ne isotope compositions. Furthermore, the pyroxene exhibits low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 393.6 to 1599.8, close to those of the air. In combination with whole-rock geochemistry it is found that pyroxene 3He/4He ratios are correlated with whole-rock (La/Yb)N and Sr/Y ratios, εNd(t) values and MgO contents. These observations demonstrate the mass transfer from the deeply subducted continental crust to the overlying mantle wedge, recording the source mixing between the crust-derived melt and the mantle peridotite in the continental subduction zone. A direct addition of the crustal He via crust-derived melt to the mantle leads to the extremely low 3He/4He ratios in the orogenic lithospheric mantle, and the dissolved atmospheric Ar and Ne in the subducted supracrustal rocks results in the air-like Ar and Ne isotope ratios. Therefore, the noble gas isotopic signatures of supracrustal rocks were carried into the mantle by the continental deep subduction to subarc depths and then transferred to the postcollisional mafic igneous rocks via the melt-peridotite reaction at the slab-mantle interface in a continental subduction channel. Our finding firstly establishes the slab-mantle interaction model for recycling of supracrustal noble gases in the continental subduction zone.

  3. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  4. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, R Stewart; Dalton, D Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-06-30

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000-15,000 K and pressures of 15-52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn. PMID:26080401

  5. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, R. Stewart; Dalton, D. Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000–15,000 K and pressures of 15–52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn. PMID:26080401

  6. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, R Stewart; Dalton, D Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-06-30

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000-15,000 K and pressures of 15-52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn.

  7. The composition of lunar noble gases traped 2.5 AE and 3.5 AE ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eugster, O.

    1986-01-01

    The times when the soils 74001 and 73261 were exposed on the lunar surface were determined by the U-235 - Xe-136 dating method. The isotopic composition of the trapped noble gases in these two soils is compared with that of the surface correlated noble gases in the young soils 12001 and in the present day solar wind. The surface correlated trapped gases are a mixture of implanted solar wind particles and retrapped lunar atmospheric gases. The observed changes are interpreted as a result of decreasing outgassing of radiogenic Ar-40 and perhaps He-4 and of fissiogenic Xe from the lunar crust. The old soils probably also contain surface correlated Kr-80 and Kr-82 produced by secondary cosmic ray neutron capture of adsorbed or retrapped bromine. To some extent the isotopic composition of the trapped gases in old lunar soil may also have been altered due to diffusion loss from material of low retentivity.

  8. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  9. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. III - Sorption of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon on carbon - Elemental fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe was studied in carbon black, acridine carbon, and diamond in an attempt to understand the origin of trapped noble gases in meteorites. The results support a model in which gases are physically adsorbed on interior surfaces formed by a pore labyrinth within amorphous carbons. The data show that: (1) the adsorption/desorption times are controlled by choke points that restrict the movement of noble gas atoms within the pore labyrinth, and (2) the physical adsorption controls the temperature behavior and elemental fractionation patterns.

  10. The solubility of noble gases in water and in NaCl brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Kennedy, B. M.

    1983-03-01

    A direct-sampling, mass-spectrometric technique has been used to measure simultaneously the solubilities of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in fresh water and NaCl brine (0 to 5.2 molar) from 0° to 65 °C, and at 1 atm total pressure of moist air. The argon solubility in the most concentrated brines is 4 to 7 times less than in fresh water at 65 °C and 0°C, respectively. The salt effect is parameterized using the Setschenow equation. ln [ β io(T) /β i(T) = MK iM(T) where M is NaCl moiarity, βio( T) and βi( T) the Bunsen solubility coefficients for gas i in fresh water and brine, and KiM( T) the empirical salting coefficient. Values of KiM( T) are calculated using volumetric concentration units for noble gas and NaCl content and are independent of NaCl molarity. Below about 40°C, temperature coefficients of all KiM are negative. The value of KHeM is a minimum at 40°C. KArM decreases from about 0.40 at 0°C to 0.28 at 65 °C. The absolute magnitudes of the differences in salting coefficients (relative to KArM) decrease from 0° to 65°C. Over the range of conditions studied, all noble gases are salted out, and KHeM ≲ KNeM < KArM < KKrM < KXeM. From the solubility data, we calculated Δ overlineG0tr, Δ overlineS0tr, Δ overlineH0tr and Δ overlineCOp,tr for the transfer of noble gases from fresh water to 1 molar NaCl solutions. At low temperatures Δ overlineS0tr, is positive, but decreases and becomes negative at temperatures ranging from about 25°C for He to 45°C for Xe. At low temperatures, the dissolved electrolyte apparently interferes with the formation of a cage of solvent molecules about the noble gas atom. At higher temperatures, the local environment of the gas atom in the brine appears to be slightly more ordered than in pure water, possibly reflecting the longer effective range of the ionic fields at higher temperature. The measured solubilities can be used to model noble gas partitioning in two-phase geothermal systems at low temperatures. The data

  11. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  12. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distributionmore » functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.« less

  13. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-08

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns-long) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules at a pressure range of 1 - 1000 bar and temperature of 310 Kelvin. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremor at hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor; while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar patterns of the order parameter for both DOPC acyl chains, which is opposite to the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the ‘critical volume’ hypothesis of anesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1 - 100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremor at the atomic scale. The non-immobilizer neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing monolayers undulations rate, which indicates enhanced diffusivity, rather than atom size, as the key factor.

  14. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-03-21

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules in the pressure range of 1-1000 bar and at a temperature of 310 K. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anaesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremors in hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of the gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor, while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar order parameter patterns for both DOPC acyl chains, which are opposite of the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the 'critical volume' hypothesis of anaesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1-100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremors at the atomic scale. The non-immobiliser neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing the monolayer undulation rate, which indicates that enhanced diffusivity rather than atomic size is the key factor. PMID:25612767

  15. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  16. Simultaneous analysis of noble gases, sulfur hexafluoride, and other dissolved gases in water.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, Matthias S; Hofer, Markus; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-08-01

    We developed an analytical method for the simultaneous measurement of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, SF6, N2, and O2 concentrations in a single water sample. The gases are extracted from the water using a head space technique and are transferred into a vacuum system for purification and separation into different fractions using a series of cold traps. Helium is analyzed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The remaining gas species are analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for analysis of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, and O2 and an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for SF6 analysis. Standard errors of the gas concentrations are approximately 8% for He and 2-5% for the remaining gas species. The method can be extended to also measure concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Tests of the method in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) showed that dissolved gas concentrations agree with measurements from other methods and concentrations of air saturated water. In a small artificial pond, we observed systematic gas supersaturations, which seem to be linked to adsorption of solar irradiation in the pond and to water circulation through a gravel bed. PMID:23826704

  17. The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 1: Two trends uncovered using noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ott, U.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Herrmann, S.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.; Peng, Z. X.; Quinn, J. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report noble gas data (helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe)), nominal gas retention ages (K-Ar, U-Th-He) and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages for the ten howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, LEW 85313, MET 00423, MET 96500, PCA 02066, PRA 04401, QUE 94200, QUE 97002, and SCO 06040, in research to better understand the regolith of the HED parent body - Vesta - through a combined petrological, compositional and noble gas study. Our main aim is to determine which howardites are truly regolithic - as defined by the presence of solar noble gas components (e.g. solar wind (SW), fractionated solar wind (FSW)) and/or by the presence of planetary components (e.g. Q, HL) associated with foreign clasts of carbonaceous chondrite material within the breccias. Of our ten howardites, four (LEW 85313, MET 00423, PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) show evidence for a regolithic origin, with noble gas ratios indicating the presence of trapped components. Howardites PRA 04401 and SCO 06040 contain significant amounts of CM type carbonaceous chondrite material, and these samples are dominated by a planetary component similar to that observed in CM meteorites Murchison and Maribo. Overall, we find evidence for two regolithic groups with different release trends: (1) SW/FSW component dominated howardites (LEW 85313 and MET 00423), where SW/FSW is dominant at low temperature releases, and less pronounced at higher temperatures; (2) Planetary component dominated howardites (PRA 04401 and SCO 06040) that also contain SW/FSW - the planetary component is associated with incorporated carbonaceous chondrite material, and is dominant at the mid-temperature release. The remaining six howardites EET 83376, EET 99408, MET 96500, PCA 02066, QUE 94200, and QUE 97002, are dominated by cosmogenic noble gases, and are not considered regolithic. Previous work by Warren et al. (2009) suggested that high siderophile element contents (specifically nickel (Ni) > 300 μg/g) were a regolith

  18. Testing the noble gas paleothermometer with a yearlong study of groundwater noble gases in an instrumented monitoring well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Chris M.; Castro, M. Clara; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Sun, Tie

    2012-04-01

    We report the results of a yearlong noble gas study conducted in 2008-2009 together with continuous physical and chemical measurements collected in a monitoring well in an aquifer in southern Michigan. Conditions near the water table are correlated with noble gas concentrations, corresponding noble gas temperatures (NGTs), and precipitation events. This yearlong study is the first noble gas field test that has employed natural recharge and in situ monitored conditions, with minimal disturbance of the unsaturated zone. This detailed study demonstrates that significant changes in conditions near the water table can occur over a year that can greatly affect NGTs. Results show that precipitation events are detected within hours at the water table, but a lag in pressure response argues for a long time constant for gas transport within the unsaturated zone. There is strong evidence for the depletion of oxygen near the water table, which affects the noble gas air-saturated water component. During reducing conditions there is evidence for significant noble gas degassing. Rain from the passage of Hurricane Ike caused a significant shift in stable isotope ratios and injection of a large quantity of excess air and likely led to a much more oxygen-rich environment in the soil gas. Although individual models can account for NGTs over portions of the record, no single NGT model can account for all features observed over the entire study. It is likely that the NGT temperature proxy must be viewed as an average of recharge conditions over several years.

  19. Trapping of xenon in ice - Implications for the origin of the earth's noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Anders, E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the earth's atmosphere contains Ne, Ar, and Kr in about C1,2-chondrite proportions, Xe is depleted about 20-fold. To test the suggestion that the 'missing' Xe is trapped in Antarctic ice, distribution coefficients for Xe in artifically formed frost at -20 to -60 C were measured, using Xe-127 tracer. The values are 0.098 + or - 0.004 cc STP/g atm for trapping and less than 5 cc STP/g atm for trapping plus adsorption. If these results are representative of natural ice, then the Antarctic ice cap contains less than 1 percent of the atmospheric Xe inventory, or not greater than about 0.001 the amount needed for a C1,2-chondrite pattern. Two possibilities remain for the 'missing' Xe, both on the premise that the earth's noble gases, along with other volatiles, came from chondritic material: (1) xenon is preferentially retained in the mantle and lower crust, due to the strong affinity of Xe for clean silicate surfaces and amorphous carbon; and (2) the source material of the earth's volatiles had high, relatively unfractionated, Ar/Xe and Kr/Xe ratios, like the non-carbonaceous noble gas carriers in C3O and E-chondrites.

  20. Trapping of Noble Gases by Radiative Association with H3 + in the Protosolar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Ellinger, Y.; Mousis, O.

    2016-04-01

    The heavy noble gas deficiencies observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in comets have been proposed to be related to a sequestration process by {{{H}}}3+ in the gas phase at the early protosolar nebula. Chemical thermodynamics and astrophysics modeling are favorable to this hypothesis, as presented in preceding papers. However, there is a point still to be raised, i.e., that no dynamical study of the efficiency of the collisional processes had been performed so far. Here, we show that, apart from the expected exception of Ne, the rate constants obtained, i.e., 0.7 × 10-18, 0.5 × 10-16, and 10-16 (cm3 s-1) for Ar, Kr, and Xe, respectively, are reasonably high for such processes, particularly in the case of Kr and Xe. The temperature dependence is also considered, showing a similar behavior for all noble gases with a peak efficiency in the range 50-60 K. Globally, we can conclude that the scenario of sequestration by {{{H}}}3+ is definitively comforted by the results of our quantum dynamical treatment. This process may also be responsible of the Ar impoverishment just measured in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft.

  1. Impact of artificial recharge on dissolved noble gases in groundwater in California.

    PubMed

    Cey, Bradley D; Hudson, G Bryant; Moran, Jean E; Scanlon, Bridget R

    2008-02-15

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in groundwater can provide valuable information on recharge temperatures and enable 3H-3He age-dating with the use of physically based interpretive models. This study presents a large (905 samples) data set of dissolved noble gas concentrations from drinking water supply wells throughout California, representing a range of physiographic, climatic, and water management conditions. Three common interpretive models (unfractionated air, UA; partial re-equilibration, PR; and closed system equilibrium, CE) produce systematically different recharge temperatures or ages; however, the ability of the different models to fit measured data within measurement uncertainty indicates that goodness-of-fit is not a robust indicator for model appropriateness. Therefore caution is necessary when interpreting model results. Samples from multiple locations contained significantly higher Ne and excess air concentrations than reported in the literature, with maximum excess air tending toward 0.05 cm3 STP g(-1) (deltaNe approximately 400%). Artificial recharge is the most plausible cause of the high excess air concentrations. The ability of artificial recharge to dissolve greater amounts of atmospheric gases has important implications for oxidation-reduction dependent chemical reactions. Measured gas concentration ratios suggest that diffusive degassing may have occurred. Understanding the physical processes controlling gas dissolution during groundwater recharge is critical for optimal management of artificial recharge and for predicting changes in water quality that can occur following artificial recharge.

  2. Estimating the recharge properties of the deep ocean using noble gases and helium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, Brice; Jenkins, William J.; Moriarty, Roisin; Brown, Peter; Jullion, Loic; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Torres Valdes, Sinhue; Hoppema, Mario; Ballentine, Chris; Meredith, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of noble gases and helium isotopes in the dense shelf waters of Antarctica reflects the boundary conditions near the ocean surface: air-sea exchange, sea ice formation, and subsurface ice melt. We use a nonlinear least squares solution to determine the value of the recharge temperature and salinity, as well as the excess air injection and glacial meltwater content throughout the water column and in the precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water. The noble gas-derived recharge temperature and salinity in the Weddell Gyre are -1.95°C and 34.95 psu near 5500 m; these cold, salty recharge values are a result of surface cooling as well as brine rejection during sea ice formation in Antarctic polynyas. In comparison, the global value for deep water recharge temperature is -0.44°C at 5500 m, which is 1.5°C warmer than the southern hemisphere deep water recharge temperature, reflecting a distinct contribution from the north Atlantic. The contrast between northern and southern hemisphere recharge properties highlights the impact of sea ice formation on setting the gas properties in southern sourced deep water. Below 1000 m, glacial meltwater averages 3.5‰ by volume and represents greater than 50% of the excess neon and argon found in the water column. These results indicate glacial melt has a nonnegligible impact on the atmospheric gas content of Antarctic Bottom Water.

  3. Trapping of Noble Gases by Radiative Association with H3 + in the Protosolar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, F.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Ellinger, Y.; Mousis, O.

    2016-04-01

    The heavy noble gas deficiencies observed in Titan’s atmosphere and in comets have been proposed to be related to a sequestration process by {{{H}}}3+ in the gas phase at the early protosolar nebula. Chemical thermodynamics and astrophysics modeling are favorable to this hypothesis, as presented in preceding papers. However, there is a point still to be raised, i.e., that no dynamical study of the efficiency of the collisional processes had been performed so far. Here, we show that, apart from the expected exception of Ne, the rate constants obtained, i.e., 0.7 × 10‑18, 0.5 × 10‑16, and 10‑16 (cm3 s‑1) for Ar, Kr, and Xe, respectively, are reasonably high for such processes, particularly in the case of Kr and Xe. The temperature dependence is also considered, showing a similar behavior for all noble gases with a peak efficiency in the range 50–60 K. Globally, we can conclude that the scenario of sequestration by {{{H}}}3+ is definitively comforted by the results of our quantum dynamical treatment. This process may also be responsible of the Ar impoverishment just measured in comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft.

  4. Crustal noble gases in deep brines as natural tracers of vertical transport processes in the Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Castro, Maria Clara; Hall, Chris M.

    2009-06-01

    Noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios are presented for 38 deep (˜0.5-3.6 km) brine samples in the Michigan Basin. These brine samples clearly show the presence of an important crustal component of 4He, 21Ne, 40Ar, and 136Xe. Both 40Arcrust and 136Xecrust display the presence of a strong vertical gradient along the sedimentary strata of the basin. We show that the in situ production for these two gases within the sedimentary strata is insufficient to account for the observed crustal component in the Michigan brines. These point to the presence of a deep, external source for crustal noble gases, likely the Precambrian crystalline basement beneath the Michigan Basin. Furthermore, observed elemental ratios of crustal noble gases (4He/40Ar, 21Ne/40Ar, 4He/136Xe, and 21Ne/136Xe) in these brines vary over several orders of magnitude with respect to the expected production ratios from the crystalline basement rocks and display a systematic pattern within the basin. Specifically, samples above the Salina Group (shallow formations) are relatively enriched in 4Hecrust and 21Necrust with respect to 40Arcrust and 136Xecrust, as opposed to those below the massive Salina evaporite layer (deeper formations) which exhibit complementary patterns. We show that such a general trend is best explained by a Rayleigh-type elemental fractionation model involving upward transport of crustal noble gases and associated elemental fractionation processes, controlled by both diffusion- and solubility-related mechanisms. As previously indicated by the mantle and atmospheric noble gas signatures in these same Michigan brine samples, release of deep crustal noble gases into the basin is yet another independent indicator pointing to the occurrence of a past thermal event in the basin. We suggest that recent reactivation of the ancient midcontinent rift system underneath the Michigan Basin is likely responsible for the upward transport of heat and loss of the atmospheric noble gas component

  5. Nonequilibrium laser plasma of noble gases: Prospects for amplification and guiding of the microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Bin, Hou; Popov, A. M.; Smetanin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    We developed the analytical model of relaxation of a low-density plasma channel produced in noble gases (Xe, Ar) by a femtosecond KrF laser pulse and investigated the temporal evolution of its dielectric permittivity. It was demonstrated that the strong nonequilibrium of the photoelectron energy spectrum and the presence of Ramsauer minimum in transport scattering cross section make such a plasma channel an optically denser medium in comparison with non-ionized gas in the microwave frequency band and consequently such a channel appears to be a waveguide. In xenon this nonequilibrium state of a plasma leads to both transportation and amplification of the microwave signal during the relaxation of the photoelectron energy spectrum. It was also shown that a circular metal waveguide partially filled with such a nonequilibrium Xe plasma provides efficient amplification of the sub-THz microwave signal.

  6. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. I - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Trapping experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Zadnik, M. G.; Anders, E.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of Xe-127 at 5 x 10 to the -7th atm onto carbon black, pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride, and pyrolyzed acridine at 100-1000 C for 5 min-240 h is measured experimentally by gamma spectrometry. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The tightly bound Xe remaining in the samples after 4000 min pumping at temperatures above 100 C is found to comprise two components: a low-temperature component attributed to physisorption within an atomic-scale labyrinth of micropores, and a high-temperature component due to volume diffusion. The implications for the trapping of noble gases near grain surfaces of amorphous carbon in meteorites are considered.

  7. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt

    1989-01-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  8. Observation of threshold effects in positron scattering from the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; McEachran, R P; Machacek, J R; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J

    2010-08-13

    Channel coupling is a phenomenon that has been investigated for many scattering processes, and is responsible for the formation of cusps or steps in the cross sections for open scattering channels at, or near, the onset of a new scattering channel. It has long been speculated that the opening of the positronium formation channel may lead to the formation of such cusp features in the elastic positron scattering cross section. In this work, elastic scattering of positrons has been measured in the region of the positronium formation threshold for the noble gases He-Xe. Cusplike behavior is observed and, while the features which are observed appear broad, they represent a magnitude of between 4 and 15% of the total elastic cross section. No evidence is found of any other features in this region, at least within the uncertainty of the present data, discounting the possibility of scattering resonances. PMID:20868040

  9. Cross-Section Measurements for Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons from Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmullin, Sean; Kidd, Mary; Tornow, Werner; Howell, Calvin; Brown, Michael; Henning, Reyco

    2010-11-01

    Neutron backgrounds are a significant concern to experiments that attempt to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. Recoil nuclei produced by neutron elastic scattering can mimic WIMP signatures. There is insufficient experimental data available for the scattering cross-sections of neutrons with noble gases (Ne, Ar, Xe), which are candidate target materials for such experiments. Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from neon of natural abundance was investigated at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at neutron energies relevant to (α,n) and low-energy spallation neutron backgrounds in these experiments. The differential cross-section was measured using a time-of-flight technique at neutron energies of 8.0 and 5.0 MeV. Details of the experimental technique and current status of measurements will be presented.

  10. Determination of Two-Photon Absorption Cross-Section of Noble Gases for Calibration of Laser Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M. I. de la; Perez, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.

    2008-10-22

    The objective of our work is to apply two-photon polarization spectroscopy as a new calibration method for the determination of two-photon excitation cross-sections of noble gases, like Xe and Kr, which are commonly used for calibrations of MP-LIF techniques in other laboratories.

  11. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Release of noble gases and nitrogen from grain-surface sites in lunar ilmenite by closed-system oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1986-01-01

    Noble gases and nitrogen were extracted from a 100 to 150 microns ilmenite separate from lunar soil 71501 by closed system stepped heating in approx. 10 torr O2 at 300 C, 400 C, 500 C, 600 C and 630 C, followed by stepped pyrolysis at ten temperatures between 680 C and approx. 1500 C. The five oxidation steps together liberated approx. 65% of the total He-4, 45% of the Ne-20, 23% of the N-14 and Ar-36, 12% of the Kr-84 and 8% of the Xe-132 in the sample; Ne-20/Ar-36 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios agree with the solar wind composition experiment, and Kr-84/Ar-36 and Xe-132/Ar-36 are within approx. 10% of Cameron's estimates for the sun and solar wind. The remaining gases, released above 630 C by pyrolysis, are strongly fractionated with respect to the SWC-Cameron solar wind elemental composition. Large concentrations of fractionated noble gases in grain interiors, their virtual absence in the relatively unfractionated surface gas reservoir, and the high N/noble gas ratio all imply that most of the solar wind noble gases initially implanted in grain surfaces are eventually lost by diffusion. Loss limits can be estimated by considering two given scenarios. It is concluded tat approx. 70 to 97% or more of the Ar implanted in 71501 ilmenite grains has diffusively escaped.

  13. Atmospheric noble gases as tracers of biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katherine L.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Kipfer, Rolf; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (NGs) were used to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer impacted by a crude oil spill, near Bemidji, MN. Concentrations of 3,4He, 20,22Ne, 36,40Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined for gas- and aqueous-phase samples collected from the vadose and saturated zones, respectively. Systematic elemental fractionation of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with respect to air was observed in both of these hydrogeologic zones. Within the vadose zone, relative ratios of Ne and Ar to Kr and Xe revealed distinct process-related trends when compared to corresponding ratios for air. The degree of NG deviation from atmospheric concentrations generally increased with greater atomic mass (i.e., ΔXe > ΔKr > ΔAr > ΔNe), indicating that Kr and Xe are the most sensitive NG tracers in the vadose zone. Reactive transport modeling of the gas data confirms that elemental fractionation can be explained by mass-dependent variations in diffusive fluxes of NGs opposite to a total pressure gradient established between different biogeochemical process zones. Depletion of atmospheric NGs was also observed within a methanogenic zone of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation located below the water table. Solubility normalized NG abundances followed the order Xe > Kr > Ar > Ne, which is indicative of dissolved NG partitioning into the gas phase in response to bubble formation and possibly ebullition. Observed elemental NG ratios of Ne/Kr, Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe and a modeling analysis provide strong evidence that CH4 generation below the water table caused gas exsolution and possibly ebullition and carbon transfer from groundwater to the vadose zone. These results suggest that noble gases provide sensitive tracers in biologically active unconfined aquifers and can assist in identifying carbon cycling and transfer within the vadose zone, the capillary fringe, and below the water table.

  14. Noble gases in presolar diamonds II: Component abundances reflect thermal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the isotopic compositions derived in Huss and Lewis, 1994a, abundances of the P3, HL, and P6 noble-gas components were determined for 15 diamonds separates from primitive chondrites of 8 chondrite classes. Within a meteorite class, the relative abundances of these components correlate with the petrologic subtype of the host meteorite, indicating that metamorphism is primarily responsible for the variations. Relative abundances of P3, HL, and P6 among diamond samples can be understood in terms of thermal processing of a single mixture of diamonds like those now found in CI and CM2 chondrites. With relatively gentle heating, primitive diamonds first lose their low-temperature P3 gases and a 'labile' fraction of the HL component. Mass loss associated with release of these components produces an increase in the HL and P6 content of the remaining diamond relative to unprocessed diamond. Higher temperatures initiate destruction of the main HL carrier, while the HL content of the surviving diamonds remains essentially constant. At the same time, the P6 carrier begins to preferentially lose light noble gases. Meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures greater than or = 650 C have lost essentially all of their presolar diamond through chemical reactions with surrounding minerals. The P3 abundance seems to be a function only of the maximum temperature experienced by the diamonds and thus is independent of the nature of the surrounding environment. If all classes inherited the same mixture of primitive diamonds, then P3 abundances would tie together the metamorphic scales in different meteorite classes. However, if the P3 abundance indicates a higher temperature than do other thermometers applicable to the host meteorite, then the P3 abundance may contain information about heating prior to accretion. Diamonds in the least metamorphosed EH, CV, and CO chondrites seem to carry a record of pre-accretionary thermal processing.

  15. Are the C delta light nitrogen and noble gases located in the same carrier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Shukolyukov, Yuri A.

    1993-01-01

    Light nitrogen and the HL family noble gas components of C(sub delta) appear to be separable by high resolution pyrolysis experiments. Thus C(sub delta) is not a homogeneous material and probably consists of debris of many stars. The question of whether the N and Xe(HL) actually reside in different carriers continues to be addressed. It is well known that C(sub delta) which was identified as nanometer sized diamonds contains isotopically anamalous elements, in particular noble gases including Xe(HL) and its family and light nitrogen (delta(N-15) down to -350 percent). Before the true nature of C(sub delta) was recognized, it was easy to suppose that the Xe(HL) and light nitrogen were located in the same carrier. However, recognition that light nitrogen in diamond from different samples varies by greater than a factor of six compared to Xe(HL) fluctuations of ca. 20 percent makes such an assumption questionable. On the basis of simple arithmetic logic, the Xe and nitrogen cannot be absolutely co-located. The average diamond grain consists of only about 1000-2000 atoms of carbon; one grain among a few x 10(exp 6) contains an atom of Xe(HL) while 5-30 atoms of light nitrogen are the typical number which need to be in every diamond grain to account for observed concentrations. If some grains are devoid of N, the others have to have a higher N concentration. Even if we were able to analyze an individual grain of the diamond for noble gases and nitrogen, we would be faced with the monumental task of locating the one amongst 10(exp 6) identical grains containing the Xe atom to examine its nitrogen content. The problem can be simplified to some extent if instead of Xe, He which is 10(exp 4) times more abundant is assumed to be a member of the HL family. Attempts to fractionate the separate carriers might be attempted using He and N as guiding indicators but even experiments of this nature are for the future. Faced with apparently insoluble problems, we have returned to an

  16. Testing The Noble Gas Paleothermometer With A Year-long Study Of Groundwater Noble Gases In An Instrumented Monitoring Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. C.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Sun, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a year-long noble gas study conducted in 2008 and early 2009, together with a wealth of continuous physical and chemical measurements collected in an instrumented monitoring well in the unconfined Glacial Drift aquifer in southern Michigan. Physical and chemical parameters at or near the water table are correlated with noble gas concentrations, corresponding noble gas temperatures (NGTs) and precipitation events. This year-long study is the first noble gas field test that has employed natural recharge, in situ monitored conditions, with minimal disturbance of the unsaturated zone. This study is unprecedented and demonstrates that there can be significant changes in physical and chemical conditions near the water table, over the space of a year, that can have profound effects on noble gas concentrations and hence, NGTs. The year-long record of conditions in the monitoring well show broad seasonal variations in pH, salinity, water temperature and water table depth. Results show that although precipitation events are detected within hours at the water table, there are significant pressure differences that persist for days at the water table, which argues for a very long time constant for gas transport within the unsaturated zone. There is strong evidence for the depletion of oxygen near the water table, which affects the noble gas air saturated water (ASW) component. When strongly reducing conditions prevail, as indicated by ORP, there is evidence for significant noble gas degassing. A major recharge event during the passage of the remnants of Hurricane Ike in the late summer 2008 caused a significant shift in H and O isotope ratios and it injected a large quantity of excess air into the groundwater. Hurricane Ike also appears to have caused a long-term change in the soil gas composition in the unsaturated zone, likely leading to a much more oxygen rich environment. Although individual competing NGT models can account for noble gas

  17. The viscosity cross section for electron scattering from the heavy noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Allan; McEachran, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The viscosity cross section is defined in terms of the elastic differential cross section σ (θ) as σv =∫0 π (1 -cos2 θ) sin θ σ (θ) dθ and appears in the Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution function in velocity space. If this distribution function is expanded in Legendre polynomials, the viscosity cross section arises from the third term. Normally, only the first two terms in this expansion are retained in the solution of the Boltzmann equation. We have recently published results for the elastic and momentum transfer cross section for electron scattering from the heavy noble gases (argon, krypton and xenon) using our complex, relativistic optical potential method which includes the effect of excitation and ionization channels on the elastic cross sections. We also provided simple analytic fits to these cross sections to aid in plasma modelling calculations. We will present similar results for the viscosity cross sections for these gases including fits using similar analytic functions. By including the third term in the expansion of the Boltzmann equation which depends on this cross section, an evaluation of the accuracy of the two-term solution can be made.

  18. Relation between Longitudinal and Transverse Diffusion Coefficients of Alkali Ions in Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. J.

    1997-10-01

    The relation between longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients of ions drifting in a neutral gas under the influence of an electric field has been investigated for alkali ions in noble gases. The 125 combinations of ions of Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the neutral gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe at gas temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 K were included in this study. Plots of the ratio of the longitudinal-to-transverse diffusion coefficients versus E/N exhibited similar variation in the values of the ratios. As the value of E/N increased from zero, the value of the ratio increased rapidly from one for all ion/neutral/temperature combinations. The ratio peaked at values mostly in the range of 1.2 to 2.5 at E/N values in the range of 20 to 120 Td. As E/N increased further, the ratio values decreased, at an ever lower rate, to values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2. These results suggest the existence of a single function relating the longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients.

  19. CANCELLED Molecular dynamics simulations of noble gases in liquidwater: Solvati on structure, self-diffusion, and kinetic isotopeeffect

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-05-25

    Despite their great importance in low-temperaturegeochemistry, self-diffusion coefficients of noble gas isotopes in liquidwater (D) have been measured only for the major isotopes of helium, neon,krypton and xenon. Data on the self-diffusion coefficients of minor noblegas isotopes are essentially non-existent and so typically are estimatedby a kinetic theory model in which D varies as the inverse square root ofthe isotopic mass (m): D proportional to m-0.5. To examine the validityof the kinetic theory model, we performed molecular dynamics (MD)simulations of the diffusion of noble gases in ambient liquid water withan accurate set of noble gas-water interaction potentials. Our simulationresults agree with available experimental data on the solvation structureand self-diffusion coefficients of the major noble gas isotopes in liquidwater and reveal for the first time that the isotopic mass-dependence ofall noble gas self-diffusion coefficients has the power-law form Dproportional to m-beta with 0noble gasisotopes caused by diffusion in ambient liquid water.

  20. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. III. Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jongmann; Anders, Edward

    1982-06-01

    To simulate trapping of noble gases by meteorites, we reacted 15 FeCr or FeCrNi alloy samples with CO, H 2O or H 2S at 350-720 K, in the presence of noble gases. The reaction products, including (Fe,Cr) 2O 3, FeCr 2S 4, FeS, C, and Fe 3C, were analyzed by mass spectrometry, usually after chemical separation by selective solvents. Three carbon samples were prepared by catalytic decomposition of CO or by dehydration of carbohydrates with H 2SO 4. The spinel and carbon samples were similar to those of earlier studies (Yang et al., 1982 and Yang and Anders, 1982), with only minor effects attributable to the presence of Ni. All samples sorted substantial amounts of noble gases, with distribution coefficients of 10 -1-10 -2 cm 3 STP/g atm for Xe. On the basis of release temperature three gas components were distinguished: a generally dominant physisorbed component (20-80% of total), and two more strongly bound, chemisorbed and trapped components. Judging from the elemental pattern, the adsorbed components were acquired at the highest noble gas partial pressure encountered by the sample - atmosphere or synthesis vessel. Sulfides, particularly daubréelite, showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite: the high- T component was larger, 30-70% of the total; Ne/Xe ratios were higher, by up to 10 2, possibly due to preferential diffusion of Ne during synthesis. In one synthesis, at relatively high P, the gases were sorbed with only minimal elemental fractionation, presumably by occlusion. Most of the features of primordial noble gases can be explained in terms of the data and concepts presented in the three papers of this series. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr, Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks, and planets resembles the adsorption pattern on the solids studied: carbon, spinels, Sulfides, etc. The variation in Ne/Ar ratio may be explained by preferential diffusion of Ne. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be

  1. Effects of Aqueous Alteration on Primordial Noble Gases in Tagish Lake (C2-ungr.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, M. E. I.; Busemann, H.; Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Herd, C. D. K.; Maden, C.; Wieler, R.

