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Sample records for nocturnal leg cramps

  1. Simvastatin-lnduced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution.

    PubMed

    Stojaković, Natasa; Igić, Rajko

    2013-01-01

    Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the'desirable' range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day). The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day). At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways.l It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  2. Night Leg Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet or thighs might cramp as well. Forcefully stretching the contracted muscle relieves the pain. Most of ... include Drinking plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration Stretching your leg muscles or riding a stationary bicycle ...

  3. [Paraesthesia in the legs].

    PubMed

    Eisensehr, Ilonka

    2007-10-18

    Paraesthesia in the legs can have numerous causes. In addition to the restless legs syndrome, other primary causes include venous insufficiency in the leg, propriospinal myoclonus, nocturnal leg cramps, peripheral polyneuropathy that affects mostly the legs or neuroleptic drug-induced akathisia. Through detailed questioning of the patient, restless legs syndrome can be specifically distinguished from the other named differential diagnoses.

  4. The effect of Vitamin D and calcium plus Vitamin D on leg cramps in pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Ameneh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad Alizadeh; Najafi, Moslem

    2017-01-01

    This study intended to determine the effects of Vitamin D and calcium-Vitamin D in treating leg cramps in pregnant women. This study was conducted as a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial on 126 participants, 18-35-year-old pregnant women with a minimum of two leg cramps per week who were referred to health-care centers in Tabriz-Iran in 2013. The participants were allocated to three 42 member groups using a randomized block design. For 42 days, the intervention groups took a 1000 unit Vitamin D pill or 300 mg calcium carbonate plus a 1000 unit Vitamin D pill, and the control group received a placebo pill every day. The participants were evaluated with regard to the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps during the week before and during the 3 rd and 6 th week of the intervention. The ANCOVA and repeated measurement test were used to analyze the data. Results showed that controlling for the effects before the intervention, calcium-Vitamin D, and Vitamin D supplements had no effect on the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps. The results of this study showed that the calcium-Vitamin D and the Vitamin D supplements have no effect on the frequency, length, and pain intensity of leg cramps during the 6 weeks of the study.

  5. Healthcare utilisation of pregnant women who experience sciatica, leg cramps and/or varicose veins: A cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Hall, Helen; Lauche, Romy; Adams, Jon; Steel, Amie; Broom, Alex; Sibbritt, David

    2016-02-01

    Common discomforts of pregnancy experienced in the lower extremity include sciatica, leg cramps and varicose veins. Whilst research attention has focused on aetiology and outcomes, the health service utilisation of pregnant women suffering from these complaints has been largely overlooked. To examine the health status and health service utilisation profile of pregnant women experiencing sciatica, leg cramps or varicose veins. Linear and logistic regression was applied to a cross-sectional survey of a pregnant women drawn from the 1973 to 1978 cohort (aged 31-36 years in 2009), of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (n=1835). Participant's demographics, health status and health service utilisation were compared for all three complaints based upon three subgroups (yes, sought help; yes, did not seek help; no). A number of women experienced sciatica (22.1%), leg cramps (18.2%) or varicose veins (9.4%). Of these, a greater proportion of women with sciatica (79.3%) or varicose veins (71.5%) sought help for their condition compared with women with leg cramps (46.7%). Comparisons between women with the conditions of interest who did seek help and those who did not only found that women with a university degree were 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.85) times less likely to seek help for their condition compared to women with a school only education. Further research examining all health seeking behaviour and treatment use of pregnant women who experience lower extremity problems is required in order to facilitate safe, effective and coordinated maternity care to further support these women during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Restless legs syndrome: a rarity in the Nigerian pregnant population?

    PubMed

    Fawale, Michael B; Ismaila, Isiaka A; Kullima, Abubakar A; Komolafe, Morenikeji A; Ijarotimi, Omotade A; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Oluyombo, Rotimi; Adedeji, Tewogbade Adeoye

    2018-03-01

    The prevalence of RLS in pregnancy is higher when compared with the general population however it remains unknown among indigenous black Africans. Available data indicate that RLS is uncommon in sub-Saharan Africa. We embarked on this study to determine the prevalence and characteristics of RLS in an antenatal clinic sample of Nigerian pregnant women compared with a primary care sample of non-pregnant women. A total of 310 pregnant women and non-pregnant women filled out a questionnaire which incorporated the 2014 minimal criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Demographic and clinical data, including sleep duration and samples for blood hemoglobin concentration and urinalysis were obtained. The mean ages of the pregnant and non-pregnant women were 24.9 ± 5.6 years and 23.6 + 5.4 years, respectively (p = 0.003). There was no case of RLS found among pregnant women while five (1.6%) of the non-pregnant women fulfilled the criteria for RLS. Overall, the prevalence report of RLS symptoms was associated with lower mean habitual nocturnal sleep duration (p < 0.05) coffee (p = 0.013) and kola nut (0.023) consumption, report of leg cramps (p < 0.001) and proteinuria (p = 0.047), Report of leg cramps and proteinuria were independently associated with RLS. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome is low among women of child-bearing age in the Nigerian population and may be lower in pregnancy. Report of leg cramps and proteinuria are independently associated with RLS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How Can I Relieve My Pregnancy Leg Cramps?

    MedlinePlus

    ... trimesters. Experts aren't sure what causes "charley horses" (the nonclinical name for painful cramps in your ... muscles). Although they can be extremely painful, charley horses are — luckily! — usually brief. What might help: Do ...

  8. Muscle cramps: A comparison of the two-leading hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Giuriato, Gaia; Pedrinolla, Anna; Federico, Schena; Venturelli, Massimo

    2018-05-26

    Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps (EAMC) are a common painful condition of muscle spasms. Despite scientists tried to understand the physiological mechanism that underlies these common phenomena, the etiology is still unclear. From 1900 to nowadays, the scientific world retracted several times the original hypothesis of heat cramps. However, recent literature seems to focus on two potential mechanisms: the dehydration or electrolyte depletion mechanism, and the neuromuscular mechanism. The aim of this review is to examine the recent literature, in terms of physiological mechanisms of EAMC. A comprehensive search was conducted on PubMed and Google Scholar. The following terminology was applied: muscle cramps, neuromuscular hypothesis (or thesis), dehydration hypothesis, Exercise-Associated muscle cramps, nocturnal cramps, muscle spasm, muscle fatigue. From the initial literature of 424 manuscripts, sixty-nine manuscripts were included, analyzed, compared and summarized. Literature analysis indicates that neuromuscular hypothesis may prevails over the initial hypothesis of the dehydration as the trigger event of muscle cramps. New evidence suggests that the action potentials during a muscle cramp are generated in the motoneuron soma, likely accompanied by an imbalance between the rising excitatory drive from the muscle spindles (Ia) and the decreasing inhibitory drive from the Golgi tendon organs. In conclusion, from the latest investigations there seem to be a spinal involvement rather than a peripheral excitation of the motoneurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrically induced muscle cramps induce hypertrophy of calf muscles in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Behringer, M; Moser, M; Montag, J; McCourt, M; Tenner, D; Mester, J

    2015-06-01

    Skeletal muscles usually cramp at short lengths, where the tension that can be exerted by muscle fibers is low. Since high tension is an important anabolic stimulus, it is questionable if cramps can induce hypertrophy and strength gains. In the present study we investigated if electrically induced cramps (EIMCs) can elicit these adaptations. 15 healthy male adults were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG; n=10) and a control group (CG; n=5). The cramp protocol (CP) applied twice a week to one leg of the IG, consisted of 3x6 EIMCs, of 5 s each. Calf muscles of the opposite leg were stimulated equally, but were hindered from cramping by fixating the ankle at 0° plantar flexion (nCP). After six weeks, the cross sectional area of the triceps surae was similarly increased in both the CP (+9.0±3.4%) and the nCP (+6.8±3.7%). By contrast, force of maximal voluntary contractions, measured at 0° and 30° plantar flexion, increased significantly only in nCP (0°: +8.5±8.8%; 30°: 11.7±13.7%). The present data indicate that muscle cramps can induce hypertrophy in calf muscles, though lacking high tension as an important anabolic stimulus.

  10. Electrically induced muscle cramps induce hypertrophy of calf muscles in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, M.; Moser, M.; Montag, J.; McCourt, M.; Tenner, D.; Mester, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Skeletal muscles usually cramp at short lengths, where the tension that can be exerted by muscle fibers is low. Since high tension is an important anabolic stimulus, it is questionable if cramps can induce hypertrophy and strength gains. In the present study we investigated if electrically induced cramps (EIMCs) can elicit these adaptations. Methods: 15 healthy male adults were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG; n=10) and a control group (CG; n=5). The cramp protocol (CP) applied twice a week to one leg of the IG, consisted of 3x6 EIMCs, of 5 s each. Calf muscles of the opposite leg were stimulated equally, but were hindered from cramping by fixating the ankle at 0° plantar flexion (nCP). Results: After six weeks, the cross sectional area of the triceps surae was similarly increased in both the CP (+9.0±3.4%) and the nCP (+6.8±3.7%). By contrast, force of maximal voluntary contractions, measured at 0° and 30° plantar flexion, increased significantly only in nCP (0°: +8.5±8.8%; 30°: 11.7±13.7%). Conclusion: The present data indicate that muscle cramps can induce hypertrophy in calf muscles, though lacking high tension as an important anabolic stimulus. PMID:26032216

  11. A Catastrophic Consequence of Cramp.

    PubMed

    Htet, Zay Myo; Karim, Mahzuz

    2018-01-01

    Quinine has long been used for the treatment of conditions such as malaria and leg cramps, and is also present at low levels in some beverages; however, it can cause serious side effects. We describe a patient who developed severe haemolysis, thrombocytopaenia, and acute kidney injury following the ingestion of a single dose of quinine. This case demonstrates the importance of awareness of such potentially life-threatening consequences of exposure to this agent.

  12. 21 CFR 310.546 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of nocturnal leg muscle cramps. (a) Quinine sulfate alone or in combination with vitamin E has been... to establish general recognition of the safety and effectiveness of quinine sulfate, vitamin E, or.... (c) Clinical investigations designed to obtain evidence that any drug product labeled, represented...

  13. 21 CFR 310.546 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of nocturnal leg muscle cramps. (a) Quinine sulfate alone or in combination with vitamin E has been... to establish general recognition of the safety and effectiveness of quinine sulfate, vitamin E, or.... (c) Clinical investigations designed to obtain evidence that any drug product labeled, represented...

  14. 21 CFR 310.546 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of nocturnal leg muscle cramps. (a) Quinine sulfate alone or in combination with vitamin E has been... to establish general recognition of the safety and effectiveness of quinine sulfate, vitamin E, or.... (c) Clinical investigations designed to obtain evidence that any drug product labeled, represented...

  15. Is nocturnal eating in restless legs syndrome linked to a specific psychopathological profile? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Sara; Scarlatti, Fabiano; Rizzo, Giovanni; Antelmi, Elena; Innamorati, Marco; Pompili, Maurizio; Brugnoli, Roberto; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Provini, Federica

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate psychological comorbidity in drug-naive or drug-free primary restless legs syndrome (p-RLS) patients with nocturnal eating disorder (NED), and to analyze the association of comorbid p-RLS and NED with obsessive-compulsive, mood and anxiety symptoms, and personality. Participants comprised 20 consecutive female outpatients with p-RLS, 10 without NED and 10 with NED, and 10 female controls matched for age. Both patients and controls were evaluated by the Hamilton Depression and the Anxiety Rating Scales, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory and the temperament and character inventory-revised. Compared to controls, p-RLS patients without and with NED had higher trait anxiety and current anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. p-RLS patients with NED also had significantly higher doubting compared to p-RLS patients without NED. Furthermore, groups differed for harm avoidance (HA), with p-RLS patients with and without NED having higher scores than controls. Untreated p-RLS patients, particularly those with nocturnal eating, report anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, perceive stressful situations as dangerous and threatening and tend to respond with anxiety to such situations. They have higher tendency to respond intensely to aversive stimuli, inhibiting behavior to avoid punishment, novelty, and frustrative omission of expected rewards. We hypothesize that higher levels of HA, a biologically determined personality trait, might constitute a diathesis predisposing individuals to display obsessive-compulsive symptoms, namely increasingly severe compulsive nocturnal eating.

  16. The relationship between nocturnal polyuria and the distribution of body fluid: assessment by bioelectric impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Torimoto, Kazumasa; Hirayama, Akihide; Samma, Shoji; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Increased nocturnal urinary volume is closely associated with nocturia. We investigated the relationship between nocturnal polyuria and the variation of body fluid distribution during the daytime using bioelectric impedance analysis. A total of 34 men older than 60 years were enrolled in this study. A frequency volume chart was recorded. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as a nocturnal urine volume per 24-hour production of greater than 0.35 (the nocturnal polyuria index). Bioelectric impedance analysis was performed 4 times daily at 8 and 11 a.m., and 5 and 9 p.m. using an InBody S20 body composition analyzer (BioSpace, Seoul, Korea). A significant difference was found in mean +/- SEM 24-hour urine production per fat-free mass between the groups with and without nocturnal polyuria (17.8 +/- 1.4 vs 7.7 +/- 0.9 ml/kg). The increase in fluid in the legs compared with the volume at 8 a.m. was significantly larger at 5 p.m., while there was no difference in the arms or trunk. Nocturnal urine volume significantly correlated with the difference in fluid volume in the legs (r = 0.527, p = 0.0019) and extracellular fluid volume (r = 0.3844, p = 0.0248) between the volumes at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. Overproduction of urine per fat-free mass leads to nocturnal polyuria. Extracellular fluid accumulates as edema in the legs during the day in patients with nocturnal polyuria. The volume of accumulated extracellular fluid correlates with nocturnal urine volume. We suggest that leg edema is the source of nocturnal urine volume and decreasing edema may cure nocturnal polyuria.

  17. Predictors of calf cramping in rugby league.

    PubMed

    Summers, Katherine M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Callister, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) in the calf are common in rugby league. To date, the etiology and predictors of calf cramping are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to undertake a prospective investigation to identify predictors of calf cramping in rugby league players. Demographic and anthropometric data and calf cramp and injury history were collected in the preseason. Hydration status, number of games played, and calf cramps were recorded on game days. Male rugby league players (n = 103, mean age 18.8 ± 4.1 years) were classified as either EAMC (experienced at least 1 incident of calf cramps in the season) or no EAMC (no calf cramps). The following were investigated as possible predictors of EAMC using logistic regression modeling: competition level, age, ethnicity, playing position, history of cramping, precramping, low back pain, foot orthotic usage, foot posture, foot strike, muscle flexibility, calf girth, hydration status, and number of games played. Half the players, n = 52, experienced at least 1 incidence of calf cramping. Playing in a senior competition level (odds ratio: 0.21; 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.75; p = 0.016), a history of calf cramping (10.85; 2.16-54.44; p = 0.004), and a history of low back pain resulting in missed field minutes (4.50, 1.37-14.79; p = 0.013) were found to predict EAMC. This study suggests that there is a high incidence of calf cramping in rugby league, especially at senior competition levels, and supports preseason screening in senior players to idetify those at risk of calf cramping and the development of possible preventative strategies.

  18. Sleep-related movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Giovanni; Gigli, Gian Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Several movement disorders may occur during nocturnal rest disrupting sleep. A part of these complaints is characterized by relatively simple, non-purposeful and usually stereotyped movements. The last version of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders includes these clinical conditions (i.e. restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleep-related leg cramps, sleep-related bruxism and sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder) under the category entitled sleep-related movement disorders. Moreover, apparently physiological movements (e.g. alternating leg muscle activation and excessive hypnic fragmentary myoclonus) can show a high frequency and severity impairing sleep quality. Clinical and, in specific cases, neurophysiological assessments are required to detect the presence of nocturnal movement complaints. Patients reporting poor sleep due to these abnormal movements should undergo non-pharmacological or pharmacological treatments.

  19. Thalamic deep brain stimulation for writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Chikashi; Katayama, Yoichi; Kano, Toshikazu; Nagaoka, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Kazutaka; Oshima, Hideki; Yamamoto, Takamitsu

    2007-11-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of idiopathic focal hand dystonia characterized by muscle cramps that accompany execution of the writing task specifically. In this report, the authors describe the clinical outcome after thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy in patients with writer's cramp and present an illustrative case with which they compare the effects of pallidal and thalamic stimulation. In addition to these results for the clinical effectiveness, they also examine the best point and pattern for therapeutic stimulation of the motor thalamus, including the nucleus ventrooralis (VO) and the ventralis intermedius nucleus (VIM), for writer's cramp. The authors applied thalamic DBS in five patients with writer's cramp. The inclusion criteria for the DBS trial in this disorder were a diagnosis of idiopathic writer's cramp and the absence of a positive response to medication. The exclusion criteria included significant cognitive dysfunction, active psychiatric symptoms, and evidence of other central nervous system diseases or other medical disorders. In one of the cases, DBS leads were implanted into both the globus pallidus internus and the VO/VIM, and test stimulation was performed for 1 week. The authors thus had an opportunity to compare the effects of pallidal and thalamic stimulation in this patient. Immediately after the initiation of thalamic stimulation, the neurological deficits associated with writer's cramp were improved in all five cases. Postoperatively all preoperative scale scores indicating the seriousness of the writer's cramp were significantly lower (p < 0.001). In the patient in whom two DBS leads were implanted, the clinical effect of thalamic stimulation was better than that of pallidal stimulation. During the thalamic stimulation, the maximum effect was obtained when stimulation was applied to both the VO and the VIM widely, compared with being applied only within the VO. The authors successfully treated patients with writer's cramp by

  20. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe Happen frequently Don't get better with stretching and drinking enough fluids Last a long time ... able to find some relief from cramps by Stretching or gently massaging the muscle Applying heat when ...

  1. [Medicinal plants useful in the cure of circulatory problems in legs].

    PubMed

    Alonso, Maria José

    2005-03-01

    Once the fundamentals of phyto-therapy in its western use are understood, this article presents concrete a application of medicinal plants: circulatory problems in legs, a problem which affects a growing sector of the population. According to epidemiological studies, close to 80% of adults suffer problems such as tired legs, swellings, edemas, cramps, or varicose veins during their lifetimes; these appear due to an insufficiency when veins can not conveniently transport blood to the heart.

  2. Writer's Cramp

    MedlinePlus

    ... cramp is a focal dystonia of the fingers, hand, and/or forearm. Symptoms usually appear when a person is trying to do a task that requires fine motor movements such as writing or playing a musical instrument. The symptoms may ...

  3. Reciprocal inhibition in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Tsai, C H; Lu, C S

    1995-09-01

    We studied the inhibition of median H-reflexes by conditioning stimuli on the radial nerve in 13 patients with writer's cramp, eight of the simple type and five of the dystonic type, and in 14 normal volunteers. The patients and controls were right-handed, and their right arms were studied. Asymptomatic left arms were also studied in nine of 13 patients. In the control group we identified three periods of inhibition, with maximum peaks at conditioning-test intervals of 0 ms (41 +/- 17%), 20 ms (40 +/- 13%), and 100 ms (36 +/- 20%). In the patient group, the amplitudes of inhibition of these three periods in both arms were significantly less than those in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the amplitudes of inhibition of these three periods between symptomatic and asymptomatic arms. There were also no significant differences between simple and dystonic writer's cramps. Our results indicate that the attenuation of reciprocal inhibition was present not only in symptomatic arms but also in asymptomatic arms of patients with writer's cramp. The defect of reciprocal inhibition in the asymptomatic hand has never been documented. We suggest that the preexistent electrophysiological abnormality may provide an explanation for the development of hand cramp after shifted writing.

  4. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation for Writer's Cramp.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul Bum; Park, Hae Kwan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Rha, Hyoung Kyun

    2009-07-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of idiopathic focal hand dystonia characterized by muscle cramps that accompany execution of the writing task specifically. There has been renewed interest in neurosurgical procedures for the treatment of dystonia over the past several years. In particular, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has received increasing attention as a therapeutic option for patients with dystonia. However, to date, limited reporters made investigations into DBS in relation to the Writer's cramp. In this case, unilateral Ventro-oralis complex (Vo) DBS resulted in a major improvement in patient's focal dystonic movement disorders. Her post-operative Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating (BFMDR) scale demonstrated 1 compared with pre-operative BFMDR scale 4. We conclude that thalamic Vo complex DBS may be an important neurosurgical therapeutic option for Writer's cramp.

  5. Writing Orthotic Device for the Management of Writer's Cramp.

    PubMed

    Singam, Narayanasarma V; Dwivedi, Alok; Espay, Alberto J

    2013-01-01

    Oral therapies and chemodenervation procedures are often unrewarding in the treatment of focal, task-specific hand disorders such as writer's cramp or primary writing tremor (PWT). A portable writing orthotic device (WOD) was evaluated on 15 consecutively recruited writer's cramp and PWT subjects. We measured overall impairment at baseline and after 2 weeks of at-home use with the Writer's Cramp Rating Scale (range = 0-8, higher is worse) and writing quality and comfort with a visual analog scale (range = 0-10). Compared to regular pen, the WOD improved the Writer's Cramp Rating Scale scores at first-test (p = 0.001) and re-test (p = 0.005) as well as writing quality and device comfort in writer's cramp subjects. Benefits were sustained at 2 weeks. PWT subjects demonstrated no improvements. WODs exploiting a muscle-substitution strategy may yield immediate benefits in patients with writer's cramp.

  6. Quinine for cramps.

    PubMed

    Pinn, G

    1998-10-01

    The bark of the cinchona tree was used by the Incas of South America to treat tropical fevers. It was brought back to Europe by the Jesuit priests and used in error to treat all types of fever. Because of its cost and lack of availability, apothecaries found an alternative antipyretic in willow bark. Subsequently salicylates were isolated from willow and quinine from cinchona bark. Quinine is used worldwide for the treatment of fever due to malaria, but in the Western environment has long been used for muscle cramps because of its neuro muscular junction blocking action. Quinine is a widely used medication which has been reported to cause thrombocytopenia on occasion. This potentially life threatening complication should be borne in mind when it is prescribed for minor symptoms such as muscle cramps.

  7. Cramp-fasciculation syndrome associated with monofocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, Nicolas J; Van Pesch, Vincent; Van Den Bergh, Peter Y K

    2017-10-01

    Cramp-fasciculation syndrome is a peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorder, which could be caused by inflammatory neuropathy. We describe a 51-year-old woman who presented with a 4- to 5-year history of fasciculations and painful cramping of the right thenar eminence. Electrophysiological studies showed motor conduction block in the right median nerve between the axilla and the elbow with fasciculation potentials and cramp discharges on electromyography in the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle. High titers of serum anti-GM1 immunoglobulin M antibodies were detected. Monofocal motor neuropathy of the right median nerve was diagnosed. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment led to significant improvement of symptoms and signs. Although fasciculations and cramps have been reported in multifocal motor neuropathy and are considered supporting criteria for the diagnosis, the occurrence of cramp-fasciculation syndrome as the presenting feature and predominant manifestation in monofocal motor neuropathy, a variant of multifocal motor neuropathy, is unique. Muscle Nerve 56: 828-832, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Menstrual Cramps (Dysmenorrhea)

    MedlinePlus

    ... during periods (menorrhagia) You have irregular menstrual bleeding (metrorrhagia) You have a family history of menstrual cramps ( ... trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  9. Self-reported sleep bruxism and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: relationship to gender and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups.

  10. Nocturnal myoclonus: treatment efficacy of clonazepam and temazepam.

    PubMed

    Mitler, M M; Browman, C P; Menn, S J; Gujavarty, K; Timms, R M

    1986-01-01

    Clonazepam (1 mg h.s.) and temazepam (30 mg h.s.) were studied in 10 patients diagnosed as having insomnia with nocturnal myoclonus. Each subject underwent two nocturnal polysomnographic recordings while drug-free, two during treatment with clonazepam, and two during treatment with temazepam. Treatment sessions were 7 days long, and recordings were done on nights 6 and 7 of the treatment sessions. A 14-day washout period separated the treatment sessions. The order of drugs used in the first and second treatment sessions was randomized. Objective and subjective sleep laboratory data showed that both drugs improved the sleep of patients with insomnia in association with nocturnal myoclonus. Neither drug significantly reduced the number of nocturnal myoclonic events. Sleep changes were consistent with those produced by sedative benzodiazepines in general. Thus, the data support clinical reports that clonazepam, a benzodiazepine marketed for the indication of seizure, is useful in improving sleep disturbances associated with nocturnal myoclonus. Temazepam, a benzodiazepine marketed for the indication of insomnia, was found to be a suitable alternative to clonazepam in the treatment of insomnia associated with nocturnal myoclonus. The present data and other studies suggest the need for a model that explains why leg movements and sleep disturbances may wax and wane independently.

  11. Neurosurgical treatment for writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Taira, T; Harashima, S; Hori, T

    2003-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of focal dystonia due to dysfunction of the pallido-thalamo-cortical circuit. The symptom is refractory to most conservative treatment, though botulinum toxin injection is generally used for symptomatic relief. As a surgical treatment of dystonia we performed stereotactic nucleus ventrooralis (Vo) thalamotomy for dystonic cramp of the hand. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age 26-40 yrs, mean 32.1 yrs) with medically intractable task-specific focal dystonia of the hand underwent Vo thalamotomy. Stereotactic target was chosen at the junction of the anterior and posterior Vo nuclei. The mean duration of the symptom ranged from 3 to 6 years (mean, 4.0 yrs). All patients had complained of difficulty in writing. Six patients were professional workers, such as comic artist, guitarist, and barber, and, because of the dystonic symptoms at their professional work, they had stopped pursuing their profession. All patients showed immediate postoperative disappearance of dystonic symptoms, and the effect was sustained during the follow up period (3-29 months, mean 13.1 mo) except in one case. One patient showed partial recurrence of the symptom and underwent second thalamotomy 5 months after the initial surgery with satisfactory results. The score of the writer's cramp rating scale significantly (p < 0.001) decreased after Vo thalamotomy. There was no permanent operative complication. There was no mortality or permanent morbidity. Although a longer follow-up is needed, stereotactic Vo thalamotomy is a useful and safe therapeutic option for writer's cramp.

  12. [Writer's cramp treated with botulinum injections].

    PubMed

    Koelman, J H; Struys, M A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Speelman, J D

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the first clinical experience with local botulinum toxin A (BTA) injections in patients with writer's cramp. Descriptive. Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In May 1993-January 1996 ten patients with writer's cramp were treated with BTA (Dysport). Age of the patients varied from 28 to 68 years, the duration of complaints from 1 to 29 years. Muscles for injections were selected by observation, sometimes combined with electromyography. BTA was administered under electromyographic guidance. The amount of BTA administered per treatment session ranged from 15 to 400 IU. In three patients the BTA-induced weakness necessary to reach a beneficial effect on writing was unacceptable. In seven patients the response was satisfactory or good and lasted 2 to 15 months (mean: 3.5 months). The results confirm the efficacy of BTA in writer's cramp.

  13. Albert Schweitzer: a patient with writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Tacik, P; Schrader, C; Weber, E; Dressler, D

    2012-06-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) the world-famous philosopher, theologian, concert organist, musicologist, philanthropist and winner of the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize suffered throughout most of his life from severe and painful muscle cramps in his right upper extremity which were triggered exclusively by handwriting. They led to tonic finger flexion and wrist extension and produced slow and clumsy handwriting of a reduced character size. Other motor functions including Schweitzer's highly skilful and famous organ playing were not affected. Inheritance from his mother is likely. Schweitzer applied several coping strategies including a specific holding pattern for pens, usage of special pens, avoidance of handwriting and slowing of handwriting. With all these features Schweitzer presents as a classical case of action-specific dystonia in the form of a simple tonic writer's cramp. Interestingly, Schweitzer never received a medical diagnosis, although writer's cramp had already been identified and described as a medical condition. Impairment of his handwriting but not his organ playing may give insight into the multifactorial aetiology of writer's cramp. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    PubMed Central

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

  15. Increased Urine Production Due to Leg Fluid Displacement Reduces Hours of Undisturbed Sleep.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Keisuke; Hirayama, Akihide; Yoshikawa, Motokiyo; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2017-07-03

    To investigate whether or not the leg fluid displacement observed when moving from the standing to recumbent position at bedtime reduces the hours of undisturbed sleep (HUS). Men aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized for urological diseases were investigated. Body water evaluation was performed three times with a bioelectric impedance method: (i) 17:00, (ii) 30 min after (short-term), and (iii) waking up (long-term). A frequency volume chart was used to evaluate the status of nocturnal urine production, and the factors affecting HUS were investigated. A total of 50 patients (mean age: 68 years) were enrolled. Short-term changes in extracellular fluid (ECF in the legs showed a significant positive correlation with urine production per unit of time at the first nocturnal voiding (UFN/HUS) (r = 0.45, P = 0.01). In the comparison between patients who had <3 HUS vs. those who had ≥3 HUS, the <3 HUS group showed significantly greater short-term changes in leg fluid volume, night-time water intake (17:00-06:00), and UFN/HUS. Multivariate analysis to assess the risk factors for <3 HUS indicated UFN/HUS as a risk factor in the overall model, and short-term changes in leg ECF and night-time water intake as risk factors in the model that only considered factors before sleep. Nocturnal leg fluid displacement may increase urine production leading up to first voiding after going to bed, and consequently, induce early awakening after falling asleep. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Cooling improves the writing performance of patients with writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Christoph; Happe, Jörg; Klockgether, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Cooling of hand and forearm muscles by immersion in 15 degrees C cold water for 5 minutes improved the writing performance of patients with writer's cramp. Since abnormal processing of muscle spindle afferent discharges contributes to the pathology of writer's cramp, this effect might result from a reduction in muscle spindle activity by lowering muscle temperature. Cooling is a simple, cheap, and safe procedure, providing temporary relief for patients with writer's cramp. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  17. Prophylactic stretching does not reduce cramp susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Harsen, James D; Long, Blaine C

    2018-03-01

    Some clinicians advocate stretching to prevent muscle cramps. It is unknown whether static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching increases cramp threshold frequency (TF c ), a quantitative measure of cramp susceptibility. Fifteen individuals completed this randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study. We measured passive hallux range of motion (ROM) and then performed 3 minutes of either static stretching, PNF stretching (hold-relax-with agonist contraction), or no stretching. ROM was reassessed and TF c was measured. PNF stretching increased hallux extension (pre-PNF 81 ± 11°, post-PNF 90 ± 10°; P < 0.05) but not hallux flexion (pre-PNF 40 ± 7°, post-PNF 40 ± 7°; P > 0.05). Static stretching increased hallux extension (pre-static 80 ± 11°, post-static 88 ± 9°; P < 0.05) but not hallux flexion (pre-static 38 ± 9°, post-static 39 ± 8°; P > 0.05). No ROM changes occurred with no stretching (P > 0.05). TF c was unaffected by stretching (no stretching 18 ± 7 Hz, PNF 16 ± 4 Hz, static 16 ± 5 Hz; P = 0.37). Static and PNF stretching increased hallux extension, but neither increased TF c . Acute stretching may not prevent muscle cramping. Muscle Nerve 57: 473-477, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Significant and serious dehydration does not affect skeletal muscle cramp threshold frequency.

    PubMed

    Braulick, Kyle W; Miller, Kevin C; Albrecht, Jay M; Tucker, Jared M; Deal, James E

    2013-07-01

    Many clinicians believe that exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) occur because of dehydration. Experimental research supporting this theory is lacking. Mild hypohydration (3% body mass loss) does not alter threshold frequency (TF), a measure of cramp susceptibility, when fatigue and exercise intensity are controlled. No experimental research has examined TF following significant (3-5% body mass loss) or serious hypohydration (>5% body mass loss). Determine if significant or serious hypohydration, with moderate electrolyte losses, decreases TF. A prepost experimental design was used. Dominant limb flexor hallucis brevis cramp TF, cramp electromyography (EMG) amplitude and cramp intensity were measured in 10 euhydrated, unacclimated men (age=24±4 years, height=184.2±4.8 cm, mass=84.8±11.4 kg). Subjects alternated exercising with their non-dominant limb or upper body on a cycle ergometer every 15 min at a moderate intensity until 5% body mass loss or volitional exhaustion (3.8±0.8 h; 39.1±1.5°C; humidity 18.4±3%). Cramp variables were reassessed posthypohydration. Subjects were well hydrated at the study's onset (urine specific gravity=1.005±0.002). They lost 4.7±0.5% of their body mass (3.9±0.5 litres of fluid), 4.0±1.5 g of Na(+) and 0.6±0.1 g K(+) via exercise-induced sweating. Significant (n=5) or serious hypohydration (n=5) did not alter cramp TF (euhydrated=15±5 Hz, hypohydrated=13±6 Hz; F1,9=3.0, p=0.12), cramp intensity (euhydrated= 94.2±41%, hypohydrated=115.9±73%; F1,9=1.9, p=0.2) or cramp EMG amplitude (euhydrated=0.18±0.06 µV, hypohydrated= 0.18±0.09 µV; F1,9=0.1, p=0.79). Significant and serious hypohydration with moderate electrolyte losses does not alter cramp susceptibility when fatigue and exercise intensity are controlled. Neuromuscular control may be more important in the onset of muscle cramps than dehydration or electrolyte losses.

  19. Hand orthosis as a writing aid in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Taş, N; Karataş, G K; Sepici, V

    2001-11-01

    Writer's cramp is a focal, task-specific dystonia of the hand and wrist. It primarily affects people who do a significant amount of writing, and causes difficulties in writing. We present five cases with writer's cramp who showed improvement in their writing ability with an applied hand orthosis. Copyright 2001 Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Plasma Levels of Biotin Metabolites Are Elevated in Hemodialysis Patients with Cramps.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masako; Ando, Itiro; Yagi, Shigeaki; Nishizawa, Manabu; Oguma, Shiro; Satoh, Keisuke; Sato, Hiroshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Patients with renal failure undergoing hemodialysis (HD) are susceptible to muscle cramps during and after HD. Muscle cramps are defined as the sudden onset of a prolonged involuntary muscle contraction accompanied by severe pain. Through HD, water-soluble vitamins are drawn out with water. Since biotin, a water-soluble vitamin, plays an essential role as one of the coenzymes in producing energy, we have hypothesized that deficiency of biotin may be responsible for HD-associated cramps. We previously reported that biotin administration ameliorated the muscle cramps, despite the elevated plasma biotin levels before HD and biotin administration, as judged by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, the ELISA measures not only biotin but also total avidin-binding substances (TABS) including biotin metabolites. In the present study, we determined biotin in HD patients as well as healthy controls, using a newly developed method with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The plasma samples were collected from 28 HD patients (16 patients with cramps and 12 patients without cramps) before HD and biotin administration and from 11 controls. The results showed that the accumulation of biotin and TABS in plasma of HD patients compared to controls. Importantly, the levels of biotin metabolites, i.e. TABS subtracted by biotin, increased significantly in patients with cramps over those without cramps. Moreover, the levels of biotin metabolites were significantly higher in patients with a poor response to administered biotin, compared to those with a good response. We propose that accumulated biotin metabolites impair biotin's functions as a coenzyme.

  1. Predicting Improvement in Writer's Cramp Symptoms following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mallory; Delrobaei, Mehdi; Rahimi, Fariborz; Atashzar, S Farokh; Shahbazi, Mahya; Patel, Rajni; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a specific focal hand dystonia causing abnormal posturing and tremor in the upper limb. The most popular medical intervention, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) therapy, is variably effective for 50-70% of patients. BoNT-A non-responders undergo ineffective treatment and may experience significant side effects. Various assessments have been used to determine response prediction to BoNT-A, but not in the same population of patients. A comprehensive assessment was employed to measure various symptom aspects. Clinical scales, full upper-limb kinematic measures, self-report, and task performance measures were assessed for nine writer's cramp patients at baseline. Patients received two BoNT-A injections then were classified as responders or non-responders based on a quantified self-report measure. Baseline scores were compared between groups, across all measures, to determine which scores predicted a positive BoNT-A response. Five of nine patients were responders. No kinematic measures were predictably different between groups. Analyses revealed three features that predicted a favorable response and separated the two groups: higher than average cramp severity and cramp frequency, and below average cramp latency. Non-kinematic measures appear to be superior in making such predictions. Specifically, measures of cramp severity, frequency, and latency during performance of a specific set of writing and drawing tasks were predictive factors. Since kinematic was not used to determine the injection pattern and the injections were visually guided, it may still be possible to use individual patient kinematics for better outcomes.

  2. A selected controlled trial of supplementary vitamin E for treatment of muscle cramps in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Zaib, Salwat

    2010-01-01

    Muscle cramps are not uncommon complications of hemodialysis (HD) treatments and lead to early termination of HD sessions and are therefore a significant cause of under-dialysis. The etiology of cramps in dialysis patients remains a matter of debate. Many reports suggested that vitamin E (vit. E) may be effective for the prevention of HD-associated cramps. We decided to perform a selected controlled trial of supplementary vit. E for treatment of patients on HD who experience frequent attacks during and between HD sessions. The goal was to compare the number of attacks of muscle cramps with the patient's baseline over a specific period of time. In this study, 19 HD patients were randomly selected of different age groups and ethnicity. Patient must have had at least 60 attacks of muscle cramps during and between HD sessions over a 12-week period. All selected patients received vit. E at a dose of 400 international units daily for 12 weeks, and the number of attacks of muscle cramps was recorded. The frequency of muscle cramps decreased significantly during vit. E therapy, and, at the end of the trial, vit. E led to cramp reductions of 68.3%. The reduction in number of attacks of muscle cramps had no significant correlation with age, sex, etiology of end-stage renal disease, serum electrolytes, or HD duration, and it showed a statistically positive correlation (P = 0.0001) with vit. E therapy. No vit. E-related adverse effects were encountered during the trial. Short-term treatment with vit. E is safe and effective in reducing number of attacks of muscle cramps in HD patients, as shown in our study.

  3. Stereotactic neurosurgery for writer's cramp: report of two cases with an overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Takashi; Koh, Masaki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a specific movement disorder with hand muscle cramps in writing, being classified into focal and action-specific dystonia. Stereotactic surgery, such as thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation (DBS), has been reported for writer's cramp; however, the number of reported cases is still scarce and surgical procedures are also controversial. In this study, therefore, we present 2 patients who underwent thalamotomy for writer's cramp and systematically review the literature on stereotactic surgery for writer's cramp. Case reports and literature review are presented. Both patients underwent ventral oral nucleus (Vo) thalamotomy safely. Their symptoms completely disappeared after surgery and did not recur during follow-up periods. In the literature, a total of 31 cases were surgically treated for writer's cramp. Stereotactic surgery included thalamotomy in 25 cases and DBS in 6. The target included the Vo in 17 cases, the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim) in 3, and both Vo and Vim in 7. Both procedures markedly improved or resolved the symptoms. Transient neurological deficits were observed in 16.0% of patients after thalamotomy. The Vo may be the most effective target to treat writer's cramp. Both thalamotomy and DBS are feasible and effective, but thalamotomy would be a better option, especially in younger or high-risk patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The effect of reflexology applied on haemodialysis patients with fatigue, pain and cramps.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gülistan; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Ozlem

    2013-06-01

    The research was conducted to evaluate the effect of foot reflexology on fatigue, pain and cramps in haemodialysis patients. The sample consisted of 80 patients in total, 40 intervention and 40 control patients, receiving treatment in the haemodialysis units of two institutions. Data were collected by using a questionnaire, Piper Fatigue Scale and visual analogue scale for measuring the severity of cramp and pain. The intervention group received reflexology treatment for 1 week in three sessions following haemodialysis, each session lasting approximately 30 min. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in data analysis. It was determined that reflexology reduced the fatigue subscale scores and total scale scores as well as pain and cramp mean scores in the intervention group. The research results revealed that the severity of fatigue, pain and cramp decreased in patients receiving reflexology. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Induction of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP in the blood-brain barrier and meninges after meningococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP.

  6. Induction of the Antimicrobial Peptide CRAMP in the Blood-Brain Barrier and Meninges after Meningococcal Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L.; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP. PMID:17030578

  7. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  8. Randomized placebo-controlled study of baclofen in the treatment of muscle cramps in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Elfert, Asem A; Abo Ali, Lobna; Soliman, Samah; Zakaria, Sherin; Shehab El-Din, Ibrahim; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief

    2016-11-01

    Muscle cramps adversely influence the quality of life of patients with liver cirrhosis. Indeed, to date, a well-established therapy for this complication is still lacking. This is the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of baclofen in the treatment of muscle cramps in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 100 patients with liver cirrhosis and muscle cramps signed an informed consent to participate in this study. They were recruited from the Department of Tropical Medicine-Tanta University Hospital. They were randomized to receive either baclofen or placebo for 3 months. Patients were followed monthly and 1 month after withdrawal. At each visit, the clinicoepidemiological data were recorded, the muscle cramp questionnaire was filled, and any drug-related side effects were reported. In the baclofen group, the frequency of muscle cramps decreased significantly after 1 and 3 months of treatment (P<0.005), with a significant relapse after withdrawal (P<0.001). Patients receiving baclofen showed a significant decrease in the severity and duration of muscle cramps (P<0.001). After 3 months of baclofen therapy at a dose of 30 mg/day, muscle cramps disappeared completely in 72%, reduced in 20%, and led to no change in 8% of patients. No significant changes in the frequency, severity, and duration of muscle cramps were noted in the placebo group. There were few but nonsignificant side effects in the baclofen group compared with the placebo group. Baclofen was well tolerated, safe, and effective in the treatment of muscle cramps in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  9. Effect of indomethacin on desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria and nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Rittig, Søren; Bower, Wendy F; Djurhuus, Jens C

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the acute effect of indomethacin on renal water and solute handling in children with coexisting monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria, and in healthy controls. A total of 23 subjects were recruited, consisting of 12 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria with partial or no response to desmopressin, and 11 age matched controls. Children completed a 48-hour inpatient study protocol consisting of fractional urine collections and blood samples. Sodium and water intake were standardized. During the second night a dose of 50 mg indomethacin was administered orally before bedtime. Diuresis, urine osmolalities, clearances and fractional excretions were calculated for sodium, potassium, urea, osmoles and solute-free water. Renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide were measured in plasma. Prostaglandin E(2) was measured in urine. Indomethacin markedly decreased the nocturnal sodium, urea and osmotic excretion in children with enuresis and controls. The overall effect on nocturnal urine output was inconsistent in the group with enuresis. Subjects in whom nocturnal diuresis was decreased following administration of indomethacin remained dry. Prostaglandin inhibition leads to antidiuresis, reducing the amount of sodium, urea and osmotic excretion in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria. The sodium regulating hormones do not seem to mediate these processes. The overall effect in desmopressin nonresponders with nocturnal polyuria is variable. The extent to which indomethacin can be applied in the treatment of enuresis needs further evaluation. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nocturnal light environments and species ecology: implications for nocturnal color vision in forests.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Cummings, Molly E

    2012-12-01

    Although variation in the color of light in terrestrial diurnal and twilight environments has been well documented, relatively little work has examined the color of light in nocturnal habitats. Understanding the range and sources of variation in nocturnal light environments has important implications for nocturnal vision, particularly following recent discoveries of nocturnal color vision. In this study, we measured nocturnal irradiance in a dry forest/woodland and a rainforest in Madagascar over 34 nights. We found that a simple linear model including the additive effects of lunar altitude, lunar phase and canopy openness successfully predicted total irradiance flux measurements across 242 clear sky measurements (r=0.85, P<0.0001). However, the relationship between these variables and spectral irradiance was more complex, as interactions between lunar altitude, lunar phase and canopy openness were also important predictors of spectral variation. Further, in contrast to diurnal conditions, nocturnal forests and woodlands share a yellow-green-dominant light environment with peak flux at 560 nm. To explore how nocturnal light environments influence nocturnal vision, we compared photoreceptor spectral tuning, habitat preference and diet in 32 nocturnal mammals. In many species, long-wavelength-sensitive cone spectral sensitivity matched the peak flux present in nocturnal forests and woodlands, suggesting a possible adaptation to maximize photon absorption at night. Further, controlling for phylogeny, we found that fruit/flower consumption significantly predicted short-wavelength-sensitive cone spectral tuning in nocturnal mammals (P=0.002). These results suggest that variation in nocturnal light environments and species ecology together influence cone spectral tuning and color vision in nocturnal mammals.

  11. Desmopressin resistant nocturnal polyuria secondary to increased nocturnal osmotic excretion.

    PubMed

    Dehoorne, Jo L; Raes, Ann M; van Laecke, Erik; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan G

    2006-08-01

    We investigated the role of increased solute excretion in children with desmopressin resistant nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria. A total of 42 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and significant nocturnal polyuria with high nocturnal urinary osmolality (more than 850 mmol/l) were not responding to desmopressin. A 24-hour urinary concentration profile was obtained with measurement of urine volume, osmolality, osmotic excretion and creatinine. The control group consisted of 100 children without enuresis. Based on osmotic excretion patients were classified into 3 groups. Group 1 had 24-hour increased osmotic excretion, most likely secondary to a high renal osmotic load. This was probably diet related since 11 of these 12 patients were obese. Group 2 had increased osmotic excretion in the evening and night, probably due to a high renal osmotic load caused by the diet characteristics of the evening meal. Group 3 had deficient osmotic excretion during the day, secondary to extremely low fluid intake to compensate for small bladder capacity. Nocturnal polyuria with high urinary osmolality in our patients with desmopressin resistant monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis is related to abnormal increased osmotic excretion. This may be explained by their fluid and diet habits, eg daytime fluid restriction, and high protein and salt intake.

  12. [Prevalence of calf muscle cramps and influencing factors for pregnant women in China during 2010-2012].

    PubMed

    Duan, Y F; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Bi, Y; Pang, X H; Yin, S A; Yang, Z Y

    2018-01-06

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of calf muscle cramps and possible influencing factors for pregnant women in China. Methods: Using a multi-stage stratified probability proportional to size cluster randomization sampling method during 2010-2012. A total of 3 582 pregnant women were investigated at 150 counties from 31 provinces in China mainland. Information on calf muscle cramps, demographic socio-economic status, pregnancy information, and the physical activities was collected through questionnaires. The semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect food intake of pregnant women. Dynamic cluster analysis was used to assess dietary pattern. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the possible influencing factors for calf muscle cramps. Results: The prevalence of calf muscle cramps was 32.9% (1 180/3 582) in Chinese pregnant women, which was 11.6% (87/748), 28.2% (420/1 492), and 50.2% (673/1 342), respectively, during the first, second and third trimester. There were significant differences between them (χ(2)=349.16, P< 0.001). Dietary patterns of the pregnant women were classified into three groups, which called relatively balanced pattern, high vegetables and fruits pattern, and high dairy pattern. Among the three groups, the prevalence of calf muscle cramps was 32.0% (952/2 971), 37.2% (186/500), and 37.8% (42/111), with significant differences (χ(2)=6.39, P= 0.041). The OR (95 %CI ) values of calf muscle cramps in the second and third trimester was 2.96 (2.28-3.83), and 8.02 (6.16-10.44), respectively, comparing with the first trimester. The OR (95 %CI ) values of calf muscle cramps in the women taking calcium before pregnant was 1.45 (1.19-1.76), comparing with the one who was not taken. The OR (95 %CI ) values of calf muscle cramps in the women who had been diagnosed by pregnancy-induced hypertension was 5.76 (2.06-16.12), comparing with the one who had not been diagnosed. The OR (95 %CI ) values of calf

  13. Nocturnal Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by an upper airway obstruction Treatment and Management Treatment of any underlying causes of nocturnal asthma ... trials . Asthma Types Allergic Asthma Nocturnal Asthma Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals About Us Treatment & Programs Health ...

  14. The cathelicidin protein CRAMP is a potential atherosclerosis self-antigen in ApoE(-/-) mice

    PubMed Central

    Mihailovic, Peter M.; Lio, Wai Man; Yano, Juliana; Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhou, Jianchang; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K.; Cercek, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Auto-immunity is believed to contribute to inflammation in atherosclerosis. The antimicrobial peptide LL-37, a fragment of the cathelicidin protein precursor hCAP18, was previously identified as an autoantigen in psoriasis. Given the reported link between psoriasis and coronary artery disease, the biological relevance of the autoantigen to atherosclerosis was tested in vitro using a truncated (t) form of the mouse homolog of hCAP18, CRAMP, on splenocytes from athero-prone ApoE(-/-) mice. Stimulation with tCRAMP resulted in increased CD8+ T cells with Central Memory and Effector Memory phenotypes in ApoE(-/-) mice, differentially activated by feeding with normal chow or high fat diet. Immunization of ApoE(-/-) with different doses of the shortened peptide (Cramp) resulted in differential outcomes with a lower dose reducing atherosclerosis whereas a higher dose exacerbating the disease with increased neutrophil infiltration of the atherosclerotic plaques. Low dose Cramp immunization also resulted in increased splenic CD8+ T cell degranulation and reduced CD11b+CD11c+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), whereas high dose increased CD11b+CD11c+ cDCs. Our results identified CRAMP, the mouse homolog of hCAP-18, as a potential self-antigen involved in the immune response to atherosclerosis in the ApoE(-/-) mouse model. PMID:29091929

  15. Stereotactic ventrooralis thalamotomy for task-specific focal hand dystonia (writer's cramp).

    PubMed

    Taira, Takaomi; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2003-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of focal dystonia due to dysfunction of the pallido-thalamo-cortical circuit. The symptom is refractory to most conservative treatment, though botulinum toxin injection is generally used for symptomatic relief. As a surgical treatment of dystonia, we performed stereotactic nucleus ventrooralis (Vo) thalamotomy for dystonic cramp of the hand. Twelve patients (5 men, 3 women; age 26-40 years, mean 32.1 years) with medically intractable task-specific focal dystonia of the hand underwent Vo thalamotomy. The stereotactic target was chosen at the junction of the anterior and posterior Vo nuclei. The mean duration of the symptom ranged from 3 to 6 years (mean 4.5 years.) All patients had complained of difficulty in writing. Seven patients were professionals, such as a comic artist, guitarist and barber, and, because of the dystonic symptoms occurring during their work, they had stopped pursuing their profession. All patients showed immediate postoperative disappearance of dystonic symptoms, and the effect was sustained during the follow-up period (3-33 months, mean 13.1 months), except in one case. Two patients showed partial recurrence of the symptom and underwent second thalamotomy 5 months after the initial surgery with satisfactory results. The score on the writer's cramp rating scale decreased significantly (p < 0.001) after Vo thalamotomy. There were no permanent operative complications. There was no mortality or permanent morbidity. Although a longer follow-up is needed, stereotactic Vo thalamotomy is a useful and safe therapeutic option for writer's cramp. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Significance of finger forces and kinematics during handwriting in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Marquardt, Christian; Schneider, Alexandra S; Fürholzer, Waltraud; Baur, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    Muscular hyperactivity during handwriting, irregular and jerky scripts, as well as awkward and slowed pen movements are the cardinal symptoms of writer's cramp. Accordingly, impaired kinematics and increased force have been reported in writer's cramp. However, the relationship between these symptoms has rarely been investigated. In addition, measurements of finger forces have been restricted to the vertical pen pressure. In the present study, the pen of a graphic tablet was equipped with a force sensor matrix to measure also the grip force produced against the pen barrel despite highly variable pen grips of the patients. Kinematics of writing movements, vertical pen pressure, and grip force were compared in 27 patients with writer's cramp and normal control writers during writing of a test sentence. As expected, all measures revealed a significantly worse writing performance in the patients compared to the control subjects. Exaggerated forces were more frequent than abnormal kinematics, and evidenced by prolonged movement times and reduced writing frequencies. Correlations were found neither between kinematics and force measures nor between the two forces. Interestingly, patients relaxed the grip force during short periods of non-writing by the same relative amount as control subjects. The finding of a large heterogeneity of performances patterns in writer's cramp may reflect the variability of dystonic symptoms as well as the highly variable compensatory strategies of individual patients. Measurements of finger force and in particular of the grip force are valuable and important descriptors of individual impairment characteristics that are independent of writing kinematics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Short-term Bleeding and Cramping Patterns with Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Method Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Justin T.; Desai, Sanyukta; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina; Madden, Tessa; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the short-term (3 and 6-month), self-reported bleeding and cramping patterns with intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the contraceptive implant, and the association of these symptoms with method satisfaction. Study Design We analyzed 3 and 6-month survey data from IUD and implant users in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, a prospective cohort study. Participants who received a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) method (levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), copper IUD, or the etonogestrel implant) and completed their 3- and 6-month surveys were included. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to examine the association of bleeding and cramping patterns with short-term satisfaction. Results Our analytic sample included 5,011 CHOICE participants: 3001 LNG-IUS users, 826 copper IUD users, and 1184 implant users. At 3 months, over 65% of LNG-IUS and implant users reported no change or decreased cramping, while 63% of copper IUD users reported increased menstrual cramping. Lighter bleeding was reported by 67% of LNG-IUS users, 58% of implant users, and 8% of copper IUD users. Satisfaction of all LARC methods was high (≥90%) and significantly higher than non-LARC methods (p<0.001). LARC users with increased menstrual cramping (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 – 0.99), heavier bleeding (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.87 – 0.96), and increased bleeding frequency (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.89 – 0.96) were less likely to report being very satisfied at 6 months. Conclusion Regardless of the LARC method, satisfaction at 3 and 6 months is very high. Changes in self-reported bleeding and cramping are associated with short-term LARC satisfaction. PMID:25046805

  18. Association of short-term bleeding and cramping patterns with long-acting reversible contraceptive method satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Justin T; Desai, Sanyukta; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina; Madden, Tessa; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2015-01-01

    We sought to examine the short-term (3- and 6-month), self-reported bleeding and cramping patterns with intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the contraceptive implant, and the association of these symptoms with method satisfaction. We analyzed 3- and 6-month survey data from IUD and implant users in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, a prospective cohort study. Participants who received a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) method (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system [LNG-IUS], copper IUD, or the etonogestrel implant) and completed their 3- and 6-month surveys were included. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to examine the association of bleeding and cramping patterns with short-term satisfaction. Our analytic sample included 5011 Contraceptive CHOICE Project participants: 3001 LNG-IUS users, 826 copper IUD users, and 1184 implant users. At 3 months, >65% of LNG-IUS and implant users reported no change or decreased cramping, while 63% of copper IUD users reported increased menstrual cramping. Lighter bleeding was reported by 67% of LNG-IUS users, 58% of implant users, and 8% of copper IUD users. Satisfaction of all LARC methods was high (≥90%). LARC users with increased menstrual cramping (relative risk adjusted [RRadj], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.85), heavier bleeding (RRadj, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92), and increased bleeding frequency (RRadj, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.67-0.80) were less likely to report being very satisfied at 6 months. Regardless of the LARC method, satisfaction at 3 and 6 months is very high. Changes in self-reported bleeding and cramping are associated with short-term LARC satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical identification of the simple sleep-related movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Walters, Arthur S

    2007-04-01

    Simple sleep-related movement disorders must be distinguished from daytime movement disorders that persist during sleep, sleep-related epilepsy, and parasomnias, which are generally characterized by activity that appears to be simultaneously complex, goal-directed, and purposeful but is outside the conscious awareness of the patient and, therefore, inappropriate. Once it is determined that the patient has a simple sleep-related movement disorder, the part of the body affected by the movement and the age of the patient give clues as to which sleep-related movement disorder is present. In some cases, all-night polysomnography with accompanying video may be necessary to make the diagnosis. Hypnic jerks (ie, sleep starts), bruxism, rhythmic movement disorder (ie, head banging/body rocking), and nocturnal leg cramps are discussed in addition to less well-appreciated disorders such as benign sleep myoclonus of infancy, excessive fragmentary myoclonus, and hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation.

  20. Actometry in measuring the symptom severity of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, K; Holi, M M; Wahlbeck, K; Ahlgren, A J; Lauerma, H

    2005-05-01

    In a previous, controlled study we demonstrated that the general lower limb activity measured by three-channel actometry is a promising objective measure of restless legs syndrome (RLS) severity. In the present study we have further evaluated the method in measuring RLS symptom severity in an open, single-day pramipexole intervention with 15 RLS patients. Both our standardized actometric parameters (nocturnal lower limb activity and controlled rest activity) decreased significantly during the intervention in parallel with the subjectively reported relief of RLS symptoms.

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow correlates of the severity of writer's cramp symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alicja; Shill, Holly; Hanakawa, Takashi; Bushara, Khalaf; Goldfine, Andrew; Hallett, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of idiopathic focal dystonia with incompletely understood pathophysiology. Recent studies provide evidence that one element might be a sensory processing defect. We performed a PET study with O(15) H(2)O to find out in which brain areas activity correlates with the severity of writer's cramp symptoms. We studied 10 patients with writer's cramp and 10 age- and gender-matched control subjects. There were seven conditions, each repeated twice: rest, writing, tapping with index finger for 2, 3, 4, and 5 min. For each scan, we obtained EMG recordings from the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), extensor indicis proprius (EIP) muscles, and a subjective score of severity of dystonia. Scans were realigned, normalized, smoothed, and analyzed using SPM99. Analysis included both intra- and intergroup comparisons and a correlation analysis where we used EMG recordings and subjective dystonia score as covariates. Random effect analysis of the writing task showed overactivity of the primary sensory cortex and no significant underactivity. Correlation analysis of dystonia patients showed activation of SI when we used the subjective dystonia score as a covariate, and activation of both the SI and primary motor cortex when the normalized EMG score of FDS was used. While some overactivity of MI is not surprising, overactivity of SI is more dramatic and suggests a primary deficit in processing sensory feedback. Writer's cramp may arise in part as a dysfunction of sensory circuits, which causes defective sensorimotor integration resulting in co-contractions of muscles and overflow phenomena.

  2. Quantitative rest activity in ambulatory monitoring as a physiological marker of restless legs syndrome: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, Katinka; Holi, Matti Mikael; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Ahlgren, Aulikki Johanna; Lauerma, Hannu

    2003-04-01

    An objective marker of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is needed for developing diagnostic tools and monitoring symptoms. Actometric ambulatory monitoring of 15 RLS patients and 15 healthy controls was undertaken in order to differentiate between RLS-related motor symptoms and normal motor activity. Nocturnal lower-limb activity per minute differentiated and discriminated between groups with no overlap, whereas the periodic limb movement index and the controlled rest activity during sitting showed less discriminative power. The naturalistic recording of nocturnal activity by actometry may prove useful for assessing the severity of RLS and for finding an objective marker to support the diagnosis of RLS. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  3. Differences in physical characteristics and response to rehabilitation for patients with hand dystonia: musicians' cramp compared to writers' cramp.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Alison L; Goldman, Sarah; Barrango, Cindy; Shrime, Maria; Wong, Tricia; Byl, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Pre-Post, Mixed Factorial Trial. Focal hand dystonia is a challenging movement disorder to rehabilitate in musicians and writers. To compare the neuromusculoskeletal characteristics of those with writers' cramp (WC) and musicians' cramp (MC), and evaluate responsiveness to learning-based sensorimotor training. Twenty-seven individuals (14 musicians, 13 writers) participated in 8 weeks of supervised therapy supplemented with a home program. Between-group differences on measures of musculoskeletal (physical), sensory, and motor performance were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention. Subjects with MC had a higher level of functional independence and better range of motion, but less strength in the affected upper limb than those of subjects with WC. Subjects with MC demonstrated greater accuracy on graphesthesia, kinesthesia, and localization at baseline. No between-group differences in motor performance were noted at baseline or post-intervention. Following individually adapted learning-based sensorimotor training, both groups improved in musculoskeletal (physical) parameters, sensory processing, and motor control; however, improvements on certain subtests differed by group. At follow-up, differences in posture, ROM, strength, graphesthesia, and kinesthesia persisted between the groups. Subjects with WC have different physical and performance risk factors compared with those of subjects with MC. Intervention paradigms are efficacious, but variable responses to rehabilitation occur.

