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Sample records for noise ii 2d

  1. On The Noise Power In 2D Op Toelectronic Devices Made Of A3II B2V Type Of Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Kamakhya P.

    1988-06-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in studying the noise power of the 2D optoelectronic devices under different physical conditions. Besides, the connection of the noise power with the Einstein relation for the diffusivity-mobility ratio of the carriers in optical materials and its influence that further integrate electronic functions with optical devices have extensively been investigated in the literature. Keeping this in view, an attempt is madp fox the first time to study the noise power in 2D optoelectronic devices made of AIB9v type of degenerate opto-electronic materials having non-parabolic and non-dtanaard energy bands. Introduing the anisotropic crystal potential to the Hamiltonian we have first lolerived an E-k dispersion relation of the carriers in the bulk specimens of "B2 v type of opto-electronic materials within the framework of k . p formalism, according to which the conduction band corresponds to a single ellipsoid of revolution at the zone center in k-space by incorporating the anisotropies in the momentum-matrix element and the spin-orbit splitting parameters, respectively, since the anisotropies in the two afore mentioned band parameters are significant physical features of the above class of materials. 'de have then formulated the 2D noise power in the presence of an infinitely deep 1D square potential well leading to the quantization of the wave vectors of the carriers which produces a discrete energy spectrum. It is found, taking n-Cd1P2 as an example which is being currently used as optoelectronic materials and photod6tectors in the near infrared region, that the noise power in 2D optoelectronic devices increases with decreasing film thickness, for a fixed electron concentration, and also increases with increasing surface electron concentration corresponding to a given film thickness. The theoretical formulations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and the corresponding well-known results for standard

  2. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  3. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  4. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  5. Ergodicity of stochastic 2D Navier-Stokes equation with Lévy noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhao; Xie, Yingchao

    In this paper we deal with the 2D Navier-Stokes equation perturbed by a Lévy noise force whose white noise part is non-degenerate and that the intensity measure of Poisson measure is σ-finite. Existence and uniqueness of invariant measure for this equation is obtained, two main properties of the Markov semigroup associated with this equation are proved. In other words, strong Feller property and irreducibility hold in the same space.

  6. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions Involving ns2nd 2D and nsnp2 2D terms in Pb II, Sn II, and Ge II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard; Ellis, David; Ritchey, Adam M.; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry; Furman, Walter

    2017-06-01

    Radiative transitions of heavy elements are of great importance in astrophysics. Studying the transition rates and their corresponding oscillator strengths allows us to determine abundances of these heavy elements and therefore leads to better understanding of neutron capture processes. We provide the results of our studies on the transitions involving ns2nd 2D and nsnp2 2D terms to the ground term for Pb II, Sn II, and Ge II. These transitions are also of interest due to their strong mixing. Our studies involve experimental measurements performed at the Toledo Heavy Ion Accelerator and theoretical multi-configuration Dirac Hartree-Fock (MCDHF)1 calculations using the development version of the GRASP2K package2. The results are compared with Pb II lines seen in spectra acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope and with other values available in the literature. 1 P. Jönsson et al., The Computational Atomic Structure Group (2014).2 P. Jönsson et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 184, 2197 (2013).

  7. Low Speed, 2-D Rotor/Stator Active Noise Control at the Source Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, John C.; Kousen, Ken A.; Zander, Anthony C.; Bak, Michael; Topol, David A.

    1997-01-01

    to be unaffected by the presence of air flow representative of the Purdue experimental rig. A test of the active noise control at the source concept for rotor/stator active noise control was demonstrated. This 2-D test demonstrated conclusively the simultaneous reduction of two acoustic modes. Reductions of over 10 dB were obtained over a wide operating range.

  8. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  9. Interferometric noise characterization of a 2-D time-spreading wavelength-hopping OCDMA network using FBG encoding and decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, Craig; Andonovic, Ivan; Atkinson, R.; Deng, Yanhua; Szefer, Jakub; Bres, Camille-Sophie; Huang, Yue Kai; Glesk, Ivan; Prucnal, Paul; Sasaki, Kensuke; Gupta, Gyaneshwar

    2007-06-01

    The results of a range of experimental characterization exercises of interferometric noise for the case of a representative 2-D time-spreading wavelength-hopping optical code family are presented. Interferometric noise is evaluated at a data rate of 2.5 Gbits/s within an OCDMA network emulation test bed established utilizing fiber Bragg grating encoders/decoders. The results demonstrate that this form of noise introduces significant system power penalties and must be taken into consideration in any OCDMA network designs and implementations.