    2016-08-01

    Variations in degree of aqueous alteration between different Tagish Lake samples do not result in significant noble gas loss. However, small variations in aqueous alteration significantly alter the behavior of some noble gas carriers such as SiC.

  2. A paleotemperature record derived from dissolved noble gases in groundwater of the Aquia Aquifer (Maryland, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Stute, Martin; Clark, Jordan F.; Reuter, Robert F.; Schlosser, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Low 14C activities in groundwater of the confined part of the Aquia aquifer in southeastern Maryland suggest that most of this water infiltrated at least 30,000 years ago. However, radiocarbon contents of the dissolved inorganic carbon seem to be affected by isotopic exchange, possibly with secondary calcite deposits in the formation, leading to overestimated 14C ages. Whereas the geochemistry of the Aquia aquifer complicates the application of the widely used 14C dating method, the accumulation of radiogenic He seems to provide a viable alternative for establishing a chronology. The quasi-linear increase of He concentrations with flow distance observed in the Aquia aquifer can be explained entirely by accumulation of in situ produced radiogenic He. U and Th concentrations in Aquia sand were measured in order to determine the accumulation rate of 4He with sufficient confidence to establish a He time scale. Concentrations of dissolved atmospheric noble gases were used to derive mean annual ground temperatures at the time of infiltration. These noble gas temperatures (NGTs) clearly show the presence of water that infiltrated under much cooler conditions than at present. NGTs are correlated with chloride concentrations, corroborating the hypothesis that chloride variations in this aquifer constitute a climate signal. In contrast, the stable isotope ratios δ 180 and δD do not provide a clear record of past climatic changes in the Aquia aquifer and the correlation between NGTs and stable isotope ratios is weak. The NGT record suggests that mean annual temperatures in this midlatitude coastal site during the last glacial maximum (LGM) were (9.0 ± 0.6) °C colder than during the Holocene. This difference is slightly lower than estimates derived from pollen data for this region, but considerably larger than the rather uniform cooling of about 5°C indicated by noble gas studies in more southern locations of North America. The larger cooling is ascribed to the influence

  3. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-01

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future. PMID:19500647

  4. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-01

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future.

  5. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  6. Isotopic Composition of Trapped and Cosmogenic Noble Gases in Several Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic abundances of the noble gases were measured in the following Martian meteorites: two shock glass inclusions from EET79001, shock vein glass from Shergotty and Y793605, and whole rock samples of ALH84001 and QUE94201. These glass samples, when combined with literature data on a separate single glass inclusion from EET79001 and a glass vein from Zagami, permit examination of the isotopic composition of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe trapped from the Martian atmosphere in greater detail. The isotopic composition of Martian Ne, if actually present in these glasses, remains poorly defined. The Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of Martian atmospheric Ar may be much less than the ratio measured by Viking and possibly as low as approx. 1900. The atmospheric Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio is less than or equal to 4.0. Martian atmospheric Kr appears to be enriched in lighter isotopes by approx. 0.4%/amu compared to both solar wind Kr and to the Martian composition previously reported. The Martian atmospheric Ar-36/Xe-132 and Kr-84/Xe-132 Xe elemental ratios are higher than those reported by Viking by factors of approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5, respectively. Cosmogenic gases indicate space exposure ages of 13.9 +/- 1 Myr for ALH84001 and 2.7 +/- 0.6 Myr for QUE94201. Small amounts of Ne-21 produced by energetic solar protons may be present in QUE94201, but are not present in ALH84001 or Y793605. The space exposure age for Y793605 is 4.9 +/- 0.6 Myr and appears to be distinctly older than the ages for basaltic shergottites.

  7. Optimized Mie potentials for phase equilibria: Application to noble gases and their mixtures with n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mick, Jason R.; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad; Jackman, Brock; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey J.

    2015-09-01

    Transferrable force fields, based on n-6 Mie potentials, are presented for noble gases. By tuning the repulsive exponent, ni, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce experimental saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures with high accuracy, from the normal boiling point to the critical point. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves for pure fluids are calculated using histogram reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. For all noble gases, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures are reproduced to within 1% and 4% of experiment, respectively. Radial distribution functions, extracted from NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, are in similarly excellent agreement with experimental data. The transferability of the optimized force fields is assessed through calculations of binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria. These mixtures include argon + krypton, krypton + xenon, methane + krypton, methane + xenon, krypton + ethane, and xenon + ethane. For all mixtures, excellent agreement with experiment is achieved without the introduction of any binary interaction parameters or multi-body interactions.

  8. Optimized Mie potentials for phase equilibria: Application to noble gases and their mixtures with n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Mick, Jason R; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad; Jackman, Brock; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-21

    Transferrable force fields, based on n-6 Mie potentials, are presented for noble gases. By tuning the repulsive exponent, ni, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce experimental saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures with high accuracy, from the normal boiling point to the critical point. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves for pure fluids are calculated using histogram reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. For all noble gases, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures are reproduced to within 1% and 4% of experiment, respectively. Radial distribution functions, extracted from NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, are in similarly excellent agreement with experimental data. The transferability of the optimized force fields is assessed through calculations of binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria. These mixtures include argon + krypton, krypton + xenon, methane + krypton, methane + xenon, krypton + ethane, and xenon + ethane. For all mixtures, excellent agreement with experiment is achieved without the introduction of any binary interaction parameters or multi-body interactions. PMID:26395716

  9. Optimized Mie potentials for phase equilibria: Application to noble gases and their mixtures with n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Mick, Jason R; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad; Jackman, Brock; Rushaidat, Kamel; Schwiebert, Loren; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-21

    Transferrable force fields, based on n-6 Mie potentials, are presented for noble gases. By tuning the repulsive exponent, ni, it is possible to simultaneously reproduce experimental saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures with high accuracy, from the normal boiling point to the critical point. Vapor-liquid coexistence curves for pure fluids are calculated using histogram reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. For all noble gases, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures are reproduced to within 1% and 4% of experiment, respectively. Radial distribution functions, extracted from NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, are in similarly excellent agreement with experimental data. The transferability of the optimized force fields is assessed through calculations of binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria. These mixtures include argon + krypton, krypton + xenon, methane + krypton, methane + xenon, krypton + ethane, and xenon + ethane. For all mixtures, excellent agreement with experiment is achieved without the introduction of any binary interaction parameters or multi-body interactions.

  10. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almloef, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases helium through xenon were determined using large flexible one-particle basis sets in conjunction with high-level treatments of electron correlation. The electron correlation methods include single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory (CCSD), an extension of CCSD that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), and second order perturbation theory (MP2). The computed alpha and gamma values are estimated to be accurate to within a few percent. Agreement with experimental data for the static hyperpolarizability gamma is good for neon and xenon, but for argon and krypton the differences are larger than the combined theoretical and experimental uncertainties. Based on our calculations, we suggest that the experimental value of gamma for argon is too low; adjusting this value would bring the experimental value of gamma for krypton into better agreement with our computed result. The MP2 values for the polarizabilities of neon, argon, krypton and zenon are in reasonabe agreement with the CCSD and CCSD(T) values, suggesting that this less expensive method may be useful in studies of polarizabilities for larger systems.

  11. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: Application to noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Río, Fernando del Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J. Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  12. Nonlinear optical responses of multiply ionized noble gases: Dispersion and spin multiplicity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar, M.; Romanov, D. A.; Levis, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply ionized ions are computed using ab initio multiconfigurational self-consistent field cubic response theory. For each species, the calculations are performed at wavelengths ranging from the static regime to those about 100 nm above the first multiphoton resonance. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients progressively decrease as the electrons are removed from the system, in qualitative agreement with phenomenological calculations. In higher ionization states, the resulting nonlinear refractive index becomes less dispersive as a function of wavelength. At each ionization stage, the sign of the optical response depends on the number of electrons in the system and, if multiple state symmetries are possible, on the spin of the particular quantum state. Thus, for N e3 + and N e4 + , the hyperpolarizability coefficients in the low-spin states (P2u, and S1g, respectively) are positive, while in the high-spin states (S4u, and P3g) they are negative. However, for doubly, triply, and quadruply charged Ar and Kr these coefficients do not undergo a sign change.

  13. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: application to noble gases.

    PubMed

    del Río, Fernando; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  14. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Santa Lucia (2008) (L6) Chondrite, a Recent Fall: Composition, Noble Gases, Nitrogen and Cosmic Ray Exposure Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.; Varela, Maria Eugenia; Joron, Jean Louis

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Lucia (2008)—one the most recent Argentine meteorite fall, fell in San Juan province, Argentina, on 23 January 2008. Several masses (total ~6 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour. Chemical data [olivine (Fa24.4) and low-Ca pyroxene (En77.8 Fs20.7 Wo1.6)] indicate that Santa Luica (2008) is a member of the low iron L chondrite group, corresponding to the equilibrated petrologic type 6. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature Committee (NomCom) of the Meteoritical Society (Meteoritic Bulletin, no. 97). We report about the chemical composition of the major mineral phases, its bulk trace element abundance, its noble gas and nitrogen data. The cosmic ray exposure age based on cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar around 20 Ma is comparable to one peak of L chondrites. The radiogenic K-Ar age of 2.96 Ga, while the young U, Th-He are of 1.2 Ga indicates that Santa Lucia (2008) lost radiogenic 4He more recently. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c and absence of solar wind noble gases are consistent with irradiation in a large body. Heavy noble gases (Ar/Kr/Xe) indicated trapped gases similar to ordinary chondrites. Krypton and neon indicates irradiation in large body, implying large pre-atmospheric meteoroid.

  16. Measuring radioactive noble gases by absorption in polycarbonates and other organics: From radon indoors to nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S.

    2013-07-01

    The report summarizes recent research and practice of using materials with high absorption ability to noble gases to measure their radioactive isotopes. Most of the studies employ bisphenol-A based polycarbonates, because of their remarkably high absorption ability to noble gases. This is the material of which commercial CDs/DVDs are made and they may serve as serendipitous, already available in dwellings, radon and thoron detectors. We present the essence of the gathered experimental evidence that the CD/DVD method can successfully address some long-lasted problems in radon dosimetry: The first is making sufficiently precise retrospective 222Rn dosimetry for the purposes of epidemiological studies and risk estimation. The second is rapid identification of buildings with radon problem. We demonstrate how this can be used to develop an integrated approach to the radon problem. Within this approach detection, diagnostic and mitigation are considered as an unified whole, and the interval between the decision to provide disks for analysis and the complete mitigation of the building, if radon problem is identified, is short. Besides radon and thoron, bisphenol-A based polycarbonates were successfully used to measure 85Kr and 133Xe for the purposes of the effluents control and nuclear safety of nuclear installations. The perspectives to employ other organic materials in which noble gases are highly soluble for measurement of their radioactive isotopes are also discussed.

  17. Noble gases, nitrogen, and methane from the deep interior to the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    Titan's thick N2-CH4 atmosphere is unlike any in the Solar System, and its origin has been shrouded in mystery for over half a century. Here, I perform a detailed analysis of chemical and isotopic data from the Cassini-Huygens mission to develop the hypothesis that Titan's (non-photochemical) atmospheric gases came from deep within. It is suggested that Titan's CH4, N2, and noble gases originated in a rocky core buried inside the giant satellite, and hydrothermal and cryovolcanic processes were critical to the creation of Titan's atmosphere. Mass balance and chemical equilibrium calculations demonstrate that all aspects of this hypothesis can be considered geochemically plausible with respect to contemporary observational, experimental, and theoretical knowledge. Specifically, I show that a rocky core with a bulk noble gas content similar to that in CI carbonaceous meteorites would contain sufficient 36Ar and 22Ne to explain their reported abundances. I also show that Henry's law constants for noble gases in relevant condensed phases can be correlated with the size of their atoms, which leads to expected mixing ratios for 84Kr (∼0.2 ppbv) and 132Xe (∼0.01 ppbv) that can explain why these species have yet to be detected (Huygens upper limit <10 ppbv). The outgassing of volatiles into Titan's atmosphere may be restricted by the stability of clathrate hydrates in Titan's interior. The noble gas geochemistry also provides significant new insights into the origin of N2 and CH4 on Titan, as I find that Ar and N2, and Kr and CH4 should exhibit similar phase partitioning behavior on Titan. One implication is that over 95% of Titan's N2 may still reside in the interior. Another key result is that the upper limit from the Huygens GC-MS on the Kr/CH4 ratio in Titan's atmosphere is far too low to be consistent with accretion of primordial CH4 clathrate, which motivates me to consider endogenic production of CH4 from CO2 as a result of geochemical reactions between liquid

  18. Noble gases preserve history of retentive continental crust in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Smye, Andrew J.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-06-01

    Budgets of 4He and 40Ar provide constraints on the chemical evolution of the solid Earth and atmosphere. Although continental crust accounts for the majority of 4He and 40Ar degassed from the Earth, degassing mechanisms are subject to scholarly debate. Here we provide a constraint on crustal degassing by comparing the noble gases accumulated in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir, New Mexico USA, with the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. A detailed geological model of the reservoir is used to provide absolute abundances and geostatistical uncertainty of 4He, 40Ar, 21Ne, 20Ne, 36Ar, and 84Kr. The present-day production rate of crustal radiogenic 4He and 40Ar, henceforth referred to as 4He* and 40Ar*, is estimated using the basement composition, surface and mantle heat flow, and seismic estimates of crustal density. After subtracting mantle and atmospheric contributions, the reservoir contains less than 0.02% of the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. This shows unequivocally that radiogenic noble gases are effectively retained in cratonic continental crust over millennial timescales. This also requires that approximately 1.5 Gt of mantle derived CO2 migrated through the crust without mobilizing the crustally accumulated gases. This observation suggests transport along a localized fracture network. Therefore, the retention of noble gases in stable crystalline continental crust allows shallow accumulations of radiogenic gases to record tectonic history. At Bravo Dome, the crustal 4He*/40Ar* ratio is one fifth of the expected crustal production ratio, recording the preferential release of 4He during the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny, 300 Ma.

  19. The origins and concentrations of water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gases on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    elements and of noble gases is also chondritic, with two notable exceptions. Nitrogen is depleted by one order of magnitude relative to water, carbon and most noble gases, which is consistent with either N retention in a mantle phase during magma generation, or trapping of N in the core. Xenon is also depleted by one order of magnitude, and enriched in heavy isotopes relative to chondritic or solar Xe (the so-called "xenon paradox"). This depletion and isotope fractionation might have taken place due to preferential ionization of xenon by UV light from the early Sun, either before Earth's formation on parent material, or during irradiation of the ancient atmosphere. The second possibility is consistent with a recent report of chondritic-like Xe in Archean sedimentary rocks that suggests that this process was still ongoing during the Archean eon (Pujol et al., 2011). If the depletion of Xe in the atmosphere was a long-term process that took place after the Earth-building events, then the amounts of atmospheric 129Xe and 131-136Xe, produced by the short-lived radioactivities of 129I (T 1/2 = 16 Ma) and 244Pu (T 1/2 = 82 Ma), respectively, need to be corrected for subsequent loss. Doing so, the I-Pu-Xe age of the Earth becomes ≤ 50 Ma after start of solar system formation, instead of ~ 120 Ma as computed with the present-day atmospheric Xe inventory.

  20. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from LEW88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Antarctic meteorite LEW88516 has been classified as a member of the SNC group of meteorites, specifically a shergottite. It is reported to be remarkably similar in mineralogy, petrogenesis and chemistry to the previously known ALH77005 shergottite, with both being compositionally distinct from other shergottites. LEW88516 shows pervasive shock features and has been found to contain glass veins attributable to a shock origin. In an effort to determine whether the glass in LEW88516 contains any of the isotopically-heavy trapped nitrogen component observed in EETA 79001 glass, as well as the related high-Ar-40/Ar-36 and high-Xe-129/Xe-132 components, we undertook an analysis of an 11.9 mg glass sample (LEW88516,4) provided to us by H. Y. McSween, Jr. as part of a consortium study of this meteorite. Nitrogen and noble gases were extracted from LEW88516,4 in a series of combustion steps at increasing temperatures followed by a final pyrolysis. Initial steps at 550 C were intended to remove any surface-sited nitrogen-containing contaminants, while the 700 C step was expected to show the onset of release of a trapped argon component, based on our previous data for EETA 79001. It was hoped that the bulk of any trapped gas release would be concentrated in one of two steps at 1100 C and approximately 1400 C, maximizing our analytical sensitivity. Results of the analysis are shown. Except for He and Ne, data obtained for the 550 C steps will be omitted from further consideration on the assumption that they represent terrestrial contamination.

  1. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ13C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., 4He, 20Ne, 36Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, 4He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, 36Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  2. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing.

  3. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  4. H3(+) as a trap for noble gases-3: multiple trapping of neon, argon, and krypton in X(n)H3(+) (n = 1-3).

    PubMed

    Pauzat, F; Ellinger, Y; Pilmé, J; Mousis, O

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies on the formation of XH(3)(+) noble gas complexes have shown strategic implications for the composition of the atmospheres of the giant planets as well as for the composition of comets. One crucial factor in the astrophysical process is the relative abundances of the noble gases versus H(3)(+). It is the context in which the possibility for clustering with more than one noble gas (X(n)H(3)(+) up to n = 3) has been investigated for noble gases X ranging from neon to krypton. In order to assert our results, a variety of methods have been used including ab initio coupled cluster CCSD and CCSD(T), MP2, and density functional BH&HLYP levels of theory. All complexes with one, two, and three noble gases are found to be stable in the Ne, Ar, and Kr families. These stable structures are planar with the noble gases attached to the apices of the H(3)(+) triangle. The binding energy of the nth atom, defined as the X(n)H(3)(+) --> X(n-1)H(3)(+) + X reaction energy, increases slightly with n varying from 1 to 3 in the neon series, while it decreases in the argon series and shows a minimum for n = 2 in the krypton series. The origin of this phenomenon is to be found in the variations in the respective vibrational energies. A topological analysis of the electron localization function shows the importance of the charge transfer from the noble gases toward H(3)(+) as a driving force in the bonding along the series. It is also consistent with the increase in the atomic polarizabilities from neon to krypton. Rotational constants and harmonic frequencies are reported in order to provide a body of data to be used for the detection in laboratory prior to space observations. This study strongly suggests that the noble gases could be sequestered even in an environment where the H(3)(+) abundance is small.

  5. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in 20Ne and 21Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high 3He 4He ratios. The high 20Ne 22Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO2 well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. ?? 1993.

  6. Martian Noble Gases in Recently Found Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Breccia Northwest Africa 8114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Wieler, R.; Kuga, M.; Maden, C.; Irving, A. J.; Clay, P. L.; Joy, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    New noble gas data for several recently found martian meteorites will be presented to determine cosmic-ray exposure ages and source pairing. The presence of trapped (atmospheric) components and discrepancies to earlier data sets will be discussed.

  7. IMPACT REGIMES AND POST-FORMATION SEQUESTRATION PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF HEAVY NOBLE GASES IN TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Sylvain; Thomas, Caroline; Schmitt, Bernard

    2010-05-10

    The difference between the measured atmospheric abundances of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon for Venus, Earth, and Mars is striking. Because these abundances drop by at least 2 orders of magnitude as one moves outward from Venus to Mars, the study of the origin of this discrepancy is a key issue that must be explained if we are to fully understand the different delivery mechanisms of the volatiles accreted by the terrestrial planets. In this work, we aim to investigate whether it is possible to quantitatively explain the variation of the heavy noble gas abundances measured on Venus, Earth, and Mars, assuming that cometary bombardment was the main delivery mechanism of these noble gases to the terrestrial planets. To do so, we use recent dynamical simulations that allow the study of the impact fluxes of comets upon the terrestrial planets during the course of their formation and evolution. Assuming that the mass of noble gases delivered by comets is proportional to the rate at which they collide with the terrestrial planets, we show that the krypton and xenon abundances in Venus and Earth can be explained in a manner consistent with the hypothesis of cometary bombardment. In order to explain the krypton and xenon abundance differences between Earth and Mars, we need to invoke the presence of large amounts of CO{sub 2}-dominated clathrates in the Martian soil that would have efficiently sequestered these noble gases. Two different scenarios based on our model can also be used to explain the differences between the neon and argon abundances of the terrestrial planets. In the first scenario, cometary bombardment of these planets would have occurred at epochs contemporary with the existence of their primary atmospheres. Comets would have been the carriers of argon, krypton, and xenon, while neon would have been gravitationally captured by the terrestrial planets. In the second scenario, we consider impacting comets that contained significantly smaller amounts of argon

  8. Noble gases in the diamond-free ureilite, ALHA 78019 - The roles of shock and nebular processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The noble gases for unshocked ureilite ALHA 78019 and moderately shocked ureilite Kenna are measured. The preparation of the samples and the analysis procedures are described. The analyses reveal that for ALHA 78019 the residue yield equals 2.5 percent of the original mass of the meteorite and 25 percent of the gas is contained in the fine-grained amorphous carbon, and for Kenna the residue yield equals 2.9 percent and 60 percent of the noble gas is contained in the carbon. It is noted that the gases and carbon are present in the ureilites prior ot the shock that produced the diamond, and the shock has no effect on the origin of the carbon in these meteorites. The source of the gas-rich carbon in the ureilite ALHA 78019 is investigated; the Xe-130/C ratio, which equals 4.2 x 10 to the -10th, implies that the gases were acquired while the ureilite was exposed to the solar nebula.

  9. Elliptical polarization favors long quantum orbits in high-order above-threshold ionization of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lai, XuanYang; Wang, ChuanLiang; Chen, YongJu; Hu, ZiLong; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, ZhiZhan; Becker, Wilhelm

    2013-01-25

    We demonstrate the significant role of long quantum orbits in strong-field atomic processes by investigating experimentally and theoretically the above-threshold ionization spectra of noble gases in intense elliptically polarized laser pulses. With increasing laser ellipticity, the yields of different energy regions of the measured electron spectrum in high-order above-threshold ionization drop at different rates. The experimental features can be reproduced by a theoretical simulation based on quantum-orbit theory, revealing that increasing ellipticity favors the contributions of the long quantum orbits in the high-order above-threshold ionization process.

  10. A comprehensive study of noble gases and nitrogen in "Hypatia", a diamond-rich pebble from SW Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avice, Guillaume; Meier, Matthias M. M.; Marty, Bernard; Wieler, Rainer; Kramers, Jan D.; Langenhorst, Falko; Cartigny, Pierre; Maden, Colin; Zimmermann, Laurent; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2015-12-01

    This is a follow-up study of a work by Kramers et al. (2013) on a very unusual diamond-rich rock fragment found in the area of south west Egypt in the south-western side of the Libyan Desert Glass strewn field. This pebble, called Hypatia, is composed of almost pure carbon. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that Hypatia is mainly made of defect-rich diamond containing lonsdaleite and multiple deformation bands. These characteristics are compatible with an impact origin on Earth and/or in space. We also analyzed concentrations and isotopic compositions of all five noble gases and nitrogen in several ∼mg sized Hypatia samples. These data confirm the conclusion by Kramers et al. (2013) that Hypatia is extra-terrestrial. The sample is relatively rich in trapped noble gases with an isotopic composition being close to the Q component found in many types of meteorites. 40Ar/36Ar ratios in individual steps are as low as 0.4 ± 0.3. Cosmic-ray produced "cosmogenic" 21Ne is present in concentrations corresponding to a nominal cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age of roughly 0.1 Myr if produced in a typical meter-sized meteoroid. Such an atypically low nominal CRE age suggests high shielding in a considerably larger body. In addition to the Xe-Q composition, an excess of radiogenic 129Xe (from the decay of short-lived radioactive 129I) is observed (129Xe /132Xe = 1.18 + / - 0.03). Two isotopically distinct N components are present, an isotopically heavy component (δ15N ∼ + 20 ‰) released at low temperatures and a major isotopically light component (δ15N ∼ - 110 ‰) at higher temperatures. This disequilibrium in N suggests that the diamonds in Hypatia were formed in space rather than upon impact on Earth (δN15atm = 0 ‰). All our data are broadly consistent with concentrations and isotopic compositions of noble gases in at least three different types of carbon-rich meteoritic materials: carbon-rich veins in ureilites

  11. Trapped solar wind noble gases, kr81/kr exposure ages and k/ar ages in apollo 11 lunar material.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, P; Geiss, J; Graf, H; Grögler, N; Krähenbühl, U; Schwaller, H; Schwarzmüller, J; Stettler, A

    1970-01-30

    Grain size and etching experiments show that the fine lunar material contains large amounts of trapped solar wind particles. Elemental and isotopic compositions of the noble gases in solar material and in the terrestrial atmosphere are significantly different, except for the Ar(36)/ Ar(38) and the Kr isotope ratios. Exposure ages of two rocks and of the fine material are between 380 and 510 x 10(6) years. Feldspar concentrates give K/Ar ages of 3220 and 3300 x 10(6) years, significantly higher than the unseparated rock.

  12. The solubility of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in water up to the critical point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, R.W.; Clynne, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The solubility of the noble gases Ar, He, Ne, Kr, and Xe in pure water was measured from 298 to 561??K. These data in turn were extrapolated to the critical point of water, thus providing a complete set of Henry's law constants from 274 to 647??K when combined with the existing literature data. Equations describing the behavior of the Henry's law constants over this temperature range are also given. The data do not confirm extrapolations of empirical correlations based on low-temperature solubility data. ?? 1978 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  13. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  14. Composition of solar wind noble gases released by surface oxidation of a metal separate from the Weston meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on a set of experiments intended to test the feasibility of determining elemental and isotopic ratios of the noble gases and nitrogen in the solar wind in metal separates from gas-rich ordinary chondrites. Helium, neon, and argon show clear evidence of a solar wind signature, while no solar component could be identified for xenon and nitrogen. Helium, neon, and argon elemental isotopic ratios appear to depend on depth within the metal grains. The ratios derived indicate that the Weston meteorite did not acquire its solar wind gases from a recent exposure to solar wind, but more probably at a time in the past similar to or even earlier than the exposure time of Apollo 17 breccias. The Ar-36/Ar-38 ratio, in tandem with other recent determinations of this value, indicates that the solar and terrestrial values can no longer be assumed to be equivalent.

  15. Implications of noble gases in a recently recognized Martian meteorite (ALH84001) for the degassing history of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    1994-01-01

    For terrestrial planets, atmospheric compositions are not static, but evolve with time, in part due to degassing of the interior. Unfortunately, the evolution is slow enough that it is usually not observable on human timescales, or even on the timescales of rocks that preserve samples of Earth's ancient atmosphere. Preliminary results on a recently recognized Martian meteorite, ALH84001, indicate that it is a very old rock, and has a relatively high noble gas content suggestive of atmospheric incorporation, but with an isotopic composition slightly inconsistent with currently known Martian reservoirs. Hence, this rock may provide a sample of ancient Martian atmosphere, which can be used to test models of volatile evolution (in particular, degassing) on Mars. ALH84001 is a cumulate orthopyroxenite. Although originally classified as a diogenite, its oxygen isotopes, and several chemical and petrographic features, strong suggest that it is, like the SNC meteorites, Martian. A Sm-Nd crystallization age of 4.5 Ga has been reported. The meteorite is rich in noble gases, compared to most SNC's. In many respects the noble gases are typical of SNC meteorites. However, there are some subtle differences. In particular, the Xe isotopes in SNC meteorites can be explained as a mixture of Martian atmospheric Xe (as represented by glass in EETA 79001), the Xe in the dunite Chassigny (usually assumed to be representative of the Martian interior, and with lower (129)Xe/(132)Xe, (134)Xe/(132)Xe and (136)Xe/(132)Xe ratios), and later additions from known processes like fission, spallation and terrestrial contamination. The isotopic composition of ALH84001 is inconsistent (at greater than 2-3 sigma) with any mixture of those components. Even if no accumulation of fission Xe during the age of the rock is assumed, there is too little (136)Xe and (134)Xe for the amount of (129)Xe measured.

  16. Evidence for multiple magma ocean outgassing and atmospheric loss episodes from mantle noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2013-12-01

    driving He/Ne fractionation in the mantle. The large differences in the 3He/22Ne of the primitive reservoir and the depleted mantle require that the giant impacts, including the Moon-forming impact, could not have melted and homogenized the whole mantle. Hence, if primordial noble gases in plumes are derived from large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the core-mantle boundary, these features did not form from crystallization of the magma ocean associated with the Moon-forming impact. LLSVPs may have formed from crystallization products of previous magma oceans and survived the Moon-forming impact, or else their formation is unrelated to magma oceans. Along with 20Ne/22Ne and 129Xe/130Xe, the disparate 3He/22Ne ratios between mantle domains require that 4.5 billion years of mantle convection has not erased chemical differences set up during accretion.

  17. Groundwater mixing pattern and origin of salinization in the Azraq Oasis, Jordan, revealed by noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaudse, Tillmann; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Tuffaha, Randa; Bani-Khalaf, Refaat

    2014-05-01

    Azraq Oasis, located in the eastern Jordanian desert, is an important freshwater resource of the country. Shallow groundwater reserves are heavily exploited since the 1980s and in consequence the groundwater table dropped by about 25 m and important wetlands dried out. Furthermore, some wells of the major well field show an increasing mineralization over the past 20 years. The fact that only a few wells show this behavior is surprising since the wells are situated quite close together and are mostly drilled to the same depth. A previous study using conventional tracers did not yield a satisfactory explanation [1]. Application of dissolved noble gases reveals the complex mixing pattern leading to the very localized salinization within the well field. It is found that the wells affected by salinization 1) contain distinctly more radiogenic 4He than the other wells, indicating higher groundwater age, and 2) exhibit a significantly enhanced 3He/4He ratio, implying an influence of deep mantle fluids. Since the hydrogeologic system in the Azraq Oasis comprises of three aquifer systems, separated by poorly permeable layers and traversed by several deep fault systems, mantle influence is expected to be found in the deeper aquifers. The data, therefore, indicate upward leakage into the shallow aquifer. However, the saline middle aquifer is virtually free of mantle helium. To our knowledge, this is the first time a groundwater system is described where mantle helium is found in an aquifer lying on top of one which is free of mantle impact. This behavior can be explained by an upstream from an even deeper (and saline) source through a nearby conductive fault, while the groundwater flow direction in the middle aquifer is towards the fault and reversed in the shallow aquifer, towards the well field. This scheme explains how the mantle fluids (and also most probably the increased salinity) infiltrates into the shallow aquifer, but not why only few wells are affected. The shallow

  18. Noble Gases in Recently Found Hot and Cold Desert Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, P.; Maden, C.; Busemann, H.

    2016-08-01

    We report He-Xe noble gas data for 7 lunar meteorites. Of 4 paired and unbrecciated mare basalts 2 surprisingly contain abundant solar wind - so far unknown for mare basalts. Potential implications for our understanding of the Moon will be discussed.

  19. Colloidally separated samples from Allende residues - Noble gases, carbon and an ESCA-study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Kronenbitter, J.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which strengthen the hypothesis of heterogeneity among the carbon- and nitrogen-bearing phases of the Allende meteorite. These data also highlight the possibility of performing physical separations yielding samples in which some of the noble gas- and carbon-bearing phases are extraordinarily predominant over others. The conclusion, based on mass and isotope balance arguments, that a significant portion of the carbonaceous matter in Allende is likely to be gas-poor or gas-free need not weaken the case for carbonaceous carriers for the major noble gas components. The concept that acid-soluble carbonaceous phases contain a multiplicity of components, each of which may have formed under a multiplicity of different physical-chemical conditions, is reemphasized by the results of the present study.

  20. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 1; Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.; Franke, L.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade thousands of meteorites have been recovered from hot deserts in the Sahara and Oman. One of the main meteorite concentration surfaces in the Sahara is the Dar al Gani plateau in Libya, which covers a total area of 8000 km2. More than 1000 meteorites have been reported from this area. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and the meteorite density of the Dar al Gani (DaG) field are described in more detail in [1]. In this work we report concentrations of the noble gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar as well as 84Kr and 132Xe in 18 DaG meteorites. In a separate paper we will report the cosmogenic radionuclides [2]. We discuss the thermal history and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) history of these meteorites, and evaluate the effects of the hot desert environment on the noble gas record.

  1. Laboratory shock emplacement of noble gases, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide into basalt, and implications for trapped gases in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Pepin, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Basalts from the Servilleta flows, Taos, NM, described by Lofgren (1983) were analyzed by mass spectrometry for shock-implanted noble gases, N2, and CO2 (which were isotopically labeled) after an exposure to 20-60 GPa shock in the presence of 0.0045-3.0 atm of ambient gas. The results were compared with data available on the constituents of the EETA 79001 meteorite. As expected, the samples shocked in this study attained emplacement efficiencies significantly lower than those apparent for lithology C of EETA 79001. Possible explanations for this difference include atmospheric overpressure at the time of EETA 79001 exposure to shock, the trapping of gas already in vugs by the intruding melt material, or the collapse of gas-filled vugs to form gas-laden glass inclusions.