  4. Rotigotine for nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease: Quantitative analysis of efficacy from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial using an axial inertial sensor.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Sringean, Jirada; Chaiwong, Suchapit; Anan, Chanawat; Penkeaw, Nuntiwat; Leaknok, Amarinee; Boonpang, Kamolwan; Saksornchai, Karn; Rattanachaisit, Watchara; Thanawattano, Chusak; Jagota, Priya

    2017-11-01

    Nocturnal hypokinesia is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD), negatively affecting quality of life of both patients and caregivers. However, evidence-based treatment strategies are limited. To evaluate the efficacy of rotigotine transdermal patch, using a wearable sensor, in the management of nocturnal immobility. 34 PD subjects with nocturnal immobility were randomized to receive rotigotine transdermal patch (mean ± SD of 10.46 ± 4.63 mg/24 h, n = 17) or placebo patch (n = 17). Treatment was titrated to an optimal dose over 1-8 weeks, then maintained for 4 weeks. Primary endpoints were objective parameters assessing axial rotation measured using an axial inertial sensor (the NIGHT-Recorder) over two nights at the patients' home. Scale-based assessments were also performed. There was a significant difference, in favor of rotigotine, in change from baseline score in the number of turns in bed (ANCOVA, p = 0.001), and degree of axial turn (p = 0.042). These objective improvements were mirrored by significantly greater improvements in clinical scale-based assessments, including the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total scores (p = 0.009), UPDRS-motor scores (p < 0.001), UPDRS-axial scores (p = 0.01), the Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (p < 0.001), the Nocturnal Akinesia Dystonia and Cramp Scale (p = 0.003) and the eight-item PD Questionnaire (PDQ-8) scores (p = 0.01) from baseline to end of treatment in patients given rotigotine compared to placebo. We show that the rotigotine patch provides a significant improvement in nocturnal symptoms as assessed using both objective measures and clinical rating scales. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using wearable sensors to record objective outcomes in PD-related clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis: the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Nocturnal Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Michael V.; Lockridge, Robert S.; Beck, Gerald J.; Eggers, Paul W.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Greene, Tom; Larive, Brett; Chan, Christopher T.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Copland, Michael; Hoy, Christopher D.; Lindsay, Robert M.; Levin, Nathan W.; Ornt, Daniel B.; Pierratos, Andreas; Pipkin, Mary F.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Stokes, John B.; Unruh, Mark L.; Star, Robert A.; Kliger, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior small studies have shown multiple benefits of frequent nocturnal hemodialysis compared to conventional three times per week treatments. To study this further, we randomized 87 patients to three times per week conventional hemodialysis or to nocturnal hemodialysis six times per week, all with single-use high-flux dialyzers. The 45 patients in the frequent nocturnal arm had a 1.82-fold higher mean weekly stdKt/Vurea, a 1.74-fold higher average number of treatments per week, and a 2.45-fold higher average weekly treatment time than the 42 patients in the conventional arm. We did not find a significant effect of nocturnal hemodialysis for either of the two coprimary outcomes (death or left ventricular mass (measured by MRI) with a hazard ratio of 0.68, or of death or RAND Physical Health Composite with a hazard ratio of 0.91). Possible explanations for the left ventricular mass result include limited sample size and patient characteristics. Secondary outcomes included cognitive performance, self-reported depression, laboratory markers of nutrition, mineral metabolism and anemia, blood pressure and rates of hospitalization, and vascular access interventions. Patients in the nocturnal arm had improved control of hyperphosphatemia and hypertension, but no significant benefit among the other main secondary outcomes. There was a trend for increased vascular access events in the nocturnal arm. Thus, we were unable to demonstrate a definitive benefit of more frequent nocturnal hemodialysis for either coprimary outcome. PMID:21775973

  6. Handwriting performance in the absence of visual control in writer's cramp patients: Initial observations

    PubMed Central

    Chakarov, Vihren; Hummel, Sibylla; Losch, Florian; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2006-01-01

    Background The present study was aimed at investigating the writing parameters of writer's cramp patients and control subjects during handwriting of a test sentence in the absence of visual control. Methods Eight right-handed patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy volunteers as age-matched control subjects participated in the study. The experimental task consisted in writing a test sentence repeatedly for fifty times on a pressure-sensitive digital board. The subject did not have visual control on his handwriting. The writing performance was stored on a PC and analyzed off-line. Results During handwriting all patients developed a typical dystonic limb posture and reported an increase in muscular tension along the experimental session. The patients were significantly slower than the controls, with lower mean vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper and they could not reach the endmost letter of the sentence in the given time window. No other handwriting parameter differences were found between the two groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that during writing in the absence of visual feedback writer's cramp patients are slower and could not reach the endmost letter of the test sentence, but their level of automatization is not impaired and writer's cramp handwriting parameters are similar to those of the controls except for even lower vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper, which is probably due to a changed strategy in such experimental conditions. PMID:16594993

  7. Defective cerebellar control of cortical plasticity in writer’s cramp

    PubMed Central

    Hubsch, Cecile; Roze, Emmanuel; Popa, Traian; Russo, Margherita; Balachandran, Ammu; Pradeep, Salini; Mueller, Florian; Brochard, Vanessa; Quartarone, Angelo; Degos, Bertrand; Vidailhet, Marie; Kishore, Asha

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence points to a role of basal ganglia dysfunction in the pathophysiology of dystonia, but recent studies indicate that cerebellar dysfunction may also be involved. The cerebellum influences sensorimotor adaptation by modulating sensorimotor plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Motor cortex sensorimotor plasticity is maladaptive in patients with writer’s cramp. Here we examined whether putative cerebellar dysfunction in dystonia is linked to these patients’ maladaptive plasticity. To that end we compared the performances of patients and healthy control subjects in a reaching task involving a visuomotor conflict generated by imposing a random deviation (−40° to 40°) on the direction of movement of the mouse/cursor. Such a task is known to involve the cerebellum. We also compared, between patients and healthy control subjects, how the cerebellum modulates the extent and duration of an ongoing sensorimotor plasticity in the motor cortex. The cerebellar cortex was excited or inhibited by means of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation before artificial sensorimotor plasticity was induced in the motor cortex by paired associative stimulation. Patients with writer’s cramp were slower than the healthy control subjects to reach the target and, after having repeatedly adapted their trajectories to the deviations, they were less efficient than the healthy control subjects to perform reaching movement without imposed deviation. It was interpreted as impaired washing-out abilities. In healthy subjects, cerebellar cortex excitation prevented the paired associative stimulation to induce a sensorimotor plasticity in the primary motor cortex, whereas cerebellar cortex inhibition led the paired associative stimulation to be more efficient in inducing the plasticity. In patients with writer’s cramp, cerebellar cortex excitation and inhibition were both ineffective in modulating sensorimotor plasticity. In patients with writer’s cramp, but not

  8. Extreme Task-Specificity in Writer’s Cramp

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Ejaz A.; Chu, Jason; Scheider, Linda H.; Savitt, Joseph; Jinnah, H. A.; Hallett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background Focal hand dystonia may be task-specific as is the case with writer’s cramp (WC). In early stages, the task-specificity can be so specific that it may be mistaken for a psychogenic movement disorder. Methods We describe four patients who showed extreme task specificity in WC. They initially only had problems writing either a single letter or number. Although they were largely thought to be psychogenic, they progressed to typical WC. Conclusions Early recognition of this condition may provide an opportunity for early initiation of treatment. PMID:21714006

  9. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    PubMed

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p < 0.05) when the dominant knee was flexed to 135 ° (23.49% MVIC) versus the traditional 90 ° (75.34% MVIC), while gluteal activation remained similarly high (51.01% and 57.81% MVIC in the traditional position, versus 47.35% and 57.23% MVIC in the modified position for the gluteus maximus and medius, respectively). Modifying the traditional single-leg bridge by flexing the

  10. Task specific grip force control in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A S; Fürholzer, W; Marquardt, C; Hermsdörfer, J

    2014-04-01

    Writer's cramp is defined as a task specific focal dystonia generating hypertonic muscle co-contractions during handwriting resulting in impaired writing performance and exaggerated finger force. However, little is known about the generalisation of grip force across tasks others than writing. The aim of the study was to directly compare regulation of grip forces during handwriting with force regulation in other fine-motor tasks in patients and control subjects. Handwriting, lifting and cyclic movements of a grasped object were investigated in 21 patients and 14 controls. The applied forces were registered in all three tasks and compared between groups and tasks. In addition, task-specific measures of fine-motor skill were assessed. As expected, patients generated exaggerated forces during handwriting compared to control subjects. However there were no statistically significant group differences during lifting and cyclic movements. The control group revealed a generalisation of grip forces across manual tasks whereas in patients there was no such correlation. We conclude that increased finger forces during handwriting are a task-specific phenomenon that does not necessarily generalise to other fine-motor tasks. Force control of patients with writer's cramp in handwriting and other fine-motor tasks is characterised by individualised control strategies. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Effects of an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB)/Diuretic vs. ARB/Calcium-Channel Blocker Combination on Uncontrolled Nocturnal Hypertension Evaluated by Information and Communication Technology-Based Nocturnal Home Blood Pressure Monitoring - The NOCTURNE Study.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Kanegae, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hajime; Uchiyama, Kazuaki; Yamagiwa, Kayo; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Kanda, Kiyomi; Hasegawa, Shinji; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2017-06-23

    Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular events. The NOCTURNE study, a multicenter, randomized controlled trial (RCT) using our recently developed information and communication technology (ICT) nocturnal home BP monitoring (HBPM) device, was performed to compare the nocturnal HBP-lowering effects of differential ARB-based combination therapies in 411 Japanese patients with nocturnal hypertension (HT).Methods and Results:Patients with nocturnal BP ≥120/70 mmHg at baseline even under ARB therapy (100 mg irbesartan daily) were enrolled. The ARB/CCB combination therapy (irbesartan 100 mg+amlodipine 5 mg) achieved a significantly greater reduction in nocturnal home systolic BP (primary endpoint) than the ARB/diuretic combination (daily irbesartan 100 mg+trichlormethiazide 1 mg) (-14.4 vs. -10.5 mmHg, P<0.0001), independently of urinary sodium excretion and/or nocturnal BP dipping status. However, the change in nocturnal home systolic BP was comparable among the post-hoc subgroups with higher salt sensitivity (diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and elderly patients). This is the first RCT demonstrating the feasibility of clinical assessment of nocturnal BP by ICT-nocturnal HBPM. The ARB/CCB combination was shown to be superior to ARB/diuretic in patients with uncontrolled nocturnal HT independently of sodium intake, despite the similar impact of the 2 combinations in patients with higher salt sensitivity.

  12. Sleep disorders and the prevalence of asymptomatic nocturnal acid and non-acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Herdman, Christine; Marzio, Dina Halegoua-De; Shah, Paurush; Denuna-Rivera, Susie; Doghramji, Karl; Cohen, Sidney; Dimarino, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Nocturnal acid reflux is associated with symptomatic and asymptomatic sleep arousals, leading to fragmented sleep. The frequency and influence of acid reflux in patients with various forms of insomnia has not been reported. The aim of this study was to quantify nocturnal acid and nonacid reflux in patients with primary sleep disorders as previously diagnosed by polysomnography. THIRTY ONE SUBJECTS WERE STUDIED: (A) 9 subjects with a polysomnographically diagnosed sleep disorder (1 with restless legs syndrome, 4 with narcolepsy, 4 with periodic limb movement disorder); (B) 12 subjects with primary insomnia (PI) and unrevealing polysomnography; and (C) 10 controls without disturbed sleep. All subjects underwent a physical examination and 24 h transnasal pH and impedance monitoring to detect acid and non-acid reflux. The 21 subjects with fragmented sleep due to a primary sleep disorder had significantly more recumbent acid exposure (>1.2% of time) as compared with control subjects (33% versus 0%). When fragmented sleep subjects were divided into two groups, 17% of PI subjects and 55% of subjects with a diagnosed sleep disorder had significant recumbent acid exposure (P=0.009). Likewise, the median recumbent nonacid events were increased in the sleep disordered group (P=0.011). This study indicates that patients with primary sleep disorders have prominent nocturnal acid reflux without symptoms of daytime acid reflux. Acid reflux is most prominent in patients with polysomnographic findings of disturbed sleep as compared to patients with PI; while non acid reflux is increased minimally in these patients.

  13. Leg Movement Activity During Sleep in Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Garbazza, Corrado; Sauter, Cornelia; Paul, Juliane; Kollek, Jenny; Dujardin, Catharine; Hackethal, Sandra; Dorn, Hans; Peter, Anita; Hansen, Marie-Luise; Manconi, Mauro; Ferri, Raffaele; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct a first detailed analysis of the pattern of leg movement (LM) activity during sleep in adult subjects with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) compared to healthy controls. Methods: Fifteen ADHD patients and 18 control subjects underwent an in-lab polysomnographic sleep study. The periodic character of LMs was evaluated with established markers of "periodicity," i.e., the periodicity index, intermovement intervals, and time distribution of LM during sleep, in addition to standard parameters such as the periodic leg movement during sleep index (PLMSI) and the periodic leg movement during sleep arousal index (PLMSAI). Subjective sleep and psychiatric symptoms were assessed using several, self-administered, screening questionnaires. Results: Objective sleep parameters from the baseline night did not significantly differ between ADHD and control subjects, except for a longer sleep latency (SL), a longer duration of the periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) in REM sleep and a higher PLMSI also in REM sleep. Data from the sleep questionnaires showed perception of poor sleep quality in ADHD patients. Conclusions: Leg movements during sleep in ADHD adults are not significantly more frequent than in healthy controls and the nocturnal motor events do not show an increased periodicity in these patients. The non-periodic character of LMs in ADHD has already been shown in children and seems to differentiate ADHD from other pathophysiological related conditions like restless legs syndrome (RLS) or periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD). The reduced subjective sleep quality reported by ADHD adults contrasted with the normal objective polysomnographic parameters, which could suggest a sleep-state misperception in these individuals or more subtle sleep abnormalities not picked up by the traditional sleep staging.

  14. Nocturnal Polyuria: Excess of Nocturnal Urine Production, Excess of Definitions-Influence on Renal Function Profile.

    PubMed

    Goessaert, An-Sofie; Walle, Johan Vande; Bosch, Ruud; Hoebeke, Piet; Everaert, Karel

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to identify important differences in renal function profile, and potential water and sodium diuresis cutoffs among participants with nocturnal polyuria according to nocturnal polyuria definitions. This post hoc analysis was based on a prospective study in which participants completed a bladder diary, collected urine and provided a blood sample. With an age dependent nocturnal polyuria index greater than 20% to 33% as the referent 4 definitions of nocturnal polyuria were compared, including 1) nocturnal polyuria index greater than 33%, 2) nocturnal urine production greater than 90 ml per hour and 3) greater than 10 ml/kg, and 4) nocturia index greater than 1.5. In 112 male and female participants significant differences in baseline characteristics and bladder diary parameters were found according to definition. Diuresis rate, free water clearance and sodium clearance had similar 24-hour courses in the subgroups with and without polyuria by each definition. The range varied more in the subgroup with vs without polyuria, especially at night for diuresis rate and free water clearance. At night the latter decreased in the polyuria subgroup based on each definition (p <0.001 to 0.045). A significant difference vs the no polyuria subgroups was found only for urine production greater than 90 ml per hour and polyuria index greater than 20% to 33%. For each definition sodium clearance remained high in the polyuria subgroup, which differed significantly from the no polyuria subgroups (p <0.001 to 0.030). Free water and sodium clearance cutoffs ranged from -0.65 to -0.85 ml per minute between 12 and 2 a.m., and 0.65 to 0.77 ml per minute between 3 and 5 a.m., respectively, with large sensitivity and specificity differences according to definition. There were important differences when comparing participants with vs without nocturnal polyuria by definition. The renal function profile indicating the pathophysiological mechanism of nocturnal polyuria did not

  15. Nocturnal Hypoxia and Loss of Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sofia B.; Ronksley, Paul E.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Tsai, Willis H.; Manns, Braden J.; Tonelli, Marcello; Klarenbach, Scott W.; Chin, Rick; Clement, Fiona M.; Hanly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in patients with kidney disease, whether nocturnal hypoxia affects kidney function is unknown. Methods We studied all adult subjects referred for diagnostic testing of sleep apnea between July 2005 and December 31 2007 who had serial measurement of their kidney function. Nocturnal hypoxia was defined as oxygen saturation (SaO2) below 90% for ≥12% of the nocturnal monitoring time. The primary outcome, accelerated loss of kidney function, was defined as a decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year. Results 858 participants were included and followed for a mean study period of 2.1 years. Overall 374 (44%) had nocturnal hypoxia, and 49 (5.7%) had accelerated loss of kidney function. Compared to controls without hypoxia, patients with nocturnal hypoxia had a significant increase in the adjusted risk of accelerated kidney function loss (odds ratio (OR) 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25, 6.67). Conclusion Nocturnal hypoxia was independently associated with an increased risk of accelerated kidney function loss. Further studies are required to determine whether treatment and correction of nocturnal hypoxia reduces loss of kidney function. PMID:21559506

  16. Increased nocturnal blood pressure in enuretic children with polyuria.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Anne; Mahler, Birgitte; Rittig, Soren; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the association between nocturnal blood pressure and urine production in children with enuresis. A total of 39 consecutive children with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6.2 to 14.9) with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis completed a bladder diary, including 2 weeks of basic documentation and 2 with desmopressin titration from 120 to 240 microg sublingually. Arterial blood pressure was measured every 30 minutes during 24 hours and during 4 additional nights using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. Furthermore, 10 healthy children were recruited into the study who completed a bladder diary for 5 days while measuring arterial blood pressures with documentation of all intake and voided volumes. Patients with nocturnal polyuria had significantly higher nocturnal mean arterial pressure than patients without polyuria and controls (p <0.05). Furthermore, a positive correlation was seen between nocturnal urine output and nocturnal mean arterial pressure (r = 0.32, p <0.001). Nocturnal urine output was significantly higher during wet nights than dry nights (p <0.001). However, no significant difference was found in mean arterial pressure between wet and dry nights. Nocturnal mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in children with enuresis with polyuria than in children without polyuria. There was a significant positive correlation between average nocturnal mean arterial pressure and nocturnal urine volume in the whole study. The association between nocturnal blood pressure and urine volume, and the role of blood pressure should be investigated in a larger group of children with enuresis who have nocturnal polyuria.

  17. Behavioral Treatment for Nocturnal Enuresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; Jones, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is one of the most prevalent and distressing of all childhood problems. The treatment of nocturnal enuresis has shifted in the past few decades from a strictly psychopathological perspective to a biobehavioral perspective. Although the primary clinical features of this disorder are medical/organic, there is currently strong…

  18. Nocturnal awakenings and pediatric injury risk.

    PubMed

    Schwebel, David C; Brezausek, Carl M

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to examine relations between nocturnal awakenings and unintentional injury risk among toddlers. A nationally representative sample of 799 children was followed longitudinally from birth through 36 months. Patterns of nocturnal awakening were assessed by parent-report at ages 6, 15, 24 and 36 months, and injury events were reported at quarterly intervals over the same time period. A range of external covariates, including positive and negative affect and externalizing behavior; maternal stress, maternal depression, and parenting style; and family socioeconomic status were measured. A persistent pattern of very mild nocturnal awakening was related to increased risk of injury during the toddler years, and that relation held after controlling for a range of potential covariates. A pattern of persistent nocturnal awakening appears to be related to unintentional injury risk in toddlers.

  19. Multi-Modal Treatment of Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Caroline; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The article reports a multimodal treatment of nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior in a mildly mentally retarded woman. Behavioral treatment and removal of caffeine from the subject's diet eliminated both nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior. (Author/DB)

  20. Patterns and Processes in Nocturnal and Crepuscular Pollination Services.

    PubMed

    Borges, Renee M; Somanathan, Hema; Kelber, Almut

    2016-12-01

    Night, dawn, and dusk have abiotic features that differ from the day. Illumination, wind speeds, turbulence, and temperatures are lower while humidity may be higher at night. Nocturnal pollination occurred in 30% of angiosperm families across 68% of orders, 97% of families with C3, two-thirds of families with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), and 71% dicot families with C4 photosynthesis. Despite its widespread occurence, nocturnal pollination occurs in more families with xerophytic adaptations than helophytes or mesophytes, suggesting that nocturnal flowering is primarily an adaptation to water stress since flowering is a water-intensive process. We propose the arid or water stress hypothesis for nocturnal flowering suggesting that plants facing water stress in a habitat (e.g., deserts) or a habitat stratum (e.g., upper canopy for epiphytes) gain a selective advantage by nocturnal flowering by reducing water loss through evapotranspiration, leading to larger flowers that provide more nectar or other resources, to support pollinators with higher rewards. Contrary to the wide taxonomic occurrence of nocturnal flowering, few animal taxa serve as nocturnal pollinators. We discuss the sensory and physiological abilities that enable pollinator movement, navigation, and detection of flowers within the nocturnal temporal niche and present a unified framework for investigation of nocturnal flowering and pollination.

  1. The Formylpeptide Receptor 2 (Fpr2) and Its Endogenous Ligand Cathelin-related Antimicrobial Peptide (CRAMP) Promote Dendritic Cell Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Huang, Jiaqiang; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Jiang, Qun; Tessarollo, Lino; Le, Yingying; Wang, Ji Ming

    2014-01-01

    Mouse formylpeptide receptor 2 (Fpr2) is a homologue of the human G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor FPR2, which interacts with pathogen and host-derived chemotactic agonists. Our previous studies revealed reduced allergic airway inflammation and immune responses in Fpr2-deficient (Fpr2−/−) mice in association with diminished dendritic cell (DC) recruitment into the airway and draining lymph nodes. These defects prompted us to investigate the potential changes in the differentiation and maturation of DCs caused by Fpr2 deficiency. Bone marrow monocytes from Fpr2−/− mouse mice incubated with GM-CSF and IL-4 in vitro showed normal expression of markers of immature DCs. However, upon stimulation with the TLR4 agonist LPS, Fpr2−/− mouse DCs failed to express normal levels of maturation markers with reduced production of IL-12 and diminished chemotaxis in response to the DC homing chemokine CCL21. Fpr2−/− DCs also failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro, and their recruitment into the T-cell zones of the spleen was reduced after antigen immunization. The capacity of Fpr2 to sustain normal DC maturation was dependent on its interaction with an endogenous ligand CRAMP expressed by DCs, because neutralization of either Fpr2 or CRAMP inhibited DC maturation in response to LPS. We additionally observed that the presence of exogenous CRAMP in culture increased the sensitivity of WT mouse DCs to LPS stimulation. The importance of CRAMP for DC maturation was further demonstrated by the observations that DCs from CRAMP−/− mice expressed lower levels of costimulatory molecules and MHC II and exhibited poor chemotaxis in response to CCL21 after LPS stimulation. Our observations indicate a nonredundant role for Fpr2 and its agonist CRAMP in DC maturation in immune responses. PMID:24808174

  2. [Overactive muscles: it can be more serious than common myalgia or cramp].

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P F; Snoeck, Marc M J; Voermans, Nicol C; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2016-01-01

    Positive muscle phenomena are due to muscle overactivity. Examples are cramp, myalgia, and stiffness. These manifestations have mostly acquired causes, e.g. side-effects of medication, metabolic disorders, vitamin deficiency, excessive caffeine intake or neurogenic disorders. We report on three patients with various positive muscle phenomena, to illustrate the clinical signs that indicate an underlying myopathy. Patient A, a 56-year-old man, was diagnosed with muscle cramp in the context of excessive coffee use and previous lumbosacral radiculopathy. Patient B, a 71-year-old man, was shown to have RYR1-related myopathy. Patient C, a 42-year-old man, suffered from Brody myopathy. We propose for clinicians to look out for a number of 'red flags' that can point to an underlying myopathy, and call for referral to neurology if indicated. Red flags include second wind phenomenon, familial occurrence of similar complaints, marked muscle stiffness, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle hypertrophy, and myoglobinuria. Establishing a correct diagnosis is important for proper treatment. Certain myopathies call for cardiac or respiratory screening.

  3. Nocturnal bruxism and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Rugh, J D; Harlan, J

    1988-01-01

    This chapter has discussed the important aspects of nocturnal bruxism and its relation to disorders of the masticatory system and headaches. Bruxism is believed to be a stress-related sleep disorder, occurring in both men and women, in children, and in adults. In most patients, bruxism results only in minor tooth wear; however, it can become extremely severe with damage occurring in essentially every part of the masticatory apparatus. Nocturnal bruxism should not be overlooked as an etiologic factor in muscular headaches. Short-term acute therapy may involve physical therapy, nocturnal electromyographic biofeedback, and medication to relieve anxiety and improve sleep. Long-term management usually includes some form of stress reduction, change in lifestyle, and an occlusal splint or nightguard to protect the teeth and masticatory system.

  4. Botulinum toxin-A injections via electrical motor point stimulation to treat writer's cramp: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lim, E C H; Quek, A M L; Seet, R C S

    2006-06-30

    Writer's cramp describes a task-specific dystonia, in which the act of writing initiates dystonic posturing of the hands. Previous studies have described the efficacy of injections of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) under electromyographic guidance, in which the injected muscle is either voluntarily, or less often, electrically (electrical motor point stimulation, EMPS) activated to ensure that the needle is in the target muscle. We performed an open label, prospective study to assess the efficacy of BTX-A injections, performed with EMPS under electromyographic guidance. Eight patients (seven male and one female) of mean age 44 (range 25-66) were recruited. All had idiopathic writer's cramp. Outcome measures, which included timed writing, objective assessment of dystonia (modified Ashworth scale and a visual analog scale rating) and patient assessment of functional disability, were assessed before injections and at six weeks follow-up. The total dose of BTX-A injected for writer's cramp ranged from 50 to 130 units, which was less than that reported in previous studies using muscle activation techniques (up to 300 units). Improvements were observed in all outcome measures. Patients reported mild (non-disabling) weakness of injected, but not of uninjected muscles. Lower dosages of BTX-A, administered using EMPS, offers the advantages of decreased cost and increased accuracy of targeting, while achieving good outcomes.

  5. Phenytoin-induced improvement in muscle cramping and insulin action in three patients with the syndrome of insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and acral hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Minaker, K L; Flier, J S; Landsberg, L; Young, J B; Moxley, R T; Kingston, W J; Meneilly, G S; Rowe, J W

    1989-09-01

    Phenytoin sodium has been used to treat muscle cramps of diverse causes, and is known to increase insulin sensitivity during long-term use. We have previously described a syndrome of insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and acral hypertrophy with continual muscle cramping. The effect of 300 mg/d of phenytoin (Dilantin) on muscle cramping and carbohydrate economy was studied in three affected patients and four control subjects. Oral glucose tolerance tests, euglycemic insulin infusion studies, and monocyte insulin binding tests were conducted before and after phenytoin administration. All three patients had notable improvement in muscle cramps. In response to phenytoin, metabolic improvements were variable, with improvement characteristically better in patients with less severe baseline metabolic abnormalities. Patient 1, with the mildest degree of glucose intolerance, had decreased fasting insulin and blood glucose levels, improved glucose tolerance, and insulin-mediated glucose disposal, associated with an increase in monocyte insulin receptors. Patient 2 had reduced fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved oral glucose tolerance, suggesting a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. Patient 3, with the most severely impaired carbohydrate economy, showed no metabolic improvement despite marked lessening of muscle pain. These clinical characteristics were unaffected in control subjects. We conclude that phenytoin is of value in the therapy of muscle cramps and glucose intolerance in patients with this syndrome.

  6. Management of nocturnal enuresis - myths and facts

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajiv; Raut, Sumantra

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis often causes considerable distress or functional impairment to patient and their parents necessitating a multidisciplinary approach from paediatrician, paediatric nephrologist, urologists and psychiatrist. Mechanisms of monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis are mainly nocturnal polyuria, bladder overactivity and failure to awaken from sleep in response to bladder sensations. Goal oriented and etiology wise treatment includes simple behavioral intervention, conditioning alarm regimen and pharmacotherapy with desmopressin, imipramine and anticholinergic drugs. Symptoms often recurs requiring change over or combination of different modes of treatment. PMID:27458562

  7. Clinical, Electrophysiological, and Serological Evaluation of Patients with Cramp-Fasciculation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    POYRAZ, Mürüvvet; MATUR, Zeliha; AYSAL, Fikret; TÜZÜN, Erdem; HANOĞLU, Lütfü; ÖGE, A. Emre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS) is a rare peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome. There are only a few reports on clinical and serological profile of a CFS cohort that was followed up by a single outpatient clinic. Methods Clinical, electrophysiological, and serological features of 6 CFS patients (5 men, 1 woman; 27–65 years old) were investigated. Results All patients presented with cramps, fasciculations, muscle pain, and autonomic symptoms, and 2 also reported numbness and burning sensation in limbs, suggestive of neuropathic pain. Antibodies to uncharacterized voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex proteins were found in 2 patients and to contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) in 1 patient. None of the patients had a tumor. Most of the patients revealed prolonged after-discharges following tibial nerve stimulation. Nerve conduction studies and R-R interval variability tests were normal, whereas sympathetic skin responses were increased in amplitude in 3 seronegative patients. Five patients showed favorable response to carbamazepine or pregabalin treatment, whereas 1 VGKC-antibody-positive patient was resistant to carbamazepine and immunosuppressant treatment. Conclusion Neuropathic pain and VGKC-complex antibodies may be encountered in CFS patients. Although autonomic symptoms are commonly found in CFS, routine autonomic system tests which are done in electrophysiology laboratories might yield normal results. PMID:28680318

  8. Clinical, Electrophysiological, and Serological Evaluation of Patients with Cramp-Fasciculation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Mürüvvet; Matur, Zeliha; Aysal, Fikret; Tüzün, Erdem; Hanoğlu, Lütfü; Öge, A Emre

    2017-06-01

    Cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS) is a rare peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome. There are only a few reports on clinical and serological profile of a CFS cohort that was followed up by a single outpatient clinic. Clinical, electrophysiological, and serological features of 6 CFS patients (5 men, 1 woman; 27-65 years old) were investigated. All patients presented with cramps, fasciculations, muscle pain, and autonomic symptoms, and 2 also reported numbness and burning sensation in limbs, suggestive of neuropathic pain. Antibodies to uncharacterized voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex proteins were found in 2 patients and to contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) in 1 patient. None of the patients had a tumor. Most of the patients revealed prolonged after-discharges following tibial nerve stimulation. Nerve conduction studies and R-R interval variability tests were normal, whereas sympathetic skin responses were increased in amplitude in 3 seronegative patients. Five patients showed favorable response to carbamazepine or pregabalin treatment, whereas 1 VGKC-antibody-positive patient was resistant to carbamazepine and immunosuppressant treatment. Neuropathic pain and VGKC-complex antibodies may be encountered in CFS patients. Although autonomic symptoms are commonly found in CFS, routine autonomic system tests which are done in electrophysiology laboratories might yield normal results.

  9. Analysis of nocturia with 24-h urine volume, nocturnal urine volume, nocturnal bladder capacity and length of sleep duration: concept for effective treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Udo, Yukihiro; Nakao, Masahiro; Honjo, Hisashi; Ukimura, Osamu; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Kitakoji, Hiroshi; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2011-03-01

    • To determine the relationship between the number of nocturia and 24-h urine volume, nocturnal urine volume, nocturnal bladder capacity and length of sleep duration as well as to assess the significance of these factors with respect to eliminating nocturnal voidings in individual patients with nocturia. • Among 532 participants who completed a 3-day bladder diary between April 2005 and December 2006, the diaries of 450 participants without 24-h polyuria were analyzed. • Clinical variables such as the number of daytime and night-time voids, 24-h urine volume, nocturnal polyuria index, daytime and night-time maximum voided volumes (MVV), night/day MVV ratio, sleep duration and proportion of night/day urine production rates were obtained from each diary. • Participants were classified into eight groups according to values of three factors: nocturnal MVV, proportion of night/day urine production rates and length of sleep duration. • Each group was divided into three subgroups: non-nocturics (number of nocturnal voidings is zero), mild nocturics (number of nocturnal voidings is one) and severe nocturics (number of nocturnal voidings is two or more). • The data from non-nocturics with three normal factors were regarded as the normal control and compared with the variables of the other subgroups using Dunnett's method. • Variables that form the basis of classifying participants into eight groups and corresponding to abnormal factors of each group were statistically significant in all the subgroups of each group. • Furthermore, a significantly increased 24-h urine volume was found in severe nocturics of the group with three normal factors. • A significantly decreased 24-h urine volume was found in non-nocturics of groups with nocturnal polyuria, decreased bladder capacity and both long sleep duration and nocturnal polyuria. • A significantly increased nocturnal MVV and night/day MVV ratio were shown in non-nocturics and mild nocturics of the groups

  10. Nocturnal bees are attracted by widespread floral scents.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Airton Torres; Maia, Artur Campos Dalia; Ojima, Poliana Yumi; dos Santos, Adauto A; Schlindwein, Clemens

    2012-03-01

    Flower localization in darkness is a challenging task for nocturnal pollinators. Floral scents often play a crucial role in guiding them towards their hosts. Using common volatile compounds of floral scents, we trapped female nocturnal Megalopta-bees (Halictidae), thus uncovering olfactory cues involved in their search for floral resources. Applying a new sampling method hereby described, we offer novel perspectives on the investigation of nocturnal bees.

  11. Pathophysiology of nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms in older patients with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Denys, Marie-Astrid; Decalf, Veerle; Kumps, Candy; Petrovic, Mirko; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-01

    To explore the mismatch between functional bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production, and to study the pathophysiology of an increased nocturnal urine production in older patients with urinary incontinence. The present prospective observational study included adults aged ≥65 years with urinary incontinence. Participants completed questionnaires, frequency volume charts and renal function profiles. The nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index was defined as nocturnal urine output/maximum voided volume; the nocturnal polyuria index as nocturnal/24 h urine output. The median age (n = 95) was 74 years (69-79), 87% were women and 73% had nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms (nocturnal urinary incontinence or nocturia ≥2). Participants with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms had a significantly higher nocturnal urine output (809 mL vs 650 mL; P = 0.001) and no significant difference in maximum voided volume (350 mL vs 437 mL; P = 0.079) compared with participants without nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. Participants (nocturnal polyuria index >33% [n = 56], nocturnal polyuria index >40% [n = 42], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index >1.87 [n = 51]) showed higher night-time diuresis rates, free water and sodium clearance compared with during the daytime. Controls (nocturnal polyuria index ≤33% [n = 26], nocturnal polyuria index ≤40% [n = 40], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index ≤1.87 [n = 44]) had no circadian rhythm in their diuresis rate or sodium clearance, but more nocturnal free water clearance compared with during the daytime. The majority of older adults with urinary incontinence present nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. An increased nocturnal sodium diuresis seems to be the only mechanism differentiating patients with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms from controls. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Nocturnal Eating: Association with Binge Eating, Obesity, and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Rosselli, Francine; Wilson, G. Terence; Perrin, Nancy; Harvey, Kate; DeBar, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine clinical correlates of nocturnal eating, a core behavioral symptom of night eating syndrome. Method Data from 285 women who had participated in a two-stage screening for binge eating were utilized. Women (n = 41) who reported one or more nocturnal eating episodes in the past 28 days on the Eating Disorder Examination and women who did not report nocturnal eating (n =244) were compared on eating disorder symptomatology, Body Mass Index (BMI), and on measures of psychosocial adjustment. Results Nocturnal eaters were significantly more likely to report binge eating and differed significantly from non-nocturnal eaters (with responses indicating greater disturbance) on weight and shape concern, eating concern, self-esteem, depression, and functional impairment, but not on BMI or dietary restraint. Group differences remained significant in analyses adjusting for binge eating. Conclusions This study confirms the association between nocturnal eating and binge eating previously found in treatment seeking samples yet also suggests that the elevated eating disorder symptoms and decreased psychosocial adjustment observed in nocturnal eaters is not simply a function of binge eating. PMID:19708071

  13. Nocturnal Oviposition Behavior of Forensically Important Diptera in Central England.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kate M; Grace, Karon A; Bulling, Mark T

    2015-11-01

    Timing of oviposition on a corpse is a key factor in entomologically based minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) calculations. However, there is considerable variation in nocturnal oviposition behavior of blow flies reported in the research literature. This study investigated nocturnal oviposition in central England for the first time, over 25 trials from 2011 to 2013. Liver-baited traps were placed in an urban location during control (diurnal), and nocturnal periods and environmental conditions were recorded during each 5-h trial. No nocturnal activity or oviposition was observed during the course of the study indicating that nocturnal oviposition is highly unlikely in central England. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Outflow from a Nocturnal Thunderstorm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    P AD-A093 796 ILLINOIS STATE WATER SURVEY URBANAF/ .2 OUTFLOW FROM A NOCTURNAL THUNDERSTORM. (U) NOV a0 R W SCOTT NSF-ATHN78-0a865 UNCLASSIFIED SWS...CR-242 ARO-15529.5-6S N I muuuuuuuuuuuu iDA0937 9 6 State Water Survey Division k istitute of METEOROLOGY SECTION 0 uJD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS...SWS Contract Report 242 / F OUTFLOW FROM A NOCTURNAL THUNDERSTORM Robert W. Scott Meteorology Section Illinois State Water Survey -- DTIC ELECTE CD

  15. Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Revisited by Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Tack, Jan; Sifrim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Impedance-pH monitoring allows detailed characterization of gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal activity associated with reflux. We assessed the characteristics of nocturnal reflux and esophageal activity preceding and following reflux. Methods Impedance-pH tracings from 11 healthy subjects and 76 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease off acid-suppressive therapy were analyzed. Characteristics of nocturnal supine reflux, time distribution and esophageal activity seen on impedance at 2 minute intervals preceding and following reflux were described. Results Patients had more nocturnal reflux events than healthy subjects (8 [4-12] vs 2 [1-5], P = 0.002), with lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux (57% [35-78] vs 80% [60-100], P = 0.044). Nocturnal reflux was mainly liquid (80%) and reached the proximal esophagus more often in patients (6% vs 0%, P = 0.047). Acid reflux predominated in the first 2 hours (66%) and weakly acidic reflux in the last 3 hours (70%) of the night. Most nocturnal reflux was preceded by aboral flows and cleared by short lasting volume clearance. In patients, prolonged chemical clearance was associated with less esophageal activity. Conclusions Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux is as common as acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and predominates later in the night. Impedance-pH can predict prolonged chemical clearance after nocturnal acid reflux. PMID:21602991

  16. Periodic leg movements during sleep and cerebral hemodynamic changes detected by NIRS.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Biallas, Martin; Wolf, Martin; Valko, Philipp O; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2009-07-01

    Periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) have been shown to be associated with changes in autonomic and hemispheric activities. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) assesses hemodynamic changes linked to hemispheric/cortical activity. We applied NIRS to test whether cerebral hemodynamic alterations accompany PLMS. Three PLMS patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography coupled with cerebral NIRS. EEG correlates of PLMS were scored and NIRS data were analysed for the identification of correspondent hemodynamic changes. PLMS were constantly associated with cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations that showed greater amplitude when associated to changes in EEG and were present also in absence of any visually detectable arousal or A phase in the EEG. This is the first study documenting cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to PLMS. The clinical relevance of these observations remains to be determined.

  17. Active and Inactive Leg Hemodynamics during Sequential Single-Leg Interval Cycling.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nicole; Abbiss, Chris R; Ihsan, Mohammed; Maiorana, Andrew J; Peiffer, Jeremiah J

    2018-06-01

    Leg order during sequential single-leg cycling (i.e., exercising both legs independently within a single session) may affect local muscular responses potentially influencing adaptations. This study examined the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle hemodynamic responses during double-leg and sequential single-leg cycling. Ten young healthy adults (28 ± 6 yr) completed six 1-min double-leg intervals interspersed with 1 min of passive recovery and, on a separate occasion, 12 (six with one leg followed by six with the other leg) 1-min single-leg intervals interspersed with 1 min of passive recovery. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, blood pressure, muscle oxygenation, muscle blood volume, and power output were measured throughout each session. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, and power output were not different between sets of single-leg intervals, but the average of both sets was lower than the double-leg intervals. Mean arterial pressure was higher during double-leg compared with sequential single-leg intervals (115 ± 9 vs 104 ± 9 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and higher during the initial compared with second set of single-leg intervals (108 ± 10 vs 101 ± 10 mm Hg, P < 0.05). The increase in muscle blood volume from baseline was similar between the active single leg and the double leg (267 ± 150 vs 214 ± 169 μM·cm, P = 0.26). The pattern of change in muscle blood volume from the initial to second set of intervals was significantly different (P < 0.05) when the leg was active in the initial (-52.3% ± 111.6%) compared with second set (65.1% ± 152.9%). These data indicate that the order in which each leg performs sequential single-leg cycling influences the local hemodynamic responses, with the inactive muscle influencing the stimulus experienced by the contralateral leg.

  18. Desmopressin is an Effective Treatment for Mixed Nocturia with Nocturnal Polyuria and Decreased Nocturnal Bladder Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Choo, Myung-Soo; Lee, Jeong Gu; Park, Choal Hee; Paick, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Han, Deok Hyun; Park, Won Hee

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of desmopressin in patients with mixed nocturia, Patients aged ≥18 yr with mixed nocturia (≥2 voids/night and a nocturnal polyuria index [NPi] >33% and a nocturnal bladder capacity index [NBCi] >1) were recruited. The optimum dose of oral desmopressin was determined during a 3-week dose-titration period and the determined dose was maintained for 4 weeks. The efficacy was assessed by the frequency-volume charts and the sleep questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a 50% or greater reduction in the number of nocturnal voids (NV) compared with baseline. Among 103 patients enrolled, 94 (79 men and 15 women) were included in the analysis. The proportion of patients with a 50% or greater reduction in NV was 68 (72%). The mean number of NV decreased significantly (3.20 to 1.34) and the mean nocturnal urine volume, nocturia index, NPi, and NBCi decreased significantly. The mean duration of sleep until the first NV was prolonged from 118.4±44.1 to 220.3±90.7 min (P<0.001). The overall impression of patients about their quality of sleep improved. Adverse events occurred in 6 patients, including one asymptomatic hyponatremia. Desmopressin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for mixed nocturia. PMID:21165296

  19. Desmopressin is an effective treatment for mixed nocturia with nocturnal polyuria and decreased nocturnal bladder capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Won; Choo, Myung-Soo; Lee, Jeong Gu; Park, Choal Hee; Paick, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Han, Deok Hyun; Park, Won Hee; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of desmopressin in patients with mixed nocturia, Patients aged ≥ 18 yr with mixed nocturia (≥ 2 voids/night and a nocturnal polyuria index [NPi] >33% and a nocturnal bladder capacity index [NBCi] >1) were recruited. The optimum dose of oral desmopressin was determined during a 3-week dose-titration period and the determined dose was maintained for 4 weeks. The efficacy was assessed by the frequency-volume charts and the sleep questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a 50% or greater reduction in the number of nocturnal voids (NV) compared with baseline. Among 103 patients enrolled, 94 (79 men and 15 women) were included in the analysis. The proportion of patients with a 50% or greater reduction in NV was 68 (72%). The mean number of NV decreased significantly (3.20 to 1.34) and the mean nocturnal urine volume, nocturia index, NPi, and NBCi decreased significantly. The mean duration of sleep until the first NV was prolonged from 118.4 ± 44.1 to 220.3 ± 90.7 min (P<0.001). The overall impression of patients about their quality of sleep improved. Adverse events occurred in 6 patients, including one asymptomatic hyponatremia. Desmopressin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for mixed nocturia.

  20. The risks of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in insulin-treated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Graveling, Alex J; Frier, Brian M

    2017-11-01

    Over half of all episodes of severe hypoglycaemia (requiring external help) occur during sleep, but nocturnal hypoglycaemia is often asymptomatic and unrecognised. The precise incidence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia is difficult to determine with no agreed definition, but continuous glucose monitoring has shown that it occurs frequently in people taking insulin. Attenuation of the counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycaemia during sleep may explain why some episodes are undetected and more prolonged, and modifies cardiovascular responses. The morbidity and mortality associated with nocturnal hypoglycaemia is probably much greater than realised, causing seizures, coma and cardiovascular events and affecting quality of life, mood and work performance the following day. It may induce impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia. Cardiac arrhythmias that occur during nocturnal hypoglycaemia include bradycardia and ectopics that may provoke dangerous arrhythmias. Treatment strategies are discussed that may help to minimise the frequency of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Circadian Rhythm of Glomerular Filtration and Solute Handling Related to Nocturnal Enuresis.

    PubMed

    Dossche, L; Raes, A; Hoebeke, P; De Bruyne, P; Vande Walle, J

    2016-01-01

    Although nocturnal polyuria in patients with monosymptomatic enuresis can largely be explained by the decreased nocturnal vasopressin secretion hypothesis, other circadian rhythms in the kidney also seem to have a role. We recently documented an absent day/night rhythm in a subgroup of desmopressin refractory cases. We explore the importance of abnormal circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration and tubular (sodium, potassium) parameters in patients with monosymptomatic enuresis. In this retrospective study of a tertiary enuresis population we collected data subsequent to a standardized screening (International Children's Continence Society questionnaire), 14-day diary for nocturnal enuresis and diuresis, and 24-hour concentration profile. The study population consisted of 139 children with nocturnal enuresis who were 5 years or older. Children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis were used as controls. There was a maintained circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration, sodium, osmotic excretion and diuresis rate in children with monosymptomatic and nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, and there was no difference between the 2 groups. Secondary analysis revealed that in patients with nocturnal polyuria (with monosymptomatic or nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis) circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration, sodium and osmotic excretion, and diuresis rate was diminished in contrast to those without nocturnal polyuria (p <0.001). Circadian rhythm of the kidney does not differ between patients with nonmonosymptomatic and monosymptomatic enuresis. However, the subgroup with enuresis and nocturnal polyuria has a diminished circadian rhythm of nocturnal diuresis, sodium excretion and glomerular filtration in contrast to children without nocturnal polyuria. This observation cannot be explained by the vasopressin theory alone. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nocturnal polyuria is related to absent circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    De Guchtenaere, A; Vande Walle, C; Van Sintjan, P; Raes, A; Donckerwolcke, R; Van Laecke, E; Hoebeke, P; Vande Walle, J

    2007-12-01

    Monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis is frequently associated with nocturnal polyuria and low urinary osmolality during the night. Initial studies found decreased vasopressin levels associated with low urinary osmolality overnight. Together with the documented desmopressin response, this was suggestive of a primary role for vasopressin in the pathogenesis of enuresis in the absence of bladder dysfunction. Recent studies no longer confirm this primary role of vasopressin. Other pathogenetic factors such as disordered renal sodium handling, hypercalciuria, increased prostaglandins and/or osmotic excretion might have a role. So far, little attention has been given to abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration rate. We evaluated the circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration rate and diuresis in children with desmopressin resistant monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria. We evaluated 15 children (9 boys) 9 to 14 years old with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria resistant to desmopressin treatment. The control group consisted of 25 children (12 boys) 9 to 16 years old with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Compared to the control population, children with nocturnal polyuria lost their circadian rhythm not only for diuresis and sodium excretion but also for glomerular filtration rate. Patients with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria lack a normal circadian rhythm for diuresis and sodium excretion, and the circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration rate is absent. This absence of circadian rhythm of glomerular filtration rate and/or sodium handling cannot be explained by a primary role of vasopressin, but rather by a disorder in circadian rhythm of renal glomerular and/or tubular functions.

  3. Atypical Initial Presentation of Painful Muscle Cramps in a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kuzel, Aaron R; Lodhi, Muhammad Uzair; Syed, Intekhab Askari; Rahim, Mustafa

    2017-11-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progressive muscle weakness that can occur proximally or distally in either the upper or lower extremities. It includes both upper motor neuron signs (spasticity, hyperreflexia, clonus, and Babinski sign) and lower motor neuron signs (atrophy, weakness, and muscle fasciculation). Initial presentation of progressively painful muscle cramps should lead the physician to screen for other signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We report the case of a 51-year-old male, who presented with dull muscle cramps in the right upper shoulder and arm. After a careful history and physical exam, it was found that patient had both upper and lower motor neuron signs; therefore, a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was made. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis should strongly be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an atypical initial presentation of progressively painful muscle cramps.

  4. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Margaret I; Kamilar, Jason M; Kirk, E Christopher

    2012-12-22

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent study has argued that new statistical methods allow eye shape to accurately predict activity patterns of mammals, including cathemeral species (animals that are equally likely to be awake and active at any time of day or night). Here, we conduct a detailed analysis of eye shape and activity pattern in mammals, using a broad comparative sample of 266 species. We find that the eye shapes of cathemeral mammals completely overlap with nocturnal and diurnal species. Additionally, most diurnal and cathemeral mammals have eye shapes that are most similar to those of nocturnal birds and lizards. The only mammalian clade that diverges from this pattern is anthropoids, which have convergently evolved eye shapes similar to those of diurnal birds and lizards. Our results provide additional evidence for a nocturnal 'bottleneck' in the early evolution of crown mammals.

  5. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Margaret I.; Kamilar, Jason M.; Kirk, E. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Most vertebrate groups exhibit eye shapes that vary predictably with activity pattern. Nocturnal vertebrates typically have large corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual sensitivity. Conversely, diurnal vertebrates generally demonstrate smaller corneas relative to eye size as an adaptation for increased visual acuity. By contrast, several studies have concluded that many mammals exhibit typical nocturnal eye shapes, regardless of activity pattern. However, a recent study has argued that new statistical methods allow eye shape to accurately predict activity patterns of mammals, including cathemeral species (animals that are equally likely to be awake and active at any time of day or night). Here, we conduct a detailed analysis of eye shape and activity pattern in mammals, using a broad comparative sample of 266 species. We find that the eye shapes of cathemeral mammals completely overlap with nocturnal and diurnal species. Additionally, most diurnal and cathemeral mammals have eye shapes that are most similar to those of nocturnal birds and lizards. The only mammalian clade that diverges from this pattern is anthropoids, which have convergently evolved eye shapes similar to those of diurnal birds and lizards. Our results provide additional evidence for a nocturnal ‘bottleneck’ in the early evolution of crown mammals. PMID:23097513

  6. [Nocturnal enuresis in children].

    PubMed

    Hjälmås, K

    1998-01-01

    After allergic disorders, nocturnal enuresis is the most common chronic childhood condition. Recent research has yielded abundant new knowledge about the condition, especially about its aetiology and pathophysiology, and the psychological consequences. A hereditary background has been substantiated by the identification in genetic linkage studies of areas in chromosomes 12 and 13 that are manifestly associated with bedwetting, though genotype expression in the phenotype appears to be complex and heterogeneous. Pathophysiologically, findings in current intensive research suggest three interactive factors to be involved: (i) relative nocturnal polyuria, due to insufficient antidiuretic hormone release during sleep in pre-teenagers, and due to renal tubular dysfunction in adolescents and adults; (ii) reduced nocturnal bladder capacity, especially in the 33 per cent of cases which do not respond to desmopressin treatment; and (iii) the patient's inability to waken in response to signals from a full bladder. Recent findings have also confirmed previous reports that with very few exceptions bedwetting is not caused by psychological factors. On the contrary, the condition causes psychological problems manifested in reduced self-esteem, shame and guilt, though self-esteem is restored by successful treatment. Active treatment should be started as soon as the child is ready to receive it, the main options being an enuresis alarm, desmopressin, or a combination of the two. If reduced bladder capacity is suspected, treatment with a detrusor relaxant should be included.

  7. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in your arms or legs Pain going down the leg Foot problems Doctors diagnose spinal stenosis with a physical exam and imaging tests. Treatments include medications, physical therapy, braces, and surgery. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis ...

  8. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  9. Report on the nocturnal raptor monitoring workshop

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey L. Holroyd; Lisa Takats

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss the development of a strategy to determine the status and assess trends of nocturnal raptor species (i.e., nocturnal owls) in Canada and the USA. A strategy for diurnal raptor species was initiated at a workshop in Boise, Idaho in August 1996. The results of these workshops will form the basis for developing the North American...

  10. Effects of moderate and heavy endurance exercise on nocturnal HRV.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, E; Vesterinen, V; Rusko, H; Nummela, A

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the effects of endurance exercise on nocturnal autonomic modulation. Nocturnal R-R intervals were collected after a rest day, after a moderate endurance exercise and after a marathon run in ten healthy, physically active men. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed as a continuous four-hour period starting 30 min after going to bed for sleep. In relation to average nocturnal heart rate after rest day, increases to 109+/-6% and 130+/-11% of baseline were found after moderate endurance exercise and marathon, respectively. Standard deviation of R-R intervals decreased to 90+/-9% and 64+/-10%, root-mean-square of differences between adjacent R-R intervals to 87+/-10% and 55+/-16%, and high frequency power to 77+/-19% and 34+/-19% of baseline after moderate endurance exercise and marathon, respectively. Also nocturnal low frequency power decreased to 56+/-26% of baseline after the marathon. Changes in nocturnal heart rate and HRV suggest prolonged dose-response effects on autonomic modulation after exercises, which may give useful information on the extent of exercise-induced nocturnal autonomic modulation and disturbance to the homeostasis.

  11. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... CT scan makes detailed pictures of the body very quickly. The test may help look for: An abscess ...

  12. Leg kinematics and kinetics in landing from a single-leg hop for distance. A comparison between dominant and non-dominant leg.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, J J; Gokeler, A; Hof, A L

    2007-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency can be a major problem for athletes and subsequent reconstruction of the ACL may be indicated if a conservative regimen has failed. After ACL reconstruction signs of abnormality in the use of the leg remain for a long time. It is expected that the landing after a single-leg hop for distance (horizontal hop) might give insight in the differences in kinematics and kinetics between uninjured legs and ACL-reconstructed legs. Before the ACL-reconstructed leg can be compared with the contralateral leg, knowledge of differences between legs of uninjured subjects is needed. Kinematic and kinetic variables of both legs were measured with an optoelectronic system and a force plate and calculated by inverse dynamics. The dominant leg (the leg with biggest horizontal hop distance) and the contralateral leg of nine uninjured subjects were compared. No significant differences were found in most of the kinematic and kinetic variables between dominant leg and contralateral leg of uninjured subjects. Only hop distance and hip extension angles differed significantly. This study suggests that there are no important differences between dominant leg and contralateral leg in healthy subjects. As a consequence, the uninvolved leg of ACL-reconstructed patients can be used as a reference. The observed variables of this study can be used as a reference of normal values and normal differences between legs in healthy subjects.

  13. Narcolepsy with Cataplexy Associated with Nocturnal Compulsive Behaviors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Palaia, Vincenzo; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Antelmi, Elena; Franceschini, Christian; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Provini, Frederica; Pagotto, Uberto; Montagna, Pasquale; Schenck, Carlos H.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the prevalence of sleep related-eating disorder (SRED) and nocturnal smoking (NS) in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC). Design: Case-control study. Setting: University hospital. Patients or Participants: 65 consecutive adult NC patients (33 men; mean age 43.9 ± 19.2 years) and 65 age-, sex-, and geographical origin-matched controls. Interventions: Validated questionnaires were used to investigate SRED, NS, restless legs syndrome (RLS), and psychopathological traits (using Eating Disorder Inventory-2 [EDI-2]; Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory [MOCI]; and Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]). Measurements and Results: NC patients showed a higher prevalence of SRED (32% vs 3%, P = 0.00001), NS (21% vs 0%, P = 0.00006), and RLS (18% vs 5%, P = 0.013) than controls. Moreover, NC patients presented more frequently with an eating-related pathological profile on the EDI-2 (80% vs 46%, P = 0.00006) and had a higher prevalence of depressed mood on the BDI (41% vs 18%, P = 0.004). In comparison to patients without SRED, NC patients with SRED were more frequently women (71% vs 39%, P = 0.013), had higher “bulimic” (29% vs 2%, P = 0.004) and “social insecurity” (48% vs 18%, P = 0.013) traits on the EDI-2, had higher obsessive-compulsiveness on the MOCI (29% vs 4%, P = 0.009), and were more depressed on the BDI (67% vs 29%, P = 0.005). NC patients with NS showed more frequent pathological profiles on the EDI-2 (100% vs 75%, P = 0.035), including the “bulimic” (29% vs 6%, P = 0.015), “perfectionism” (43% vs 14%, P = 0.016), and “social insecurity” (50% vs 22, P = 0.035) profiles. Conclusion: Our study shows a strong association of the compulsive nocturnal behaviors SRED and NS with adult NC. Citation: Palaia V; Poli F; Pizza F; Antelmi E; Franceschini C; Moghadam KK; Provini F; Pagotto U; Montagna P; Schenck CH; Mignot E; Plazzi G. Narcolepsy with cataplexy associated with nocturnal compulsive behaviors: a case

  14. Nocturnal cough in children with stable cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Lianne; Loeve, Martine; de Jongste, Johan; Hop, Wim; Tiddens, Harm

    2009-09-01

    To date no studies have been published on nocturnal cough frequency in children with stable CF. Aim of the study was to assess nocturnal cough frequency in children with CF. In addition nocturnal cough frequency was correlated with parameters of disease severity. During two nights cough was recorded with a digital audio recorder in 25 patients (mean age 13 years; range 6-19) with clinically stable CF. In addition oxygen saturation was measured. The day following the recording spirometry was carried out. CT scores were obtained from the most recent routine CT scan. Cough was expressed in cough seconds (csec) and in cough seconds per hour (csec/hr). Data shown are median values and interquartile range (IQR). First night: 8 csec (IQR 3-52); 0.9 csec/hr (IQR 0.3-6.1) Second night: 6 csec (IQR 2-32); 0.6 csec/hr (IQR 0.1-3.4). Csec in the 1st night did not correlate significantly with csec in the 2nd night. Only for the 2nd night a strong correlation was found between csec/hr and the FEV1%pred (r(s) = -0.75, P < 0.001) and FEF(75) %pred (r(s) = -0.71, P < 0.001). Bronchiectasis score correlated borderline with the mean csec/hr of both nights (r(s) = 0.39, P = 0.08). During both nights cough was significantly higher in the first hour of sleep (P < or = 0.04). Frequency of nocturnal coughing in children with CF was higher than that described for normal children. Nocturnal cough tended to be more severe in children with more advanced CF lung disease. Nocturnal cough was more severe in the first hour of sleep and varied from night-to-night. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Wide-field motion tuning in nocturnal hawkmoths

    PubMed Central

    Theobald, Jamie C.; Warrant, Eric J.; O'Carroll, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Nocturnal hawkmoths are known for impressive visually guided behaviours in dim light, such as hovering while feeding from nectar-bearing flowers. This requires tight visual feedback to estimate and counter relative motion. Discrimination of low velocities, as required for stable hovering flight, is fundamentally limited by spatial resolution, yet in the evolution of eyes for nocturnal vision, maintenance of high spatial acuity compromises absolute sensitivity. To investigate these trade-offs, we compared responses of wide-field motion-sensitive neurons in three species of hawkmoth: Manduca sexta (a crepuscular hoverer), Deilephila elpenor (a fully nocturnal hoverer) and Acherontia atropos (a fully nocturnal hawkmoth that does not hover as it feeds uniquely from honey in bees' nests). We show that despite smaller eyes, the motion pathway of D. elpenor is tuned to higher spatial frequencies and lower temporal frequencies than A. atropos, consistent with D. elpenor's need to detect low velocities for hovering. Acherontia atropos, however, presumably evolved low-light sensitivity without sacrificing temporal acuity. Manduca sexta, active at higher light levels, is tuned to the highest spatial frequencies of the three and temporal frequencies comparable with A. atropos. This yields similar tuning to low velocities as in D. elpenor, but with the advantage of shorter neural delays in processing motion. PMID:19906663

  16. Experimental-clinical study on the effects of hydromassage with Thermae Oasis's salsobromoiodine water in chronic venous stasis disease of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, E; De Luca, S; Sommaruga, S; Grassellino, V; Nappi, G

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of thermal therapy, in particular hydromassage therapy with the ''Ca' Rossa'' salsobromoiodic water of the Thermae Oasis (Ferrara, Italy), in patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) of the inferior limbs. Fourty-four patients with primary varices of the legs were enrolled. The anamnestic symptomatologic indicators of disease were: pain, perception of heaviness or paresthesias, nocturnal cramps, ''restless leg'' syndrome, pruritus. The symptoms were evaluated for both intensity and frequency. An additional clinical indicator was the centimetric measurement of the leg diameters at 3 levels: supramalleolar, mid-calf and mid-thigh. The patients were subdivided in two groups: patients submitted to a cycle of hydromassage with salsobromoiodic water and patients treated with compressive elastic stocking (12 mmHg). At the end of the treatment cycle, symptomatologic and clinical data were reassessed, in addition to morphological and velocimetric parameters related to the function of the peripheral vascular system. The results showed in Group A (thermal water hydromassage) an improved reduction of subjective and objective symptoms as compared to the control Group B, demonstrating a superior efficacy of thermal therapy. The efficacy of hydromassage therapy is due not only to the favourable action of hydrostatic pressure upon venous flow of the inferior limbs, but also to the peculiar chemical and physical characteristics of the thermal water utilized in this study. The elevated osmotic power of hydromassage is responsible for the significant intrinsic antiedematous properties.

  17. Nocturnal vision and landmark orientation in a tropical halictid bee.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J; Kelber, Almut; Gislén, Anna; Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi; Wcislo, William T

    2004-08-10

    Some bees and wasps have evolved nocturnal behavior, presumably to exploit night-flowering plants or avoid predators. Like their day-active relatives, they have apposition compound eyes, a design usually found in diurnal insects. The insensitive optics of apposition eyes are not well suited for nocturnal vision. How well then do nocturnal bees and wasps see? What optical and neural adaptations have they evolved for nocturnal vision? We studied female tropical nocturnal sweat bees (Megalopta genalis) and discovered that they are able to learn landmarks around their nest entrance prior to nocturnal foraging trips and to use them to locate the nest upon return. The morphology and optics of the eye, and the physiological properties of the photoreceptors, have evolved to give Megalopta's eyes almost 30 times greater sensitivity to light than the eyes of diurnal worker honeybees, but this alone does not explain their nocturnal visual behavior. This implies that sensitivity is improved by a strategy of photon summation in time and in space, the latter of which requires the presence of specialized cells that laterally connect ommatidia into groups. First-order interneurons, with significantly wider lateral branching than those found in diurnal bees, have been identified in the first optic ganglion (the lamina ganglionaris) of Megalopta's optic lobe. We believe that these cells have the potential to mediate spatial summation. Despite the scarcity of photons, Megalopta is able to visually orient to landmarks at night in a dark forest understory, an ability permitted by unusually sensitive apposition eyes and neural photon summation.