  10. Noise reduction methods applied to two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) reveal complementary benefits of pre- and post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Foist, Rod B; Schulze, H Georg; Ivanov, Andre; Turner, Robin F B

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) is a powerful spectral analysis technique widely used in many fields of spectroscopy because it can reveal spectral information in complex systems that is not readily evident in the original spectral data alone. However, noise may severely distort the information and thus limit the technique's usefulness. Consequently, noise reduction is often performed before implementing 2D-COS. In general, this is implemented using one-dimensional (1D) methods applied to the individual input spectra, but, because 2D-COS is based on sets of successive spectra and produces 2D outputs, there is also scope for the utilization of 2D noise-reduction methods. Furthermore, 2D noise reduction can be applied either to the original set of spectra before performing 2D-COS ("pretreatment") or on the 2D-COS output ("post-treatment"). Very little work has been done on post-treatment; hence, the relative advantages of these two approaches are unclear. In this work we compare the noise-reduction performance on 2D-COS of pretreatment and post-treatment using 1D (wavelets) and 2D algorithms (wavelets, matrix maximum entropy). The 2D methods generally outperformed the 1D method in pretreatment noise reduction. 2D post-treatment in some cases was superior to pretreatment and, unexpectedly, also provided correlation coefficient maps that were similar to 2D correlation spectroscopy maps but with apparent better contrast.

  11. Impact of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a 2D Lattice of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Spiral waves in the neocortex may provide a spatial framework to organize cortical oscillations, thus help signal communication. However, noise influences spiral wave. Many previous theoretical studies about noise mainly focus on unbounded Gaussian noise, which contradicts that a real physical quantity is always bounded. Furthermore, non-Gaussian noise is also important for dynamical behaviors of excitable media. Nevertheless, there are no results concerning the effect of bounded noise on spiral wave till now. Based on Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model subjected to bounded noise with the form of Asin[ωt + σW(t)], the influences of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a two-dimensional (2D) square lattice of neurons are investigated in detail by separately adjusting the intensity σ, amplitude A, and frequency f of bounded noise. It is found that the increased intensity σ can facilitate the formation of spiral wave while the increased amplitude A tends to destroy spiral wave. Furthermore, frequency of bounded noise has the effect of facilitation or inhibition on pattern synchronization. Interestingly, for the appropriate intensity, amplitude and frequency can separately induce resonance-like phenomenon.

  12. Impact of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a 2D Lattice of neurons.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-02-21

    Spiral waves in the neocortex may provide a spatial framework to organize cortical oscillations, thus help signal communication. However, noise influences spiral wave. Many previous theoretical studies about noise mainly focus on unbounded Gaussian noise, which contradicts that a real physical quantity is always bounded. Furthermore, non-Gaussian noise is also important for dynamical behaviors of excitable media. Nevertheless, there are no results concerning the effect of bounded noise on spiral wave till now. Based on Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model subjected to bounded noise with the form of Asin[ωt + σW(t)], the influences of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a two-dimensional (2D) square lattice of neurons are investigated in detail by separately adjusting the intensity σ, amplitude A, and frequency f of bounded noise. It is found that the increased intensity σ can facilitate the formation of spiral wave while the increased amplitude A tends to destroy spiral wave. Furthermore, frequency of bounded noise has the effect of facilitation or inhibition on pattern synchronization. Interestingly, for the appropriate intensity, amplitude and frequency can separately induce resonance-like phenomenon.

  13. Impact of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a 2D Lattice of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spiral waves in the neocortex may provide a spatial framework to organize cortical oscillations, thus help signal communication. However, noise influences spiral wave. Many previous theoretical studies about noise mainly focus on unbounded Gaussian noise, which contradicts that a real physical quantity is always bounded. Furthermore, non-Gaussian noise is also important for dynamical behaviors of excitable media. Nevertheless, there are no results concerning the effect of bounded noise on spiral wave till now. Based on Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model subjected to bounded noise with the form of Asin[ωt + σW(t)], the influences of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a two-dimensional (2D) square lattice of neurons are investigated in detail by separately adjusting the intensity σ, amplitude A, and frequency f of bounded noise. It is found that the increased intensity σ can facilitate the formation of spiral wave while the increased amplitude A tends to destroy spiral wave. Furthermore, frequency of bounded noise has the effect of facilitation or inhibition on pattern synchronization. Interestingly, for the appropriate intensity, amplitude and frequency can separately induce resonance-like phenomenon. PMID:28220877