  2. Noble gases, stable isotopes, and radiocarbon as tracers of flow in the Dakota aquifer, Colorado and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.F.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Macfarlane, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CI) have been analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems, presumably caused by large well screens. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were found in south-eastern Colorado where the Dakota is poorly confined. The tracer data suggest that the first group recharged locally during the last few thousand years and the second group was composed of ground water that recharged earlier during a cooler climate, presumably during the last glacial period (LGP) and mixed aged water. The paleotemperature record archived in this groundwater system indicates that south-eastern Colorado was about 5??C cooler during the LGP than during the late Holocene. Similar temperature changes derived from dissolved noble gases in other aquifer systems have been reported earlier for the south-western United States. The third water type was located down gradient of the first two in the confined Dakota in western and central Kansas. Groundwater residence time of this water mass is on the order of 104-105 yrs and its recharge location is near the Colorado and Kansas border down gradient of the other water types. The study shows the importance of using multiple tracers when investigating ground water systems.A suite of chemical and isotope tracers (dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, and CL) were analyzed along a flow path in the Dakota aquifer system to determine likely recharge sources, ground water residence times, and the extent of mixing between local and intermediate flow systems. Three water types were distinguished with the tracers, each having a very different history. Two of the water types were located in south-eastern Colorado

  3. Modeling the transport and fate of radioactive noble gases in very dry desert alluvium: Realistic scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    US DOE Order 5820.2A (1988) requires that a performance assessment of all new and existing low-level radioactive waste management sites be made. An integral part of every performance assessment is the mathematical modeling of the transport and fate of noble gas radionuclides in the gas phase. Current in depth site characterization of the high desert alluvium in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is showing that the alluvium is very very dry all the way to the water table (240 meters below land surface). The potential for radioactive noble gas (e.g. Rn-220 and Rn-222) transport to the atmosphere from shallow land burial of Thorium and Uranium waste is very high. Objectives of this modeling effort include: Construct a physics based sits specific noble gas transport model; Include induced advection due to barometric pressure changes at the atmospheric boundary layer (thin) - dry desert alluvium interface; User selected option for use of NOAA barometric pressure or a ``home brewed`` barometric pressure wave made up of up to 15 sinusoids and cosinusoids; Use the model to help make engineering decisions on the design of the burial pits and associated closure caps.

  4. Noble gases in planetary atmospheres - Implications for the origin and evolution of atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Black, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The radiogenic and primordial noble gas contents of the Venus, earth, and Mars atmospheres are compared with one another and with the noble gas content of other extraterrestrial samples, particularly meteorites. Key trends in the primordial noble gas content of terrestrial planetary atmospheres are shown to include: (1) a several-orders-of-magnitude decrease in Ne-20 and Ar-36 from Venus to earth to Mars; (2) a nearly constant Ne-20/Ar-36 ratio, which is comparable to that found in the more primitive carbonaceous chondrites and which is two orders of magnitude smaller than the solar ratio; (3) a sizable fractionation of Ar, Kr, and Xe from their solar ratios, though the degree of fractionation (especially for Ar-36/Xe-132) appears to decrease systematically from carbonaceous chondrites to Mars to earth to Venus; and (4) large differences in Ne and Xe isotopic ratios among earth, meteorites, and the sun. It is suggested that the grain-accretion hypothesis can explain all four trends, though the assumptions needed to achieve this agreement are far from proven.

  5. Noble gases in submarine pillow basalt glasses from Loihi and Kilauea, Hawaii: A solar component in the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A. ); Clague, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances have been analysed in twenty-two samples of basaltic glass dredged from the submarine flanks of two currently active Hawaiian volcanoes, Loihi Seamount and Kilauea. Neon isotopic ratios are enriched in [sup 20]Ne and [sup 21]Ne by as much as 16% with respect to atmospheric ratios. All the Hawaiian basalt glass samples show relatively high [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios. The high [sup 20]Ne/[sup 22]Ne values in some of the Hawaiian samples, together with correlations between neon and helium systematics, suggest the presence of a solar component in the source regions of the Hawaiian mantle plume. The solar hypothesis for the Earth's primordial noble gas composition can account for helium and neon isotopic ratios observed in basaltic glasses from both plume and spreading systems, in fluids in continental hydrothermal systems, in CO[sub 2] well gases, and in ancient diamonds. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the Earth's atmosphere.

  6. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  7. Differences of Terrestrial Alteration Effects in Ordinary Chondrites from Hot and Cold Deserts: Petrography and Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, P.; Loeken, T.; Schultz, L.

    1992-07-01

    Several differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations have been recognized that are attributed to two main causes, namely a general difference in their parent meteoroid populations and/or secondary effects like weathering or pairing (see e.g.[1]). In the last few years several hundred new meteorites have become available from hot desert areas (Nullabor Plain, Roosevelt County, Sahara Desert). Compared to Antarctic meteorites these stones are stored on Earth in very different climatic environments. Thus, both groups should show different patterns of weathering. In this paper we report petrographic observations and noble gas measurements concerning terrestrial alterations of a suite of ordinary chondrites from the Sahara desert and Antarctica. Forty thin sections of desert meteorites (Acfer, El Djouf, Illafegh, Daraj, and Roosevelt County) and 60 thin sections of Antarctic ordinary chondrites (Allan Hills and Frontier Mountain) were investigated microscopically. In addition, in some of these meteorites the concentration and isotopic composition of all noble gases were determined. In this report we will discuss the trapped Kr and Xe only. As already noted by Jull et al. [2] many desert meteorites are heavily weathered. Compared to Antarctic meteorites their proportion of metal and troilite is smaller, while iron oxides and iron hydroxides are more abundant. In Antarctic meteorites most silicates are not severely altered. H- and L-group chondri- tes from the Acfer region and Roosevelt County, however, show a remarkable weathering feature of some silicates: In many of these samples nest-like structures are found that consist of silicate fragments embedded in iron oxide or hydroxide. Different stages of their development can be observed. It starts with the filling by these iron compounds of fine cracks of the original grains. With the process of weathering proceeding these cracks grow and finally destroy larger crystals completely to smaller

  8. GAS-PHASE SEQUESTRATION OF NOBLE GASES IN THE PROTOSOLAR NEBULA: POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES ON THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ozgurel, O.; Mousis, O.; Ali Dib, M. E-mail: ellinger@lct.jussieu.fr E-mail: olivier.mousis@obs-besancon.fr

    2013-11-01

    We address the problem of the sequestration of Ar, Kr, and Xe by H{sub 3}{sup +} in the gas-phase conditions encountered during the cooling of protoplanetary disks when H{sub 3}{sup +} is competing with other species present in the same environment. Using high-level ab initio simulations, we try to quantify other sequestration possibilities involving He, H{sub 5}{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} present in the protosolar nebula. Apart from the fact that H{sub 3}{sup +} complexes formed with heavy noble gases are found to be by far much more stable than those formed with He or H{sub 2}O, we show that H{sub 2}D{sup +} and H{sub 3}O{sup +}, both products of the reactions of H{sub 3}{sup +} with HD and H{sub 2}O, can also be efficient trapping agents for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Meanwhile, the abundance profile of H{sub 3}{sup +} in the outer part of the nebula is revisited with the use of an evolutionary accretion disk model that allows us to investigate the possibility that heavy noble gases can be sequestered by H{sub 3}{sup +} at earlier epochs than those corresponding to their trapping in planetesimals. We find that H{sub 3}{sup +} might be abundant enough in the outer protosolar nebula to trap Xe and Kr prior their condensation epochs, implying that their abundances should be solar in Saturn's current atmosphere and below the observational limit in Titan. The same scenario predicts that comets formed at high heliocentric distances should also be depleted in Kr and Xe. In situ measurements, such as those planed with the Rosetta mission on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, will be critical to check the validity of our hypotheses.

  9. Shock-implanted noble gases - An experimental study with implications for the origin of Martian gases in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt H.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-implantation of gases is studied by artificially shocking whole rock and power samples of terrestrial basalt to pressures of 2-40 GPa. Ar, Kr, Xe, and Ne were implanted into the silicate. It is observed that the amount of implanted gas is linearly proportional to its partial pressure over a pressure range of 0.0001 to 0.1 atmosphere. The fractionation effect in the implanted gas and the gas diffusion properties are examined. The amounts of gas that would have been implanted with 100 percent efficiency are calculated from the measured porosities of the power samples and are compared to observed abundances. It is determined that the implantation efficiencies are approximately 0.5 percent at 2 GPa, 7 percent at 5 GPa, and greater than 50 percent at both 20 and 35 GPa. The experimental data correlate with the shock implantation of Martian gases without mass fractionation into the shock-melted phase of meteorite EETA 79001.

  10. Intensive sampling of noble gases in fluids at Yellowstone: I. Early overview of the data; regional patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Lynch, M. A.; Reynolds, J. H.; Smith, S. P.

    1985-05-01

    The Roving Automated Rare Gas Analysis (RARGA) lab of Berkeley's Physics Department was deployed in Yellowstone National Park for a 19 week period commencing in June, 1983. During this time 66 gas and water samples representing 19 different regions of hydrothermal activity within and around the Yellowstone caldera were analyzed on site. Routinely, the abundances of five stable noble gases and the isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar were determined for each sample. In a few cases the isotopes of Kr and Xe were also determined and found to be of normal atmospheric constitution. Correlated variations in the isotopic compositions of He and Ar can be explained within the precision of the measurements by mixing of only three distinct components. The first component is of magmatic origin and is enriched in the primordial isotope 3He with 3He /4He ≥ 16 times the air value. This component also contains radiogenic 40Ar and possible 36Ar with 40Ar /36Ar ≥ 500 , resulting in a 3He /36Ar ratio ≥ 41,000 times the air value. The second component is assumed to be purely radiogenic 4He and 40Ar ( 4∗He /40∗Ar = 4.08 ± .33 ). This component is the probable carrier of observed excesses of 21∗Ne, attributed to the α,n reaction on 18O. Its radiogenic character implies a crustal origin in U. Th, and Krich aquifer rocks. The third component, except for possible mass fractionation, is isotopically indistinguishable from the noble gases in the atmosphere. This component originates largely from infiltrating run-off water saturated with atmospheric gases. In addition to exhibiting nucleogenic 21∗Ne, Ne data show anomalies in the ratio 20Ne /20Ne , which correlate roughly with the 21Ne /22Ne anomalies for the most part, but not as would occur from simple mass fractionation. Some exaggerated instances of the 20Ne /22Ne anomaly occur which could be explained by combined mass fractionation of Ne and Ar isotopes to a severe degree coupled with remixing with normally isotopic

  11. Spreading of Greenland meltwaters in the ocean revealed by noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaird, Nicholas; Straneo, Fiammetta; Jenkins, William

    2015-09-01

    We present the first noble gas observations in a proglacial fjord in Greenland, providing an unprecedented view of surface and submarine melt pathways into the ocean. Using Optimum Multiparameter Analysis, noble gas concentrations remove large uncertainties inherent in previous studies of meltwater in Greenland fjords. We find glacially modified waters with submarine melt concentrations up to 0.66 ± 0.09% and runoff 3.9 ± 0.29%. Radiogenic enrichment of Helium enables identification of ice sheet near-bed melt (0.48 ± 0.08%). We identify distinct regions of meltwater export reflecting heterogeneous melt processes: a surface layer of both runoff and submarine melt and an intermediate layer composed primarily of submarine melt. Intermediate ocean waters carry the majority of heat to the fjords' glaciers, and warmer deep waters are isolated from the ice edge. The average entrainment ratio implies that ocean water masses are upwelled at a rate 30 times the combined glacial meltwater volume flux.

  12. Resonance Ionization of Heavy Noble Gases: The Potential of KR and Xe Measurements from Single Pre-Solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, N.

    1995-09-01

    Since the first reliable indication of the existence of non-terrestrial composition of Xe isotopes in meteorites by Reynolds [1,2], anomalies have been found in the isotopic composition of many elements in meteorites, implying a plurality of nucleosynthetic processes, and indicating that the initial conditions leading to the formation of the solar system were quite diverse [3]. Noble gases provide a unique window into the composition of the progenitor material to the solar system [4]. Stellar evolution may contribute by the s-process, r-process, p-process, etc., each with its own isotopic distribution. Kr and Xe are especially useful as the large number of isotopes (7 in the 78Kr to 86Kr range, and 9 in the 124Xe to 136Xe range) provide many clues to help unravel the multiple sources to the measured abundances. Although Xe has been measured and analyzed considerably more frequently than Kr in meteorite studies, this has only partially been due to the wealth of information derivable from Xe studies, but also, due to experimental difficulties encountered in Kr measurements. Early in the development of stellar nucleosynthesis, 86Kr was proposed as a chronometer of the s-process [5], but until recently has provided unreliable results [6]. Other interesting properties derivable from Kr isotope measurements include 78Kr as an indication of spallation history, 80Kr as a stellar thermometer, and 81Kr and 83Kr to determine cosmic ray exposure ages. Studies of highly refractory microscopic grains (diamond, graphite and SiC) separated from the much more abundant carbonaceous matrix in primitive meteorites have shown a remarkable isotopic composition diversity in a small fraction of single grains from the same meteorite, implying multiple stellar sources [4]. Ion microprobe measurements have been possible of the major constituents of single interstellar grains [7,8] and of He and Ne using a state-of-the-art static noble gas mass spectrometer [9-11]. But, a recent attempt to

  13. Comparative study of the collisional electron detachment of C-, Si-, and Ge- by light noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, H.; Zappa, F.; Martins, M. H.; Magalhães, S. D.; Jalbert, Ginette; Coelho, L. F.; de Castro Faria, N. V.

    2001-05-01

    Collisional electron detachment of anions with np3 structures (n=2, 3, and 4), namely, C-, Si-, and Ge-, was studied for He, Ne, and Ar targets and relative velocities ranging from 0.2 a.u. to 2.2 a.u.. Single, double, and triple electron ejection cross sections were also measured for the C- anion colliding with an Ar target, being observed to obey a binomial distribution. Two striking universal features were observed concerning the total detachment cross sections: for each target a multiplicative scaling may be made for the cross sections of the three projectiles, and these factors are target independent. The maxima of these three curves show a nonmonotonic correspondence with the noble-gas atomic numbers. A simple law, proposed for the scaling, indicates the presence of metastable states in the Si- and Ge- beams.

  14. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. II - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Etching and heating experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadnik, M. G.; Wacker, J. F.; Lewis, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The release of trapped Xe from amorphous-C phases of meteorites is simulated experimentally by HNO3 etching of carbon-black and pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride samples exposed to Xe-127 for 0.5-240 h at 100-1000 C and then degassed for 9 h or more at the same temperatures, as reported by Wacker et al. (1985). The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Samples exposed at 100-200 C are found to lose most of their Xe after etching to a depth of only about 20 pm, while those exposed at 800-1000 C exhibit a second more tightly bound component extending to a depth of 3 nm, indicative of diffusion of Xe during exposure and resembling planetary Xe. The higher noble-gas concentrations measured in meteorites are attributed to rate-controlled Xe uptake over a long period in the solar nebula.

  15. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  16. Irradiation History of Itokawa Regolith Material Deduced from Noble Gases in the Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Miura, Yayoi N.; Osawa, Takahito; Bajo, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Shintaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ireland, Trevor R.; Kitajima, Fumio; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Zolensky, Michael E.; Uesugi, Masayuki; Shirai, Kei; Abe, Masanao; Yada, Toru; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Akio; Mukai, Toshifumi; Ueno, Munetaka; Okada, Tatsuaki; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-01

    Noble gas isotopes were measured in three rocky grains from asteroid Itokawa to elucidate a history of irradiation from cosmic rays and solar wind on its surface. Large amounts of solar helium (He), neon (Ne), and argon (Ar) trapped in various depths in the grains were observed, which can be explained by multiple implantations of solar wind particles into the grains, combined with preferential He loss caused by frictional wear of space-weathered rims on the grains. Short residence time of less than 8 million years was implied for the grains by an estimate on cosmic-ray-produced 21Ne. Our results suggest that Itokawa is continuously losing its surface materials into space at a rate of tens of centimeters per million years. The lifetime of Itokawa should be much shorter than the age of our solar system.

  17. Nonlinear optical response of noble gases via the metastable electronic state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, A.; Wright, E. M.; Kolesik, M.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to elucidate the theoretical underpinnings of the metastable electronic state approach (MESA) and demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of the nonlinear optical response of noble-gas atoms with emphasis on the application of the method to the propagation of multicolor optical fields in large-scale, spatially resolved simulations. More specifically, single-active-electron models of various atoms are employed to calculate their nonlinear properties both within the adiabatic approximation, involving a single metastable state and beyond, capturing inertial effects, and wavelength-dependent ionization. Simulations for excitation pulses at different center wavelengths as well as ionization in two-color pulses are presented and compared with numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Illustrative examples of the numerical simulation of high-power pulse propagation incorporating MESA data are also presented and showcase the successful application to optical filamentation in the midinfrared region.

  18. A Single Lodranite/Acapulcoite Parent Body: Noble Gases in Lodranite QUE 93148 and Acapulcoite ALH 81261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, A.; Eugster, O.; Marti, K.; Michel, R.

    1995-09-01

    We continue our comprehensive studies of the cosmic ray exposure history of lodranites [1] to include new noble gas measurements in the QUE 93148 lodranite and the ALH 81261 acapulcoite. In addition, we model the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in lodranites and acapulcoites using the HERMES high energy transport code [2], in order to test whether conventional production rates can be extrapolated to this group of small meteoroids which reveal very large values of the shielding parameter 22Ne/21Ne (Table 1). The model calculations are based on the same excitation functions of p- and n-induced reactions as used in recent calculations [3,4]. We extended our studies to acapulcoites, since petrologic, mineralogic, and O-isotopic investigations [5] as well as chemical investigations [6] suggest that lodranites and acapulcoites are residues of varying degree of partial melting, consistent with an origin on a common parent body. Whether a collisional event on the common parent body ejected both types of meteorites can be investigated by an analysis of the transfer times to Earth, specifically their cosmic-ray exposure ages. Because the contents of trapped He, Ne, and Ar in lodranites and acapulcoites are very low we can derive reliable cosmogenic noble gas contents. Using the composition-adjusted production rates for cosmogenic noble gases in achondrites [7], and adopting the shielding-parameter dependence for H-chondrites the exposure ages of [1] are obtained. For lodranites these exposure ages overlap those calculated [8] from 26Al and 10Be measurements. For the acapulcoites our exposure ages agree with those [5] calculated with the Graf-model [9], as well as with the shielding-independent exposure age for Acapulco that is based on the 36Cl-36Ar method[10]. The large spread in the exposure ages can be attributed to the highly variable target element abundances, as multiple measurements on several aliquots show unusually large variations. The fact that the average

  19. Sedimentary halogens and noble gases within Western Antarctic xenoliths: Implications of extensive volatile recycling to the sub continental lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadley, Michael W.; Ballentine, Chris J.; Chavrit, Déborah; Dallai, Luigi; Burgess, Ray

    2016-03-01

    Recycling of marine volatiles back into the mantle at subduction zones has a profound, yet poorly constrained impact on the geochemical evolution of the Earth's mantle. Here we present a combined noble gas and halogen study on mantle xenoliths from the Western Antarctic Rift System (WARS) to better understand the flux of subducted volatiles to the sub continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) and assess the impact this has on mantle chemistry. The xenoliths are extremely enriched in the heavy halogens (Br and I), with I concentrations up to 1 ppm and maximum measured I/Cl ratios (85.2 × 10-3) being ∼2000 times greater than mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB). The Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios of the xenoliths span a range from MORB-like ratios to values similar to marine pore fluids and serpentinites, whilst the 84Kr/36Ar and 130Xe/36Ar ratios range from modern atmosphere to oceanic sediments. This indicates that marine derived volatiles have been incorporated into the SCLM during an episode of subduction related metasomatism. Helium isotopic analysis of the xenoliths show average 3He/4He ratios of 7.5 ± 0.5 RA (where RA is the 3He/4He ratio of air = 1.39 × 10-6), similar to that of MORB. The 3He/4He ratios within the xenoliths are higher than expected for the xenoliths originating from the SCLM which has been extensively modified by the addition of subducted volatiles, indicating that the SCLM beneath the WARS must have seen a secondary alteration from the infiltration and rise of asthenospheric fluids/melts as a consequence of rifting and lithospheric thinning. Noble gases and halogens within these xenoliths have recorded past episodes of volatile interaction within the SCLM and can be used to reconstruct a tectonic history of the WARS. Marine halogen and noble gas signatures within the SCLM xenoliths provide evidence for the introduction and retention of recycled volatiles within the SCLM by subduction related metasomatism, signifying that not all volatiles that survive

  20. The Role of Noble Gases in Defining the Mean Residence Times of Fluids within Precambrian Crustal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Fellowes, J.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; McDermott, J. M.; Holland, G.; Mabry, J.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Brines rich in N2, H2, CH4 and He hosted within Precambrian crustal rocks are known to sustain microbial life [1]. The geological systems containing these brines have the potential to isolate organisms over planetary timescales and so can provide unique insight into the diversity and evolution of terrestrial life [1-3]. Long considered geological outliers, the prevalence of systems containing these ancient, deep fracture waters is only now being revealed. Recent studies demonstrate the Precambrian crust which accounts for ~70% of total crustal surface area has a global hydrogen production comparable to marine systems [2]. In addition to H2-producing reactions (e.g. radiolysis and serpentinization), a diversity of CH4-producing reactions also occur in these systems through both microbial and water-rock interactions [1, 2]. However, the role these Precambrian systems have in global hydrogen and carbon cycles is poorly understood. For this we need good constraints on the origins, residence times and degree of microbial activity of the fluids within these systems as well as the degree of interaction with external systems. Fortunately, noble gases are ideal for this role [1,3]. Previous noble gas analysis of N2, H2, CH4 and He-rich fluid samples collected at 2.4 km depth from a Cu-Zn mine in Timmins, Ontario, identified isolated fracture fluids with the oldest residence times ever observed (>1.1 Ga) [3]. This study has been significantly expanded now to fluids from an even greater depth (3 km) at Timmins, and from two new mines in the Sudbury Basin. Preliminary data from the deeper Timmins level indicate a new closed system with 136Xe/130Xe ratios 93% above modern air values (20% at 2.4 km) and an early atmosphere 124Xe/130Xe signal approaching the age of the host rock (~2.7 Ga) [4]. In comparison, the Sudbury system indicates exchange with an external source, being highly enriched in helium (30% gas volume) but with a low fissiogenic 136Xe/130Xe excess (10-38% above

  1. Microstructures, mineral chemistry, noble gases and nitrogen in the recent fall, Bhuka iron (IAB) meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Ranjith, P. M.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Chattopadhyay, Basab; Shrivastava, K. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report some chemical, petrological and isotopic studies of the Bhuka iron meteorite that fell in Rajasthan, India in 2005. Numerous silicate and graphite inclusions are visible on the surface of the hand specimen. In the polished and etched surface studied, irregular patches of graphite are found as the most dominant inclusion and commonly associated with pure corundum (95 wt% Al2O3), spinel, feldspar and Si-rich phases. Apart from typical lamellar intergrowth with kamacite (i.e. the Widmänstatten pattern), taenites are also commonly found to occur as a rim of the graphite inclusions. P-rich (up to 10 wt%) taenites are also found locally within the recrystallised kamacite matrix. Based on mineralogy, texture and bulk composition, Bhuka resembles the low-Ni IAB subgroup (ungrouped). Noble gas isotope studies suggest He, Ne and Ar are mostly of cosmogenic origin, while Kr and Xe are a mixture of cosmogenic, radiogenic and trapped components. A pre-atmospheric radius of 10±1 cm and a cosmic ray exposure age of 346±52 Ma are derived based on depth dependant (3He/4He)c and 38Arc respectively, as per the production systematics of cosmogenic noble gas isotopes (Ammon et al., 2009). Cosmogenic 83Kr and 126Xe yield production rates of 12 and 0.335 (in 10-15ccSTP/g Ma) for 83Kr and 126Xe respectively. Presence of trapped Kr and Xe, with (84Kr/132Xe)t=2 and radiogenic 129Xe=120×10-12 ccSTP/g are due to presence of graphite/silicate inclusions in the analysed sample. Over ~150% excess 131Xec than expected from spallation suggests contribution from (n,ɤ) reactions from Ba from inclusions and suggests irradiation of pre-atmospheric object in a larger body, indicative of complex irradiation. Trapped N of 24 ppm, with δ15N=-10.7±0.8‰ observed in Bhuka, is heavier than the range observed hither to in IAB irons.

  2. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-01

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  3. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.; Norman, P.; Aksela, H.; Aagren, H.

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of {approx}4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  4. Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in Antarctic H chondrites with high and normal natural thermoluminescence levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Jennifer L.; Franke, Luitgard; Scherer, Peter; Schultz, Ludolf; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2000-07-01

    We report noble gas data for 37 H chondrites collected from the Allan Hills by EUROMET in the 1988/1989 Field Season. Among these are 16 specimens with high levels (>100 krad) of natural thermoluminescence (NTL), originally interpreted as signaling their derivation from a single meteoroid with an orbit that became Earth-crossing -~100 ka ago. One of these 16 is an H3 with a cosmic ray exposure age of ~33 Ma and clearly represents a separate fall. The other 15 H4-6 chondrites derive from 3 separate meteoroids, each of which is represented by a 5- or 6-member group. These groups have mean exposure ages of 3.7, 4.1 and 6.6 Ma: the middle-group members all contain solar Ne. The 2 younger groups also seem to each include a few H chondrites with normal NTL levels. Measurements of cosmogenic 10Be (1.5 Ma), 26Al (710 ka) and 36Cl (301 ka) in 14 of the high NTL chondrites indicate that all reflect a simple irradiation history. In contrast, many of a different, 38-member, randomly-selected suite of Antarctic H chondrites seem to have different cosmic ray irradiation histories. The 3.7 and 6.6 Ma groups from the 37-member Allan Hills suite come, respectively, from about 5-30 cm and about 5-10 cm depths in 80-125 cm and 60-125 cm-radius meteoroids.

  5. Isotopic anomalies of noble gases in meteorites and their origins. III - LL-chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaerts, L.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    Nine LL-chondrites were studied by selective etching to characterize the noble gas components in three mineral fractions: HF-HCl-solubles, chromite and carbon. The Ne-20/Ar-36 ratio is considered, noting that chondrites of different petrologic types cannot all be derived from the same volatile rich ancestor, but must have formed over a range of temperatures, with correspondingly different volatile contents. Variations in the carbonaceous chondrite fission (CCFXe) component in LL3, LL5, and LL6 chondrites are discussed, noting that if CCFXe comes from a supernova, then its distribution in LL-chondrites requires three presolar carrier minerals of the right solubility properties, containing three different xenon components. However, if CCFXe comes from fission of a volatile superheavy element, then its decrease from LL3 to LL6 can be attributed to less complete condensation from the solar nebula. Finally, the three types of primordial xenon components which occur in different minerals of the same meteorite are described.

  6. Production Rates of Noble Gases in the Near-Surface Layers of Europa by Energetic Charged Particles and the Potential for Determining Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2003-01-01

    The surface of Europa is expected to be extremely active, undergoing tectonic and/or tidal geological activity and sputtering/ deposition, as well as impact cratering. Determination of the actual age of the surface at one or more places would greatly simplify trying to sort out what processes are occurring, and at what rate. If there is K present, as the spectral and compositional modeling discussed predict, it should be possible, in principle, to determine K-Ar crystallization ages. Whether or not there is K present, a consideration of the environment suggests we can determine an energetic particle exposure age if we can make in situ measurements of the abundances of major elements and of noble gas isotopes. This requires instrumentation that is within reach of current technology. In this paper, we calculate production rates for noble-gas isotopes in a simplified Europan surface, to quantify the amount of light noble gases produced by exposure to energetic particles.

  7. Stratification of discharge in noble gases from the viewpoint of the discrete dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Golubovskii, Yu. Pelyukhova, E.; Sigeneger, F.; Nekuchaev, V.

    2015-03-15

    Based on the analysis of electron phase trajectories in sinusoidal electric fields, a new point of view on discharge stratification is proposed. It is shown that the positive column can be considered as a spatial resonator in which electric fields with a fundamental period length L{sub S} or higher mode length q/p L{sub S} establish, where p and q are integers and p > q. The fundamental mode length L{sub S} is equivalent to the distance on which electrons gain energy equal to the lowest excitation threshold. This distance determines a length of the S-striation. Unlike kinetic theory, in the presented model resonance properties of the discharge column are not connected with elastic collision energy losses. A point map is used to obtain the resonance trajectories of electrons in the phase plane. Stable points for the positions of inelastic collisions in the resonance trajectories have been found at the positions of field maxima in the case of integer ratios p/q . For non-integer ratios p/q , multiple resonance trajectories arise according to a more complex stability criterion. From this point of view, S-, P-, and R-striations in noble gas discharges can be explained. Due to energy losses in elastic collisions, initial electron energy distribution functions converge to the resonance trajectories (the so-called “bunch effect”). The findings of the discrete model agree with results of kinetic theory and experiment. The new approach avoids difficulties of the kinetic theory in the case of exceptionally large relaxation lengths which can even exceed the positive column length.

  8. Noble gases fingerprint a metasedimentary fluid source in the Macraes orogenic gold deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R. J.; Burgess, Ray; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-04-01

    The world-class Macraes orogenic gold deposit (˜10 Moz resource) formed during the late metamorphic uplift of a metasedimentary schist belt in southern New Zealand. Mineralising fluids, metals and metalloids were derived from within the metasedimentary host. Helium and argon extracted from fluid inclusions in sulphide mineral grains (three crush extractions from one sample) have crustal signatures, with no evidence for mantle input (R/Ra = 0.03). Xenon extracted from mineralised quartz samples provides evidence for extensive interaction between fluid and maturing organic material within the metasedimentary host rocks, with 132Xe/36Ar ratios up to 200 times greater than air. Similarly, I/Cl ratios for fluids extracted from mineralised quartz are similar to those of brines from marine sediments that have interacted with organic matter and are ten times higher than typical magmatic/mantle fluids. The Macraes mineralising fluids were compositionally variable, reflecting either mixing of two different crustal fluids in the metasedimentary pile or a single fluid type that has had varying degrees of interaction with the host metasediments. Evidence for additional input of meteoric water is equivocal, but minor meteoric incursion cannot be discounted. The Macraes deposit formed in a metasedimentary belt without associated coeval magmatism, and therefore represents a purely crustal metamorphogenic end member in a spectrum of orogenic hydrothermal processes that can include magmatic and/or mantle fluid input elsewhere in the world. There is no evidence for involvement of minor intercalated metabasic rocks in the Macraes mineralising system. Hydrothermal fluids that formed other, smaller, orogenic deposits in the same metamorphic belt have less pronounced noble gas and halogen evidence for crustal fluid-rock interaction than at Macraes, but these deposits also formed from broadly similar metamorphogenic processes.

  9. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  10. A density functional theory study of magneto-electric Jones birefringence of noble gases, furan homologues, and mono-substituted benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Fahleson, Tobias; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia; Rizzo, Antonio; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.

    2013-11-21

    We report on the results of a systematic ab initio study of the Jones birefringence of noble gases, of furan homologues, and of monosubstituted benzenes, in the gas phase, with the aim of analyzing the behavior and the trends within a list of systems of varying size and complexity, and of identifying candidates for a combined experimental/theoretical study of the effect. We resort here to analytic linear and nonlinear response functions in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. A correlation is made between the observable (the Jones constant) and the atomic radius for noble gases, or the permanent electric dipole and a structure/chemical reactivity descriptor as the para Hammett constant for substituted benzenes.

  11. Dating and tracing groundwater resources in central Québec with noble gases, 14C and water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautour, G.; Pinti, D. L.; Castro, M. C.; Barbecot, F.; Larocque, M.; Hall, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Canada water supply is derived mainly from lakes and rivers while groundwater accounts for less than 30% of the demand. Climatic and anthropogenic stress is endangering this natural resource. This study is part of a Quebec-funded program to characterize groundwater resources from major basins to ensure adequate water quality and management. The Bécancour River catchment area, 200 km NE of Montréal, is studied for this purpose. The region extends from the Appalachian Mts. down to the St. Lawrence River. Water chemistry shows the occurrence of Ca,Na-HCO3, Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3 and NaCl waters, mainly recharged in the Appalachians and flowing to the St. Lawrence River. Aquifers are also recharged locally through Quaternary sandy deposits throughout the plain. Main aquifers are found both in unconfined and confined Quaternary sands intercalated with clays, and also locally in fractured Ordovician carbonates. To identify groundwater flow paths and to estimate water residence times, a multi-isotopic study involving noble gases, 14C and U, Th isotopes was initiated. Noble gas preliminary results were obtained on two transects, one along the downward flow path and the second perpendicular to the first, along a deeper sinclinorium with NaCl waters (TDS =170-705 mg/L). The 3He/4He ratios versus 4He/20Ne clearly points to mixing between three water bodies. The first has been recharged very recently displaying a near-atmospheric ratio of 0.79 Ra (Ra=atmospheric 3He/4He ratio of 1.386 x 10-6) and a 4He/20Ne of 0.2 close to the Air Saturated Water value, i.e. the ratio of atmospheric He and Ne dissolved in groundwater. The second water body is slightly older and shows the occurrence of tritiogenic 3He (3Hetri) excesses up to 1.07x10-13 ccSTP/g. These waters are found along the transect parallel to the main flow path. Using a local tritium decay curve and measured 3Hetri, an age of 19-20 years is suggested. The third water body contains large amounts of radiogenic 4He produced by U

  12. Proton affinities of maingroup-element hydrides and noble gases: trends across the periodic table, structural effects, and DFT validation.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Rösler, Ernst; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2006-10-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of the gas-phase basicity of archetypal neutral bases across the periodic system using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of the density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. First, we validate DFT as a reliable tool for computing proton affinities and related thermochemical quantities: BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P is shown to yield a mean absolute deviation of 2.0 kcal/mol for the proton affinity at 298 K with respect to experiment, and 1.2 kcal/mol with high-level ab initio benchmark data. The main purpose of this work is to provide the proton affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of the neutral bases constituted by all maingroup-element hydrides of groups 15-17 and the noble gases, that is, group 18, and periods 1-6. We have also studied the effect of step-wise methylation of the protophilic center of the second- and third-period bases.