  18. Nocturnal Hypoglycemia: Answering the Challenge With Long-acting Insulin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Nocturnal hypoglycemia may be the most common type of hypoglycemia in individuals with diabetes using insulin and is particularly worrisome because it often goes undetected and may lead to unconsciousness and even death in severe cases. Objectives The prevalence, causes, and consequences of nocturnal hypoglycemia as well as detection and prevention strategies are reviewed, including the use of long-acting insulin analogs, which offer more physiologic and predictable time-action profiles than traditional human basal insulin. Data Sources A total of 307 publications (151 PubMed; 104 Adis; 52 BIOSIS) were reviewed. Review Methods Relevant trials were found by searching for “(detemir OR glargine) AND nocturnal AND (hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes.” To capture trials that may not have specified “nocturnal” in the title or abstract text but still reported nocturnal hypoglycemia data, a supplemental search of PubMed using “(detemir OR glargine) AND (nocturnal OR hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes” was undertaken. Results A review of these trials found that patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia when receiving long-acting insulin analogs (insulin detemir or insulin glargine), provided that glycemic control is comparable to that provided by traditional human basal insulin. Long-acting insulin analogs may be the best option to provide basal insulin coverage in patients who do not choose or require continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Conclusions Randomized clinical trials suggest that the long-acting insulin analogs are associated with a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia than neutral protamine Hagedorn without sacrificing glycemic control. PMID:17955093

  19. Interventions for varicose veins and leg oedema in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rebecca M D; Aflaifel, Nasreen; Bamigboye, Anthony A

    2015-10-19

    Pregnancy is presumed to be a major contributory factor in the increased incidence of varicose veins in women, which can in turn lead to venous insufficiency and leg oedema. The most common symptom of varicose veins and oedema is the substantial pain experienced, as well as night cramps, numbness, tingling, the legs may feel heavy, achy, and possibly be unsightly. Treatments for varicose veins are usually divided into three main groups: surgery, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. Treatments of leg oedema comprise mostly symptom reduction rather than cure and use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. To assess any form of intervention used to relieve the symptoms associated with varicose veins and leg oedema in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials of treatments for varicose veins or leg oedema, or both, in pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We included seven trials (involving 326 women). The trials were largely unclear for selection bias and high risk for performance and detection bias.Two studies were placebo-controlled trials. The first one compared a phlebotonic (rutoside) with placebo for the reduction in symptoms of varicose veins; the second study evaluated the efficacy of troxerutin in comparison to placebo among 30 pregnant women in their second trimester with symptomatic vulvar varicosities and venous insufficiency in their lower extremities. Data from this study were not in useable format, so were not included in the analysis. Two trials compared either compression stockings with resting in left lateral position or reflexology with rest for 15 minutes for the reduction of leg oedema. One trial compared standing water immersion for 20 minutes with sitting upright in a chair with legs elevated for 20

  20. Temporal Relationships Between Napping and Nocturnal Sleep in Healthy Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Karen P; Hall, Martica H; Lee, Laisze; Matthews, Karen A

    2017-01-01

    Many adolescents do not achieve the recommended 9 hr of sleep per night and report daytime napping, perhaps because it makes up for short nocturnal sleep. This article tests temporal relationships between daytime naps and nighttime sleep as measured by actigraphy and diary among 236 healthy high school students during one school week. Mixed model analyses adjusted for age, race, and gender demonstrated that shorter actigraphy-assessed nocturnal sleep duration predicted longer napping (measured by actigraphy and diary) the next day. Napping (by actigraphy and diary) predicted shorter nocturnal sleep duration and worse sleep efficiency that night measured by actigraphy. Diary-reported napping also predicted poorer self-reported sleep quality that night. Frequent napping may interfere with nocturnal sleep during adolescence.

  1. Vision and visual navigation in nocturnal insects.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2011-01-01

    With their highly sensitive visual systems, nocturnal insects have evolved a remarkable capacity to discriminate colors, orient themselves using faint celestial cues, fly unimpeded through a complicated habitat, and navigate to and from a nest using learned visual landmarks. Even though the compound eyes of nocturnal insects are significantly more sensitive to light than those of their closely related diurnal relatives, their photoreceptors absorb photons at very low rates in dim light, even during demanding nocturnal visual tasks. To explain this apparent paradox, it is hypothesized that the necessary bridge between retinal signaling and visual behavior is a neural strategy of spatial and temporal summation at a higher level in the visual system. Exactly where in the visual system this summation takes place, and the nature of the neural circuitry that is involved, is currently unknown but provides a promising avenue for future research.

  2. Nocturnal enuresis in children in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Michel N; Ekila, Mathilde B; Ekulu, Pépé M; Aloni, Muriel L; Magoga, Kumbundu

    2012-10-01

      To determine the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in children of Kinshasa in Democratic Republic of Congo.   In all, 506 questionnaires were sent to parents of children aged 6-12 years randomly selected from four primary schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. The questionnaire was designed to collect information about prevalence and factors associated with nocturnal enuresis.   A total of 415 (82.0%) were correctly completed. In this series, 109 children were identified as nocturnal enuresis in which 50 boys and 56 girls (p > 0.05). Factors associated with nocturnal enuresis were deep sleep, young age and familial history of enuresis (p < 0.05). Only 11% of patients have been consulted by doctors. Twelve children (11.0%) were treated by healers traditional. In the other part, 43 children (39.4%) were frequently punished by their parents. The common self-help strategies were 79 children (72.5%) were submitted to fluid restrictions before going to sleep and 68 (62.4%) were waking the child at night to void.   In Kinshasa, the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis was high to those reported in Asian and Western countries. Nocturnal enuresis remains an important clinical problem in children but only a small percentage of parents seek medical help. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  3. Low-level nocturnal wind maximum over the Central Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greco, Steven; Ulanski, Stanley; Garstang, Michael; Houston, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    A low-level nocturnal wind maximum is shown to exist over extensive and nearly undisturbed rainforest near the central Amazon city of Manaus. Meteorological data indicate the presence of this nocturnal wind maximum during both the wet and dry seasons of the Central Amazon Basin. Daytime wind speeds which are characteristically 3-7 m/s between 300 and 1000 m increase to 10-15 m/s shortly after sunset. The wind-speed maximum is reached in the early evening, with wind speeds remaining high until several hours after sunrise. The nocturnal wind maximum is closely linked to a strong low-level inversion formed by radiational cooling of the rainforest canopy. Surface and low-level pressure gradients between the undisturbed forest and the large Amazon river system and the city of Manaus are shown to be responsible for much of the nocturnal wind increase. The pressure gradients are interpreted as a function of the thermal differences between undisturbed forest and the river/city. The importance of both the frictional decoupling and the horizontal pressure gradient suggest that the nocturnal wind maximum does not occur uniformly over all Amazonia. Low-level winds are thought to be pervasive under clear skies and strong surface cooling and that, in many places (i.e., near rivers), local pressure gradients enhance the low-level nocturnal winds.

  4. Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel N.; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ± 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

  5. Survival with Three-Times Weekly In-Center Nocturnal Versus Conventional Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianglin; Suri, Rita S.; Nesrallah, Gihad; Lindsay, Robert; Garg, Amit X.; Lester, Keith; Ofsthun, Norma; Lazarus, Michael; Hakim, Raymond M.

    2012-01-01

    Whether the duration of hemodialysis treatments improves outcomes remains controversial. Here, we evaluated survival and clinical changes associated with converting from conventional hemodialysis (mean=3.75 h/treatment) to in-center nocturnal hemodialysis (mean=7.85 h/treatment). All 959 consecutive patients who initiated nocturnal hemodialysis for the first time in 77 Fresenius Medical Care facilities during 2006 and 2007 were eligible. We used Cox models to compare risk for mortality during 2 years of follow-up in a 1:3 propensity score–matched cohort of 746 nocturnal and 2062 control patients on conventional hemodialysis. Two-year mortality was 19% among nocturnal hemodialysis patients compared with 27% among conventional patients. Nocturnal hemodialysis associated with a 25% reduction in the risk for death after adjustment for age, body mass index, and dialysis vintage (hazard ratio=0.75, 95% confidence interval=0.61–0.91, P=0.004). With respect to clinical features, interdialytic weight gain, albumin, hemoglobin, dialysis dose, and calcium increased on nocturnal therapy, whereas postdialysis weight, predialysis systolic blood pressure, ultrafiltration rate, phosphorus, and white blood cell count declined (all P<0.001). In summary, notwithstanding the possibility of residual selection bias, conversion to treatment with nocturnal hemodialysis associates with favorable clinical features, laboratory biomarkers, and improved survival compared with propensity score–matched controls. The potential impact of extended treatment time on clinical outcomes while maintaining a three times per week hemodialysis schedule requires evaluation in future clinical trials. PMID:22362905

  6. Desmopressin (melt) therapy in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and nocturnal polyuria results in improved neuropsychological functioning and sleep.

    PubMed

    Van Herzeele, Charlotte; Dhondt, Karlien; Roels, Sanne P; Raes, Ann; Hoebeke, Piet; Groen, Luitzen-Albert; Vande Walle, Johan

    2016-09-01

    There is a high comorbidity between nocturnal enuresis, sleep disorders and psychological problems. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a decrease in nocturnal diuresis volume not only improves enuresis but also ameliorates disrupted sleep and (neuro)psychological dysfunction, the major comorbidities of this disorder. In this open-label, prospective phase IV study, 30 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) underwent standardized video-polysomnographic testing and multi-informant (neuro)psychological testing at baseline and 6 months after the start of desmopressin treatment in the University Hospital Ghent, Belgium. Primary endpoints were the effect on sleep and (neuro)psychological functioning. The secondary endpoint was the change in the first undisturbed sleep period or the time to the first void. Thirty children aged between 6 and 16 (mean 10.43, standard deviation 3.08) years completed the study. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and a prolonged first undisturbed sleep period. Additionally, (neuro)psychological functioning was improved on several domains. The study demonstrates that the degree of comorbidity symptoms is at least aggravated by enuresis (and/or high nocturnal diuresis rate) since sleep and (neuro)psychological functioning were significantly ameliorated by treatment of enuresis. These results indicate that enuresis is not such a benign condition as has previously been assumed.

  7. Task driven optimal leg trajectories in insect-scale legged microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Neel; Goldberg, Benjamin; Jayaram, Kaushik; Wood, Robert

    Origami inspired layered manufacturing techniques and 3D-printing have enabled the development of highly articulated legged robots at the insect-scale, including the 1.43g Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR). Research on these platforms has expanded its focus from manufacturing aspects to include design optimization and control for application-driven tasks. Consequently, the choice of gait selection, body morphology, leg trajectory, foot design, etc. have become areas of active research. HAMR has two controlled degrees-of-freedom per leg, making it an ideal candidate for exploring leg trajectory. We will discuss our work towards optimizing HAMR's leg trajectories for two different tasks: climbing using electroadhesives and level ground running (5-10 BL/s). These tasks demonstrate the ability of single platform to adapt to vastly different locomotive scenarios: quasi-static climbing with controlled ground contact, and dynamic running with un-controlled ground contact. We will utilize trajectory optimization methods informed by existing models and experimental studies to determine leg trajectories for each task. We also plan to discuss how task specifications and choice of objective function have contributed to the shape of these optimal leg trajectories.

  8. [Nocturnal polyuria, treatment with desmopressin].

    PubMed

    Zachoval, R; Krhut, J; Šottner, O; Hanuš, T; Martan, A; Horčička, L; Feyereisl, J; Halaška, M; Švabík, K; Krofta, L

    2013-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic and especially pharmacologic treatment options are available for nocturnal polyuria. Desmopressin represents the basis of pharmacologic treatment. Desmopressin acetate is a synthetic analogue of arginine vasopressin with high affinity to V2 receptors with antidiuretic effect. It is the only medicament currently registered for antidiuretic treatment. Desmopressin has not any relevant affinity to V1 receptors, and therefore there is no hypertensive effect in contrary to natural vasopressin. Desmopressin use before a bedtime leads to reduced production of urine during a sleep, therefore time between desires to void is prolonged and number of nocturia is reduced. Clinical effect, in a meaning of reduced urine production and increased osmolality of urine, lasts approximately 8-12 hours. In the treatment of nocturnal polyuria desmopressin is used orally one hour before a bedtime. It is essential to titrate an ideal dose, the initial dose is 60 µg of MELT formula (fast melting oral formulation) and it can be increased according to the clinical effect up to the maximal recommended daily dose 240 µg. Patients treated with desmopressin should cut down a fluid intake 1 hour before and 8 hours after the use of desmopressin. Total number of adverse events connected withdesmopressin treatment in clinical studies was higher compared to placebo but the side effects were mostly mild. The most common adverse events were headaches, nausea, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, dry mouth and hyponatremia both in the short-term and long-term clinical trials. Hyponatremia was observed mainly in patients over 65 year of age. Therefore treatment with desmopressin should not be commended in patients over 65 year of age without close monitoring of the natrium level in serum and all patients should be informed about the first symptoms of hyponatremia - headache, nausea and insomnia. According to Evidence Based Medicine, the level of evidence for treatment of nocturnal polyuria with

  9. Visual reliability and information rate in the retina of a nocturnal bee.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2008-03-11

    Nocturnal animals relying on vision typically have eyes that are optically and morphologically adapted for both increased sensitivity and greater information capacity in dim light. Here, we investigate whether adaptations for increased sensitivity also are found in their photoreceptors by using closely related and fast-flying nocturnal and diurnal bees as model animals. The nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis is capable of foraging and homing by using visually discriminated landmarks at starlight intensities. Megalopta's near relative, Lasioglossum leucozonium, performs these tasks only in bright sunshine. By recording intracellular responses to Gaussian white-noise stimuli, we show that photoreceptors in Megalopta actually code less information at most light levels than those in Lasioglossum. However, as in several other nocturnal arthropods, Megalopta's photoreceptors possess a much greater gain of transduction, indicating that nocturnal photoreceptors trade information capacity for sensitivity. By sacrificing photoreceptor signal-to-noise ratio and information capacity in dim light for an increased gain and, thus, an increased sensitivity, this strategy can benefit nocturnal insects that use neural summation to improve visual reliability at night.

  10. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes--consequences and assessment.

    PubMed

    DeVries, J Hans; Wentholt, Iris M E; Masurel, Nathalie; Mantel, Itske; Poscia, Alessandro; Maran, Alberto; Heine, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia is inevitable when striving for low HbA1c values. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia often occurs without symptoms, but results in diminished next day well-being and hypoglycaemia unawareness. Frequency of nocturnal hypoglycaemia was first assessed in research ward settings, but suffered from insufficient glucose sampling frequency. This may have resulted in overestimation of the duration of hypoglycaemic episodes. The advent of the first continuous glucose sensor, the needle-type MedtronicMiniMed Continuous Glucose Measurement System, revolutionized the assessment of glucose values. However, on scrutiny, the first version of this sensor showed a drift into the hypoglycaemic area and delayed recovery from hypoglycaemia. Using the microdialysis-based GlucoDay system, our group reported a lower frequency of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients using an insulin pump, than that expected from the existing literature. Today, more than 80 years after the introduction of insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, the associated frequency of nocturnal hypoglycaemia still awaits its definitive assessment. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Lindsay Leg Club: supporting the NHS to provide leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Morag

    2013-06-01

    Public health services will need to cope with additional demands due to an ageing society and the increasing prevalence of chronic conditions. Lower-limb ulceration is a long-term, life-changing condition and leg ulcer management can be challenging for nursing staff. The Lindsay Leg Club model is a unique partnership between community nurses, members and the local community, which provides quality of care and empowerment for patients with leg ulcers, while also supporting and educating nursing staff. The Leg Club model works in accord with core themes of Government and NHS policy. Patient feedback on the Leg Club model is positive and the Leg Clubs provide a service to members which is well accepted by patients, yet is more economically efficient than the traditional district nursing practice of home visits. Lindsay Leg Clubs provide a valuable support service to the NHS in delivering improved quality of care while improving efficiency.

  12. Nocturnal colonization behavior of blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    George, Kelly A; Archer, Melanie S; Toop, Tes

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide research into nocturnal colonization by blowflies has produced many contradictory findings, prompting investigation specific to southeastern Australia. Initial experiments showed that blowfly colonization begins shortly after sunrise and continues until sunset; nocturnal colonization never occurred. Colonization peaks occurred at mid-morning, midday, and in the hours preceding sunset. In an additional experiment, wild blowflies were captured and placed in cages with colonization medium supplied nocturnally. Colonization occurred on four of five nights, and Calliphora augur (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) was the main species colonizing baits nocturnally. Results suggest that colonization is most likely to occur during warm weather and when flies are able to walk or crawl to bait. In particular, blowflies trapped within a confined space (such as a room or car) with warmer-than-ambient temperature may be stimulated to colonize nearby remains. Entomologists should consider these findings when estimating minimum postmortem interval under these environmental conditions. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Nocturnal motor activity in fibromyalgia patients with poor sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Hyyppä, M T; Kronholm, E

    1995-01-01

    Nocturnal motor activity was examined in long-term rehabilitation patients complaining of poor sleep and having fibromyalgia syndrome (N = 24) or other musculoskeletal disorders (N = 60) and compared with that in 91 healthy controls drawn from a random community sample. Self-reports on sleep complaints and habits were collected. The frequency of nocturnal body movements, the "apnoea" index and ratio of "quiet sleep" to total time in bed were measured using the Static Charge Sensitive Bed (SCSB) (BioMatt). As a group, patients with fibromyalgia syndrome did not differ from patients with other musculoskeletal disorders or from healthy controls in their nocturnal motor activity. The "apnoea" index was a little higher in the fibromyalgia group than in the healthy control group but did not differ from that of the group of other musculoskeletal patients. Further multivariate analyses adjusted for age, BMI, medication and "apnoea" index did not support the assumption that an increased nocturnal motor activity characterizes patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

  14. Extended Duration Nocturnal Hemodialysis and Changes in Plasma Metabolite Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kalim, Sahir; Wald, Ron; Yan, Andrew T; Goldstein, Marc B; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Xu, Dihua; Berg, Anders H; Clish, Clary; Thadhani, Ravi; Rhee, Eugene P; Perl, Jeffrey

    2018-03-07

    In-center, extended duration nocturnal hemodialysis has been associated with variable clinical benefits, but the effect of extended duration hemodialysis on many established uremic solutes and other components of the metabolome is unknown. We determined the magnitude of change in metabolite profiles for patients on extended duration nocturnal hemodialysis. In a 52-week prospective, observational study, we followed 33 patients receiving conventional thrice weekly hemodialysis who converted to nocturnal hemodialysis (7-8 hours per session, three times per week). A separate group of 20 patients who remained on conventional hemodialysis (3-4 hours per session, three times per week) served as a control group. For both groups, we applied liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling on stored plasma samples collected from all participants at baseline and after 1 year. We examined longitudinal changes in 164 metabolites among those who remained on conventional hemodialysis and those who converted to nocturnal hemodialysis using Wilcoxon rank sum tests adjusted for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate <0.05). On average, the nocturnal group had 9.6 hours more dialysis per week than the conventional group. Among 164 metabolites, none changed significantly from baseline to study end in the conventional group. Twenty-nine metabolites changed in the nocturnal group, 21 of which increased from baseline to study end (including all branched-chain amino acids). Eight metabolites decreased after conversion to nocturnal dialysis, including l-carnitine and acetylcarnitine. By contrast, several established uremic retention solutes, including p -cresol sulfate, indoxyl sulfate, and trimethylamine N -oxide, did not change with extended dialysis. Across a wide array of metabolites examined, extended duration hemodialysis was associated with modest changes in the plasma metabolome, with most differences relating to metabolite increases, despite increased

  15. Does the Age of Donor Kidneys Affect Nocturnal Polyuria in Patients With Successful Real Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Mitsui, T; Morita, K; Iwami, D; Kitta, T; Kanno, Y; Moriya, K; Takeda, M; Shinohara, N

    We investigated whether the age of donor kidneys influences the incidence of nocturnal polyuria in patients with successful renal transplantation (RTX). Eighty-five patients (45 men and 40 women) undergoing RTX (median age, 47 years) were included in this study. Twenty-four-hour bladder diaries were kept for 3 days, and nocturnal polyuria was defined as a nocturnal polyuria index (nocturnal urine volume/24-hour urine volume) of >0.33. Risk factors for nocturnal polyuria were analyzed in patients with RTX by means of the Mann-Whitney U test, χ 2 test, and a logistic regression analysis. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) developed from diabetes mellitus in 16 patients (19%). Sixty-five patients (76%) received pre-transplant dialysis, with a median duration of 5 years. The median serum creatinine level and body mass index at the most recent visit were 1.2 mg/dL and 21.2 kg/m 2 , respectively. On the basis of the 24-hour bladder diaries, nocturnal polyuria was identified in 48 patients (56%). A logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus as the original disease for ESRD was the only risk factor for nocturnal polyuria (odds ratio, 8.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.01-65.3; P = .0028). The age of donor kidneys at examination did not affect the incidence of nocturnal polyuria (P = .9402). Nocturnal polyuria was not uncommon in patients with successful RTX. Diabetes mellitus as the original disease for ESRD was the only risk factor for nocturnal polyuria, whereas the age of donor kidneys at examination did not affect the incidence of nocturnal polyuria. Thus, nocturnal polyuria is caused by recipient factors but not donor factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of muscle activity immediately after botulinum toxin injection for writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Karp, B I; Goldstein, S R; Bara-Jimenez, W; Yaseen, Z; Hallett, M

    1999-03-01

    Animal and human studies have shown that nerve stimulation enhances some effects of botulinum toxin (btx A) injection. Voluntary muscle activity might work similarly and would focus the effect of an injection into the active muscles. We studied the effects of exercise immediately after btx A injection in eight patients with writer's cramp with established response to btx A over two injection cycles with a single-blinded, randomized, crossover design. Immediately after the first study injection, they were randomly assigned to write continuously for 30 min or have their hand and forearm immobilized for 30 min. Following the second injection, they were assigned the alternate condition. Patients were assessed just before each injection, and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months post-injection. Assessment included objective strength testing, self-reported rating of benefit and weakness, and blinded evaluation of videotapes and writing samples of the patients writing a standard passage. Strength testing showed that the maximum weakness occurred at 2 weeks post-injection, but the benefit was maximum at 6 weeks post-injection. The "write" condition resulted in greater reduction in strength than the "rest" condition. Btx A treatment led to improvement in self-reported ratings, writer's cramp rating scale scores by blinded raters, and reduction in writing time, but the differences between the "write" and "rest" conditions were not significant. We conclude that voluntary muscle activity immediately after btx A injection leads to greater reduction in muscle strength. Our findings raise the possibility that voluntary muscle activation may allow reduction of btx A doses and favorably alter the balance of benefit and side effects of btx A injections.

  17. Wild Chimpanzees on the Edge: Nocturnal Activities in Croplands

    PubMed Central

    Krief, Sabrina; Cibot, Marie; Bortolamiol, Sarah; Seguya, Andrew; Krief, Jean-Michel; Masi, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    In a rapidly changing landscape highly impacted by anthropogenic activities, the great apes are facing new challenges to coexist with humans. For chimpanzee communities inhabiting encroached territories, not bordered by rival conspecifics but by human agricultural fields, such boundaries are risky areas. To investigate the hypothesis that they use specific strategies for incursions out of the forest into maize fields to prevent the risk of detection by humans guarding their field, we carried out video recordings of chimpanzees at the edge of the forest bordered by a maize plantation in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Contrary to our expectations, large parties are engaged in crop-raids, including vulnerable individuals such as females with clinging infants. More surprisingly chimpanzees were crop-raiding during the night. They also stayed longer in the maize field and presented few signs of vigilance and anxiety during these nocturnal crop-raids. While nocturnal activities of chimpanzees have been reported during full moon periods, this is the first record of frequent and repeated nocturnal activities after twilight, in darkness. Habitat destruction may have promoted behavioural adjustments such as nocturnal exploitation of open croplands. PMID:25338066

  18. Comparing the effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping on declarative memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Lo, June C; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal sleep and daytime napping facilitate memory consolidation for semantically related and unrelated word pairs. We contrasted forgetting of both kinds of materials across a 12-hour interval involving either nocturnal sleep or daytime wakefulness (experiment 1) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen's d=0.71 and 0.68) than for related ones (Cohen's d=0.58 and 0.15). While the size of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping effects was similar for unrelated word pairs, for related pairs, the effect of nocturnal sleep was more prominent. Together, these findings suggest that sleep preferentially facilitates offline memory processing of materials that are more susceptible to forgetting.

  19. Most nocturnal asthma symptoms occur outside of exacerbations and associate with morbidity.

    PubMed

    Horner, Caroline C; Mauger, David; Strunk, Robert C; Graber, Nora J; Lemanske, Robert F; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Zeiger, Robert S; Taussig, Lynn M; Bacharier, Leonard B

    2011-11-01

    Although nocturnal awakenings help categorize asthma severity and control, their clinical significance has not been thoroughly studied. We sought to determine the clinical consequences of nocturnal asthma symptoms requiring albuterol (NASRAs) in children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma outside of periods when oral corticosteroids were used for worsening asthma symptoms. Two hundred eighty-five children aged 6 to 14 years with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma were randomized to receive one of 3 controller regimens and completed daily symptom diaries for 48 weeks. Diary responses were analyzed for the frequency and consequences of NASRAs. NASRAs occurred in 72.2% of participants at least once, and in 24.3% of participants, they occurred 13 or more times. The majority (81.3%) of nocturnal symptoms occurred outside of exacerbation periods and were associated the next day with the following events: albuterol use (56.9% of days preceded by nocturnal symptoms vs 18.1% of days not preceded by nocturnal symptoms; relative risk [RR], 2.3; 95% CI, 2.2-2.4), school absence (5.0% vs 0.3%; RR, 10.6; 95% CI, 7.8-14.4), and doctor contact (3.7% vs 0.2%; RR, 8.8; 95% CI, 6.1-12.5). Similar findings were noted during exacerbation periods (RRs of 1.7 for albuterol use, 5.5 for school absence, and 4.9 for doctor contacts). Nocturnal symptoms did not predict the onset of exacerbations. Nocturnal symptoms requiring albuterol in children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma receiving controller therapy occurred predominantly outside of exacerbation periods. Despite being poor predictors of exacerbations, they were associated with increases in albuterol use, school absences, and doctor contacts the day after nocturnal symptom occurrences. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ocellar optics in nocturnal and diurnal bees and wasps.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J; Kelber, Almut; Wallén, Rita; Wcislo, William T

    2006-12-01

    Nocturnal bees, wasps and ants have considerably larger ocelli than their diurnal relatives, suggesting an active role in vision at night. In a first step to understanding what this role might be, the morphology and physiological optics of ocelli were investigated in three tropical rainforest species - the nocturnal sweat bee Megalopta genalis, the nocturnal paper wasp Apoica pallens and the diurnal paper wasp Polistes occidentalis - using hanging-drop techniques and standard histological methods. Ocellar image quality, in addition to lens focal length and back focal distance, was determined in all three species. During flight, the ocellar receptive fields of both nocturnal species are centred very dorsally, possibly in order to maximise sensitivity to the narrow dorsal field of light that enters through gaps in the rainforest canopy. Since all ocelli investigated had a slightly oval shape, images were found to be astigmatic: images formed by the major axis of the ocellus were located further from the proximal surface of the lens than images formed by the minor axis. Despite being astigmatic, images formed at either focal plane were reasonably sharp in all ocelli investigated. When compared to the position of the retina below the lens, measurements of back focal distance reveal that the ocelli of Megalopta are highly underfocused and unable to resolve spatial detail. This together with their very large and tightly packed rhabdoms suggests a role in making sensitive measurements of ambient light intensity. In contrast, the ocelli of the two wasps form images near the proximal boundary of the retina, suggesting the potential for modest resolving power. In light of these results, possible roles for ocelli in nocturnal bees and wasps are discussed, including the hypothesis that they might be involved in nocturnal homing and navigation, using two main cues: the spatial pattern of bright patches of daylight visible through the rainforest canopy, and compass information

  1. Technical advances in flow cytometry-based diagnosis and monitoring of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Rodolfo Patussi; Bento, Laiz Cameirão; Bortolucci, Ana Carolina Apelle; Alexandre, Anderson Marega; Vaz, Andressa da Costa; Schimidell, Daniela; Pedro, Eduardo de Carvalho; Perin, Fabricio Simões; Nozawa, Sonia Tsukasa; Mendes, Cláudio Ernesto Albers; Barroso, Rodrigo de Souza; Bacal, Nydia Strachman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To discuss the implementation of technical advances in laboratory diagnosis and monitoring of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria for validation of high-sensitivity flow cytometry protocols. Methods: A retrospective study based on analysis of laboratory data from 745 patient samples submitted to flow cytometry for diagnosis and/or monitoring of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Results: Implementation of technical advances reduced test costs and improved flow cytometry resolution for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone detection. Conclusion: High-sensitivity flow cytometry allowed more sensitive determination of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone type and size, particularly in samples with small clones. PMID:27759825

  2. Comparing the Effects of Nocturnal Sleep and Daytime Napping on Declarative Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal sleep and daytime napping facilitate memory consolidation for semantically related and unrelated word pairs. We contrasted forgetting of both kinds of materials across a 12-hour interval involving either nocturnal sleep or daytime wakefulness (experiment 1) and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2). Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen’s d = 0.71 and 0.68) than for related ones (Cohen’s d = 0.58 and 0.15). While the size of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping effects was similar for unrelated word pairs, for related pairs, the effect of nocturnal sleep was more prominent. Together, these findings suggest that sleep preferentially facilitates offline memory processing of materials that are more susceptible to forgetting. PMID:25229457

  3. The Relationship among Leg Strength, Leg Power and Alpine Skiing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettman, Larry R.; Huckel, Jack R.

    The purpose of this study was to relate leg strength and power to alpine skiing success as measured by FIS points. Isometric leg strength was represented by the knee extension test described by Clarke. Leg power was measured by the vertical jump test and the Margaria-Kalamen stair run. Results in the strength and power tests were correlated with…

  4. Nocturnal Sleep Dynamics Identify Narcolepsy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Franceschini, Christian; Liguori, Rocco; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of nocturnal sleep dynamics in the differential diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: One hundred seventy-five patients with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, n = 79), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, n = 22), idiopathic hypersomnia (IH, n = 22), and “subjective” hypersomnolence (sHS, n = 52). Interventions: None. Methods: Polysomnographic (PSG) work-up included 48 h of continuous PSG recording. From nocturnal PSG conventional sleep macrostructure, occurrence of sleep onset rapid eye movement period (SOREMP), sleep stages distribution, and sleep stage transitions were calculated. Patient groups were compared, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to test the diagnostic utility of nocturnal PSG data to identify NT1. Results: Sleep macrostructure was substantially stable in the 2 nights of each diagnostic group. NT1 and NT2 patients had lower latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NT1 patients showed the highest number of awakenings, sleep stage transitions, and more time spent in N1 sleep, as well as most SOREMPs at daytime PSG and at multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) than all other groups. ROC curve analysis showed that nocturnal SOREMP (area under the curve of 0.724 ± 0.041, P < 0.0001), percent of total sleep time spent in N1 (0.896 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), and the wakefulness-sleep transition index (0.796 ± 0.034, P < 0.0001) had a good sensitivity and specificity profile to identify NT1 sleep, especially when used in combination (0.903 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), similarly to SOREMP number at continuous daytime PSG (0.899 ± 0.026, P < 0.0001) and at MSLT (0.956 ± 0.015, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Sleep macrostructure (i.e. SOREMP, N1 timing) including stage transitions reliably identifies hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 among central disorders of hypersomnolence. Citation: Pizza F, Vandi S

  5. Impact of nocturnal heartburn on quality of life, sleep, and productivity: the SINERGE study.

    PubMed

    Calleja, José Luis; Bixquert, M; Maldonado, J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the SINERGE study was to assess the impact of nocturnal heartburn on quality of life, sleep, and productivity. Ambulatory patients >/=18 years old and classified as defined cases of nocturnal heartburn (n=337), nonnocturnal heartburn (n=139), uncontrolled hypertension (n=198), and symptomatic depression (n=104) were included in this cross-sectional study. Information on age, gender, body mass index, and comorbidity was collected and the following validated questionnaires were applied: SF-12, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire. The prevalence of primary care consultation for heartburn and nocturnal heartburn was 4.7% and 1.9%, respectively. Health-related quality of life, sleep, and productivity were significantly impaired in patients with frequent nocturnal heartburn symptoms as compared with those of the patients without nocturnal symptoms or patients with hypertension. Nocturnal heartburn poses a considerable burden for the sufferer because of the impact on quality of life, sleep, and daily activities.

  6. Decreased bilateral cortical representation patterns in writer's cramp: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tina; Kupsch, Andreas; Bruhn, Harald; Scheurig, Christian; Schmidt, Sein; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2009-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to characterize patterns of cortical activation in response to sensory and motor tasks in patients with writer's cramp. 17 patients and 17 healthy subjects were examined during finger-tapping, index finger flexion, and electrical median nerve stimulation of both hands during electromyographic monitoring. SPM2 was used to evaluate Brodmann area (BA) 4, 1, 2, 3, 6, 40. Patients showed decreased activation in the left BA 4 with motor tasks of both hands and the left BA 1-3 with right finger-tapping. With left finger-tapping there was bilateral underactivation of single areas of the somatosensory cortex. Patients exhibited decreased activation in the bilateral BA 6 with left motor tasks and in the right BA 6 with right finger-tapping. Patients had decreased activation in bilateral BA 40 with finger-tapping of both hands. The findings suggest decreased baseline activity or an impaired activation in response to motor tasks in BA 1-4, 6, 40 in patients with writer's cramp for the dystonic and the clinically unaffected hand.

  7. Differences in ocular parameters between diurnal and nocturnal raptors.

    PubMed

    Beckwith-Cohen, Billie; Horowitz, Igal; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Lublin, Avishai; Ofri, Ron

    2015-01-01

    To establish and compare normal ocular parameters between and within diurnal and nocturnal raptor groups. Eighty-eight ophthalmically normal raptors of six nocturnal and 11 diurnal species were studied. Tear production was measured using Schirmer tear test (STT) and phenol red thread test (PRTT), and applanation tonometry was conducted. Ultrasonographic measurements of axial length (AL), mediolateral axis (ML), vitreous body (VB), and pecten length (PL) were recorded, and conjunctival cultures were obtained. A weak correlation (R = 0.312, P = 0.006) was found between PRTT and STT. Tear production was significantly lower in nocturnal species (P < 0.001), but no difference was observed in intraocular pressure (IOP). VB and PL were significantly longer in diurnals (P < 0.001 and P = 0.021, respectively), and no significant difference was observed in AL and ML. When comparing results within these groups, there was a significant difference between most species for all parameters except IOP. Fifty-one percent of the examined raptors were positive for mycology or bacteriology, either on culture or PCR. The most common infectious agent isolated was Staphylococcus spp. Phenol red thread test and STT are both valid methods to measure tear production; however, a separate baseline must be determined for each species using these methods, as the results of one method cannot be extrapolated to the other. Due to significant differences observed within diurnal and nocturnal species, it appears that a more intricate division should be used when comparing these parameters for raptors, and the classification of diurnal or nocturnal holds little significance in the baseline of these data. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  8. Polysomnographic study of nocturnal sleep in idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Ferri, Raffaele; Poli, Francesca; Vandi, Stefano; Cosentino, Filomena I I; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    We investigated nocturnal sleep abnormalities in 19 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (IH) in comparison with two age- and sex- matched control groups of 13 normal subjects (C) and of 17 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC), the latter considered as the extreme of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Sleep macro- and micro- (i.e. cyclic alternating pattern, CAP) structure as well as quantitative analysis of EEG, of periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS), and of muscle tone during REM sleep were compared across groups. IH and NC patients slept more than C subjects, but IH showed the highest levels of sleep fragmentation (e.g. awakenings), associated with a CAP rate higher than NC during lighter sleep stages and lower than C during slow wave sleep respectively, and with the highest relative amount of A3 and the lowest of A1 subtypes. IH showed a delta power in between C and NC groups, whereas muscle tone and PLMS had normal characteristics. A peculiar profile of microstructural sleep abnormalities may contribute to sleep fragmentation and, possibly, EDS in IH. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Diurnal and nocturnal pollination of Marginatocereus marginatus (Pachycereeae: Cactaceae) in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dar, Saleem; del Coro Arizmendi, Ma; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2006-03-01

    Chiropterophillous and ornithophillous characteristics can form part of a single reproductive strategy in plants that have flowers with diurnal and nocturnal anthesis. This broader pollination strategy can ensure seed set when pollinators are scarce or unpredictable. This appears to be true of hummingbirds, which presumably pollinate Marginatocereus marginatus, a columnar cactus with red nocturnal and diurnal flowers growing as part of dense bat-pollinated columnar cacti forests in arid regions of central Mexico. The aim of this study was to study the floral biology of M. marginatus, and evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal vs. diurnal pollinators and the contribution of each pollinator group to overall plant fitness. Individual flower buds were marked and followed to evaluate flower phenology and anthesis time. Flowers and nectar production were measured. An exclusion experiment was conducted to measure the relative contribution of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators to seed set. Marginatocereus marginatus has red hermaphroditic flowers with nocturnal and diurnal anthesis. The plant cannot produce seeds by selfing and was pollinated during the day by hummingbirds and during the night by bats, demonstrating that both pollinator groups were important for plant reproduction. Strong pollen limitation was found in the absence of one of the pollinator guilds. Marginatocereus marginatus has an open pollination system in which both diurnal and nocturnal pollinators are needed to set seeds. This represents a fail-safe pollination system that can ensure both pollination, in a situation of low abundance of one of the pollinator groups (hummingbirds), and high competition for nocturnal pollinators with other columnar cacti that bloom synchronously with M. marginatus in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico.

  10. Diurnal and Nocturnal Pollination of Marginatocereus marginatus (Pachycereeae: Cactaceae) in Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DAR, SALEEM; ARIZMENDI, Ma. del CORO; VALIENTE-BANUET, ALFONSO

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Chiropterophillous and ornithophillous characteristics can form part of a single reproductive strategy in plants that have flowers with diurnal and nocturnal anthesis. This broader pollination strategy can ensure seed set when pollinators are scarce or unpredictable. This appears to be true of hummingbirds, which presumably pollinate Marginatocereus marginatus, a columnar cactus with red nocturnal and diurnal flowers growing as part of dense bat-pollinated columnar cacti forests in arid regions of central Mexico. The aim of this study was to study the floral biology of M. marginatus, and evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal vs. diurnal pollinators and the contribution of each pollinator group to overall plant fitness. • Methods Individual flower buds were marked and followed to evaluate flower phenology and anthesis time. Flowers and nectar production were measured. An exclusion experiment was conducted to measure the relative contribution of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators to seed set. • Key Results Marginatocereus marginatus has red hermaphroditic flowers with nocturnal and diurnal anthesis. The plant cannot produce seeds by selfing and was pollinated during the day by hummingbirds and during the night by bats, demonstrating that both pollinator groups were important for plant reproduction. Strong pollen limitation was found in the absence of one of the pollinator guilds. • Conclusions Marginatocereus marginatus has an open pollination system in which both diurnal and nocturnal pollinators are needed to set seeds. This represents a fail-safe pollination system that can ensure both pollination, in a situation of low abundance of one of the pollinator groups (hummingbirds), and high competition for nocturnal pollinators with other columnar cacti that bloom synchronously with M. marginatus in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico. PMID:16394025

  11. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in "turnout".

    PubMed

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in "turned out" postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat.

  12. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effectmore » upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.« less

  13. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-27

    sweeps the leg during stance, and the third places the foot during flight and controls body attitude during stance. Each of the three methods elucidates...secondary strategy has been to examine systems with springy legs, so that the role of resonant oscillatory leg behavior might be better understood. ’ The ...body attitude : I lopping _leit: ’ The control system rcgulate:; hopping height by manlil)Lulating hopping energy. The leg is springy, so hopping is a

  14. Rifampin

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of coordination difficulty concentrating confusion changes in behavior muscle weakness pain in the arms, hands, feet, or legs heartburn stomach cramps diarrhea gas painful or irregular menstrual periods vision changes Some ...

  15. Superior visual performance in nocturnal insects: neural principles and bio-inspired technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrant, Eric J.

    2016-04-01

    At night, our visual capacities are severely reduced, with a complete loss in our ability to see colour and a dramatic loss in our ability to see fine spatial and temporal details. This is not the case for many nocturnal animals, notably insects. Our recent work, particularly on fast-flying moths and bees and on ball-rolling dung beetles, has shown that nocturnal animals are able to distinguish colours, to detect faint movements, to learn visual landmarks, to orient to the faint pattern of polarised light produced by the moon and to navigate using the stars. These impressive visual abilities are the result of exquisitely adapted eyes and visual systems, the product of millions of years of evolution. Nocturnal animals typically have highly sensitive eye designs and visual neural circuitry that is optimised for extracting reliable information from dim and noisy visual images. Even though we are only at the threshold of understanding the neural mechanisms responsible for reliable nocturnal vision, growing evidence suggests that the neural summation of photons in space and time is critically important: even though vision in dim light becomes necessarily coarser and slower, it also becomes significantly more reliable. We explored the benefits of spatiotemporal summation by creating a computer algorithm that mimicked nocturnal visual processing strategies. This algorithm dramatically increased the reliability of video collected in dim light, including the preservation of colour, strengthening evidence that summation strategies are essential for nocturnal vision.

  16. Interrupted breeding in a songbird migrant triggers development of nocturnal locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, Andrey; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Kishkinev, Dmitry; Grinkevich, Vitaly

    2018-04-03

    Long-distance avian migrants, e.g. Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus), can precisely schedule events of their annual cycle. However, the proximate mechanisms controlling annual cycle and their interplay with environmental factors are poorly understood. We artificially interrupted breeding in reed warblers by bringing them into captivity and recording birds' locomotor activity for 5-7 days. Over this time, most of the captive birds gradually developed nocturnal locomotor activity not observed in breeding birds. When the birds were later released and radio-tracked, the individuals with highly developed caged activity performed nocturnal flights. We also found that reed warblers kept indoors without access to local cues developed a higher level of nocturnal activity compared to the birds kept outdoors with an access to the familiar environment. Also, birds translocated from a distant site (21 km) had a higher motivation to fly at night-time after release compared to the birds captured within 1 km of a study site. Our study suggests that an interrupted breeding triggers development of nocturnal locomotor activity in cages, and the level of activity is correlated with motivation to perform nocturnal flights in the wild, which can be restrained by familiar environment.

  17. The pathophysiology of monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis with special emphasis on the circadian rhythm of renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Dossche, L; Walle, J Vande; Van Herzeele, C

    2016-06-01

    Nocturnal polyuria in monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) has so far mainly been attributed to a disturbed circadian rhythm of renal water handling. Low vasopressin levels overnight correlate with absent maximal concentrating activity, resulting in an increased nocturnal diuresis with low urinary osmolality. Therefore, treatment with desmopressin is a rational choice. Unfortunately, 20 to 60 % of children with monosymptomatic enuresis are desmopressin-resistant. There is increasing evidence that other disturbed circadian rhythms might play a role in nocturnal polyuria. This review focuses on renal aspects in the pathophysiology of nocturnal polyuria in MNE, with special emphasis on circadian rhythms. Articles related to renal circadian rhythms and enuresis were searched through the PubMed library with the goal of providing a concise review. Nocturnal polyuria can only partially be explained by blunted circadian rhythm of vasopressin secretion. Other alterations in the intrinsic renal circadian clock system also seem to be involved, especially in desmopressin-resistant enuresis. • Disturbance in the circadian rhythm of arginine vasopressin secretion is related to nocturnal polyuria in children with enuresis. • Desmopressin is recommended as a treatment for monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, working as a vasopressin analogue acting on V2 receptors in the collecting ducts of the kidney. What is New: • Other renal circadian rhythms might play a role in nocturnal polyuria, especially in desmopressin-resistant case.

  18. Rotigotine's effect on PLM-associated blood pressure elevations in restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cassel, Werner; Benes, Heike; Kesper, Karl; Rye, David; Sica, Domenic; Winkelman, John W.; Bauer, Lars; Grieger, Frank; Joeres, Lars; Moran, Kimberly; Schollmayer, Erwin; Whitesides, John; Carney, Hannah C.; Walters, Arthur S.; Oertel, Wolfgang; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This double-blind, placebo-controlled, interventional trial was conducted to investigate the effects of rotigotine patch on periodic limb movement (PLM)–associated nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) elevations. Methods: Patients with moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS) were randomized to rotigotine (optimal dose [1–3 mg/24 h]) or placebo. Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) assessments were performed during polysomnography at baseline and at the end of 4-week maintenance. Primary outcome was change in number of PLM-associated SBP elevations (defined as slope of linear regression ≥2.5 mm Hg/beat-to-beat interval over 5 consecutive heartbeats [≥10 mm Hg]). Additional outcomes were total SBP elevations, PLM-associated and total diastolic BP (DBP) elevations, periodic limb movements index (PLMI), and PLM in sleep arousal index (PLMSAI). Results: Of 81 randomized patients, 66 (37 rotigotine, 29 placebo) were included in efficacy assessments. PLM-associated SBP elevations were significantly reduced with rotigotine vs placebo (least squares mean treatment difference [95% confidence interval (CI)] −160.34 [−213.23 to −107.45]; p < 0.0001). Rotigotine-treated patients also had greater reduction vs placebo in total SBP elevations (−161.13 [−264.47 to −57.79]; p = 0.0028), PLM-associated elevations (−88.45 [−126.12 to −50.78]; p < 0.0001), and total DBP elevations (−93.81 [−168.45 to −19.16]; p = 0.0146), PLMI (−32.77 [−44.73 to −20.80]; p < 0.0001), and PLMSAI (−7.10 [−11.93 to −2.26]; p = 0.0047). Adverse events included nausea (rotigotine 23%; placebo 8%), headache (18% each), nasopharyngitis (18%; 8%), and fatigue (13%; 15%). Conclusions: Further investigation is required to determine whether reductions in nocturnal BP elevations observed with rotigotine might modify cardiovascular risk. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with moderate to severe

  19. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  20. Subsidence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Merrilee A.; Stull, Roland B.

    1986-08-01

    Nights with clear skies and strong radiative cooling that favor the formation of statically stable nocturnal boundary layers (NBL) are also those nights most likely to have subsidence, because of the presence of synoptic high-pressure regions. The divergence associated with subsidence laterally removes some of the chilled nocturnal boundary layer air causing the NBL to not grow as rapidly as would otherwise be expected. An equivalent interpretation is that subsidence-induced heating partially counteracts the radiative and turbulent cooling.A new form of nocturnal integral depth scale, HT, is introduced that incorporates the heating and cooling contributions at night. This scale can be used with a variety of idealized temperature profile shapes, including slab, linear, and exponential. It is shown that observed values of subsidence for two case studies can reduce the NBL growth rate, as measured by HT/t, by 5 to 50% and can cause corresponding errors in the estimation of accumulated cooling unless there is a proper accounting of subsidence.Subsidence plays a very minor role close to the ground, but for the case studies presented here its heating rate increases with height and becomes of comparable magnitude to the cooling rates of turbulence and radiation within the top third of the NBL. Although no adequate measurements of horizontal advective effects were available for the case studies used here, it appears from an energy balance that advection must not be neglected because its magnitude can be as large as turbulence and radiation.

  1. Slow eye movements distribution during nocturnal sleep.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Fabbri, Margherita; Magosso, Elisa; Ursino, Mauro; Provini, Federica; Ferri, Raffaele; Montagna, Pasquale

    2011-08-01

    To assess the distribution across nocturnal sleep of slow eye movements (SEMs). We evaluated SEMs distribution in the different sleep stages, and across sleep cycles in nocturnal recordings of 10 healthy women. Sleep was scored according to standard criteria, and the percentage of time occupied by the SEMs was automatically detected. SEMs were differently represented during sleep stages with the following order: wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO): 61%, NREM sleep stage 1: 54%, REM sleep: 43%, NREM sleep stage 2: 21%, NREM sleep stage 3: 7%, and NREM sleep stage 4: 3% (p<0.0001). There was no difference between phasic and tonic REM sleep. SEMs progressively decreased across the NREM sleep cycles (38%, 15%, 13% during NREM sleep stage 2 in the first three sleep cycles, p=0.006), whereas no significant difference was found for REM, NREM sleep stage 1, slow-wave sleep and WASO. Our findings confirm that SEMs are a phenomenon typical of the sleep onset period, but are also found in REM sleep. The nocturnal evolution of SEMs during NREM sleep stage 2 parallels the homeostatic process underlying slow-wave sleep. SEMs are a marker of sleepiness and, potentially, of sleep homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep Apnea and Circadian Extracellular Fluid Change as Independent Factors for Nocturnal Polyuria.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Aya; Suzuki, Motofumi; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Masaki; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Akishita, Masahiro; Homma, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the relationships among nocturnal polyuria, sleep apnea and body fluid volume to elucidate the pathophysiology of nocturia in sleep apnea syndrome. We enrolled 104 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography for suspected sleep apnea syndrome. Self-assessed symptom questionnaires were administered to evaluate sleep disorder and lower urinary tract symptoms, including nocturia. Voiding frequency and voided volume were recorded using a 24-hour frequency-volume chart. Body fluid composition was estimated in the morning and at night using bioelectric impedance analysis. Frequency-volume chart data were analyzed in 22 patients after continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Patients with nocturnal polyuria showed a higher apnea-hypopnea index (33.9 vs 24.2, p = 0.03) and a larger circadian change in extracellular fluid adjusted to lean body mass (0.22 vs -0.19, p = 0.019) than those without nocturnal polyuria. These relations were more evident in patients 65 years old or older than in those 64 years or younger. A multivariate linear regression model showed an independent relationship of nocturnal polyuria with the apnea-hypopnea index and the circadian change in extracellular fluid adjusted to lean body mass (p = 0.0012 and 0.022, respectively). Continuous positive airway pressure therapy significantly improved nocturnal polyuria and nocturia only in patients with nocturnal polyuria. This study identified sleep apnea and the circadian change in extracellular fluid as independent factors for nocturnal polyuria. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nocturnal hypoxemia in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Regina Terse Trindade; Santana, Maria Angélica Pinheiro; Almeida, Priscila de Carvalho; Machado, Almério de Souza; Araújo-Filho, José Bouzas; Salles, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nocturnal hypoxemia and its association with pulmonary function, nutritional status, sleep macrostructure, and obstructive respiratory events during sleep in a population of clinically stable children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 67 children and adolescents with CF between 2 and 14 years of age. All of the participants underwent polysomnography, and SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. We also evaluated the Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K) scores, spirometry findings, and nutritional status of the patients. RESULTS: The study involved 67 patients. The mean age of the patients was 8 years. The S-K scores differed significantly between the patients with and without nocturnal hypoxemia, which was defined as an SpO2 < 90% for more than 5% of the total sleep time (73.75 ± 6.29 vs. 86.38 ± 8.70; p < 0.01). Nocturnal hypoxemia correlated with the severity of lung disease, FEV1 (rs = −0.42; p = 0.01), FVC (rs = −0.46; p = 0.01), microarousal index (rs = 0.32; p = 0.01), and apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.56; p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients with CF and mild-to-moderate lung disease, nocturnal oxygenation correlated with the S-K score, spirometry variables, sleep macrostructure variables, and the apnea-hypopnea index. PMID:24473760

  4. [Electrostimulation and magnetic therapy in the treatment of accommodation cramp and in the prevention of progressive myopia in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Riabtseva, A A; Gerasimenko, M Iu; Savina, M M; Filatova, E V

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a procedure and results of use of electrostimulation, magnetic therapy, and electrophoresis during treatment for accommodation cramp and in the prevention of myopia in children and adolescents. Data that characterize the dynamics and stability of achieved results are given.

  5. Aches and pains during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between 18 and 24 weeks. When you feel stretching or pain, move slowly or change positions. Mild ... common in the last months of pregnancy. Sometimes stretching your legs before bed will reduce the cramps. ...

  6. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  7. Effects of exercise intensity and duration on nocturnal heart rate variability and sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Myllymäki, Tero; Rusko, Heikki; Syväoja, Heidi; Juuti, Tanja; Kinnunen, Marja-Liisa; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2012-03-01

    Acute physical exercise may affect cardiac autonomic modulation hours or even days during the recovery phase. Although sleep is an essential recovery period, the information on nocturnal autonomic modulation indicated by heart rate variability (HRV) after different exercises is mostly lacking. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of exercise intensity and duration on nocturnal HR, HRV, HR, and HRV-based relaxation, as well as on actigraphic and subjective sleep quality. Fourteen healthy male subjects (age 36 ± 4 years, maximal oxygen uptake 49 ± 4 ml/kg/min) performed five different running exercises on separate occasions starting at 6 p.m. with HR guidance at home. The effect of intensity was studied with 30 min of exercises at intensities corresponding to HR level at 45% (easy), 60% (moderate) and 75% (vigorous) of their maximal oxygen uptake. The effect of duration was studied with 30, 60, and 90 min of moderate exercises. Increased exercise intensity elevated nocturnal HR compared to control day (p < 0.001), but it did not affect nocturnal HRV. Nocturnal HR was greater after the day with 90- than 30- or 60-min exercises (p < 0.01) or control day (p < 0.001). Nocturnal HRV was lower after the 90-min exercise day compared to control day (p < 0.01). Neither exercise intensity nor duration had any impact on actigraphic or subjective sleep quality. The results suggest that increased exercise intensity and/or duration cause delayed recovery of nocturnal cardiac autonomic modulation, although long exercise duration was needed to induce changes in nocturnal HRV. Increased exercise intensity or duration does not seem to disrupt sleep quality.

  8. The Relationship Between Child Anxiety Related Disorders and Primary Nocturnal Enuresis.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Bahman; Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Rafeei, Mohammad; Mostajeran, Mahssa

    2016-06-01

    Nocturnal enuresis, often called bedwetting or sleep wetting, is a common problem in children after the age of five and may lead to symptoms such as infection, incontinence and frequent urination. This problem refers to a state in which children after the age of five have no control of their urine for six continuous months and it cannot be attributed to any organic factors or drug use. In this study we aimed to study generalized anxiety disorder as one of the possible causes of primary nocturnal enuresis. In this case-control study 180 children with primary nocturnal enuresis and same number of healthy children with a mean age of 7 - 17 years old with the same demographic characteristics were selected. The study took place at Amir Kabir hospital of Arak, Iran during year 2014. After collecting the information, diagnosis was verified based on the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM) IV-TR criteria. Results were analyzed using the SPSS software (IBM Corp. Released 2011. IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 20.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.). Frequency of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, school phobia, social anxiety, separation anxiety, history of anxiety in mother, history of primary nocturnal enuresis in parent's family and body mass index had a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.005). With the results obtained from this study we could say that there was a clear significant difference between the two control and patient groups for all subgroups of anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder and their relationship with primary nocturnal enuresis. Given the higher prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, school phobia, social anxiety, separation anxiety and comparison with healthy children, it is recommended for all children with primary nocturnal enuresis to be investigated and treated for generalized anxiety disorder.

  9. Removal of nutrient limitations by long-term fertilization decreases nocturnal water loss in savanna trees.

    Treesearch

    F.G. Scholz; S.J. Bucci; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.C. Franco; F. Miralles-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, nocturnal transpiration can be relatively high in temperate and tropical woody species. In nutrient-poor systems such as the Brazilian Cerrado, nocturnal transpiration may enhance delivery of nutrients to roots. We compared nocturnal transpiration of three dominant Cerrado tree species growing in unfertilized plots and plots to...

  10. The nocturnal bottleneck and the evolution of activity patterns in mammals.

    PubMed

    Gerkema, Menno P; Davies, Wayne I L; Foster, Russell G; Menaker, Michael; Hut, Roelof A

    2013-08-22

    In 1942, Walls described the concept of a 'nocturnal bottleneck' in placental mammals, where these species could survive only by avoiding daytime activity during times in which dinosaurs were the dominant taxon. Walls based this concept of a longer episode of nocturnality in early eutherian mammals by comparing the visual systems of reptiles, birds and all three extant taxa of the mammalian lineage, namely the monotremes, marsupials (now included in the metatherians) and placentals (included in the eutherians). This review describes the status of what has become known as the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis, giving an overview of the chronobiological patterns of activity. We review the ecological plausibility that the activity patterns of (early) eutherian mammals were restricted to the night, based on arguments relating to endothermia, energy balance, foraging and predation, taking into account recent palaeontological information. We also assess genes, relating to light detection (visual and non-visual systems) and the photolyase DNA protection system that were lost in the eutherian mammalian lineage. Our conclusion presently is that arguments in favour of the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis in eutherians prevail.

  11. The nocturnal bottleneck and the evolution of activity patterns in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gerkema, Menno P.; Davies, Wayne I. L.; Foster, Russell G.; Menaker, Michael; Hut, Roelof A.

    2013-01-01

    In 1942, Walls described the concept of a ‘nocturnal bottleneck’ in placental mammals, where these species could survive only by avoiding daytime activity during times in which dinosaurs were the dominant taxon. Walls based this concept of a longer episode of nocturnality in early eutherian mammals by comparing the visual systems of reptiles, birds and all three extant taxa of the mammalian lineage, namely the monotremes, marsupials (now included in the metatherians) and placentals (included in the eutherians). This review describes the status of what has become known as the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis, giving an overview of the chronobiological patterns of activity. We review the ecological plausibility that the activity patterns of (early) eutherian mammals were restricted to the night, based on arguments relating to endothermia, energy balance, foraging and predation, taking into account recent palaeontological information. We also assess genes, relating to light detection (visual and non-visual systems) and the photolyase DNA protection system that were lost in the eutherian mammalian lineage. Our conclusion presently is that arguments in favour of the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis in eutherians prevail. PMID:23825205

  12. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Children with Monosymptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Cecilie Siggaard; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Borch, Luise; Borg, Britt; Rittig, Søren

    2017-09-01

    In a third of all children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis their condition is refractory to first line treatments. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been documented to be efficacious in children with daytime incontinence. We investigated the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (3 or more wet nights per week) and no nocturnal polyuria were randomized to treatment with active or sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation involving 1-hour sessions twice daily for 10 weeks in a double-blind design. Of the 52 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis included in the study 47 completed treatment (mean age 9.5 ± 2.1 years, 38 males). None of the children experienced a full response with complete remission of enuresis. Treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation did not lead to significant changes in number of wet nights, nocturnal urine production on wet or dry nights, maximum voided volume with and without first morning voided volume, or voiding frequency when comparing parameters before and after treatment. The present study demonstrates no anti-enuretic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal urine production and bladder capacity remained unchanged during and after treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk Factors with Nocturnal Enuresis in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Patrick; McCool, F. Dennis; Hale, Lauren; Stone, Katie; Eaton, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in women increases significantly after menopause. However, identifying at-risk women in this population is difficult because they tend to underreport symptoms and their complaints may differ from those traditionally associated with OSA. We investigated whether OSA risk factors are associated with the presence of a “non-traditional” complaint such as nocturnal enuresis in postmenopausal women. Methods A cross-sectional study of postmenopausal women ages 50–79, who participated in the Women Health Initiative Observational and Clinical Trial Studies (1993–2005) at 40 Clinical Centers in the United States, was performed. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis was employed to determine the association of OSA risk factors with nocturnal enuresis. Results A cohort of 2,789 women (1.7%) reported having nocturnal enuresis. Obesity (Odds ratio (OR)=2.29, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.00–2.62), snoring (OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.74–2.32), poor sleep quality (OR=1.70, 95% CI 1.52–1.91), sleep fragmentation (OR=2.44, 95% CI 2.14–2.79), daytime sleepiness (OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.33–1.68), and hypertension (OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.01–1.26) were associated with nocturnal enuresis. Each additional OSA risk factor in a predefined OSA score significantly increased the odds of having nocturnal enuresis in a dose-response fashion (OR=1.38, 2.00, 2.80, 3.87, 5.10, and 7.02 for scores of 1–6, respectively) compared to no risk factors. Conclusion OSA risk factors are associated with nocturnal enuresis in postmenopausal women. Mechanisms relating nocturnal enuresis to OSA may include apnea-associated changes of intra-thoracic pressure leading to increased urine output. Questioning at-risk postmenopausal women presenting with nocturnal enuresis about other OSA risk factors should be considered. PMID:26325085

  14. Targeting nocturnal hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Fleischer, Jesper; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Ebbehøj, Eva; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2014-11-01

    Several studies in different populations have suggested that nighttime blood pressure (BP) is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than daytime BP. Consequently, treatment strategies to target nighttime BP have come into focus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of change of administration time of antihypertensive drugs. We included 41 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension (nighttime systolic BP >120 mm Hg) in an open-label, crossover study. Patients were randomized to 8 weeks of either morning or bedtime administration of all of the individual's once-daily antihypertensive drugs, followed by 8 weeks of switched dosing regimen. Bedtime administration of antihypertensive drugs resulted in a significant reduction in nighttime (7.5 mm Hg; P<0.001) and 24-hour (3.1 mm Hg; P=0.014) systolic BP, with a nonsignificant reduction in daytime (1.3 mm Hg; P=0.336) systolic BP. We did not find morning BP surge to be different between dosing regimens. Levels of C-reactive protein were significantly lower with bedtime administration, which may indicate an effect on low-grade inflammation. We found no difference in urinary albumin excretion, regardless of albuminuria status. Urinary sodium/creatinine was significantly increased and urinary osmolality significantly reduced with bedtime administration, which can be interpreted as increased nocturnal natriuresis. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nocturnal hypertension, administration of once-daily antihypertensive drugs at bedtime may be favorable. The increased nocturnal natriuresis may reflect increased effect of bedtime-administered thiazides and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, suggesting a potential mechanism of the observed effects on BP with chronotherapeutic intervention. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Legs Syndrome Condition Restless Legs Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Treatment5. Questions Overview ... twitch when you try and sleep (also called periodic limb movements of sleep or PLMS). Diagnosis How ...

  16. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and C reactive protein among middle-aged community residents: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Isao; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Sato, Shinichi; Shimamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Masamitsu; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-06-01

    There are conflicting results for the association between obstructive sleep apnoea and raised C reactive protein (CRP) levels. A study was undertaken to investigate whether nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, a surrogate marker for obstructive sleep apnoea, was associated with CRP levels among a community-dwelling Japanese population. Among participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS), 1422 male and 2466 female community residents aged 40-69 years were tested during sleep. No nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia were defined using 3% oxygen desaturation index cut-off points at 5 and 15 events/h, respectively. High-sensitivity CRP levels were measured using a latex particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. Multivariate analysis was adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, current alcohol intake, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus and menopausal status for women. Multivariable-adjusted mean CRP levels among men were 0.70 mg/l (95% CI 0.65 to 0.75) for no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.74 to 0.89) for mild nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and 0.84 mg/l (95% CI 0.70 to 1.00) for moderate to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (p for trend=0.03). The values for women were 0.59 mg/l (95% CI 0.57 to 0.62), 0.66 mg/l (95% CI 0.59 to 0.73) and 0.82 mg/l (95% CI 0.62 to 1.03), respectively (p for trend=0.008). Compared with no nocturnal intermittent hypoxia, the prevalence of a high CRP level (>or=1.0 mg/l) was 1.4-1.7-fold higher for mild to severe nocturnal intermittent hypoxia in both sexes. Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia is associated with raised serum CRP levels among middle-aged Japanese subjects.