  13. Proton affinities of maingroup-element hydrides and noble gases: trends across the periodic table, structural effects, and DFT validation.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Rösler, Ernst; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2006-10-01

    We have carried out an extensive exploration of the gas-phase basicity of archetypal neutral bases across the periodic system using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of the density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. First, we validate DFT as a reliable tool for computing proton affinities and related thermochemical quantities: BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P is shown to yield a mean absolute deviation of 2.0 kcal/mol for the proton affinity at 298 K with respect to experiment, and 1.2 kcal/mol with high-level ab initio benchmark data. The main purpose of this work is to provide the proton affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of the neutral bases constituted by all maingroup-element hydrides of groups 15-17 and the noble gases, that is, group 18, and periods 1-6. We have also studied the effect of step-wise methylation of the protophilic center of the second- and third-period bases. PMID:16823810

  14. Noble gases and halogens in Graves Nunataks 06129: The complex thermal history of a felsic asteroid crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claydon, Jennifer L.; Crowther, Sarah A.; Fernandes, Vera A.; Gilmour, Jamie D.

    2015-06-01

    The meteorite Graves Nunataks 06128/06129 is a rare example of felsic asteroidal crust. Knowledge of its history can help shed light on the evolution processes of planetesimals. The noble gases can be used to constrain both the chronology of meteorites and the processes that result in movements of volatile elements on asteroidal bodies. We have examined the I-Xe and Ar-Ar systems of the plagioclase-rich achondrite, Graves Nunataks 06129 by high-resolution laser step-heating of irradiated samples. Iodine and 129Xe∗ are both present but are released at different temperatures and do not show a correlation, therefore the I-Xe system in GRA 06129 has no chronological significance. We propose that radiogenic 129Xe∗ was lost from primary phases and parentless 129Xe∗ was later introduced into the rock by interaction with a fluid sourced from a reservoir that evolved with a high I/Xe ratio. This could have been the same halogen-rich fluid that induced the conversion of merrillite and pyroxene into chlorapatite. Inherited 40Ar (i.e. not generated by in situ decay of 40K) is also present in one of three fragments studied here and may have been introduced at the same time as parentless 129Xe∗.

  15. Composition of solar flare noble gases preserved in meteorite parent body regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Badhwar, G.; Murali, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    Isotopic composition of solar-flare (SF) Ne was determined in acid-etched pyroxene mineral separates from the Kapoeta meteorite, a brecciated meteorite known to contain implanted solar gases. The results yield the SF Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of 11.6 +/-0.2, confirming previous determinations of this SF ratio in lunar and meteoritic samples. The same SF Ne composition was also obtained by applying an ordinate intercept technique to the same data set. The ordinate intercept technique was then applied to the Ar and He data. The results are SF Ar-36/Ar-38 = 4.9 +/-0.1 and SF He-4/He-3 = 3800 +/-200. These values are significantly different from the solar-wind (SW) Ar and He values. It is estimated that the concentration of the SF component in Kapoeta pyroxenes is about 20 percent that of the SW component, orders of magnitude higher than expected from SW and SF proton flux measurements.

  16. Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation in confined plasmas: Comparison of noble and molecule gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, June Young; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-03-15

    Experimental verification of the Boltzmann relation is performed in argon and oxygen gas inductively coupled plasmas from the measurements of both the spatial electron currents (as a fluid approach) and the electron energy probability functions (EEPFs, as a kinetic approach). At a low gas pressure of 10 mTorr, the measured electron currents are spatially uniform, and the EEPFs in the total electron energy scale are identical, which indicate that the Boltzmann relation is valid at both the argon and oxygen gases. As the gas pressure increases to 30-40 mTorr, however, the Boltzmann relation is broken in the oxygen gas discharge, while the Boltzmann relation is still valid in the argon gas discharge. This different variation in the oxygen gas discharge is mainly due to the presence of various inelastic collisions in the entire electron energy region, which causes the transition of the electron kinetics from a non-local to a local regime.

  17. Volatiles (nitrogen, noble gases) in recently discovered SNC meteorites, extinct radioactivities and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marty, B.; Marti, K.; Zimmermann, L.

    2003-09-01

    We report noble gas and nitrogen analyses of newly discovered SNC meteorites, one nakhlite (NWA817) and four shergottites (NWA480, NWA856, NWA1068, and SaU 005). The K-Ar age (1.3 Ga) as well as the cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age (10.0±1.3 Ma) of nakhlite NWA817 agree with data of Nakhla. The CRE ages of NWA480, NWA856, and NWA1068 (2.35±0.20, 2.60±0.21 and 2.01±0.65 Ma, respectively) are consistent, within uncertainties, with other basaltic shergottites, but the CRE age of SaU 005 (1.25±0.07 Ma) is distinct and indicates a different ejection event. Bulk K-Ar ages of all shergottites exceed the reported radiometric ages and reveal the presence of inherited radiogenic 40Ar in basaltic lavas. The isotopic composition of nitrogen trapped in these SNC meteorites is not homogeneous, since δ 15N values of either +15 to 20‰ or +45‰, indicate different nitrogen reservoirs. All shergottites contain fission xenon from 238U, and fission Xe of extinct ( T1/2=82 Ma) 244Pu, previously identified in ALH84001, in Chassigny and in Nakhla is also present in at least one shergottite (NWA856). The shergottites contain less fissiogenic Xe than other SNC, suggesting that either their source was more degassed or that the magma source region closed at a later time. In nakhlites, fission xenon from 244Pu correlates with uranium, a geochemical proxy of plutonium. Thus it is possible that fissiogenic Xe was not inherited during magma differentiation, but rather was produced in situ and retained in refractory mineral assemblages. In this interpretation, the magma evolution that settled the mineralogy and geochemistry of nakhlites took place at a time when 244Pu was alive and pre-dated the (late) events recorded in their radiometric ages. Alternatively, fissiogenic xenon was trapped from a mantle source during closed system evolution of the parent magmas, in which case such evolution might have taken place at considerable depth (pressure) in order to inhibit magma degassing during the

  18. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-01

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  19. Halogens and noble gases in Mathematician Ridge meta-gabbros, NE Pacific: implications for oceanic hydrothermal root zones and global volatile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Vanko, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Six variably amphibolitised meta-gabbros cut by quartz-epidote veins containing high-salinity brine, and vapour fluid inclusions were investigated for halogen (Cl, Br, I) and noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations. The primary aims were to investigate fluid sources and interactions in hydrothermal root zones and determine the concentrations and behaviours of these elements in altered oceanic crust, which is poorly known, but has important implications for global volatile (re)cycling. Amphiboles in each sample have average concentrations of 0.1-0.5 wt% Cl, 0.5-3 ppm Br and 5-68 ppb I. Amphibole has Br/Cl of ~0.0004 that is about ten times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions and seawater, and I/Cl of 2-44 × 10-6 that is 3-5 times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions but higher than seawater. The amphibole and fluid compositions are attributed to mixing halogens introduced by seawater with a large halogen component remobilised from mafic lithologies in the crust and fractionation of halogens between fluids and metamorphic amphibole formed at low water-rock ratios. The metamorphic amphibole and hydrothermal quartz are dominated by seawater-derived atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and mantle-derived He, with 3He/4He of ~9 R/Ra (Ra = atmospheric ratio). The amphibole and quartz preserve high 4He concentrations that are similar to MORB glasses and have noble gas abundance ratios with high 4He/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar that are greater than seawater and air. These characteristics result from the high solubility of light noble gases in amphibole and suggest that all the noble gases can behave similarly to `excess 40Ar' in metamorphic hydrothermal root zones. All noble gases are therefore trapped in hydrous minerals to some extent and can be inefficiently lost during metamorphism implying that even the lightest noble gases (He and Ne) can potentially be subducted into the Earth's mantle.

  20. The Constancy of the Galactic Cosmic Rays: The Contribution of Cosmogenic Noble Gases and Radionuclides in Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T.; Leya, I.; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Pavetich, S.; Scharf, A.

    2016-08-01

    We measured cosmogenic noble gas and radionuclide concentrations in iron meteorites and calculated their cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages. We set up CRE age histograms and searched for periodic peaks to study galactic cosmic ray flux variations.

  1. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-28

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ɛ) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ɛ(∞)) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σs, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σs obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at the core of

  2. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-28

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ε) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ε{sup ∞}) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σ{sub s}, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σ{sub s} obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at

  3. The solvation radius of silicate melts based on the solubility of noble gases and scaled particle theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The existing solubility data on noble gases in high-temperature silicate melts have been analyzed in terms of Scaling Particle Theory coupled with an ab initio assessment of the electronic, dispersive, and repulsive energy terms based on the Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). After a preliminary analysis of the role of the contracted Gaussian basis sets and theory level in reproducing appropriate static dipole polarizabilities in a vacuum, we have shown that the procedure returns Henry's law constants consistent with the values experimentally observed in water and benzene at T = 25 °C and P = 1 bar for the first four elements of the series. The static dielectric constant (ɛ) of the investigated silicate melts and its optical counterpart (ɛ∞) were then resolved through the application of a modified form of the Clausius-Mossotti relation. Argon has been adopted as a probe to depict its high-T solubility in melts through an appropriate choice of the solvent diameter σs, along the guidelines already used in the past for simple media such as water or benzene. The σs obtained was consistent with a simple functional form based on the molecular volume of the solvent. The solubility calculations were then extended to He, Ne, and Kr, whose dispersive and repulsive coefficients are available from theory and we have shown that their ab initio Henry's constants at high T reproduce the observed increase with the static polarizability of the series element with reasonable accuracy. At room temperature (T = 25 °C) the calculated Henry's constants of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr in the various silicate media predict higher solubilities than simple extrapolations (i.e., Arrhenius plots) based on high-T experiments and give rise to smooth trends not appreciably affected by the static polarizabilities of the solutes. The present investigation opens new perspectives on a wider application of PCM theory which can be extended to materials of great industrial interest at the core of

  4. Investigations of cosmic-ray-produced nuclides in iron meteorites. V - More data on the nuclides of potassium and noble gases, on exposure ages and meteoroid sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshage, H.; Feldmann, H.; Braun, O.

    1983-02-01

    The concentrations of the cosmic-ray-produced He-, Ne-, and ArSPEC sp -nuclides in samples of 31 iron meteorites have been determineSPEC sp d by mass spectrometry. A critical examination of the results SPEC sp was performed. The data of at least 52 samples prove to be useSPEC sp ful to describe the "normal" abundance patterns of cosmogenic SPEC sp noble gases in iron meteorites; the description is accomplisheSPEC sp d by a new system of equations that correlate some properly seSPEC sp lected abundance ratios with one another. SPEC sp

  5. Ab initio molecular orbital studies of the vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes of boron trifluoride with the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Ford, Thomas A

    2005-05-01

    The molecular structures, interaction energies, charge transfer properties and vibrational spectra of the van der Waals complexes formed between boron trifluoride and the noble gases neon, argon, krypton and xenon have been computed using second and fourth order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANL2DZ basis set. The complexes are all symmetric tops, with the noble gas atom acting as a sigma electron donor along the C3 axis of the BF3 molecule. The interaction energies are all vanishingly small, and the amount of charge transferred in each case is of the order of 0.01e. The directions of the wavenumber shifts of the symmetric bending (nu2) and antisymmetric stretching (nu3) modes of the BF3 fragment confirm those determined experimentally, and the shifts are shown to correlate well with the polarizability of the noble gas atom and the inverse sixth power of the intermonomer separation. The nu2 mode is substantially more sensitive to complexation than the nu3 vibration.

  6. Using noble gases in the pore water of ocean sediments to characterize CH4 seepage off the coast of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Newly developed analytical techniques to determine the abundances of noble gases in sediment pore water [1, 5] allow noble-gas concentrations and isotope ratios to be measured easily and routinely in unconsolidated lacustrine sediments [6, 7]. We applied these techniques for the first time to ocean sediments to investigate an active cold methane seepage system located in the South Pacific off the coast of New Zealand using 3He-4He ratios determined in the sediment pore water. Our results [8] show that more 3He-rich fluids are released in the vicinity of the Pacific-Australian subduction zone than at the forearc stations located closer to the New Zealand coast. However, the 3He-4He isotope signature in the sediment column indicates that only a minor part of the He emanating from deeper strata originates from a (depleted) mantle source. Hence, most He in the pore water is produced locally by the radioactive decay of U and Th in the sediment minerals or in the underlying crustal rocks. Such an occurrence of isotopically heavy crustal He also suggests that the source of the largest fraction of methane is a near-surface geochemical reservoir. This finding is in line with a previous δ13C study in the water column which concluded that the emanating methane is most likely of biological origin and is formed in the upper few meters of the sediment column [2]. The prevalence of isotopically heavy He agrees well with the outcome of other previous studies on island arc systems [3, 4] which indicate that the forearc regions are characterized by crustal He emission, whereas the volcanic arc region is characterized by the presence of mantle He associated with rising magma. References [1] Brennwald, M. S., Hofer, M., Peeters, F., Aeschbach-Hertig, W., Strassmann, K., Kipfer, R., and Imboden, D. M. (2003). Analysis of dissolved noble gases in the pore water of lacustrine sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 1, 51-62. [2] Faure, K., Greinert, J., Schneider von Deimling, J., Mc

  7. Noble gases, their carrier phases, and argon chronology of upper mantle rocks from Zabargad Island, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieloff, M.; Weber, H. W.; Kurat, G.; Jessberger, E. K.; Janicke, J.

    1997-12-01

    in the orthopyroxenite vein rock Z31 by stepwise crushing and subsequent total fusion. Isotopic ratios show a well defined correlation with crushing step that indicates the presence of two different types or generations of inclusions, which were subjected to different degrees of contamination by atmosphere type noble gases. As inclusions were trapped before tje main deformation of the peridotite complex (Kurat et al., 1993), argon with relatively low 40Ar/36Ar ratios ( ≤ 1500) was trapped in the mantle, which requires an admixture of argon of atmospheric composition to the source region of the peridotites. Radiogenic isotopes ( 4He, 40Ar) are dominated by the mantle source, however, the 4He/40Ar ratio (˜0.16) is much lower than expected from long term decay of radioactive parent nuclides U, Th, and K. Such low ratios, which have previously been observed also in mantle xenoliths, obviously reflect the indigenous peridotitic source and are most probably due to fractionation processes in the mantle.

  8. Searching for Indigenous Noble Gases in the Moon: Vacuum Crushing of Vesicular Basalt 15016 and Stepwise Heating of Anorthosites 60025, 60215 and 65315 Aliquots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Avice, G.; Marty, B.; Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts during the last four decades, no primordial signature of lunar xenon has been found. In order to further investigate the possible occurrence of indigenous volatiles in the Moon, we have analysed the noble gas and nitrogen isotopic compositions in two different sets of samples. Vacuum crushing of highly vesicular (~50% by volume) basalt 15016 (3.4 b.y. old, 300 m.y. exposure age) releases large amounts of spallation-produced gases that overshadow any other component. Lunar anorthosites 60025, 60215 and 65315 have the lowest exposure duration (~2m.y.) among Apollo samples. Consequently, they contain only limited cosmogenic (e.g. 124,126Xe) and solar wind noble gases. Furthermore, anorthosite is poor in U and Pu, leading to negligible contribution of fissiogenic Xe isotopes. These properties make these samples ideal for searching for lunar primordial noble gases. As observed in previous studies [1-3], lunar anorthosite Xe presents an isotopic composition very close to that of terrestrial atmosphere, which has been previously attributed to "abnormal adsorption" of terrestrial Xe after sample return. This presumed atmospheric Xe contamination can only be removed by heating the samples at medium to high temperature under vacuum, and is therefore different from common adsorption. In order to investigate this abnormal adsorption, uncrushed gravels of lunar anorthosite were exposed to a neutral Xe-rich atmosphere. Infrared reflectance spectrometry of processed, and unprocessed, samples shows a shift in the anorthosite's peak of the former, possibly corresponding to chemical Xe bonding. This phenomenon could explain the difficulties met for forty years when investigating a lunar primordial xenon component in anorthosites. However, our high precision Xe isotope analysis shows a systematic trend toward depletion in the heavy Xe isotopes (134Xe and 136Xe) not seen before. This leads us to make a tantalising parallel between the indigenous component in

  9. Mean annual temperature in New Zealand during the last glacial maximum derived from dissolved noble gases in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, A. M.; Stute, M.; Morgenstern, U.; Stewart, M. K.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a reconstruction of mean annual surface temperature in New Zealand over the last glacial period using groundwater noble gas paleothermometry. Low resolution 14C-derived mean recharge ages of groundwater from the Deep Moutere, Deep Wairau, and Taranaki aquifers range from roughly 41,500 yr to present, including the last glacial maximum (LGM). Modeled noble gas temperatures of probable glacial-age samples range from roughly 3.7-6.2 °C cooler than present. We present an error-weighted mean cooling of 4.6 ± 0.5°C relative to present during last glacial period. The screened depth intervals of some wells sampled in this study allow for a degree of mixing during extraction between groundwater layers of different recharge age. Mixing with modern groundwater may slightly elevate the noble gas temperatures (NGTs) of glacial-age samples while making them appear substantially younger. Given the uncertainty in dating, we cannot rule out a larger LGM temperature depression of up to ∼6 °C. The ∼4.6 °C cooling estimate agrees with a number of terrestrial paleoclimate reconstructions near the study area as well as the majority of nearby paleoceanographic temperature studies.

  10. Anionic chemistry of noble gases: formation of Mg-NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) compounds under pressure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Li; Brgoch, Jakoah; Spera, Frank; Jackson, Matthew G; Kresse, Georg; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-11

    While often considered to be chemically inert, the reactivity of noble gas elements at elevated pressures is an important aspect of fundamental chemistry. The discovery of Xe oxidation transformed the doctrinal boundary of chemistry by showing that a complete electron shell is not inert to reaction. However, the reductive propensity, i.e., gaining electrons and forming anions, has not been proposed or examined for noble gas elements. In this work, we demonstrate, using first-principles electronic structure calculations coupled to an efficient structure prediction method, that Xe, Kr, and Ar can form thermodynamically stable compounds with Mg at high pressure (≥125, ≥250, and ≥250 GPa, respectively). The resulting compounds are metallic and the noble gas atoms are negatively charged, suggesting that chemical species with a completely filled shell can gain electrons, filling their outermost shell(s). Moreover, this work indicates that Mg2NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) are high-pressure electrides with some of the electrons localized at interstitial sites enclosed by the surrounding atoms. Previous predictions showed that such electrides only form in Mg and its compounds at very high pressures (>500 GPa). These calculations also demonstrate strong chemical interactions between the Xe 5d orbitals and the quantized interstitial quasiatom (ISQ) orbitals, including the strong chemical bonding and electron transfer, revealing the chemical nature of the ISQ. PMID:26488848

  11. Anionic chemistry of noble gases: formation of Mg-NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) compounds under pressure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Li; Brgoch, Jakoah; Spera, Frank; Jackson, Matthew G; Kresse, Georg; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-11

    While often considered to be chemically inert, the reactivity of noble gas elements at elevated pressures is an important aspect of fundamental chemistry. The discovery of Xe oxidation transformed the doctrinal boundary of chemistry by showing that a complete electron shell is not inert to reaction. However, the reductive propensity, i.e., gaining electrons and forming anions, has not been proposed or examined for noble gas elements. In this work, we demonstrate, using first-principles electronic structure calculations coupled to an efficient structure prediction method, that Xe, Kr, and Ar can form thermodynamically stable compounds with Mg at high pressure (≥125, ≥250, and ≥250 GPa, respectively). The resulting compounds are metallic and the noble gas atoms are negatively charged, suggesting that chemical species with a completely filled shell can gain electrons, filling their outermost shell(s). Moreover, this work indicates that Mg2NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) are high-pressure electrides with some of the electrons localized at interstitial sites enclosed by the surrounding atoms. Previous predictions showed that such electrides only form in Mg and its compounds at very high pressures (>500 GPa). These calculations also demonstrate strong chemical interactions between the Xe 5d orbitals and the quantized interstitial quasiatom (ISQ) orbitals, including the strong chemical bonding and electron transfer, revealing the chemical nature of the ISQ.

  12. Noble Gases in Alpine Gold: U/Th-He Dating and Excesses of Radiogenic He and AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Krahenbuhl, U.; Neuenschwander, J.

    1992-07-01

    quantity of trapped atmospheric noble gases we estimate atmospheric ^4He in the gold samples to be three to five orders of magnitude below the observed ^4He concentration. Placer gold is finely distributed in rock material and might be exposed to an alpha-particle irradiation from neighboring U/Th-rich minerals. An alternative He source are inclusions of U/Th-rich minerals, such as zircon, either within the gold material or mechanically worked into the spangles as they were part of the river detritus. Acknowledgement: We thank the Swiss NSF for their support. References: Diamond L.W. (1990) Am. J. of Science 290, 912-958. Schmid K. (1973) Schw. Min. Petr. Mitt. 53, 125-156. Table 1, which in the hard copy appears here, shows concentrations of He, Ne, and Ar (10^-8 cm^3 STP/g) and of K, Th, and U (ppm) in vein-type free gold, placer gold, and quartz. The ^3He and ^21Ne signals were below detection limits, that is ^4He/^3He in gold is >100'000. Average ^20Ne/^22Ne ratios in gold and quartz are 10.2 +- 0.2, that is about 4% larger than in the terrestrial atmosphere. Average ^36Ar/^38Ar = 5.2 +- 0.2 (within errors identical to ^36Ar/^38Ar in air). 1) Sample sizes 50-100 mg. 2) Radiogenic ^40Ar = ^40Ar-295.5 x ^36Ar. 3) Calculated from U/Th and ^40K decay.

  13. Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well mimicking the Lennard-Jones fluid and a comparison with noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bárcenas, M; Reyes, Y; Romero-Martínez, A; Odriozola, G; Orea, P

    2015-02-21

    Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well (TW) fluid are obtained with the aim of mimicking the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and approach the properties of noble gases. For this purpose, the scope of the TW is varied to match vapor-liquid densities and surface tension. Surface tension and coexistence curves of TW systems with different ranges were calculated with replica exchange Monte Carlo and compared to those data previously reported in the literature for truncated and shifted (STS), truncated (ST), and full Lennard-Jones (full-LJ) potentials. We observed that the scope of the TW potential must be increased to approach the STS, ST, and full-LJ properties. In spite of the simplicity of TW expression, a remarkable agreement is found. Furthermore, the variable scope of the TW allows for a good match of the experimental data of argon and xenon. PMID:25702023

  14. Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well mimicking the Lennard-Jones fluid and a comparison with noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bárcenas, M; Reyes, Y; Romero-Martínez, A; Odriozola, G; Orea, P

    2015-02-21

    Coexistence and interfacial properties of a triangle-well (TW) fluid are obtained with the aim of mimicking the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and approach the properties of noble gases. For this purpose, the scope of the TW is varied to match vapor-liquid densities and surface tension. Surface tension and coexistence curves of TW systems with different ranges were calculated with replica exchange Monte Carlo and compared to those data previously reported in the literature for truncated and shifted (STS), truncated (ST), and full Lennard-Jones (full-LJ) potentials. We observed that the scope of the TW potential must be increased to approach the STS, ST, and full-LJ properties. In spite of the simplicity of TW expression, a remarkable agreement is found. Furthermore, the variable scope of the TW allows for a good match of the experimental data of argon and xenon.

  15. Noble Gases in Iddingsite from the Lafayette Meteorite: Evidence for Liquid Water on Mars in the Last Few Hundred Million Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Brkland, M. K.; Cohen, B. A.; Grier, J. A.; Li, B.; Olson, E. K.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases from 18 samples of weathering products ("iddingsite") from the Lafayette meteorite. Potassium-argon ages of 12 samples range from near zero to 670 +/- 91 Ma. These ages confirm the martian origin of the iddingsite, but it is not clear whether any or all of the ages represent iddingsite formation as opposed to later alteration or incorporation of martian atmospheric Ar-40. In any case, because iddingsite formation requires liquid water, this data requires the presence of liquid water near the surface of Mars at least as recently as 1300 Ma ago, and probably as recently as 650 Ma ago. Krypton and Xe analysis of a single 34 microg sample indicates the presence of fractionated martian atmosphere within the iddingsite. This also confirms the martian origin of the iddingsite. The mechanism of incorporation could either be through interaction with liquid water during iddingsite formation or a result of shock implantation of adsorbed atmospheric gas.

  16. Origins of volatile elements (H, C, N, noble gases) on Earth and Mars in light of recent results from the ROSETTA cometary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard; Avice, Guillaume; Sano, Yuji; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Hässig, Myrtha; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Mousis, Olivier; Rubin, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements of the volatile composition of the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter 67P) allow constraints to be set on the origin of volatile elements (water, carbon, nitrogen, noble gases) in inner planets' atmospheres. Analyses by the ROSINA mass spectrometry system onboard the Rosetta spacecraft indicate that 67P ice has a D/H ratio three times that of the ocean value (Altwegg et al., 2015) and contains significant amounts of N2, CO, CO2, and importantly, argon (Balsiger et al., 2015). Here we establish a model of cometary composition based on literature data and the ROSINA measurements. From mass balance calculations, and provided that 67P is representative of the cometary ice reservoir, we conclude that the contribution of cometary volatiles to the Earth's inventory was minor for water (≤1%), carbon (≤1%), and nitrogen species (a few % at most). However, cometary contributions to the terrestrial atmosphere may have been significant for the noble gases. They could have taken place towards the end of the main building stages of the Earth, after the Moon-forming impact and during either a late veneer episode or, more probably, the Terrestrial Late Heavy Bombardment around 4.0-3.8 billion years (Ga) ago. Contributions from the outer solar system via cometary bodies could account for the dichotomy of the noble gas isotope compositions, in particular xenon, between the mantle and the atmosphere. A mass balance based on 36Ar and organics suggests that the amount of prebiotic material delivered by comets could have been quite considerable - equivalent to the present-day mass of the biosphere. On Mars, several of the isotopic signatures of surface volatiles (notably the high D/H ratios) are clearly indicative of atmospheric escape processes. Nevertheless, we suggest that cometary contributions after the major atmospheric escape events, e.g., during a Martian Late Heavy Bombardment towards the end of the Noachian era, could account for the

  17. Using carbon and water isotopes and noble gases to assess the origin of methane in fresh water aquifers in the south of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, Hans Peter; de Weert, Jasperien; Vonhof, Hubert; Janssen, Renee; Sueltenfuss, Juergen; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Castelijns, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater in the Dutch subsurface is known to contain substantial concentrations of methane of which the origin is not always clear. The Dutch subsurface contains relatively high organic matter contents which makes a biogenic origin plausible, however few studies have used water and carbon isotopes to deduce the origin of methane. In relation to possible future exploitation of deep shale gas resources, it is now considered important to assess base line quality of fresh groundwater in overlying aquifers from which drinking water is produced. Therefore, we sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields in the south of the Netherlands which represents a mixture of groundwater of different ages and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13C-DIC and 13C-CH4 and the full range of noble gases. 13C-CH4 measurements were carried out using a Picarro G2201-i CRDS analyser. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources and included carbonate dissolution and methanogenesis as the defining processes. The 13C-CH4 measurements showed a range of δ-values between -70 and -100‰, which give a clear indication for biogenic methane. No clear relations between 13C-CH4 and 13C-DIC or the 4He/CH4 ratio were observed. However, clear spatial patterns indicated that more depleted values are grouped in specific areas. The 13δCH4 values did not show a clear relation with the age distribution of the pumped water, even though a large range of age distributions was observed including old water with an age of > 25 k yrs. We believe that spatial differences in organic matter contents, origin of the geological deposits and/or the

  18. Origin and Processes Highlighted By Noble Gases Geochemistry of Submarine Gas Emissions from Seeps at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay):

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, A.; Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Bignon, L.; Pujol, M.; Levaché, D.

    2014-12-01

    Noble gases are widely used as tracers to both determine fluid origin and identify transfer processes governing fluid flow in natural systems. This work presents the preliminary results and interpretations from submarine gas samples collected during the GAZCOGNE2 cruise (2013). The seepage activity and the spatial distribution of the widespread emission sites encountered at this area are described by (Dupré et al. 2014). Gas composition shows that methane is the dominant species compared to the C2+. The associated δ13C and δD signatures point to a biogenic origin- through CO2 reduction- of the gas. Helium concentrations are very low, ranging from 0.1 and 2.3 ppm, indicating a low residence time of the fluids in the subsurface. However, the resulting helium isotopic ratios are mostly crustal fingerprinted (around 0.02). The R/Ra values sometimes exhibit higher value of 0.2, indicative either an ASW (air saturated water) value, or the fingerprint of ancient mantle helium, the later in agreement with the geological structural context of the Parentis Basin. Most of the samples exhibit a mixing between ASW and air, probably by excess air addition to the initial ASW concentration. The elemental Ne/Ar ratio is remarkably constant for the totality of the samples, with a value typical of ASW (0.2). This result implies that the migrating gas phase is "stripping" the original water matrix from its noble gas content, as described by Gillfillian et al., 2008. This further indicates that an intermediate reservoir of biogenic gas should be present at depth. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References: Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or the expression of hydrocarbon leakage?, Continental Shelf Research, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2014.07.004. Gilfillan S

  19. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Monahans H5 chondrite, Zolensky et al. report the first occurrence of grains of halite (NaCl), which contain minor sylvite (KCl) and tiny inclusions of liquid water. Here we report Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of Monahans light (4.53 Ga) and dark phases and of the halite (>4.33 Ga). We report the presence of trapped solar gases in the dark phase, demonstrating that it represents a prior regolith on the Monahans parent body, We also report the cosmic-ray exposure age of Monahans and the neutron fluence experienced by the regolith component. Because the halite grains are apparently located only in the regolith phase, they may have formed by early hydrous activity within the Monahans parent body regolith, or they may have been introduced from outside.

  20. On the size and structure of helium snowballs formed around charged atoms and clusters of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx(+) ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He20(84)Kr2(+) and the isobaric, nonmagic He41(84)Kr(+). Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr(+), which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa(+) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7300] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx(+) (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx(+) suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr(+) to Kr3(+). Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2(+) and He12Kr3(+) [Kim , J. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214301] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex(+) (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr(+) and HenXe(+) show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr(+); differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions.

  1. The evolution of Devonian hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers of the northern Appalachian Basin: Insights from integrating noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Whyte, Colin J.; Walsh, Talor B.; Kondash, Andrew J.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    groundwater (P(CH4) = ∼1 atmosphere) and elevated [Cl] and [Ba]. These data suggest that 4He is dominated by an exogenous (i.e., migrated) crustal source for these hydrocarbon gas- and salt-rich fluids. In combination with published inorganic geochemistry (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr, Sr/Ba, Br-/Cl-), new noble gas and hydrocarbon isotopic data (e.g., 20Ne/36Ar, C2+/C1, δ13C-CH4) suggest that a hydrocarbon-rich brine likely migrated from the Marcellus Formation (via primary hydrocarbon migration) as a dual-phase fluid (gas + liquid) and was fractionated by solubility partitioning during fluid migration and emplacement into conventional UD traps (via secondary hydrocarbon migration). Based on the highly fractionated 4He/CH4 data relative to Marcellus and UD production gases, we propose an additional phase of hydrocarbon gas migration where natural gas previously emplaced in UD hydrocarbon traps actively diffuses out into and equilibrates with modern shallow groundwater (via tertiary hydrocarbon migration) following uplift, denudation, and neotectonic fracturing. These data suggest that by integrating noble gas geochemistry with hydrocarbon and dissolved ion chemistry, one can better determine the source and migration processes of natural gas in the Earth's crust, which are two critical factors for understanding the presence of hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers.