  17. The Effect of Breathing Exercises on the Nocturnal Enuresis in the Children with the Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghipour, Shahnaz; Masjedi, Mohsen; Kelishadi, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Background The nocturnal enuresis is one of the most common complaints of childhood. Upper airway obstruction and nocturnal snoring affect the nocturnal enuresis in children. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of breathing exercises on the nocturnal enuresis in the children with the sleep-disordered breathing. Patients and Methods This study was conducted in year of 2011 by a semi-experimental design with the control group among 40 children, aged 6 - 12 years, who had the nocturnal enuresis. Participants were examined based on the criteria of nocturnal enuresis, oral breathing, and nocturnal snoring. Subsequently, they were randomly assigned to the case and control groups. In the case group, the breathing exercises were performed for 45 minutes, and were pursued for four weeks in the morning following and prior to sleeping, and subsequently the arterial blood gases were measured and the frequency of enuresis and the respiratory rates (RR) were recorded. Results After intervention the means of PaCO2 and RR in the control group were significantly higher than the case group (P < 0.0001). Likewise, O2sat, PaO2 in the case group were higher than the control group (P < 0.0001). The nocturnal enuresis decreased significantly in the case group, compared to the control group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions This study suggests that the breathing exercises may reduce the frequency of nocturnal enuresis in the patients with the oral breathing and nocturnal snore. The clinical implications of these findings should be verified in the future longitudinal studies. PMID:24719691

  18. Prospective Assessment of Nocturnal Awakenings in a Case Series of Treatment-Seeking Chronic Insomnia Patients: A Pilot Study of Subjective and Objective Causes

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Barry; Romero, Edward; Ulibarri, Victor A.; Kikta, Shara

    2012-01-01

    Background: The cause of nocturnal awakenings in patients with chronic insomnia is rarely researched. This study prospectively assessed the etiology of nocturnal awakenings (subjectively and objectively) among patients with insomnia at a private, community-based sleep medical center. Methods: Twenty adult patients with chronic insomnia enrolled between April 2008 and February 2010 met diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder, never previously visited a sleep specialist or underwent sleep testing, and reported no classic sleep disordered breathing symptoms. Patients completed validated scales for insomnia, sleepiness, impairment, anxiety, depression, and quality of life, a qualitative interview to assess subjective reasons for awakenings, and a diagnostic sleep study to objectively assess awakenings and their precipitants. Results: Subjective and objective data showed clinically meaningful insomnia, primarily sleep maintenance insomnia. The most common self-reported reasons for awakenings were: uncertain cause (50%), nightmares (45%), nocturia (35%), bedroom distractions (20%), or pain (15%). No patient identified breathing symptoms as a cause. Objectively, 531 awakenings were observed in the total sample, and 478 (90%) were preceded by sleep breathing events (apnea, hypopnea, or respiratory effort-related event). Fifty-three awakenings were caused by other factors (independent leg jerks [7], spontaneous [14], and sleep that was laboratory-induced [32]). Thirty awakenings ≥ 5 min—a duration sufficient to predispose toward an insomnia episode—were each preceded by a breathing event. Conclusions: Among patients with insomnia with no classic sleep breathing symptoms and therefore low probability of a sleep breathing disorder, most of their awakenings were precipitated by a medical condition (sleep disordered breathing), which contrasted sharply with their perceptions about their awakenings. Citation: Krakow B; Romero E; Ulibarri VA; Kikta S. Prospective

  19. [An autopsy case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with prominent muscle cramps, fasciculation, and high titer of anti-voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody].

    PubMed

    Sato, Aki; Sakai, Naoko; Shinbo, Junsuke; Hashidate, Hideki; Igarashi, Shuichi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Yamazaki, Motoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 55-year-old male who had prominent fasciculation and muscle cramps. Muscle weakness and atrophy of the trunk, respiratory system, and extremities gradually progressed. On the basis of these features, we diagnosed this patient as having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), however, the upper motor neuron signs were not significant. Following the detection of the anti-voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody at 907.5 pM (normal < 100 pM) and repetitive discharge in a nerve conduction study, immunotherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone (mPSL), double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP), ciclosporin, and rituximab was introduced. mPSL and DFPP showed only tentative effectiveness for fasciculation and muscle cramps, respectively. Thereafter, muscle weakness progressed. The patient died of type II respiratory failure at the age of 57 years, about 2 years after the onset of the disease. At autopsy, a histopathological diagnosis of ALS with lower-motor-predominant degeneration was made. Characteristic cellular features, including Bunina bodies in the remaining lower motor neurons and phosphorylated TAR DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (pTDP-43)-immunopositive inclusions in both upper and lower motor neuron systems, were evident. At present, an immunological role of the anti-VGKC complex antibody in the development of cramp-fasciculation syndrome has been speculated. In this ALS patient, the antibodies might be associated with pathomechanisms underlying the characteristic symptoms.

  20. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri

  1. [Nocturnal continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion--a therapeutic possibility in labile type I diabetes under exceptional conditions].

    PubMed

    Bruns, W; Steinborn, F; Menzel, R; Staritz, B; Bibergeil, H

    1990-03-15

    The whole-day continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with portable pumps in daily blood glucose autocontrol guarantees a more stabile and favourable glycaemia than multiple injections in labile type I diabetics. The success is mainly to be traced back to the continuous replacement of the basal secretion, particularly to the nocturnal fasting phase. In this study the effect on the glycaemia is investigated with exclusively nocturnal administration of the CSII under maintenance of multiple insulin injections during this day. In a group of 18 type I diabetics the nocturnal CSII in comparison to intermediate insulin administrations in the evening led to a significant improvement of glycaemia (p less than 0.01), in particular to the decrease of the fasting blood sugars (p less than 0.05). In two casuistic observations in comparison to all the other conventional methods for the compensation of the nocturnal glycaemia (depot insulin, nocturnal injection of normal insulin) the nocturnal CSII proved to be superior. Therefore, the nocturnal CSII is an--though more rarely to be used--alternative, which may be taken into consideration, of a whole-day CSII is temporarily unwished for.

  2. Nocturnal Sleep Dynamics Identify Narcolepsy Type 1.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Franceschini, Christian; Liguori, Rocco; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the reliability of nocturnal sleep dynamics in the differential diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence. Cross-sectional. Sleep laboratory. One hundred seventy-five patients with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, n = 79), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, n = 22), idiopathic hypersomnia (IH, n = 22), and "subjective" hypersomnolence (sHS, n = 52). None. Polysomnographic (PSG) work-up included 48 h of continuous PSG recording. From nocturnal PSG conventional sleep macrostructure, occurrence of sleep onset rapid eye movement period (SOREMP), sleep stages distribution, and sleep stage transitions were calculated. Patient groups were compared, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to test the diagnostic utility of nocturnal PSG data to identify NT1. Sleep macrostructure was substantially stable in the 2 nights of each diagnostic group. NT1 and NT2 patients had lower latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NT1 patients showed the highest number of awakenings, sleep stage transitions, and more time spent in N1 sleep, as well as most SOREMPs at daytime PSG and at multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) than all other groups. ROC curve analysis showed that nocturnal SOREMP (area under the curve of 0.724 ± 0.041, P < 0.0001), percent of total sleep time spent in N1 (0.896 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), and the wakefulness-sleep transition index (0.796 ± 0.034, P < 0.0001) had a good sensitivity and specificity profile to identify NT1 sleep, especially when used in combination (0.903 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), similarly to SOREMP number at continuous daytime PSG (0.899 ± 0.026, P < 0.0001) and at MSLT (0.956 ± 0.015, P < 0.0001). Sleep macrostructure (i.e. SOREMP, N1 timing) including stage transitions reliably identifies hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 among central disorders of hypersomnolence. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Anatomical Specializations for Nocturnality in a Critically Endangered Parrot, the Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus)

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, Jeremy R.; Gsell, Anna C.; Brunton, Dianne; Heesy, Christopher P.; Hall, Margaret I.; Acosta, Monica L.; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    The shift from a diurnal to nocturnal lifestyle in vertebrates is generally associated with either enhanced visual sensitivity or a decreased reliance on vision. Within birds, most studies have focused on differences in the visual system across all birds with respect to nocturnality-diurnality. The critically endangered Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), a parrot endemic to New Zealand, is an example of a species that has evolved a nocturnal lifestyle in an otherwise diurnal lineage, but nothing is known about its' visual system. Here, we provide a detailed morphological analysis of the orbits, brain, eye, and retina of the Kakapo and comparisons with other birds. Morphometric analyses revealed that the Kakapo's orbits are significantly more convergent than other parrots, suggesting an increased binocular overlap in the visual field. The Kakapo exhibits an eye shape that is consistent with other nocturnal birds, including owls and nightjars, but is also within the range of the diurnal parrots. With respect to the brain, the Kakapo has a significantly smaller optic nerve and tectofugal visual pathway. Specifically, the optic tectum, nucleus rotundus and entopallium were significantly reduced in relative size compared to other parrots. There was no apparent reduction to the thalamofugal visual pathway. Finally, the retinal morphology of the Kakapo is similar to that of both diurnal and nocturnal birds, suggesting a retina that is specialised for a crepuscular niche. Overall, this suggests that the Kakapo has enhanced light sensitivity, poor visual acuity and a larger binocular field than other parrots. We conclude that the Kakapo possesses a visual system unlike that of either strictly nocturnal or diurnal birds and therefore does not adhere to the traditional view of the evolution of nocturnality in birds. PMID:21860663

  4. Nocturnal Polyuria and Hypertension in Patients with Lifestyle Related Diseases and Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu; Homma, Yukio; Takeda, Masayuki; Gotoh, Momokazu; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Akino, Hironobu; Hayashi, Koichi; Yonemoto, Koji

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationship of nocturnal polyuria in patients with common lifestyle related diseases and overactive bladder, with special attention to hypertension. After baseline assessment, patients recorded 24-hour urinary frequency/volume, blood pressure and heart rate for 3 days. They were stratified into 4 groups based on mean blood pressure, including no hypertension, and controllable, untreated and uncontrolled hypertension, respectively. The 2,353 eligible patients, who had urinary urgency once or more per week and 1 or more nocturnal toilet visits, were enrolled from 543 sites in Japan. Of these patients complete data, including the 24-hour frequency volume chart, were collected from 1,271. Multivariable analyses showed a statistically significant association of nocturnal polyuria with increasing age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.05, p <0.001) and gender (women vs men OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.96, p = 0.02), and for controllable (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.83-1.460), untreated (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.55-4.45) and uncontrolled (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.81-1.62) hypertension vs no hypertension (p = 0.005). However, when assessed separately in men and women, hypertension and heart rate were significantly associated with nocturnal polyuria in women alone (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia were significantly associated with nocturnal polyuria in men alone (p <0.001). The current study demonstrates that nocturnal polyuria was significantly associated with age, male gender, and untreated hypertension in patients with lifestyle related diseases and overactive bladder. The association between hypertension and nocturnal polyuria was significant in women alone. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A cutoff value based on analysis of a reference population decreases overestimation of the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria.

    PubMed

    van Haarst, Ernst P; Bosch, J L H Ruud

    2012-09-01

    We sought criteria for nocturnal polyuria in asymptomatic, nonurological adults of all ages by reporting reference values of the ratio of daytime and nighttime urine volumes, and finding nocturia predictors. Data from a database of frequency-volume charts from a reference population of 894 nonurological, asymptomatic volunteers of all age groups were analyzed. The nocturnal polyuria index and the nocturia index were calculated and factors influencing these values were determined by multivariate analysis. The nocturnal polyuria index had wide variation but a normal distribution with a mean ± SD of 30% ± 12%. The 95th percentile of the values was 53%. Above this cutoff a patient had nocturnal polyuria. This value contrasts with the International Continence Society definition of 33% but agrees with several other reports. On multivariate regression analysis with the nocturnal polyuria index as the dependent variable sleeping time, maximum voided volume and age were the covariates. However, the increase in the nocturnal polyuria index by age was small. Excluding polyuria and nocturia from analysis did not alter the results in a relevant way. The nocturnal voiding frequency depended on sleeping time and maximum voided volume but most of all on the nocturia index. The prevalence of nocturnal polyuria is overestimated. We suggest a new cutoff value for the nocturnal polyuria index, that is nocturnal polyuria exists when the nocturnal polyuria index exceeds 53%. The nocturia index is the best predictor of nocturia. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adaptive genomic evolution of opsins reveals that early mammals flourished in nocturnal environments.

    PubMed

    Borges, Rui; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Gomes, Cidália; Heesy, Christopher P; Antunes, Agostinho

    2018-02-05

    Based on evolutionary patterns of the vertebrate eye, Walls (1942) hypothesized that early placental mammals evolved primarily in nocturnal habitats. However, not only Eutheria, but all mammals show photic characteristics (i.e. dichromatic vision, rod-dominated retina) suggestive of a scotopic eye design. Here, we used integrative comparative genomic and phylogenetic methodologies employing the photoreceptive opsin gene family in 154 mammals to test the likelihood of a nocturnal period in the emergence of all mammals. We showed that mammals possess genomic patterns concordant with a nocturnal ancestry. The loss of the RH2, VA, PARA, PARIE and OPN4x opsins in all mammals led us to advance a probable and most-parsimonious hypothesis of a global nocturnal bottleneck that explains the loss of these genes in the emerging lineage (> > 215.5 million years ago). In addition, ancestral character reconstruction analyses provided strong evidence that ancestral mammals possessed a nocturnal lifestyle, ultra-violet-sensitive vision, low visual acuity and low orbit convergence (i.e. panoramic vision). Overall, this study provides insight into the evolutionary history of the mammalian eye while discussing important ecological aspects of the photic paleo-environments ancestral mammals have occupied.

  7. Prognostic value of nocturnal pulse oximetry in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rivera-López, Ricardo; Jordán-Martínez, Laura; López-Fernández, Silvia; Rivera-Fernandez, Ricardo; Tercedor, Luis; Sáez-Roca, Germán

    2018-05-23

    To analyze the prognostic value of nocturnal hypoxemia measured with portable nocturnal pulse-oximetry in patients hospitalized due to heart failure and its relation to mortality and hospital readmission. We included 38 patients who were admitted consecutively to our unit with the diagnosis of decompensated heart failure. Pulse-oximetry was considered positive for hypoxemia when more than 10 desaturations per hour were recorded during sleep. Follow-up was performed for 30.3 (standard deviation [SD] 14.2) months, the main objective being a combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital readmission due to heart failure. The average age was 70.7 (SD 10.7) years, 63.3% were males. Pulse-oximetry was considered positive for hypoxemia in 27 (71%) patients. Patients with positive pulse-oximetry had the most frequent endpoint (9.1% [1] vs. 61.5% [16], P = 0.003). After multivariate analysis, continuous nocturnal hypoxemia was related to the combined endpoint (HR = 8.37, 1.19-68.4, P = 0.03). Patients hospitalized for heart failure and nocturnal hypoxemia measured with portable pulse-oximeter have an increased risk of hospital readmission and death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of Nocturnal Enuresis and Its Associated Factors in Primary School and Preschool Children of Khorramabad in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Katayoun; Pournia, Yadollah; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad; Farhadi, Ali; Shafizadeh, Fathollah; Hosseinabadi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nocturnal enuresis refers to an inability to control urination during sleep. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and its associated factors in children in the city of Khorramabad. Materials and Methods. In this descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional study, 710 male and female children were divided into two groups with equal numbers. The samples were selected from the schools of Khorramabad using the multistage cluster and stratified random sampling methods based on the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV. The data was analyzed using the logistic regression. Results. The results showed that 8% of the children had nocturnal enuresis, including 5.2% of primary nocturnal enuresis and 2.8% of secondary nocturnal enuresis. The prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in the boys (10.7%) was higher compared with that in the girls (5.4%) (P = 0.009). There were statistically significant relationships between nocturnal enuresis and history of nocturnal enuresis in siblings (P = 0.023), respiratory infections (P = 0.036), deep sleep (P = 0.007), corporal punishment at school (P = 0.036), anal itching (P = 0.043), and history of seizures (P = 0.043). Conclusion. This study showed that the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in the boys was higher compared with that in the girls. PMID:25374608

  9. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A.; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human–wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public

  10. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration.

    PubMed

    Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals' life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human-wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public

  11. Nocturnal Polyuria in Older Women with Urge Urinary Incontinence: Role of Sleep Quality, Time in Bed and Medications Used.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shachi; Perera, Subashan; Clarkson, Becky D; Tadic, Stasa D; Resnick, Neil M

    2017-03-01

    Nocturia is common and bothersome in older adults, especially those who are also incontinent. Since nocturnal polyuria is a major contributor, we examined factors associated with nocturnal polyuria in this population to identify those possibly amenable to intervention. We analyzed baseline data from 2 previously completed studies of urge urinary incontinence. The studies involved 284 women (mean age ± SD 72.9 ± 7.9 years) who also completed 3-day voiding diaries. Participants with a nocturnal polyuria index greater than 33% were categorized as having nocturnal polyuria (nocturnal polyuria index = nocturnal urinary volume per 24-hour urine volume). Associations between nocturnal polyuria and various demographic, clinical and sleep related parameters were determined. Overall 55% of the participants had nocturnal polyuria. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that age, body mass index, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, time spent in bed and duration of first uninterrupted sleep were independent correlates of nocturnal polyuria. Participants with a larger nocturnal excretion reported a shorter duration of uninterrupted sleep before first awakening to void and worse sleep quality despite spending similar time in bed. Body mass index, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers, time in bed and duration of uninterrupted sleep before first awakening to void are independently associated with nocturnal polyuria in older women with urge urinary incontinence, and are potentially modifiable. These findings also confirm the association between sleep and nocturnal polyuria. Further studies should explore whether interventions to reduce nocturnal polyuria and/or increase the duration of uninterrupted sleep before first awakening to void would help to improve sleep quality in this population and thereby reduce or eliminate the need for sedative hypnotics. Copyright © 2017 American Urological

  12. The association between nocturia and nocturnal polyuria in clinical and epidemiological studies: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Hofmeester, Ilse; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Steffens, Martijn G; Bosch, J L H Ruud; Drake, Marcus J; Weiss, Jeffrey P; Blanker, Marco H

    2014-04-01

    We determined the relationship between nocturia and nocturnal polyuria. The PubMed® and Embase® databases were searched for studies written in English, German, French or Dutch with original data on adult participants in an investigation of the relationship between nocturia and nocturnal polyuria. A meta-analysis of the difference in mean nocturnal voiding frequencies between patients with and without nocturnal polyuria was conducted. Nocturnal polyuria risk was compared between participants with and without nocturia, and the resulting odds ratio was subsequently converted to relative risk with 95% CIs. From 511 references identified we selected 78 publications of 66 studies, 15 of which met the inclusion criteria for this study. Quality scores of studies were generally high for internal validity but low for external validity. In 7 studies (1,416 participants) we estimated a standardized mean difference of 0.59 (95% CI 0.29-0.89) for nocturnal voids between nocturnal polyuria and nonnocturnal polyuria cases. In 8 other studies (with 2,320 participants) we calculated a pooled OR of 4.99 (3.92-6.37) for nocturnal polyuria in individuals with nocturia. The corresponding RR, based on a nocturnal polyuria risk in the pooled population of 63.8%, was 1.41 (1.37-1.44). The association between nocturia and nocturnal polyuria is apparent and robust. However, the clinical importance of the association appears to be less obvious than previously suggested based on single studies. The observed high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria, as a result of the applied International Continence Society definition, may be responsible for this discrepancy. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Heavy rainfall triggers increased nocturnal flight in desert populations of the Pacific black duck (Anas superciliosa).

    PubMed

    McEvoy, J F; Ribot, R F H; Wingfield, J C; Bennett, A T D

    2017-12-14

    Understanding of avian nocturnal flight comes mainly from northern hemisphere species in seasonal temperate ecosystems where nocturnal flight is often precisely timed and entrained by annual photoperiod. Here we investigate patterns of nocturnal flight in waterbirds of Australian desert ecosystems that fly considerable distances to find temporary water bodies formed from rainfall which is highly unpredictable seasonally and spatially, and when there is sufficient water, they then breed. How they perform these feats of navigation and physiology remain poorly known. Using GPS tracking of 38 satellite tagged Pacific black ducks (Anas superciliosa) in two contrasting ecosystems, before and after heavy rainfall we revealed a key role for facultative nocturnal flight in the movement ecology of this species. After large rainfall events, birds rapidly increased nocturnal flight activity in the arid aseasonal ecosystem, but not in the mesic seasonal one. Nocturnal flights occurred throughout the night in both ecosystems. Long range flights (>50 km in 2 hours) occurred almost exclusively at night; at night the distance flown was higher than during the day, birds visited more locations, and the locations were more widely dispersed. Our work reveals that heavy rainfall triggers increased nocturnal flight activity in desert populations of waterbirds.

  14. Increasing trunk flexion transforms human leg function into that of birds despite different leg morphology.

    PubMed

    Aminiaghdam, Soran; Rode, Christian; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    Pronograde trunk orientation in small birds causes prominent intra-limb asymmetries in the leg function. As yet, it is not clear whether these asymmetries induced by the trunk reflect general constraints on the leg function regardless of the specific leg architecture or size of the species. To address this, we instructed 12 human volunteers to walk at a self-selected velocity with four postures: regular erect, or with 30 deg, 50 deg and maximal trunk flexion. In addition, we simulated the axial leg force (along the line connecting hip and centre of pressure) using two simple models: spring and damper in series, and parallel spring and damper. As trunk flexion increases, lower limb joints become more flexed during stance. Similar to birds, the associated posterior shift of the hip relative to the centre of mass leads to a shorter leg at toe-off than at touchdown, and to a flatter angle of attack and a steeper leg angle at toe-off. Furthermore, walking with maximal trunk flexion induces right-skewed vertical and horizontal ground reaction force profiles comparable to those in birds. Interestingly, the spring and damper in series model provides a superior prediction of the axial leg force across trunk-flexed gaits compared with the parallel spring and damper model; in regular erect gait, the damper does not substantially improve the reproduction of the human axial leg force. In conclusion, mimicking the pronograde locomotion of birds by bending the trunk forward in humans causes a leg function similar to that of birds despite the different morphology of the segmented legs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  16. Light pollution modifies the expression of daily rhythms and behavior patterns in a nocturnal primate.

    PubMed

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14(th) night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.

  17. Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate

    PubMed Central

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes. PMID:24236115

  18. Cyclic nocturnal awakening: a warning sign of a cluster bout.

    PubMed

    Martins, Isabel Pavão

    2015-04-01

    Cluster headache is an excruciating unilateral headache with autonomic symptoms whose periodic nocturnal activity, which interrupts sleep, has been attributed to a hypothalamic generator. We describe a patient with a longstanding episodic cluster headache who experienced, on two occasions, a period of nocturnal awakenings without pain or autonomic symptoms, lasting one week before the onset of a cluster bout. Awakenings occurred twice/night at the same hours of impending cluster attacks and had no apparent trigger, being unusual for this patient who had no previous sleep disturbances. Neurological examination and brain imaging were normal. This case documents two new aspects of cluster headache. It suggests that repeated nocturnal awakenings can be a warning sign of an impending cluster period, a finding that may have therapeutic implications, and also that hypothalamic activation may begin several days before trigemino-autonomic symptoms, thus behaving as a true bout generator. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. The relative importance of olfaction and vision in a diurnal and a nocturnal hawkmoth.

    PubMed

    Balkenius, Anna; Rosén, Wenqi; Kelber, Almut

    2006-04-01

    Nectar-feeding animals can use vision and olfaction to find rewarding flowers and different species may give different weight to the two sensory modalities. We have studied how a diurnal or nocturnal lifestyle affects the weight given to vision and olfaction. We tested naïve hawkmoths of two species in a wind tunnel, presenting an odour source and a visual stimulus. Although the two species belong to the same subfamily of sphingids, the Macroglossinae, their behaviour was quite different. The nocturnal Deilephila elpenor responded preferably to the odour while the diurnal Macroglossum stellatarum strongly favoured the visual stimulus. Since a nocturnal lifestyle is ancestral for sphingids, the diurnal species, M. stellatarum, has evolved from nocturnal moths that primarily used olfaction. During bright daylight visual cues may have became more important than odour.

  20. Effects of Night-Time Use of Rotigotine on Nocturnal Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vallderiola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Aparicio, Javier; Tarradellas, Jaume; Salazar, Gabriel; Oliver, Josep María; Callén, Antonio; Delgado, Tania; Nobbe, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This open-label study assessed the efficacy and safety of exclusive night-time administration of transdermal rotigotine in patients with nocturnal and early morning PD symptoms. Methods. Patients with PD and nocturnal and early morning symptoms received transdermal rotigotine patches (2–16 mg/24 h) applied in the evening and removed in the morning for 3 months. Sleep disturbance was assessed with modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2). Other outcomes included a pain visual analogue scale (VAS) and short-form Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) for quality of life. Results. 74 patients completed treatment in this study. At the end of treatment, PDSS-2 total score had improved by mean 10.9 points from baseline (p < 0.001). All three PDSS-2 domain scores (sleep disturbances, nocturnal motor symptoms, and nocturnal symptoms) were also significantly improved by 41%, 56%, and 48%, respectively (p < 0.001). VAS-pain score decreased from 3.2 to 2.3 (p < 0.001). PDQ-8 score decreased from 23.8 to 18.1 (p < 0.001). The most frequently reported adverse events included nausea (9%), anxiety (4%), and dizziness (4%). Conclusions. Night-time administration of transdermal rotigotine is an effective and well tolerated treatment for nocturnal symptoms in patients with PD. PMID:26576319

  1. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. ...

  2. The Behavioral Treatment of Childhood Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Notes that of the treatments attempted for nocturnal enuresis, pharmacotherapy, individual psychotherapy, and behavioral conditioning, the most effective is behavioral conditioning with a urine alarm. Reviews the enuresis literature and provides recommendations for use of the urine alarm approach. (Author/ABB)

  3. Adaptation to Life in the High Andes: Nocturnal Oxyhemoglobin Saturation in Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine Mary; Baya, Ana; Gavlak, Johanna; Carroll, Annette; Heathcote, Kate; Dimitriou, Dagmara; L'Esperance, Veline; Webster, Rebecca; Holloway, John; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Kirkham, Fenella Jane; Bucks, Romola Starr; Hogan, Alexandra Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Physiological adaptation to high altitude hypoxia may be impaired in Andeans with significant European ancestry. The respiratory ‘burden’ of sleep may challenge adaptation, leading to relative nocturnal hypoxia. Developmental aspects of sleep-related breathing in high-altitude native children have not previously been reported. We aimed to determine the influence of development on diurnal-nocturnal oxyhemoglobin differences in children living at high altitude. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study. Seventy-five healthy Bolivian children aged 6 mo to 17 y, native to low altitude (500 m), moderate high altitude (2,500 m), and high altitude (3,700 m) were recruited. Daytime resting pulse oximetry was compared to overnight recordings using Masimo radical oximeters. Genetic ancestry was determined from DNA samples. Results: Children had mixed European/Amerindian ancestry, with no significant differences between altitudes. Sixty-two participants had ≥ 5 h of nocturnal, artifact-free data. As predicted, diurnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased across altitudes (infants and children, both P < 0.001), with lowest diurnal values at high altitude in infants. At high altitude, there was a greater drop in nocturnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation (infants, P < 0.001; children, P = 0.039) and an increase in variability (all P ≤ 0.001) compared to low altitude. Importantly, diurnal to nocturnal altitude differences diminished (P = 0.036), from infancy to childhood, with no further change during adolescence. Conclusions: Physiological adaptation to high-altitude living in native Andeans is unlikely to compensate for the significant differences we observed between diurnal and nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation, most marked in infancy. This vulnerability to sleep-related hypoxia in early childhood has potential lifespan implications. Future studies should characterize the sleep- related respiratory physiology underpinning our

  4. A new method for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Ai, M; Mizutani, H

    1993-09-01

    A new portable system for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts has been devised. This system was suitable for patients to take home and record tooth contacts by themselves. A micro photo sensor using optical fibres was applied to detect tooth contacts. The sensor and the target were accurately fixed to opposed molars, respectively on the same side, with removable metal attachments. Patients were instructed to set the attachment to their tooth each experimental night. In the present study, data was assembled for four or five nights in three subjects who were free of masticatory pain and dysfunction. Each subject showed an individual tooth contact pattern. It is suggested that this new system is useful and convenient for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts.

  5. Do high fasting glucose levels suggest nocturnal hypoglycaemia? The Somogyi effect-more fiction than fact?

    PubMed

    Choudhary, P; Davies, C; Emery, C J; Heller, S R

    2013-08-01

    The Somogyi effect postulates that nocturnal hypoglycaemia causes fasting hyperglycaemia attributable to counter-regulatory hormone release. Although most published evidence has failed to support this hypothesis, this concept remains firmly embedded in clinical practice and often prevents patients and professionals from optimizing overnight insulin. Previous observational data found lower fasting glucose was associated with nocturnal hypoglycaemia, but did not assess the probability of infrequent individual episodes of rebound hypoglycaemia. We analysed continuous glucose monitoring data to explore its prevalence. We analysed data from 89 patients with Type 1 diabetes who participated in the UK Hypoglycaemia study. We compared fasting capillary glucose following nights with and without nocturnal hypoglycaemia (sensor glucose < 3.5 mmol/l). Fasting capillary blood glucose was lower after nights with hypoglycaemia than without [5.5 (3.0) vs. 14.5 (4.5) mmol/l, P < 0.0001], and was lower on nights with more severe nocturnal hypoglycaemia [5.5 (3.0) vs. 8.2 (2.3) mmol/l; P = 0.018 on nights with nadir sensor glucose of < 2.2 mmol/l vs. 3.5 mmol/l]. There were only two instances of fasting capillary blood glucose > 10 mmol/l after nocturnal hypoglycaemia, both after likely treatment of the episode. When fasting capillary blood glucose is < 5 mmol/l, there was evidence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia on 94% of nights. Our data indicate that, in clinical practice, the Somogyi effect is rare. Fasting capillary blood glucose ≤ 5 mmol/l appears an important indicator of preceding silent nocturnal hypoglycaemia. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  6. Nicardipine

    MedlinePlus

    ... fast heartbeat muscle cramps constipation heartburn increased sweating dry mouth If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment: swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs difficulty breathing or ...

  7. Environmental enrichment for a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Fay E; Melfi, Vicky A

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an integral aspect of modern zoo animal management but, empirical evaluation of it is biased toward species housed in single-species groups. Nocturnal houses, where several nocturnal species are housed together, are particularly overlooked. This study investigated whether three species (nine-banded armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus; Senegal bush babies, Galago senegalensis; two-toed sloths, Choloepus didactylus) in the nocturnal house at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, UK could be enriched using food-based and sensory EE. Subjects were an adult male and female of each species. EE was deemed effective if it promoted target species-typical behaviors, behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones. Results from generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that food-based EE elicited the most positive behavioral effects across species. One set of food-based EEs (Kong®, termite mound and hanging food) presented together was associated with a significant increase in species-typical behaviors, increased behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones in armadillos and bush babies. Although one type of sensory EE (scented pine cones) increased overall exhibit use in all species, the other (rainforest sounds) was linked to a significant decrease in species-typical behavior in bush babies and sloths. There were no intra or interspecies conflicts over EE, and commensalism occurred between armadillos and bush babies. Our data demonstrate that simple food-based and sensory EE can promote positive behavioral changes in a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit. We suggest that both food and sensory EE presented concurrently will maximize opportunities for naturalistic activity in all species. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Short daily-, nocturnal- and conventional-home hemodialysis have similar patient and treatment survival.

    PubMed

    Tennankore, Karthik K; Na, Yingbo; Wald, Ron; Chan, Christopher T; Perl, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Home hemodialysis (HHD) has many benefits, but less is known about relative outcomes when comparing different home-based hemodialysis modalities. Here, we compare patient and treatment survival for patients receiving short daily HHD (2-3 hours/5 plus sessions per week), nocturnal HHD (6-8 hours/5 plus sessions per week) and conventional HHD (3-6 hours/2-4 sessions per week). A nationally representative cohort of Canadian HHD patients from 1996-2012 was studied. The primary outcome was death or treatment failure (defined as a permanent return to in-center hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) using an intention to treat analysis and death-censored treatment failure as a secondary outcome. The cohort consisted of 600, 508 and 202 patients receiving conventional, nocturnal, and short daily HHD, respectively. Conventional-HHD patients were more likely to use dialysis catheter access (43%) versus nocturnal or short daily HHD (32% and 31%, respectively). Although point estimates were in favor of both therapies, after multivariable adjustment for patient and center factors, there was no statistically significant reduction in the relative hazard for the death/treatment failure composite comparing nocturnal to conventional HHD (hazard ratio 0.83 [95% confidence interval 0.66-1.03]) or short daily to conventional HHD (0.84, 0.63-1.12). Among those with information on vascular access, patients receiving nocturnal HHD had a relative improvement in death-censored treatment survival (0.75, 0.57-0.98). Thus, in this national cohort of HHD patients, those receiving short daily and nocturnal HHD had similar patient/treatment survival compared with patients receiving conventional HHD. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lack of nocturnal blood pressure fall in elderly bedridden hypertensive patients with cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masato; Ando, Hitoshi; Fujimura, Akio

    2012-02-01

    To prevent recurrence of cerebrovascular disease (CVD), adequate control of blood pressure (BP) is extremely important for the treatment of hypertensive CVD patients. As absence of the nocturnal fall of BP by the expected 10-20% from daytime levels is reported to exaggerate target organ injury, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was conducted, especially to obtain data during nighttime sleep. Forty-eight elderly bedridden chronic phase CVD hypertensive patients (assessed 1-3 mo after CVD accident) participated. As a group, nocturnal BP was higher than diurnal BP, whereas nocturnal pulse rate was lower than diurnal pulse rate. The nocturnal BP fall was blunted in most (∼90%) of the patients. These results suggest that to perform a rational drug treatment, it is essential to do 24-h ABPM before initiation of antihypertensive therapy in elderly bedridden hypertensive CVD patients.

  10. A model for nocturnal frost formation on a wing section: Aircraft takeoff performance penalties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietenberger, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The nocturnal frost formation on a wing section, to explain the hazard associated with frost during takeoff was investigated. A model of nocturnal frost formation on a wing section which predicts when the nocturnal frost will form and also its thickness and density as a function of time was developed. The aerodynamic penalities as related to the nocturnal frost formation properties were analyzed to determine how much the takeoff performance would be degraded by a specific frost layer. With an aircraft takeoff assuming equations representing a steady climbing flight, it is determined that a reduction in the maximum gross weight or a partial frost clearance and a reduction in the takeoff angle of attack is needed to neutralize drag and life penalities which are due to frost. Atmospheric conditions which produce the most hazardous frost buildup are determined.

  11. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  12. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced modulations of resting state motor connectivity in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Bharath, R D; Biswal, B B; Bhaskar, M V; Gohel, S; Jhunjhunwala, K; Panda, R; George, L; Gupta, A K; Pal, P K

    2015-05-01

    Writer's cramp (WC) is a focal task-specific dystonia of the hand which is increasingly being accepted as a network disorder. Non-invasive cortical stimulation using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has produced therapeutic benefits in some of these patients. This study aimed to visualize the motor network abnormalities in WC and also its rTMS induced modulations using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Nineteen patients with right-sided WC and 20 matched healthy controls (HCs) were prospectively evaluated. All patients underwent a single session of rTMS and rsfMRI was acquired before (R1) and after (R2) rTMS. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis of several regions in the motor network was performed for HCs, R1 and R2 using SPM8 software. Thresholded (P < 0.05, false discovery rate corrected) group level mean correlation maps were used to derive significantly connected region of interest pairs. Writer's cramp showed a significant reduction in resting state functional connectivity in comparison with HCs involving the left cerebellum, thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, bilateral supplementary motor area, right medial prefrontal lobe and right post central gyrus. After rTMS there was a significant increase in the contralateral resting state functional connectivity through the left thalamus-right globus pallidus-right thalamus-right prefrontal lobe network loop. It is concluded that WC is a network disorder with widespread dysfunction much larger than clinically evident and changes induced by rTMS probably act through subcortical and trans-hemispheric unaffected connections. Longitudinal studies with therapeutic rTMS will be required to ascertain whether such information could be used to select patients prior to rTMS therapy. © 2015 EAN.

  13. Somatosensory cortical remodelling after rehabilitation and clinical benefit of in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Bleton, Jean Pierre; Vidailhet, Marie; Bourdain, Frédéric; Ducorps, Antoine; Schwartz, Denis; Delmaire, Christine; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Renault, Bernard; Garnero, Line; Meunier, Sabine

    2011-05-01

    In order to explore the pathophysiological basis of a new rehabilitation therapy in writer's cramp (WC), healthy controls, untreated WC patients and WC patients who recovered a legible handwriting after rehabilitation were explored using magnetoencephalography, and the somatosensory evoked fields of fingers I, II, III and V in the sensory cortex were studied. In the cortex controlling the dystonic limb, the size of the hand representation in the trained patients was similar to that of healthy controls, and significantly different from that of untrained patients. Trained patients exhibited 'super-normal' reorganisation of the finger maps. In the cortex controlling the non-dystonic limb, there was little difference between trained and untrained patients, and the hand representation was enlarged and disorganised. The authors hypothesise that prolonged tailored rehabilitation in WC may induce long-term plasticity phenomena, lateralised to the cortex controlling the dystonic hand.

  14. Anterior urethral valve in an adolescent with nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia Chang; Yang, Stephen Shei Dei; Tsai, Yao Chou

    2007-11-01

    The anterior urethral valve (AUV) is a rare congenital urethral anomaly that can lead to variable urinary tract symptoms. We report on a 13-year-old boy with AUV who was referred from a primary care physician for nocturnal enuresis. AUV was disclosed by videourodynamic study and confirmed by simultaneous retrograde cystourethroscopy and antegrade urethroscopy. The AUV was ablated by neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet contact laser at the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock directions. A postoperative videourodynamic study depicted a patent urethra, a good maximal flow rate, and improved bladder capacity. His nocturnal enuresis had completely subsided at a follow-up period of longer than 24 months.

  15. Understanding nocturnal enuresis and its treatments.

    PubMed

    Potter, D C; Wogoman, H A; Nietch, P

    1999-09-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is a condition that touches the lives of many children around the world. Affected children and their parents may experience feelings of guilt, frustration, and anxiety because of their lack of control over the situation. Nurses can play an important role in providing education to families in regards to the causes and treatment of enuresis. It is important for nurses to understand the problem of bedwetting thoroughly so they can assist the family in making an informed decision about the various options currently available. Nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) is a common disorder that frequently results in frustration and stress on not only the children that experience it, but their parents as well. Scharf, Pravda, Jennings, Kauffman, and Ringel (1987) note that an estimated five to seven million children in America experience enuresis. Enuresis has family and psychosocial aspects, along with financial concerns. Therefore, it is important for nurses to be aware of the causes of enuresis, how it affects the family, and the current treatments that are available.

  16. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  17. Evaluation of the occurrence and diagnose definitions for Nocturnal Polyuria in Spinal Cord Injured patients during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Viaene, Annick; Denys, Marie-Astrid; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Claeys, Jana; Raes, Ann; Roggeman, Saskia; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-03

    Little is known about the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria in spinal cord injured (SCI) patients and the definitions which are preferable in this population. To determine the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria (NP) in spinal cord injured patients during in-patient rehabilitation in the Ghent University Hospital. To study the influence of different time periods (daytime, bed rest and sleep) on the accuracy of the existing diagnose definitions for NP specifically for this type of patients. Retrospective study using patient records. SCI patients during hospital based rehabilitation between 2011 and 2014. Seventy-four SCI patients were selected and their records of frequency-volume charts were examined, after exclusion of unreliable data, forty-seven patients were retained for the current study. Retrospective study using data from frequency-volume charts of either two or three days from patients with SCI. Nocturnal urine production (NUP) and nocturnal polyuria index (NPi) were calculated. There was a significant increase in diuresis, calculated as urine production, between day time and bed rest (p=0.008) and between day time and sleep (p=0.001). All patients showed nocturnal polyuria during a 12-hour night time period (including both bed rest and sleep) and 39 patients showed nocturnal polyuria during the 8 hour period of sleep. There was no significant difference in mean urine production between bed rest and sleep. Prevalence of NP did not significantly differ between the complete or incomplete SCI patients or between patients with higher and lower SCI levels. This study showed that the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria in patients with SCI is high and that it is important to consider which definitions of NP are used for diagnosis. Increase in diuresis is observed during bed rest and sleep and the diagnose is correctly estimated when nocturnal urine production definitions are used in both time periods. In accordance with what was expected, diagnose of NP was

  18. Interactive influences of ethnicity, endothelin-1 gene, and everyday discrimination upon nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Gregoski, Mathew J; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Kapuku, Gaston; Dong, Yanbin; Zhu, Haidong; Davis, Mary; Gonto, Kelsey; Treiber, Frank A

    2013-06-01

    Everyday discrimination scale scores are associated with increased ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and reduced nocturnal dipping, and the endothelin-1 (ET-1)/Lys198Asn polymorphism is associated with increased resting BP and exaggerated BP reactivity among African Americans compared to European Americans. Combined influences of these factors on BP control are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis of a three-way interaction between ethnicity, ET-1 carrier status, and everyday discrimination upon ambulatory BP and nocturnal dipping. Baseline laboratory anthropometrics and the everyday discrimination scale were completed by 352 (175 African American) young adult normotensives, followed by 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring. For nocturnal dipping, multiple regression models controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, and body mass index revealed significant three-way ET-1 × everyday discrimination × ethnicity interactions. Specifically, among African American ET-1 T-allele carriers, increases in everyday discrimination led to reduced nocturnal dipping. African Americans that carry the ET-1/Lys198Asn T-allele and report higher everyday discrimination scores may be at particular risk for reduced nocturnal dipping.

  19. Interactive Influences of Ethnicity, Endothelin-1 Gene, and Everyday Discrimination Upon Nocturnal Ambulatory Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gregoski, Mathew J.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Kapuku, Gaston; Dong, Yanbin; Zhu, Haidong; Davis, Mary; Gonto, Kelsey; Treiber, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Everyday discrimination scale scores are associated with increased ambulatory blood pressure (BP), and reduced nocturnal dipping, and the ET-1/Lys198Asn polymorphism is associated with increased resting BP and exaggerated BP reactivity among African Americans compared to European Americans. Combined influences of these factors on BP control are unknown. Purpose This study tested the hypothesis of a three-way interaction between ethnicity, ET-1 carrier status and everyday discrimination upon ambulatory BP and nocturnal dipping. Methods Baseline laboratory anthropometrics and the everyday discrimination scale were completed by 351 (175 African American) young adult normotensives; followed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Results For nocturnal dipping, multiple regression models controlling for age, sex, race, and BMI revealed significant three-way ET-1 x everyday discrimination x ethnicity interactions. Specifically, among African American ET-1 T-allele carriers, increases in everyday discrimination led to reduced nocturnal dipping. Conclusions African Americans that carry the ET1/Lys198Asn T-allele and report higher everyday discrimination scores may be at particular risk for reduced nocturnal dipping. PMID:23436272

  20. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetic patients, assessed with continuous glucose monitoring: frequency, duration and associations.

    PubMed

    Wentholt, I M E; Maran, A; Masurel, N; Heine, R J; Hoekstra, J B L; DeVries, J H

    2007-05-01

    We quantified the occurrence and duration of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in individuals with Type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or multiple-injection therapy (MIT) using a continuous subcutaneous glucose sensor. A microdialysis sensor was worn at home by 24 patients on CSII (mean HbA(1c) 7.8 +/- 0.9%) and 33 patients on MIT (HbA(1c) 8.7 +/- 1.3%) for 48 h. Occurrence and duration of nocturnal hypoglycaemia were assessed and using multivariate regression analysis, the association between HbA(1c), diabetes duration, treatment type (CSII vs. MIT), fasting and bedtime blood glucose values, total daily insulin dose and mean nocturnal glucose concentrations, and hypoglycaemia occurrence and duration was investigated. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia < or = 3.9 mmol/l occurred in 33.3% of both the CSII- (8/24) and MIT-treated patients (11/33). Mean (+/- sd; median, interquartile range) duration of hypoglycaemia < or = 3.9 mmol/l was 78 (+/- 76; 57, 23-120) min per night for the CSII- and 98 (+/- 80; 81, 32-158) min per night for the MIT-treated group. Multivariate regression analysis showed that bedtime glucose value had the strongest association with the occurrence (P = 0.026) and duration (P = 0.032) of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Microdialysis continuous glucose monitoring has enabled more precise quantification of nocturnal hypoglycaemia occurrence and duration in Type 1 diabetic patients. Occurrence and duration of nocturnal hypoglycaemia were mainly associated with bedtime glucose value.

  1. Getting a good night sleep? The importance of recognizing and treating nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2018-05-01

    When Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are asked about the quality of their sleep, their answers are dominated by difficulties associated with impaired mobility in bed, medically referred to as nocturnal hypokinesia. Nocturnal hypokinesia is symptomatic from the mid-stage of the disease, affecting up to 70% of PD patients, and contributes to poor sleep quality, and increased carer burden. Here we explore four areas of nocturnal hypokinesia that are relevant to clinical practice, namely: manifestations and definition; clinical assessment and objective monitoring; etiologies and contributing factors; and evidence-based therapeutic approaches. In addition, we provide an operational definition of what constitutes nocturnal hypokinesia and outline different methods of assessment, ranging from clinical interviews and rating scales to objective night-time monitoring with inertial sensors. Optimal management of nocturnal hypokinesia in PD begins with recognizing its manifestation by inquiring about cardinal symptoms and contributing factors from, not only patients, but also carers, followed by formal assessment, and the application of individualized evidence-based treatment. Night-time dopaminergic treatment is the primary therapy; however, careful clinical judgment is required to balance the benefits with the potential adverse events related to nocturnal dopaminergic stimulation. Future studies are needed to explore the practicality of home-based objective assessment of nocturnal hypokinesia, new therapeutic options not limited to dopaminergic medications, and non-pharmacologic approaches, including training on compensatory strategies and bedroom adaptations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormalities of Eye-Hand Coordination in Patients with Writer's Cramp: Possible Role of the Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Kotikalapudi, Raviteja; Lenka, Abhishek; Thennarassu, Kandavel; Yadav, Ravi; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Writer's cramp (WC) is one of the commonly observed focal dystonias. The pathophysiology of WC has not been fully understood. The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis of dystonia. As the cerebellum is crucial for maintaining accurate eye-hand coordination (EHC), its role in the pathogenesis of WC can be investigated by studying the EHC in patients with WC. Fifteen patients with WC (women:men, 3:12) and 15 age- and gender-matched controls performed oculomotor and EHC tasks. A visually guided stimulus (VGS) task was first performed with eye-only condition (EOC) and then with EHC. A significant interaction between the groups (controls and patients) and tasks (EOC and EHC) with age as a covariate confirmed that the two groups reacted differently to the tasks in saccadic latency (F(1,27) = 4.8; p = 0.039) and average saccade acceleration (F(1,27) = 10.6; p = 0.003). The curvature index of acceleration of the hand was significantly more in patients compared to controls (patients vs. controls, 2.4±0.4 vs. 1.8±0.2, p = 0.01). While performing the EHC task, there was a significant correlation of the Writer's Cramp Rating Score with the average saccadic speed (-0.61, p = 0.016), peak saccadic deceleration (0.59, p = 0.019) and average saccadic acceleration (-0.63, p = 0.012). Saccadic acceleration and latency are abnormal while performing EHC tasks in patients with WC. Our study gives further insights into the possible role of the cerebellum in the pathogenesis of WC.

  3. Scale Modelling of Nocturnal Cooling in Urban Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spronken-Smith, R. A.; Oke, T. R.

    Scale modelling is used to determine the relative contribution of heat transfer processes to the nocturnal cooling of urban parks and the characteristic temporal and spatial variation of surface temperature. Validation is achieved using a hardware model-to-numerical model-to-field observation chain of comparisons. For the calm case, modelling shows that urban-park differences of sky view factor (s) and thermal admittance () are the relevant properties governing the park cool island (PCI) effect. Reduction in sky view factor by buildings and trees decreases the drain of longwave radiation from the surface to the sky. Thus park areas near the perimeter where there may be a line of buildings or trees, or even sites within a park containing tree clumps or individual trees, generally cool less than open areas. The edge effect applies within distances of about 2.2 to 3.5 times the height of the border obstruction, i.e., to have any part of the park cooling at the maximum rate a square park must be at least twice these dimensions in width. Although the central areas of parks larger than this will experience greater cooling they will accumulate a larger volume of cold air that may make it possible for them to initiate a thermal circulation and extend the influence of the park into the surrounding city. Given real world values of s and it seems likely that radiation and conduction play almost equal roles in nocturnal PCI development. Evaporation is not a significant cooling mechanism in the nocturnal calm case but by day it is probably critical in establishing a PCI by sunset. It is likely that conditions that favour PCI by day (tree shade, soil wetness) retard PCI growth at night. The present work, which only deals with PCI growth, cannot predict which type of park will be coolest at night. Complete specification of nocturnal PCI magnitude requires knowledge of the PCI at sunset, and this depends on daytime energetics.

  4. Hiatal hernia predisposes to nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Karamanolis, Georgios; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Adamopoulos, Adam; Barbatzas, Charalampos; Vafiadis, Irini; Ladas, Spiros D

    2013-06-01

    Nocturnal reflux has been associated with severe complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and a poorer quality of life. Hiatal hernia predisposes to increased oesophageal acid exposure, but the effect on night reflux symptoms has never been investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate if hiatal hernia is associated with more frequent and severe night reflux symptoms. A total of 215 consecutive patients (110 male, mean age 52.6 ± 14.7 years) answered a detailed questionnaire on frequency and severity of specific day and night reflux symptoms. Subsequently, all patients underwent upper endoscopy and were categorized in two groups based on the endoscopic presence of hiatal hernia. Patients with hiatal hernia were more likely to have nocturnal symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia (78.6 vs. 51.8%, p = 0.0001); 59.2% of patients with hiatal hernia reported heartburn and 60.2% regurgitation compared to 43.8 and 39.3% of those without hiatal hernia, respectively (p = 0.033 and p = 0.003). The proportions of patients with day heartburn or regurgitation were not significantly different between the two groups. Night heartburn and regurgitation were graded as significantly more severe by patients with hiatal hernia (4.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.2 ± 3.7, p = 0.002, and 3.8 ± 4.2 vs. 2.2 ± 3.5, p = 0.001, respectively). Patients with hiatal hernia had more frequent weekly night heartburn and regurgitation compared to those without hiatal hernia (p = 0.004 and p = 0.008, respectively). More patients with hiatal hernia reported nocturnal reflux symptoms compared to those without hiatal hernia. Furthermore, nocturnal reflux symptoms were significantly more frequent and graded as significantly more severe in patients with presence of hiatal hernia rather than in those without hiatal hernia.

  5. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and telomere length predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sekiya, Yuko; Okuno, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Nao; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Kawashima, Nozomu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kudo, Kazuko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease characterized by severe defects in stem cell number resulting in hypocellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenias. Minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and a short telomere length were identified as predictive biomarkers of immunosuppressive therapy responsiveness in aplastic anemia. We enrolled 113 aplastic anemia patients (63 boys and 50 girls) in this study to evaluate their response to immunosuppressive therapy. The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and telomere length were detected by flow cytometry. Forty-seven patients (42%) carried a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population. The median telomere length of aplastic anemia patients was −0.99 standard deviation (SD) (range −4.01–+3.01 SD). Overall, 60 patients (53%) responded to immunosuppressive therapy after six months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the absence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a shorter telomere length as independent unfavorable predictors of immunosuppressive therapy response at six months. The cohort was stratified into a group of poor prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria negative and shorter telomere length; 37 patients) and good prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria positive and/or longer telomere length; 76 patients), respectively. The response rates of the poor prognosis and good prognosis groups at six months were 19% and 70%, respectively (P<0.001). The combined absence of a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a short telomere length is an efficient predictor of poor immunosuppressive therapy response, which should be considered while deciding treatment options: immunosuppressive therapy or first-line hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The trial was registered in www.umin.ac.jp with number UMIN000017972. PMID:26315930

  6. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and telomere length predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sekiya, Yuko; Okuno, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Nao; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Kawashima, Nozomu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kudo, Kazuko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease characterized by severe defects in stem cell number resulting in hypocellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenias. Minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and a short telomere length were identified as predictive biomarkers of immunosuppressive therapy responsiveness in aplastic anemia. We enrolled 113 aplastic anemia patients (63 boys and 50 girls) in this study to evaluate their response to immunosuppressive therapy. The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and telomere length were detected by flow cytometry. Forty-seven patients (42%) carried a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population. The median telomere length of aplastic anemia patients was -0.99 standard deviation (SD) (range -4.01-+3.01 SD). Overall, 60 patients (53%) responded to immunosuppressive therapy after six months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the absence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a shorter telomere length as independent unfavorable predictors of immunosuppressive therapy response at six months. The cohort was stratified into a group of poor prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria negative and shorter telomere length; 37 patients) and good prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria positive and/or longer telomere length; 76 patients), respectively. The response rates of the poor prognosis and good prognosis groups at six months were 19% and 70%, respectively (P<0.001). The combined absence of a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a short telomere length is an efficient predictor of poor immunosuppressive therapy response, which should be considered while deciding treatment options: immunosuppressive therapy or first-line hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The trial was registered in www.umin.ac.jp with number UMIN000017972. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Are the hamstrings from the drive leg or landing leg more active in baseball pitchers? An electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Zaferiou, Antonia; Chalmers, Peter N; Ruby, Deana; Malloy, Phillip; Luchetti, Timothy J; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2017-11-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) has become a common procedure among baseball players of all levels. There are several graft choices in performing UCLR, one of which is a hamstring (gracilis or semitendinosus) autograft. It is unclear whether the hamstring muscle from a pitcher's drive leg (ipsilateral side of the UCLR) or landing leg (contralateral side of the UCLR) is more active during the pitching motion. We hypothesized that the landing leg semitendinosus will be more electromyographically active than the drive leg. Healthy, elite male pitchers aged 16-21 years were recruited. Sixteen pitchers (average age, 17.6 ± 1.6 years; 67% threw right handed) underwent electromyographic analysis. Pitchers threw 5 fastballs at 100% effort from the wind-up with electromyographic analysis of every pitch. Activation of the semitendinosus and biceps femoris in both legs was compared within pitchers and between pitchers. Hamstring activity was higher in the drive leg than in the landing leg during each phase and in sum, although the difference was significant only during the double support phase (P = .021). On within-pitcher analysis, 10 of 16 pitchers had significantly more sum hamstring activity in the drive leg than in the landing leg, while only 4 of 16 had more activity in the landing leg (P = .043). During the baseball pitch, muscle activity of the semitendinosus was higher in the drive leg than in the landing leg in most pitchers. Surgeons performing UCLR using hamstring autograft should consider harvesting the graft from the pitcher's landing leg to minimize disruption to the athlete's pitching motion. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Visual Navigation in Nocturnal Insects.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Despite their tiny eyes and brains, nocturnal insects have evolved a remarkable capacity to visually navigate at night. Whereas some use moonlight or the stars as celestial compass cues to maintain a straight-line course, others use visual landmarks to navigate to and from their nest. These impressive abilities rely on highly sensitive compound eyes and specialized visual processing strategies in the brain. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  9. Adaptation to Life in the High Andes: Nocturnal Oxyhemoglobin Saturation in Early Development.

    PubMed

    Hill, Catherine Mary; Baya, Ana; Gavlak, Johanna; Carroll, Annette; Heathcote, Kate; Dimitriou, Dagmara; L'Esperance, Veline; Webster, Rebecca; Holloway, John; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Kirkham, Fenella Jane; Bucks, Romola Starr; Hogan, Alexandra Marie

    2016-05-01

    Physiological adaptation to high altitude hypoxia may be impaired in Andeans with significant European ancestry. The respiratory 'burden' of sleep may challenge adaptation, leading to relative nocturnal hypoxia. Developmental aspects of sleep-related breathing in high-altitude native children have not previously been reported. We aimed to determine the influence of development on diurnal-nocturnal oxyhemoglobin differences in children living at high altitude. This was a cross-sectional, observational study. Seventy-five healthy Bolivian children aged 6 mo to 17 y, native to low altitude (500 m), moderate high altitude (2,500 m), and high altitude (3,700 m) were recruited. Daytime resting pulse oximetry was compared to overnight recordings using Masimo radical oximeters. Genetic ancestry was determined from DNA samples. Children had mixed European/Amerindian ancestry, with no significant differences between altitudes. Sixty-two participants had ≥ 5 h of nocturnal, artifact-free data. As predicted, diurnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation decreased across altitudes (infants and children, both P < 0.001), with lowest diurnal values at high altitude in infants. At high altitude, there was a greater drop in nocturnal mean oxyhemoglobin saturation (infants, P < 0.001; children, P = 0.039) and an increase in variability (all P ≤ 0.001) compared to low altitude. Importantly, diurnal to nocturnal altitude differences diminished (P = 0.036), from infancy to childhood, with no further change during adolescence. Physiological adaptation to high-altitude living in native Andeans is unlikely to compensate for the significant differences we observed between diurnal and nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation, most marked in infancy. This vulnerability to sleep-related hypoxia in early childhood has potential lifespan implications. Future studies should characterize the sleep- related respiratory physiology underpinning our observations. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies

  10. Circadian rhythm of a Silene species favours nocturnal pollination and constrains diurnal visitation

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Benítez, Samuel; Dötterl, Stefan; Giménez-Benavides, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Traits related to flower advertisement and reward sometimes vary in a circadian way, reflecting phenotypic specialization. However, specialized flowers are not necessarily restricted to specialized pollinators. This is the case of most Silene species, typically associated with diurnal or nocturnal syndromes of pollination but usually showing complex suites of pollinators. Methods A Silene species with mixed floral features between diurnal and nocturnal syndromes was used to test how petal opening, nectar production, scent emission and pollination success correlate in a circadian rhythm, and whether this is influenced by environmental conditions. The effect of diurnal and nocturnal visitation rates on plant reproductive success is also explored in three populations, including the effect of the pollinating seed predator Hadena sancta. Key Results The result showed that repeated petal opening at dusk was correlated with nectar secretion and higher scent production during the night. However, depending on environmental conditions, petals remain opened for a while in the morning, when nectar and pollen still were available. Pollen deposition was similarly effective at night and in the morning, but less effective in the afternoon. These results were consistent with field studies. Conclusions The circadian rhythm regulating floral attractiveness and reward in S. colorata is predominantly adapted to nocturnal flower visitors. However, favourable environmental conditions lengthen the optimal daily period of flower attraction and pollination towards morning. This allows the complementarity of day and night pollination. Diurnal pollination may help to compensate the plant reproductive success when nocturnal pollinators are scarce and when the net outcome of H. sancta shifts from mutualism to parasitism. These results suggest a functional mechanism explaining why the supposed nocturnal syndrome of many Silene species does not successfully predict their

  11. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximum deviation, and velocity on the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes of center of pressure were measured. [Results] In balance assessment with eyes open, there were significant differences between groups according to hip joint angle, except for maximum deviation on the anteroposterior axis. In balance assessment with eyes closed, there were significant differences between total length measurements at 0° and 30°, 60° and between 30° and 90°. There were significant differences between sway velocity measurements at 0° and 30° and between 30° and 90°. [Conclusion] Thus, there were differences in static balance according to hip joint angle. It is necessary to clearly identify the hip joint angle during one-leg standing testing.

  12. The effect of first nocturnal ejaculation timing on risk and sexual behaviors of Korean male adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Ji; Yang, Go-Eun; Chueh, Hee Won; Park, Jae Hong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the effect of first nocturnal ejaculation timing on risk and sexual behaviors of Korean male adolescents. Methods We analyzed data from the 10th edition of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based survey that was conducted with male high school adolescents in grades 10–12. The survey included 17,907 adolescents, and 10,326 responded their experience of first nocturnal ejaculation. Of these, 595 had their first nocturnal ejaculation in ≤grade 4 (“early puberty”) and 9,731 had their first nocturnal ejaculation in ≥grade 5 (“normal puberty”). We analyzed differences between these 2 groups in risk and sexual behaviors. Results Early first nocturnal ejaculation showed a positive association with sexual intercourse (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.56–4.17), sexual debut at elementary school age (OR, 7.45; 95% CI, 5.00–11.10), and having had a sexually transmitted disease (OR, 6.60; 95% CI, 3.94–11.08). After a multiple logistic regression to adjust for socio-demographic variables, early first nocturnal ejaculation was still positively associated with sexual intercourse (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 2.03–3.69), sexual debut at elementary school age (OR, 5.96; 95% CI, 3.47–10.22), and having had a sexually transmitted disease (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 2.52–10.20). Early first nocturnal ejaculation was positively associated with alcohol consumption, smoking, and substance use. However, this was not statistically significant after adjusting for several socio-demographic variables. Conclusion There is a positive association between early nocturnal ejaculation and sexual behaviors in male adolescents. Proactive education about sexual behaviors is required for adolescents who reach sexual maturity early. PMID:28443258

  13. Retinal and optical adaptations for nocturnal vision in the halictid bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi A; Warrant, Eric J

    2004-06-01

    The apposition compound eye of a nocturnal bee, the halictid Megalopta genalis, is described for the first time. Compared to the compound eye of the worker honeybee Apis mellifera and the diurnal halictid bee Lasioglossum leucozonium, the eye of M. genalis shows specific retinal and optical adaptations for vision in dim light. The major anatomical adaptations within the eye of the nocturnal bee are (1) nearly twofold larger ommatidial facets and (2) a 4-5 times wider rhabdom diameter than found in the diurnal bees studied. Optically, the apposition eye of M. genalis is 27 times more sensitive to light than the eyes of the diurnal bees. This increased optical sensitivity represents a clear optical adaptation to low light intensities. Although this unique nocturnal apposition eye has a greatly improved ability to catch light, a 27-fold increase in sensitivity alone cannot account for nocturnal vision at light intensities that are 8 log units dimmer than during daytime. New evidence suggests that additional neuronal spatial summation within the first optic ganglion, the lamina, is involved.

  14. Elevated nocturnal NEFA are an early signal for hyperinsulinaemic compensation during diet-induced insulin resistance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Josiane L; Kolka, Cathryn M; Castro, Ana V B; Asare Bediako, Isaac; Paszkiewicz, Rebecca L; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Szczepaniak, Lidia S; Knutson, Kristen L; Kim, Stella P; Bergman, Richard N

    2015-11-01

    A normal consequence of increased energy intake and insulin resistance is compensatory hyperinsulinaemia through increased insulin secretion and/or reduced insulin clearance. Failure of compensatory mechanisms plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus; consequently, it is critical to identify in vivo signal(s) involved in hyperinsulinaemic compensation. We have previously reported that high-fat feeding leads to an increase in nocturnal NEFA concentration. We therefore designed this study to test the hypothesis that elevated nocturnal NEFA are an early signal for hyperinsulinaemic compensation for insulin resistance. Blood sampling was conducted in male dogs to determine 24 h profiles of NEFA at baseline and during high-fat feeding with and without acute nocturnal NEFA suppression using a partial A1 adenosine receptor agonist. High-fat feeding increased nocturnal NEFA and reduced insulin sensitivity, effects countered by an increase in acute insulin response to glucose (AIR(g)). Pharmacological NEFA inhibition after 8 weeks of high-fat feeding lowered NEFA to baseline levels and reduced AIR(g) with no effect on insulin sensitivity. A significant relationship emerged between nocturnal NEFA levels and AIR(g). This relationship indicates that the hyperinsulinaemic compensation induced in response to high-fat feeding was prevented when the nocturnal NEFA pattern was returned to baseline. Elevated nocturnal NEFA are an important signal for hyperinsulinaemic compensation during diet-induced insulin resistance.

  15. The effect of dexlansoprazole MR on nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbances in patients with symptomatic GERD.

    PubMed

    Fass, Ronnie; Johnson, David A; Orr, William C; Han, Cong; Mody, Reema; Stern, Kathleen N; Pilmer, Betsy L; Perez, M Claudia

    2011-03-01

    Nocturnal heartburn and related sleep disturbances are common among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study evaluated the efficacy of dexlansoprazole MR 30 mg in relieving nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbances, improving work productivity, and decreasing nocturnal symptom severity in patients with symptomatic GERD. Patients (N=305) with frequent, moderate-to-very severe nocturnal heartburn and associated sleep disturbances were randomized 1:1 in a double-blind fashion to receive dexlansoprazole MR or placebo once daily for 4 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage of nights without heartburn. Secondary end points were the percentage of patients with relief of nocturnal heartburn and of GERD-related sleep disturbances over the last 7 days of treatment. At baseline and week 4/final visit, patients completed questionnaires that assessed sleep quality, work productivity, and the severity and impact of nocturnal GERD symptoms. Dexlansoprazole MR 30 mg (n=152) was superior to placebo (n=153) in median percentage of nights without heartburn (73.1 vs. 35.7%, respectively; P<0.001). Dexlansoprazole MR was significantly better than placebo in percentage of patients with relief of nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbances (47.5 vs. 19.6%, 69.7 vs. 47.9%, respectively; P<0.001), and led to significantly greater improvements in sleep quality and work productivity and decreased nocturnal symptom severity. Adverse events were similar across treatment groups. In patients with symptomatic GERD, dexlansoprazole MR 30 mg is significantly more efficacious than placebo in providing relief from nocturnal heartburn, in reducing GERD-related sleep disturbances and the consequent impairments in work productivity, and in improving sleep quality/quality of life.

  16. Nocturnal faecal soiling and anal masturbation.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A F; Tayler, P J; Bhate, S R

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of late onset faecal soiling as a result of anal masturbation in children who were neither mentally handicapped nor psychotic were studied. The role of soiling in aiding the young person and his family to avoid separating and maturing is highlighted. We suggest that the association of anal masturbation and resistant nocturnal soiling may be unrecognised. PMID:2270946

  17. Reproductive biology of Echinopsis terscheckii (Cactaceae): the role of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Baes, P; Saravia, M; Sühring, S; Godínez-Alvarez, H; Zamar, M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reproductive biology of Echinopsis terscheckii, a species endemic to northwest Argentina that has nocturnal flowers. We expected that this species had a generalised pollination system, with moths and diurnal visitors as the primary pollinators. To test this, we studied the floral biology, breeding system and floral visitors of this species and the effectiveness of nocturnal and diurnal visitors. Floral biology was defined based on floral morphology, floral cycle and nectar production of the flowers. The breeding system and relative contributions of diurnal and nocturnal visitors to fruit and seed set were analysed through field experiments. E. terscheckii flowers opened at sunset and closed the following day. The peak of nectar production occurred at midnight. Flowers were determined to be self-incompatible. Moths, bees and birds were identified as floral visitors. Moths were the most frequent visitors at night, whereas bees were the most frequent visitors during the day. Fruit production by diurnal pollinators was less than that by nocturnal pollinators; among all floral visitors, moths were the most effective pollinators. We have demonstrated for the first time that moths are the primary pollinators of columnar cacti of the genus Echinopsis. Our results suggest that moths might be important pollinators of columnar cactus species with nocturnal flowers in the extra-tropical deserts of South America. © 2010 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  18. Frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in patients attended in Belém, Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Junior, Lacy Cardoso; Cardoso, Maria do Socorro de Oliveira; Rocha, Euzamar Gaby; Anijar, Herika; Cunha, Mariana; Saraiva, João Carlos Pina

    2011-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a hematological disease with complex physiopathology. It is genetically characterized by a somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene (phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class A), in which the best known antigens are DAF (decay accelerating factor or CD55) and MIRL (membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis or CD59). Objective To determine the frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in patients attended at the HEMOPA foundation from November 2008 to July 2009. Method Thirty patients, with ages ranging from two to 79 years old and suspected of having paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria were examined. All patients were immunophenotyped by flow cytometry for the CD5, CD59, CD16 and CD45 antigens. Results Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria was identified in nine of the thirty patients investigated. Another 3 cases had inconclusive results with CD59-negative labeling only for neutrophils. The highest frequency of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients (7/9) and inconclusive cases (2/3) were between 19 years old and 48 years old, with a median of 28 years. Conclusion These results show the importance of flow cytometry to identify cases in which patients are deficient in only one antigen (CD59). PMID:23284241

  19. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekbom, Karl; Ulfberg, J

    2009-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological sensory-motor disorder that is characterized by intense restlessness and unpleasant creeping sensations deep inside the lower legs. Symptoms appear when the legs are at rest and are worst in the evening and at night. They force patients to keep moving their legs, and often to get out of bed and wander about. Periodic limb movements (PLMS) are also common during sleep amongst those suffering from RLS, and sleep efficiency is severely reduced. There are idiopathic as well as symptomatic forms of RLS, the latter being associated with e.g. pregnancy, iron deficiency and chronic renal failure. A family history of RLS is very common and pedigrees in these cases suggest an autosomal-dominant transmission with high penetrance. Genetic investigations have been performed in order to identify genes associated with RLS. Several loci have been found (on chromosomes 12q, 14q, 9p, 2q, 20p and 16p). Pathophysiology of RLS remains incompletely understood. However, advanced brain imaging studies and positive results of dopaminergic treatment suggest that RLS may be generated by dopamine dysfunction locally within the central nervous system. At present, there is a wide range of treatment options including levodopa, dopamine agonists, opioids, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs and iron supplements.

  20. Exercise-Associated Collapse in Endurance Events: A Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a classification system devised for exercise-associated collapse in endurance events based on casualties observed at six Twin Cities Marathons. Major diagnostic criteria are body temperature and mental status. Management protocol includes fluid and fuel replacement, temperature correction, and leg cramp treatment. (Author/SM)

  1. Association between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Shouichi; Tanimoto, Yuko; Araki, Yoshiko; Katayama, Akira; Fujii, Akihito; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2003-11-01

    To examine the relationship between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux. Controlled descriptive study and double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Portable pH monitoring, electromyography, and audio-video recordings were conducted during the night in the subjects' home. Ten patients with bruxism and 10 normal subjects were matched for height, weight, age, and sex. They did not have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Medication with a proton pump inhibitor (ie, a gastric-acid-inhibiting drug). The bruxism group showed a significantly higher frequency of nocturnal rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes (mean +/- SD: 6.7 +/- 2.2 times per hour) and a higher frequency and percentage of time of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 4.0 and 5.0 (0.5 +/- 0.9 and 3.6 +/- 1.6 times per hour and 1.3% +/- 2.5% and 7.4% +/- 12.6%, respectively) than the control group (RMMA episodes: 2.4 +/- 0.9 times per hour; gastroesophageal reflux episodes: 0.0 +/- 0.0 and 0.1 +/- 0.3 times per hour and 0.0% +/- 0.0% and 0.0% +/- 0.0%, respectively). In the bruxism group, 100% of the gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 3.0 and 4.0 included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst, the duration of which was approximately 0.5 to 1.0 seconds, probably representing swallowing of saliva. The majority of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH of 4.0 to 5.0 also included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst in the control and bruxism groups (100% +/- 0.0% vs 70.7% +/- 16.5%), again probably due to swallowing of saliva. The remaining minority of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH of 4.0 to 5.0 contained only an electromyographic burst (swallowing of saliva). The frequency of RMMA episodes after the release of the medication from the proton pump inhibitor, which increased the gastric and esophageal pH, was significantly lower than that after administration of the placebo in the control

  2. A preliminary investigation of the nocturnal temperature structure above the city of Edmonton, Alberta

    Treesearch

    D. Yap

    1977-01-01

    Information about the nocturnal temperature structure over Edmonton, Alberta. Observations of the temperature fields, including two- and three-dimensional forms of the nocturnal heat island, were obtained from minisonde ascents, an instrumented helicopter, and towers during a 3-week urban air-pollution field study. Results show that urban-induced temperature...

  3. The Motor and the Brake of the Trailing Leg in Human Walking: Leg Force Control Through Ankle Modulation and Knee Covariance

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Megan E.; Chang, Young-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Human walking is a complex task, and we lack a complete understanding of how the neuromuscular system organizes its numerous muscles and joints to achieve consistent and efficient walking mechanics. Focused control of select influential task-level variables may simplify the higher-level control of steady state walking and reduce demand on the neuromuscular system. As trailing leg power generation and force application can affect the mechanical efficiency of step-to-step transitions, we investigated how joint torques are organized to control leg force and leg power during human walking. We tested whether timing of trailing leg force control corresponded with timing of peak leg power generation. We also applied a modified uncontrolled manifold analysis to test whether individual or coordinated joint torque strategies most contributed to leg force control. We found that leg force magnitude was adjusted from step-to-step to maintain consistent leg power generation. Leg force modulation was primarily determined by adjustments in the timing of peak ankle plantar-flexion torque, while knee torque was simultaneously covaried to dampen the effect of ankle torque on leg force. We propose a coordinated joint torque control strategy in which the trailing leg ankle acts as a motor to drive leg power production while trailing leg knee torque acts as a brake to refine leg power production. PMID:27334888

  4. Nocturnality in synapsids predates the origin of mammals by over 100 million years

    PubMed Central

    Angielczyk, K. D.; Schmitz, L.

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnality is widespread among extant mammals and often considered the ancestral behavioural pattern for all mammals. However, mammals are nested within a larger clade, Synapsida, and non-mammalian synapsids comprise a rich phylogenetic, morphological and ecological diversity. Even though non-mammalian synapsids potentially could elucidate the early evolution of diel activity patterns and enrich the understanding of synapsid palaeobiology, data on their diel activity are currently unavailable. Using scleral ring and orbit dimensions, we demonstrate that nocturnal activity was not an innovation unique to mammals but a character that appeared much earlier in synapsid history, possibly several times independently. The 24 Carboniferous to Jurassic non-mammalian synapsid species in our sample featured eye morphologies consistent with all major diel activity patterns, with examples of nocturnality as old as the Late Carboniferous (ca 300 Ma). Carnivores such as Sphenacodon ferox and Dimetrodon milleri, but also the herbivorous cynodont Tritylodon longaevus were likely nocturnal, whereas most of the anomodont herbivores are reconstructed as diurnal. Recognizing the complexity of diel activity patterns in non-mammalian synapsids is an important step towards a more nuanced picture of the evolutionary history of behaviour in the synapsid clade. PMID:25186003

  5. Mobile Disdrometer Observations of Nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems During PECAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, D. J.; Rasmussen, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding microphysical processes in nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is an important objective of the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) experiment, which occurred from 1 June - 15 July 2015 in the central Great Plains region of the United States. Observations of MCSs were collected using a large array of mobile and fixed instrumentation, including ground-based radars, soundings, PECAN Integrated Sounding Arrays (PISAs), and aircraft. In addition to these observations, three mobile Parsivel disdrometers were deployed to obtain drop-size distribution (DSD) measurements to further explore microphysical processes in convective and stratiform regions of nocturnal MCSs. Disdrometers were deployed within close range of a multiple frequency network of mobile and fixed dual-polarization radars (5 - 30 km range), and near mobile sounding units and PISAs. Using mobile disdrometer and multiple-wavelength, dual-polarization radar data, microphysical properties of convective and stratiform regions of MCSs are investigated. The analysis will also examine coordinated Range-Height Indicator (RHI) scans over the disdrometers to elucidate vertical DSD structure. Analysis of dense observations obtained during PECAN in combination with mobile disdrometer DSD measurements contributes to a greater understanding of the structural characteristics and evolution of nocturnal MCSs.

  6. Factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia in at-risk adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Darrell M; Calhoun, Peter M; Maahs, David M; Chase, H Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig; Beck, Roy W

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15-45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of <60 mg/dL for ≥30 min) included bedtime blood glucose (BG), exercise intensity, bedtime snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (P<0.001), lower HbA1c levels (P=0.006), medium/high-intensity exercise during the preceding day (P=0.003), and the occurrence of antecedent daytime hypoglycemia (P=0.001). There was a trend for lower bedtime BG levels to be associated with more frequent nocturnal hypoglycemia (P=0.10). Bedtime snack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night.

  7. A colored leg banding technique for Amazona parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for individual identification of Amazona was developed using plastic leg bands. Bands were made from 5- and 7-mm-wide strips of laminated PVC coiled 2.5 times with an inside diameter 4-5 mm gt the maximum diameter of the parrot's leg. Seventeen parrots were captured in Puerto Rico, marked with individual plastic leg bands, and observed for 204-658 d with only one lost or damaged plastic band. Plastic leg bands did not cause injury to or calluses on parrots' legs. The plastic material used for making leg bands was available in 18 colors in 1994, which would allow unique marking of 306 individuals using one plastic leg band on each leg.

  8. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 31. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: diagnosis and management. Am Fam Physician . 2013;88( ...

  9. Nocturnal movements of desert bighorn sheep in the Muddy Mountains, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Lowrey, Chris E.; Jeffress, Matthew; Thompson, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    Adequate management of a species requires complete knowledge of its ecology, including both nocturnal and diurnal behavior. Knowledge of the movement behavior of bighorn sheep can provide insight for understanding spatial population processes as the combined result of individual behavior, physiological constraints, and fine-scale environmental influences. However, because of past difficulties in tracking radio-collared animals in the dark, little is known about nocturnal movements of many ungulates, including desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni). The use of GPS collars that supply sequential location records over a 24-hour period has provided new opportunities for recording movements of animals. We report findings from a preliminary analysis of data on nocturnal movements of desert bighorn sheep wearing GPS collars in the Muddy Mountains, Nevada. The study is part of a larger research project on movement patterns aimed at assessing the connectivity of bighorn sheep populations that comprise the metapopulation in southern Nevada. We recorded nighttime locations at 2100 and 0400 PST and calculated a total of 8,758 nocturnal movement distances for 12 ewes and 16 rams. Nocturnal movements were characteristic of all individuals. Bighorn sheep varied in the magnitude of movement from night to night and there were significant differences among individuals in the mean distance moved. Females had a greater proportion of short movement distances when compared to males; males had the greatest proportion of long distance movements. Movement distances were affected by sex, season, and percent of the moon’s surface illumination. Mean movement distances of males were greater than those of females. For both males and females, mean movement distances were shortest during the late spring months (April-June) and greatest during summer (July–September). Mean movement distances were greatest when the moon was brightest for all seasons except late spring, when movement

  10. Influence of atmospheric properties on detection of wood-warbler nocturnal flight calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Kyle G.; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Wainwright, Charlotte E.; Tegeler, Amy K.

    2015-10-01

    Avian migration monitoring can take on many forms; however, monitoring active nocturnal migration of land birds is limited to a few techniques. Avian nocturnal flight calls are currently the only method for describing migrant composition at the species level. However, as this method develops, more information is needed to understand the sources of variation in call detection. Additionally, few studies examine how detection probabilities differ under varying atmospheric conditions. We use nocturnal flight call recordings from captive individuals to explore the dependence of flight call detection on atmospheric temperature and humidity. Height or distance from origin had the largest influence on call detection, while temperature and humidity also influenced detectability at higher altitudes. Because flight call detection varies with both atmospheric conditions and flight height, improved monitoring across time and space will require correction for these factors to generate standardized metrics of songbird migration.

  11. Severe Nocturnal and Postexercise Hypoxia in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Halphen, Isabelle; Elie, Caroline; Brousse, Valentine; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Allali, Slimane; Bonnet, Damien; de Montalembert, Mariane

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) that is inconsistently associated with painful crises and acute chest syndrome. To assess the prevalence and risk factors of hypoxia, we recorded daytime, nocturnal, and postexercise pulse oximetry (SpO2) values in 39 SCD patients with a median age of 10.8 years. Median daytime SpO2 was 97% (range, 89%–100%), and 36% of patients had daytime hypoxia defined as SpO2<96%. Median nocturnal SpO2 was 94.7% (range, 87.7%–99.5%), 50% of patients had nocturnal hypoxia defined as SpO2≤93%, and 11(37%) patients spent more than 10% of their total sleep time with SpO2<90%. Median postexercise SpO2 was 94% (range, 72%–100%) and 44.7% of patients had postexercise hypoxia defined as an SpO2 decrease ≥3% after a 6-minute walk test. Among patients with normal daytime SpO2, 35% had nocturnal and 42% postexercise hypoxia. Compared to 9 patients without daytime, nocturnal, or postexercise hypoxia, 25 patients with hypoxia under at least one of these three conditions had greater anemia severity (P = 0.01), lower HbF levels (P = 0.04), and higher aspartate aminotransferase levels (P = 0.03). Males predominated among patients with postexercise hypoxia (P = 0.004). Hypoxia correlated neither with painful crises nor with acute chest syndrome. Of 32 evaluable patients, 6 (18.8%) had a tricuspid regurgitation velocity ≥2.6 m/s, and this feature was associated with anemia (P = 0.044). Median percentage of the predicted distance covered during a 6-minute walk test was 86% [46–120]; the distance was negatively associated with LDH (P = 0.044) and with a past history of acute chest syndrome (P = 0.009). In conclusion, severe episodes of nocturnal and postexercise hypoxia are common in children with SCD, even those with normal daytime SpO2. PMID:24878576

  12. [Urodynamic changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and nocturnal polyuria].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Tu, Zuo-sheng; Lü, Sheng-qi; Li, Qing-quan; Chen, Xue-qin

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the urodynamic changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and nocturnal polyuria. From Sept. 2002 to Jun. 2008, 23 patients with nocturnal polyuria were diagnosed as having OSAHS by polysomnography (PSG). The number and output of nocturia, the osmotic pressure and the excretion of Na(+) were recorded during both the PSG night and CPAP titrating night. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) were also measured at 11PM in the 2 nights and 7AM in the next mornings. Urodynamic studies including urine flow, bladder pressure during filling, pressure-flow study during voiding and urethral pressure were carried out in these patients. Urodynamic studies were performed again after treatment with CPAP for 3 months. PSG showed that the patients with nocturnal polyuria had moderate to severe OSAHS, in which the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) being 48 ± 15 events per hour. The number of nocturnal voiding during the PSG night was more than that during the CPAP titrating night. During the PSG night, the output of nocturia, the nocturia excretion of Na(+), ANP levels (at 7am in the next morning after PSG night) increased and the osmotic pressure of nocturia decreased. CPAP therapy could reverse these abnormalities. The main characteristics of urodynamics in these patients included weak detrusor contraction, hypoesthesia in filling cystometry, and decreased bladder compliance, and detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, both the motility of the detrusor of bladder and the bladder compliance improved. CPAP therapy can effectively reverse the nocturnal polyuria in OSAHS patients. In OSAHS patients, the features of nocturia, including the changes of output, osmotic pressure and the excretion of Na(+), may be related to the secretion of high-level of ANP. During the course of chronic progressively OSAHS pathophysiology, detrusor function of bladder may be damaged

  13. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  14. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  15. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawlmore » through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.« less

  16. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  17. Musician's cramp as manifestation of maladaptive brain plasticity: arguments from instrumental differences.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Baur, Volker; Hofmann, Aurélie; Lim, Vanessa K; Jabusch, Hans-Christian

    2012-04-01

    Musician's cramp is a task-specific movement disorder that presents itself as muscular incoordination or loss of voluntary motor control of extensively trained movements while a musician is playing the instrument. It is characterized by task specificity and gender bias, affecting significantly more males than females. The etiology is multifaceted: a combination of a genetic predisposition, termed endophenotype, and behavioral triggering factors being the leading features for the manifestation of the disorder. We present epidemiological data from 591 musician patients from our outpatient clinic demonstrating an influence of fine-motor requirements on the manifestation of dystonia. Brass, guitar, and woodwind players were at greater risk than other instrumentalists. High temporospatial precision of movement patterns, synchronous demands on tonic and phasic muscular activation, in combination with fine-motor burdens of using the dominant hand in daily life activities, constitute as triggering factors for the disorder and may explain why different body parts are affected. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. The Benslimane's Artistic Model for Leg Beauty.

    PubMed

    Benslimane, Fahd

    2012-08-01

    In 2000, the author started observing legs considered to be attractive. The goal was to have an ideal aesthetic model and compare the disparity between this model and a patient's reality. This could prove helpful during leg sculpturing to get closer to this ideal. Postoperatively, the result could then be compared to the ideal curves of the model legs and any remaining deviations from the ideal curves could be pointed out and eventually corrected in a second session. The lack of anthropometric studies of legs from the knee to the ankle led the author to select and study attractive legs to find out the common denominators of their beauty. The study consisted in analyzing the features that make legs look attractive. The legs of models in magazines were scanned and inserted into a PowerPoint program. The legs of live models, Barbie dolls, and athletes were photographed. Artistic drawings by Leonardo da Vinci were reviewed and Greek sculptures studied. Sculptures from the National Archaeological Museum of Athens were photographed and included in the PowerPoint program. This study shows that the first criterion for beautiful legs is the straightness of the leg column. Not a single attractive leg was found to deviate from the vertical, and each was in absolute continuity with the thigh. The second criterion is the similarity of curve distribution and progression from knee to ankle. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors at www.springer.com/00266.

  19. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  20. On the biomimetic design of agile-robot legs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  1. Association between morphometric variables and nocturnal desaturation in sickle-cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Salles, Cristina; Bispo, Marcelo; Trindade-Ramos, Regina Terse

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate associations between morphometric variables, cervical circumference (CC), and abdominal circumference (AC) with the presence of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia. all patients were submitted to baseline polysomnography, oral cavity measurements (maxillary intermolar distance, mandibular intermolar distance, and overjet), and CC and AC measurements. a total of 85 patients were evaluated. A positive correlation was observed between the height/age Z-score and CC measurement (r = 0.233, p = 0.031). The presence of nocturnal desaturation was associated with CC (59.2± 9.3 vs. 67.5 ± 10.7, p = 0.006) and AC measurements (27.0 ± 2.0 vs. 29.0± 2.1, p = 0.028). There was a negative correlation between desaturation and maxillary intermolar distance (r = -0.365, p = 0.001) and mandibular intermolar distance (r = -0.233, p = 0.037). the morphometric variables of CC and AC may contribute to raise suspicion of nocturnal desaturation in children and adolescents with sickle-cell anemia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  3. Pollination of Campomanesia phaea (Myrtaceae) by night-active bees: a new nocturnal pollination system mediated by floral scent.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, G D; Pinheiro, M; Dötterl, S; Alves-Dos-Santos, I

    2017-03-01

    Bees are the most important diurnal pollinators of angiosperms. In several groups of bees a nocturnal/crepuscular habit developed, yet little is known about their role in pollination and whether some plants are adapted specifically to these bees. We used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the reproductive biology and to understand the role of nocturnal/crepuscular bees in pollination of Campomanesia phaea (Myrtaceae), popularly named cambuci. We studied the floral biology and breeding system of C. phaea. We collected the floral visitors and tested the pollinators' effectiveness. We also determined the floral scents released at night and during daytime, and studied behavioural responses of crepuscular/nocturnal bees towards these scents. The flowers of cambuci were self-incompatible and had pollen as the only resource for flower visitors. Anthesis lasted around 14 h, beginning at 04:30 h at night. The flowers released 14 volatile compounds, mainly aliphatic and aromatic compounds. We collected 52 species of floral visitors, mainly bees. Nocturnal and crepuscular bees (four species) were among the most frequent species and the only effective pollinators. In field bioassays performed at night, nocturnal/crepuscular bees were attracted by a synthetic scent blend consisting of the six most abundant compounds. This study describes the first scent-mediated pollination system between a plant and its nocturnal bee pollinators. Further, C. phaea has several floral traits that do not allow classification into other nocturnal pollination syndromes (e.g. pollinator attraction already before sunrise, with pollen as the only reward), instead it is a plant specifically adapted to nocturnal bees. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Factors Associated with Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Darrell M.; Calhoun, Peter M.; Maahs, David M.; Chase, H. Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K.; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Materials and Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15–45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of <60 mg/dL for ≥30 min) included bedtime blood glucose (BG), exercise intensity, bedtime snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Results: Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (P<0.001), lower HbA1c levels (P=0.006), medium/high-intensity exercise during the preceding day (P=0.003), and the occurrence of antecedent daytime hypoglycemia (P=0.001). There was a trend for lower bedtime BG levels to be associated with more frequent nocturnal hypoglycemia (P=0.10). Bedtime snack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night. PMID:25761202

  5. Why do flamingos stand on one leg?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Williams, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    A series of observational studies of captive Caribbean flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber were conducted to determine why flamingos rest on one leg. While frequently asked by the general public, this basic question has remained unanswered by the scientific community. Here we suggest that the latency of flamingos to initiate forward locomotion following resting on one leg is significantly longer than following resting on two, discounting the possibility that unipedal resting reduces muscle fatigue or enhances predatory escape. Additionally, we demonstrate that flamingos do not display lateral preferences at the individual or group levels when resting on one leg, with each bird dividing its resting time across both legs. We show that while flamingos prefer resting on one leg to two regardless of location, the percentage of birds resting on one leg is significantly higher among birds standing in the water than among those on land. Finally, we demonstrate a negative relationship between temperature and the percentage of observed birds resting on one leg, such that resting on one leg decreases as temperature rises. Results strongly suggest that unipedal resting aids flamingos in thermoregulation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Young Adults and Cognitive Function in Midlife: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Hongyan; Muntner, Paul; Reis, Jared P.; Calhoun, David A.; Viera, Anthony J.; Levine, Deborah A.; Jacobs, David R.; Shimbo, Daichi; Liu, Kiang; Greenland, Philip; Lloyd-Jones, Donald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) is associated with risk for cardiovascular events. However, the relationship between nocturnal BP in young adults and cognitive function in midlife remains unclear. METHODS We used data from the ambulatory BP monitoring substudy of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study, including 224 participants (mean age 30 years, 45% men, 63% African Americans). At the 20-year follow-up, the Stroop test (executive function), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (psychomotor speed), and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (verbal memory) were assessed. RESULTS Baseline mean office, daytime, and nocturnal BP were 109/73, 120/74, and 107/59mm Hg, respectively. Nocturnal BP dipping, calculated as (nocturnal systolic BP [SBP] − daytime SBP) × 100/daytime SBP, was divided into quartiles (Q1: −39.3% to −16.9%; Q2: −16.8% to −13.2%, Q3 [reference]: −13.1% to −7.8%, and Q4: −7.7% to +56.4%). In multiple regression analyses, the least nocturnal SBP dipping (Q4 vs. reference) and higher nocturnal diastolic BP level were associated with worse Stroop scores, with adjustments for demographic and clinical characteristics, and cumulative exposure to office BP during follow-up (β [standard error]: 0.37 [0.18] and 0.19 [0.07], respectively; all P < 0.05). Digit Symbol Substitution Test and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test were not significantly associated with nocturnal SBP dipping or nocturnal SBP/diastolic BP levels. CONCLUSIONS Among healthy young adults, less nocturnal SBP dipping and higher nocturnal diastolic BP levels were associated with lower executive function in midlife, independent of multiple measures of office BP during long-term follow-up. PMID:25783740

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain are involved in many critical functions, including reasoning, planning, judgment, and problem-solving. It is unclear ... E, Montagna P. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. A clinical and polygraphic overview of 100 consecutive cases. Brain. ...

  8. Neuropsychological functioning related to specific characteristics of nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Van Herzeele, C; Dhondt, K; Roels, S P; Raes, A; Groen, L-A; Hoebeke, P; Walle, J Vande

    2015-08-01

    There is a high comorbidity demonstrated in the literature between nocturnal enuresis and several neuropsychological dysfunctions, with special emphasis on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the majority of the psychological studies did not include full non-invasive screening and failed to differentiate between monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) and non-MNE patients. The present study primarily aimed to investigate the association between nocturnal enuresis and (neuro)psychological functioning in a selective homogeneous patient group, namely: children with MNE and associated nocturnal polyuria (NP). Secondly, the study investigated the association between specific characteristics of nocturnal enuresis (maximum voided volume, number of wet nights and number of nights with NP) and ADHD-inattentive symptoms, executive functioning and quality of life. The psychological measurements were multi-informant (parents, children and teachers) and multi-method (questionnaires, clinical interviews and neuropsychological testing). Thirty children aged 6-16 years (mean 10.43 years, SD 3.08) were included. Of them, 80% had at least one psychological, motor or neurological difficulty. The comorbid diagnosis of ADHD, especially the predominantly inattentive presentation, was most common. According to the teachers, a low maximum voided volume (corrected for age) was associated with more attention problems, and a high number of nights with NP was associated with more behaviour-regulation problems. No significant correlations were found between specific characteristics of enuresis and quality of life. Details are demonstrated in Table. The children were recruited from a tertiary referral centre, which resulted in selection bias. Moreover, NP was defined as a urine output exceeding 100% of the expected bladder capacity for age (EBC), and not according to the expert-opinion-based International Children's Continence Society norm of 130% of EBC. The definition

  9. Effect of daily sildenafil on patients with absent nocturnal erections due to pelvic fracture urethral disruption: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Zhang, Z; Gao, B; Yuan, Y; Cui, W; Tang, Y; Song, W; Xin, Z

    2016-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common sequel of pelvic fracture urethral disruption. Those patients with nocturnal erections may respond favourably to sildenafil; however, little is known about the response to sildenafil in patients with absent nocturnal erections. The aim was to evaluate the response to the treatment of sildenafil 50 mg taken once daily in the patients with absent nocturnal erections. From January 2008 to December 2011, a total of 28 patients with absent nocturnal erections were evaluated. We recorded nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity with an erectometer. If nocturnal erections were absent for three nights, patients were administrated sildenafil 100 mg at bedtime and tested again at the fourth night. Penile duplex ultrasound with intracavernous injection was performed to define the cause of ED. All patients received a daily dose of sildenafil 50 mg for 12 weeks. Response to sildenafil treatment was defined as sustained erections allowing vaginal penetration and intercourse. Twenty-three (78%) patients completed the daily sildenafil treatment, and follow-up was available. The nocturnal erections at the fourth night in 13 patients (46.4%) were improved. About 61.5% (8/13) reported effective response to daily sildenafil. The improvement of nocturnal erections induced by sildenafil taken at bedtime might predict the response to sildenafil taken daily. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Neural organisation in the first optic ganglion of the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2004-11-01

    Each neural unit (cartridge) in the first optic ganglion (lamina) of the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis contains nine receptor cell axons (6 short and 3 long visual fibres), and four different types of first-order interneurons, also known as L-fibres (L1 to L4) or lamina monopolar cells. The short visual fibres terminate within the lamina as three different types (svf 1, 2, 3). The three long visual fibres pass through the lamina without forming characteristic branching patterns and terminate in the second optic ganglion, the medulla. The lateral branching pattern of svf 2 into adjacent cartridges is unique for hymenopterans. In addition, all four types of L-fibres show dorso-ventrally arranged, wide, lateral branching in this nocturnal bee. This is in contrast to the diurnal bees Apis mellifera and Lasioglossum leucozonium, where only two out of four L-fibre types (L2 and L4) reach neighbouring cartridges. In M. genalis, L1 forms two sub-types, viz. L1-a and L1-b; L1-b in particular has the potential to contact several neighbouring cartridges. L2 and L4 in the nocturnal bee are similar to L2 and L4 in the diurnal bees but have dorso-ventral arborisations that are twice as wide. A new type of laterally spreading L3 has been discovered in the nocturnal bee. The extensive neural branching pattern of L-fibres in M. genalis indicates a potential role for these neurons in the spatial summation of photons from large groups of ommatidia. This specific adaptation in the nocturnal bee could significantly improve reliability of vision in dim light.

  11. Nocturnal herbivore-induced plant volatiles attract the generalist predatory earwig Doru luteipes Scudder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo-Guevara, Natalia; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G. V.; Cabezas-Guerrero, Milton F.; Bento, José Maurício S.

    2017-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that entomophagous arthropods use herbivore-induced plant volatile (HIPV) blends to search for their prey or host. However, no study has yet focused on the response of nocturnal predators to volatile blends emitted by prey damaged plants. We investigated the olfactory behavioral responses of the night-active generalist predatory earwig Doru luteipes Scudder (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) to diurnal and nocturnal volatile blends emitted by maize plants ( Zea mays) attacked by either a stem borer ( Diatraea saccharalis) or a leaf-chewing caterpillar ( Spodoptera frugiperda), both suitable lepidopteran prey. Additionally, we examined whether the earwig preferred odors emitted from short- or long-term damaged maize. We first determined the earwig diel foraging rhythm and confirmed that D. luteipes is a nocturnal predator. Olfactometer assays showed that during the day, although the earwigs were walking actively, they did not discriminate the volatiles of undamaged maize plants from those of herbivore damaged maize plants. In contrast, at night, earwigs preferred volatiles emitted by maize plants attacked by D. saccharalis or S. frugiperda over undamaged plants and short- over long-term damaged maize. Our GC-MS analysis revealed that short-term damaged nocturnal plant volatile blends were comprised mainly of fatty acid derivatives (i.e., green leaf volatiles), while the long-term damaged plant volatile blend contained mostly terpenoids. We also observed distinct volatile blend composition emitted by maize damaged by the different caterpillars. Our results showed that D. luteipes innately uses nocturnal herbivore-induced plant volatiles to search for prey. Moreover, the attraction of the earwig to short-term damaged plants is likely mediated by fatty acid derivatives.

  12. Nocturnality in synapsids predates the origin of mammals by over 100 million years.

    PubMed

    Angielczyk, K D; Schmitz, L

    2014-10-22

    Nocturnality is widespread among extant mammals and often considered the ancestral behavioural pattern for all mammals. However, mammals are nested within a larger clade, Synapsida, and non-mammalian synapsids comprise a rich phylogenetic, morphological and ecological diversity. Even though non-mammalian synapsids potentially could elucidate the early evolution of diel activity patterns and enrich the understanding of synapsid palaeobiology, data on their diel activity are currently unavailable. Using scleral ring and orbit dimensions, we demonstrate that nocturnal activity was not an innovation unique to mammals but a character that appeared much earlier in synapsid history, possibly several times independently. The 24 Carboniferous to Jurassic non-mammalian synapsid species in our sample featured eye morphologies consistent with all major diel activity patterns, with examples of nocturnality as old as the Late Carboniferous (ca 300 Ma). Carnivores such as Sphenacodon ferox and Dimetrodon milleri, but also the herbivorous cynodont Tritylodon longaevus were likely nocturnal, whereas most of the anomodont herbivores are reconstructed as diurnal. Recognizing the complexity of diel activity patterns in non-mammalian synapsids is an important step towards a more nuanced picture of the evolutionary history of behaviour in the synapsid clade. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Endurance performance and nocturnal HRV indices.

    PubMed

    Nummela, A; Hynynen, E; Kaikkonen, P; Rusko, H

    2010-03-01

    The effects of endurance training on endurance performance characteristics and cardiac autonomic modulation during night sleep were investigated. Twenty-four sedentary subjects trained over four weeks two hours per week at an average running intensity of 76+/-4% of their heart rate reserve. The R to R ECG-intervals were recorded and heart rate variability indices including high frequency power (HFP) were calculated for the nights following the training days every week. The subjects were divided into responders and non-responders according to the improvements in the maximal velocity of the incremental treadmill test (v(max)). The responders improved their v(max) by 10.9+/-46 % (p < 0.001) while no changes were observed in the non-responders (1.6+/-3.0%), although there were no differences in any training load variables between the groups. In the responders nocturnal HFP was significantly higher during the fourth training week compared to the first training week (p=0.036). Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between the change in v(max) and the change in nocturnal HFP (r=0.482, p=0.042). It was concluded that after similar training, an increase in cardiac vagal modulation was related to improved v(max) in the sedentary subjects. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  14. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1991-04-02

    This invention is comprised of a pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing. between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair laying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is widemore » and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.« less

  15. The Legs Problem--For All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an example of a versatile multi-solution problem that can be used right across the primary years. The basic problem is: "Noah saw 16 legs go past him into the Ark. How many creatures did he see?" Any even number can be used, although, 2 legs allows only one answer and with 16 legs there are already 14 different…

  16. Spectral sensitivity of the nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus,as a vector of West Nile virus is the target of many surveillance and control efforts. Surveillance of this species primarily consists of light traps baited with a variety of chemical lures. While much research has focused on optimization of the olfa...

  17. Sound imaging of nocturnal animal calls in their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Takeshi; Aihara, Ikkyu; Otsuka, Takuma; Takeda, Ryu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2011-09-01

    We present a novel method for imaging acoustic communication between nocturnal animals. Investigating the spatio-temporal calling behavior of nocturnal animals, e.g., frogs and crickets, has been difficult because of the need to distinguish many animals' calls in noisy environments without being able to see them. Our method visualizes the spatial and temporal dynamics using dozens of sound-to-light conversion devices (called "Firefly") and an off-the-shelf video camera. The Firefly, which consists of a microphone and a light emitting diode, emits light when it captures nearby sound. Deploying dozens of Fireflies in a target area, we record calls of multiple individuals through the video camera. We conduct two experiments, one indoors and the other in the field, using Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). The indoor experiment demonstrates that our method correctly visualizes Japanese tree frogs' calling behavior. It has confirmed the known behavior; two frogs call synchronously or in anti-phase synchronization. The field experiment (in a rice paddy where Japanese tree frogs live) also visualizes the same calling behavior to confirm anti-phase synchronization in the field. Experimental results confirm that our method can visualize the calling behavior of nocturnal animals in their natural habitat.

  18. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12–23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51–98 vs. 7–8 mm yr−1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake. PMID:26074373

  19. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration.

    PubMed

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-15

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr(-1)). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  20. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens.

    PubMed

    Yorzinski, Jessica L; Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A; Gnerlich, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences.

  1. Impaired force control in writer's cramp showing a bilateral deficit in sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Bleton, Jean-Pierre; Teremetz, Maxime; Vidailhet, Marie; Mesure, Serge; Maier, Marc A; Lindberg, Påvel G

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal cortical processing of sensory inputs has been found bilaterally in writer's cramp (WC). This study tested the hypothesis that patients with WC have an impaired ability to adjust grip forces according to visual and somatosensory cues in both hands. A unimanual visuomotor force-tracking task and a bimanual sense of effort force-matching task were performed by WC patients and healthy controls. In visuomotor tracking, WC patients showed increased error, greater variability, and longer release duration than controls. In the force-matching task, patients underestimated, whereas controls overestimated, the force applied in the other hand. Visuomotor tracking and force matching were equally impaired in both the symptomatic and nonsymptomatic hand in WC patients. This study provides evidence of bilaterally impaired grip-force control in WC, when using visual or sense of effort cues. This suggests a generalized subclinical deficit in sensorimotor integration in WC. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Nocturnal and Circadian Rhythm of Blood Pressure Is Associated with Renal Structure Damage and Function in Patients with IgAN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Huhai; Yang, Jurong; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Kailong; Huo, Bengang; Dai, Huanzi; Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Jie; Tan, Wei; He, Yani

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) is closely related to target organ damage in hypertension. However, the association between abnormal circadian rhythm of BP and renal injury is not clear. We investigated whether renal injury is associated with nocturnal BP and circadian rhythm of BP in Chinese IgAN patients. Clinic and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring data were obtained from 330 Chinese IgAN patients with mean 24 h BP < 130/80 and mean daytime BP < 135/85 mmHg. Renal histopathological injury was determined according to the Oxford classification of IgAN. Among the 330 IgAN subjects, 35.8% suffered from nocturnal hypertension, 61.5% had abnormal circadian BP, and 27% had nocturnal hypertension with a nondipping pattern. Compared with nocturnal normotensive patients, patients with nocturnal hypertension had significantly higher levels of blood cystatin C, blood uric acid, and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and significantly a higher mean renal tissue injury score. The nondipping hypertensive group had significantly higher nocturnal diastolic and systolic BP, blood uric acid, and glomerulosclerosis rates, whereas eGFR was lower. In nondipping hypertensive patients, urinary sodium excretion and renal tissue injury scores were significantly higher than dipping patients. Nocturnal hypertension and abnormal circadian BP correlated with renal tissue injury, renal interstitial fibrosis, and aortic arch atherosclerosis. Abnormal circadian rhythm of BP and nocturnal hypertension are common clinical manifestations in Chinese IgAN patients with normal mean 24 h BP. Abnormal circadian BP and nocturnal hypertension may accelerate IgAN progression by inducing renal dysfunction and histopathological damage. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensitivity of nocturnal boundary layer temperature to tropospheric aerosol surface radiative forcing under clear-sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Udaysankar S.; McNider, Richard; Patadia, Falguni; Christopher, Sundar A.; Fuller, Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Since the middle of the last century, global surface air temperature exhibits an increasing trend, with nocturnal temperatures increasing at a much higher rate. Proposed causative mechanisms include the radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols on the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) where the temperature response is amplified due to shallow depth and its sensitivity to potential destabilization. A 1-D version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to examine the sensitivity of the nocturnal boundary layer temperature to the surface longwave radiative forcing (SLWRF) from urban aerosol loading and doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. The analysis is conducted for typical midlatitude nocturnal boundary layer case days from the CASES-99 field experiment and is further extended to urban sites in Pune and New Delhi, India. For the cases studied, locally, the nocturnal SLWRF from urban atmospheric aerosols (2.7-47 W m-2) is comparable or exceeds that caused by doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (3 W m-2), with the surface temperature response ranging from a compensation for daytime cooling to an increase in the nocturnal minimum temperature. The sensitivity of the NBL to radiative forcing is approximately 4 times higher compared to the daytime boundary layer. Nighttime warming or cooling may occur depending on the nature of diurnal variations in aerosol optical depth. Soil moisture also modulates the magnitude of SLWRF, decreasing from 3 to 1 W m-2 when soil saturation increases from 37% to 70%. These results show the importance of aerosols on the radiative balance of the climate system.

  5. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-07-21

    Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spring mass model and stabilized by applying swing leg control. Here, linear adaptations of the three leg parameters, leg angle, leg length and leg stiffness during late swing phase are assumed. Experimentally observed kinematic control parameters (leg rotation and leg length change) of human and avian running are compared, and interpreted within the context of this model, with specific focus on stability and robustness characteristics. The results suggest differences in stability characteristics and applied control strategies of human and avian running, which may relate to differences in leg posture (straight leg posture in humans, and crouched leg posture in birds). It has been suggested that crouched leg postures may improve stability. However, as the system of control strategies is overdetermined, our model findings suggest that a crouched leg posture does not necessarily enhance running stability. The model also predicts different leg stiffness adaptation rates for human and avian running, and suggests that a crouched avian leg posture, which is capable of both leg shortening and lengthening, allows for stable running without adjusting leg stiffness. In contrast, in straight-legged human running, the preparation of the ground contact seems to be more critical, requiring leg stiffness adjustment to remain stable. Finally, analysis of a simple robustness measure, the normalized maximum drop, suggests that the crouched leg posture may provide greater robustness to changes in terrain height

  6. Don't break a leg: running birds from quail to ostrich prioritise leg safety and economy on uneven terrain.

    PubMed

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Hubicki, Christian M; Blum, Yvonne; Renjewski, Daniel; Hurst, Jonathan W; Daley, Monica A

    2014-11-01

    Cursorial ground birds are paragons of bipedal running that span a 500-fold mass range from quail to ostrich. Here we investigate the task-level control priorities of cursorial birds by analysing how they negotiate single-step obstacles that create a conflict between body stability (attenuating deviations in body motion) and consistent leg force-length dynamics (for economy and leg safety). We also test the hypothesis that control priorities shift between body stability and leg safety with increasing body size, reflecting use of active control to overcome size-related challenges. Weight-support demands lead to a shift towards straighter legs and stiffer steady gait with increasing body size, but it remains unknown whether non-steady locomotor priorities diverge with size. We found that all measured species used a consistent obstacle negotiation strategy, involving unsteady body dynamics to minimise fluctuations in leg posture and loading across multiple steps, not directly prioritising body stability. Peak leg forces remained remarkably consistent across obstacle terrain, within 0.35 body weights of level running for obstacle heights from 0.1 to 0.5 times leg length. All species used similar stance leg actuation patterns, involving asymmetric force-length trajectories and posture-dependent actuation to add or remove energy depending on landing conditions. We present a simple stance leg model that explains key features of avian bipedal locomotion, and suggests economy as a key priority on both level and uneven terrain. We suggest that running ground birds target the closely coupled priorities of economy and leg safety as the direct imperatives of control, with adequate stability achieved through appropriately tuned intrinsic dynamics. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Don't break a leg: running birds from quail to ostrich prioritise leg safety and economy on uneven terrain

    PubMed Central

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Hubicki, Christian M.; Blum, Yvonne; Renjewski, Daniel; Hurst, Jonathan W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    Cursorial ground birds are paragons of bipedal running that span a 500-fold mass range from quail to ostrich. Here we investigate the task-level control priorities of cursorial birds by analysing how they negotiate single-step obstacles that create a conflict between body stability (attenuating deviations in body motion) and consistent leg force–length dynamics (for economy and leg safety). We also test the hypothesis that control priorities shift between body stability and leg safety with increasing body size, reflecting use of active control to overcome size-related challenges. Weight-support demands lead to a shift towards straighter legs and stiffer steady gait with increasing body size, but it remains unknown whether non-steady locomotor priorities diverge with size. We found that all measured species used a consistent obstacle negotiation strategy, involving unsteady body dynamics to minimise fluctuations in leg posture and loading across multiple steps, not directly prioritising body stability. Peak leg forces remained remarkably consistent across obstacle terrain, within 0.35 body weights of level running for obstacle heights from 0.1 to 0.5 times leg length. All species used similar stance leg actuation patterns, involving asymmetric force–length trajectories and posture-dependent actuation to add or remove energy depending on landing conditions. We present a simple stance leg model that explains key features of avian bipedal locomotion, and suggests economy as a key priority on both level and uneven terrain. We suggest that running ground birds target the closely coupled priorities of economy and leg safety as the direct imperatives of control, with adequate stability achieved through appropriately tuned intrinsic dynamics. PMID:25355848

  8. Effects of myofascial release leg pull and sagittal plane isometric contract-relax techniques on passive straight-leg raise angle.

    PubMed

    Hanten, W P; Chandler, S D

    1994-09-01

    Experimental evidence does not currently exist to support the claims of clinical effectiveness for myofascial release techniques. This presents an obvious need to document the effects of myofascial release. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two techniques, sagittal plane isometric contract-relax and myofascial release leg pull for increasing hip flexion range of motion (ROM) as measured by the angle of passive straight-leg raise. Seventy-five nondisabled, female subjects 18-29 years of age were randomly assigned to contract-relax, leg pull, or control groups. Pretest hip flexion ROM was measured for each subject's right hip with a passive straight-leg raise test using a fluid-filled goniometer. Subjects in the treatment groups received either contract-relax or leg pull treatment applied to the right lower extremity; subjects in the control group remained supine quietly for 5 minutes. Following treatment, posttest straight-leg raise measurements were performed. A one-way analysis of variance followed by a Newman-Keuls post hoc comparison of mean gain scores showed that subjects receiving contract-relax treatment increased their ROM significantly more than those who received leg pull treatment, and the increase in ROM of subjects in both treatment groups was significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest that while both contract-relax and leg pull techniques can significantly increase hip flexion ROM in normal subjects, contract-relax treatment may be more effective and efficient than leg pull treatment.

  9. [Replantation at lower leg level].

    PubMed

    Daigeler, A; Fansa, H; Westphal, T; Schneider, W

    2003-11-01

    Replantation in reconstructive surgery is an established procedure due to microsurgical techniques. It can be routinely performed in unilateral lower leg amputation. In some cases of bilateral amputation, in which orthotopic replantation is not possible due to the complex trauma, heterotopic replantation is a therapeutic option. This avoids prosthetic fitting. We report five cases of orthotopic and two of heterotopic lower limb replantations. Functional outcome concerning sensibility, mobility, pain, and aesthetic result were assessed clinically and using a questionnaire. Functional outcome and patient satisfaction were good. The psychological situation of the patients as well as mobility and stability of the replanted limbs were satisfying. Heterotopically replanted patients found the replanted legs superior to the prostheses. We conclude that, in lower leg amputation, attempts should be made to replant the extremity. In bilateral lower leg amputations, at least one limb should be reconstructed, even if "only" a heterotopic replantation can be performed.

  10. Cramp-fasciculation syndrome in patients with and without neural autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Klein, Christopher J; Jones, Lyell K

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the clinical, electrophysiological and neural autoantibody characteristics in cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS) patients. We reviewed Mayo Clinic records from 2000 to 2011 to identify clinically defined CFS patients who underwent neural autoantibody testing. Stored sera of patients who tested positive for antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC complex) were analyzed further for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) or contactin-associated protein-2 immunoglobulin G (CASPR2-IgG) antibodies. Thirty-seven patients were identified. Twelve were seropositive for neural autoantibodies. Clinical manifestations were similar in seropositive and seronegative patients, although central and autonomic neuronal hyperexcitability symptoms were more common in seropositive cases. No patients had a malignancy. Repetitive tibial nerve stimulation at 10 Hz revealed longer afterdischarges in seropositive patients. Two of 7 patients with VGKC-complex autoimmunity demonstrated LGI1 or CASPR2-IgG antibodies. Only 2 of 12 seropositive patients required immunotherapy. VGKC-complex autoimmunity occurs in a minority of CFS patients. Antibody positivity was associated with extramuscular manifestations, typically without malignancy. Target antigens within the VGKC complex remain unknown in most patients. Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  11. From dusk till dawn: nocturnal and diurnal pollination in the epiphyte Tillandsia heterophylla (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, P A; Krömer, T; García-Franco, J G; MacSwiney G, M C

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators, we studied the reproductive biology and pollinators of Tillandsia heterophylla E. Morren, an epiphytic tank bromeliad endemic to southeastern Mexico. Since anthesis in T. heterophylla is predominantly nocturnal but lasts until the following day, we hypothesised that this bromeliad would receive visits from both diurnal and nocturnal visitors, but that nocturnal visitors would be the most effective pollinators, since they arrive first to the receptive flower, and that bats would be the most frequent nocturnal visitors, given the characteristics of the nectar. Flowering of T. heterophylla began in May and lasted until July. The species is fully self-compatible, with an anthesis that lasts for ca. 15-16 h. Mean volume of nectar produced per flower was 82.21 μl, with a mean sugar concentration of 6.33%. The highest volume and concentration of nectar were found at 20:00 h, with a subsequent decline in both to almost zero over the following 12-h period. T. heterophylla has a generalist pollination system, since at least four different morphospecies of visitors pollinate its flowers: bats, moths, hummingbirds and bees. Most of the pollinating visits corresponded to bats and took place in the early evening, when stigma receptivity had already begun; making bats the probable pollinator on most occasions. However, diurnal pollinators may be important as a 'fail-safe' system by which to guarantee the pollination of T. heterophylla. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Abnormalities of Eye–Hand Coordination in Patients with Writer’s Cramp: Possible Role of the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Kotikalapudi, Raviteja; Lenka, Abhishek; Thennarassu, Kandavel; Yadav, Ravi; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background Writer’s cramp (WC) is one of the commonly observed focal dystonias. The pathophysiology of WC has not been fully understood. The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis of dystonia. As the cerebellum is crucial for maintaining accurate eye–hand coordination (EHC), its role in the pathogenesis of WC can be investigated by studying the EHC in patients with WC. Methods Fifteen patients with WC (women:men, 3:12) and 15 age- and gender-matched controls performed oculomotor and EHC tasks. A visually guided stimulus (VGS) task was first performed with eye-only condition (EOC) and then with EHC. Results A significant interaction between the groups (controls and patients) and tasks (EOC and EHC) with age as a covariate confirmed that the two groups reacted differently to the tasks in saccadic latency (F(1,27) = 4.8; p = 0.039) and average saccade acceleration (F(1,27) = 10.6; p = 0.003). The curvature index of acceleration of the hand was significantly more in patients compared to controls (patients vs. controls, 2.4±0.4 vs. 1.8±0.2, p = 0.01). While performing the EHC task, there was a significant correlation of the Writer’s Cramp Rating Score with the average saccadic speed (–0.61, p = 0.016), peak saccadic deceleration (0.59, p = 0.019) and average saccadic acceleration (–0.63, p = 0.012). Discussion Saccadic acceleration and latency are abnormal while performing EHC tasks in patients with WC. Our study gives further insights into the possible role of the cerebellum in the pathogenesis of WC. PMID:29109905

  13. The Australian Bogong Moth Agrotis infusa: A Long-Distance Nocturnal Navigator

    PubMed Central

    Warrant, Eric; Frost, Barrie; Green, Ken; Mouritsen, Henrik; Dreyer, David; Adden, Andrea; Brauburger, Kristina; Heinze, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    The nocturnal Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) is an iconic and well-known Australian insect that is also a remarkable nocturnal navigator. Like the Monarch butterflies of North America, Bogong moths make a yearly migration over enormous distances, from southern Queensland, western and northwestern New South Wales (NSW) and western Victoria, to the alpine regions of NSW and Victoria. After emerging from their pupae in early spring, adult Bogong moths embark on a long nocturnal journey towards the Australian Alps, a journey that can take many days or even weeks and cover over 1000 km. Once in the Alps (from the end of September), Bogong moths seek out the shelter of selected and isolated high ridge-top caves and rock crevices (typically at elevations above 1800 m). In hundreds of thousands, moths line the interior walls of these cool alpine caves where they “hibernate” over the summer months (referred to as “estivation”). Towards the end of the summer (February and March), the same individuals that arrived months earlier leave the caves and begin their long return trip to their breeding grounds. Once there, moths mate, lay eggs and die. The moths that hatch in the following spring then repeat the migratory cycle afresh. Despite having had no previous experience of the migratory route, these moths find their way to the Alps and locate their estivation caves that are dotted along the high alpine ridges of southeastern Australia. How naïve moths manage this remarkable migratory feat still remains a mystery, although there are many potential sensory cues along the migratory route that moths might rely on during their journey, including visual, olfactory, mechanical and magnetic cues. Here we review our current knowledge of the Bogong moth, including its natural history, its ecology, its cultural importance to the Australian Aborigines and what we understand about the sensory basis of its long-distance nocturnal migration. From this analysis it becomes clear that

  14. Separating selection by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators on floral display and spur length in Gymnadenia conopsea.

    PubMed

    Sletvold, Nina; Trunschke, Judith; Wimmergren, Carolina; Agren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Most plants attract multiple flower visitors that may vary widely in their effectiveness as pollinators. Floral evolution is expected to reflect interactions with the most important pollinators, but few studies have quantified the contribution of different pollinators to current selection on floral traits. To compare selection mediated by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators on floral display and spur length in the rewarding orchid Gymnadenia conopsea, we manipulated the environment by conducting supplemental hand-pollinations and selective pollinator exclusions in two populations in central Norway. In both populations, the exclusion of diurnal pollinators significantly reduced seed production compared to open pollination, whereas the exclusion of nocturnal pollinators did not. There was significant selection on traits expected to influence pollinator attraction and pollination efficiency in both the diurnal and nocturnal pollination treatment. The relative strength of selection among plants exposed to diurnal and nocturnal visitors varied among traits and populations, but the direction of selection was consistent. The results suggest that diurnal pollinators are more important than nocturnal pollinators for seed production in the study populations, but that both categories contribute to selection on floral morphology. The study illustrates how experimental manipulations can link specific categories of pollinators to observed selection on floral traits, and thus improve our understanding of how species interactions shape patterns of selection.

  15. Nocturia in men is a chaotic condition dominated by nocturnal polyuria.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Tetsuya; Yamada, Yuta; Sugihara, Toru; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Motofumi; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2015-05-01

    To characterize nocturia in men based on frequency volume chart data and symptom profiles assessed using the Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score and Athens Insomnia Scale questionnaires. The Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score and Athens Insomnia Scale questionnaires were administered to 299 consecutive treatment naïve men with nocturia (≥one time per night). Frequency volume chart data were recorded for 2 days. Correlations between nocturia and clinical characteristics including symptom scores, clinical diagnosis, Charlson Comorbidity Index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, uroflowmetry and prostate volume were analyzed. Patients were divided into five groups: one time (n = 36), two times (n = 65), three times (n = 85), four times (n = 78) and five times (n = 34) of nocturia. Age, prevalence or severity of chronic kidney disease, hyperlipidemia, low bladder capacity, nocturnal polyuria, urgency, bladder pain and sleep disorders were significantly correlated with the severity of nocturia. The Spearman correlation analysis identified eight possible independent factors for nocturia: age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, urgency, bladder pain, sleep quality, sleepiness during the day, average voided volume and nocturnal volume divided by body weight. Logistic regression analysis showed that nocturnal volume divided by body weight was the strongest factor of nocturia, and ≥7, 9 and 9.7 mL/kg were practical cut-off values of three, four and five times per night of nocturia, respectively. Nocturia in men is a chaotic condition dominated by nocturnal polyuria, and related to multiple factors including age, renal function, urgency, bladder pain, insomnia and bladder volume. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Classification and Analysis of Four Types of Elevated Nocturnal Convective Initiation During Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, S. A.; Gallus, W. A., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    A large portion of precipitation seen in the Great Plains region of the United States falls from nocturnal convection. Quite often, nocturnally initiated convection may grow upscale into a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) that in turn may cause high impact weather events such as severe wind, flooding, and even tornadoes. Thus, correctly predicting nocturnal convective initiation is an integral part of forecasting for the Great Plains. Unfortunately, it is also one of the most challenging aspects of forecasting for this region. Many forecasters familiar with the Great Plains region have noted that elevated nocturnal convective initiation seems to favor a few distinct and rather diverse modes, which pose varying degrees of forecasting difficulties. This study investigates four of these modes, including initiation caused by the interaction of the low level jet and a frontal feature, initiation at the nose of the low level jet without the presence of a frontal feature, linear features ahead of and perpendicular to a forward propagating MCS, and initiation occurring with no discernible large scale forcing mechanism. Improving elevated nocturnal convective initiation forecasts was one of the primary goals of the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field campaign that took place from June 1 to July 15, 2015, which collected a wealth of convective initiation data. To coincide with these data sets, nocturnal convective initiation episodes from the 2015 summer season were classified into each of the aforementioned groups. This allowed for a thorough investigation of the frequency of each type of initiation event, as well as identification of typical characteristics of the atmosphere (forcing mechanisms present, available instability, strength/location of low level jet, etc.) during each event type. Then, using archived model data and the vast data sets collected during the PECAN field campaign, model performance during PECAN for each convective initiation mode was

  17. Leg stiffness and expertise in men jumping.

    PubMed

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Bardy, Benoît G; Durey, Alain

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate: a) the leg spring behavior in the one-leg vertical jump, b) the contribution of impulse parameters to this behavior, and c) the effect of jumping expertise on leg stiffness. Four categories of experts (handball, basketball, volleyball players, and Fosbury athletes), as well as novice subjects performed a run-and-jump test to touch a ball with the head. Five experimental conditions were tested from 55 to 95% of the maximum jump height. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using six cameras and a force plate. The mechanical behavior of the musculoskeleton component of the human body can be modeled as a simple mass-spring system, from which leg stiffness values can be extracted to better understand energy transfer during running or jumping. The results indicate that leg stiffness (mean value of 11.5 kN.m) decreased with jumping height. Leg shortening at takeoff also increased with jumping height, whereas contact time decreased (-18%). No difference was found between experts and novices for leg stiffness. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) indicated the contribution of two main factors to the performance. The first factor emerged out of vertical force, stiffness, and duration of impulse. The second factor included leg shortening and jumping height. Differences between experts and novices were observed in terms of the contribution of leg stiffness to jump height, and more importantly, clear differences existed between experts in jumping parameters. The analysis performed on the sport categories indeed revealed different jumping profiles, characterized by specific, sport-related impulse parameters.