  2. Thermal metamorphism of primitive meteorites. VIII - Noble gases, carbon and sulfur in Allende /C3/ meteorite heated at 400-1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Noble gases, C and S, are lost from Allende samples heated for 1 week at temperatures of 400-1000 C in a low pressure environment. In the extreme, losses of He-3 and He-4 are about 100 x while for C, S and Ne, Ar and Kr isotopes and Xe-132 these are less than or equal to 10 x. Except for He, these losses are less severe than those of Bi or Tl from samples heated in the same runs. Significant He, Ne and Ar isotopic fractionation during heating indicates preferential outgassing of specific reservoirs. Next to He, Ar-40 is the most labile of those species considered here but still less so than Bi or Tl. L-group (but not H- or LL-group) chondrites may have lost mobile elements like Tl while being outgassed after late impact-associated heating. A less likely alternative involving a collateral relation between condensation conditions and depth in a parent object may also explain the L-group trend.

  3. Noble gases in oxidized residue prepared from the Saratov L4 chondrite and Raman spectroscopic study of residues to characterize phase Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Jun-Ichi; Morishita, Kazuhiko; Nara, Masayuki; Amari, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed noble gases in an oxidized residue prepared from a HF-HCl residue of the Saratov L4 chondrite. The Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations in the oxidized residue are two orders of magnitude lower than those in the HF-HCl residue, and they are close to concentrations in the bulk. The He and Ne concentrations are similar in the three samples. The Ne isotopic ratios are almost purely cosmogenic, indicating absence of presolar diamonds (the carrier of the HL component). Thus, Saratov contains phase Q without presolar diamond. A study of the Raman spectroscopic parameters for the HF-HCl residue and the oxidized residue shows large changes due to oxidation. The directions of these changes are the same as observed in Allende, except oxidation increased the ID/IG (intensity ratio of the D band to the G band) in Saratov but decreased in Allende. This difference may be attributed to the different crystalline stages of carbon in both meteorites. The shifts in the Raman parameters to a discrete and/or more expanded region suggest that (1) oxidation changes the crystalline condition of graphitic carbon, (2) phase Q is not a dissolved site, and (3) the release of Q-gas is simply related to the rearrangement of the carbon structure during oxidation.

  4. Adsorption of inert gases including element 118 on noble metal and inert surfaces from ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic calculations.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2008-10-14

    The interaction of the inert gases Rn and element 118 with various surfaces has been studied on the basis of fully relativistic ab initio Dirac-Coulomb CCSD(T) calculations of atomic properties. The calculated polarizability of element 118, 46.3 a.u., is the largest in group 18, the ionization potential is the lowest at 8.91 eV, and the estimated atomic radius is the largest, 4.55 a.u. These extreme values reflect, in addition to the general trends in the Periodic Table, the relativistic expansion and destabilization of the outer valence 7p(3/2) orbital. Van der Waals coefficients C(3) and adsorption enthalpies DeltaH(ads) of Ne through element 118 on noble metals and inert surfaces, such as quartz, ice, Teflon, and graphite, were calculated in a physisorption model using the atomic properties obtained. The C(3) coefficients were shown to steadily increase in group 18, while the increase in DeltaH(ads) from Ne to Rn does not continue to element 118: The large atomic radius of the latter element is responsible for a decrease in the interaction energy. We therefore predict that experimental distinction between Rn and 118 by adsorption on these types of surfaces will not be feasible. A possible candidate for separating the two elements is charcoal; further study is needed to test this possibility.

  5. Isotopic anomalies of noble gases in meteorites and their origins. VI Presolar components in the Murchison C2 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaerts, L.; Lewis, R. S.; Matsuda, J.-I.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Rare gases were analyzed by stepped heating in five fractions of a chemically resistant residue from Murchison that had been separated according to grain size and resistance to HClO4. Nine gas components were recognized, of which three appear to be presolar: (1) Ne-E(H) released at 1000-1600 C and located in spinel; (2) Ne-E(L) released at less than 800 C and apparently located in a carbonaceous phase of grain size up to 10 microns; and (3) s-process Xe and Kr released at 1200-1600 C and located in a poorly characterized, possibly carbonaceous phase, distinct from the host phase of Ne-E(L).

  6. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  7. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl4 and CF4. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl4 and Ng-CF4 and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF4, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl4, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the

  8. Adsorption and desorption of noble gases on activated charcoal: I. 133Xe studies in a monolayer and packed bed.

    PubMed

    Scarpitta, S C; Harley, N H

    1990-10-01

    Detailed desorption studies using petroleum-based activated charcoals were conducted in monolayers and packed beds. Less extensive studies were conducted on several other types of charcoal. Kinetic studies, using 133Xe, demonstrated the existence of a micropore volume with entrance capillaries that together determined the response characteristics of charcoal to external concentration gradients of tracer gases. This new two-phase model, composed of micropores and entrance capillaries, describes the desorption dynamics of an adsorbed gas in the presence of water vapor. Condensed water vapor in the entrance capillaries of the charcoal reduced the effective pore radius and increased the diffusion half-time. Water could also adversely affect the integrating capability of the charcoal dramatically if the adsorbed water completely blocked the entrance capillaries. The amount of adsorbed water required to block the capillaries varied with the charcoal type and was termed here as the "break-point." The desorption parameters measured in this work can be used to design an improved passive Rn monitor to effectively integrate during a 3-7 d exposure period by eliminating the adverse effects of water vapor. The improved canister design would provide more accurate and reproducible measurements of indoor Rn concentrations than are currently available. PMID:2398007

  9. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  10. Using noble gases measured in spring discharge to trace hydrothermal processes in the Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, W.P.; Susong, D.D.; Solomon, D.K.; Heasler, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in springs are used to investigate boiling of hydrothermal water and mixing of hydrothermal and shallow cool water in the Norris Geyser Basin area. Noble gas concentrations in water are modeled for single stage and continuous steam removal. Limitations on boiling using noble gas concentrations are then used to estimate the isotopic effect of boiling on hydrothermal water, allowing the isotopic composition of the parent hydrothermal water to be determined from that measured in spring. In neutral chloride springs of the Norris Geyser Basin, steam loss since the last addition of noble gas charged water is less than 30% of the total hydrothermal discharge, which results in an isotopic shift due to boiling of ?? 2.5% ??D. Noble gas concentrations in water rapidly and predictably change in dual phase systems, making them invaluable tracers of gas-liquid interaction in hydrothermal systems. By combining traditional tracers of hydrothermal flow such as deuterium with dissolved noble gas measurements, more complex hydrothermal processes can be interpreted. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Nitrogen and noble gases in the 71501 bulk soil and ilmenite as records of the solar wind exposure: Which is correct?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, P.; Baur, H.; Etique, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The N determination in mg sized mineral separates from lunar soils by static mass spectrometry is an experimental break-through likely to contribute to the deciphering of the records left in the mineral grains by the exposure to the solar wind. In this discussion some comparisons of the results of N and noble gas analyses of the 71501 bulk soil and an ilmenite separate thereof are focussed on. Conclusions from noble gas data obtained on mineral separates from some 20 soils are summarized in a companion paper and are also discussed herein.

  12. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  13. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  14. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = (3)He, (4)He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6-7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the accuracy of

  15. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6–7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the

  16. New constraints on the release of noble gases during in vacuo crushing and application to scapolite Br-Cl-I and 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M. A.; Phillips, D.

    2009-10-01

    The release of irradiation-produced noble gas isotopes ( 38Ar Cl, 80Kr Br, 128Xe I and 39Ar K) during in vacuo crushing scapolite has been investigated and is compared to quartz. Three thousand crushing strokes released ˜98% of fluid inclusion-hosted noble gas from quartz. In comparison, 3000 crushing strokes released only ˜4% of the lattice-hosted 38Ar Cl from a scapolite gem. In vacuo crushing released lattice Ar preferentially relative to lattice Kr or Xe and prolonged crushing released ˜88% of the lattice-hosted noble gas in 96,000 crushing strokes. We suggest fast diffusion pathways generated by crushing are an important noble gas release mechanism and we demonstrate two applications of prolonged in vacuo crushing on irradiated scapolite. Firstly, scapolite molar Br/Cl and I/Cl values are shown to vary over a similar range as crustal fluids. The Cl-rich scapolite gem from Hunza, Pakistan has Br/Cl of 0.5-0.6 × 10 -3 and I/Cl values of 0.3-2 × 10 -6, that are similar to fluids that have dissolved evaporites. In contrast, three out of four skarn-related scapolites from the Canadian Grenville Province have molar Br/Cl values of 1.5-2.4 × 10 -3, and I/Cl values of 11-24 × 10 -6, that are broadly consistent with skarn formation by magmatic fluids. The fourth Grenvillian scapolite, with only 0.02 wt% Cl, has an exceptionally elevated molar Br/Cl value of up to ˜54 × 10 -3 and I/Cl of 284 × 10 -6. It is unclear if these values reflect the composition of fluids formed during metamorphism or preferential incorporation of Br and I in Cl-poor meionitic scapolite. Secondly, the Grenvillian scapolites give plateau ages of between 830 Ma and 400 Ma. The oldest ages post-date regional skarn formation by ˜200 Myr, but are similar to feldspar cooling ages in the Province. The age variation in these samples is attributed to a combination of factors including variable thermal history and the presence of mineral sub-grains in some of the samples. These sub

  17. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  18. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  19. Prediction of Superhalogen-Stabilized Noble Gas Compounds.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Devleena

    2014-09-18

    The discovery of HArF has generated renewed interest in the chemistry of noble gases, particularly their hydrides. Though many weak complexes of noble gases bound by van der Waals interactions are known, the number of halogenated noble gas compounds, HNgX (Ng = noble gas; X = halogen), where the noble gas atom is chemically bound, is limited. These molecules are metastable, and their specialty is that there is substantial ionic bonding between the noble gas atom and the halogen atom. In this Letter, it is shown using density functional theory and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory that by replacing the halogen atoms by superhalogens (Y), whose electron affinities are much larger than those of halogens, more ionic bonds between Ng and Y can be attained. Moreover, the superhalogen-containing noble gas hydrides, HNgY, are more stable compared to their halogenated counterparts. PMID:26276326

  20. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  1. Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812—Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieler, R.; Huber, L.; Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Leya, I.; Maden, C.; Masarik, J.; Meier, M. M. M.; Nagao, K.; Trappitsch, R.; Irving, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present noble gas data for 16 shergottites, 2 nakhlites (NWA 5790, NWA 10153), and 1 angrite (NWA 7812). Noble gas exposure ages of the shergottites fall in the 1-6 Ma range found in previous studies. Three depleted olivine-phyric shergottites (Tissint, NWA 6162, NWA 7635) have exposure ages of ~1 Ma, in agreement with published data for similar specimens. The exposure age of NWA 10153 (~12.2 Ma) falls in the range of 9-13 Ma reported for other nakhlites. Our preferred age of ~7.3 Ma for NWA 5790 is lower than this range, and it is possible that NWA 5790 represents a distinct ejection event. A Tissint glass sample contains Xe from the Martian atmosphere. Several samples show a remarkably low (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratio < 0.80, as previously observed in a many shergottites and in various other rare achondrites. This was explained by solar cosmic ray-produced Ne (SCR Ne) in addition to the commonly found galactic cosmic ray-produced Ne, implying very low preatmospheric shielding and ablation loss. We revisit this by comparing measured (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratios with predictions by cosmogenic nuclide production models. Indeed, several shergottites, acalpulcoites/lodranites, angrites (including NWA 7812), and the Brachina-like meteorite LEW 88763 likely contain SCR Ne, as previously postulated for many of them. The SCR contribution may influence the calculation of exposure ages. One likely reason that SCR nuclides are predominantly detected in meteorites from rare classes is because they usually are analyzed for cosmogenic nuclides even if they had a very small (preatmospheric) mass and hence low ablation loss.

  2. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction. PMID:26624276

  3. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  4. Noble gas diffusion in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Burnard, P.; Laporte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fractionated noble gas relative abundances (Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar and Xe/Ar) and isotopic compositions (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne, 21Ne/22Ne) are found in volcanic materials, notably in pumices (1-3). This has generally been interpreted as fractionation resulting from diffusion. However, there is some disagreement as to whether this fractionation occurs during high temperature magmatic processes (3) or due to diffusion of air into solidified pyroclastic deposits (2). We show that differences in relative noble gas diffusivities (e.g. D4He vs D40Ar, where D is the diffusivity) and isotopic diffusivities (e.g. D40Ar vs D36Ar) reduce at high temperatures (Fig). These results predict minimal fractionation of noble gases during magmatic processes. However, it is important to note that these diffusivities were measured in silicate glasses; the relative noble diffusivities in silicate liquids are poorly known. We have developed a new experimental protocol which will to determine the diffusivities of the noble gases and their isotopes in the liquid state. A graphite crucible c. 0.3 mm diameter and c. 20mm deep is filled with powdered glass of the desired composition, heated to 1773 K for 15 minutes and quenched to form a glass cylinder within the crucible. The crucible is then placed in a low pressure (1 bar) controlled atmosphere vertical furnace and heated at high temperatures (1673-1773K) for 2 hours in a pure N2 atmosphere. At this point noble gases (He and Ar) are introduced into the furnace and allowed to diffuse into the cylinder of liquid for durations of between 30 and 90. After quenching, the glass cylinder, preserving its' diffusion profile, is sawed into c. 1mm thick discs which are measured by conventional noble gas mass spectrometry for noble gas abundances (He, Ar) and isotopes (40,38,36Ar). The results will be presented at the conference. References 1 Kaneoka, I. Earth Planet Sci Letts 48, 284-292 (1980). 2 Pinti, D. L., Wada, N. & Matsuda, J. J. Volcan

  5. Noble gases in ancient asteroidal atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical and numerical results presented here suggest that acceleration of photoions by the solar wind motional field is a significant loss process for Xe on asteroids about 200 km in radius or larger, if the Xe is thermalized by its interactions with the surface. For Ar, photoion acceleration can only become important for asteroids nearly 500 km in radius. Thus photoion acceleration, previously invoked for lunar samples, could be responsible for excess fission-produced Xe found associated with solar wind Xe in howarditic meteorites. The lack of such Xe in other types of meteorites may reflect either smaller parent bodies or later times of regolith exposure. Similarly, the failure to observe solar-wind-associated radiogenic Ar-40 in meteorites is consistent with the much smaller likelihood that Ar will be photoionized.

  6. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  7. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  8. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  9. Advances in noble gas paleothermometry on speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Thomas; Kluge, Tobias; Mangini, Augusto; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    2010-05-01

    The application of the noble gas paleothermometer on speleothem fluid inclusions promises to provide absolute paleotemperatures from stalagmites. These noble gas temperatures (NGTs) are based on the temperature dependent solubility of gases in water and could help to interpret other speleothem proxies. In particular NGTs may help to better understand oxygen isotope records. In summer and autumn 2009 a measurement run with 26 (sub-)samples from 9 different caves was performed. The water and the noble gases were released using a stepwise extraction technique by online in vacuo crushing and thermal heating. Depending on the sample water amount about three extraction steps were performed for each sample, so that the total number of speleothem measurements exceeded 80 in this run. NGTs were determined from noble gas concentrations by inverse modeling. Only the equilibrium solubility component, which contains the temperature information, and an atmospheric air component from air-filled inclusions are included in the calculations. Plots of two noble gas concentrations against each other (Xe-Ne, Kr-Ar) show that the measured concentrations are in general agreement with this simple model. Unfortunately the combined mass spectrometric measurement of Ar, Kr and Xe turned out to be slightly problematic. A separated measurement should solve the corresponding problems. Furthermore, a lab water standard for noble gases will be prepared to further examine the measurements in the future. In this measurement run samples from not only Bunker Cave (Germany) showed suitable properties for NGT determination but also samples from Katerloch Cave (Austria) where the water concentration varies between 0.4 to 4 ?l per g calcite which is comparable to the Bunker Cave stalagmites. The air to water volume ratio is below 0.1 which in principle allows the determination of NGTs with errors in the range of 1 °C. The calculated NGTs are in the range of the modern cave air temperature.

  10. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  11. Noble Gas Proxy Evidence Of Holocene Climate Fluctuations In The Elwha Watershed, Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleotempertures retrieved from the groundwater archives in the largest watershed (≈800 km2) in the Olympic Mountains suggest asynchronous Olympic Peninsula climate responses during the Everson interstade period after the last continental glacial maximum. Dissolved noble gases fr...

  12. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  13. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  14. Determination of Natural In Vivo Noble-Gas Concentrations in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Livingstone, David M.; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  15. Transport cross sections for proton-noble gases and proton-carbon scattering in the energy range from 0.1 eV to 10 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag S.; Schultz, David R.

    2006-10-01

    Using the fully quantum mechanical treatment, elastic differential and integral elastic cross sections have been calculated over a wide range of center-of-mass collision energies, 0.1--10 000 eV, for protons scattered by noble gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe as well as carbon atoms. In addition, the momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections, relevant to transport modeling, have been computed from the quantal differential cross sections along with results of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The two complementary sets of results (classical and quantal) for the transport cross sections, enriched with the CTMC charge transfer data, provided deeper insight into the accuracy of the data over the broad energy range. Isotopic scaling relations, derived form the calculations, enable application of the results to the deuterium/tritium rich fusion plasma environment. All data are available through the worldwide website of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov)[1]. [1] P. S. Krstic and D. R. Schultz, Physics of Plasmas 13, 053501 (2006).

  16. A new Method for Paleotemperature Reconstruction - Noble gas Measurements on Speleothems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Marx, T.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved atmospheric noble gases in groundwater are used to reconstruct paleotemperatures based on their temperature dependent solubilities. Noble gases dissolved in microscopic water inclusions in speleothems are expected to reflect the cave temperature and thus potentially are a new tool for paleotemperature reconstruction. Noble gases extracted from speleothem samples consist of two components: The noble gases corresponding to the air-equilibrated water and additionally gases from air-filled inclusions. Too large contributions of air can mask the temperature information contained in the water and are a major challenge for the method. Stepwise procedures enable to separate these components partially and thus provide the possibility for temperature determination. Measurements on several speleothems from the Bunker Cave (Germany) enabled the reconstruction of paleotemperatures for three different periods: the Holocene, Marine Isotope Stage 3 and the Eemian interglacial. The results from different speleothems with temporally overlapping growth periods are in reasonable agreement. Multiple measurements on the same growth layer yielded furthermore reproducible noble gas temperatures. The temperature differences obtained from the Bunker Cave stalagmites are coincident with earlier studies based on pollen, sediment and ice cores as well as other speleothem data. Measurement of both the stable isotopes (δ18O, δ13C) and noble gas temperatures on the same stalagmite enable the disentanglement of different effects on the stable isotopes and finally may result in a better understanding of past climate as well as of the isotope signals as climate proxies in speleothems.

  17. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-08-05

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies.

  18. The Noble Savage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1993-01-01

    Traces the history of the "noble savage" concept, from the romantic view of the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries of American Indians as holdovers from the "golden age," to current media images of the medicine man or the Indian princess. Discusses how this patronizing stereotype continues to undermine Indian identity. (SV)

  19. Defining Noble Gas Partitioning for Carbon Capture and Storage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Masters, A.; Rochelle, C.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    For viable CCS implementation variables such as CO2 dissolution rates, reactions with the host rock and the extent of groundwater interaction must be accurately constrained. Noble gases play an important role in these systems [e.g. 1,2]. Their application, however, requires accurate Henry's constants within dense CO2-H2O systems. Current interpretations use pure noble gas-H2O partitioning data [3,4] and assume CO2-noble gas interactions are negligible, even at high (>700 kg/m3) CO2 densities [2]. To test this assumption we experimentally determined noble gas CO2-H2O partitioning for the 170-656 kg/m3 CO2 density range; representative of most CCS environments. Contrary to assumption, CO2 density significantly affected noble gas partition coefficients. For helium, increasing CO2 density resulted in a negative deviation trend from CO2-free values whilst for argon, krypton and xenon strong, positive deviations were observed. At 656 kg/m3 these deviations were -35%, 74%, 114% and 321% respectively. This is interpreted as the CO2 phase acting as a polar solvent inducing polarisation in the noble gases. Deviation trends are well defined using a 2nd order polynomial. The effect of a dense CO2 phase can now be incorporated into existing noble gas models. We also present results from a Gibbs-Ensemble Monte Carlo molecular simulation to model partitioning for this binary system. This fundamental technique makes predictions based on the pair-potentials of interaction between the molecules. Here it gives the phase compositions and Henry coefficients for noble gases. With a proven ability in accurately replicating both the CO2-H2O system and low pressure noble gas Henry constants the focus is now on fully optimising the model to match high pressure observations. [1] Gilfillan et al. (2009) Nature 458 614-618 [2] Gilfillan et al. (2008) GCA 72 1174-1198 [3] Crovetto et al. (1982) J.Chem.Phys. 76 1077-1086 [4] Ballentine et al. in Porcelli et al. (eds.) (2002) Rev.Min.Geo. 47 539-614.

  20. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  1. Noble gas isotopic composition as a key reference parameter in a planetary atmospheric evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.

    2010-12-01

    The isotopic composition of noble gases is a key reference parameter in discussing the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Currently, two widely occurring noble gas components are identified in the early solar system, one is the Solar Wind noble gas (SW-noble gas, hereafter) and another is the Q-noble gas in unaltered meteorites: both noble gases are characterized by their ubiquitous occurrence and high isotopic homogeneity. Since the SW-noble gas is directly ejected from the Sun, it has been assumed to be a good proxy of the average noble gas isotopic composition in the Sun, namely the solar noble gas. The systematic enrichment of the heavier isotopes in the Q-noble gas relative to the SW-noble gas is then commonly attributed to its isotopic fractionation from the SW-noble gas. However, the isotopic compositions of the SW-noble gas either implanted on lunar soils or trapped by artificial targets show considerable isotopic variation depending on the velocity of the Solar Wind. Therefore, it is important to examine how closely the SW-noble gas represents the indigenous solar noble gas component or the mean isotopic composition of noble gases of the Sun. Here we show that the isotopic composition of the SW-noble gas is substantially fractionated relative to the solar value, and therefore should not be used as a reference parameter. We further suggest that the post D-burning Q-noble gas (see below) is the better proxy of the solar noble gas, and this should be used as a reference of the Solar noble gas isotopic composition in discussing the planetary atmospheric evolution. The most distinct difference between the Q- and the SW-noble gas is apparent in a 3He/4He isotopic ratio: 4.64e-4 in Q-He [1], but 1.23e-4 in SW-He[2]. The difference is attributed to the conversion of deuteron (D) to 3He in the Sun, namely the D-burning [3], due to high temperature during the pre-main sequence stage of the Sun. With the use of recent data on D/H ratios from helio-seismology [4] and

  2. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years.

  3. Noble gas loss may indicate groundwater flow across flow barriers in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; Bryant, Hudson G.; Stute, M.; Clark, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Average calculated noble gas temperatures increase from 10 to 22??C in groundwater from recharge to discharge areas in carbonate-rock aquifers of southern Nevada. Loss of noble gases from groundwater in these regional flow systems at flow barriers is the likely process that produces an increase in recharge noble gas temperatures. Emplacement of low permeability rock into high permeability aquifer rock and the presence of low permeability shear zones reduce aquifer thickness from thousands to tens of meters. At these flow barriers, which are more than 1,000 m lower than the average recharge altitude, noble gases exsolve from the groundwater by inclusion in gas bubbles formed near the barriers because of greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure. However, re-equilibration of noble gases in the groundwater with atmospheric air at the low altitude spring discharge area, at the terminus of the regional flow system, cannot be ruled out. Molecular diffusion is not an important process for removing noble gases from groundwater in the carbonate-rock aquifers because concentration gradients are small.

  4. Atmospheric noble gas signatures in deep Michigan Basin brines as indicators of a past thermal event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Castro, Maria Clara; Hall, Chris M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (e.g., 22Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 130Xe) in crustal fluids are only sensitive to subsurface physical processes. In particular, depletion of atmospheric noble gases in groundwater due to boiling and steam separation is indicative of the occurrence of a thermal event and can thus be used to trace the thermal history of stable tectonic regions. We present noble gas concentrations of 38 deep brines (~ 0.5-3.6 km) from the Michigan Basin. The atmospheric noble gas component shows a strong depletion pattern with respect to air saturated water. Depletion of lighter gases ( 22Ne and 36Ar) is stronger compared to the heavier ones ( 84Kr and 130Xe). To understand the mechanisms responsible for this overall atmospheric noble gas depletion, phase interaction models were tested. We show that this atmospheric noble gas depletion pattern is best explained by a model involving subsurface boiling and steam separation, and thus, consistent with the occurrence of a past thermal event of mantle origin as previously indicated by both high 4He/heat flux ratios and the presence of primordial mantle He and Ne signatures in the basin. Such a conceptual model is also consistent with the presence of past elevated temperatures in the Michigan Basin (e.g., ~ 80-260 °C) at shallow depths as suggested by previous thermal studies in the basin. We suggest that recent reactivation of the ancient mid-continent rift system underneath the Michigan Basin is likely responsible for the release of both heat and mantle noble gases into the basin via deep-seated faults and fracture zones. Relative enrichment of atmospheric Kr and Xe with respect to Ar is also observed, and is interpreted as reflecting the addition of sedimentary Kr and Xe from associated hydrocarbons, following the hydrothermal event. This study pioneers the use of atmospheric noble gases in subsurface fluids to trace the thermal history of stable tectonic regions.

  5. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  6. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  7. Fullerenes and the Nature of Planetary Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Nuth, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, two issues have dominated the discussion of planetary noble gas patterns: 1) the general resemblance of the noble gas abundances in carbonaceous chondrites to those measured in the Earth s atmosphere and; 2) atmospheric inventories of argon and neon that fall off significantly with increasing distance from the Sun. The recognition of the latter has led to the conclusion that the planetary component is not found on planets. In particular, the inability to explain the missing xenon reservoir, once thought to be sequestered in crustal rocks has been extremely troublesome. Some models have focused on various fractionations of solar wind rather than condensation as the process for the evolution of noble gases in the terrestrial planets. However, these models cannot explain the observed gradient of the gases, nor do they account for the similar Ne/Ar ratios and the dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have focused on hydrodynamic escape to explain the fractionation of gases, like neon, in the atmosphere and the mantle. Escape theory also seems to explain, in part, the isotopically heavy argon on Mars, however, it does not explain the discrepancies observed for the abundances of argon and neon on Venus and the Earth. This has led to the assumption that some combination of solar wind implantation, absorption and escape are needed to explain the nature of planetary noble gases.

  8. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  9. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by factors of 0.91, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.05, respectively, to reach a much improved agreement with experimental Henry's coefficients. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the xenon εij term, coupled with the reasonable agreement of the initial values, no scaling factor is applied for this noble gas. These resulting optimized pair potentials also accurately predict partitioning within a CO2-H2O binary phase system as well as diffusion coefficients in ambient water. This further supports the quality of these interaction potentials. Consequently, they can now form a well-grounded basis for the future molecular modeling of multiphase geological systems. PMID:26452070

  10. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  11. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp (3)He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with (129)Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp (83)Kr MRI is discussed.

  12. Conbined noble gas and stable isotope constraints on nitrogen gas sources within sedimentary basins. Final report for period 15 March 1996 - 14 March 1999 extended to 14 March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ballentine, C.J.; Halliday, Alexander N.; Lollar, B. Sherwood

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen is one of the major non-hydrocarbon gases found in natural gas reservoirs. The objective of this work was to combine the information available from both noble gas and stable isotope systematics to understand the origin of nitrogen and related gas sources, transport behavior, and mass balance within natural gas reservoirs and sedimentary basin systems. The goals achieved are summarized under the following headings: Noble gas and stable isotopes in nitrogen-rich natural gases; Noble gases in groundwater; and Characterization of magmatic and crustal noble gas input into basin systems. Lists of publications and presentations are included.

  13. Light noble gas dissolution into ring structure-bearing materials and lattice influences on noble gas recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2015-06-01

    Light noble gas (He-Ne-Ar) solubility has been experimentally determined in a range of materials with six-member, tetrahedral ring structures: beryl, cordierite, tourmaline, antigorite, muscovite, F-phlogopite, actinolite, and pargasite. Helium solubility in these materials is relatively high, 4 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-7 mol g-1 bar-1, which is ∼100 to 100,000× greater than He solubility in olivine, pyroxene, or spinel. Helium solubility broadly correlates with the topology of ring structures within different minerals. Distinctive He-Ne-Ar solubility patterns are associated with the different ring structure topologies. Combined, these observations suggest ring structures have a strong influence on noble gas solubility in materials and could facilitate the recycling of noble gases, along with other volatiles (i.e., water, chlorine, and fluorine), into the mantle. Measurements of Ne and Ar solubility in antigorite, however, are highly variable and correlated with each other, suggesting multiple factors contribute the solubility of noble gases in serpentine-rich materials.

  14. The MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL): A NASA Investigator Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Noble-gas isotopes are a well-established technique for providing detailed temperature-time histories of rocks and meteorites. We have established the MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL) at Marshall Space Flight Center to serve as a NASA investigator facility in the wake of the closure of the JSC laboratory formerly run by Don Bogard. The MNGRL lab was constructed to be able to measure all the noble gases, particularly Ar-Ar and I-Xe radioactive dating to find the formation age of rocks and meteorites, and Ar/Kr/Ne cosmic-ray exposure ages to understand when the meteorites were launched from their parent planets.

  15. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  16. Photoionization of noble-gas atoms by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Astapenko, V. A. Svita, S. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The photoionization of atoms of noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses of a corrected Gaussian shape is studied theoretically. Computations are performed in the context of perturbation theory using a simple expression for the total probability of photoionization of an atom by electromagnetic pulses. The features of this process are revealed and analyzed for various ranges of the parameters of the problem.

  17. Performance of the High Resolution, Multi-collector Helix MC Plus Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer at the Australian National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Honda, Masahiko; Hamilton, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Performance of the Helix MC Plus noble gas mass spectrometer installed at the Australian National University (ANU) is reported. Results for sensitivity, mass discrimination and their linearity against partial pressure of noble gases, and mass resolution of the mass spectrometer are presented, and the results are compared with those of conventional noble gas mass spectrometers. The application of the five detectors on the Helix MC Plus in measuring various noble gas isotopes in multi-collector modes and the integration of the software drivers of peripheral hardware devices into the controlling program Qtegra of the mass spectrometer are discussed. High mass resolution (>1800) and mass resolving power (>8000) make this mass spectrometer unique in noble gas cosmo-geochemistry. It provides the capability to measure isobaric interference-free noble gas isotopes in multi-collector mode, significantly improves the accuracy to determine isotopic ratios, and greatly increases the efficiency of data acquisition.

  18. 77 FR 70159 - Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark, LLC, Noble...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark..., Marble River, LLC (Marble River or Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Noble Clinton Windpark I... pay Marble River for headroom created by common system upgrade facilities that benefit Noble and...

  19. Pumping mechanism for different gases in ion pumps with different configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audi, M.

    1988-09-01

    Ion pumps have the capability of pumping all gases of gas. Different phenomena are involved whens differnet gases are pumped. According to the pumping mechanisms in ion pump, gases can be divided in three rough groups: getterable gases, hydrogen and moble gases. Several different configurations of ion pumps have been developed through the years, to optimize their performance. Unfortunately, optimizing performance for one type of gas, often dimnishees performance for other gas. Diode ion pumps are the best choice for pumping getterable gases and hydrogen, but shown dramatic instability in pumping noble gases. Differential cathode ion pumps have a better behavior with noble gases, but slightly lower speeds for other gases. Triode ion pumps are stable when pumping noble gases, but have a reduced hydrogen capacity. The last generation of ion pumps has solved this problem: with a triode configuration and a unique cathode design, they have a high pumping speed for getterable gases, a pumping speed and pumping stability for noble gases even better than standard triode, and a pumping speed and capacity for hydrogen comparable to diode pumps.

  20. Noble metals in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, Karolina; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide research groups are searching for anticancer compounds, many of them are organometalic complexes having platinum group metals as their active centers. Most commonly used cytostatics from this group are cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Cisplatin was used fot the first time in 1978, from this time many platinum derivatives were created. In this review we present biological properties and probable future clinical use of platinum, gold, silver, iridium and ruthenium derivatives. Gold derivative Auranofin has been studied extensively. Action of silver nanoparticles on different cell lines was analysed. Iridium isotopes are commonly used in brachyterapy. Ruthenium compound new anti-tumour metastasis inhibitor (NAMI-A) is used in managing lung cancer metastases. Electroporation of another ruthenium based compound KP1339 was also studied. Most of described complexes have antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties. Further studies need to be made. Nevertheless noble metal based chemotherapheutics and compounds seem to be an interesting direction of research. PMID:26557773

  1. Large atmospheric noble gas excesses in a shallow aquifer in the Michigan Basin as indicators of a past mantle thermal event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Rohit B.; Castro, M. Clara; Hall, Chris M.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2013-08-01

    Significant atmospheric noble gas excesses in aquifer systems have systematically been linked to increased hydrostatic pressure, either due to increased water table levels or due to the development of ice cover. Measured noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in the shallow Saginaw aquifer in the Michigan Basin display both moderate (∼20-60% Ne excess) and large (∼80->120% Ne excess) excesses of atmospheric noble gases with respect to air saturated water for modern recharge conditions. All large atmospheric noble gas excesses are located in the main discharge area of the Michigan Basin, in the Saginaw Lowlands region. Here, through a step-by-step analysis, we first show that large atmospheric noble gas excesses in the Saginaw aquifer do not result from increased hydrostatic pressure but, instead, are the result of vertical transport of atmospheric noble gases that are believed to have escaped from deep Michigan Basin brines following a past thermal event of mantle origin. Subsequently, we show that the atmospheric noble gas pattern of the entire Michigan Basin strata appears to result from two distinct end-members: (a) an end-member represented by the deepest, most depleted brines from which most of the atmospheric noble gases escaped; and (b) an end-member with excess atmospheric noble gas values above those displayed by the Saginaw samples. The latter is unconstrained due to the dilution effect exerted by recharge water. Using a Rayleigh distillation model we further show that the greater enrichment of lighter relative to heavier noble gases in the Saginaw aquifer in the Saginaw Lowlands area is compatible with either diffusion or solubility related mechanisms. These findings reinforce the notion that a past thermal event is indeed responsible for the atmospheric noble gas excesses found in the Saginaw aquifer in the Saginaw Lowlands area. They are also consistent with and reinforce previous findings with respect to the occurrence of a thermal event of mantle

  2. Towards a Noble Gas Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Walker, Thad

    2014-05-01

    Noble gas NMR detected by alkali co-magnetometers has the potential for measurement of precession frequencies at the pHz level. This is done by eliminating the dominant known sources of systematic errors: alkali frequency shifts and quadrupole shifts. We present results of successful synchronous pumping of noble gas nuclei and measurements of alkali co-magnetometer sensitivity levels that project a 131-Xe noise level of 100 nHz /√{ Hz} . Future dual noble-gas co-magnetometry promises to improve the noise level by a factor of 10 or more. This research is supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  3. Electronegative gases

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined.