  18. Nocturnal eating disturbs phosphorus excretion in young subjects: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Masae; Noda, Saaya; Morimoto, Yuuka; Suzuki, Akitsu; Nishino, Kanaho; Ando, Sakiko; Umeda, Minako; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arai, Hidekazu

    2015-10-08

    Nocturnal eating have recently increased. Serum phosphorus levels and regulators of phosphorus have circadian variations, so it is suggested that the timing of eating may be important in controlling serum phosphorus levels. However, there have been no reports on the effects of nocturnal eating on phosphorus metabolism. The objective was to evaluate the effects of nocturnal eating on phosphorus metabolism. Fourteen healthy men participated in two experimental protocols with differing dinner times. The design of this study was a crossover study. The subjects were served test meals three times (breakfast; 07:30 h, lunch; 12:30 h, dinner; 17:30 or 22:30 h) a day. Blood and urine samples were collected to assess diurnal variation until the following morning. The following morning, fasting serum phosphorus levels in the late dinner group were markedly higher than those in the early dinner group (p < 0.001), although serum calcium levels were maintained at approximately constant levels throughout the day in both groups. Fluctuations in urinary calcium excretion were synchronized with the timing of dinner eating, however, fluctuations in urinary phosphorus excretion were not synchronized. Urinary phosphorus excretions at night were inhibited in the late dinner group. In the late dinner group, intact parathyroid hormone levels didn't decrease, and they were significantly higher in this group compared with the early dinner group at 20:00 h (p = 0.004). The following morning, fasting serum fibroblast growth factor 23 levels in the late dinner group had not changed, but those in the early dinner group were significantly increased (p = 0.003). Serum free fatty acid levels before dinner were significantly higher in the late dinner group compared with the early dinner group. Our results indicate that nocturnal eating inhibits phosphorus excretion. It is suggested that nocturnal eating should be abstained from to manage serum phosphorus levels to within an adequate

  19. Anatomic and functional leg-length inequality: A review and recommendation for clinical decision-making. Part II, the functional or unloaded leg-length asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Gary A

    2005-01-01

    Background Part II of this review examines the functional "short leg" or unloaded leg length alignment asymmetry, including the relationship between an anatomic and functional leg-length inequality. Based on the reviewed evidence, an outline for clinical decision making regarding functional and anatomic leg-length inequality will be provided. Methods Online databases: Medline, CINAHL and Mantis. Plus library searches for the time frame of 1970–2005 were done using the term "leg-length inequality". Results and Discussion The evidence suggests that an unloaded leg-length asymmetry is a different phenomenon than an anatomic leg-length inequality, and may be due to suprapelvic muscle hypertonicity. Anatomic leg-length inequality and unloaded functional or leg-length alignment asymmetry may interact in a loaded (standing) posture, but not in an unloaded (prone/supine) posture. Conclusion The unloaded, functional leg-length alignment asymmetry is a likely phenomenon, although more research regarding reliability of the measurement procedure and validity relative to spinal dysfunction is needed. Functional leg-length alignment asymmetry should be eliminated before any necessary treatment of anatomic LLI. PMID:16080787

  20. INTRA-RATER RELIABILITY OF THE MULTIPLE SINGLE-LEG HOP-STABILIZATION TEST AND RELATIONSHIPS WITH AGE, LEG DOMINANCE AND TRAINING.

    PubMed

    Sawle, Leanne; Freeman, Jennifer; Marsden, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Balance is a complex construct, affected by multiple components such as strength and co-ordination. However, whilst assessing an athlete's dynamic balance is an important part of clinical examination, there is no gold standard measure. The multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test is a functional test which may offer a method of evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance, but it needs to show adequate intra-tester reliability. The purpose of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of a dynamic balance test, the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test on the dominant and non-dominant legs. Intra-rater reliability study. Fifteen active participants were tested twice with a 10-minute break between tests. The outcome measure was the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test score, based on a clinically assessed numerical scoring system. Results were analysed using an Intraclass Correlations Coefficient (ICC 2,1 ) and Bland-Altman plots. Regression analyses explored relationships between test scores, leg dominance, age and training (an alpha level of p = 0.05 was selected). ICCs for intra-rater reliability were 0.85 for the dominant and non-dominant legs (confidence intervals = 0.62-0.95 and 0.61-0.95 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed scores within two standard deviations. A significant correlation was observed between the dominant and non-dominant leg on balance scores (R 2 =0.49, p<0.05), and better balance was associated with younger participants in their non-dominant leg (R 2 =0.28, p<0.05) and their dominant leg (R 2 =0.39, p<0.05), and a higher number of hours spent training for the non-dominant leg R 2 =0.37, p<0.05). The multiple single-leg hop-stabilisation test demonstrated strong intra-tester reliability with active participants. Younger participants who trained more, have better balance scores. This test may be a useful measure for evaluating the dynamic attributes of balance. 3.

  1. Altered brain activation in a reversal learning task unmasks adaptive changes in cognitive control in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Knutzen, Arne; Granert, Oliver; Sablowsky, Simone; Götz, Julia; Wolff, Stephan; Jansen, Olav; Dressler, Dirk; Schneider, Susanne A; Klein, Christine; Deuschl, Günther; van Eimeren, Thilo; Witt, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Previous receptor binding studies suggest dopamine function is altered in the basal ganglia circuitry in task-specific dystonia, a condition characterized by contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles while performing specific tasks. Dopamine plays a role in reward-based learning. Using fMRI, this study compared 31 right-handed writer's cramp patients to 35 controls in reward-based learning of a probabilistic reversal-learning task. All subjects chose between two stimuli and indicated their response with their left or right index finger. One stimulus response was rewarded 80%, the other 20%. After contingencies reversal, the second stimulus response was rewarded in 80%. We further linked the DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIa polymorphism, which is associated with 30% reduction of the striatal dopamine receptor density with reward-based learning and assumed impaired reversal learning in A + subjects. Feedback learning in patients was normal. Blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in controls increased with negative feedback in the insula, rostral cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and parietal cortex (pFWE < 0.05). In comparison to controls, patients showed greater increase in BOLD activity following negative feedback in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA32). The genetic status was not correlated with the BOLD activity. The Brodmann area 32 (BA32) is part of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) that plays an important role in coordinating and integrating information to guide behavior and in reward-based learning. The dACC is connected with the basal ganglia-thalamo-loop modulated by dopaminergic signaling. This finding suggests disturbed integration of reinforcement history in decision making and implicate that the reward system might contribute to the pathogenesis in writer's cramp.

  2. The Effectiveness of Silodosin for Nocturnal Polyuria in Elderly Men With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Won; Park, Jinsung; Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong-Wook; Kim, Hyung Joon; Jung, Jae Hung; Kim, Won Tae

    2015-09-01

    To investigate improvement in nocturia and nocturnal polyuria in nocturnal polyuria patients after silodosin administration by using a 3-day frequency volume chart. This was a prospective multicenter study. We enrolled nocturnal polyuria patients (nocturnal polyuria index [NPi]>0.33), aged ≥60 years, diagnosed with the 3-day frequency volume charts of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia taking α-blockers. Of the 54 patients, 30 (55.6%) completed the study according to the study protocol (per-protocol group), and 24 dropped out (dropout group). Of the 24 patients in the dropout group, 5 withdrew consent due to side effects or lack of efficacy, 7 were lost to follow-up at 4 weeks, 8 were lost to follow-up at 12 weeks, and 4 dropped out due to failure to complete 3-day frequency volume charts at 12 weeks. In the per-protocol group, there was significant improvement in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), especially question numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and the quality of life question (P=0.001, P=0.007, P<0.001, P=0.003, P=0.049, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). The Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ) score for the sleep question improved from 64.36 to 70.43 (P=0.039). The NPi reduced from 0.4005 to 0.3573 (P=0.027); however, in many cases, there was no improvement in nocturnal polyuria itself. In intention-to-treat analysis, there were significant improvements in IPSS and LSEQ in 45 patients. In elderly nocturnal polyuria patients, silodosin monotherapy exhibits good efficacy in improving nocturia and nocturnal polyuria; however, the mean NPi was still >0.33. Considering the high dropout rate of our study due to no implementation of 3-day frequency volume charts, prospective and large-scale studies are needed to confirm our results.

  3. Primary nocturnal enuresis is associated with lower intelligence quotient scores in boys from poorer socioeconomic status families.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Abbas; Bahrainian, Seyed Abdolmajid; Khoshdel, Alireza; Jalaly, Niloofar; Golshan, Shabnam; Pakmanesh, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    To explore intelligence quotient in boys with primary nocturnal enuresis compared with normal boys considering their socioeconomic status. A total of 152 school-aged boys (including 55 boys with primary nocturnal enuresis and 97 matched normal controls) were assessed. Boys with a history of any neurological or urological disease were excluded. Two different districts of Tehran: Khani-Abad (a poor district) and Pirouzi (a middle class district) districts were enrolled according to socioeconomic status data reported by the World Health Organization. Intelligence tests were carried out using a validated Iranian translation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised. Total, as well as performance intelligence quotient and verbal intelligence quotient scores and verbal-performance discrepancy (the difference between verbal and performance intelligence quotient scores for each individual) were compared using a t-test between boys with primary nocturnal enuresis in each district and their matched controls. Considering each district separately, the total intelligence quotient score was lower in primary nocturnal enuresis cases than controls only in the lower income district (90.7 ± 23.3 vs 104.8 ± 14.7, P = 0.002). Similarly, boys with primary nocturnal enuresis ranked lower in verbal intelligence quotient (P = 0.002) and performance intelligence quotient (P = 0.004) compared with their matched normal controls only in lower income district, whereas in the higher income district, boys with primary nocturnal enuresis ranked similar in total intelligence quotient to their matched controls. Boys with primary nocturnal enuresis had a lower intelligence quotient compared with the control participants only in low-income district. It seems important to adjust the results of the intelligence quotient assessment in these children according to their socioeconomic status. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Nocturnal polyuria and decreased serum testosterone: is there an association in men with lower urinary tract symptoms?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the putative association between nocturia and decreased serum testosterone in men with lower urinary tract symptoms. Frequency volume charts and serum testosterone levels of patients visiting the outpatient clinic for lower urinary tract symptoms were collected and analyzed. Age, prostate volume, body mass index and the presence of comorbidities were accounted for. Frequency volume charts were analyzed for pathophysiological components of nocturnal polyuria, global polyuria, decreased nocturnal bladder capacity and increased frequency to identify associated risks. Frequency volume charts were also used to chart 8-h changes of volume, frequency and capacity to identify time diurnal interactions with risk factors based on serum testosterone levels. A total of 2180 patients were enrolled in the study. Multivariate analysis showed testosterone decreased 0.142 ng/mL for every increase in nocturia, independent of other factors. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant difference between pathophysiological components. Decreased testosterone was shown to carry a significant independent risk for overall nocturia (odds ratio 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.013-2.527, P = 0.044), and particularly nocturnal polyuria (odds ratio 1.934, 95% confidence interval 1.001-3.737, P = 0.027). Repeated measurement models showed patients with serum testosterone below 2.50 ng/mL to have a paradoxical increase in nocturnal urine volume at night. Nocturia, especially nocturnal polyuria, is associated with decreased serum testosterone. Patients with low serum testosterone show increased nocturnal urine output. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  6. Visual orientation and navigation in nocturnal arthropods.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2010-01-01

    With their highly sensitive visual systems, the arthropods have evolved a remarkable capacity to orient and navigate at night. Whereas some navigate under the open sky, and take full advantage of the celestial cues available there, others navigate in more difficult conditions, such as through the dense understory of a tropical rainforest. Four major classes of orientation are performed by arthropods at night, some of which involve true navigation (i.e. travel to a distant goal that lies beyond the range of direct sensory contact): (1) simple straight-line orientation, typically for escape purposes; (2) nightly short-distance movements relative to a shoreline, typically in the context of feeding; (3) long-distance nocturnal migration at high altitude in the quest to locate favorable feeding or breeding sites, and (4) nocturnal excursions to and from a fixed nest or food site (i.e. homing), a task that in most species involves path integration and/or the learning and recollection of visual landmarks. These four classes of orientation--and their visual basis--are reviewed here, with special emphasis given to the best-understood animal systems that are representative of each. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Local Characteristics of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer in Response to External Pressure Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Steven; Baas, Peter; van Hooft, Antoon; van Hooijdonk, Ivo; Bosveld, Fred; van de Wiel, Bas

    2017-04-01

    Geostrophic wind speed data, derived from pressure observations, are used in combination with tower measurements to investigate the nocturnal stable boundary layer at Cabauw, The Netherlands. Since the geostrophic wind speed is not directly influenced by local nocturnal stability, it may be regarded as an external forcing parameter of the nocturnal stable boundary layer. This is in contrast to local parameters such as in situ wind speed, the Monin-Obukhov stability parameter (z/L) or the local Richardson number. To characterize the stable boundary layer, ensemble averages of clear-sky nights with similar geostrophic wind speed are formed. In this manner, the mean dynamical behavior of near-surface turbulent characteristics, and composite profiles of wind and temperature is systematically investigated. We find that the classification results in a gradual ordering of the diagnosed variables in terms of the geostrophic wind speed. In an ensemble sense the transition from the weakly stable to very stable boundary layer is more gradual than expected. Interestingly, for very weak geostrophic winds turbulent activity is found to be negligibly small while the resulting boundary cooling stays finite. Realistic numerical simulations for those cases should therefore have a a solid description of other thermodynamic processes such as soil heat conduction and radiative transfer. This prerequisite poses a challenge for Large-Eddy Simulations of weak wind nocturnal boundary layers.

  8. Broken Leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices into the broken bone to maintain proper alignment during healing. Other injuries may be treated with ... that extend into the joint and poor bone alignment can cause osteoarthritis years later. If your leg ...

  9. Nocturnal excretion of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin in children and adolescents with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Anderson, George M; Pichard, Nadège; Charbuy, Henriette; Touitou, Yvan

    2005-01-15

    Many studies in autistic disorder report sleep problems and altered circadian rhythms, suggesting abnormalities in melatonin physiology. Additionally, melatonin, a pineal gland hormone produced from serotonin, is of special interest in autistic disorder given reported alterations in central and peripheral serotonin neurobiology. Nocturnal urinary excretion of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin was measured by radioimmunoassay in groups of children and adolescents with autistic disorder (n = 49) and normal control individuals (n = 88) matched on age, sex, and Tanner stage of puberty. Nocturnal 6-sulphatoxymelatonin excretion rate was significantly and substantially lower in patients with autism than in normal controls (mean +/- SEM, .75 +/- .11 vs. 1.80 +/- .17 microg/hr, p =.0001), and was significantly negatively correlated with severity of autistic impairments in verbal communication and play (p < .05). These findings indicate clearly that nocturnal production of melatonin is reduced in autism. Further research is warranted in order to understand the mechanisms underlying the lower melatonin production, to assess the impact of altered melatonin on the pathophysiology and behavioral expression of autistic disorder, and to determine the utility of melatonin administration in individuals with autism.

  10. Associations of Sleep Quality and Awake Physical Activity with Fluctuations in Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Manabu; Koyama, Hidenori; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Naka, Mariko; Miyoshi, Akio; Kanzaki, Akinori; Kakutani, Miki; Shoji, Takuhito; Moriwaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleep quality and awake physical activity are important behavioral factors involved in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, potentially through nocturnal blood pressure (BP) changes. However, the impacts of quantitatively measured sleep quality and awake physical activity on BP fluctuation, and their relationships with several candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension are not well elucidated. Methods This cross-sectional study included 303 patients registered in the HSCAA study. Measurements included quantitatively determined sleep quality parameters and awake physical activity obtained by actigraph, nocturnal systolic BP (SBP) fall [100 × (1- sleep SBP/awake SBP ratio)], apnea hypopnea index, urinary sodium and cortisol secretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity, insulin resistance index, parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Results Simple regression analysis showed that time awake after sleep onset (r = -0.150), a parameter of sleep quality, and awake physical activity (r = 0.164) were significantly correlated with nocturnal SBP fall. Among those, time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.179) and awake physical activity (β = 0.190) were significantly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP fall in multiple regression analysis. In a subgroup of patients without taking anti-hypertensive medications, both time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.336) and awake physical activity (β = 0.489) were more strongly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP falls. Conclusion Sleep quality and awake physical activity were found to be significantly associated with nocturnal SBP fall, and that relationship was not necessarily confounded by candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension. PMID:27166822

  11. NOCTURNAL ENURESIS AS A RISK FACTOR FOR FALLS IN OLDER COMMUNITY-DWELLING WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Avita K.; Andy, Uduak U.; Newman, Diane K.; Stambakio, Hanna; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Arya, Lily A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association between urinary symptoms, fall risk and physical limitations in older community-dwelling women with urinary incontinence (UI). Materials and Methods In-depth assessment of day and nighttime urinary symptoms, fall risk, physical function, physical performance tests and mental function in older community-dwelling women with UI and who had not sought care for their urinary symptoms. All assessments were performed in the participants’ homes. We used univariable and multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship of urinary symptoms with fall risk, physical function, and physical performance. Results In 37 women with UI (mean age 74 ± 8.4 years), 48% were at high risk for falls. Nocturnal enuresis was reported by 50%. Increased fall risk was associated with increasing frequency of nocturnal enuresis (p=0.04), worse lower limb (p<0.001) and worse upper limb (p<0.0001) function and worse performance on a composite physical performance test of strength, gait and balance (p=0.02). Women with nocturnal enuresis had significantly lower median physical performance test scores (7, range 0, 11) than women without nocturnal enuresis (median 9, range 1, 12, p=0.04). In a multivariable regression model that included age, nocturnal enuresis episodes and physical function, only physical function was associated with increased fall risk (p<0.0001). Conclusion Nocturnal enuresis is common in older community-dwelling women with UI and may serve as a marker for fall risk even in women not seeking care for their urinary symptoms. Interventions targeting upper and lower body physical function could potentially reduce risk of falls in older women with UI. PMID:26626218

  12. Simple model for estimating dry deposition velocity of ozone and its destruction in a polluted nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Ho; Lai, Chin-Hsing; Wu, Yee-Lin; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Determining the destructions of both ozone and odd oxygen, O x, in the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) is important to evaluate the regional ozone budget and overnight ozone accumulation. This work develops a simple method to determine the dry deposition velocity of ozone and its destruction at a polluted nocturnal boundary layer. The destruction of O x can also be determined simultaneously. The method is based on O 3 and NO 2 profiles and their surface measurements. Linkages between the dry deposition velocities of O 3 and NO 2 and between the dry deposition loss of O x and its chemical loss are constructed and used. Field measurements are made at an agricultural site to demonstrate the application of the model. The model estimated nocturnal O 3 dry deposition velocities from 0.13 to 0.19 cm s -1, very close to those previously obtained for similar land types. Additionally, dry deposition and chemical reactions account for 60 and 40% of the overall nocturnal ozone loss, respectively; ozone dry deposition accounts for 50% of the overall nocturnal loss of O x, dry deposition of NO 2 accounts for another 20%, and chemical reactions account for the remaining 30%. The proposed method enables the use of measurements made in typical ozone field studies to evaluate various nocturnal destructions of O 3 and O x in a polluted environment.

  13. Nocturnality constrains morphological and functional diversity in the eyes of reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambient light levels are often considered to drive the evolution of eye form and function. Diel activity pattern is the main mechanism controlling the visual environment of teleost reef fish, with day-active (diurnal) fish active in well-illuminated conditions, whereas night-active (nocturnal) fish cope with dim light. Physiological optics predicts several specific evolutionary responses to dim-light vision that should be reflected in visual performance features of the eye. Results We analyzed a large comparative dataset on morphological traits of the eyes in 265 species of teleost reef fish in 43 different families. The eye morphology of nocturnal reef teleosts is characterized by a syndrome that indicates better light sensitivity, including large relative eye size, high optical ratio and large, rounded pupils. Improved dim-light image formation comes at the cost of reduced depth of focus and reduction of potential accommodative lens movement. Diurnal teleost reef fish, released from the stringent functional requirements of dim-light vision have much higher morphological and optical diversity than nocturnal species, with large ranges of optical ratio, depth of focus, and lens accommodation. Conclusions Physical characteristics of the environment are an important factor in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate eye. Both teleost reef fish and terrestrial amniotes meet the functional requirements of dim-light vision with a similar evolutionary response of morphological and optical modifications. The trade-off between improved dim-light vision and reduced optical diversity may be a key factor in explaining the lower trophic diversity of nocturnal reef teleosts. PMID:22098687

  14. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng; ...

    2015-10-17

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO 2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO 2 monitoring network) was estimated in this paper with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released onmore » two contrasting nights—slightly stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (~24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO 2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. Finally, the contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.« less

  15. Nocturnality constrains morphological and functional diversity in the eyes of reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lars; Wainwright, Peter C

    2011-11-19

    Ambient light levels are often considered to drive the evolution of eye form and function. Diel activity pattern is the main mechanism controlling the visual environment of teleost reef fish, with day-active (diurnal) fish active in well-illuminated conditions, whereas night-active (nocturnal) fish cope with dim light. Physiological optics predicts several specific evolutionary responses to dim-light vision that should be reflected in visual performance features of the eye. We analyzed a large comparative dataset on morphological traits of the eyes in 265 species of teleost reef fish in 43 different families. The eye morphology of nocturnal reef teleosts is characterized by a syndrome that indicates better light sensitivity, including large relative eye size, high optical ratio and large, rounded pupils. Improved dim-light image formation comes at the cost of reduced depth of focus and reduction of potential accommodative lens movement. Diurnal teleost reef fish, released from the stringent functional requirements of dim-light vision have much higher morphological and optical diversity than nocturnal species, with large ranges of optical ratio, depth of focus, and lens accommodation. Physical characteristics of the environment are an important factor in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate eye. Both teleost reef fish and terrestrial amniotes meet the functional requirements of dim-light vision with a similar evolutionary response of morphological and optical modifications. The trade-off between improved dim-light vision and reduced optical diversity may be a key factor in explaining the lower trophic diversity of nocturnal reef teleosts.

  16. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO 2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO 2 monitoring network) was estimated with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released on two contrasting nights—slightlymore » stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (~24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO 2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. The contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.« less

  17. Quantifying the local influence at a tall tower site in nocturnal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert; Zhang, Gengsheng

    The influence of the local terrestrial environment on nocturnal atmospheric CO 2 measurements at a 329-m television transmitter tower (and a component of a CO 2 monitoring network) was estimated in this paper with a tracer release experiment and a subsequent simulation of the releases. This was done to characterize the vertical transport of emissions from the surface to the uppermost tower level and how it is affected by atmospheric stability. The tracer release experiment was conducted over two nights in May of 2009 near the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. Tracer was released onmore » two contrasting nights—slightly stable and moderately stable—from several upwind surface locations. Measurements at the 329-m level on both nights indicate that tracer was able to mix vertically within a relatively short (~24 km) distance, implying that nocturnal stable conditions do not necessarily prevent vertical dispersion in the boundary layer and that CO 2 measurements at the tower are at least partly influenced by nearby emissions. A simulation of the tracer release is used to calculate the tower footprint on the two nights to estimate the degree to which the local domain affects the tower readings. The effect of the nocturnal boundary layer on the area sampled by the tower can be seen clearly, as the footprints were affected by changes in stability. Finally, the contribution of local sources to the measurements at the tower was minimal, however, suggesting that nocturnal concentrations at upper levels are contributed mostly by regional sources.« less

  18. Detection of subtle nocturnal motor activity from 3-D accelerometry recordings in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Nijsen, Tamara M E; Cluitmans, Pierre J M; Arends, Johan B A M; Griep, Paul A M

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a first step towards reliable detection of nocturnal epileptic seizures based on 3-D accelerometry (ACM) recordings. The main goal is to distinguish between data with and without subtle nocturnal motor activity, thus reducing the amount of data that needs further (more complex) analysis for seizure detection. From 15 ACM signals (measured on five positions on the body), two features are computed, the variance and the jerk. In the resulting 2-D feature space, a linear threshold function is used for classification. For training and testing, the algorithm ACM data along with video data is used from nocturnal registrations in seven mentally retarded patients with severe epilepsy. Per patient, the algorithm detected 100% of the periods of motor activity that are marked in video recordings and the ACM signals by experts. From all the detections, 43%-89% was correct (mean =65%). We were able to reduce the amount of data that need to be analyzed considerably. The results show that our approach can be used for detection of subtle nocturnal motor activity. Furthermore, our results indicate that our algorithm is robust for fluctuations across patients. Consequently, there is no need for training the algorithm for each new patient.

  19. [Acute leg compartment syndrome after exertion].

    PubMed

    Misović, Sidor; Kronja, Goran; Ignjatović, Dragan; Tomić, Aleksandar

    2005-03-01

    A case of a 22-year old soldier, with a history of pain in the leg during heavy exercise, which desisted at rest, was presented. One day before admission, the patient had felt an extreme exertion-induced pain in his right leg which had not lessenned at rest. At the same time, the patient noticed persistent severe leg edema. On physical examination, the intracompartmental pressure was 62 mmHg (> 30 mmHg). The patient was urgently operated on, and fasciotomy according to Mubarak was used. At second surgery, the debridement of the muscles of the posterior group of the leg, and the evacuation of hemathoma from the anterior and lateral group of the right leg muscles were perfomed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Fasciotomy wounds were closed within 14 days of the surgery. The complete physical treatment was done. Follow-up examinations 1, 3, and 6 months afterwards were satisfactory. The soldier completed his compulsory military service without any sequelae. Laboratory results were normal. Overlooked, unrecognized or surgically untreated compartment syndrome can cause severe damage, including even the loss of the extremity.

  20. Nocturnal Propagating Thunderstorms May Favor Urban "Hot-Spots": A Model-Based Study over Minneapolis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution WRF model sensitivity experiments are carried out (with and without urban land cover) to study urban impacts on nocturnal propagating thunderstorms over the city of Minneapolis. It is found that the storm spatial characteristics, especially the position of the storm cell, are appreciably altered by the presence of urban land cover. The most robust urban instability during stormy conditions is the enhanced surface convergence due to increased frictional drag. No urban impact is visible on the rainfall intensity simulated by the model. The frictional convergence, aided by the nocturnal Urban Heat Island (UHI), appears to be responsible for attracting propagating storms towards the urban center. Advanced modeling experiments are needed to quantify the mechanical and thermal influence along with similar studies in other cities to further investigate the urban impact on the frequency and trajectory of nocturnal propagating storms.

  1. [Is nocturnal polyuria more frequent among patients with Parkinson's disease?].

    PubMed

    Romain, J; Torny, F; Dumas, J-P; Gamé, X; Descazeaud, A

    2015-05-01

    Nocturia is a frequent complaint in the population of idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (IPD). The consequences of nocturia in the IPD population are at high importance as these patients have motor problems and therefore a risk of nocturnal fall. The aim of the study was to determine the mechanism of nocturia in patients with MPI, by determining the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (NP) in this population. A prospective study by bladder diary was conducted on 70 consecutive IPD patients consulting for regular neurological follow-up at a non-severe stage. Nocturia was defined as 1 or more awakenings to urinate. Two definitions of NP were used: nocturnal diuresis 33% or higher of the total diuresis (NUV33), which is the ICS (International Continence Society) definition, and nocturnal diuresis 90 mL/h or higher (NUP90). The mean patient age was 71 years (45-86, sex ratio 33/30). On average, patients were diagnosed for IPD 6.76 years earlier. The prevalence of NP was 64.5% according to NUV33 definition, and 17.7% according to NUP90 definition. Among patients with nocturia, the prevalence of NP was 66% (NUV33) and 21.5% (NUP90). No association was observed between disease duration of the IPD and the prevalence of nocturia and NP. Patients 70 years and older were more likely to have NP as defined by NUV33 than those less than 70 years (72.7% versus 55.17%, P=0.015). Men had more frequently nocturia (33.3% versus 20.7%, P=0.027). The prevalence of NP and nocturia was analyzed in patients with IPD at a non-severe stage. This prevalence was not higher than in the general population of the same age. The mechanism of nocturia in patients with IPD is not unambiguous and therefore requires to be explored by a bladder diary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of arm-leg coordination in flat breaststroke.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D; Seifert, L; Leblanc, H; Boulesteix, L; Carter, M

    2004-10-01

    This study proposes a new method to evaluate arm-leg coordination in flat breaststroke. Five arm and leg stroke phases were defined with a velocity-video system. Five time gaps quantified the time between arm and leg actions during three paces of a race (200 m, 100 m and 50 m) in 16 top level swimmers. Based on these time gaps, effective glide, effective propulsion, effective leg insweep and effective recovery were used to identify the different stroke phases of the body. A faster pace corresponded to increased stroke rate, decreased stroke length, increased propulsive phases, shorter glide phases, and a shorter T1 time gap, which measured the effective body glide. The top level swimmers showed short time gaps (T2, T3, T4, measuring the timing of arm-leg recoveries), which reflected the continuity in arm and leg actions. The measurement of these time gaps thus provides a pertinent evaluation of swimmers' skill in adapting their arm-leg coordination to biomechanical constraints.

  3. Cold and hunger induce diurnality in a nocturnal mammal.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Riede, Sjaak J; Gorter, Jenke A; Eijer, Willem G; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael; Daan, Serge; Pilorz, Violetta; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-10-21

    The mammalian circadian system synchronizes daily timing of activity and rest with the environmental light-dark cycle. Although the underlying molecular oscillatory mechanism is well studied, factors that influence phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns (temporal niche switching, chronotype) are presently unknown. Molecular evidence suggests that metabolism may influence the circadian molecular clock, but evidence at the level of the organism is lacking. Here we show that a metabolic challenge by cold and hunger induces diurnality in otherwise nocturnal mice. Lowering ambient temperature changes the phase of circadian light-dark entrainment in mice by increasing daytime and decreasing nighttime activity. This effect is further enhanced by simulated food shortage, which identifies metabolic balance as the underlying common factor influencing circadian organization. Clock gene expression analysis shows that the underlying neuronal mechanism is downstream from or parallel to the main circadian pacemaker (the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus) and that the behavioral phenotype is accompanied by phase adjustment of peripheral tissues. These findings indicate that nocturnal mammals can display considerable plasticity in circadian organization and may adopt a diurnal phenotype when energetically challenged. Our previously defined circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis proposes that such circadian plasticity, which naturally occurs in nocturnal mammals, reflects adaptive maintenance of energy balance. Quantification of energy expenditure shows that diurnality under natural conditions reduces thermoregulatory costs in small burrowing mammals like mice. Metabolic feedback on circadian organization thus provides functional benefits by reducing energy expenditure. Our findings may help to clarify relationships between sleep-wake patterns and metabolic phenotypes in humans.

  4. Postmenopausal estrogen therapy modulates nocturnal nonlinear heart rate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Irina; Ekholm, Eeva; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Hiekkanen, Heikki; Huikuri, Heikki

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of postmenopausal estrogen therapy (ET) on nocturnal nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV). In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 71 healthy hysterectomized postmenopausal women received either transdermal estradiol or placebo for 3 months. After a washout period of 1 month, the treatments were reversed. Sleep studies were performed after both treatment periods. One steady-state epoch per night of the awake state, stage 2 (light) non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, stage 3-4 (deep) non-REM sleep, also known as slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep was extracted. From the electrocardiogram, nonlinear HRV was analyzed as the fractal scaling exponents alpha1 and alpha2, approximate entropy (ApEn), and the Poincaré plot variability coefficients SD1 and SD2. These were correlated to ET use in both different sleep stages and averaged across all sleep stages. During ET, the nocturnal ApEn decreased from 0.80 +/- 0.01 to 0.74 +/- 0.02 (P < 0.05), the most marked reduction occurring during slow-wave sleep (from 0.77 +/- 0.05 to 0.63 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05). In addition, SD2 decreased in slow-wave sleep and REM sleep during ET (P < 0.05 for both). In light non-REM sleep, alpha1 slightly increased during ET (P < 0.05). ET has a slightly but distinctively attenuating effect on some nocturnal nonlinear measures of HRV, especially on complexity of heart rate dynamics. This implies that ET may have potentially deleterious effects on cardiovascular health during sleep.

  5. Modulation of corticospinal input to the legs by arm and leg cycling in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, R; Alvarado, L; Kim, S; Chong, S L; Mushahwar, V K

    2017-10-01

    The spinal cervico-lumbar interaction during rhythmic movements in humans has recently been studied; however, the role of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs is not well understood. The goals of this study were to investigate the effect of active rhythmic arm movements on the corticospinal drive to the legs ( study 1 ) and assess the effect of simultaneous arm and leg training on the corticospinal pathway after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) ( study 2). In study 1 , neurologically intact (NI) participants or participants with iSCI performed combinations of stationary and rhythmic cycling of the arms and legs while motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle. In the NI group, arm cycling alone could facilitate the VL MEP amplitude, suggesting that dynamic arm movements strongly modulate the corticospinal pathway to the legs. No significant difference in VL MEP between conditions was found in participants with iSCI. In study 2 , participants with iSCI underwent 12 wk of electrical stimulation-assisted cycling training: one group performed simultaneous arm and leg (A&L) cycling and the other legs-only cycling. MEPs in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were compared before and after training. After training, only the A&L group had a significantly larger TA MEP, suggesting increased excitability in the corticospinal pathway. The findings demonstrate the importance of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs and suggest that active engagement of the arms in lower limb rehabilitation may produce better neural regulation and restoration of function. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study aimed to demonstrate the importance of arm movements in modulating the corticospinal drive to the legs. It provides direct evidence in humans that active movement of the arms could facilitate corticospinal transmission to the legs and, for the first time, shows that facilitation is absent after spinal cord

  6. Recurrence of stroke caused by nocturnal hypoxia-induced blood pressure surge in a young adult male with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsuro; Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) causes resistant hypertension and a hypopnea-related nocturnal blood pressure (BP) surge. This could lead to an increase of not only the nocturnal BP level but also nocturnal BP variability, both of which increase an individual's cardiovascular risk. We recently developed a trigger sleep BP monitoring method that initiates BP measurement when an individual's oxygen desaturation falls below a variable threshold, and we demonstrated that it can detect a BP surge during apnea episodes. We here report the case of a 36-year-old man with severe OSAS who experienced the recurrence of stroke due to nocturnal hypoxia and a nocturnal BP surge measured by this trigger sleep BP monitoring device. A nocturnal BP surge during sleep in OSAS patients could be a strong trigger of cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic leg length asymmetry during gait is not a valid method for estimating mild anatomic leg length discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Leporace, Gustavo; Batista, Luiz Alberto; Serra Cruz, Raphael; Zeitoune, Gabriel; Cavalin, Gabriel Armondi; Metsavaht, Leonardo

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the validity of dynamic leg length discrepancy (DLLD) during gait as a radiation-free screening method for measuring anatomic leg length discrepancy (ALLD). Thirty-three subjects with mild leg length discrepancy walked along a walkway and the dynamic leg length discrepancy (DLLD) was calculated using a motion analysis system. Pearson correlation and paired Student t -tests were applied to calculate the correlation and compare the differences between DLLD and ALLD (α = 0.05). The results of our study showed DLLD is not a valid method to predict ALLD in subjects with mild limb discrepancy.

  8. Effects of desmopressin for the treatment of nocturnal polyuria in elderly women: impact on related sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Yu, Ho Song; Chung, Ho Suck; Kwon, Dongdeuk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the efficacy, safety, and impact of desmopressin on quality of sleep in treating nocturnal polyuria in elderly women. Methods: We recruited 60 women over 60 years old with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including nocturia, and with nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as nighttime urine production exceeding 33% of the 24-hour total urine volume determined by a frequency volume (FV) chart. All patients failed to respond to treatment of their underlying disease and evening fluid restriction. Desmopressin 0.1 mg was administered orally at bedtime for 12 weeks. The participants completed a series of questionnaires on the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) sleep scale and FV chart before and after treatment. Results: The patient population had a mean age of 69.2 ± 9.4 years (range: 61–81). The mean duration of symptoms was 61.2 ± 45.1 months. Significant decreases were evident after desmopressin treatment in the number of nocturia episodes (3.63 ± 1.61 to 2.00 ± 1.13, p = 0.01), nocturnal urine volume (p = 0.01), nocturnal polyuria index (NPI) (p = 0.01), and nocturia index (NI) p = 0.01). Among the categories of the MOS sleep scale, sleep index (p = 0.003), sleep disturbance (p = 0.001), snoring (p = 0.028), and shortness of breath (p = 0.036) significantly changed, with a decreased number of nocturia episodes. Adverse events were mild. Conclusions: Desmopressin is an effective treatment for nocturnal polyuria in elderly women, where conservative treatment has failed. Sleep quality is also improved. PMID:26600882

  9. Leg stiffness and stride frequency in human running.

    PubMed

    Farley, C T; González, O

    1996-02-01

    When humans and other mammals run, the body's complex system of muscle, tendon and ligament springs behaves like a single linear spring ('leg spring'). A simple spring-mass model, consisting of a single linear leg spring and a mass equivalent to the animal's mass, has been shown to describe the mechanics of running remarkably well. Force platform measurements from running animals, including humans, have shown that the stiffness of the leg spring remains nearly the same at all speeds and that the spring-mass system is adjusted for higher speeds by increasing the angle swept by the leg spring. The goal of the present study is to determine the relative importance of changes to the leg spring stiffness and the angle swept by the leg spring when humans alter their stride frequency at a given running speed. Human subjects ran on treadmill-mounted force platform at 2.5ms-1 while using a range of stride frequencies from 26% below to 36% above the preferred stride frequency. Force platform measurements revealed that the stiffness of the leg spring increased by 2.3-fold from 7.0 to 16.3 kNm-1 between the lowest and highest stride frequencies. The angle swept by the leg spring decreased at higher stride frequencies, partially offsetting the effect of the increased leg spring stiffness on the mechanical behavior of the spring-mass system. We conclude that the most important adjustment to the body's spring system to accommodate higher stride frequencies is that leg spring becomes stiffer.

  10. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure.

  11. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R.; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A.; Gnerlich, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences. PMID:26339552

  12. Radiation forcing by the atmospheric aerosols in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D. K.; Ponnulakshami, V. K.; Mukund, V.; Subramanian, G.; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2013-05-01

    We have conducted experimental and theoretical studies on the radiation forcing due to suspended aerosols in the nocturnal boundary layer. We present radiative, conductive and convective equilibrium profile for different bottom boundaries where calculated Rayleigh number is higher than the critical Rayleigh number in laboratory conditions. The temperature profile can be fitted using an exponential distribution of aerosols concentration field. We also present the vertical temperature profiles in a nocturnal boundary in the presence of fog in the field. Our results show that during the presence of fog in the atmosphere, the ground temperature is greater than the dew-point temperature. The temperature profiles before and after the formation of fog are also observed to be different.

  13. The influence of periodic increases of human activity on crepuscular and nocturnal mammals: Testing the weekend effect.

    PubMed

    Nix, Joshua H; Howell, Ryan G; Hall, Lucas K; McMillan, Brock R

    2018-01-01

    Human recreation can negatively affect wildlife, particularly on weekends when human activity is highest (i.e., the weekend effect). Much of what we understand about the weekend effect is based on research conducted on diurnal species, which have greater temporal overlap with humans. Because nocturnal species generally avoid times when humans are active, they are likely less affected by anthropogenic activity on weekends. Our objective was to test the weekend effect in relation to the degree of nocturnality of mammals in a recreational area. We predicted that as nocturnality increased, the effect of human activity would decrease. To address our objective, we placed 50 remote cameras along the Diamond Fork River in Utah from January to June 2015. We found that three out of the four focal species supported our predictions. Mule deer (crepuscular) reduced activity throughout our entire study area during weekends and avoided campgrounds. Beavers and mountain lions (both nocturnal) did not negatively respond to increased human activity. Raccoons (nocturnal) reduced activity during weekends, but only within campground areas. Our findings indicate that as the temporal overlap increases between wildlife and humans, so does the influence that humans have on wildlife. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Navigational Efficiency of Nocturnal Myrmecia Ants Suffers at Low Light Levels

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F.; Raderschall, Chloé A.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of navigating to specific goals in both bright sun-lit and dim-lit environments. Both diurnal and nocturnal insects use quite similar navigation strategies. This is despite the signal-to-noise ratio of the navigational cues being poor at low light conditions. To better understand the evolution of nocturnal life, we investigated the navigational efficiency of a nocturnal ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, at different light levels. Workers of M. pyriformis leave the nest individually in a narrow light-window in the evening twilight to forage on nest-specific Eucalyptus trees. The majority of foragers return to the nest in the morning twilight, while few attempt to return to the nest throughout the night. We found that as light levels dropped, ants paused for longer, walked more slowly, the success in finding the nest reduced and their paths became less straight. We found that in both bright and dark conditions ants relied predominantly on visual landmark information for navigation and that landmark guidance became less reliable at low light conditions. It is perhaps due to the poor navigational efficiency at low light levels that the majority of foragers restrict navigational tasks to the twilight periods, where sufficient navigational information is still available. PMID:23484052

  15. Evidence of reduced bladder capacity during nighttime in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Borg, B; Kamperis, K; Olsen, L H; Rittig, S

    2018-04-01

    Bladder capacity in children with nocturnal enuresis is assessed by maximal voided volumes (MVV) obtained through daytime frequency volume (FV) charts. Although a degree of association has been demonstrated, daytime MVV does not consistently correspond with the nocturnal bladder capacity (NBC) in monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE). It was hypothesized that isolated reduced NBC is a common phenomenon in children with nocturnal enuresis, despite normal daytime bladder function. The aim of this study was to evaluate NBC in children with MNE and normal daytime voided volumes. Specifically, it aimed to determine the prevalence and degree of reduced NBC when using nocturnal urine production (NUP) during wet nights as a surrogate estimate of NBC. Furthermore, it aimed to investigate the relationship between NBC and desmopressin response. Data from 103 children aged 5-15 years consecutively treated for MNE in a tertiary referral centre and with normal MVV on daytime FV charts were collected for this cohort study. Home recordings were completed for 2 weeks at baseline and during desmopressin dose titration. Estimated nocturnal bladder capacity (eNBC) was assessed separately each night as the total NUP causing a wet night. If NUP during a wet night was less than MVV, it was considered to be reduced eNBC during that particular night. Surprisingly, 82% (n = 84) of the children with MNE and normal daytime MVV experienced at least one wet night, with NUP below the daytime MVV indicative of a reduced eNBC. For 84 patients, mean percentage of wet nights with reduced eNBC (NUP below MVV) was 49% (SD ± 31). A total of 11% of children with frequently reduced eNBC (>40% of wet nights with reduced eNBC) responded to desmopressin (Summary Fig.). Of the children with frequently reduced NBC, 91% experienced wet nights, with NUP <65% of expected bladder capacity (EBC). A significant proportion of children with MNE and normal MVV during the daytime frequently experienced wet

  16. Dark Matters: Challenges of Nocturnal Communication Between Plants and Animals in Delivery of Pollination Services

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Renee M.

    2018-01-01

    The night is a special niche characterized by dim light, lower temperatures, and higher humidity compared to the day. Several animals have made the transition from the day into the night and have acquired unique adaptations to cope with the challenges of performing nocturnal activities. Several plant species have opted to bloom at night, possibly as a response to aridity to prevent excessive water loss through evapotranspiration since flowering is often a water-demanding process, or to protect pollen from heat stress. Nocturnal pollinators have visual adaptations to function under dim light conditions but may also trade off vision against olfaction when they are dependent on nectar-rewarding and scented flowers. Nocturnal pollinators may use CO2 and humidity cues emanating from freshly-opened flowers as indicators of nectar-rich resources. Some endothermic nocturnal insect pollinators are attracted to thermogenic flowers within which they remain to obtain heat as a reward to increase their energy budget. This review focuses on mechanisms that pollinators use to find flowers at night, and the signals that nocturnally blooming flowers may employ to attract pollinators under dim light conditions. It also indicates gaps in our knowledge. While millions of years of evolutionary time have given pollinators and plants solutions to the delivery of pollination services and to the offering of appropriate rewards, this history of successful evolution is being threatened by artificial light at night. Excessive and inappropriate illumination associated with anthropogenic activities has resulted in significant light pollution which serves to undermine life processes governed by dim light. PMID:29599655

  17. Dark Matters: Challenges of Nocturnal Communication Between Plants and Animals in Delivery of Pollination Services.

    PubMed

    Borges, Renee M

    2018-03-01

    The night is a special niche characterized by dim light, lower temperatures, and higher humidity compared to the day. Several animals have made the transition from the day into the night and have acquired unique adaptations to cope with the challenges of performing nocturnal activities. Several plant species have opted to bloom at night, possibly as a response to aridity to prevent excessive water loss through evapotranspiration since flowering is often a water-demanding process, or to protect pollen from heat stress. Nocturnal pollinators have visual adaptations to function under dim light conditions but may also trade off vision against olfaction when they are dependent on nectar-rewarding and scented flowers. Nocturnal pollinators may use CO 2 and humidity cues emanating from freshly-opened flowers as indicators of nectar-rich resources. Some endothermic nocturnal insect pollinators are attracted to thermogenic flowers within which they remain to obtain heat as a reward to increase their energy budget. This review focuses on mechanisms that pollinators use to find flowers at night, and the signals that nocturnally blooming flowers may employ to attract pollinators under dim light conditions. It also indicates gaps in our knowledge. While millions of years of evolutionary time have given pollinators and plants solutions to the delivery of pollination services and to the offering of appropriate rewards, this history of successful evolution is being threatened by artificial light at night. Excessive and inappropriate illumination associated with anthropogenic activities has resulted in significant light pollution which serves to undermine life processes governed by dim light.

  18. A new leg voxel model in two different positions for simulation of the non-uniform distribution of (241)Am in leg bones.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Majid; Brey, Richard R; Meldrum, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    A new leg voxel model in two different positions (straight and bent) has been developed for in vivo measurement calibration purposes. This voxel phantom is a representation of a human leg that may provide a substantial enhancement to Monte Carlo modeling because it more accurately models different geometric leg positions and the non-uniform distribution of Am throughout the leg bones instead of assuming a one-position geometry and a uniform distribution of radionuclides. This was accomplished by performing a radiochemical analysis on small sections of the leg bones from the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) case 0846. USTUR case 0846 represents an individual who was repeatedly contaminated by Am via chronic inhalation. To construct the voxel model, high resolution (2 mm) computed tomography (CT) images of the USTUR case 0846 leg were obtained in different positions. Thirty-six (36) objects (universes) were segmented manually from the CT images using 3D-Doctor software. Bones were divided into 30 small sections with an assigned weight exactly equal to the weight of bone sections obtained from radiochemical analysis of the USTUR case 0846 leg. The segmented images were then converted into a boundary file, and the Human Monitoring Laboratory (HML) voxelizer was used to convert the boundary file into the leg voxel phantom. Excluding the surrounding air regions, the straight leg phantom consists of 592,023 voxels, while the bent leg consists of 337,567 voxels. The resulting leg voxel model is now ready for use as an MCNPX input file to simulate in vivo measurement of bone-seeking radionuclides.

  19. Nocturnal Light Exposure Alters Hepatic Pai-1 Expression by Stimulating the Adrenal Pathway in C3H Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aoshima, Yoshiki; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Taka-aki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the possibility that nocturnal light exposure affects many biological processes in rodents, especially the circadian rhythm, an endogenous oscillation of approximately 24 h. However, there is still insufficient information about the physiological effects of nocturnal light exposure. In this study, we examined the changes in gene expression and serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major component of the fibrinolytic system that shows typical circadian rhythmicity, in C3H/He mice. Zeitgeber time (ZT) was assessed with reference to the onset of light period (ZT0). Exposure to fluorescent light (70 lux) for 1 h in the dark period (ZT14) caused a significant increase in hepatic Pai-1 gene expression at ZT16. Serum PAI-1 levels also tended to increase, albeit not significantly. Expression levels of the typical clock genes Bmal1, Clock, and Per1 were significantly increased at ZT21, ZT16, and ZT18, respectively. Exposure to nocturnal light significantly increased plasma adrenalin levels. The effects of nocturnal light exposure on Pai-1 expression disappeared in adrenalectomized mice, although the changes in clock genes were still apparent. In conclusion, our results suggest that nocturnal light exposure, even for 1 h, alters hepatic Pai-1 gene expression by stimulating the adrenal pathway. Adrenalin secreted from the adrenal gland may be an important signaling mediator of the change in Pai-1 expression in response to nocturnal light exposure. PMID:25077763

  20. The Clinical and Serological Effect of a Gluten-Free Diet in Border Terriers with Epileptoid Cramping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, M; Garden, O A; Hadjivassiliou, M; Harvey, R J; Sanders, D S; Powell, R; Garosi, L

    2015-01-01

    Canine epileptoid cramping syndrome (CECS) is a paroxysmal movement disorder of Border Terriers (BTs). These dogs might respond to a gluten-free diet. The objective of this study was to examine the clinical and serological effect of a gluten-free diet in BTs with CECS. Six client-owned BTs with clinically confirmed CECS. Dogs were prospectively recruited that had at least a 6-month history of CECS based on the observed phenomenology (using video) and had exhibited at least 2 separate episodes on different days. Dogs were tested for anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2 IgA) and anti-gliadin (AGA IgG) antibodies in the serum at presentation, and 3, 6, and 9 months after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Duodenal biopsies were performed in 1 dog. Serum TG2 IgA titers were increased in 6/6 BTs (P = .006) and AGA IgG titers were increased in 5/6 BTs at presentation compared to those of controls (P = .018). After 9 months, there was clinical and serological improvement in all BTs with CECS strictly adhering to a gluten-free diet (5/5). One dog had persistently increased antibody titers. This dog scavenged horse manure. On the strict introduction of a gluten-free diet this dog also had an improved clinical and serological response. The diet-associated improvement was reversible in 2 dogs on completion of the study, both of which suffered a relapse of CECS on the re-introduction of gluten. Canine epileptoid cramping syndrome in BTs is a gluten-sensitive movement disorder triggered and perpetuated by gluten and thus responsive to a gluten-free diet. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. The Effectiveness of Silodosin for Nocturnal Polyuria in Elderly Men With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Won; Park, Jinsung; Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong-Wook; Kim, Hyung Joon; Jung, Jae Hung; Kim, Won Tae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate improvement in nocturia and nocturnal polyuria in nocturnal polyuria patients after silodosin administration by using a 3-day frequency volume chart. Methods: This was a prospective multicenter study. We enrolled nocturnal polyuria patients (nocturnal polyuria index [NPi]>0.33), aged ≥60 years, diagnosed with the 3-day frequency volume charts of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia taking α-blockers. Of the 54 patients, 30 (55.6%) completed the study according to the study protocol (per-protocol group), and 24 dropped out (dropout group). Results: Of the 24 patients in the dropout group, 5 withdrew consent due to side effects or lack of efficacy, 7 were lost to follow-up at 4 weeks, 8 were lost to follow-up at 12 weeks, and 4 dropped out due to failure to complete 3-day frequency volume charts at 12 weeks. In the per-protocol group, there was significant improvement in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), especially question numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and the quality of life question (P=0.001, P=0.007, P<0.001, P=0.003, P=0.049, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). The Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ) score for the sleep question improved from 64.36 to 70.43 (P=0.039). The NPi reduced from 0.4005 to 0.3573 (P=0.027); however, in many cases, there was no improvement in nocturnal polyuria itself. In intention-to-treat analysis, there were significant improvements in IPSS and LSEQ in 45 patients. Conclusions: In elderly nocturnal polyuria patients, silodosin monotherapy exhibits good efficacy in improving nocturia and nocturnal polyuria; however, the mean NPi was still >0.33. Considering the high dropout rate of our study due to no implementation of 3-day frequency volume charts, prospective and large-scale studies are needed to confirm our results. PMID:26620902

  2. Circadian characteristics of urinary leukotriene E(4) in healthy subjects and nocturnal asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, K; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, S; Abe, S

    2001-12-01

    Circadian rhythmicity of cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs) and thromboxane (TX)-A(2) in healthy subjects and nocturnal asthmatic patients remains a subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of these mediators to the pathogenesis of nocturnal asthma. We measured peak expiratory flow rate, urinary concentration of LTE(4), 11-dehydro-TXB(2), and creatinine eight times every 3 h in three groups: healthy control subjects (n = 5, group A), nocturnal asthmatic patients (n = 9, group B), and nonnocturnal asthmatic subjects (n = 9, group C). To evaluate the reproducibility of the measurement of urinary LTE(4), we measured urinary LTE(4) in group A for 3 separate days. The urinary LTE(4) concentrations from 3 to 6 AM were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than from 3 to 6 PM in both group A and group B, but not in group C. The mean levels of LTE(4) in group B and group C were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those in group A. In group B, another small peak was observed from 6 to 9 PM. No significant day-to-day variation was observed in group A. Urinary 11-dehydro-TXB(2) values from 3 to 6 AM were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than those levels from 3 to 6 PM in all groups, and the mean levels in group B and group C were significantly higher than those in group A (p < 0.05). Circadian rhythmicity of urinary LTE(4) with a morning peak was found in healthy control subjects and nocturnal asthmatic subjects, but not in nonnocturnal asthmatic patients. It was suggested that cysteinyl LTs rather than TXA(2) might contribute to the nocturnal worsening of asthma.

  3. Mobile nocturnal long-term monitoring of wheezing and cough.

    PubMed

    Gross, Volker; Reinke, Christian; Dette, Frank; Koch, Roland; Vasilescu, Dragos; Penzel, Thomas; Koehler, Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Changes in normal lung sounds are an important sign of pathophysiological processes in the bronchial system and lung tissue. For the diagnosis of bronchial asthma, coughing and wheezing are important symptoms that indicate the existence of obstruction. In particular, nocturnal long-term acoustic monitoring and assessment make sense for qualitative and quantitative detection and documentation. Previous methods used for lung function diagnosis require active patient cooperation that is not possible during sleep. We developed a mobile device based on the CORSA standard that allows the recording of respiratory sounds throughout the night. To date, we have recorded 133 patients with different diagnoses (80 male, 53 female), of whom 38 were children. In 68 of the patients we could detect cough events and in 87 we detected wheezing. The recording method was tolerated by all participating adults and children. Our mobile system allows non-invasive and cooperation-independent nocturnal monitoring of acoustic symptoms in the domestic environment, especially at night, when most ailments occur.

  4. [Nocturnal spasmodic cough in the infant. Evolution after antireflux treatment].

    PubMed

    Dordal, M T; Baltazar, M A; Roca, I; Marques, L; Server, M T; Botoy, J

    1994-02-01

    Several studies have shown the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux, bronchial asthma and chronic nocturnal cough and this should not be neglected, particularly in patients who present an unfavourable development in spite of conventional treatment. For diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux, amongst other investigations, esophageal gammagraphy of swallowing, that detects alterations in the mobility of the oesophagus, secondary to a possible oesophagitis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical progress and gammagraphy of a group of children with chronic predominantly nocturnal cough (with or without bronchial asthma) with initially pathological esophageal gammagraphy, after three months of treatment with gastrokinetic drugs (cisapride against domperidone) and postural dietetic limits, in comparison with a reference group who, although having followed the limits in question had not received the pharmacological treatment. From the clinical viewpoint, cough disappeared in 64.5% of cases without significant statistical differences between the two groups. Gammagraphy became normal in 20/55 cases, improved in 10/55 cases and was unchanged in 25/55. Although there was no significant difference, gammagraphy development was better in children who received domperidone. The agreement between clinical progress and gammagraphy was 60% with a large number of false positives in the gammagraphy. We believe that the simple introduction of the postural-dietetic measures may improve the clinical control in the type of patients who present with a chronic nocturnally predominant cough that does not yield to conventional treatment.

  5. Social support and nocturnal blood pressure dipping: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fortmann, Addie L; Gallo, Linda C

    2013-03-01

    Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality than resting BP measurements. Studies have reported associations between social support, variously defined, and BP dipping. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to investigate associations of functional and structural social support with nocturnal BP dipping assessed over a minimum of 24 hours. A total of 297 articles were identified. Of these, 11 met criteria for inclusion; all studies were cross-sectional in design and included adult participants only (mean age = 19 to 72 years). Evidence was most consistent for an association between functional support and BP dipping, such that 5 of 7 studies reported statistically (or marginally) significant positive associations with BP dipping. Statistically significant functional support-BP dipping associations were moderate (standardized effect size (d) = 0.41) to large (d = 2.01) in magnitude. Studies examining structural support were fewer and relatively less consistent; however, preliminary evidence was observed for associations of marital status and social contact frequency with BP dipping. Statistically significant structural support findings were medium (d = 0.53) to large (d = 1.13) in magnitude. Overall, findings suggest a link between higher levels of functional support and greater nocturnal BP dipping; preliminary evidence was also observed for the protective effects of marriage and social contact frequency. Nonetheless, the relatively small number of studies conducted to date and the heterogeneity of findings across meaningful subgroups suggest that additional research is needed to substantiate these conclusions.

  6. Comparing effects of insulin analogues and human insulin on nocturnal glycaemia in hypoglycaemia-prone people with Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, P L; Tarnow, L; Bay, C; Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Parving, H-H; Perrild, H; Beck-Nielsen, H; Christiansen, J S; Thorsteinsson, B; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U

    2017-05-01

    To assess the difference between analogue and human insulin with regard to nocturnal glucose profiles and risk of hypoglycaemia in people with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. A total of 72 people [46 men, mean ± sd age 54 ± 12 years, mean ± sd HbA 1c 65 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.1 ± 1.1%), mean ± sd duration of diabetes 30 ± 14 years], who participated in a 2-year randomized, crossover trial of basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir/insulin aspart or human NPH insulin/human regular insulin (the HypoAna trial) were studied for 2 nights during each treatment. Venous blood was drawn hourly during sleep. Primary endpoints were nocturnal glucose profiles and occurrence of hypoglycaemia (blood glucose ≤ 3.9 mmol/l). During insulin analogue treatment, the mean nocturnal plasma glucose level was significantly higher than during treatment with human insulin (10.6 vs 8.1 mmol/l). The fasting plasma glucose level was similar between the treatments. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia was registered during 41/101 nights (41%) in the human insulin arm and 19/117 nights (16%) in the insulin analogue arm, corresponding to a hazard ratio of 0.26 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.45; P < 0.0001) with insulin analogue. Treatment with insulin analogue reduces the occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia assessed by nocturnal glucose profiles in people with Type 1 diabetes prone to severe hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal glucose profiles provide a more comprehensive assessment of clinical benefit of insulin regimens as compared to conventional recording of hypoglycaemia. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  7. Ocean Drilling Program: Completed Legs

    Science.gov Websites

    . Austin Leg summary Repository Wolfgang Schlager 102 14-Mar-85 25-Apr-85 Miami, Florida 418 Bermuda Rise Lisbon, Portugal 902-906 New Jersey Sea-Level Transect Peter Blum Gregory Mountain Leg summary Repository , Nova Scotia 1071-1073 Continuing the New Jersey Sea-Level Transect Mitchell J. Malone James A. Austin

  8. Correlates Among Nocturnal Agitation, Sleep, and Urinary Incontinence in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Karen; Specht, Janet; Forch, Windy

    2016-01-01

    Family caregivers of elders with dementia often face the challenging behaviors of nighttime agitation, sleep disturbances, and urinary incontinence. To date, no study has examined the interrelationships of these behaviors in community-dwelling persons. This single group, descriptive study employs wireless body sensors to objectively collect data on nighttime agitation, sleep, and urinary incontinence in patients with dementia in their homes over a 5- to 7-day period. The aims are to (1) examine the feasibility and acceptability of the use of body sensors in community-dwelling persons with dementia; (2) describe patterns of nocturnal agitation, sleep continuity and duration, and nighttime urinary incontinence; and (3) examine the relationships among nocturnal agitation, sleep continuity and duration, and nighttime urinary incontinence. Data collection is in early stages and is still in progress. Challenges and advantages from preliminary data collection are reported. PMID:24670931

  9. RELAP5 Analyses of OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Experiments on Intermediate-Break LOCAs at Hot Leg or Cold Leg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Maruyama, Yu; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Experiments simulating PWR intermediate-break loss-of-coolant accidents (IBLOCAs) with 17% break at hot leg or cold leg were conducted in OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project using the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). In the hot leg IBLOCA test, core uncovery started simultaneously with liquid level drop in crossover leg downflow-side before loop seal clearing (LSC) induced by steam condensation on accumulator coolant injected into cold leg. Water remained on upper core plate in upper plenum due to counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) because of significant upward steam flow from the core. In the cold leg IBLOCA test, core dryout took place due to rapid liquid level drop in the core before LSC. Liquid was accumulated in upper plenum, steam generator (SG) U-tube upflow-side and SG inlet plenum before the LSC due to CCFL by high velocity vapor flow, causing enhanced decrease in the core liquid level. The RELAP5/MOD3.2.1.2 post-test analyses of the two LSTF experiments were performed employing critical flow model in the code with a discharge coefficient of 1.0. In the hot leg IBLOCA case, cladding surface temperature of simulated fuel rods was underpredicted due to overprediction of core liquid level after the core uncovery. In the cold leg IBLOCA case, the cladding surface temperature was underpredicted too due to later core uncovery than in the experiment. These may suggest that the code has remaining problems in proper prediction of primary coolant distribution.

  10. The effect of lateral decubitus position on nocturnal intraocular pressure over a habitual 24-hour period in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Zhen, Yi; Wang, Hao; Yang, Diya; Wang, Ningli

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of lateral decubitus position (LDP) on nocturnal intraocular pressure (IOP) and the effect of LDP on 24-hour habitual IOP pattern in healthy subjects. Intraocular pressure was measured every 2-hours using an Accupen Applanation Tonometer (Accutome, USA). During the diurnal period (7:30 am, 9:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm, 3:30 pm, 5:30 pm, 7:30 pm, and 9:30 pm), IOP was measured in the sitting position under bright light (500-1000 lux) after the subjects had been seated for 5 min. The nocturnal IOP was measured in the supine position, right LDP, and left LDP, with randomized sequences, under dim light (<10 lux) at 11:30 pm, 1:30 am, 3:30 am, and 5:30 am. The subjects were awakened and maintained each position for 5 min before the measurement. The 24-hour habitual IOP patterns were obtained according to the nocturnal position (supine, right LDP and left LDP) for either eye. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Nineteen healthy subjects were included with a mean age of 51.3±5.8 years. During the nocturnal period, a significant IOP difference was found between the dependent eye (the eye on the lower side) of LDP and the supine position, but not for all the nocturnal time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant, although the mean nocturnal IOP and the diurnal-nocturnal IOP change for the right and the left eye in the LDP pattern was slightly higher than that in the sitting-supine pattern. Significant nocturnal IOP differences existed between the dependent eye and the supine, but did not occur consistently for all time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant in healthy subjects.

  11. An automated technique for monitoring nocturnal avian vocalizations

    Treesearch

    James B. Johnson; Daniel Saenz; D. Brent Burt; Richard N. Conner

    2002-01-01

    We used audio recording dataloggers known as Frogloggers to collect nocturnal bird vocalizations at eight different sites within the Davy Crockett National Forest and the Stephen F. Austin Experimental Forest in eastern Texas from 9 May 2000 to 31 June 2001. We programmed the dataloggers to record for one-minute intervals at the beginning of each hour starting at 2100...

  12. Differential arousal regulation by prokineticin 2 signaling in the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qun-Yong; Burton, Katherine J; Neal, Matthew L; Qiao, Yu; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Sun, Yanjun; Xu, Xiangmin; Ma, Yuanye; Li, Xiaohan

    2016-08-18

    The temporal organization of activity/rest or sleep/wake rhythms for mammals is regulated by the interaction of light/dark cycle and circadian clocks. The neural and molecular mechanisms that confine the active phase to either day or night period for the diurnal and the nocturnal mammals are unclear. Here we report that prokineticin 2, previously shown as a circadian clock output molecule, is expressed in the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, and the expression of prokineticin 2 in the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells is oscillatory in a clock-dependent manner. We further show that the prokineticin 2 signaling is required for the activity and arousal suppression by light in the mouse. Between the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey, a signaling receptor for prokineticin 2 is differentially expressed in the retinorecipient suprachiasmatic nucleus and the superior colliculus, brain projection targets of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Blockade with a selective antagonist reveals the respectively inhibitory and stimulatory effect of prokineticin 2 signaling on the arousal levels for the nocturnal mouse and the diurnal monkey. Thus, the mammalian diurnality or nocturnality is likely determined by the differential signaling of prokineticin 2 from the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells onto their retinorecipient brain targets.

  13. Not letting the left leg know what the right leg is doing: limb-specific locomotor adaptation to sensory-cue conflict.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Frank H; Fox, Laura F; Hoon Kim, Dong

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of limb-specific locomotor adaptation in order to adjudicate between sensory-cue-conflict theory and motor-adaptation theory. The results were consistent with cue-conflict theory in demonstrating that two different leg-specific hopping aftereffects are modulated by the presence of conflicting estimates of self-motion from visual and nonvisual sources. Experiment 1 shows that leg-specific increases in forward drift during attempts to hop in place on one leg while blindfolded vary according to the relationship between visual information and motor activity during an adaptation to outdoor forward hopping. Experiment 2 shows that leg-specific changes in performance on a blindfolded hopping-to-target task are similarly modulated by the presence of cue conflict during adaptation to hopping on a treadmill. Experiment 3 shows that leg-specific aftereffects from hopping additionally produce inadvertent turning during running in place while blindfolded. The results of these experiments suggest that these leg-specific locomotor aftereffects are produced by sensory-cue conflict rather than simple motor adaptation.

  14. Seeing in the dark: vision and visual behaviour in nocturnal bees and wasps.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J

    2008-06-01

    In response to the pressures of predation, parasitism and competition for limited resources, several groups of (mainly) tropical bees and wasps have independently evolved a nocturnal lifestyle. Like their day-active (diurnal) relatives, these insects possess apposition compound eyes, a relatively light-insensitive eye design that is best suited to vision in bright light. Despite this, nocturnal bees and wasps are able to forage at night, with many species capable of flying through a dark and complex forest between the nest and a foraging site, a behaviour that relies heavily on vision and is limited by light intensity. In the two best-studied species - the Central American sweat bee Megalopta genalis (Halictidae) and the Indian carpenter bee Xylocopa tranquebarica (Apidae) - learned visual landmarks are used to guide foraging and homing. Their apposition eyes, however, have only around 30 times greater optical sensitivity than the eyes of their closest diurnal relatives, a fact that is apparently inconsistent with their remarkable nocturnal visual abilities. Moreover, signals generated in the photoreceptors, even though amplified by a high transduction gain, are too noisy and slow to transmit significant amounts of information in dim light. How have nocturnal bees and wasps resolved these paradoxes? Even though this question remains to be answered conclusively, a mounting body of theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that the slow and noisy visual signals generated by the photoreceptors are spatially summed by second-order monopolar cells in the lamina, a process that could dramatically improve visual reliability for the coarser and slower features of the visual world at night.

  15. Quantifying Leg Movement Activity During Sleep.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Raffaele; Fulda, Stephany

    2016-12-01

    Currently, 2 sets of similar rules for recording and scoring leg movement (LM) exist, including periodic LM during sleep (PLMS) and periodic LM during wakefulness. The former were published in 2006 by a task force of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group, and the second in 2007 by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. This article reviews the basic recording methods, scoring rules, and computer-based programs for PLMS. Less frequent LM activities, such as alternating leg muscle activation, hypnagogic foot tremor, high-frequency LMs, and excessive fragmentary myoclonus are briefly described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Salmeterol versus slow-release theophylline combined with ketotifen in nocturnal asthma: a multicentre trial. French Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed

    Muir, J F; Bertin, L; Georges, D

    1992-11-01

    We wished to assess the efficacy of inhaled salmeterol (SML; 50 micrograms b.i.d.) compared to a combination of slow-release theophylline and ketotifen p.o. (TK; T 300 mg+K 1 mg b.i.d.) for the treatment of nocturnal asthma. Ninety six patients with nocturnal asthma, (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 60-90% of predicted value, reversibility > or = 15%, at least two nocturnal awakenings per week) were eligible for a multicentre, double-blind, double-dummy cross-over study (14-day run-in, two successive 28-day treatment periods). Efficacy was assessed as success/failure, success being defined as the complete disappearance of nocturnal symptoms/awakening during the last week of each treatment period. There was a statistically significant difference between SML and TK for this criterion: 46% and 39% success with SML during periods I (first 28-day period) and II (following the cross-over), compared to only 15% and 26% with TK, respectively (p < 0.01). SML was also significantly better for the other criteria (lung function, rescue salbutamol intake during day and night). Side-effects were five times less frequent in SML-treated patients (p < 0.004). Efficacy and tolerance of SML were obviously far better than those of TK in patients with nocturnal asthma.

  17. Total lactate dehydrogenase activity of tail muscle is not cold-adapted in nocturnal lizards from cool-temperate habitats.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Miller, J H; Clark, A G; Daugherty, C H

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of metabolic processes on temperature constrains the behavior, physiology and ecology of many ectothermic animals. The evolution of nocturnality in lizards, especially in temperate regions, requires adaptations for activity at low temperatures when optimal body temperatures are unlikely to be obtained. We examined whether nocturnal lizards have cold-adapted lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH was chosen as a representative metabolic enzyme. We measured LDH activity of tail muscle in six lizard species (n=123: three nocturnal, two diurnal and one crepuscular) between 5 and 35 degrees C and found no differences in LDH-specific activity or thermal sensitivity among the species. Similarly, the specific activity and thermal sensitivity of LDH were similar between skinks and geckos. Similar enzyme activities among nocturnal and diurnal lizards indicate that there is no selection of temperature specific LDH enzyme activity at any temperature. As many nocturnal lizards actively thermoregulate during the day, LDH may be adapted for a broad range of temperatures rather than adapted specifically for the low temperatures encountered when the animals are active. The total activity of LDH in tropical and temperate lizards is not cold-adapted. More data are required on biochemical adaptations and whole animal thermal preferences before trends can be established.

  18. Research and Development of Information and Communication Technology-based Home Blood Pressure Monitoring from Morning to Nocturnal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Matsumoto, Yuri; Hamasaki, Haruna; Okawara, Yukie; Kondo, Maiko; Nozue, Ryoko; Yamagata, Hiromi; Okura, Ayako; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Asians have specific characteristics of hypertension (HTN) and its relationship with cardiovascular disease. The morning surge in blood pressure (BP) in Asians is more extended, and the association slope between higher BP and the risk for cardiovascular events is steeper in this population than in whites. Thus, 24-hour BP control including at night and in the morning is especially important for Asian patients with HTN. There are 3 components of "perfect 24-hour BP control": the 24-hour BP level, adequate dipping of nocturnal BP (dipper type), and adequate BP variability such as the morning BP surge. The morning BP-guided approach using home BP monitoring (HBPM) is the first step toward perfect 24-hour BP control. After controlling morning HTN, nocturnal HTN is the second target. We have been developing HBPM that can measure nocturnal BP. First, we developed a semiautomatic HBPM device with the function of automatic fixed-interval BP measurement during sleep. In the J-HOP (Japan Morning Surge Home Blood Pressure) study, the largest nationwide home BP cohort, we successfully measured nocturnal home BP using this device with data memory, 3 times during sleep (2, 3, and 4 am), and found that nocturnal home BP is significantly correlated with organ damage independently of office and morning BP values. The second advance was the development of trigger nocturnal BP (TNP) monitoring with an added trigger function that initiates BP measurements when oxygen desaturation falls below a variable threshold continuously monitored by pulse oximetry. TNP can detect the specific nocturnal BP surges triggered by hypoxic episodes in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. We also added the lowest heart rate-trigger function to TNP to detect the "basal nocturnal BP," which is determined by the circulating volume and structural cardiovascular system without any increase in sympathetic tonus. This double TNP is a novel concept for evaluating the pathogenic pressor mechanism of nocturnal BP

  19. Loading and performance of the support leg in kicking.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    The punt kick is important in many football codes and support leg kinematics and ground reaction forces have been implicated in injury and performance in kicking. To evaluate ground reaction forces and support leg kinematics in the punt kick. Cross sectional study. Seven elite Australian football players performed maximal kicks into a net using both the preferred and non-preferred legs. A force plate measured ground reaction forces and an optical motion capture system (200Hz) collected kinematic data during the stance phase of the kick. Preferred and non-preferred legs were compared and performance was evaluated by correlating parameters with foot speed at ball contact. Vertical forces were larger than running at a similar speed but did not reach levels that might be considered an injury risk. Braking forces were directed solely posteriorly, as for soccer kicks, but lateral force patterns varied with some players experiencing greater forces medially and others laterally. A more extended support leg, larger peak vertical and braking force during the stance phase and a shorter stance contact time was associated with larger kick leg foot speed at ball contact. No difference existed between the preferred and non-preferred legs for ground reaction forces or support leg mechanics. To punt kick longer, a straighter support leg, less time on the ground and stronger braking should be encouraged. Conditioning the support leg to provide stronger braking potential is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nocturnal polyuria and saluresis in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, M K; Varghese, Z; Fernando, O N; Moorhead, J F

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of nocturnal polyuria and saluresis in renal allograft recipients was studied by comparing the day to night (D:N) ratios of urine volume and sodium excretion in 15 patients who had undergone transplantation less than one year previously (recent-transplant group) with those in 11 patients who had undergone transplantation at least one year previously. Eleven patients with chronic renal failure and 12 normal subjects served as controls. Patients in the recent-transplant group had significantly lower D:N ratios of urine volume and sodium excretion than the patients who had undergone transplantation at least a year before, while the ratios in this last group did not differ significantly from those in the normal subjects. Nocturnal polyuria and saluresis gradually subsided in five patients studied for three months. Chronic renal failure and uraemic autonomic neuropathy were unlikely causes of the nocturia. The patients in the recent-transplant group had significantly lower D:N ratios of urine volume than the controls with chronic renal failure, and the mean Valsalva ratio in eight of them was not significantly different from that in the normal subjects. An undue sensitivity of renal allografts to postural influences was proposed. PMID:6986946

  1. Towards a Comparative Measure of Legged Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    body movement with change of velocity or direction in response to a stimulus” [18]. Notwithstanding the many informative and inspiring studies of legged...specific power (watts per kilogram taken over a gait cycle of leg power output relative to leg muscle mass or body mass) [22, 26–28] but it is not scale...closest to the body mass normalized mea- sure we will introduce below. In contrast, characterizing directional aspects of agility performance seems

  2. Nocturnal, every-other-day, online haemodiafiltration: an effective therapeutic alternative.

    PubMed

    Maduell, Francisco; Arias, Marta; Durán, Carlos E; Vera, Manel; Fontseré, Néstor; Azqueta, Manel; Rico, Nayra; Pérez, Nuria; Sentis, Alexis; Elena, Montserrat; Rodriguez, Néstor; Arcal, Carola; Bergadá, Eduardo; Cases, Aleix; Bedini, Jose Luis; Campistol, Josep M

    2012-04-01

    Longer and more frequent dialysis sessions have demonstrated excellent survival and clinical advantages, while online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) provides the most efficient form of dialysis treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of a longer (nocturnal) and more frequent (every-other-day) dialysis schedule with OL-HDF at the same or the highest convective volume. This prospective, in-centre crossover study was carried out in 26 patients, 18 males and 8 females, 49.2±14 years old, on 4-5 h thrice-weekly post-dilution OL-HDF, switched to nocturnal every-other-day OL-HDF. Patient inclusion criteria consisted of stable patients with good vascular access and with good prospects for improved occupational, psychological and social rehabilitation. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Group A received the same convective volume as previously for 6 months followed by a higher convective volume for a further 6 months, while Group B received the same schedule in reverse order. Nocturnal every-other-day OL-HDF was well tolerated and 56% of patients who were working during the baseline period continued to work throughout the study with practically no absenteeism. The convective volume was 26.7±2 L at baseline, 27.5±2 with the unchanged volume and 42.9±4 L with the higher volume. eKt/V increased from 1.75±0.4 to 3.37±0.9. Bicarbonate, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine values decreased, while phosphate levels fell markedly with a 90% reduction in phosphate binders. Blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) improved and the use of anti-hypertensive drugs decreased. In both groups, BUN, creatinine and β2-microglobulin reduction ratios improved. Different removal patterns were observed for myoglobin, prolactin and α1-acid glycoprotein. Nocturnal every-other-day OL-HDF could be an excellent therapeutic alternative since good tolerance and occupational rehabilitation, marked improvement in dialysis dose

  3. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in severe aplastic anemia patients treated with horse anti-thymocyte globulin plus cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, Phillip; Marte, Michael; Nunez, Olga; Young, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Clones of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor protein-deficient cells are characteristic in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and are present in about 40–50% of patients with severe aplastic anemia. Flow cytometry has allowed for sensitive and precise measurement of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor protein-deficient red blood cells and neutrophils in severe aplastic anemia. Design and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones measured by flow cytometry in 207 consecutive severe aplastic anemia patients who received immunosuppressive therapy with a horse anti-thymocyte globulin plus cyclosporine regimen from 2000 to 2008. Results The presence of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor protein-deficient clone was detected in 83 (40%) patients pre-treatment, and the median clone size was 9.7% (interquartile range 3.5–29). In patients without a detectable clone pre-treatment, the appearance of a clone after immunosuppressive therapy was infrequent, and in most with a clone pre-treatment, clone size often decreased after immunosuppressive therapy. However, in 30 patients, an increase in clone size was observed after immunosuppressive therapy. The majority of patients with a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone detected after immunosuppressive therapy did not have an elevated lactate dehydrogenase, nor did they experience hemolysis or thrombosis, and they did not require specific interventions with anticoagulation and/or eculizumab. Of the 7 patients who did require therapy for clinical paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria symptoms and signs, all had an elevated lactate dehydrogenase and a clone size greater than 50%. In all, 18 (8.6%) patients had a clone greater than 50% at any given time of sampling. Conclusions The presence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone in severe aplastic anemia is associated with low morbidity and mortality, and specific measures to address clinical paroxysmal

  4. Signatures of functional constraint at aye-aye opsin genes: the potential of adaptive color vision in a nocturnal primate.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H; Martin, Robert D; Verrelli, Brian C

    2007-09-01

    While color vision perception is thought to be adaptively correlated with foraging efficiency for diurnal mammals, those that forage exclusively at night may not need color vision nor have the capacity for it. Indeed, although the basic condition for mammals is dichromacy, diverse nocturnal mammals have only monochromatic vision, resulting from functional loss of the short-wavelength sensitive opsin gene. However, many nocturnal primates maintain intact two opsin genes and thus have dichromatic capacity. The evolutionary significance of this surprising observation has not yet been elucidated. We used a molecular population genetics approach to test evolutionary hypotheses for the two intact opsin genes of the fully nocturnal aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a highly unusual and endangered Madagascar primate. No evidence of gene degradation in either opsin gene was observed for any of 8 aye-aye individuals examined. Furthermore, levels of nucleotide diversity for opsin gene functional sites were lower than those for 15 neutrally evolving intergenic regions (>25 kb in total), which is consistent with a history of purifying selection on aye-aye opsin genes. The most likely explanation for these findings is that dichromacy is advantageous for aye-ayes despite their nocturnal activity pattern. We speculate that dichromatic nocturnal primates may be able to perceive color while foraging under moonlight conditions, and suggest that behavioral and ecological comparisons among dichromatic and monochromatic nocturnal primates will help to elucidate the specific activities for which color vision perception is advantageous.

  5. Motion of the center of mass in children with spastic hemiplegia: balance, energy transfer, and work performed by the affected leg vs. the unaffected leg.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Pierce, Rosemary; Do, K Patrick; Aiona, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry between limbs in people with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HEMI) adversely affects limb coordination and energy generation and consumption. This study compared how the affected leg and the unaffected leg of children with HEMI would differ based on which leg trails. Full-body gait analysis data and force-plate data were analyzed for 31 children (11.9 ± 3.8 years) with HEMI and 23 children (11.1 ± 3.1 years) with typical development (TD). Results showed that peak posterior center of mass-center of pressure (COM-COP) inclination angles of HEMI were smaller than TD when the affected leg trailed but not when the unaffected leg trailed. HEMI showed greater peak medial COM-COP inclination angles and wider step width than TD, no matter which leg trailed. More importantly, when the affected leg of HEMI trailed, it did not perform enough positive work during double support to propel COM motion. Consequently, the unaffected leg had to perform additional positive work during the early portion of single support, which costs more energy. When the unaffected leg trailed, the affected leg performed more negative work during double support; therefore, more positive work was still needed during early single support, but energy efficiency was closer to that of TD. Energy recovery factor was lower when the affected leg trailed than when the unaffected leg trailed; both were lower than TD. These findings suggest that the trailing leg plays a significant role in propelling COM motion during double support, and the 'unaffected' side of HEMI may not be completely unaffected. It is important to strengthen both legs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic Lower Leg Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Results: Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Conclusion: Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. PMID:23016078

  7. Complete (1)H resonance assignment of beta-maltose from (1)H-(1)H DQ-SQ CRAMPS and (1)H (DQ-DUMBO)-(13)C SQ refocused INEPT 2D solid-state NMR spectra and first principles GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Webber, Amy L; Elena, Bénédicte; Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Pham, Tran N; Mauri, Francesco; Pickard, Chris J; Gil, Ana M; Stein, Robin; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Brown, Steven P

    2010-07-14

    A disaccharide is a challenging case for high-resolution (1)H solid-state NMR because of the 24 distinct protons (14 aliphatic and 10 OH) having (1)H chemical shifts that all fall within a narrow range of approximately 3 to 7 ppm. High-resolution (1)H (500 MHz) double-quantum (DQ) combined rotation and multiple pulse sequence (CRAMPS) solid-state NMR spectra of beta-maltose monohydrate are presented. (1)H-(1)H DQ-SQ CRAMPS spectra are presented together with (1)H (DQ)-(13)C correlation spectra obtained with a new pulse sequence that correlates a high-resolution (1)H DQ dimension with a (13)C single quantum (SQ) dimension using the refocused INEPT pulse-sequence element to transfer magnetization via one-bond (13)C-(1)H J couplings. Compared to the observation of only a single broad peak in a (1)H DQ spectrum recorded at 30 kHz magic-angle spinning (MAS), the use of DUMBO (1)H homonuclear decoupling in the (1)H DQ CRAMPS experiment allows the resolution of distinct DQ correlation peaks which, in combination with first-principles chemical shift calculations based on the GIPAW (Gauge Including Projector Augmented Waves) plane-wave pseudopotential approach, enables the assignment of the (1)H resonances to the 24 distinct protons. We believe this to be the first experimental solid-state NMR determination of the hydroxyl OH (1)H chemical shifts for a simple sugar. Variable-temperature (1)H-(1)H DQ CRAMPS spectra reveal small increases in the (1)H chemical shifts of the OH resonances upon decreasing the temperature from 348 K to 248 K.

  8. Human hopping on damped surfaces: strategies for adjusting leg mechanics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Chet T; Farley, Claire T

    2003-08-22

    Fast-moving legged animals bounce along the ground with spring-like legs and agilely traverse variable terrain. Previous research has shown that hopping and running humans maintain the same bouncing movement of the body's centre of mass on a range of elastic surfaces by adjusting their spring-like legs to exactly offset changes in surface stiffness. This study investigated human hopping on damped surfaces that dissipated up to 72% of the hopper's mechanical energy. On these surfaces, the legs did not act like pure springs. Leg muscles performed up to 24-fold more net work to replace the energy lost by the damped surface. However, considering the leg and surface together, the combination appeared to behave like a constant stiffness spring on all damped surfaces. By conserving the mechanics of the leg-surface combination regardless of surface damping, hoppers also conserved centre-of-mass motions. Thus, the normal bouncing movements of the centre of mass in hopping are not always a direct result of spring-like leg behaviour. Conserving the trajectory of the centre of mass by maintaining spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination may be an important control strategy for fast-legged locomotion on variable terrain.

  9. Cryptic seedling herbivory by nocturnal introduced generalists impacts survival, performance of native and exotic plants.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Sharon Y; Stanton, Maureen L; Emery, Nancy C; Bradley, Carrie A; Carleton, Alexandra; Dittrich-Reed, Dylan R; Ervin, Olivia A; Gray, Levi N; Hamilton, Andrew M; Rogge, Jennifer Harrington; Harper, Skye D; Law, Kimberley Cook; Pham, Vinh Q; Putnam, Matthew E; Roth, Tara M; Theil, Jacob H; Wells, Lara M; Yoshizuka, Eric M

    2009-02-01

    Although much of the theory on the success of invasive species has been geared at escape from specialist enemies, the impact of introduced generalist invertebrate herbivores on both native and introduced plant species has been underappreciated. The role of nocturnal invertebrate herbivores in structuring plant communities has been examined extensively in Europe, but less so in North America. Many nocturnal generalists (slugs, snails, and earwigs) have been introduced to North America, and 96% of herbivores found during a night census at our California Central Valley site were introduced generalists. We explored the role of these herbivores in the distribution, survivorship, and growth of 12 native and introduced plant species from six families. We predicted that introduced species sharing an evolutionary history with these generalists might be less vulnerable than native plant species. We quantified plant and herbivore abundances within our heterogeneous site and also established herbivore removal experiments in 160 plots spanning the gamut of microhabitats. As 18 collaborators, we checked 2000 seedling sites every day for three weeks to assess nocturnal seedling predation. Laboratory feeding trials allowed us to quantify the palatability of plant species to the two dominant nocturnal herbivores at the site (slugs and earwigs) and allowed us to account for herbivore microhabitat preferences when analyzing attack rates on seedlings. The relationship between local slug abundance and percent cover of five common plant taxa at the field site was significantly negatively associated with the mean palatability of these taxa to slugs in laboratory trials. Moreover, seedling mortality of 12 species in open-field plots was positively correlated with mean palatability of these taxa to both slugs and earwigs in laboratory trials. Counter to expectations, seedlings of native species were neither more vulnerable nor more palatable to nocturnal generalists than those of

  10. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  11. The health-related quality-of-life impact of nocturnal awakenings in the middle-aged and older Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Väätäinen, Saku; Tuomilehto, Henri; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitalo, Hannu; Hussi, Esko; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Martikainen, Janne

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) impact of the nocturnal awakenings and the duration of the sleep in the Finnish middle-aged and older population. Cross-sectional sample consisted of 823 community-dwelling persons aged 55-75 living in a single municipality in a rural area of Eastern Finland. Frequency of the nocturnal awakenings was dichotomized as reporting "frequent," if the participant reported subjectively awakening "often" or "very often," and "infrequent" if the participant reported awakening "sometimes" or less frequently. HRQOL was measured with a preference-based HRQOL-index instrument, 15D. Analyses were adjusted for gender, BMI, morbidities, depression, employment and marital status, current smoking and drinking, exercise, recommendation to exercise from a health care professional, and subjective opinion about own exercise habits. Frequent nocturnal awakenings had statistically and clinically significant negative impact on HRQOL, the mean (SE) adjusted marginal HRQOL impact being -0.0416 (0.006). More than 10 and less than 6.5 h of daily sleep were associated with higher probability of having low HRQOL, adjusted odd ratios (95 % CI) being 2.65 (1.11-6.33) and 2.65 (1.55-4.52), respectively. However, the changes in daily sleep duration did not have noticeable influence on the significance or magnitude of the negative HRQOL impact of the frequent nocturnal awakenings. Nocturnal awakenings displayed a strong independent association with decreased HRQOL. The findings suggest that both clinicians and researchers should pay closer attention to nocturnal awakenings and other sleep problems in order to find ways to improve the quality of life in individuals with such conditions.

  12. Nocturnal oxygen saturation in children with stable cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Lianne; Bakker, Marije; Joosten, Koen; Hop, Wim; Tiddens, Harm

    2012-11-01

    Hypoxemia during sleep is a common finding in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients with more advanced lung disease. Nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with frequent awakenings and poor sleep quality. For children with CF, data of nocturnal oxygen saturation are sparse. To assess the oxygen saturation profile during sleep in 25 clinically stable children with CF lung disease and to correlate these data with spirometry, cough frequency, sleep quality, and CT-scan scores. During two nights cough was recorded with a digital audio recorder in 25 clinically stable CF patients. In addition oxygen saturation was measured. The day following the recording spirometry was carried out. CT scores were obtained from the most recent routine CT scan. Twenty-two patients were included in the study. Mean age (range) was 13 (6-18) years. Spirometry was FVC% 84 (range 52-114), FEV(1) % 77 (range 43-115), and FEF(75) % 50 (range 12-112). The mean SO(2) was 95.6% for the first and 96.2% for the second night. Mean SO(2) between the two nights correlated strongly (r(s) = 0.84, P < 0.001). Positive correlation was observed between mean SO(2) of the two nights (mean × SO(2)) and FVC, FEV(1) and FEF(75). Correlations were found between mean × SO(2) and the total CT score (r(s) = -0.45, P = 0.05) and the bronchiectasis subscore (r(s) = -0.48, P = 0.03). Nocturnal oxygen saturation in children with stable CF is lower than that in healthy children, and is correlated with lung function parameters and CT scores. Monitoring oxygen saturation during one night is sufficient to get a representative recording. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The New Portable Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Device Was Efficacious in the Control of Primary Dysmenorrhea Cramp Pain.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Gabriela R; Oliveira, Raquel; Parada, Flavia; Mattos, Anita L

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an established method for pain relief in dysmenorrhea. A feasible advantage would be the study of a portable device. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new portable TENS device (TANYX®) for menstruation cramps. Forty women were evaluated in a double-blind, prospective, randomized fashion, divided into sham and active groups. TENS was applied medially at the suprapubic region, for 30-min duration at eight-hour intervals, up to seven days. The placebo group (PG) received sham device. The TENS group (TG) applied an active 85 Hz frequency TENS. Efficacy measures were pain relief evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS) and diclofenac intake, and quality of life represented by: 1) capacity to get out of the bed, 2) food or drink intake, 3) missing routine daily activities such as work or school, and 4) quality of sleep. The active TENS device induced a prompt onset of pain relief in a strictly segmental manner nearby the dermatomes where the TENS was applied at the skin, and there was a drop in mean pain score from 8 to 2 cm (p < 0.001). Diclofenac consumption was also significantly reduced (p < 0.01), compared with the PG. Quality of life improved significantly in TG when compared with PG (p < 0.05). Three months after the beginning of the study, 14/20 of the women were still using the active device regularly. No adverse effects were observed. The portable, disposable, active TENS device induced a prompt onset of pain relief and improved the quality of life, without adverse effects, in patients with painful cramps associated with dysmenorrhea. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. ODYSSEUS autonomous walking robot: The leg/arm design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourbakis, N. G.; Maas, M.; Tascillo, A.; Vandewinckel, C.

    1994-01-01

    ODYSSEUS is an autonomous walking robot, which makes use of three wheels and three legs for its movement in the free navigation space. More specifically, it makes use of its autonomous wheels to move around in an environment where the surface is smooth and not uneven. However, in the case that there are small height obstacles, stairs, or small height unevenness in the navigation environment, the robot makes use of both wheels and legs to travel efficiently. In this paper we present the detailed hardware design and the simulated behavior of the extended leg/arm part of the robot, since it plays a very significant role in the robot actions (movements, selection of objects, etc.). In particular, the leg/arm consists of three major parts: The first part is a pipe attached to the robot base with a flexible 3-D joint. This pipe has a rotated bar as an extended part, which terminates in a 3-D flexible joint. The second part of the leg/arm is also a pipe similar to the first. The extended bar of the second part ends at a 2-D joint. The last part of the leg/arm is a clip-hand. It is used for selecting several small weight and size objects, and when it is in a 'closed' mode, it is used as a supporting part of the robot leg. The entire leg/arm part is controlled and synchronized by a microcontroller (68CH11) attached to the robot base.

  15. Human hopping on damped surfaces: strategies for adjusting leg mechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Chet T; Farley, Claire T

    2003-01-01

    Fast-moving legged animals bounce along the ground with spring-like legs and agilely traverse variable terrain. Previous research has shown that hopping and running humans maintain the same bouncing movement of the body's centre of mass on a range of elastic surfaces by adjusting their spring-like legs to exactly offset changes in surface stiffness. This study investigated human hopping on damped surfaces that dissipated up to 72% of the hopper's mechanical energy. On these surfaces, the legs did not act like pure springs. Leg muscles performed up to 24-fold more net work to replace the energy lost by the damped surface. However, considering the leg and surface together, the combination appeared to behave like a constant stiffness spring on all damped surfaces. By conserving the mechanics of the leg-surface combination regardless of surface damping, hoppers also conserved centre-of-mass motions. Thus, the normal bouncing movements of the centre of mass in hopping are not always a direct result of spring-like leg behaviour. Conserving the trajectory of the centre of mass by maintaining spring-like mechanics of the leg-surface combination may be an important control strategy for fast-legged locomotion on variable terrain. PMID:12965003

  16. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... anything that contains metal into the scanner room. Considerations Tests that may be done instead of an ... Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg Patient Instructions Femur fracture repair - discharge Hip fracture - discharge ...

  17. A load-based mechanism for inter-leg coordination in insects

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Animals rely on an adaptive coordination of legs during walking. However, which specific mechanisms underlie coordination during natural locomotion remains largely unknown. One hypothesis is that legs can be coordinated mechanically based on a transfer of body load from one leg to another. To test this hypothesis, we simultaneously recorded leg kinematics, ground reaction forces and muscle activity in freely walking stick insects (Carausius morosus). Based on torque calculations, we show that load sensors (campaniform sensilla) at the proximal leg joints are well suited to encode the unloading of the leg in individual steps. The unloading coincides with a switch from stance to swing muscle activity, consistent with a load reflex promoting the stance-to-swing transition. Moreover, a mechanical simulation reveals that the unloading can be ascribed to the loading of a specific neighbouring leg, making it exploitable for inter-leg coordination. We propose that mechanically mediated load-based coordination is used across insects analogously to mammals. PMID:29187626

  18. Writer's cramp: increased dorsal premotor activity during intended writing.

    PubMed

    Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Helmich, Rick C; Medendorp, W P; Van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Toni, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Simple writer's cramp (WC) is a task-specific form of dystonia, characterized by abnormal movements and postures of the hand during writing. It is extremely task-specific, since dystonic symptoms can occur when a patient uses a pencil for writing, but not when it is used for sharpening. Maladaptive plasticity, loss of inhibition, and abnormal sensory processing are important pathophysiological elements of WC. However, it remains unclear how those elements can account for its task-specificity. We used fMRI to isolate cerebral alterations associated with the task-specificity of simple WC. Subjects (13 simple WC patients, 20 matched controls) imagined grasping a pencil to either write with it or sharpen it. On each trial, we manipulated the pencil's position and the number of imagined movements, while monitoring variations in motor output with electromyography. We show that simple WC is characterized by abnormally increased activity in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) when imagined actions are specifically related to writing. This cerebral effect was independent from the known deficits in dystonia in generating focal motor output and in processing somatosensory feedback. This abnormal activity of the PMd suggests that the task-specific element of simple WC is primarily due to alterations at the planning level, in the computations that transform a desired action outcome into the motor commands leading to that action. These findings open the way for testing the therapeutic value of interventions that take into account the computational substrate of task-specificity in simple WC, e.g. modulations of PMd activity during the planning phase of writing. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Frustrated S = 1/2 Two-Leg Ladder with Different Leg Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Okamoto, Kiyomi; Hikihara, Toshiya; Sakai, Tôru

    2017-04-01

    We explore the ground-state phase diagram of the S = 1/2 two-leg ladder. The isotropic leg interactions J1,a and J1,b between nearest neighbor spins in the legs a and b, respectively, are different from each other. The xy and z components of the uniform rung interactions are denoted by Jr and ΔJr, respectively, where Δ is the XXZ anisotropy parameter. This system has a frustration when J1,aJ1,b < 0 irrespective of the sign of Jr. The phase diagrams on the Δ (0≤Δ<1) versus J1,b plane in the cases of J1,a = - 0.2 and J1,a = 0.2 with Jr = -1 are determined numerically. We employ the physical consideration, the level spectroscopy analysis of the results obtained by the exact diagonalization method and also the density-matrix renormalization-group method. It is found that the non-collinear ferrimagnetic (NCFR) state appears as the ground state in the frustrated region of the parameters. Furthermore, the direct-product triplet-dimer (TD) state in which all rungs form the TD pair is the exact ground state, when J1,a + J1,b = 0 and 0≤ Δ ≲ 0.83. The obtained phase diagrams consist of the TD, XY and Haldane phases as well as the NCFR phase.

  20. A Biomechanical Comparison of Single-Leg Landing and Unplanned Sidestepping.

    PubMed

    Chinnasee, Chamnan; Weir, Gillian; Sasimontonkul, Siriporn; Alderson, Jacqueline; Donnelly, Cyril

    2018-06-14

    Unplanned sidestepping and single-leg landing have both been used to screen athletes for injury risk in sport. The aim of this study was to directly compare the lower limb mechanics of three single-leg landing tasks and an unplanned sidestepping task. Thirteen elite female team sport athletes completed a series of non-contact single-leg drop landings, single-leg countermovement jumps, single-leg jump landings and unplanned sidestepping in a randomized counterbalanced design. Three dimensional kinematics (250 Hz) and ground reaction force (2,000 Hz) data with a participant specific lower limb skeletal model were used to calculate and compare hip, knee and ankle joint kinematics, peak joint moments, instantaneous joint power and joint work during the weight acceptance phase of each sporting task (α=0.05). Peak knee joint moments and relevant injury risk thresholds were used to classify each athlete's anterior cruciate ligament injury risk during unplanned sidestepping and single-leg jump landing. Results showed that peak joint moments, power and work were greater during the single-leg jump landing task when compared to the single-leg drop landings and single-leg countermovement jumps tasks. Peak frontal and sagittal plane knee joint moments, knee joint power, as well as hip and knee joint work were greater during unplanned sidestepping when compared to the landing tasks. Peak ankle joint moments, power and work were greater during the landing tasks when compared to unplanned sidestepping. For 4 of the 13 athletes tested, their anterior cruciate ligament injury risk classification changed depending on whether they performed an unplanned sidestepping or single-leg jump landing testing procedure. To summarize, a single-leg jump landing testing procedure places a larger mechanical on the ankle joint when compared to single-leg drop landings, single-leg countermovement jumps and unplanned sidestepping. An unplanned sidestepping testing procedure places a larger

  1. Insulin delivery and nocturnal glucose control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tauschmann, Martin; Hovorka, Roman

    2017-12-01

    Nocturnal glucose control remains challenging in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes due to highly variable overnight insulin requirements. The issue may be addressed by glucose responsive insulin delivery based on real-time continuous glucose measurements. Areas covered: This review outlines recent developments of glucose responsive insulin delivery systems from a paediatric perspective. We cover threshold-based suspend application, predictive low glucose suspend, and more advanced single hormone and dual-hormone closed-loop systems. Approaches are evaluated in relation to nocturnal glucose control particularly during outpatient randomised controlled trials. Expert opinion: Significant progress translating research from controlled clinical centre settings to free-living unsupervised home studies have been achieved over the past decade. Nocturnal glycaemic control can be improved whilst reducing the risk of hypoglycaemia with closed-loop systems. Following the US regulatory approval of the first hybrid closed-loop system in non-paediatric population, large multinational closed-loop clinical trials and pivotal studies including paediatric populations are underway or in preparation to facilitate the use of closed-loop systems in clinical practice.

  2. Sensitivity of sensor-based sit-to-stand peak power to the effects of training leg strength, leg power and balance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Regterschot, G Ruben H; Folkersma, Marjanne; Zhang, Wei; Baldus, Heribert; Stevens, Martin; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2014-01-01

    Increasing leg strength, leg power and overall balance can improve mobility and reduce fall risk. Sensor-based assessment of peak power during the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer may be useful for detecting changes in mobility and fall risk. Therefore, this study investigated whether sensor-based STS peak power and related measures are sensitive to the effects of increasing leg strength, leg power and overall balance in older adults. A further aim was to compare sensitivity between sensor-based STS measures and standard clinical measures of leg strength, leg power, balance, mobility and fall risk, following an exercise-based intervention. To achieve these aims, 26 older adults (age: 70-84 years) participated in an eight-week exercise program aimed at improving leg strength, leg power and balance. Before and after the intervention, performance on normal and fast STS transfers was evaluated with a hybrid motion sensor worn on the hip. In addition, standard clinical tests (isometric quadriceps strength, Timed Up and Go test, Berg Balance Scale) were performed. Standard clinical tests as well as sensor-based measures of peak power, maximal velocity and duration of normal and fast STS showed significant improvements. Sensor-based measurement of peak power, maximal velocity and duration of normal STS demonstrated a higher sensitivity (absolute standardized response mean (SRM): ≥ 0.69) to the effects of training leg strength, leg power and balance than standard clinical measures (absolute SRM: ≤ 0.61). Therefore, the presented sensor-based method appears to be useful for detecting changes in mobility and fall risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microgravity, Mesh-Crawling Legged Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Marzwell, Neville; Matthews, Jaret; Richardson, Krandalyn; Wall, Jonathan; Poole, Michael; Foor, David; Rodgers, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and microgravity flight-testing are part of a continuing development of palm-sized mobile robots that resemble spiders (except that they have six legs apiece, whereas a spider has eight legs). Denoted SpiderBots (see figure), they are prototypes of proposed product line of relatively inexpensive walking robots that could be deployed in large numbers to function cooperatively in construction, repair, exploration, search, and rescue activities in connection with exploration of outer space and remote planets.

  4. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactormore » (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.« less

  5. Skipping on uneven ground: trailing leg adjustments simplify control and enhance robustness.

    PubMed

    Müller, Roy; Andrada, Emanuel

    2018-01-01

    It is known that humans intentionally choose skipping in special situations, e.g. when descending stairs or when moving in environments with lower gravity than on Earth. Although those situations involve uneven locomotion, the dynamics of human skipping on uneven ground have not yet been addressed. To find the reasons that may motivate this gait, we combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations on a bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum model (BSLIP). To drive the model, the following parameters were estimated from nine subjects skipping across a single drop in ground level: leg lengths at touchdown, leg stiffness of both legs, aperture angle between legs, trailing leg angle at touchdown (leg landing first after flight phase), and trailing leg retraction speed. We found that leg adjustments in humans occur mostly in the trailing leg (low to moderate leg retraction during swing phase, reduced trailing leg stiffness, and flatter trailing leg angle at lowered touchdown). When transferring these leg adjustments to the BSLIP model, the capacity of the model to cope with sudden-drop perturbations increased.

  6. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance.

  7. Neuroendocrine aspects of primary endogenous depression. XV: Mathematical modeling of nocturnal melatonin secretion in major depressives and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Sekula, L K; Lucke, J F; Heist, E K; Czambel, R K; Rubin, R T

    1997-03-24

    We previously reported a trend toward a higher mean nocturnal serum melatonin (MEL) concentration, based on 30-min blood sampling over 24 h, in 23 female definite endogenous depressive compared to 23 matched normal female control subjects, and no significant difference in 15 male depressives compared to their controls (Rubin et al., 1992). In both groups of patients vs. their controls, there also were trends toward an earlier MEL rise time, by about 30 min, and a later MEL peak time, by about 90 min. Because the offset of MEL secretion was not estimated in that study, the total duration of MEL secretion could not be determined. To further delineate the nocturnal MEL secretion curve, we modeled the MEL data by a linear-Beta model, a four-parameter adaptation of the Beta function. One parameter accounted-for baseline (diurnal) MEL concentration, two accounted for the shapes of the ascending and descending phases of the nocturnal secretion curve, and the fourth accounted for the area under the curve. The model permitted estimation of the start, peak, and end times of nocturnal MEL secretion. There again was a trend toward a higher mean nocturnal MEL concentration in the female depressives compared to their matched controls. There were no significant patient-control differences in secretion onset or peak times in either the women or the men except for nocturnal MEL offset time: the female patients had a trend toward a later offset time, by about 40 min, than their controls; this difference was not present in the men. With women and men analyzed together, the difference in nocturnal MEL offset time between patients and controls just reached significance (P < 0.05). The linear-Beta model appears to satisfactorily fit the MEL data and provides estimators of the onset, peak, and offset times of the activation phase of MEL secretion. This model may be applicable to more severely skewed 24-h hormone secretion curves, such as ACTH and cortisol.

  8. Eight-Year Experience with Nocturnal, Every-Other-Day, Online Haemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Maduell, Francisco; Ojeda, Raquel; Arias-Guillen, Marta; Rossi, Florencia; Fontseré, Néstor; Vera, Manel; Rico, Nayra; Gonzalez, Leonardo Nicolás; Piñeiro, Gastón; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Rodas, Lida; Bedini, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    New haemodialysis therapeutic regimens are required to improve patient survival. Longer and more frequent dialysis sessions have produced excellent survival and clinical advantages, while online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) provides the most efficient form of dialysis treatment. In this single-centre observational study, 57 patients on 4-5-hour thrice-weekly OL-HDF were switched to nocturnal every-other-day OL-HDF. Inclusion criteria consisted of stable patients with good prospects for improved occupational, psychological and social rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to report our 8-year experience with this schedule and to evaluate analytical and clinical outcomes. Nocturnal, every-other-day OL-HDF was well tolerated and 56% of patients were working. The convective volume increased from 26.7 ± 2 litres at baseline to 46.6 ± 6.5 litres at 24 months (p < 0.01). Increasing the dialysis dose significantly decreased bicarbonate, blood-urea-nitrogen and creatinine values. Predialysis phosphate levels fell markedly with complete suspension of phosphate binders from the second year of follow-up. Although haemoglobin was unchanged, there was a 50.4% reduction in darbepoetin dose at 24 months and a significant decrease in the erythropoietin resistance index. Blood pressure significantly decreased in a few months. Antihypertensive medication requirements were decreased by 60% after 3 months and by 73% after 1 year and this difference was maintained thereafter. Nocturnal, every-other-day OL-HDF could be an excellent therapeutic alternative since it is well tolerated and leads to clinical and social-occupational rehabilitation with satisfactory morbidity and mortality. These encouraging results strengthen us to continue and invite other clinicians to join this initiative. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The risk of hyponatremia with desmopressin use for nocturnal polyuria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Park, Joon-Sung; Kim, Yong Tae; Park, Sung Yul; Kim, Gheun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin is used for treating nocturnal polyuria, but hyponatremia is an associated concern in the elderly due to impaired urinary dilution. This study was undertaken to characterize hyponatremia occurring in adults using desmopressin for nocturnal polyuria. Data from 172 patients who were prescribed desmopressin for nocturnal polyuria at a urology clinic from September 2010 through February 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and laboratory parameters were investigated to examine the risk factors for desmopressin-associated hyponatremia. The average follow-up serum sodium measured 21 ± 22 days after using desmopressin was 138 ± 5 mmol/l. Hyponatremia (<135 mmol/l) was found in 24 patients (14%), and it was severe in 7 (<126 mmol/l). In the hyponatremic patients, serum sodium decreased by 11 ± 6 mmol/l. Patients with hyponatremia were older than those with normonatremia (78 ± 7 vs. 68 ± 9 years, p < 0.0001). The presence of either hyponatremia-predisposing comorbidities or concurrent medications was associated with hyponatremia. Patients with hyponatremia had lower basal hemoglobin (11 ± 2 vs. 13 ± 2 g/dl, p < 0.001) and serum sodium (139 ± 2 vs. 140 ± 2 mmol/l, p < 0.05) than those with normonatremia. Multivariate logistic regression after adjustment for basal serum sodium showed that advanced age (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.03-1.27) and lower hemoglobin level (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.43-0.94) were independently associated with hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is not infrequently associated with desmopressin use. Those with advanced age (≥65 years) and lower hemoglobin are at risk of desmopressin-associated hyponatremia and need to be carefully monitored. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Lower Limb Symmetry: Comparison of Muscular Power Between Dominant and Nondominant Legs in Healthy Young Adults Associated With Single-Leg-Dominant Sports.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Alex; Guiloff, Rodrigo; Rojas, Juan; Delgado, Iris; Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    Achieving a symmetrical power performance (difference <15%) between lower limbs is generally recommended during sports rehabilitation. However, athletes in single-leg-dominant sports, such as professional soccer players, could develop significant asymmetry between their dominant and nondominant legs, such that symmetry does not act as a viable comparison. To (1) compare maximal muscular power between the dominant and nondominant legs in healthy young adults, (2) evaluate the effect of a single-leg-dominant sport activity performed at the professional level, and (3) propose a parameter of normality for maximal power difference in the lower limbs of this young adult population. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 78 healthy, male, young adults were divided into 2 groups according to sport activity level. Group 1 consisted of 51 nonathletes (mean ± SD age, 20.8 ± 1.5 years; weight, 71.9 ± 10.5 kg) who participated in less than 8 hours a week of recreational physical activity with nonspecific training; group 2 consisted of 27 single-leg-dominant professional soccer players (age, 18.4 ± 0.6 years; weight, 70.1 ± 7.5 kg) who specifically trained and competed at their particular activity 8 hours or more a week. For assessment of maximal leg power, both groups completed the single-leg squat jump test. Dominance was determined when participants completed 2 of 3 specific tests with the same extremity. Statistical analysis included the Student t test. No statistical difference was found for maximal power between dominant and nondominant legs for nonathletes ( t = -1.01, P = .316) or single-leg-dominant professional soccer players ( t = -1.10, P = .281). A majority (95%) of participants studied showed a power difference of less than 15% between their lower extremities. Among young healthy adults, symmetrical power performance is expected between lower extremities independent of the existence of dominance and difference in sport activity level. A less than 15

  11. [The Activation of Interlimb Interactions Increase the Motor Output in Legs in Healthy Subjects under the Conditions of Arm and Leg Unloading].

    PubMed

    Selionov, V A; Solopova, I A; Zhvansky, D S

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effect of arm movements and movements of separate arm joints on the electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of voluntary and vibration-triggered stepping-like leg movements under the conditions of horizontal support of upper and lower limbs. The horizontal support of arms provided a significantly increase in the rate of activation of locomotor automatism by non-invasive impact on tonic sensory inputs. The addition of active arm movements during involuntary rhytmic stepping-like leg movements led to an increase in EMG activity of hip muscles and was accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of hip and shin movements. Passive arm movements had the same effect on induced leg movements. The movement of the shoulder joints led to an increase in the activity of hip muscles and an increase in the amplitude of movements of the knee and hip joints. At the same time, the movement of forearms. and wrists had similar facilitating effect on electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of rhytmic stepping-like movements, but influenced the distal segments of legs to a greater extent. Under the conditions of sub-threshold vibration of leg muscles, voluntary arm movements led to the activation of involuntary rhytmic stepping movements. During voluntary leg movements, the addition of arm movements had a significantly smaller impact on the parameters of rhytmic stepping than during involuntary leg movements. Thus, the simultaneous movements of upper and lower limbs are an effective method of activation of neural networks connecting the rhythm generators of arms and legs. Under the conditions of arm and leg unloading, the interactions between the cervical and lumbosacral segments of the spinal cord seem to play the major role in the impact of arm movements on the patterns of leg movements. The described methods of activation of interlimb interactions can be used in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients and patients with spinal cord injuries

  12. Leg pairs as virtual wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Russel; Duttweiler, Mark; Khanlian, Luke; Setrakian, Mark

    2005-05-01

    We propose the use of virtual wheels as the starting point of a new vehicle design. Each virtual wheel incorporates a pair of simple legs that, by simulating the rotary motion and ground contact of a traditional wheel, combine many of the benefits of legged and wheeled motion. We describe the use of virtual wheels in the design of a robotic mule, presenting an analysis of the mule's mobility the results of our efforts to model and build such a device.

  13. Fiber-type distribution in insect leg muscles parallels similarities and differences in the functional role of insect walking legs.

    PubMed

    Godlewska-Hammel, Elzbieta; Büschges, Ansgar; Gruhn, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) enzyme activity in muscle fibers determines their contraction properties. We analyzed mATPase activities in muscles of the front, middle and hind legs of the orthopteran stick insect (Carausius morosus) to test the hypothesis that differences in muscle fiber types and distributions reflected differences in their behavioral functions. Our data show that all muscles are composed of at least three fiber types, fast, intermediate and slow, and demonstrate that: (1) in the femoral muscles (extensor and flexor tibiae) of all legs, the number of fast fibers decreases from proximal to distal, with a concomitant increase in the number of slow fibers. (2) The swing phase muscles protractor coxae and levator trochanteris, have smaller percentages of slow fibers compared to the antagonist stance muscles retractor coxae and depressor trochanteris. (3) The percentage of slow fibers in the retractor coxae and depressor trochanteris increases significantly from front to hind legs. These results suggest that fiber-type distribution in leg muscles of insects is not identical across leg muscles but tuned towards the specific function of a given muscle in the locomotor system.

  14. Remotely-sensed, nocturnal, dew point correlates with malaria transmission in Southern Province, Zambia: a time-series study.

    PubMed

    Nygren, David; Stoyanov, Cristina; Lewold, Clemens; Månsson, Fredrik; Miller, John; Kamanga, Aniset; Shiff, Clive J

    2014-06-13

    Plasmodium falciparum transmission has decreased significantly in Zambia in the last decade. The malaria transmission is influenced by environmental variables. Incorporation of environmental variables in models of malaria transmission likely improves model fit and predicts probable trends in malaria disease. This work is based on the hypothesis that remotely-sensed environmental factors, including nocturnal dew point, are associated with malaria transmission and sustain foci of transmission during the low transmission season in the Southern Province of Zambia. Thirty-eight rural health centres in Southern Province, Zambia were divided into three zones based on transmission patterns. Correlations between weekly malaria cases and remotely-sensed nocturnal dew point, nocturnal land surface temperature as well as vegetation indices and rainfall were evaluated in time-series analyses from 2012 week 19 to 2013 week 36. Zonal as well as clinic-based, multivariate, autoregressive, integrated, moving average (ARIMAX) models implementing environmental variables were developed to model transmission in 2011 week 19 to 2012 week 18 and forecast transmission in 2013 week 37 to week 41. During the dry, low transmission season significantly higher vegetation indices, nocturnal land surface temperature and nocturnal dew point were associated with the areas of higher transmission. Environmental variables improved ARIMAX models. Dew point and normalized differentiated vegetation index were significant predictors and improved all zonal transmission models. In the high-transmission zone, this was also seen for land surface temperature. Clinic models were improved by adding dew point and land surface temperature as well as normalized differentiated vegetation index. The mean average error of prediction for ARIMAX models ranged from 0.7 to 33.5%. Forecasts of malaria incidence were valid for three out of five rural health centres; however, with poor results at the zonal level. In this

  15. Mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis in lebanese children: prevalence, relation with obesity, and psychological effect.

    PubMed

    Merhi, Bassem Abu; Hammoud, Ahmad; Ziade, Fouad; Kamel, Raymond; Rajab, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is involuntary urination while sleeping after a certain age, usually five years, when children should have established bladder control. The prevalence has been found to be up to 20% in five year old children, and it is considered the most common urological childhood complication. This study was conducted on Makassed School children aged 5-18 years. This was a two-step study, the first step was a questionnaire distributed to the children to be answered by their parents. The second step included individually meeting with every child who met the inclusion criteria and his/her parents and physically examining the child. 11,440 questionnaires were distributed to school children aged 5-18 years, to be answered by their parents. Of the 7270 parents who responded back, 6620 reported no enuresis, 90 (1.25%) reported only diurnal enuresis, 107 (1.5%) reported diurnal and nocturnal enuresis, and 453 parents reported their child having nocturnal enuresis only. The data collected was analyzed according to age, sex, area, body mass index (BMI), and the PMQOL-SF score. The prevalence of mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) in Lebanon was found to be 5.3%. The results showed that the prevalence of MNE is inversely proportional to age. The prevalence of male to female ratio was 1.4:1. As for the prevalence according to different geographic areas, the results have shown that the North had the majority of cases with 7.6% prevalence. Results showed that 82.4% of children had a score more than 50, and only 28% of parents had a score above 50. The prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in Lebanon is lower than that in neighboring countries such as Turkey8 and Saudi Arabia,9 but higher than that in Italy10 and Hong Kong. Our study has managed to show the same results, with a peak in incidence at seven years then dropping back to 0% at the age of 16. Our study has shown a male to female predominance but the male to female ratio was 1.4:1, a value lower than that

  16. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  17. Relationship among nocturnal sleep deficit, excess weight and metabolic alterations in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Nelina; Rangel, Airam; Rodríguez, Carla; Rodríguez, Lisette; Rodríguez, Valeria

    2014-12-01

    Sleep modulates neuroendocrine function and metabolism; therefore, changes in sleep duration may lead to developing obesity during adolescence. To assess the possible association among nocturnal sleep duration, the presence of overweight and metabolic alterations in a group of adolescents. Cross-sectional, analytical study conducted at a school in Valencia, Venezuela, during the 2012-2013 school year. Participants were 12 to 17 year-old adolescents. A survey on nocturnal sleep duration was administered; weight, height and waist circumference were recorded; and glycemia, lipid profile and insulinemia levels were measured. Body mass index and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were calculated. Ninety adolescents were included. Compared to the group with normal weight, adolescents with excessive weight had, in average, fewer sleep hours Sundays through Thursdays (p < 0.05) and a higher rate of sleep deficit and sleep debt (p < 0.05). Low HDL cholesterol and insulin resistance was significantly associated with sleep debt (p < 0.05). Among adolescents with sleep debt, the risk of having excess weight was 2.70 times higher (95% CI= 1.09-6.72; p= 0.032) regardless of age, gender, sexual maturity, sleep deficit Sundays through Thursdays, and history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in first-degree relatives. Nocturnal sleep deficit and sleep debt were significantly associated with excess weight and metabolic alterations related to a high cardiometabolic risk.

  18. Injury due to leg bands in willow flycatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of banding and color banding. Color bands and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) bands applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color band(s) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS band and a color band (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS bands alone, yielding an overall USFWS band injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.

  19. The effect of leg preference on postural stability in healthy athletes.

    PubMed

    Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; Hupperets, Maarten D W; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-03

    In research regarding postural stability, leg preference is often tested and controlled for. However, leg preference may vary between tasks. As athletes are a group of interest for postural stability testing, we evaluated the effect of five leg preference tasks categorization (step up, hop, ball kick, balance, pick up) on single-leg postural stability of 16 field hockey athletes. The 'center of pressure speed' was calculated as the primary outcome variable of single-leg postural stability. Secondary variables were 'mean length of the GRF vector in the horizontal plane', 'mean length of the ankle angular velocity vector', and 'mean length of the hip angular velocity vector', as well as the separate outcomes per degree of freedom. Results showed that leg preference was inconsistent between leg preference tasks. Moreover, the primary and secondary variables yielded no significant difference between the preferred and non-preferred legs, regardless of the applied leg preference task categorization (p>0.05). The present findings do not support the usability of leg preference tasks in controlling for bias of postural stability. In conclusion, none of the applied leg preference tasks revealed a significant effect on postural stability in healthy field hockey athletes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Shedding light on light: benefits of anthropogenic illumination to a nocturnally foraging shorebird.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Ross G; Bearhop, Stuart; Campbell, Hamish A; Bryant, David M

    2013-03-01

    Intertidal habitats provide important feeding areas for migratory shorebirds. Anthropogenic developments along coasts can increase ambient light levels at night across adjacent inter-tidal zones. Here, we report the effects of elevated nocturnal light levels upon the foraging strategy of a migratory shorebird (common redshank Tringa totanus) overwintering on an industrialised estuary in Northern Europe. To monitor behaviour across the full intertidal area, individuals were located by day and night using VHF transmitters, and foraging behaviour was inferred from inbuilt posture sensors. Natural light was scored using moon-phase and cloud cover information and nocturnal artificial light levels were obtained using geo-referenced DMSP/OLS night-time satellite imagery at a 1-km resolution. Under high illumination levels, the commonest and apparently preferred foraging behaviour was sight-based. Conversely, birds feeding in areas with low levels of artificial light had an elevated foraging time and fed by touch, but switched to visual rather than tactile foraging behaviour on bright moonlit nights in the absence of cloud cover. Individuals occupying areas which were illuminated continuously by lighting from a large petrochemical complex invariably exhibited a visually based foraging behaviour independently of lunar phase and cloud cover. We show that ambient light levels affect the timing and distribution of foraging opportunities for redshank. We argue that light emitted from an industrial complex improved nocturnal visibility. This allowed sight-based foraging in place of tactile foraging, implying both a preference for sight-feeding and enhanced night-time foraging opportunities under these conditions. The study highlights the value of integrating remotely sensed data and telemetry techniques to assess the effect of anthropogenic change upon nocturnal behaviour and habitat use. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

  1. Pineal melatonin and the innate immune response: the TNF-alpha increase after cesarean section suppresses nocturnal melatonin production.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Gerlândia N; Cardoso, Elaine C; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda M S; Markus, Regina P

    2007-11-01

    The nocturnal surge of melatonin is the endocrine expression of the circadian system and is essential for organizing the timing of various endogenous processes. Previous works suggest that, in the beginning of a defense response, the increase in circulating tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) leads to a transient block of nocturnal melatonin production and promotes a disruption of internal time organization. In the present paper, the concentration of melatonin and cytokines [TNF-alpha, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12] in the colostrum (postdelivery day 3) and in the milk (postdelivery days 10, 15, 20 and 30) obtained at midday and midnight from mothers who gave birth by vaginal or cesarean section were compared. The nocturnal melatonin surge observed 3 days after vaginal delivery was absent after cesarean section. IL-12 presented no daily variation in either case, while daily variations in IFN-gamma, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-5 were observed after vaginal delivery and cesarean section. On the other hand, the increase in TNF-alpha after cesarean section resulted in suppression of the nocturnal melatonin surge. Daily variation of IL-2 was only observed after recovery of the nocturnal melatonin surge, 30 days after cesarean section. The present paper supports the hypothesis of a cross-talk between the pineal gland and the immune system, which could represent a putative immune-pineal axis.

  2. Evidence for increased olfactory receptor gene repertoire size in two nocturnal bird species with well-developed olfactory ability

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S; Fidler, Andrew E; Kempenaers, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, the molecular basis of the sense of smell is encoded by members of a large gene family, namely olfactory receptor (OR) genes. Both the total number of OR genes and the proportion of intact OR genes in a genome may indicate the importance of the sense of smell for an animal. There is behavioral, physiological, and anatomical evidence that some bird species, in particular nocturnal birds, have a well developed sense of smell. Therefore, we hypothesized that nocturnal birds with good olfactory abilities have evolved (i) more OR genes and (ii) more intact OR genes than closely related and presumably less 'olfaction-dependent' day-active avian taxa. Results We used both non-radioactive Southern hybridization and PCR with degenerate primers to investigate whether two nocturnal bird species that are known to rely on olfactory cues, the brown kiwi (Apteryx australis) and the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), have evolved a larger OR gene repertoire than their day-active, closest living relatives (for kiwi the emu Dromaius novaehollandiae, rhea Rhea americana, and ostrich Struthio camelus and for kakapo the kaka Nestor meridionalis and kea Nestor notabilis). We show that the nocturnal birds did not have a significantly higher proportion of intact OR genes. However, the estimated total number of OR genes was larger in the two nocturnal birds than in their relatives. Conclusion Our results suggest that ecological niche adaptations such as daily activity patterns may have shaped avian OR gene repertoires. PMID:19467156

  3. Extended driving impairs nocturnal driving performances.

    PubMed

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3-5 am, 1-5 am and 9 pm-5 am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [+/-SD] = 23.4 [+/-1.7] years) participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC) in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3-5 am) driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05) for the intermediate (1-5 am) driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001) for the long (9 pm-5 am) driving session. Compared to the reference session (9-10 pm), the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001), 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001) and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001), respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05) and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01). At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited.