  4. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1997-09-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes. 15 figs.

  5. Effect of noble gases on an atmospheric greenhouse /Titan/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R.; Owen, T.

    1973-01-01

    Several models for the atmosphere of Titan have been investigated, taking into account various combinations of neon and argon. The investigation shows that the addition of large amounts of Ne and/or Ar will substantially reduce the hydrogen abundance required for a given greenhouse effect. The fact that a large amount of neon should be present if the atmosphere is a relic of the solar nebula is an especially attractive feature of the models, because it is hard to justify appropriate abundances of other enhancing agents.

  6. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John D.; Meikrantz, David H.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes.

  7. Tectonic implications of radiogenic noble gases in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Schubert, G.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the ways in which the He-4 and Ar-40 radiogenic isotopes furnish important constraints on planetary interior tectonics. In the case of the earth, where there are such independent constraints on radiogenic isotope concentrations as observed surface heat flow, the specification of radiogenic isotope concentration allows the interpretation of data on the Ar-40 atmospheric mass and mantle He-4 in terms of models for the entire mantle and of layered mantle convection. He loss rate estimates through the Venus atmosphere indicate a flux that is nearly equal to that through the earth atmosphere.

  8. Solar and terrestrial noble gases in magnetospheric precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Stettler, W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal-foil collectors were installed on the external structure of Skylab to entrap precipitating magnetospheric particles. The foils were retrieved, and the entrapped helium, neon, and argon were isotopically analyzed in a high-resolution mass spectrometer. Solar and terrestrial helium and neon and terrestrial argon were detected. As expected, the isotopic composition of neon and argon in the high atmosphere was found to be strongly fractionated. Special techniques were used to estimate the initial particle energy of He-3. The measured He-3 flux is consistent with the assumption that precipitating solar He-3 is the major source of terrestrial He-3.

  9. Assessment of Noble Gases in the Savannah River Site Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    A series of documents has been published that assesses the impact of various radionuclides released to the environment by Savannah River Site operations. The quantity released, the disposition of the radionuclides in the environment, and the dose to offsite individuals has been presented for carbon, cesium, iodine, plutonium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and uranium. An assessment of the impact of non-radioactive mercury also has been published.

  10. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  11. The Chemistry of the Noble Gases, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernick, Cedric L.

    The history of the discovery, isolation, characterization, production and use of argon, krypton, xenon, helium, and radon is followed by an account of early attempts to react them with other elements. The use of the electron shell theory of valence to explain their inertness and the reactions of chemists to the production of xenon compounds is…

  12. Fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    Water-soluble fluorescent metallic clusters at sizes comparable to the Fermi wavelength of an electron (˜0.5 nm for gold and silver) were created and their photophysical properties were investigated at the bulk and single molecule levels. We employed biocompatible dendrimer and peptide to prepare a series of strong fluorescent gold and silver clusters with chemical or photo reduction methods. Facilitated by the well-defined dendrimer size, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that the fluorescent silver nanocluster size ranges from 2 to 8 Ag atoms. The correlation of emission energy with the number of atoms, N, in each gold nanocluster is quantitatively fit for the smallest nanoclusters with no adjustable parameters by the simple scaling relation of EFermi/N1/3, in which EFermi is the Fermi energy of bulk gold. The transition energy scaling inversely with cluster radius indicates that electronic structure can be well described with the spherical jellium model and further demonstrates that these nanomaterials are "multi-electron artificial atoms". Fluorescence from these small metal clusters can be considered protoplasmonic, molecular transitions of the free conduction electrons before the onset of collective dipole oscillations occurring when a continuous density of states is reached. In addition, very strong single molecular Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman enhancement by fluorescent silver clusters was observed. Pushing to larger sizes, we also created ˜2nm diameter glutathione encapsulated luminescent gold nanoparticles. Distinct from similarly sized but nonluminescent gold nanoparticles, these 2 nm gold nanoparticles show bright, long lifetime emission but no plasmon absorption. The emission might arise from charge transfer between gold atoms and the thiol ligand. Providing the "missing link" between atomic and nanoparticle behavior in noble metals, these highly fluorescent, water-soluble gold and silver nanoclusters offer complementary transition

  13. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Research of medical gases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Research of medical gases is well established in Poland and has been marked with the foundation of several professional societies. Numerous academic centers including those dealing with hyperbaric and diving medicine conduct studies of medical gases, in vast majority supported with intramural funds. In general, Polish research of medical gases is very much clinical in nature, covering new applications and safety of medical gases in medicine; on the other hand there are several academic centers pursuing preclinical studies, and elaborating basic theories of gas physiology and mathematical modeling of gas exchange. What dominates is research dealing with oxygen and ozone as well as studies of anesthetic gases and their applications. Finally, several research directions involving noble gas, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide for cell protection, only begin to gain recognition of basic scientists and clinicians. However, further developments require more monetary spending on research and clinical testing as well as formation of new collective bodies for coordinating efforts in this matter. PMID:23916016

  15. Noble gas encapsulation: clathrate hydrates and their HF doped analogues.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sukanta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The significance of clathrate hydrates lies in their ability to encapsulate a vast range of inert gases. Although the natural abundance of a few noble gases (Kr and Xe) is poor their hydrates are generally abundant. It has already been reported that HF doping enhances the stability of hydrogen hydrates and methane hydrates, which prompted us to perform a model study on helium, neon and argon hydrates with their HF doped analogues. For this purpose 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues are taken as the model clathrate hydrates, which are among the building blocks of sI, sII and sH types of clathrate hydrate crystals. We use the dispersion corrected and gradient corrected hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of thermodynamic parameters as well as conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors. The method of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation is used through atom centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) techniques to envisage the structural behaviour of different noble gas hydrates on a 500 fs timescale. Electron density analysis is carried out to understand the nature of Ng-OH2, Ng-FH and Ng-Ng interactions. The current results noticeably demonstrate that the noble gas (He, Ne, and Ar) encapsulation ability of 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues is thermodynamically favourable. PMID:25047071

  16. Noble Gas Analysis for the OMEGA Gas Sampling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, G. T.; Hupcher, S. M.; Freeman, C. G.; Stoyer, M. A.; Sangster, T. C.

    2007-11-01

    The OMEGA Gas Sampling System (OGSS) at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics can be used to study a wide variety of implosion parameters in inertial confinement fusion. By doping a target capsule with carefully chosen detector nuclei, nuclear reactions between fusion products and detector nuclei can produce noble gas isotopes. Following a capsule implosion, these gases are pumped out of the target chamber and are collected into sample bottles. We have developed a bench-top analysis station at Geneseo capable of determining the number of noble gas atoms present in the sample bottles. A needle valve is used to admit gas from the sample bottles into a vacuum chamber at a controlled rate. The conductance of the needle valve is a function of pressure and gas type. A residual gas analyzer (RGA) is used to measure the partial pressures of each type of noble gas in the vacuum chamber. The RGA is calibrated with a calibrated leak, which allows known amounts of different gases into the chamber at a constant rate. Analysis of the gasses collected following a D^3He implosion is currently underway.

  17. Experimental determination of noble gas, SF6 and CO2 flow profiles through a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgallon, Rachel; Gilfillan, Stuart; Edlmann, Katriona; McDermott, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and SF6 have recently been used as artificial and inherent tracers of CO2 flow and migration from within[1,2] and from geological reservoirs[3]. However, outstanding questions remain, particularly regarding the flow behaviour of the noble gases compared to CO2. Here we present results from specially constructed experimental equipment, which has been used to determine the factors affecting transport of noble gases relative to CO2 in a porous sandstone. The experimental setup consists of a sample loop that can be loaded with a desired gas mixture. This sample can be released as a pulse into a feeder gas stream through a flow cell. The flow cell consists of a 3.6 cm diameter core, which can be of any length. The sample is surrounded by aluminium foil and treated with epoxy resin inside stainless steel tubing. The flow cell is encased by two purpose designed dispersion end plates. Real-time analysis of the arrival peaks of the gases downstream is recorded using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). For the experiments, a 0.96 m core of Fell Sandstone was selected to represent a porous media. Noble gases and SF6 pulses were flowed through a CO2 carrier gas at five different pressure gradients (10 - 50 kPa) with arrival profiles measured using the QMS. Surprisingly, peak arrival times of He were slower than the other noble gases at each pressure gradient. The differences in peak arrival times between He and other noble gases increased as pressure decreased and the curve profiles for each noble gas differ significantly. The heavier noble gases (Kr and Xe) along with SF6 show a steeper peak rise at initial appearance, but have a longer duration profile than the He curves. Interestingly, the breakthrough curve profiles for both Kr and Xe were similar to SF6 indicating that Kr and Xe could be substituted for SF6, which is a potent greenhouse gas, in tracing applications. In addition, CO2 pulses were passed through a N2 carrier gas. The

  18. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  19. Targets Involved in Cardioprotection by the Non-Anesthetic Noble Gas Helium.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Smit, Kirsten F; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Research data from the past decade indicate that noble gases like xenon and helium exert profound cardioprotection when applied before, during or after organ ischemia. Of all noble gases, especially helium, has gained interest in the past years because it does not have an anesthetic "side effect" like xenon, allowing application of this specific gas in numerous clinical ischemia/reperfusion situations. Because helium has several unique characteristics and no hemodynamic side effects, helium could be administered in severely ill patients. Investigations in animals as well as in humans have proven that this noble gas is not completely inert and can induce several biological effects. Though the underlying molecular mechanisms of helium-induced cardiac protection are still not yet fully understood, recently different signaling pathways have been elucidated.

  20. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  1. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Greenhouse Gases Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products ... Power Wave Power Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Biomass Wood and Wood Waste Waste-to-Energy (MSW) Landfill ...

  2. Relationship between recent cave temperatures and noble gas temperatures derived from fluid inclusions of modern soda straw stalactites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcsu, Laszlo; Papp, Laszlo; Major, Zoltan; Molnar, Mihaly

    2010-05-01

    Recently, strong effort is devoted to establish a new method to derive palaeotemperatures from noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations dissolved in fluid inclusions of speleothems [1-2]. It has been already shown that the water content of the speleothems can be determined via the water vapour pressure after the water has been released from the carbonate samples and collected in a cold finger and then heated up to room temperature. Additionally, the noble gas contents can be precisely measured with noble gas mass spectrometers. Based on these noble gas concentration data sets, a so-called noble gas temperature (NGT) can be calculated meaning a temperature at which the noble gases have been dissolved in water. To use these NGT's as a palaeoclimate proxy, one of the main questions is how these noble gas temperatures reflect the prevailing cave temperature in which the carbonate has grown. We studied noble gas significances in recent soda straw stalactites from more than ten Central European caves covering a temperature range of 1 to 14 °C. Kluge et al. (2008) has shown the soda straw stalactites might contain less excess air, hence they are more suitable samples to derive NGT's, because noble gas abundances from large air inclusions can mask the temperature information. The 14C ages of these soda straw dripstones were obtained to be recent or at least Holocene ages. Thus one can assume that the cave temperatures during carbonate formation were as same as at present. We measured the water and noble gas contents of numerous carbonate samples from soda straw stalactites and calculated noble gas temperatures by a precision of 1 °C or better. Comparing these temperatures with cave temperatures we obtained that they agree well within the uncertainty of the noble gas temperature determination. Therefore, we can conclude if diffusion of noble gas isotopes does not play a significant role in the carbonate lattice this new tool helps the palaeoclimate community to gain

  3. Development of a portable membrane contactor sampler for noble gas analyses of surface and groundwater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Han, L. H.; Jaklitsh, M.; Aggarwal, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    Noble gas isotopes dissolved in groundwater provide valuable information about climatic conditions during air-water exchange, as well as the residence time of groundwater and its renewal rate. The isotope composition of noble gases can also serve as geochemical fingerprints to decipher the origin of groundwater and its flow system. Conventionally, groundwater is sampled using a copper tube, which is subsequently degassed using a vacuum extraction system for isotope analysis by a mass spectrometer. Although this conventional and well-established way of sampling is widely recognised as being reliable and robust, a major drawback to this method is its size and weight. For example, our sampler consists of a copper tube of 10 mm diameter x 1000 mm length and a metal casing with pinch-off clamps with its total weight to be 2 kg each. A box of 24 samplers well exceeds 40 kg. Considering that sampling fields are not necessarily easily accessible by vehicle, taking hundreds of samples in the field is generally a tough task for everyone. There is a different type of sampler, which is comprised of a much smaller copper tube (6 mm in diameter and 100 mm long for our case) with clamps and a semi-permeable membrane filter. It is sunk into water and left there for dissolved gases to diffuse into the sampler until their concentrations in water become equilibrated with those in the tube. This diffusion sampler is small and easy to handle in the field; it has an advantage over conventional copper tubes, as the diffusion sampler collects gases so that there is no gas extraction process needed before isotope analysis. However, this method requires an equilibration time of 24 hours or more, which could result in lower time-efficiency for sampling work. In order to enable time-efficient and less-painstaking sampling of noble gases dissolved in surface and groundwater, we have developed a portable and self-powered sampling device specified to noble gas analysis by mass spectrometer

  4. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  5. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  6. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  7. Noble Gas Signatures in Athabasca Glacier - Tracing Glacial Meltwater Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hall, C. M.; Castro, M. C.; Aciego, S.; Arendt, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a noble gas study in glacial meltwater (GMW) from the Athabasca Glacier (AG) in the Columbia Icefield, Canada. It constrains the relative contributions of GMW sources, water residence times, and spatial locations where the GMW originates in the alpine glacier. This is possible due to the conservative nature of noble gases and temperature dependency of their concentrations in water in equilibrium with the atmosphere (ASW) which allows for estimation of the altitude at which GMW originated. In addition, crustal He accumulates in water over time, allowing for estimation of water residence times. Water samples were collected in the morning on selected dates in May and July 2011 at two locations about 200 m apart near the terminus area at altitudes between 2000 m and 2100 m. Eight samples were collected in six different days. Results show that the major source of subglacial meltwater is ASW rather than old, compressed glacial ice, which has a distinct noble gas signature not seen in our samples. Given that, GMW samples from the AG do deviate to a certain extent from the ASW values corresponding to measured water temperature and altitude at collection points. Two patterns are observed in the concentrations of the AG samples. The first one presents a relative Ar enrichment with respect to Ne, Kr, and Xe, first observed in high-altitude springs in the Galápagos Islands (Warrier et al., 2012). The second one displays a mass-dependent pattern, first observed in Michigan rainwater (Warrier et al., 2013). A preliminary Xe analysis indicates equilibration altitudes between 2500 m and 3400 m, values compatible with local topography. Samples present He excess of 4% to 91%, and suggest an average residence time of ~400 yrs. References:Warrier, R. B., Castro, M. C., and Hall, C. M. (2012), Recharge and source-water insights from the Galapagos Islands using noble gases and stable isotopes, Water Resour. Res., 48, W03508, doi:10.1029/2011WR010954. Warrier, R. B., Castro

  8. Noble gas composition of the solar wind as collected by the Genesis mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Wieler, Rainer; Baur, Heinrich; Olinger, Chad; Friedmann, Tom A.; Burnett, Donald S.

    2009-12-01

    We present the elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases in the bulk solar wind collected by the NASA Genesis sample return mission. He, Ne, and Ar were analyzed in diamond-like carbon on a silicon substrate (DOS) and 84,86Kr and 129,132Xe in silicon targets by UV laser ablation noble gas mass spectrometry. Solar wind noble gases are quantitatively retained in DOS and with exception of He also in Si as shown by a stepwise heating experiment on a flown DOS target and analyses on other bulk solar wind collector materials. Solar wind data presented here are absolutely calibrated and the error of the standard gas composition is included in stated uncertainties. The isotopic composition of the light noble gases in the bulk solar wind is as follows: 3He/ 4He: (4.64 ± 0.09) × 10 -4, 20Ne/ 22Ne: 13.78 ± 0.03, 21Ne/ 22Ne: 0.0329 ± 0.0001, 36Ar/ 38Ar 5.47 ± 0.01. The elemental composition is: 4He/ 20Ne: 656 ± 5, and 20Ne/ 36Ar 42.1 ± 0.3. Genesis provided the first Kr and Xe data on the contemporary bulk solar wind. The preliminary isotope and elemental composition is: 86Kr/ 84Kr: 0.302 ± 0.003, 129Xe/ 132Xe: 1.05 ± 0.02, 36Ar/ 84Kr 2390 ± 150, and 84Kr/ 132Xe 9.5 ± 1.0. The 3He/ 4He and the 4He/ 20Ne ratios in the Genesis DOS target are the highest solar wind values measured in exposed natural and artificial targets. The isotopic composition of the other noble gases and the Kr/Xe ratio obtained in this work agree with data from lunar samples containing "young" (˜100 Ma) solar wind, indicating that solar wind composition has not changed within at least the last 100 Ma. Genesis could provide in many cases more precise data on solar wind composition than any previous experiment. Because of the controlled exposure conditions, Genesis data are also less prone to unrecognized systematic errors than, e.g., lunar sample analyses. The solar wind is the most authentic sample of the solar composition of noble gases, however, the derivation of solar noble gas

  9. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  10. Noble Gas Analysis in the Quest to Find "Regolithic" Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, Julia A.; Hermann, S.; Herrin, J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The howardite meteorites consist of approximately 200 polymict breccias of eucrite (basaltic) and diogenite (orthopyroxenitic) material (collectively, the HED group) that originate from the asteroid belt. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy of asteroids and laboratory studies of HEDs have indicated that the asteroid 4-Vesta is the likely parent body, and the partially-demolished south pole may be the source region. Asteroid regolith formation processes may be responsible for a number of observed petrological features including impact melt clasts, reworked clasts and mosaisicm. We have identified such features in a study of 30 howardites and polymict eucrites, and developed a regolith grading scheme based on petrology. However, the true regolithic nature of the howardite suite is not well defined, and previous research has suggested correlations between Ni contents of 300 - 1200 micron / g, a minimal variation in Al2O3 content around 8-9 wt% and the presence of solar wind noble gases are key hallmarks of an ancient regolith on Vesta . Through combined petrological, compositional and noble gas research, we aim to better understand howardite petrological diversity, regolith formation processes on parent asteroids, and to establish what defines a truly "regolithic" howardite. Our research will play an integral part in the interpretation of data gathered by the Dawn mission. Here we report the preliminary results from our noble gas analyses of four howardites: LEW 85313, EET 99408, MET 96500 and PCA 02066. Bulk major element compositional data have been collected, further petrological data for the HED group are reported by our colleagues, whilst trace-element analyses are underway. Our work will investigate the extent of whether previously described Ni, Al2O3 and noble gas characteristics are in fact indicative of a "regolithic" howardite.

  11. Isotopic and noble gas geochemistry in geothermal research

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; DePaolo, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this program is to provide, through isotopic analyses of fluids, fluid inclusions, and rocks and minerals coupled with improved methods for geochemical data analysis, needed information regarding sources of geothermal heat and fluids, the spatial distribution of fluid types, subsurface flow, water-rock reaction paths and rates, and the temporal evolution of geothermal systems. Isotopic studies of geothermal fluids have previously been limited to the light stable isotopes of H, C, and O. However, other isotopic systems such as the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and reactive elements (e.g. B, N, S, Sr and Pb) are complementary and may even be more important in some geothermal systems. The chemistry and isotopic composition of a fluid moving through the crust will change in space and time in response to varying chemical and physical parameters or by mixing with additional fluids. The chemically inert noble gases often see through these variations, making them excellent tracers for heat and fluid sources. Whereas, the isotopic compositions of reactive elements are useful tools in characterizing water-rock interaction and modeling the movement of fluids through a geothermal reservoir.

  12. Noble gas isotopes in mineral springs within the Cascadia Forearc, Wasihington and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Constantz, James E.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey report presents laboratory analyses along with field notes for a pilot study to document the relative abundance of noble gases in mineral springs within the Cascadia forearc of Washington and Oregon. Estimates of the depth to the underlying Juan de Fuca oceanic plate beneath the sample sites are derived from the McCrory and others (2012) slab model. Some of these springs have been previously sampled for chemical analyses (Mariner and others, 2006), but none currently have publicly available noble gas data. Helium isotope values as well as the noble gas values and ratios presented below will be used to determine the sources and mixing history of these mineral waters.

  13. Cryogenic method for measuring nuclides and fission gases

    DOEpatents

    Perdue, P.T.; Haywood, F.F.

    1980-05-02

    A cryogenic method is provided for determining airborne gases and particulates from which gamma rays are emitted. A special dewar counting vessel is filled with the contents of the sampling flask which is immersed in liquid nitrogen. A vertically placed sodium-iodide or germanium-lithium gamma-ray detector is used. The device and method are of particular use in measuring and identifying the radioactive noble gases including emissions from coal-fired power plants, as well as fission gases released or escaping from nuclear power plants.

  14. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  15. Noble Gas Inventory of Micrometeorites Collected at the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and Indications for Their Provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Baecker, B.; Folco, L.; Cordier, C.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of processes have been considered possibly contributing the volatiles including noble gases to the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (e.g., [1-3]). Special consideration has been given to the concept of accretion of volatile-rich materials by the forming planets. This might include infalling planetesimals and dust, and could include material from the outer asteroid belt, as well as cometary material from the outer solar system. Currently, the dominant source of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth is represented by micrometeorites (MMs) with sizes mostly in the 100-300 micron range [3, 4]). Their role has been assessed by [3], who conclude that accretion of early micrometeorites played a major role in the formation of the terrestrial atmosphere and oceans. We have therefore set out to investigate in more detail the inventory of noble gases in MMs. Here we summarize some of our results obtained on MMs collected in micrometeorite traps of the Transantarctic Mountains [5].

  16. The atmospheric inventory of Xenon and noble cases in shales The plastic bag experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Honda, M.; Kramer, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    A novel trapped gas analysis protocol is applied to five shales in which the samples are sealed in air to eliminate the possibility of gas loss in the preanalysis laboratory vacuum exposure of a conventional protocol. The test is aimed at a determination concerning the hypothesis that atmospheric noble gases occur in the same proportion as planetary gases in meteorites, and that the factor-of-23 deficiency of air Xe relative to planetary Xe is made up by Xe stored in shales or other sedimentary rocks. The results obtained do not support the shale hypothesis.

  17. Noble Gas Thermometry and Hydrologic Ages: Evidence for Late Holocene Warming in Southwest Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M.; Goblet, P.

    2003-12-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstruction through the use of noble gases dissolved in groundwater has been the object of numerous studies in recent years. Unlike many other continental temperature proxies, noble gases have the advantage of providing direct information on atmospheric temperatures at the time rainwater penetrated the ground and joined a particular groundwater reservoir. In recent years, new methods for determination of noble gas temperatures have been developed, which provide a high level of accuracy on such temperature estimations. The issue of paleoclimatic reconstruction through noble gases however, is not only one of accurate temperature determination, but also one of accurate water age estimation so that a correct correspondence between noble gas temperatures and groundwater age can be established and proper paleoclimatic reconstruction attempted. The typical approach to estimate groundwater ages has been based on computing water travel times along streamlines from the recharge to the observation point taking into account only advection. This approach is limited because, like any other tracer, the movement of water in porous media is also affected by cinematic dispersion and molecular diffusion. We have therefore undertaken the formulation of hydrologic models that yield significantly better constraints on groundwater ages in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations of south Texas, where noble gas temperatures have already been determined. To account for groundwater mixing we treat age as one would treat a solute concentration. In order to simulate groundwater ages we used a finite element model of groundwater flow that has been validated by 4He and 3He. The finite model spans a 120.6 Km cross-section between altitudes of +220m and -2210 m, and comprises 58,968 elements and 31,949 nodes. Combination of these newly calculated water ages and previously reported noble gas temperatures reveals new aspects of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate in

  18. The Noble Gas Record of Gas-Water Phase Interaction in the Tight-Gas-Sand Reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.; Harris, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    The mass of hydrocarbons that have migrated through tight-gas-sandstone systems before the permeability reduces to trap the hydrocarbon gases provides critical information in the hydrocarbon potential analysis of a basin. The noble gas content (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) of the groundwater has a unique isotopic and elemental composition. As gas migrates through the water column, the groundwater-derived noble gases partition into the hydrocarbon phase. Determination of the noble gases in the produced hydrocarbon phase then provides a record of the type of interaction (simple phase equilibrium or open system Rayleigh fractionation). The tight-gas-sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains represent one of the most significant gas resources in the United States. The producing reservoirs are generally developed in low permeability (averaging <0.1mD) Upper Cretaceous fluvial to marginal marine sandstones and commonly form isolated overpressured reservoir bodies encased in even lower permeability muddy sediments. We present noble gas data from producing fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming; the the Piceance Basin, Colorado; and in the Uinta Basin, Utah. The data is consistent from all three basins. We show how in each basin the noble gases record open system gas migration through a water column at maximum basin burial. The data within an open system model indicates that the gas now in-place represents the last ~10% of hydrocarbon gas to have passed through the water column, most likely prior to permeability closedown.

  19. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  20. Structural Measurements from Images of Noble Gas Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadman, Robert V.; Kadlecek, Stephen J.; Emami, Kiarash; MacDuffie Woodburn, John; Vahdat, Vahid; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of externally polarized noble gases such as ^3He has been used for pulmonary imaging for more than a decade. Because gas diffusion is impeded by the alveoli, the diffusion coefficient of gas in the lung, measured on a time scale of milliseconds, is reduced compared to that of the same gas mixture in the absence of restrictions. When the alveolar walls decay, as in emphysema, diffusivity in the lung increases. In this paper, the relationship between diffusion measurements and the size of the restricting structures will be discussed. The simple case of diffusion in an impermeable cylinder, a structure similar to the upper respiratory airways in mammals, has been studied. A procedure will be presented by which airways of order 2 mm in diameter may be accurately measured; demonstration experiments with plastic tubes will also be presented. The additional developments needed before this technique becomes practical will be briefly discussed.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  4. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  5. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  6. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. First-principles study of noble gas impurities and defects in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Alexander E.; Wolverton, C.

    2011-10-01

    We performed a series of density functional theory + U (DFT + U) calculations to explore the energetics of various defects in UO{sub 2}, i.e., noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), Schottky defects, and the interaction between these defects. We found the following: (1) collinear antiferromagnetic UO{sub 2} has an energy-lowering distortion of the oxygen sublattice from ideal fluorite positions; (2) DFT + U qualitatively affects the formation volume of Schottky defect clusters in UO{sub 2} (without U the formation volume is negative, but including U the formation volume is positive); (3) the configuration of the Schottky defect cluster is dictated by a competition between electrostatic and surface energy effects; (4) the incorporation energy of inserting noble gas atoms into an interstitial site has a strong dependence on the volume of the noble gas atom, corresponding to the strain it causes in the interstitial site, from He (0.98 eV) to Xe (9.73 eV); (5) the energetics of each of the noble gas atoms incorporated in Schottky defects show strong favorable binding, due to strain relief associated with moving the noble gas atom from the highly strained interstitial position into the vacant space of the Schottky defect; and (6) for argon, krypton, and xenon, the binding energy of a noble gas impurity with the Schottky defect is larger than the formation energy of a Schottky defect, thereby making the formation of Schottky defects thermodynamically favorable in the presence of these large impurities.

  8. Noble metal superparticles and methods of preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Yugang; Hu, Yongxing

    2016-07-12

    A method comprises heating an aqueous solution of colloidal silver particles. A soluble noble metal halide salt is added to the aqueous solution which undergoes a redox reaction on a surface of the silver particles to form noble metal/silver halide SPs, noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs on the surface of the silver particles. The heat is maintained for a predetermined time to consume the silver particles and release the noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or the noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs into the aqueous solution. The aqueous solution is cooled. The noble metal/silver halide SPs, the noble metal halide/silver halide SPs or noble metal oxide/silver halide SPs are separated from the aqueous solution. The method optionally includes adding a soluble halide salt to the aqueous solution.

  9. Noble gas partitioning behavior in the Sleipner Vest hydrocarbon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Warr, O.; Mabry, J.; Byrne, D. J.; Meurer, W. P.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert and variably soluble in crustal fluids. They are primarily introduced into hydrocarbon reservoirs through exchange with formation waters, and can be used to assess migration pathways, mechanisms and reservoir storage. Of particular interest is the role groundwater plays in hydrocarbon transport, which is reflected in hydrocarbon-water volume ratios. We present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas isotope and abundance data from the Sleipner Vest field, in the Norwegian North Sea. Sleipner gases are generated from primary cracking of kerogen and the thermal cracking of oil, sourced from type II marine source, with relatively homogeneous maturities and a range in vitrinite reflectance (1.2-1.7%). Gases are hosted in the lower shoreface sandstones of the Jurassic Hugin formation, which is sealed by the Jurassic Upper Draupne and Heather formations. Gases are composed of N2 (0.6-0.9%), CO2 (5.4-15.3%) and hydrocarbons (69-80%). Helium isotopes (3He/4He) are radiogenic and range from 0.065 to 0.116 RA, showing a small mantle contribution, consistent with Ne isotopes (20Ne/22Ne from 9.70-9.91; 21Ne/22Ne from 0.0290-0.0344) and Ar isotopes (40Ar/36Ar from 315-489). 20Ne/36Ar, 84Kr/36Ar and 132Xe/36Ar values are systematically higher relative to air saturated water ratios. These data are discussed within the framework of several conceptual models: i) Total gas-stripping model, which defines the minimum volume of water to have interacted with the hydrocarbon phase; ii) Equilibrium model, assuming simple equilibration between groundwater and hydrocarbon phase at reservoir P,T and salinity; and iii) Open and closed system gas-stripping models. Using Ne-Ar, we estimate gas-water ratios for the Sleipner system of 0.02-0.09, which compare with geologic gas-water estimates of ~0.24, and suggest more groundwater interaction than a static system estimate. Kr and Xe show evidence for an additional source or process involving oil or sediments.

  10. Chronology and shock history of the Bencubbin meteorite: A nitrogen, noble gas, and Ar-Ar investigation of silicates, metal and fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard; Kelley, Simon; Turner, Grenville

    2010-11-01

    We have investigated the distribution and isotopic composition of nitrogen and noble gases, and the Ar-Ar chronology of the Bencubbin meteorite. Gases were extracted from different lithologies by both stepwise heating and vacuum crushing. Significant amounts of gases were found to be trapped within vesicles present in silicate clasts. Results indicate a global redistribution of volatile elements during a shock event caused by an impactor that collided with a planetary regolith. A transient atmosphere was created that interacted with partially or totally melted silicates and metal clasts. This atmosphere contained 15N-rich nitrogen with a pressure ⩾3 × 10 5 hPa, noble gases, and probably, although not analyzed here, other volatile species. Nitrogen and noble gases were re-distributed among bubbles, metal, and partly or totally melted silicates, according to their partition coefficients among these different phases. The occurrence of N 2 trapped in vesicles and dissolved in silicates indicates that the oxygen fugacity ( fO2) was greater than the iron-wüstite buffer during the shock event. Ar-Ar dating of Bencubbin glass gives an age of 4.20 ± 0.05 Ga, which probably dates this impact event. The cosmic-ray exposure age is estimated at ˜40 Ma with two different methods. Noble gases present isotopic signatures similar to those of "phase Q" (the major host of noble gases trapped in chondrites) but elemental patterns enriched in light noble gases (He, Ne and Ar) relative to Kr and Xe, normalized to the phase Q composition. Nitrogen isotopic data together with 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios indicate mixing between a 15N-rich component (δ 15N = +1000‰), terrestrial N, and an isotopically normal, chondritic N. Bencubbin and related 15N-rich meteorites of the CR clan do not show stable isotope (H and C) anomalies, precluding contribution of a nucleosynthetic component as the source of 15N enrichments. This leaves two possibilities, trapping of an ancient, highly fractionated

  11. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    Neutron detection is a technique essential to homeland security, nuclear reactor instrumentation, neutron diffraction science, oil-well logging, particle physics and radiation safety. The current shortage of helium-3, the neutron absorber used in most gas-filled proportional counters, has created a strong incentive to develop alternate methods of neutron detection. Excimer-based neutron detection (END) provides an alternative with many attractive properties. Like proportional counters, END relies on the conversion of a neutron into energetic charged particles, through an exothermic capture reaction with a neutron absorbing nucleus (10B, 6Li, 3He). As charged particles from these reactions lose energy in a surrounding gas, they cause electron excitation and ionization. Whereas most gas-filled detectors collect ionized charge to form a signal, END depends on the formation of diatomic noble-gas excimers (Ar*2, Kr*2,Xe* 2) . Upon decaying, excimers emit far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, which may be collected by a photomultiplier tube or other photon detector. This phenomenon provides a means of neutron detection with a number of advantages over traditional methods. This thesis investigates excimer scintillation yield from the heavy noble gases following the boron-neutron capture reaction in 10B thin-film targets. Additionally, the thesis examines noble-gas excimer lifetimes with relationship to gas type and gas pressure. Experimental data were collected both at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, and on a newly developed neutron beamline at the Maryland University Training Reactor. The components of the experiment were calibrated at NIST and the University of Maryland, using FUV synchrotron radiation, neutron imaging, and foil activation techniques, among others. Computer modeling was employed to simulate charged-particle transport and excimer photon emission within the experimental apparatus. The observed excimer

  12. On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.

    2006-03-01

    In situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60-150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17)% in helium, 22.1(13)% in neon, and 17.0(10)% in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross-sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

  13. A model to explain the various paradoxes associated with mantle noble gas geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Don L.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of an energetic accretion, the Earth is a volatile-poor and strongly differentiated planet. The volatile elements can be accounted for by a late veneer (≈1% of total mass of the Earth). The incompatible elements are strongly concentrated into the exosphere (atmosphere, oceans, sediments, and crust) and upper mantle. Recent geochemical models invoke a large primordial undegassed reservoir with chondritic abundances of uranium and helium, which is clearly at odds with mass and energy balance calculations. The basic assumption behind these models is that excess “primordial” 3He is responsible for 3He/4He ratios higher than the average for midocean ridge basalts. The evidence however favors depletion of 3He and excessive depletion of 4He and, therefore, favors a refractory, residual (low U, Th) source Petrological processes such as melt-crystal and melt-gas separation fractionate helium from U and Th and, with time, generate inhomogeneities in the 3He/4He ratio. A self-consistent model for noble gases involves a gas-poor planet with trapping of CO2 and noble gases in the shallow mantle. Such trapped gases are released by later tectonic and magmatic processes. Most of the mantle was depleted and degassed during the accretion process. High 3He/4He gases are viewed as products of ancient gas exsolution stored in low U environments, rather than products of primordial reservoirs. PMID:9689038

  14. ABOUT THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF HYDROCARBON LAKES IN THE ORIGIN OF TITAN'S NOBLE GAS ATMOSPHERIC DEPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lebonnois, S.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L. Q.; Ferreira, A. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    An unexpected feature of Titan's atmosphere is the strong depletion in primordial noble gases revealed by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent on 2005 January 14. Although several plausible explanations have already been formulated, no definitive response to this issue has yet been found. Here, we investigate the possible sequestration of these noble gases in the liquid contained in lakes and wet terrains on Titan and the consequences for their atmospheric abundances. Considering the atmosphere and the liquid existing on the soil as a whole system, we compute the abundance of each noble gas relative to nitrogen. To do so, we make the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between the liquid and the atmosphere, the abundances of the different constituents being determined via regular solution theory. We find that xenon's atmospheric depletion can be explained by its dissolution at ambient temperature in the liquid presumably present on Titan's soil. In the cases of argon and krypton, we find that the fractions incorporated in the liquid are negligible, implying that an alternative mechanism must be invoked to explain their atmospheric depletion.

  15. Noble gas measurements from tiny water amounts: fluid inclusions in carbonates of speleothemes and coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Laszlo; Palcsu, Laszlo; Major, Zoltan

    2010-05-01

    Based on the concentrations of dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions in speleothems and corals, noble gas temperatures (NGT) might be derived, that would be important climate information [1]. In the case of terrestrial carbonates, it means that the temperature dependency of noble gases in the evolving fluid inclusions is suitable to determine the prevailing temperature. This recognition provides new opportunities for the research of paleoclimate. Additionally, the dissolved noble gases in the fluid inclusions represented in corals could be used to study past sea surface temperatures that are one of the most essential parameter of climate reconstructions. To measure dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions of a few micro-litres, a noble gas mass spectrometer equipped with an ultra high vacuum preparation line is the most suitable way. The preparation of the carbonate samples is performed in a sample preparation system connected to a static mode VG 5400 noble gas mass spectrometer. As a first step of the sample preparation, one piece of a sample is put into a crusher of the preparation line and then evacuated and heated at night. The crushing of dripstone and coral samples is carried out in a stainless steel pipe with a ferro-magnetic ball at 150 °C temperature, in such a way that the ball is kept on elevating and falling down onto the carbonate sample one hundred times. The aim of the heating is to avoid the water released from the fluid inclusions not to be adsorbed on the surface of the freshly broken carbonate [2]. The water released from the fluid inclusions is frozen into a cold finger, being held at temperature of -70 °C for 15 minutes. In this case, the collection efficiency is better than 99.7 %. Then the cold finger is warmed to 27 °C, and the pressure of the water vapour expanded to the volume of the cold finger is determined by a pressure gauge, which accuracy is better than 0.2 % in the pressure range of 10-2 mbar to 11 mbar. The water vapour

  16. CO-oxidation catalysts: Low-temperature CO oxidation over Noble-Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of CO to CO2 is an important reaction technologically and environmentally and a complex and interesting reaction scientifically. In most cases, the reaction is carried out in order to remove CO as an environmental hazard. A major application of heterogeneous catalysts is catalytic oxidation of CO in the exhaust of combustion devices. The reaction over catalysts in exhaust gas is fast and often mass-transfer-limited since exhaust gases are hot and O2/CO ratios are high. The main challenges to catalyst designers are to control thermal sintering and chemical poisoning of the active materials. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form unique catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  17. Rare gases systematics and mantle structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allegre, C. J.; Staudacher, T.

    1994-01-01

    The following points are emphasized: one of the most important ones is certainly the first set of experimental data on the solubility of noble gases in metal phases at intermediate pressures, since the core was certainly not formed at ultra high pressures, as emphasized by Ahrens and confirmed by trace elements systematics Wanke. The experimental data clearly show that the core can not be a major reservoir for terrestrial rare gases; the second point is a more elaborate reconsideration of the (40)K-(40)Ar budget of the Earth. This shows that (40)Ar contained in continental crust plus upper mantle plus atmosphere is at maximum half of the (40)Ar inventory of the whole earth. This implies the existence of a two layered mantle; the third point is the discovery by the Australian noble gases group of the existence of high (20)Ne/(22)Ne and low (21)Ne/(22)Ne isotopic ratios in Loihi seamount samples. This results which are different to the MORB ratios confirm the idea of a two layered model, but suggest the existence of a primordial solar type Ne reservoir. Several possibilities about the origin of this (20)Ne excess in the mantle will be discussed; The high (40)Ar/(36)Ar, (129)Xe/(130)Xe and (134) Xe/(130)Xe, (136)Xe/(130)Xe are confirmed by new data. The corresponding ratios for the lower mantle will be discussed. (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratios up to 6000 can be accepted and will not modify the general model of the mantle. They confirm the atmosphere chronology, about 85 percent of the atmosphere was formed in the first 50 My and 15 percent later on.

  18. Noble gas composition and 40Ar/39Ar age in eclogites from the main hole of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Hanel, Michael; Altherr, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    We present the first comprehensive noble gas study on eclogites. The four eclogite samples were recovered during the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling and are from two distinct profile depth sections differing in their degree of interaction with meteoric water, based on their δ 18O-values (surface related and of mantle-type). Hence, noble gas analyses offer the potential to further discriminate between shallow (meteoric) and deep (mantle) fluid sources. Noble gas compositions reveal typical crustal fluid compositions, characterized by a variable mixture of atmospheric gases with significant contributions of nucleogenic neon, radiogenic 4He*, radiogenic 40Ar*, fissiogenic 131-136Xe, and presumably bariogenic 131Xe, but no significant addition of mantle gases. This signature can be also considered to represent one endmember component of eclogitic diamonds. Concentrations of non-radiogenic noble gases are rather low, with depletion of light relative to the heavier noble gases. Eclogites from lower depth which experienced a higher degree of interaction with meteoric water also showed higher contributions of atmospheric gas compared with eclogites recovered from greater depth. This is interpreted to result from interaction with high-salinity fluids during ultrahigh pressure (UH P). It demonstrates that the atmospheric noble gas abundance is a proxy for interaction with surface related fluids. 40Ar/39Ar (inverse) isochron ages of two phengite separates (241.2 ± 0.4 Ma and 275.0 ± 1.8 Ma, 1 σ-errors) predate the main phase of UH P metamorphism (ca. 220 Ma). Biotite yields an integrated age of about 1100 Ma. These age values are interpreted to reflect the likely addition of excess 40Ar without any chronological meaning.

  19. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  20. Issues Involving The OSI Concept of Operation For Noble Gas Radionuclide Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C R; Sun, Y

    2011-01-21

    The development of a technically sound protocol for detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is critical to the successful operation of an on site inspection (OSI) under the CTBT and has broad ramifications for all aspects of the OSI regime including the setting of specifications for both sampling and analysis equipment used during an OSI. With NA-24 support, we are investigating a variety of issues and concerns that have significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work at LLNL focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments - a lesson we learned previously from the LLNL Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Evaluation of a number of important noble gas detection issues, potentially affecting OSI policy, has awaited the US re-engagement with the OSI technical community. Thus, there have been numerous issues to address during the past 18 months. Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of LLNL computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied in the field making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated during the past year. We complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that is intended to be a practical solution to most if not all the challenges addressed here.

  1. Noble Gas Analysis for Mars Robotic Missions: Evaluating K-Ar Age Dating for Mars Rock Analogs and Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Ming, D. W.; Garrison, D. H.; Jones, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Nagao, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this noble gas investigation was to evaluate the possibility of measuring noble gases in martian rocks and air by future robotic missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission has, as part of its payload, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which consists of a pyrolysis oven integrated with a GCMS. The MSL SAM instrument has the capability to measure noble gas compositions of martian rocks and atmosphere. Here we suggest the possibility of K-Ar age dating based on noble gas release of martian rocks by conducting laboratory simulation experiments on terrestrial basalts and martian meteorites. We provide requirements for the SAM instrument to obtain adequate noble gas abundances and compositions within the current SAM instrumental operating conditions, especially, a power limit that prevents heating the furnace above approx.1100 C. In addition, Martian meteorite analyses from NASA-JSC will be used as ground truth to evaluate the feasibility of robotic experiments to constrain the ages of martian surface rocks.

  2. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  3. Nuclear Structure of the Noble Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Nakyeong

    Modern physics usually pictures the nuclear structure as about sphere and treats various detailed situation as perturbative, which may be obscured. In addition, the explanation why 235U undergoes nuclear fission and 238U does not is too difficult and unclear for the people to understand. However, in this paper, we introduce a new approach on the nuclear structure of the noble gas, which simultaneously can explain several phenomena that is obscurely elucidated by modern physics. We consider a 1:1 ratio between protons and neutrons and need the concept of the symmetry of the nuclear structure, because the electron's shell of the noble gas is fully occupied. From these, we can predict the number of neutrons of each noble gas exactly

  4. Optimizing detection of noble gas emission at a former UNE site: sample strategy, collection, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, R.; Olsen, K.; Hayes, J. C.; Emer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests may be first detected by seismic or air samplers operated by the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization). After initial detection of a suspicious event, member nations may call for an On-Site Inspection (OSI) that in part, will sample for localized releases of radioactive noble gases and particles. Although much of the commercially available equipment and methods used for surface and subsurface environmental sampling of gases can be used for an OSI scenario, on-site sampling conditions, required sampling volumes and establishment of background concentrations of noble gases require development of specialized methodologies. To facilitate development of sampling equipment and methodologies that address OSI sampling volume and detection objectives, and to collect information required for model development, a field test site was created at a former underground nuclear explosion site located in welded volcanic tuff. A mixture of SF-6, Xe127 and Ar37 was metered into 4400 m3 of air as it was injected into the top region of the UNE cavity. These tracers were expected to move towards the surface primarily in response to barometric pumping or through delayed cavity pressurization (accelerated transport to minimize source decay time). Sampling approaches compared during the field exercise included sampling at the soil surface, inside surface fractures, and at soil vapor extraction points at depths down to 2 m. Effectiveness of various sampling approaches and the results of tracer gas measurements will be presented.

  5. Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M. Ya. Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-08-15

    We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C{sub n} under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C{sub n}. This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C{sub n}, which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical {delta}-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R{sub C} is much larger than the atomic radius r{sub A} and the thickness {delta}{sub C} of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C{sub n} photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors.

  6. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  7. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  8. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  9. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  10. Noble gas and carbon isotopic evidence for CO2-driven silicate dissolution in a recent natural CO2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubacq, Benoît; Bickle, Mike J.; Wigley, Max; Kampman, Niko; Ballentine, Chris J.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Secure storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs requires predicting gas-water-rock interactions over millennial timescales. Noble gases and carbon isotope measurements can be used to shed light on the nature of competing dissolution-precipitation processes over different timescales, from the fast dissolution of gaseous CO2 in groundwater to more sluggish reactions involving dissolution and precipitation of newly formed minerals in the reservoir. Here we study a compilation of gas analyses including noble gases and δ13C of CO2 from nine different natural CO2 reservoirs. Amongst these reservoirs, the Bravo Dome CO2 field (New Mexico, USA) shows distinct geochemical trends which are explained by degassing of noble gases from groundwater altering the composition of the gas phase. This groundwater degassing is synchronous with the dissolution of CO2 in groundwater. Progressive creation of alkalinity via CO2-promoted mineral dissolution is required to explain the observed positive correlation between CO2/3He and δ13C of the gas phase, a unique feature of Bravo Dome. The differences between Bravo Dome and other natural CO2 reservoirs are likely explained by the more recent filling of Bravo Dome, reflecting CO2-water-rock interactions over thousands of years rather than over millions of years in older reservoirs.

  11. Noble Gas Partitioning in Bravo Dome Natural Magmatic CO2 field: Implications for Crustal CO2 accumulations and Gas Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    We report a combination of field data, experiments, and analytical theory investigating the dissolution of the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field into the underlying brine aquifer. The Bravo Dome reservoir contains 1.3Gt±0.6Gt of magmatic CO2 trapped above a shallow brine aquifer. We compute that 22%±7% of the original CO2 has dissolved since its migration, and that the CO2 entered between 1.2Ma and 1.5Ma. The CO2 also contains trace amounts of noble gases, used by previous authors and this study to identify the migration direction and quantify mass of CO2 dissolved. We present a simple analytical model and experimental verification showing that noble gases in even trace amounts will not move uniformly with a migrating gas plume in the crust. Due to varying degrees of solubility in groundwater, the more volatile gases will tend to enrich at the front of the migrating CO2 plume. This effect can be used to improve interpretations of subsurface noble gas concentration gradients.

  12. A Grounded Theory of the Development of Noble Youth Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton

    2012-01-01

    Having a noble purpose in life is an important component of positive youth development; however, little is known about how noble purposes develop over time. Therefore, using three waves of interviews over a 5-year period with 9 adolescents (N = 9) who demonstrated intense commitments to various noble purposes, the present study developed a…

  13. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble...

  15. Results from the XENON10 and the Race to Detect Dark Matter with Noble Liquids

    ScienceCinema

    Shutt, Tom [Case Western Reserve, Cleveland, Ohio, United States

    2016-07-12

    Detectors based on liquid noble gases have the potential to revolutionize the direct search for WIMP dark matter. The XENON10 experiment, of which I am a member, has recently announced the results from it's first data run and is now the leading WIMP search experiment. This and other experiments using xenon, argon and neon have the potential to rapidly move from the current kg-scale target mass to the ton scale and well beyond. This should allow a (nearly) definitive test or discovery of dark matter if it is in the form of weakly interacting massive particles.

  16. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  17. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  18. Catalytic combustion of actual low and medium heating value gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of both low and medium heating value gases using actual coal derived gases obtained from operating gasifiers was demonstrated. A fixed bed gasifier with a complete product gas cleanup system was operated in an air blown mode to produce low heating value gas. A fluidized bed gasifier with a water quench product gas cleanup system was operated in both an air enriched and an oxygen blown mode to produce low and medium, heating value gas. Noble metal catalytic reactors were evaluated in 12 cm flow diameter test rigs on both low and medium heating value gases. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5% were obtained with all coal derived gaseous fuels. The NOx emissions ranged from 0.2 to 4 g NO2 kg fuel.

  19. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE NANOSTRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-assisted (MW) spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts, silver (Ag), gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) is reported using sugar solutions such as -D glucose, sucrose and maltose, etc. to generate nanomaterials. These MW-assisted reactions, conducted in aqueo...

  20. The Colour of the Noble Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the physical basis for colors of noble metals (copper, silver, gold) developed from energy conservation/quantum mechanical view of free electron photoabsorption. Describes production of absorption edges produced by change in density of occupied valence electron states in the d-band, which allows stronger absorption in the visible photon…

  1. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  2. Natural Death and the Noble Savage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    1995-01-01

    The belief that dying and grieving are natural processes is widely held in modern bereavement care. Examines four assumption often made in this connection: (1) most primitive cultures deal with death in an accepting way; (2) this way is different than our own; (3) it is a good and noble way; and (4) traditional societies see death as natural. (JBJ)

  3. Different options for noble gas categorization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Martin

    2010-05-01

    For noble gas monitoring it is crucial to support the decision makers who need to decide whether a decection may indicate a potential nuclear test. Several parameters are available that may help to distinguish a legitimate civilian source from a nuclear explosion. The most promising parameters are: (a) Anomaly observations with respect to the history of concentrations found at that site. (b) Isotopic activity ratios can be used to separate a nuclear reactor domain from the parameter space that is specific for nuclear explosions. (c) Correlation with source-receptor-sensitivities related to known civilian sources as determined by atmospheric transport simulations. A combination of these can be used to categorize an observation. So far, several initial ideas have been presented but the issue of noble gas categorisation has been postponed with the argument that further scientific studies and additional experience have to be awaited. This paper presents the principles of different options for noble gas categorisation and considers how they would meet the interests of different classes of member states. It discusses under different points of view what might be the best approach for the noble gas categorisation scheme.

  4. Theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-10-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones-type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analog in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed. In particular, the predicted plasma electron density in a sonoluminescent bubble turns out to be in good agreement with the value measured in recent experiments.

  5. Theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-10-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones-type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analog in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed. In particular, the predicted plasma electron density in a sonoluminescent bubble turns out to be in good agreement with the value measured in recent experiments. PMID:24229140

  6. Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

    2006-05-03

    The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

  7. Trends in source gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Fraser, P. J.; Albritton, D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Legrand, M.; Makide, Y.; Rowland, F. S.; Steele, L. P.; Zander, R.

    1989-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that, by their breakdown, introduce into the stratosphere halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen compounds that are important in stratospheric ozone destruction. Given here is an update of the existing concentration time series for chlorocarbons, nitrous oxide, and methane. Also reviewed is information on halogen containing species and the use of these data for establishing trends. Also reviewed is evidence on trends in trace gases that influence tropospheric chemistry and thus the tropospheric lifetimes of source gases, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen oxides. Much of the information is given in tabular form.

  8. Nonlinear optical response of multiply ionized noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar(1, 3), Maryam; Romanov(2, 3), Dmitri; Levis(1, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    Calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of ionized species using ab initio methods presents computational and conceptual difficulties, as these ionized species often have open-shell electronic system. We use multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with extended basis sets for calculating dynamic polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply charged cations in non-resonant regime. The calculations were performed at wavelengths ranging from about 100 nm to the red of the first multi-photon resonance all the way toward the static regime. The results were benchmarked to those of CCSD calculations for ions of even-number charge. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients were found to decrease when the electrons are progressively removed from the system. At higher ionization states, these coefficients become less dispersive as a function of wavelength. The values and even the signs of the γ (2) coefficients were found to depend on the spin of the ionic quantum state. Thus, for Ne+3 and Ne+4, in low-spin states (2 Pu, and 1 Sg, respectively) the sign of γ (2) is positive, whereas in high-spin states (4 Su, and 3 Pg) the sign is negative. The calculated hyperpolarizabilities of multiply ionized atoms relate to experiments on very bright high-order harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas.

  9. External Photoevaporation of the Solar Nebula: Jupiter's Noble Gas Enrichments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (~3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H2. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H2, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (lsim 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot & Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions <~ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot & Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ~0.1 M ⊕ of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  10. EXTERNAL PHOTOEVAPORATION OF THE SOLAR NEBULA: JUPITER's NOBLE GAS ENRICHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (∼3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H{sub 2}. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H{sub 2}, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (≲ 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot and Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions ≲ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot and Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ∼0.1 M {sub ⊕} of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  11. Ultrapure Gases - From the Production Plant to the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, H.; Zuzel, G.

    2007-03-28

    Radioactive noble gas isotopes are a potential source of background in low-level physics experiments, since they are present in the atmosphere and also in widely used gases produced from the atmosphere. We have studied the 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn contamination of commercially available nitrogen using low background proportional counters and a rare gas mass spectrometer. It was found that air separation plants are very effective in removing traces of radioactive noble gases and that the available purity can be significantly higher than commercial specifications. On the other hand the gas handling processes which are necessary to deliver gases from the production plant to the customer are a possible source of re-contaminations and determine in most cases the achievable purity. By simulating these processes under realistic conditions we have establish together with the Italian company 'SOL group' a well controlled delivery path which can hold the purity. For the short-lived 222Rn the initial contamination is less critical, because it decays away. Instead the emanation rate of the cryogenic tank was found to determine the achievable purity, since it permanently delivers new 222Rn.

  12. An Alteration Scale for CM Chondrites and Implications for Planetary Noble Gas Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, L. B.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Zolensky, M.

    1993-07-01

    Three progressive alteration parameters have been identified from the mineralogical and textural analyses of 7 CM chondritic falls. These indices predict the following order of progressive alteration [3]: Murchison (MC)noble gases, Ar^36, Xe^84, and Kr^132. Two of the progressive alteration parameters monitor the volumetric production of CM phyllosilicates, which was estimated from the modal analysis of 1 to 3 thin sections from each of the analyzed falls. These are the percentages of phyllosilicates in chondrules and the volume of anhydrous matrix silicates, which increase and decease, respectively, with progressive alteration. The third alteration index, the mean Fe^3+/(2-Si) ratio in phyllosilicates, is a stoichiometric-based approximation that monitors variations in mineral composition during progressive alteration, and decreases with increasing alteration. Values of Fe^3+/(2-Si) were calculated from an average of microprobe analyses of matrix phyllosilicates in each meteorite based on a generalized phyllosilicate stoichiometry, [(Fe, Mg)(sub)3-x (Al,Fe^3+)(sub)x(Si(sub)(2-x)(Al,Fe^3+)(sub)x)O(sub)5(OH)(sub)4], which accommodates a continuous transition from cronstedtite to serpentine compositions. The bulk Ar^36 content of the 7 investigated samples decreases with increasing alteration as predicted by the alteration parameters, which suggests the possibility of degassing events. The same trend is observed for Kr^84 and Xe^132. The loss of noble gases in CM chondritic meteorites has previously been noted [1,5], and may be related to the open-system behavior that is predicted for other volatile components in CM chondrites, such as C1 [4], water [3], and methane [2]. Although high-temperature minerals are depleted in noble gases relative to the low

  13. The contribution of hydrothermally altered ocean crust to the mantle halogen and noble gas cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavrit, Déborah; Burgess, Ray; Sumino, Hirochika; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Droop, Giles; Shimizu, Aya; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that seawater-derived noble gases and halogens are recycled into the deep mantle by the subduction of oceanic crust. To understand the processes controlling the availability of halogens and noble gases for subduction, we determined the noble gas elemental and isotopic ratios and halogen (Cl, Br, I) concentrations in 28 igneous samples from the altered oceanic crust (AOC) from 5 ODP sites in the Eastern and Western Pacific Ocean. Crushing followed by heating experiments enabled determination of noble gases and halogens in fluid inclusions and mineral phases respectively. Except for He and Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic ratios were all air-like suggesting that primary MORB signatures have been completely overprinted by air and/or seawater interaction. In contrast, 3He/4He ratios obtained by crushing indicate that a mantle helium component is still preserved, and 40Ar/36Ar values are affected by radiogenic decay in the mineral phases. The 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios are respectively up to 15 times and 5 times higher than those of seawater and the highest ratios are found in samples affected by low temperature alteration (shallower than 800-900 m sub-basement). We consider three possible processes: (i) adsorption onto the clays present in the samples; (ii) fluid inclusions with a marine pore fluid composition; and (iii) fractionation of seawater through phase separation caused by boiling. Ninety percent of the Cl, Br and I were released during the heating experiments, showing that halogens are dominantly held in mineral phases prior to subduction. I/Cl ratios vary by 4 orders of magnitude, from 3 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-2. The mean Br/Cl ratio is 30% lower than in MORB and seawater. I/Cl ratios lower than MORB values are attributed to Cl-rich amphibole formation caused by hydrothermal alteration at depths greater than 800-900 m sub-basement together with different extents of I loss during low and high temperature alteration. At shallower depths, I

  14. Nanoscale lead and noble gas inclusions in aluminum: structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Andersen, Hans Henrik; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used for structural and physical characterization of nanoscale inclusions of lead and noble gases in aluminum. When the inclusion sizes approach nanoscale dimensions, many of their properties are seen to deviate from similar properties in bulk and in most cases the deviations will increase as the inclusion sizes decrease. Binary alloys of lead and noble gases with aluminum are characterized by extremely low mutual solubilities and inclusions will, therefore, exist as practically pure components embedded in the aluminum matrix. Furthermore, the thermal vacancy mobility in aluminum at and above room temperature is sufficiently high to accommodate volume strains associated with the inclusions thus leading to virtually strain free crystals. The inclusions grow in parallel cube alignment with the aluminum matrix and have a cuboctahedral shape, which reflects directly the anisotropy of the interfacial energies. Inclusions in grain boundaries can have single crystalline or bicrystalline morphology that can be explained from a generalized Wulff analysis such as the xi-vector construction. The inclusions have been found to display a variety of nanoscale features such as high Laplace pressure, size-dependent superheating during melting, deviations from the Wulff shape displaying magic size effects, a shape dependence of edge energy, and so on. All these effects have been observed and monitored by TEM using conventional imaging conditions and high-resolution conditions in combination with in-situ analysis at elevated temperatures.

  15. Using noble gas ratios to determine the origin of ground ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utting, Nicholas; Lauriol, Bernard; Lacelle, Denis; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Argon, krypton and xenon have different solubilities in water, meaning their ratios in water are different from those in atmospheric air. This characteristic is used in a novel method to distinguish between ice bodies which originate from the compaction of snow (i.e. buried snow banks, glacial ice) vs. ice which forms from the freezing of groundwater (i.e. pingo ice). Ice which forms from the compaction of snow has gas ratios similar to atmospheric air, while ice which forms from the freezing of liquid water is expected to have gas ratios similar to air-equilibrated water. This analysis has been conducted using a spike dilution noble gas line with gas extraction conducted on-line. Samples were mixed with an aliquot of rare noble gases while being melted, then extracted gases are purified and cryogenically separated. Samples have been analysed from glacial ice, buried snow bank ice, intrusive ice, wedge ice, cave ice and two unknown ice bodies. Ice bodies which have formed from different processes have different gas ratios relative to their formation processes.

  16. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  17. Noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Raymond; Turner, Grenville

    1994-01-01

    Application of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar method and noble gas studies to diamonds has increased our understanding of their age relationships to the host kimberlite or lamproite, and of the source and composition of volatile-rich fluids in the upper mantle. The properties of diamond (inert, high mechanical strength and low gas diffusivities) means they are especially useful samples for studying gases trapped deep within the earth (less than 150 km) as they are unlikely to have undergone loss or exchange of entrapped material since formation. Volatile-rich fluids (H2O-CO2) are important agents for metasomatic processes in the upper mantle, and the noble gases and halogens preferentially partition into this phase leading to a strong geochemical coherence between these groups of elements. The abundances of the halogens in the major reservoirs of the Earth shows a marked progression from chlorine, concentrated in the oceans, through to iodine which, through its affinity to organic material, is concentrated mainly in sediments. Abundances in the upper mantle are low. This is particularly true for iodine which is of special interest in view of its potential significance as an indicator of sediment recycling and by way of its link to (129)Xe amomalies in the mantle through the low extinct isotope (129)I. Extensions of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar technique enable measurements of halogens and other elements (K, Ca, Ba, U) by production of noble gas isotopes from these species during neutron irradiation. Samples analyzed in this way include 15 coated stones from an unknown source in Zaire, 3 boarts from the Jwaneng and 1 boart from the Orapa kimberlites, both in Botswana.

  18. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, Jacob C.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Coplan, Michael A.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-14

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ({sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li) in {sup 10}B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick {sup 10}B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker {sup 10}B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  19. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science.

  20. Mantle and Crustal Sources of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Noble gases in Cascade-Range and Aleutian-Arc Volcanic gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, Robert B.; Poreda, Robert J.; Evans, William C.; Janik, Cathy J.; Ritchie, Beatrice E.

    2003-01-01

    Here we report anhydrous chemical (CO2, H2S, N2, H2, CH4, O2, Ar, He, Ne) and isotopic (3He/4He, 40Ar/36Ar, δ13C of CO2, δ13C of CH4, δ15N) compositions of virtually airfree gas samples collected between 1994 and 1998 from 12 quiescent but potentially restless volcanoes in the Cascade Range and Aleutian Arc (CRAA). Sample sites include ≤173°C fumaroles and springs at Mount Shasta, Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Augustine Volcano, Mount Griggs, Trident, Mount Mageik, Aniakchak Crater, Akutan, and Makushin. The chemical and isotopic data generally point to magmatic (CO2, Ar, He), shallow crustal sedimentary (hereafter, SCS) (CO2, N2, CH4), crustal (He), and meteoric (N2, Ar) sources of volatiles. CH4 clearly comes from SCS rocks in the subvolcanic systems because CH4 cannot survive the higher temperatures of deeper potential sources. Further evidence for a SCS source for CH4 as well as for non-mantle CO2 and non-meteoric N2 comes from isotopic data that show wide variations between volcanoes that are spatially very close and similar isotopic signatures from volcanoes from very disparate areas. Our results are in direct opposition to many recent studies on other volcanic arcs (Kita and others, 1993; Sano and Marty, 1995; Fischer and others, 1998), in that they point to a dearth of subducted components of CO2 and N2 in the CRAA discharges. Either the CRAA volcanoes are fundamentally different from volcanoes in other arcs or we need to reevaluate the significance of subducted C and N recycling in convergent-plate volcanoes.

  1. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  2. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  3. Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.; Dawless, Robert K.; Hosler, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

  4. Recycling of volatiles at subduction zones: Noble gas evidence from the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni arc of papua New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Kenneth; Mcinnes, Brent; Patterson, Desmond

    1994-01-01

    Convergent margin processes play an important but poorly understood role in the distribution of terrestrial volatile species. For example, subduction processes filter volatiles from the subducting package, thereby restricting their return to the mantle. In addition, once extracted from the downgoing slab, volatiles become an essential component in the petrogenesis of island arc magmas. The noble gases, with their systematic variation in physical properties and diversity of radiogenic isotopes, should carry a uniquely valuable record of these processes. However, thus far studies of noble gases in arc volcanics have achieved only limited success in this regard. Subduction-related lavas and geothermal fluids carry (3)He/(4)He ratios equal to or slightly lower than those found in the depleted upper mantle source of mid-ocean ridge basalts. Apparently slab-derived helium (which should have (3)He/(4)He much less than MORB) is extensively diluted by MORB-like helium from the mantle wedge, making it difficult to use helium as a tracer of convergent margin processes. Interpretation of the heavier noble gases (Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe) in arc lavas has also proven difficult, because the lavas carry low noble gas concentrations and hence are subject to pervasive atmospheric contamination. The low noble gas concentrations may be a consequence of degassing in the high level magma chambers characteristic of arc stratovolcanos. We have recently initiated a project to better constrain the behavior of volatiles in subduction zones through geochemical studies of the tectonically unusual volcanoes of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) arc in the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea.