  4. Impairment of a parieto-premotor network specialized for handwriting in writer's cramp

    PubMed Central

    Najee-ullah, Muslimah 'Ali; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Handwriting with the dominant hand is a highly skilled task singularly acquired in humans. This skill is the isolated deficit in patients with writer's cramp (WC), a form of dystonia with maladaptive plasticity, acquired through intensive and repetitive motor practice. When a skill is highly trained, a motor program is created in the brain to execute the same movement kinematics regardless of the effector used for the task. The task- and effector-specific symptoms in WC suggest that a problem particularly occurs in the brain when the writing motor program is carried out by the dominant hand. In the present MRI study involving 12 WC patients (with symptoms only affecting the right dominant hand during writing) and 15 age matched unaffected controls we showed that: (1) the writing program recruited the same network regardless of the effector used to write in both groups; (2) dominant handwriting recruited a segregated parieto-premotor network only in the control group; (3) local structural alteration of the premotor area, the motor component of this network, predicted functional connectivity deficits during dominant handwriting and symptom duration in the patient group. Dysfunctions and structural abnormalities of a segregated parieto-premotor network in WC patients suggest that network specialization in focal brain areas is crucial for well-learned motor skill. PMID:27466043

  5. Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy Associated with Nocturnal Dip in Blood Pressure: Findings from the Maracaibo Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Melgarejo, Jesús D; Lee, Joseph H; Petitto, Michele; Yépez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe A; Jin, Zhezhen; Chávez, Carlos A; Pirela, Rosa V; Calmón, Gustavo E; Lee, Winston; Johnson, Matthew P; Mena, Luis J; Al-Aswad, Lama A; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Allikmets, Rando; Maestre, Gladys E; De Moraes, C Gustavo

    2018-06-01

    To determine which nocturnal blood pressure (BP) parameters (low levels or extreme dipper status) are associated with an increased risk of glaucomatous damage in Hispanics. Observational cross-sectional study. A subset (n = 93) of the participants from the Maracaibo Aging Study (MAS) who met the study eligibility criteria were included. These participants, who were at least 40 years of age, had measurements for optical tomography coherence, visual field (VF) tests, 24-hour BP, office BP, and intraocular pressure <22 mmHg. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses under the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework were used to examine the relationships between glaucomatous damage and BP parameters, with particular attention to decreases in nocturnal BP. Glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) based on the presence of optic nerve damage and VF defects. The mean age was 61.9 years, and 87.1% were women. Of 185 eyes evaluated, 19 (26.5%) had signs of GON. Individuals with GON had significantly lower 24-hour and nighttime diastolic BP levels than those without. However, results of the multivariate GEE models indicated that the glaucomatous damage was not related to the average systolic or diastolic BP levels measured over 24 hours, daytime, or nighttime. In contrast, extreme decreases in nighttime systolic and diastolic BP (>20% compared with daytime BP) were significant risk factors for glaucomatous damage (odds ratio, 19.78 and 5.55, respectively). In this population, the link between nocturnal BP and GON is determined by extreme dipping effects rather than low nocturnal BP levels alone. Further studies considering extreme decreases in nocturnal BP in individuals at high risk of glaucoma are warranted. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced on workdays and weekends.

    PubMed

    Vahle-Hinz, Tim; Bamberg, Eva; Dettmers, Jan; Friedrich, Niklas; Keller, Monika

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the lagged effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced during both workdays and weekends. Fifty employees participated in a diary study. Multilevel and regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between work stress measured at the end of a workday, work-related rumination measured during the evening, and restful sleep measured the following morning. Work stress, measured as the mean of 2 consecutive workdays, was substantially but not significantly related to restful sleep on weekends. Work stress was unrelated to nocturnal heart rate variability. Work-related rumination was related to restful sleep on weekends but not on workdays. Additionally, work-related rumination on weekends was positively related to nocturnal heart rate variability during the night between Saturday and Sunday. No mediation effects of work stress on restful sleep or nocturnal heart rate variability via work-related rumination were confirmed.

  7. Pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensive patients: role of fluid retention and nocturnal rostral fluid shift.

    PubMed

    White, L H; Bradley, T D; Logan, A G

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients, particularly those with drug resistance. Evidence from animal experiments, epidemiologic studies and clinical trials strongly suggest a causal link. Mechanistic studies argue for increased sympathetic neural activity and endothelial dysfunction. However, disturbances in fluid volume regulation and distribution may also be involved in the pathogenesis of these two conditions. Several studies have shown a high prevalence of OSA in fluid-retaining states including hypertension, a direct relationship between the severity of OSA and the volume of fluid displaced from the legs to the neck during sleep, and a decrease in upper airway cross-sectional area in response to graded lower body positive pressure. Treatments targeting fluid retention and redistribution, including diuretics, mineralocorticoid antagonists, exercise, and possibly renal denervation lower blood pressure and reduce the apnoea-hypopnoea index, a measure of OSA severity. From these observations, it has been postulated that during the daytime, excess fluid collects in the lower extremities due to gravity, and on lying down overnight is redistributed rostrally to the neck, where it may narrow the upper airway and increase its collapsibility, predisposing to OSA when pharyngeal dilator muscle activity decreases during sleep. This article discusses the associations between OSA and hypertension and reviews the evidence for fluid accumulation and its nocturnal rostral redistribution in the pathogenesis of OSA in hypertensive patients.

  8. Integrated system for single leg walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Reid; Krotkov, Eric; Roston, Gerry

    1990-07-01

    The Carnegie Mellon University Planetary Rover project is developing a six-legged walking robot capable of autonomously navigating, exploring, and acquiring samples in rugged, unknown environments. This report describes an integrated software system capable of navigating a single leg of the robot over rugged terrain. The leg, based on an early design of the Ambler Planetary Rover, is suspended below a carriage that slides along rails. To walk, the system creates an elevation map of the terrain from laser scanner images, plans an appropriate foothold based on terrain and geometric constraints, weaves the leg through the terrain to position it above the foothold, contacts the terrain with the foot, and applies force enough to advance the carriage along the rails. Walking both forward and backward, the system has traversed hundreds of meters of rugged terrain including obstacles too tall to step over, trenches too deep to step in, closely spaced obstacles, and sand hills. The implemented system consists of a number of task-specific processes (two for planning, two for perception, one for real-time control) and a central control process that directs the flow of communication between processes.

  9. Agreement and correlation between the straight leg raise and slump tests in subjects with leg pain.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    The straight leg raise (SLR) and slump tests have traditionally been used to identify nerve root compression arising from disk herniation. However, they may be more appropriate as tests of lumbosacral neural tissue mechanosensitivity. The aim of this study was to determine agreement and correlation between the SLR and slump tests in a population presenting with back and leg pain. This was an observational, cross-sectional study design. Forty-five subjects with unilateral leg pain were recruited from an outpatient Back Pain Screening Clinic at a large teaching hospital in Ireland. The SLR and slump tests were performed on each side. In the event of symptom reproduction, the ankle was dorsiflexed. Reproduction of presenting symptoms, which were intensified by ankle dorsiflexion, was interpreted as a positive test. An inclinometer was used to measure range of motion (ROM). There was substantial agreement between SLR and slump test interpretation (kappa = 0.69) with good correlation in ROM between the 2 tests (r = 0.64) on the symptomatic side. In subjects who had positive results, ROM for both tests was significantly reduced compared to ROM on the contralateral side and ROM in subjects who had negative results. When the SLR and slump tests are interpreted as positive in the event of reproduction of presenting leg pain that are intensified by ankle dorsiflexion, these tests show substantial agreement and good correlation in the leg pain population. When interpreted in this way, these tests may be appropriate tests of neural tissue mechanosensitivity, but further criteria must be met before a definitive conclusion in relation to neural tissue mechanosensitivity may be drawn.

  10. Compliant leg behaviour explains basic dynamics of walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    The basic mechanics of human locomotion are associated with vaulting over stiff legs in walking and rebounding on compliant legs in running. However, while rebounding legs well explain the stance dynamics of running, stiff legs cannot reproduce that of walking. With a simple bipedal spring–mass model, we show that not stiff but compliant legs are essential to obtain the basic walking mechanics; incorporating the double support as an essential part of the walking motion, the model reproduces the characteristic stance dynamics that result in the observed small vertical oscillation of the body and the observed out-of-phase changes in forward kinetic and gravitational potential energies. Exploring the parameter space of this model, we further show that it not only combines the basic dynamics of walking and running in one mechanical system, but also reveals these gaits to be just two out of the many solutions to legged locomotion offered by compliant leg behaviour and accessed by energy or speed. PMID:17015312

  11. A nocturnal decline of salivary pH associated with airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Sano, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Yamasaki, Akira; Kurai, Jun; Hasegawa, Yasuyuki; Igishi, Tadashi; Okazaki, Ryota; Tohda, Yuji; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji

    2010-08-01

    Salivary pH is associated with esophageal acid reflux and neutralization of esophageal acid. In this study, we assessed the association between nocturnal decline of salivary pH and airway hyperresponsiveness. Salivary pH was serially assessed in 9 patients with mild asthma (7 men and 2 women; mean age 33.3 years; mean %predicted FEV(1.0) 89.4%) and 10 healthy volunteers (6 men and 4 women; mean age 31.2 years) using a pH indicator tape. The buffering capacity of saliva was defined as the median effective dose (ED(50)) for acidification of saliva with 0.01 N HCl, and airway responsiveness was defined as the dose of methacholine producing a 35% fall in Grs (PD(35)-Grs). There was a significant correlation between the values obtained from the pH indicator tape and those obtained from the electrometric pH meter. Using the indicator tape for sequential monitoring, we observed a nocturnal fall (ΔpH) in salivary pH in all subjects. A significant correlation was found between airway hyperresponsiveness (PD(35)-Grs) and either ΔpH or ED(50) in mildly asthmatic patients. Vagal reflux dysfunction might contribute to nocturnal salivary pH as well as to airway hyperresponsiveness in mild asthmatics.

  12. The Association of Pediatric Obesity With Nocturnal Non-Dipping on 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Macumber, Ian R; Weiss, Noel S; Halbach, Susan M; Hanevold, Coral D; Flynn, Joseph T

    2016-05-01

    Obesity has been linked with abnormal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure (BP) in adults, which in turn is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. There are few data regarding abnormal dipping status in the obese pediatric population. The goal of this study was to further describe the relationship between obesity and non-dipping status on ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABPM) in children. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a database of patients aged 5-21 years who had undergone 24-hour ABPM at Seattle Children's Hospital from January 2008 through May 2014. Subjects were grouped by body mass index (BMI) into lean (BMI 15th-85th percentile) and obese (BMI >95th percentile) groups. Compared to lean subjects (n = 161), obese subjects (n = 247) had a prevalence ratio (PR) for non-dipping of 2.15, adjusted for race (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.25-3.42). Increasing severity of obesity was not further associated with nocturnal non-dipping. Nocturnal non-dipping was not associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (PR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.71-1.44). These results suggest that in children, just as in adults, obesity is related to a relatively decreased dipping in nocturnal BP. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Successful Use of the Nocturnal Urine Alarm for Diurnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; Vollmer, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    A urine alarm, typically used to treat nocturnal enuresis, was effectively used to treat diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female with depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and conduct disorder. The study indicated that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at three-month and…

  14. Numerical simulation of the nocturnal turbulence characteristics over Rattlesnake Mountain

    Treesearch

    W.E. Heilman; E.S. Takle

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional second-order turbulence-closure model based on Mellor-Yamada level 3 is used to examine the nocturnal turbulence characteristics over Rattlesnake Mountain in Washington. Simulations of mean horizontal velocities and potential temperatures agree well with data. The equations for the components of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) show that anisotropy...

  15. Formation of nocturnal low-level jets and structure of the nocturnal boundary layer in the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, P. M.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wharton, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma in 2012 and 2013. Its main objective was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2-km of the atmosphere using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques including a sodar, multiple Doppler wind lidars (DWL), a Raman lidar and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI). Several instruments from the University of Oklahoma and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides for a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, and multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators who took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. This presentation provides an overview of the LABLE experiments and a summary of important results. One focus area will be the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation of nocturnal low-level jets. Such low-level jets were frequently observed during both LABLE campaigns and often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages. The combination of high-resolution AERI temperature profiles with DWL mean wind and turbulence profiles provided new insights about the structure and evolution of low-level jets.

  16. A meta-analysis of rate ratios for nocturnal confirmed hypoglycaemia with insulin degludec vs. insulin glargine using different definitions for hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Heller, S; Mathieu, C; Kapur, R; Wolden, M L; Zinman, B

    2016-04-01

    A prospective meta-analysis of phase 3 trials showed lower rates of nocturnal hypoglycaemia with insulin degludec vs. insulin glargine. We investigated the consistency of the results across different definitions of hypoglycaemia. This post-hoc, patient-level meta-analysis included six randomized, controlled, 26- or 52-week phase 3a trials in insulin-naïve participants with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 diabetesinsulin naïve ), participants with Type 2 diabetes mellitus using basal-bolus therapy (Type 2 diabetesBB ) and those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. We used three definitions of hypoglycaemia and different timescales for the nocturnal period. Rates were analysed for the entire core trial period, the 'maintenance period' only, and the extension trial set population. Analyses utilized a negative binomial regression model. In Type 2 diabetesinsulin naïve participants, risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia was significantly lower with insulin degludec vs. insulin glargine for all hypoglycaemia definitions and trial periods. Risk was also lower for the timescale 21.59-05.59, but not 00.01-07.59. For Type 2 diabetesBB , nocturnal hypoglycaemia rates were lower with insulin degludec vs. insulin glargine across all definitions, timescales and trial periods, with one exception. For individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, nocturnal hypoglycaemia risk was significantly lower with insulin degludec during the maintenance period for the original definition (plasma glucose < 3.1 mmol/l, timescale 00.01-05.59) and in the extension trial set population for all hypoglycaemia definitions except for the nocturnal timescale 00.01-07.59. Compared with insulin glargine, insulin degludec is associated with lower rates of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and similar or lower rates in Type 1 diabetes mellitus, across different definitions. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  17. Detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and related bone marrow diseases, with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls and caveats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sa A.; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Stachurski, Dariusz; Anderson, Mary; Raza, Azra; Woda, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The presence of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in the setting of aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, the status of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in various categories of myelodysplastic syndrome and in other bone marrow disorders is not well-studied. Design and Methods By using multiparameter flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis with antibodies specific for four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (CD55, CD59, CD16, CD66b) and performing an aerolysin lysis confirmatory test in representative cases, we assessed the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes in 110 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 15 with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease, 5 with idiopathic myelofibrosis and 6 with acute myeloid leukemia. Results Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes were detected in nine patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndrome who showed clinicopathological features of bone marrow failure, similar to aplastic anemia. All paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-positive cases demonstrated loss of the four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, with CD16−CD66b− clones being larger than those of CD55−CD59− (p<0.05). Altered glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expression secondary to granulocytic hypogranulation, immaturity, and/or immunophenotypic abnormalities was present in a substantial number of cases and diagnostically challenging. Conclusions These results show that routine screening for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with an intrinsic bone marrow disease who show no clinical evidence of hemolysis has an appreciable yield in patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndromes. The recognition of diagnostic caveats and pitfalls associated with the underlying intrinsic bone marrow disease is essential in interpreting paroxysmal nocturnal

  18. Detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and related bone marrow diseases, with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls and caveats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sa A; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Stachurski, Dariusz; Anderson, Mary; Raza, Azra; Woda, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in the setting of aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, the status of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in various categories of myelodysplastic syndrome and in other bone marrow disorders is not well-studied. By using multiparameter flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis with antibodies specific for four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (CD55, CD59, CD16, CD66b) and performing an aerolysin lysis confirmatory test in representative cases, we assessed the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes in 110 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 15 with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease, 5 with idiopathic myelofibrosis and 6 with acute myeloid leukemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes were detected in nine patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndrome who showed clinicopathological features of bone marrow failure, similar to aplastic anemia. All paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-positive cases demonstrated loss of the four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, with CD16(-)CD66b(-) clones being larger than those of CD55(-)CD59(-) (p<0.05). Altered glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expression secondary to granulocytic hypogranulation, immaturity, and/or immunophenotypic abnormalities was present in a substantial number of cases and diagnostically challenging. These results show that routine screening for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with an intrinsic bone marrow disease who show no clinical evidence of hemolysis has an appreciable yield in patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndromes. The recognition of diagnostic caveats and pitfalls associated with the underlying intrinsic bone marrow disease is essential in interpreting paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria testing correctly. In our experience, the CD

  19. α(1)-adrenoceptor blocker naftopidil improves sleep disturbance with reduction in nocturnal urine volume.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Tsujimura, Akira; Takao, Tetsuya; Namiki, Mikio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2011-04-01

    To examine the mechanism underlying improvements in nocturia by α(1)-blockers, we investigated whether the α(1)-blocker naftopidil acts on nocturia with sleep disturbance using a frequency/volume chart (FVC). A total of 56 male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms were enrolled. The inclusion criteria were as follows: eight or more points on the I-PSS; three or more points on the I-PSS score for nocturia; and prostate volume larger than 20 ml. Patients received 50 mg of naftopidil once daily for 4 weeks, and non-responders received 75 mg for another 4 weeks. All patients were examined, and their data entered into FVC for 2 days before and after administration of naftopidil. Quality of sleep was also evaluated using modified Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). Patients with sleep quality scores of three or four were assigned to sleep disturbance group (n = 33), while those with scores of less than three were assigned to non-disturbance group (n = 23). After administration of naftopidil, total I-PSS decreased and nocturia score decreased from 3.5 to 2.6 (P < 0.01). Total mean score of modified PSQI in sleep disturbance group became significantly lower after administration of naftopidil (from 16.9 to 14.0; P < 0.01). Naftopidil significantly decreased nocturnal urine volume, resulting in a decrease in the nocturnal polyuria index in both sleep disturbance and non-disturbance groups. These results suggest that α(1)-blockers have the ability to normalize sleep disorders. Naftopidil improved nocturnal polyuria regardless of the presence of sleep disturbance, meaning that it might directly reduce nocturnal urine production.

  20. Swimming with stiff legs at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke

    2015-08-01

    Locomotion at low Reynolds number is not possible with cycles of reciprocal motion, an example being the oscillation of a single pair of rigid paddles or legs. Here, I demonstrate the possibility of swimming with two or more pairs of legs. They are assumed to oscillate collectively in a metachronal wave pattern in a minimal model based on slender-body theory for Stokes flow. The model predicts locomotion in the direction of the traveling wave, as commonly observed along the body of free-swimming crustaceans. The displacement of the body and the swimming efficiency depend on the number of legs, the amplitude, and the phase of oscillations. This study shows that paddling legs with distinct orientations and phases offers a simple mechanism for driving flow.

  1. Dimensional synthesis of a leg mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, F.; Lovasz, E.-Ch; Pop, C.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    An eight bar leg mechanism dimensional synthesis is presented. The mathematical model regarding the synthesis is described and the results obtained after computation are verified with help of 2D mechanism simulation in Matlab. This mechanism, inspired from proposed solution of Theo Jansen, is integrated into the structure of a 2 DOF quadruped robot. With help of the kinematic synthesis method described, it is tried to determine new dimensions for the mechanism, based on a set of initial conditions. These are established by taking into account the movement of the end point of the leg mechanism, which enters in contact with the ground, during walking. An optimization process based on the results obtained can be conducted further in order to find a better solution for the leg mechanism.

  2. Coordination of planar cell polarity pathways through Spiny-legs

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaonkar, Abhijit A; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis and physiology of tissues and organs requires planar cell polarity (PCP) systems that orient and coordinate cells and their behaviors, but the relationship between PCP systems has been controversial. We have characterized how the Frizzled and Dachsous-Fat PCP systems are connected through the Spiny-legs isoform of the Prickle-Spiny-legs locus. Two different components of the Dachsous-Fat system, Dachsous and Dachs, can each independently interact with Spiny-legs and direct its localization in vivo. Through characterization of the contributions of Prickle, Spiny-legs, Dachsous, Fat, and Dachs to PCP in the Drosophila wing, eye, and abdomen, we define where Dachs-Spiny-legs and Dachsous-Spiny-legs interactions contribute to PCP, and provide a new understanding of the orientation of polarity and the basis of PCP phenotypes. Our results support the direct linkage of PCP systems through Sple in specific locales, while emphasizing that cells can be subject to and must ultimately resolve distinct, competing PCP signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09946.001 PMID:26505959

  3. The Lower Extremity Biomechanics of Single- and Double-Leg Stop-Jump Tasks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common occurrence in sports requiring stop-jump tasks. Single- and double-leg stop-jump techniques are frequently executed in sports. The higher risk of ACL injury in single-leg drop landing task compared to a double-leg drop landing task has been identified. However the injury bias between single- and double-leg landing techniques has not been investigated for stop-jump tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between single- and double-leg stop-jump tasks in knee kinetics that were influenced by the lower extremity kinematics during the landing phase. Ground reaction force, lower extremity kinematics, and knee kinetics data during the landing phase were obtained from 10 subjects performing single- and double-leg stop-jump tasks, using motion-capture system and force palates. Greater peak posterior and vertical ground reaction forces, and peak proximal tibia anterior and lateral shear forces (p < 0.05) during landing phase were observed of single-leg stop-jump. Single-leg stop-jump exhibited smaller hip and knee flexion angle, and knee flexion angular velocity at initial foot contact with the ground (p < 0.05). We found smaller peak hip and knee flexion angles (p < 0.05) during the landing phase of single-leg stop-jump. These results indicate that single-leg landing may have higher ACL injury risk than double-leg landing in stop-jump tasks that may be influenced by the lower extremity kinematics during the landing phase. Key points Non-contact ACL injuries are more likely to occur during the single-leg stop-jump task than during the double-leg stop-jump task. Single-leg stop-jump exhibited greater peak proximal tibia anterior and lateral shear forces, and peak posterior and vertical ground reaction forces during the landing phase than the double-leg stop-jump task. Single-leg stop-jump exhibited smaller hip flexion angle, knee flexion angle, and knee flexion angular velocity at initial foot

  4. Decreased Nocturnal Movements in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marca, Giacomo Della; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Scarano, Emanuele; Colicchio, Salvatore; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Tonali, Pietro A.; Ricci, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Reduced mobility during sleep characterizes a variety of movement disorders and neuromuscular diseases. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the third most common form of muscular dystrophy in the general population, and people with FSHD have poor sleep quality. The aims of the present study were to evaluate nocturnal motor activity in patients with FSHD by means of videopolysomnography and to verify whether activity was associated with modifications in sleep structure. Methods: We enrolled 32 adult patients affected by genetically confirmed FSHD (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.1 ± 13.4 years) and 32 matched control subjects, (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.5 ± 11.4 years). Major body movements (MBM) were scored in videopolygraphic recordings in accordance with established criteria. An MBM index was calculated (number of MBM per hour of sleep). Results: The FSHD group showed a decrease in the MBM index (FSHD: 1.2 ± 1.1; control subjects: 2.3 ± 1.2, analysis of variance F = 13.672; p = 0.008). The sleep pattern of patients with FSHD, as compared with that of controls, was characterized by longer sleep latencies, shorter sleep durations, an increased percentage of wake during sleep, and a decreased percentage of rapid eye movement sleep. In the patient group, the MBM index was inversely correlated with severity of disease (Spearman test: r30 = −0.387; p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present findings suggest that patients with FSHD have a reduced number of nocturnal movements, which is related to disease severity. Reduced movement in bed may contribute to the sleep modifications observed in these patients. Citation: Marca GD; Frusciante R; Dittoni S; Vollono C; Losurdo A; Testani E; Scarano E; Colicchio S; Iannaccone E; Tonali PA; Ricci E. Decreased nocturnal movements in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(3):276-280. PMID:20572422

  5. Nocturnal Fanning Suppresses Downy Mildew Epidemics in Sweet Basil

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yigal; Ben-Naim, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew is currently the most serious disease of sweet basil around the world. The oomycete causal agent Peronospora belbahrii requires ≥ 4h free leaf moisture for infection and ≥7.5h of water-saturated atmosphere (relative humidity RH≥95%) at night for sporulation. We show here that continued nocturnal fanning (wind speed of 0.4–1.5 m/s) from 8pm to 8am dramatically suppressed downy mildew development. In three experiments conducted during 2015, percent infected leaves in regular (non-fanned) net-houses reached a mean of 89.9, 94.3 and 96.0% compared to1.2, 1.7 and 0.5% in adjacent fanned net-houses, respectively. Nocturnal fanning reduced the number of hours per night with RH≥95% thus shortened the dew periods below the threshold required for infection or sporulation. In experiments A, B and C, the number of nights with ≥4h of RH≥95% was 28, 10 and 17 in the non-fanned net-houses compared to 5, 0 and 5 in the fanned net-houses, respectively. In the third experiment leaf wetness sensors were installed. Dew formation was strongly suppressed in the fanned net-house as compared to the non-fanned net-house. Healthy potted plants became infected and sporulated a week later if placed one night in the non-fanned house whereas healthy plants placed during that night in the fanned house remained healthy. Infected potted basil plants sporulated heavily after one night of incubation in the non-fanned house whereas almost no sporulation occurred in similar plants incubated that night in the fanned house. The data suggest that nocturnal fanning is highly effective in suppressing downy mildew epidemics in sweet basil. Fanning prevented the within-canopy RH from reaching saturation, reduced dew deposition on the leaves, and hence prevented both infection and sporulation of P. belbahrii. PMID:27171554

  6. Nocturnal insect availability in bottomland hardwood forests managed for wildlife in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loraine Ketzler,; Christopher Comer,; Twedt, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Silviculture used to alter forest structure and thereby enhance wildlife habitat has been advocated for bottomland hardwood forest management on public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Although some songbirds respond positively to these management actions to attain desired forest conditions for wildlife, the response of other species, is largely unknown. Nocturnal insects are a primary prey base for bats, thereby influencing trophic interactions within hardwood forests. To better understand how silviculture influences insect availability for bats, we conducted vegetation surveys and sampled insect biomass within silviculturally treated bottomland hardwood forest stands. We used passive blacklight traps to capture nocturnal flying insects in 64 treated and 64 untreated reference stands, located on 15 public conservation areas in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Dead wood and silvicultural treatments were positively associated with greater biomass of macro-Lepidoptera, macro-Coleoptera, and all insect taxa combined. Biomass of micro-Lepidoptera was negatively associated with silvicultural treatment but comprised only a small proportion of total biomass. Understanding the response of nocturnal insects to wildlife-forestry silviculture provides insight for prescribed silvicultural management affecting bat species.

  7. Nocturnal to Diurnal Switches with Spontaneous Suppression of Wheel-Running Behavior in a Subterranean Rodent

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Tøien, Øivind; Valentinuzzi, Veronica S.; Buck, C. Loren; Oda, Gisele A.

    2015-01-01

    Several rodent species that are diurnal in the field become nocturnal in the lab. It has been suggested that the use of running-wheels in the lab might contribute to this timing switch. This proposition is based on studies that indicate feed-back of vigorous wheel-running on the period and phase of circadian clocks that time daily activity rhythms. Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys aff. knighti) are subterranean rodents that are diurnal in the field but are robustly nocturnal in laboratory, with or without access to running wheels. We assessed their energy metabolism by continuously and simultaneously monitoring rates of oxygen consumption, body temperature, general motor and wheel running activity for several days in the presence and absence of wheels. Surprisingly, some individuals spontaneously suppressed running-wheel activity and switched to diurnality in the respirometry chamber, whereas the remaining animals continued to be nocturnal even after wheel removal. This is the first report of timing switches that occur with spontaneous wheel-running suppression and which are not replicated by removal of the wheel. PMID:26460828

  8. Leg exoskeleton reduces the metabolic cost of human hopping.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Alena M; Herr, Hugh M

    2009-09-01

    During bouncing gaits such as hopping and running, leg muscles generate force to enable elastic energy storage and return primarily from tendons and, thus, demand metabolic energy. In an effort to reduce metabolic demand, we designed two elastic leg exoskeletons that act in parallel with the wearer's legs; one exoskeleton consisted of a multiple leaf (MLE) and the other of a single leaf (SLE) set of fiberglass springs. We hypothesized that hoppers, hopping on both legs, would adjust their leg stiffness while wearing an exoskeleton so that the combination of the hopper and exoskeleton would behave as a linear spring-mass system with the same total stiffness as during normal hopping. We also hypothesized that decreased leg force generation while wearing an exoskeleton would reduce the metabolic power required for hopping. Nine subjects hopped in place at 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, and 2.6 Hz with and without an exoskeleton while we measured ground reaction forces, exoskeletal compression, and metabolic rates. While wearing an exoskeleton, hoppers adjusted their leg stiffness to maintain linear spring-mass mechanics and a total stiffness similar to normal hopping. Without accounting for the added weight of each exoskeleton, wearing the MLE reduced net metabolic power by an average of 6% and wearing the SLE reduced net metabolic power by an average of 24% compared with hopping normally at frequencies between 2.0 and 2.6 Hz. Thus, when hoppers used external parallel springs, they likely decreased the mechanical work performed by the legs and substantially reduced metabolic demand compared with hopping without wearing an exoskeleton.

  9. Using multimedia for patient information--a program about nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J H; Collier, J; Crook, I; Garrud, P; Harris, P; MacKinlay, D R; Redsell, S A

    1998-05-01

    To identify the information needs of children with nocturnal enuresis, and to design, produce and evaluate an interactive computer program to provide this information. The program was developed over an 18-month period using information provided by children, parents and professionals, and was evaluated in a hospital-based enuresis clinic in 65 children. Usability and knowledge gained were also evaluated in 43 healthy children aged 8-10 years attending a local inner-city primary school. An interactive program about nocturnal enuresis was developed, which runs on a personal computer and uses sound, voice, cartoon drawings and animation in a modular design. Knowledge scores increased in clinic attendees and in schoolchildren after using the program (Wilcoxon matched pairs test, P < 0.001). This improvement was maintained when the program was re-tested 6-10 months later. This interactive computer program holds children's attention and increases their understanding of enuresis. Interactive multimedia may be useful to complement the information provided by health professionals. This method of communication may be particularly useful for children with a low level of literacy.

  10. Study on Mucin in Normal-Appearing Leg Skin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel

    2017-03-01

    Dermal deposits of mucin in the legs have been described associated with venous insufficiency. However, some degree of stasis dermatitis is generally common in aged individuals. Therefore, some amount of mucin is expected a priori in the reticular dermis of aged patients, even in the absence of clinical lesions. To test this hypothesis, the authors investigated the mucin in the legs of aged individuals without any dermatologic disease. Cutaneous samples were taken from the legs of 15 autopsy cases. A sample of the skin of the legs (either from the left or the right leg without any distinction being made) was randomly taken (without selecting any specific area or attending to macroscopical features). The skin samples were fixed in formaldehyde, and sections obtained from all samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, iron, and Alcian blue. Iron deposits were graded as 0/4 in 7 cases, as 1/4 in 4 cases, as 2/4 in 2 cases, and as 4/4 in 2 cases. Cases with greater deposits of iron also had other signs of stasis, such as neovascularization. All the samples scored 0 for dermal mucin deposits in the reticular dermis. The authors conclude that mucin deposits in the legs are not inherent to aging. Therefore, any mucin deposit in the reticular dermis, as well as expansion of the periadnexal dermis by mucin deposits, should be considered abnormal.

  11. Laboratory on legs: an architecture for adjustable morphology with legged robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, G. Clark; Pusey, Jason; Knopf, Ryan; Johnson, Aaron M.; Koditschek, Daniel E.

    2012-06-01

    For mobile robots, the essential units of actuation, computation, and sensing must be designed to fit within the body of the robot. Additional capabilities will largely depend upon a given activity, and should be easily reconfigurable to maximize the diversity of applications and experiments. To address this issue, we introduce a modular architecture originally developed and tested in the design and implementation of the X-RHex hexapod that allows the robot to operate as a mobile laboratory on legs. In the present paper we will introduce the specification, design and very earliest operational data of Canid, an actively driven compliant-spined quadruped whose completely different morphology and intended dynamical operating point are nevertheless built around exactly the same "Lab on Legs" actuation, computation, and sensing infrastructure. We will review as well, more briefly a second RHex variation, the XRL platform, built using the same components.

  12. Low levels of nitryl chloride at ground level: nocturnal nitrogen oxides in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osthoff, Hans D.; Odame-Ankrah, Charles A.; Taha, Youssef M.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Schiller, Corinne L.; Haga, Donna; Jones, Keith; Vingarzan, Roxanne

    2018-05-01

    The nocturnal nitrogen oxides, which include the nitrate radical (NO3), dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), and its uptake product on chloride containing aerosol, nitryl chloride (ClNO2), can have profound impacts on the lifetime of NOx ( = NO + NO2), radical budgets, and next-day photochemical ozone (O3) production, yet their abundances and chemistry are only sparsely constrained by ambient air measurements. Here, we present a measurement data set collected at a routine monitoring site near the Abbotsford International Airport (YXX) located approximately 30 km from the Pacific Ocean in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV) on the west coast of British Columbia. Measurements were made from 20 July to 4 August 2012 and included mixing ratios of ClNO2, N2O5, NO, NO2, total odd nitrogen (NOy), O3, photolysis frequencies, and size distribution and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (PM1). At night, O3 was rapidly and often completely removed by dry deposition and by titration with NO of anthropogenic origin and unsaturated biogenic hydrocarbons in a shallow nocturnal inversion surface layer. The low nocturnal O3 mixing ratios and presence of strong chemical sinks for NO3 limited the extent of nocturnal nitrogen oxide chemistry at ground level. Consequently, mixing ratios of N2O5 and ClNO2 were low ( < 30 and < 100 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) and median nocturnal peak values of 7.8 and 7.9 pptv, respectively). Mixing ratios of ClNO2 frequently peaked 1-2 h after sunrise rationalized by more efficient formation of ClNO2 in the nocturnal residual layer aloft than at the surface and the breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer structure in the morning. When quantifiable, production of ClNO2 from N2O5 was efficient and likely occurred predominantly on unquantified supermicron-sized or refractory sea-salt-derived aerosol. After sunrise, production of Cl radicals from photolysis of ClNO2 was negligible compared to production of OH from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O except

  13. [Design and application of medical electric leg-raising machine].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jintang; Chen, Jinyuan; Zhao, Zixian; Lin, Jinfeng; Li, Juanhong; Zhong, Jingliang

    2017-08-01

    Passive leg raising is widely used in clinic, but it lacks of specialized mechanical raise equipment. It requires medical staff to raise leg by hand or requires a multi-functional bed to raise leg, which takes time and effort. Therefore we have developed a new medical electric leg-raising machine. The equipment has the following characteristics: simple structure, stable performance, easy operation, fast and effective, safe and comfortable. The height range of the lifter is 50-120 cm, the range of the angle of raising leg is 10degree angle-80degree angle, the maximum supporting weight is 40 kg. Because of raising the height of the lower limbs and making precise angle, this equipment can completely replace the traditional manner of lifting leg by hand with multi-functional bed to lift patients' leg and can reduce the physical exhaustion and time consumption of medical staff. It can change the settings at any time to meet the needs of the patient; can be applied to the testing of PLR and dynamically assessing the hemodynamics; can prevent deep vein thrombosis and some related complications of staying in bed; and the machine is easy to be cleaned and disinfected, which can effectively avoid hospital acquired infection and cross infection; and can also be applied to emergency rescue of various disasters and emergencies.

  14. An index for breathlessness and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Borg, E; Borg, G; Larsson, K; Letzter, M; Sundblad, B-M

    2010-08-01

    The features of perceived symptoms causing discontinuation of strenuous exercise have been scarcely studied. The aim was to characterize the two main symptoms causing the discontinuation of heavy work in healthy persons as well as describe the growth of symptoms during exercise. Breathlessness (b) and leg fatigue (l) were assessed using the Borg CR10 Scale and the Borg CR100 (centiMax) Scale, during a standardized exercise test in 38 healthy subjects (24-71 years). The b/l-relationships were calculated for terminal perceptions (ERI(b/l)), and the growth of symptoms determined by power functions for the whole test, as well as by growth response indexes (GRI). This latter index was constructed as a ratio between power levels corresponding to a very strong and a moderate perception. In the majority (71%) of the test subjects, leg fatigue was the dominant symptom at the conclusion of exercise (P<0.001) and the b/l ratio was 0.77 (CR10) and 0.75 (CR100), respectively. The GRI for breathlessness and leg fatigue was similar, with good correlations between GRI and the power function exponent (P<0.005). In healthy subjects, leg fatigue is the most common cause for discontinuing an incremental exercise test. The growth functions for breathlessness and leg fatigue during work are, however, almost parallel.

  15. Mono-Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis in Lebanese Children: Prevalence, Relation with Obesity, and Psychological Effect

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Bassem Abu; Hammoud, Ahmad; Ziade, Fouad; Kamel, Raymond; Rajab, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nocturnal enuresis is involuntary urination while sleeping after a certain age, usually five years, when children should have established bladder control. The prevalence has been found to be up to 20% in five year old children, and it is considered the most common urological childhood complication. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted on Makassed School children aged 5–18 years. This was a two-step study, the first step was a questionnaire distributed to the children to be answered by their parents. The second step included individually meeting with every child who met the inclusion criteria and his/her parents and physically examining the child. RESULTS 11,440 questionnaires were distributed to school children aged 5–18 years, to be answered by their parents. Of the 7270 parents who responded back, 6620 reported no enuresis, 90 (1.25%) reported only diurnal enuresis, 107 (1.5%) reported diurnal and nocturnal enuresis, and 453 parents reported their child having nocturnal enuresis only. The data collected was analyzed according to age, sex, area, body mass index (BMI), and the PMQOL-SF score. The prevalence of mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) in Lebanon was found to be 5.3%. The results showed that the prevalence of MNE is inversely proportional to age. The prevalence of male to female ratio was 1.4:1. As for the prevalence according to different geographic areas, the results have shown that the North had the majority of cases with 7.6% prevalence. Results showed that 82.4% of children had a score more than 50, and only 28% of parents had a score above 50. DISCUSSION The prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in Lebanon is lower than that in neighboring countries such as Turkey8 and Saudi Arabia,9 but higher than that in Italy10 and Hong Kong. Our study has managed to show the same results, with a peak in incidence at seven years then dropping back to 0% at the age of 16. Our study has shown a male to female predominance but the male to

  16. The effect of the lunar cycle on fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraging ecology of nocturnally and diurnally active spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Roee; Dayan, Tamar; Levy, Ofir; Schubert, Iris; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2011-01-01

    We studied stress hormones and foraging of nocturnal Acomys cahirinus and diurnal A. russatus in field populations as well as in two field enclosures populated by both species and two field enclosures with individuals of A. russatus alone. When alone, A. russatus individuals become also nocturnally active. We asked whether nocturnally active A. russatus will respond to moon phase and whether this response will be obtained also in diurnally active individuals. We studied giving-up densities (GUDs) in artificial foraging patches and fecal cortisol metabolite levels. Both species exhibited elevated fecal cortisol metabolite levels and foraged to higher GUDs in full moon nights; thus A. russatus retains physiological response and behavioral patterns that correlate with full moon conditions, as can be expected in nocturnal rodents, in spite of its diurnal activity. The endocrinological and behavioral response of this diurnal species to moon phase reflects its evolutionary heritage.

  17. Expression and Evolution of Short Wavelength Sensitive Opsins in Colugos: A Nocturnal Lineage That Informs Debate on Primate Origins.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Gillian L; Lim, Norman T-L; Neitz, Maureen; Peichl, Leo; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2013-01-01

    A nocturnal activity pattern is central to almost all hypotheses on the adaptive origins of primates. This enduring view has been challenged in recent years on the basis of variation in the opsin genes of nocturnal primates. A correspondence between the opsin genes and activity patterns of species in Euarchonta-the superordinal group that includes the orders Primates, Dermoptera (colugos), and Scandentia (treeshrews)-could prove instructive, yet the basic biology of the dermopteran visual system is practically unknown. Here we show that the eye of the Sunda colugo ( Galeopterus variegatus ) lacks a tapetum lucidum and has an avascular retina, and we report on the expression and spectral sensitivity of cone photopigments. We found that Sunda colugos have intact short wavelength sensitive (S-) and long wavelength sensitive (L-) opsin genes, and that both opsins are expressed in cone photoreceptors of the retina. The inferred peak spectral sensitivities are 451 and 562 nm, respectively. In line with adaptation to nocturnal vision, cone densities are low. Surprisingly, a majority of S-cones coexpress some L-opsin. We also show that the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions of exon 1 of the S-opsin gene is indicative of purifying selection. Taken together, our results suggest that natural selection has favored a functional S-opsin in a nocturnal lineage for at least 45 million years. Accordingly, a nocturnal activity pattern remains the most likely ancestral character state of euprimates.

  18. Remotely-sensed, nocturnal, dew point correlates with malaria transmission in Southern Province, Zambia: a time-series study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum transmission has decreased significantly in Zambia in the last decade. The malaria transmission is influenced by environmental variables. Incorporation of environmental variables in models of malaria transmission likely improves model fit and predicts probable trends in malaria disease. This work is based on the hypothesis that remotely-sensed environmental factors, including nocturnal dew point, are associated with malaria transmission and sustain foci of transmission during the low transmission season in the Southern Province of Zambia. Methods Thirty-eight rural health centres in Southern Province, Zambia were divided into three zones based on transmission patterns. Correlations between weekly malaria cases and remotely-sensed nocturnal dew point, nocturnal land surface temperature as well as vegetation indices and rainfall were evaluated in time-series analyses from 2012 week 19 to 2013 week 36. Zonal as well as clinic-based, multivariate, autoregressive, integrated, moving average (ARIMAX) models implementing environmental variables were developed to model transmission in 2011 week 19 to 2012 week 18 and forecast transmission in 2013 week 37 to week 41. Results During the dry, low transmission season significantly higher vegetation indices, nocturnal land surface temperature and nocturnal dew point were associated with the areas of higher transmission. Environmental variables improved ARIMAX models. Dew point and normalized differentiated vegetation index were significant predictors and improved all zonal transmission models. In the high-transmission zone, this was also seen for land surface temperature. Clinic models were improved by adding dew point and land surface temperature as well as normalized differentiated vegetation index. The mean average error of prediction for ARIMAX models ranged from 0.7 to 33.5%. Forecasts of malaria incidence were valid for three out of five rural health centres; however, with poor

  19. Leg deformation during imaginal ecdysis in the downy emerald, Cordulia aenea (Odonata, Corduliidae).

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Frantsevich, Ludmilla

    2018-04-01

    A dragonfly larva migrates from the water to the shore, perches on a plant stem and grasps it with strongly flexed legs. Adult legs inside the larval exoskeleton fit to the larval legs joint-to-joint. The adult emerges with stretched legs. During the molt, an imaginal leg must follow all the angles in exuvial joints. In turn, larval apodemes are withdrawn from imaginal legs. We visualized transient shapes of the imaginal legs by the instant fixation of insects at different moments of the molt, photographed isolated exuvial legs with the imaginal legs inside and then removed the exuvial sheath. Instant shapes of the imaginal tibia show sharp intrapodomere bends copying the angle in the larval femoro-tibial joint. The site of bending shifts distad during the molt. This is possible if the imaginal leg is pliable. The same problem of leg squeezing is also common in hemimetabolous insects as well as in other arthropods, whereas holometabolous insects overcome problems of a tight confinement either by using leg pliability in other ways but not squeezing (cyclorrhaphan flies, mosquitoes) or by pulling hardened legs out without change of their pupal zigzag configuration (moths, ants, honey bees). The pupal legs are not intended to grasp any external substrate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Characteristics of Nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems in the U.S. Great Plains as Observed During the PECAN Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, D. J.; Dougherty, E.; Rasmussen, K. L.; Torres, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer in the U.S. Great Plains, some of the heaviest precipitation falls from large thunderstorm complexes known as Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). These frequently occurring MCSs are often nocturnal in nature, so the dynamics associated with these systems are more elusive than those in the daytime. The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field campaign was launched over a 7-week period as an endeavor to better understand nocturnal MCSs occurring in the Great Plains. PECAN featured a dense array of ground-based and airborne instruments to observe nocturnal MCS, including dual-polarization radars at multiple frequencies, mobile mesonets, and sounding units. Our role in PECAN involved deploying Ott Parsivel disdrometers to gain information on drop size distributions (DSDs) and fall speeds. Analysis of disdrometer data in conjunction with radar data presented using Contour Frequency by Altitude Diagrams (CFADs) and high-resolution radiosonde data allows for a structural comparison of PECAN MCS cases to previously identified MCS archetypes. Novel insights into the structural evolution of nocturnal MCSs in relation to their synoptic, mesoscale, and thermodynamic environments are presented, using data collected from dense and numerous observation platforms. Understanding the environmental conditions that result in different nocturnal MCS configurations is useful for gaining insight into precipitation distributions and potential severe weather and flooding hazards in the Great Plains.

  1. Bat predation on nocturnally migrating birds

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Juste, Javier; García-Mudarra, Juan L.; Agirre-Mendi, Pablo T.

    2001-01-01

    Bat predation on birds is a very rare phenomenon in nature. Most documented reports of bird-eating bats refer to tropical bats that occasionally capture resting birds. Millions of small birds concentrate and cross over the world's temperate regions during migration, mainly at night, but no nocturnal predators are known to benefit from this enormous food resource. An analysis of 14,000 fecal pellets of the greater noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) reveals that this species captures and eats large numbers of migrating passerines, making it the only bat species so far known that regularly preys on birds. The echolocation characteristics and wing morphology of this species strongly suggest that it captures birds in flight. PMID:11493689

  2. Nocturnal hypoventilation in neuromuscular disease: prevalence according to different definitions issued from the literature.

    PubMed

    Ogna, Adam; Quera Salva, Maria-Antonia; Prigent, Helene; Mroue, Ghassane; Vaugier, Isabelle; Annane, Djillali; Lofaso, Frederic; Orlikowski, David

    2016-05-01

    Restrictive respiratory failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neuromuscular diseases (NMD). Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is used to treat hypoventilation, identified by daytime hypercapnia or nocturnal desaturation. Recently, transcutaneous measure of CO2 (TcCO2) has been increasingly used to detect hypoventilation, using different cut-offs. We aimed to compare the prevalence of hypoventilation in an unselected adult NMD population according to different definitions issued from the literature. All consecutive nocturnal capno-oximetries performed between 2010 and 2014 in unventilated adult NMD patients were analysed retrospectively. Concomitant blood gas analysis and lung function data were collected. Patients on oxygen therapy were excluded. Hypoventilation was defined according to eight criteria, based on daytime PaCO2, daytime base excess, nocturnal SpO2 or TcCO2. Data from 232 patients were analysed (mean age 43.1 ± 15.4 years; 50.0 % women; vital capacity 59.2 ± 24.2 % of predicted). The hypoventilation prevalence was 10.3 to 61.2 %, depending on the used definition. The different definitions showed 49.1 to 94.8 % concordance (Cohen's kappa for agreement 0.115 to 0.763). Overall agreement between the eight definitions was poor (Light's kappa 0.267), and agreement between definitions based on nocturnal SpO2 and those based on TcCO2 was even lower (Light's kappa 0.204). We found large differences in hypoventilation prevalence according to the used definition. This has practical consequences, as HMV indication relies upon hypoventilation detection. We believe that capno-oximetry should be included in the diagnostic tools used to detect hypoventilation but this requires an update of consensus guidelines to agree upon the best definition.

  3. Sleep Quality and Nocturnal Sleep Duration in Pregnancy and Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shirong; Tan, Sara; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teoh, Oon Hoe; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael J; Kramer, Michael S; Gooley, Joshua J

    2017-02-01

    To examine the influence of maternal sleep quality and nocturnal sleep duration on risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a multiethnic Asian population. A cohort of 686 women (376 Chinese, 186 Malay, and 124 Indian) with a singleton pregnancy attended a clinic visit at 26-28 weeks of gestation as part of the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes mother-offspring cohort study. Self-reported sleep quality and sleep duration were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). GDM was diagnosed based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test administered after an overnight fast (1999 WHO criteria). Multiple logistic regression was used to model separately the associations of poor sleep quality (PSQI score > 5) and short nocturnal sleep duration (<6 h) with GDM, adjusting for age, ethnicity, maternal education, body mass index, previous history of GDM, and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score). In the cohort 296 women (43.1%) had poor sleep quality and 77 women (11.2%) were categorized as short sleepers; 131 women (19.1%) were diagnosed with GDM. Poor sleep quality and short nocturnal sleep duration were independently associated with increased risk of GDM (poor sleep, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11 to 2.76; short sleep, adjusted OR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.66). During pregnancy, Asian women with poor sleep quality or short nocturnal sleep duration exhibited abnormal glucose regulation. Treating sleep problems and improving sleep behavior in pregnancy could potentially reduce the risk and burden of GDM. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ipratropium bromide in patients with nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, I. D.; Hughes, D. T.; McDonnell, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen patients with nocturnal asthma were recruited to a two period crossover trial which compared a run-in period on nightly salbutamol (200 micrograms) with a period on nightly ipratropium bromide (160 micrograms) and a period on nightly salbutamol plus ipratropium at night. Morning dipping, as assessed by the fall in peak flow overnight, was significantly reduced in the periods when ipratropium bromide was taken. Peak flow in the morning and also at night was improved when taking ipratropium bromide. Ipratropium bromide in adequate dosage appears to be effective in reducing morning dipping in asthma. PMID:6236436

  5. Seasonal associations with urban light pollution for nocturnally migrating bird populations.

    PubMed

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Buler, Jeffrey J; Farnsworth, Andrew; Cabrera-Cruz, Sergio A

    2017-11-01

    The spatial extent and intensity of artificial light at night (ALAN) has increased worldwide through the growth of urban environments. There is evidence that nocturnally migrating birds are attracted to ALAN, and there is evidence that nocturnally migrating bird populations are more likely to occur in urban areas during migration, especially in the autumn. Here, we test if urban sources of ALAN are responsible, at least in part, for these observed urban associations. We use weekly estimates of diurnal occurrence and relative abundance for 40 nocturnally migrating bird species that breed in forested environments in North America to assess how associations with distance to urban areas and ALAN are defined across the annual cycle. Migratory bird populations presented stronger than expected associations with shorter distances to urban areas during migration, and stronger than expected association with higher levels of ALAN outside and especially within urban areas during migration. These patterns were more pronounced during autumn migration, especially within urban areas. Outside of the two migration periods, migratory bird populations presented stronger than expected associations with longer distances to urban areas, especially during the nonbreeding season, and weaker than expected associations with the highest levels of ALAN outside and especially within urban areas. These findings suggest that ALAN is associated with higher levels of diurnal abundance along the boundaries and within the interior of urban areas during migration, especially in the autumn when juveniles are undertaking their first migration journey. These findings support the conclusion that urban sources of ALAN can broadly effect migratory behavior, emphasizing the need to better understand the implications of ALAN for migratory bird populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of Thermoelectric Performance and Durability of Functionalized Skutterudite Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomedal, Gunstein; Kristiansen, Nils R.; Sottong, Reinhard; Middleton, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Thermoelectric generators are a promising technology for waste heat recovery. As new materials and devices enter a market penetration stage, it is of interest to employ fast and efficient measurement methods to evaluate the long-term stability of thermoelectric materials in combination with metallization and coating (functionalized thermoelectric legs). We have investigated a method for measuring several thermoelectric legs simultaneously. The legs are put under a common temperature gradient, and the electrical characteristics of each leg are measured individually during thermal cycling. Using this method, one can test different types of metallization and coating applied to skutterudite thermoelectric legs and look at the relative changes over time. Postcharacterization of these initial tests with skutterudite legs using a potential Seebeck microprobe and an electron microscope showed that oxidation and interlayer diffusion are the main reasons for the gradual increase in internal resistance and the decrease in open-circuit voltage. Although we only tested skutterudite material in this work, the method is fully capable of testing all kinds of material, metallization, and coating. It is thus a promising method for studying the relationship between failure modes and mechanisms of functionalized thermoelectric legs.

  7. Urinary arsenic, pesticides, heavy metals, phthalates, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polyfluoroalkyl compounds are associated with sleep troubles in adults: USA NHANES, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2017-01-01

    Links between environmental chemicals and human health have emerged, but the effects on sleep health were less studied. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships of different sets of environmental chemicals and common sleep troubles in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2005-2006 including demographics, serum measurements, lifestyle factors, self-reported sleep troubles, and urinary environmental chemical concentrations. Statistical analyses including descriptive statistics, t-test, chi-square test, and survey-weighted logistic regression models were performed. Of all 5563 Americans aged 18-85, 2331 (42.0%) had wake-up at night, 2914 (52.5%) felt unrested during the day, 740 (13.4%) had leg jerks while sleeping, and 1059 (19.1%) had leg cramps for 2+ times a month. Higher levels of urinary arsenic, phthalates, and polyfluoroalkyl compounds were associated with wake-up at night. Higher levels of urinary 4-tert-octylphenol and polyfluoroalkyl compounds were associated with being unrested during the day. Higher levels of urinary arsenic, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polyfluoroalkyl compounds were associated with leg jerks while sleeping. Higher levels of urinary pesticides, heavy metals, phthalates, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons were associated with leg cramps while sleeping. However, there were no significant associations with other environmental chemicals such as parabens, bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, triclosan, perchlorate, nitrate, or thiocyanate. Eliminating arsenic, heavy metals, phthalate, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polyfluoroalkyl compounds to improve sleep health might be considered while understanding the biological pathway with a longitudinal or experimental approach in future research would be suggested.

  8. Impairment of a parieto-premotor network specialized for handwriting in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cecile; Horovitz, Silvina G; Najee-Ullah, Muslimah 'Ali; Hallett, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Handwriting with the dominant hand is a highly skilled task singularly acquired in humans. This skill is the isolated deficit in patients with writer's cramp (WC), a form of dystonia with maladaptive plasticity, acquired through intensive and repetitive motor practice. When a skill is highly trained, a motor program is created in the brain to execute the same movement kinematics regardless of the effector used for the task. The task- and effector-specific symptoms in WC suggest that a problem particularly occurs in the brain when the writing motor program is carried out by the dominant hand. In this MRI study involving 12 WC patients (with symptoms only affecting the right dominant hand during writing) and 15 age matched unaffected controls we showed that: (1) the writing program recruited the same network regardless of the effector used to write in both groups; (2) dominant handwriting recruited a segregated parieto-premotor network only in the control group; (3) local structural alteration of the premotor area, the motor component of this network, predicted functional connectivity deficits during dominant handwriting and symptom duration in the patient group. Dysfunctions and structural abnormalities of a segregated parieto-premotor network in WC patients suggest that network specialization in focal brain areas is crucial for well-learned motor skill. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4363-4375, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Relationship between sleep stages and nocturnal trapezius muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian; Nicoletti, Corinne; Omlin, Sarah; Brink, Mark; Läubli, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Former studies reported a relationship between increased nocturnal low level trapezius muscle activity and neck or shoulder pain but it has not been explored whether trapezius muscle relaxation is related to sleep stages. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether trapezius muscle activity is related to different sleep stages, as measured by polysomnography. Twenty one healthy subjects were measured on four consecutive nights in their homes, whereas the first night served as adaptation night. The measurements included full polysomnography (electroencephalography (EEG), electrooculography (EOG), electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiography (ECG)), as well as surface EMG of the m. trapezius descendens of the dominant arm. Periods with detectable EMG activity of the trapezius muscle lasted on average 1.5% of the length of the nights and only in four nights it lasted longer than 5% of sleeping time. Neither rest time nor the length of periods with higher activity levels of the trapezius muscle did significantly differ between sleep stages. We found no evidence that nocturnal trapezius muscle activity is markedly moderated by the different sleep stages. Thus the results support that EMG measurements of trapezius muscle activity in healthy subjects can be carried out without concurrent polysomnographic recordings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. B-type natriuretic peptide is a determinant of the nocturnal increase in blood pressure independently of arterial hypertrophy and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Igase, Michiya; Miki, Tetsuro; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Loss of the nocturnal blood pressure (BP) drop is a risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes. However, clinical parameters that predispose to changes in nocturnal BP are currently uncertain. Given the possible involvement of salt sensitivity in nocturnal BP levels, we investigated a hypothesized association between plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels - a marker of body fluid retention - and nocturnal BP in a general population. Study participants were 1020 general individuals. Participants were divided into four groups (riser, nondipper, dipper, and extreme dipper) by their percentage changes in nocturnal SBP measured using an ambulatory BP monitor. Plasma BNP levels were positively associated with circadian BP change (β = 0.162, P < 0.001) independently of carotid hypertrophy (β = 0.133, P < 0.001), and awake heart rate (β = -0.102, P = 0.001) and SBP (β = -0.246, P < 0.001). Risers showed 1.6 times higher BNP levels than dippers, whereas oxygen desaturation during sleep was frequently observed in nondippers. Results of multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that BNP level was a significant determinant for the riser pattern [odds ratio (OR) 1.27 (BNP 10 pg/ml), P < 0.001], whereas oxygen desaturation was specifically associated with the nondipping pattern (OR 1.04, P = 0.001). When participants were subdivided by BNP level, risers were more frequent in the high BNP subgroup (19.5%) than in the low BNP subgroup (6.7%) (OR 3.39, P < 0.001). A slight increase in plasma BNP level was independently associated with rising nocturnal BP. Our results may help to understand the pathophysiology of circadian BP variation, and be a clue to identify individuals who require careful BP monitoring.

  11. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... flow, which can injure nerves and other tissues. Causes PAD is caused by "hardening of the arteries." ... small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores (ischemic ulcers on the lower legs) Tissue death (gangrene) ...

  12. Dietary sodium and nocturnal blood pressure dipping in normotensive men and women.

    PubMed

    Brian, M S; Dalpiaz, A; Matthews, E L; Lennon-Edwards, S; Edwards, D G; Farquhar, W B

    2017-02-01

    Impaired nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping (i.e., <10% decline in nocturnal BP) is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. Excess sodium has been shown to impair BP regulation and increase cardiovascular disease risk, yet few studies have assessed the influence of dietary sodium on nocturnal dipping in normotensive adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary sodium on BP dipping in normotensive men and women. Eighty healthy normotensive adults participated in a controlled feeding study (men: n=39, 34±2 years; women: n=41, 41±2 years). Participants consumed a standardized run-in 100 mmol sodium per day diet for 7 days, followed by 7 days of low-sodium (LS; 20 mmol per day) and high-sodium (HS; 300 mmol per day) diets in random order. On the final day of each diet, subjects wore a 24 h ambulatory BP monitor, collected a 24 h urine sample and provided a blood sample. During the run-in diet, 24 h urinary sodium excretion was 79.4±5.1 mmol per 24 h in men and 85.3±5.5 mmol per 24 h in women (P>0.05). Systolic BP dipping was not different between men (11.4±1.0%) and women (11.2±0.9%); (P>0.05). During the HS diet, 24 h urinary sodium excretion increased compared with the LS diet in men (LS=31.7±4.6 mmol per 24 h vs HS=235.0±13.9 mmol per 24 h, P<0.01) and women (LS=25.8±2.2 mmol per 24 h vs HS=234.7±13.8 mmol per 24 h, P<0.01). Despite this large increase in sodium intake and excretion, systolic BP dipping was not blunted in men (LS=8.9±1.0% vs HS=9.4±1.2%, P>0.05) or women (LS=10.3±0.8% vs HS=10.5±0.8%, P>0.05). Among normotensive men and women, HS does not blunt nocturnal BP dipping.

  13. The diet of a nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer's petrel, across the lunar cycle.

    PubMed

    Waap, S; Symondson, W O C; Granadeiro, J P; Alonso, H; Serra-Gonçalves, C; Dias, M P; Catry, P

    2017-05-03

    The lunar cycle is believed to strongly influence the vertical distribution of many oceanic taxa, with implications for the foraging behaviour of nocturnal marine predators. Most studies to date testing lunar effects on foraging have focused on predator activity at-sea, with some birds and marine mammals demonstrating contrasting behavioural patterns, depending on the lunar-phase. However, to date no study has focused on how the lunar cycle might actually affect predator-prey interactions in the upper layers of the ocean. Here, we tested whether the diet of the predominantly nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer's petrel (Bulweria bulwerii) would change throughout the lunar cycle, using molecular analysis to augment detection and taxonomic resolution of prey collected from stomach-contents. We found no evidence of dietary shifts in species composition or diversity, with Bulwer's petrel always consuming a wide range of mesopelagic species. Other co-variables potentially affecting light availability at-sea, such as percentage of cloud cover, did not confound our results. Moreover, many of the species found are thought not to reach the sea-surface. Our findings reveal that nocturnal predators are probably more specialized than previously assumed, irrespective of ambient-light, but also reveal deficiencies in our current understanding of species vertical distribution and predation-dynamics at-sea.

  14. Joint Observational Research on Nocturnal Atmospheric Dispersion of Aerosols (JORNADA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    physical processes in NBL . Research Progress: July 2008-January 2009 Objective 1. Analysis of the Stationarity of Mesoscale Turbulence in the...data allows for a more complete understanding of the nocturnal boundary layer ( NBL ). We have analyzed lidar measurements of plume meander and...dispersion and their relationship to the complexities of NBL structure. Plume Dispersion: Vertical plume dispersion parameters (σz) were derived

  15. EVOLUTION OF THE NOCTURNAL INVERSION LAYER AT AN URBAN AND NONURBAN LOCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evolutionary cycle of the nocturnal radiation inversion layer from formation until dissipation under fair weather conditions was investigated by time-series analyses of observations of inversion base and top heights, and inversion strength at an urban and a nonurban site in S...

  16. Leg lengthening and shortening

    MedlinePlus

    ... to match its length. Proper timing of this treatment is important for best results. Certain health conditions can lead to very unequal leg lengths. They include: Poliomyelitis Cerebral palsy Small, weak muscles or short, tight ( ...

  17. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-06

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system.

  18. Leaf carbohydrates influence transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation in the facultative CAM plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Taybi, Tahar; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M

    2017-11-01

    Nocturnal degradation of transitory starch is a limiting factor for the optimal function of crassulacean acid metabolism and must be coordinated with phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)-mediated CO 2 uptake to optimise carbon gain over the diel cycle. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nocturnal carboxylation is coordinated with starch degradation in CAM via a mechanism whereby the products of these pathways regulate diel transcript abundance and enzyme activities for both processes. To test this hypothesis, a starch and CAM-deficient mutant of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was compared with wild type plants under well-watered and saline (CAM-inducing) conditions. Exposure to salinity increased the transcript abundance of genes required for nocturnal carboxylation, starch and sucrose degradation in both wild type and mutant, but the transcript abundance of several of these genes was not sustained over the dark period in the low-carbohydrate, CAM-deficient mutant. The diel pattern of transcript abundance for PEPC mirrored that of PEPC protein, as did the transcripts, protein, and activity of chloroplastic starch phosphorylase in both wild type and mutant, suggesting robust diel coordination of these metabolic processes. Activities of several amylase isoforms were low or lacking in the mutant, whilst the activity of a cytosolic isoform of starch phosphorylase was significantly elevated, indicating contrasting modes of metabolic regulation for the hydrolytic and phosphorylytic routes of starch degradation. Externally supplied sucrose resulted in an increase in nocturnal transcript abundance of genes required for nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation. These results demonstrate that carbohydrates impact on transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nocturnal carboxylation and starch degradation in CAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional preservation and varia