  5. Recycling of volatiles at subduction zones: Noble gas evidence from the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni arc of papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Kenneth; McInnes, Brent; Patterson, Desmond

    Convergent margin processes play an important but poorly understood role in the distribution of terrestrial volatile species. For example, subduction processes filter volatiles from the subducting package, thereby restricting their return to the mantle. In addition, once extracted from the downgoing slab, volatiles become an essential component in the petrogenesis of island arc magmas. The noble gases, with their systematic variation in physical properties and diversity of radiogenic isotopes, should carry a uniquely valuable record of these processes. However, thus far studies of noble gases in arc volcanics have achieved only limited success in this regard. Subduction-related lavas and geothermal fluids carry (3)He/(4)He ratios equal to or slightly lower than those found in the depleted upper mantle source of mid-ocean ridge basalts. Apparently slab-derived helium (which should have (3)He/(4)He much less than MORB) is extensively diluted by MORB-like helium from the mantle wedge, making it difficult to use helium as a tracer of convergent margin processes. Interpretation of the heavier noble gases (Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe) in arc lavas has also proven difficult, because the lavas carry low noble gas concentrations and hence are subject to pervasive atmospheric contamination. The low noble gas concentrations may be a consequence of degassing in the high level magma chambers characteristic of arc stratovolcanos. We have recently initiated a project to better constrain the behavior of volatiles in subduction zones through geochemical studies of the tectonically unusual volcanoes of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) arc in the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea.

  6. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Brown, M. A.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  7. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, I; Huppert, M; Brown, M A; van Bokhoven, J A; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup. PMID:26724045

  8. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J.; Brown, M. A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  9. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, I; Huppert, M; Brown, M A; van Bokhoven, J A; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  10. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  11. Experimental study of pulsed power driven radiative shockwaves in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, J.; Lebedev, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S.; Swadling, G.; Burdiak, G.; Hall, G.; Patankar, S.; de Grouchy, P.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Pickworth, L.; Khoory, E.; Smith, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.

    2013-10-01

    The use of plastic disks coated with a thin film of Aluminium has been investigated as a control mechanism for the shockwave formed from a radial foil z-pinch in the presence of an ambient medium. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE (1.4 MA, 250 ns rise time) facility at Imperial College London. The configuration produces a strong radiative shockwave driven with constant velocity (>25 km/s) for long time (>400 ns) and spatial scales (cm). Experimental results demonstrate scaling of shock compression opposite to that found in 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Evidence of a thermal instability in the post-shock cooling region is linked to a decrease in compression for higher atomic masses due to increased radiative cooling. Increases in post-shock temperature and ionization have been measured with decreased radial distance from a strongly cooling hydrodynamic jet. Regions of observed thermal instability for Xenon and Krypton agree with those expected from evaluation of theoretical cooling functions. Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London.

  12. On the abundances of noble and biologically relevant gases in Lake Vostok, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Lakhlifi, Azzedine; Picaud, Sylvain; Pasek, Matthew; Chassefière, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by the possibility of comparing theoretical predictions of Lake Vostok's composition with future in situ measurements, we investigated the composition of clathrates that are expected to form in this environment from the air supplied to the lake by melting ice. To establish the best possible correlation between the lake water composition and that of air clathrates formed in situ, we used a statistical thermodynamic model based on the description of the guest-clathrate interaction by a spherically averaged Kihara potential with a nominal set of potential parameters. We determined the fugacities of the different volatiles present in the lake by defining a "pseudo" pure substance dissolved in water owning the average properties of the mixture and by using the Redlich-Kwong equation of state to mimic its thermodynamic behavior. Irrespective of the clathrate structure considered in our model, we found that xenon and krypton are strongly impoverished in the lake water (a ratio in the 0.04-0.1 range for xenon and a ratio in the ≈ 0.15-0.3 range for krypton) compared to their atmospheric abundances. Argon and methane were also found to be depleted in the Lake Vostok water by factors in the 0.5-0.95 and 0.3-0.5 ranges, respectively, compared to their atmospheric abundances. On the other hand, the carbon dioxide abundance was found to be substantially enriched in the lake water compared to its atmospheric abundance (by a factor in the 1.6-5 range at 200 residence times). The comparison of our predictions of the CO2 and CH4 mole fractions in Lake Vostok with future in situ measurements will allow disentangling between the possible supply sources.

  13. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

  14. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen is presently extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the major constituent. This theoretical framework is applied to three different cases. In the first, it is shown that the fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon is explainable as a consequence of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of the accretion process. In the second, the anomalously high Ar-38/Ar-36 ratio of Mars is shown to be due to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping and very pure hydrogen wind. In the last case, it is speculated that the currently high Martian D/H ratio emerged during the hydrodynamic escape phase which fractionated Ar.

  15. Release of Implanted Noble Gases from Metallic Glass Vitreloy During Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Vitreloy, a metallic vitreous glass, was examined as a potential target material for the Genesis Mission solar wind collector. Stepped pyrolysis revealed that He and Ne implanted in Vitreloy were efficiently re-trapped during phase transitions.

  16. Non-atmospheric noble gases from CO(sub 2) well ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hudson, G. B.; Velsko, C.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Huss, G. R.; Chivas, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years a number of studies of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial material has allowed the piecing together of a picture of events occurring in the early solar system (4.5 Gyr ago), including the formation of the earth. However, before this picture can be completed with an appropriate amount of detail it will be necessary to make further advances. One of the areas where knowledge is lacking is the chemical and isotopic composition of the earth as a whole. The lack of knowledge has less to do with the capabilities of modern techniques than with the availability of samples to study. About 99.6 percent of the earth's mass is contained in the mantle and core, leaving less that 1 percent in the crust and atmosphere. Although the crust is derived from the mantle it has undergone extensive changes and it is therefore difficult (although not impossible) to use crustal material to study events occurring 4.5 Gyr ago. More information about the early earth could be obtained from studies of the mantle but it is difficult to obtain mantle material, because the mean thickness of the crust is 17 km, much greater than even the deepest mines or drill shafts. The two types of available mantle samples are discussed.

  17. First investigation of noble gases in the Dengli H3,8 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Assonov, S. S.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Dengli (H3,8) meteorite, which weighs 243.5 g, is a find from the Karakum desert. It is a complex microbreccia containing unusual clasts which are more typical for regolithic breccias than for H-chondrites. Based on comparisons of Xe and Kr content and isotopic composition, the Dengli does not differ significantly from other H-chondrites. Its exposure age is 7.6 Ma. That is in agreement with common data for the exposure age (6.2 + 0.2 Ma) of 350 H-chondrites. Dengli's K/Ar age (4.01 Ga) coincides with the same ages of many other H-chondrites. Thus the Dengli is not regolithic breccia, and it probably formed during accretion of its parent body.

  18. Noble gases in LEW88516 shergottite: Evidence for exposure age pairing with ALH77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    LEW88516 contains excess amounts of radiogenic Ar-40 and Xe-129 that are slightly greater than those observed in ALH77005, but in the same relative proportion as much larger excesses observed in EET79001. Cosmogenic He-3 and Ne-21 abundances in LEW88516 are very similar to those for ALH77005 and are consistent with a common initiation of cosmic ray exposure -2.8 Myr ago for four of the five shergottites. Exposure of these four shergottites could have been under different shielding in a common meteoroid, or in several objects.

  19. Thermodynamic Functions of Solvation of Hydrocarbons, Noble Gases, and Hard Spheres in Tetrahydrofuran-Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sedov, I A; Magsumov, T I

    2015-07-16

    Thermodynamic solvation properties of mixtures of water with tetrahydrofuran at 298 K are studied. The Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of solvation of n-octane and toluene are determined experimentally. For molecular dynamics simulations of the binary solvent, we have modified a TraPPE-UA model for tetrahydrofuran and combined it with the SPC/E potential for water. The excess thermodynamic functions of neon, xenon, and hard spheres with two different radii are calculated using the particle insertion method. Simulated and real systems share the same characteristic trends for the thermodynamic functions. A maximum is present on dependencies of the enthalpy of solvation from the composition of solvent at 70-90 mol % water, making it higher than in both of the cosolvents. It is caused by a high enthalpy of cavity formation in the mixtures rich with water due to solvent reorganization around the cavity, which is shown by calculation of the enthalpy of solvation of hard spheres. Addition of relatively small amounts of tetrahydrofuran to water effectively suppresses the hydrophobic effect, leading to a quick increase of both the entropy and enthalpy of cavity formation and solvation of low polar molecules. PMID:26115405

  20. Groundwater dynamics and arsenic mobilization in Bangladesh assessed using noble gases and tritium.

    PubMed

    Klump, Stephan; Kipfer, Rolf; Cirpka, Olaf A; Harvey, Charles F; Brennwald, Matthias S; Ashfaque, Khandaker N; Badruzzaman, Abu Borhan M; Hug, Stephan J; Imboden, Dieter M

    2006-01-01

    The contamination of groundwater by geogenic arsenic is the cause of major health problems in south and southeast Asia. Various hypotheses proposing that As is mobilized by the reduction of iron (oxy)hydroxides are now under discussion. One important and controversial question concerns the possibility that As contamination might be related to the extraction of groundwater for irrigation purposes. If As were mobilized by the inflow of re-infiltrating irrigation water rich in labile organic carbon, As-contaminated groundwater would have been recharged after the introduction of groundwater irrigation 20-40 years ago. We used environmental tracer data and conceptual groundwater flow and transport modeling to study the effects of groundwater pumping and to assess the role of reinfiltrated irrigation water in the mobilization of As. Both the tracer data and the model results suggest that pumping induces convergent groundwater flow to the depth of extraction and causes shallow, young groundwater to mix with deep, old groundwater. The As concentrations are greatest at a depth of 30 m where these two groundwater bodies come into contact and mix. There, within the mixing zone, groundwater age significantly exceeds 30 years, indicating that recharge of most of the contaminated water occurred before groundwater irrigation became established in Bangladesh. Hence, at least at our study site, the results call into question the validity of the hypothesis that re-infiltrated irrigation water is the direct cause of As mobilization; however, the tracer data suggest that, at our site, hydraulic changes due to groundwater extraction for irrigation might be related to the mobilization of As.

  1. Total scattering cross sections and interatomic potentials for neutral hydrogen and helium on some noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzic, D.N.; Cohen, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Measurements of energy-dependent scattering cross sections for 30 to 1800 eV D incident on He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, and for 40 to 850 eV He incident on He, Ar, and Kr are presented. They are determined by using the charge-exchange efflux from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak as a source of D or He. These neutrals are passed through a gas-filled scattering cell and detected by a time-of-flight spectrometer. The cross section for scattering greater than the effective angle of the apparatus (approx. =20 mrad) is found by measuring the energy-dependent attenuation of D or He as a function of pressure in the scattering cell. The interatomic potential is extracted from the data.

  2. Trapping Planetary Noble Gases During the Fischer-Tropsch-Type Synthesis of Organic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.; Meshik, A.

    2010-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO arc exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions!, Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these rcactions:u . The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic materiaL Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  3. Predicted versus observed cosmic-ray-produced noble gases in lunar samples - Improved Kr production ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regnier, S.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Marti, K.; Reedy, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    New sets of cross sections for the production of krypton isotopes from targets of Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr have been constructed primarily on the bases of experimental excitation functions for Kr production from Y. These cross sections were used to calculate galactic-cosmic-ray and solar-proton production rates for Kr isotopes in the moon. The paper reports spallation Kr data obtained from ilmenite separates of rocks 10017 and 10047. Production rates and isotopic ratios for cosmogenic Kr observed in ten well-documented lunar samples and in ilmenite separates and bulk samples from several lunar rocks with long but unknown irradiation histories were compared with predicted rates and ratios. The agreements were generally quite good.

  4. Noble gases in the Murchison meteorite - Possible relics of s-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Anders, E.

    1978-01-01

    The Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contains a new type of xenon component, enriched by up to 50 percent in five of the nine stable xenon isotopes, mass numbers 128 to 132. This component is released at 1200 to 1600 C from a severely etched mineral fraction. Krypton shows a similar but smaller enrichment in the isotopes 80 and 82. Neon and helium released in the same interval also are quite anomalous, being highly enriched in the isotopes 22 and 3. These patterns are strongly suggestive of three nuclear processes believed to take place in red giants: the s process (neutron capture on a slow time scale), helium burning, and hydrogen shell burning. If this interpretation is correct, then primitive meteorites contain yet another kind of alien, presolar material: dust grains ejected from red giants.

  5. Impact event at the Permian-Triassic boundary: evidence from extraterrestrial noble gases in fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Poreda, R J; Hunt, A G; Bunch, T E; Rampino, M

    2001-02-23

    The Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) event, which occurred about 251.4 million years ago, is marked by the most severe mass extinction in the geologic record. Recent studies of some PTB sites indicate that the extinctions occurred very abruptly, consistent with a catastrophic, possibly extraterrestrial, cause. Fullerenes (C60 to C200) from sediments at the PTB contain trapped helium and argon with isotope ratios similar to the planetary component of carbonaceous chondrites. These data imply that an impact event (asteroidal or cometary) accompanied the extinction, as was the case for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event about 65 million years ago. PMID:11222855

  6. Femtosecond-pulse-driven, electron-excited XUV lasers in eight-times-ionized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lemoff, B E; Barty, C P; Harris, S E

    1994-04-15

    We propose three XUV laser schemes in the 30-50-nm wavelength region that can be driven by 10-Hz ultrashort-pulse terawatt laser systems. Tunneling ionization by circularly polarized radiation produces both the ions and hot electrons necessary to excite the upper laser level.

  7. Noble-metal-free plasmonic photocatalyst: hydrogen doped semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangchao; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2014-01-01

    The unique capacity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) offers a new opportunity to overcome the limited efficiency of semiconductor photocatalyst. Here we unravel that LSPR, which usually occurs in noble metal nanoparticles, can be realized by hydrogen doping in noble-metal-free semiconductor using TiO2 as a model photocatalyst. Moreover, its LSPR is located in infrared region, which supplements that of noble metal whose LSPR is generally in the visible region, making it possible to extend the light response of photocatalyst to infrared region. The near field enhancement is shown to be comparable with that of noble-metal nanoparticles, indicating that highly enhanced light absorption rate can be expected. The present work can provide a key guideline for the creation of highly efficient noble-metal-free plasmonic photocatalysts and have a much wider impact in infrared bioimaging and spectroscopy where infrared LSPR is essential. PMID:24496400

  8. Noble gas storage and delivery system for ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Dwight Douglas (Inventor); Ramos, Charlie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method and system for storing and delivering a noble gas for an ion propulsion system where an adsorbent bearing a noble gas is heated within a storage vessel to desorb the noble gas which is then flowed through a pressure reduction device to a thruster assembly. The pressure and flow is controlled using a flow restrictor and low wattage heater which heats an adsorbent bed containing the noble gas propellant at low pressures. Flow rates of 5-60 sccm can be controlled to within about 0.5% or less and the required input power is generally less than 50 W. This noble gas storage and delivery system and method can be used for earth orbit satellites, and lunar or planetary space missions.

  9. Microdiamonds from Different Meteorite Types: N and Noble Gas Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Sahijpal, S.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. P.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Goswami, J. N.

    1993-07-01

    Microdiamonds isolated from CV3 and ordinary chondrites have been found to differ from those in CM2 meteorites in their N contents and low-temperature Xe-component (Xe-P3), even though the amounts of Xe-HL and the delta ^15N are similar [1,2]. We undertook a simultaneous study of N and noble gases in diamond-rich separates of Murchison (CM2), Efremovka (CV3), and Krymka (LL3.0) meteorites to identify the association of N and noble gas components in them and to characterize possible differences. Gases are extracted by combustion in 3 torr oxygen at low temperatures (up to 700 degrees C) and by pyrolysis at higher temperatures. Murchison: There are two peak releases. About 60-90% of all gases are released in the 550 degrees C step, which is characterized by the presence of Ne-A2, Xe-HL, and delta ^15N = -330 per mil. The second peak at 1200 degrees C gave delta ^15N = -567 per mil and showed a clear admixture of Ne-E and Xe-S (measured 20/22 = 4.2, 21/22 = 0.018, 130/132 = 0.309), indicating the presence of SiC. The low-temperature steps (400 degrees and 450 degrees C) gave Xe-P3 with an admixture of Xe-HL. These results are in agreement with our earlier analysis of another aliquot of Murchison C delta [3]. Efremovka (DE-4): There is a broad release in the 550 degrees C and 600 degrees C steps and a second peak at 1200 degrees C. We estimate that about 60% and 40% respectively of the sample are combusted at the two low- temperature steps. Although the 550 degrees C and 600 degrees C steps have similar gas amounts (except for Xe), other gases show significant differences in their isotopic compositions. The minimum delta ^15N of -290 per mil (600 degrees C) is much heavier than the typical C delta value of -330 per mil [1]. Xenon in both fractions is pure Xe-HL, while Kr is different [86/82 = 1.67 (550 degrees C) and 1.91 (600 degrees C)]. The 1200 degrees C fraction shows the presence of a small admixture of Ne-E, Xe-S, and Kr-S, but the delta ^15N (-127 per mil ) is

  10. Potential energy curves for the interaction of Ag(5s) and Ag(5p) with noble gas atoms.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; Sadeghpour, H R; Dalgarno, A

    2013-02-28

    We investigate the interaction of ground and excited states of a silver atom with noble gases (NG), including helium. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves are calculated with quantum chemistry methods and spin-orbit effects in the excited states are included by assuming a spin-orbit splitting independent of the internuclear distance. We compare our results with experimentally available spectroscopic data, as well as with previous calculations. Because of strong spin-orbit interactions, excited Ag-NG potential energy curves cannot be fitted to Morse-like potentials. We find that the labeling of the observed vibrational levels has to be shifted by one unit.

  11. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  12. Constraints on light noble gas partitioning at the conditions of spinel-peridotite melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2013-12-01

    Helium partitioning between olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and spinel and basaltic melt has been experimentally determined under upper mantle melting conditions (up to 20 kbar and 1450 °C). Under the conditions explored, helium partition coefficients are similar in all minerals investigated (KdHe˜10-4), suggesting He is evenly distributed between the minerals of spinel peridotite. This is in contrast to most incompatible elements, which are concentrated in clinopyroxene in spinel peridotite. The studied minerals have different concentrations of point defects, but similar He solubility, providing no evidence for He partitioning onto specific defects sites (e.g. cation vacancies). Upper limits on the partition coefficients for Ne and Ar have also been determined, constraining these elements to be moderately to highly incompatible in olivine at the conditions of spinel peridotite melting (<10-2 and <10-3, respectively). Helium partitioning in peridotite minerals varies little within the range of temperatures, pressures, and mineral compositions explored in this study. Reported partition coefficients, in combination with previous work, suggest that moderate to high degree mantle melting is not an efficient mechanism for increasing (U+Th)/He, (U+Th)/Ne, or K/Ar of the depleted mantle (DMM) through time, and consequently, supports the argument that recycling of oceanic crust is largely responsible for the relatively strong radiogenic noble gas signatures in the depleted mantle. Mantle residues with lowered (U+Th)/He, (U+Th)/Ne, and K/Ar may be produced through large extents of melting, but concentrations of noble gases will be low, unless noble gas solubility in solids deviate from Henry's Law at high fugacity.

  13. Noble gas residence times of saline waters within crystalline bedrock, Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niedermann, Samuel; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Noble gas residence times of saline groundwaters from the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, located within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Finland, are presented. The accumulation of radiogenic (4He, 40Ar) and nucleogenic (21Ne) noble gas isotopes in situ together with the effects of diffusion are considered. Fluid samples were collected from depths between 180 and 2480 m below surface, allowing us to compare the modelled values with the measured concentrations along a vertical depth profile. The results show that while the concentrations in the upper part are likely affected by diffusion, there is no indication of diffusive loss at or below 500 m depth. Furthermore, no mantle derived gases were found unequivocally. Previous studies have shown that distinct vertical variation occurs both in geochemistry and microbial community structuring along the drill hole, indicating stagnant waters with no significant exchange of fluids between different fracture systems or with surface waters. Therefore in situ accumulation is the most plausible model for the determination of noble gas residence times. The results show that the saline groundwaters in Outokumpu are remarkably old, with most of the samples indicating residence times between ∼20 and 50 Ma. Although being first order approximations, the ages of the fluids clearly indicate that their formation must predate more recent events, such as Quaternary glaciations. Isolation within the crust since the Eocene-Miocene epochs has also direct implications to the deep biosphere found at Outokumpu. These ecosystems must have been isolated for a long time and thus very likely rely on energy and carbon sources such as H2 and CO2 from groundwater and adjacent bedrock rather than from the ground surface.

  14. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  15. A new approach for the interpretation of stable isotope signals in speleothems using noble gas temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Marx, T.; Scholz, D.; Spötl, C.; Niggemann, S.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Mangini, A.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.

    2009-04-01

    The development of a measurement and extraction system for noble gases contained in speleothem fluid inclusions enables the determination of equilibration temperatures. This so-called noble gas temperature (NGT) can be used in addition to other proxies, such as stable oxygen and carbon isotopes or trace elements, to constrain paleoclimate changes. Typical sample sizes are about 1 g calcite. With this quantity, and a low contribution of air-filled inclusions to the total signal, an uncertainty of about 1℃ is achievable. Using stalagmites from the Bunker Cave in northern Germany a NGT record was established. This record covers different periods of the last 130 ka and offers the possibility to compare temperature changes reconstructed from NGTs with variations in the stable isotope and trace element data of the same stalagmite. Most noticeable is the evolution of the ^18O signal, which shows a strong depletion during periods of increased NGTs. The comparison of the NGTs with other climate records shows the detected temperature changes to be consistent with variations reconstructed e.g. from pollen, ice cores and corals.

  16. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts. PMID:27585708

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts.

  19. Noble metal chain adsorption on graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hamdollah; Moaddeli, Mohammad; Amiri, Peiman

    2016-05-01

    Van-der-Waals dispersion force plays a crucial role in physisorption mechanisms. Using density functional theory, the adsorption of noble metal (Cu, Ag, and Au) chains on graphene sheet was studied within two possible adsorption geometries, the zig-zag and the preferred armchair one. In order to take the portion of non-local correlations into account, we applied both semi-empirical and ab-initio van-der-Waals functionals in our calculations. The interaction leads to a charge transfer at the physisorption interface and makes graphene p-doped. Not only does the Fermi level shifts with respect to the Dirac point, but also a small band gap opening is predicted. Work function calculations confirm the presence of physisorption mechanism at the interface.

  20. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde, João; Doria, Gonçalo; Baptista, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings. PMID:22007307

  1. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation.

  2. Noxious gases in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Likas, C; Exarchou, V; Gourgoulianis, K; Giaglaras, P; Gemptos, T; Kittas, K; Molyvdas, P A

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of NO(2) and SO(2) was measured in a commercial greenhouse from 23/9/1999 25/01/2000. The measurements showed that the level of the two gases is very high in the greenhouse atmosphere. Lung function tests in 42 workers showed that temporary work did not influence significantly the respiratory health status. PMID:11426932

  3. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  4. Laser microprobe analyses of noble gas isotopes and halogens in fluid inclusions: Analyses of microstandards and synthetic inclusions in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ar, Kr, Xe, Cl, Br, I, and K abundances and isotopic compositions have been measured in microscopic fluid inclusions in minerals by noble gas mass spectrometry following neutron irradiation and laser extraction. The laser microprobe noble gas mass spectrometric (LMNGMS) technique was quantified by use of microstandards, including air-filled capillary tubes, synthetic basalt glass grains, standard hornblende grains, and synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz. Common natural concentrations of halogens (Cl, Br, and I) and noble gases (Ar and Kr) in trapped groundwaters and hydrothermal fluids can be analyzed simultaneously by LMNGMS in as little as 10-11 L of inclusion fluid, with accuracy and precision to within 5-10% for element and isotope ratios. Multicomponent element and isotope correlations indicate contaminants or persistent reservoirs of excess Xe and/or unfractionated air in some synthetic and natural fluid inclusion samples. LMNGMS analyses of natural fluid inclusions using the methods and calibrations reported here may be used to obtain unique information on sources of fluids, sources of fluid salinity, mixing, boiling (or unmixing), and water-rock interactions in ancient fluid flow systems. ?? 1992.

  5. Mineralogy and noble gas isotopes of micrometeorites collected from Antarctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsujimoto, Shin-ichi; Tobimatsu, Yu; Nakamura, Tomoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shoichi; Nagahara, Hiroko; Tachibana, Shogo; Terada, Kentaro; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated seven micrometeorites (MMs) from Antarctic snow collected in 2003 and 2010 by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, and noble-gas isotope analysis. Isotopic ratios of He and Ne indicate that the noble gases in these MMs are mostly of solar wind (SW). Based on the release patterns of SW 4He, which should reflect the degree of heating during atmospheric entry, the seven MMs were classified into three types including two least heated, three moderately heated, and two severely heated MMs. The heating degrees are well correlated to their mineralogical features determined by TEM observation. One of the least heated MMs is composed of phyllosilicates, whereas the other consists of anhydrous minerals within which solar flare tracks were observed. The two severely heated MMs show clear evidence of atmospheric heating such as partial melt of the uppermost surface layer in one and abundant patches of dendritic magnetite and Si-rich glass within an olivine grain in the other. It is noteworthy that a moderately heated MM composed of a single crystal of olivine has a 3He/4He ratio of 8.44 × 10-4, which is higher than the SW value of 4.64 × 10-4, but does not show a cosmogenic 21Ne signature such as 20Ne/21Ne/22Ne = 12.83/0.0284/1. The isotopic compositions of He and Ne in this sample cannot be explained by mixing of a galactic cosmic ray (GCR)-produced component and SW gases. The high 3He/4He ratio without cosmogenic 21Ne signature likely indicates the presence of a 3He-enriched component derived from solar energetic particles.

  6. Noble Gas Signatures in Antrim Shale Gas in the Michigan Basin - Assessing Compositional Variability and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in the Michigan Basin looked at the atmospheric and terrigenic noble gas signatures of deep brines to place constraints on the past thermal history of the basin and to assess the extent of vertical transport processes within this sedimentary system. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of shale gas samples from the Antrim shale formation in the Michigan Basin. The Antrim shale was one of the first economic shale-gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively developed since the 1980's. This study pioneers the use of noble gases in subsurface shale gas in the Michigan Basin to clarify the nature of vertical transport processes within the sedimentary sequence and to assess potential variability of noble gas signatures in shales. Antrim Shale gas samples were analyzed for all stable noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) from samples collected at depths between 300 and 500m. Preliminary results show R/Ra values (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) varying from 0.022 to 0.21. Although most samples fall within typical crustal R/Ra range values (~0.02-0.05), a few samples point to the presence of a mantle He component with higher R/Ra ratios. Samples with higher R/Ra values also display higher 20Ne/22Ne ratios, up to 10.4, and further point to the presence of mantle 20Ne. The presence of crustally produced nucleogenic 21Ne and radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent with 21Ne/22Ne ratios up to 0.033 and 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 312. The presence of crustally produced 4He, 21Ne and 40Ar is not spatially homogeneous within the Antrim shale. Areas of higher crustal 4He production appear distinct to those of crustally produced 21Ne and 40Ar and are possibly related the presence of different production levels within the shale with varying concentrations of parent elements.

  7. NG09 And CTBT On-Site Inspection Noble Gas Sampling and Analysis Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Tanaka, Junichi

    2010-05-01

    A provision of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) allows on-site inspections (OSIs) of suspect nuclear sites to determine if the occurrence of a detected event is nuclear in origin. For an underground nuclear explosion (UNE), the potential success of an OSI depends significantly on the containment scenario of the alleged event as well as the application of air and soil-gas radionuclide sampling techniques in a manner that takes into account both the suspect site geology and the gas transport physics. UNE scenarios may be broadly divided into categories involving the level of containment. The simplest to detect is a UNE that vents a significant portion of its radionuclide inventory and is readily detectable at distance by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The most well contained subsurface events will only be detectable during an OSI. In such cases, 37 Ar and radioactive xenon cavity gases may reach the surface through either "micro-seepage" or the barometric pumping process and only the careful siting of sampling locations, timing of sampling and application of the most site-appropriate atmospheric and soil-gas capturing methods will result in a confirmatory signal. The OSI noble gas field tests NG09 was recently held in Stupava, Slovakia to consider, in addition to other field sampling and analysis techniques, drilling and subsurface noble gas extraction methods that might be applied during an OSI. One of the experiments focused on challenges to soil-gas sampling near the soil-atmosphere interface. During withdrawal of soil gas from shallow, subsurface sample points, atmospheric dilution of the sample and the potential for introduction of unwanted atmospheric gases were considered. Tests were designed to evaluate surface infiltration and the ability of inflatable well-packers to seal out atmospheric gases during sample acquisition. We discuss these tests along with some model-based predictions regarding infiltration under different near

  8. Mesoporous nano/micro noble metal particles: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Luo, Xiao

    2014-05-01

    The morphology, size and composition often govern the physical and chemical properties of noble metal units with a size in the nano or micro scale. Thus, the controlled growth of noble metal crystals would help to tailor their unique properties and this would be followed by their practical application. Mesoporous nano/micro noble metal units are types of nanostructured material that have fascinating properties that can generate great potential for various applications. This review presents a general view on the growth mechanisms of porous noble metal units and is focused on recent progresses in their synthetic approaches. Then, their potential applications in the field of drug delivery, cell imaging and SERS substrates, as well as fuel cell catalysts are overviewed.

  9. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  10. Toxic gases from fires.

    PubMed

    Terrill, J B; Montgomery, R R; Reinhardt, C F

    1978-06-23

    The major lethal factors in uncontrolled fires are toxic gases, heat, and oxygen deficiency. The predominant toxic gas is carbon monoxide, which is readily generated from the combusion of wood and other cellulosic materials. Increasing use of a variety of synthetic polymers has stimulated interest in screening tests to evaluated the toxicity of polymeric materials when thermally decomposed. As yet, this country lacks a standardized fire toxicity test protocol. PMID:208143

  11. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Rong Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2014-02-24

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  12. High Voltage in Noble Liquids for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, B.; Bernard, E.; Faham, C. H.; Ito, T. M.; Lundberg, B.; Messina, M.; Monrabal, F.; Pereverzev, S. P.; Resnati, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Soderberg, M.; Strauss, T.; Tomas, A.; Va'vra, J.; Wang, H.

    2014-08-22

    A workshop was held at Fermilab November 8-9, 2013 to discuss the challenges of using high voltage in noble liquids. The participants spanned the fields of neutrino, dark matter, and electric dipole moment physics. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions. This document summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from experiments in these fields at developing high voltage systems in noble liquids.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-08-12

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  14. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  15. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Isotopic studies of rare gases in terrestrial samples and natural nucleosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This project is concerned with research in rare gas mass spectrometry. Using a two-pronged attack, we study fluids using a system (RARGA) designed for fluid analysis in bulk which is sometimes deployed in the field and a laser microprobe mass spectrometer for fluid inclusion studies. In 1991 the RARGA project continued monitoring helium isotope variations associated with renewed seismic activity in Long Valley Caldera and expanded our geothermal data base to include Lassen National Park. An important objective, continuing in 1992, is to understand better the reasons for somewhat elevated {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios in regions where there is no contemporary volcanism which could produce the effect by addition of mantle helium. To this end, 1991 saw continued efforts to understand variations in composition between fluids and associated reservoir rocks and extended the data base to include fluids from the Gulf of Mexico. Our DOE work in calibrating a sensitive laser microprobe mass spectrometer for noble gases in fluid inclusions continues with successful returns particularly in calibrating neutron irradiated samples for tracing halogen ratios. In connection with observations of neutron-produced noble gas nuclides in granites, we have begun comparing measurements with calculations for both thermal and epithermal neutrons. We submitted a third paper on noble gases in diamonds, concentrating on observed effects of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, and fission xenon implantation from nuclear processes in adjacent material in the matrix rock. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Ferromagnetism exhibited by nanoparticles of noble metals.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Urmimala; Das, Barun; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, Athinarayanan; Rao, C N R

    2011-08-22

    Gold nanoparticles with average diameters in the range 2.5-15 nm, prepared at the organic/aqueous interface by using tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC) as reducing agent, exhibit ferromagnetism whereby the saturation magnetization M(S) increases with decreasing diameter and varies linearly with the fraction of surface atoms. The value of M(S) is higher when the particles are present as a film instead of as a sol. Capping with strongly interacting ligands such as alkane thiols results in a higher M(S) value, which varies with the strength of the metal-sulfur bond. Ferromagnetism is also found in Pt and Ag nanoparticles prepared as sols, and the M(S) values vary as Pt>Au>Ag. A careful study of the temperature variation of the magnetization of Au nanoparticles, along with certain other observations, suggests that small bare nanoparticles of noble metals could indeed possess ferromagnetism, albeit weak, which is accentuated in the presence of capping agents, specially alkane thiols which form strong metal-sulfur bonds.

  18. Multiple scattering of matter waves: An analytic model of the refractive index for atomic and molecular gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2010-08-15

    We present an analytic model of the refractive index for matter waves propagating through atomic or molecular gases. The model, which combines the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) treatment of the long-range attraction with the Fraunhofer model treatment of the short-range repulsion, furnishes a refractive index in compelling agreement with recent experiments of Jacquey et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 240405 (2007)] on Li atom matter waves passing through dilute noble gases. We show that the diffractive contribution, which arises from scattering by a two-dimensional 'hard core' of the potential, is essential for obtaining a correct imaginary part of the refractive index.

  19. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  20. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.