  14. Image Pretreatment Tools II: Normalization Techniques for 2-DE and 2-D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Quasso, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is usually applied to identify different protein expression profiles in biological samples (e.g., control vs. pathological, control vs. treated). Information about the effect to be investigated (a pathology, a drug, a ripening effect, etc.) is however generally confounded with experimental variability that is quite large in 2-DE and may arise from small variations in the sample preparation, reagents, sample loading, electrophoretic conditions, staining and image acquisition. Obtaining valid quantitative estimates of protein abundances in each map, before the differential analysis, is therefore fundamental to provide robust candidate biomarkers. Normalization procedures are applied to reduce experimental noise and make the images comparable, improving the accuracy of differential analysis. Certainly, they may deeply influence the final results, and to this respect they have to be applied with care. Here, the most widespread normalization procedures are described both for what regards the applications to 2-DE and 2D Difference Gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) maps.

  15. Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside: Intermolecular interactions and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez, A.; Carbonio, R.E.; Reguera, E.

    2015-10-15

    This contribution discusses the intercalation of imidazole and its 2-ethyl derivative, and pyridine in 2D copper nitroprusside. In the interlayer region, neighboring molecules remain interacting throu gh their dipole and quadrupole moments, which supports the solid 3D crystal structure. The crystal structure of this series of intercalation compounds was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction patterns complemented with spectroscopic information. The intermolecular interactions were studied from the refined crystal structures and low temperature magnetic measurements. Due to strong attractive forces between neighboring molecules, the resulting π–π cloud overlapping enables the ferromagnetic coupling between metal centers on neighboring layers, which was actually observed for the solids containing imidazole and pyridine as intercalated molecules. For these two solids, the magnetic data were properly described with a model of six neighbors. For the solid containing 2-ethylimidazole and for 2D copper nitroprusside, a model of four neighbors in a plane is sufficient to obtain a reliable data fitting. - Highlights: • Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Molecular properties of intercalation compounds of 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Magnetic properties of hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Hybrid inorganic–organic 3D framework.

  16. Ambient Vehicular Noise recorded on a 2D Distributed Fiber Optic Sensing Array :Applications to Permafrost Thaw Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Wagner, A. M.; Dou, S.; Martin, E. R.; Ekblaw, I.; Ulrich, C.; James, S. R.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a recently developed technique that allows the spatially dense ( 1m) continuous recording of seismic signals on long strands of commercial fiber optic cables. The availability of continuous recording on dense arrays offers unique possibilities for long-term timelapse monitoring of environmental processes in arctic environments. In the absence of a repeatable semi-permanent seismic source, the use of ambient surface wave noise from infrastructure use (e.g. moving vehicles) for seismic imaging allows tomographic monitoring of evolving subsurface systems. Challenges in such scenarios include (1) the processing requirements for dense (1000+ channel) arrays recording weeks to months of seismic data, (2) appropriate methods to retrieve empirical noise correlation functions (NCFs) in environments with non-optimal array geometries and both coherent as well as incoherent noise, and (3) semi-automated approaches to invert timelapse NCFs for near-surface soil properties.We present an exploratory study of data from a sparse 2D DAS array acquisition on 4000 linear meters of trenched fiber deployed in 10 crossing profiles. The dataset, collected during July and August of 2016, covers a zone of permafrost undergoing a controlled thaw induced by an array of resistive heaters. The site, located near a heavily used road, has a high level of infrastructure noise but exhibits distance-dependent variation in both noise amplitude and spectrum. We apply seismic interferometry to retrieve the empirical NCF across array subsections, and use collocated geophone and broadband sensors to measure the NCF against the true impulse response function of the medium. We demonstrate that the combination of vehicle tracking and data windowing allows improved reconstruction of stable NCFs appropriate for dispersion analysis and inversion. We also show both spatial and temporal patterns of background noise at the site using 2D beamforming and spectral analysis. Our

  17. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  18. 2D water layer enclathrated between Mn(II)-Ni(CN){sub 4} coordination frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Ambarish; Bhowmick, Indrani; Sheldrick, William S.; Jana, Atish Dipankar; Ali, Mahammed

    2009-10-15

    A [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-}based two-dimensional Mn(II) coordination polymer {l_brace}Mn(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[NiCN]{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}, in which the coordination layers are stacked on top of each other sandwiching 2D water layer of boat-shaped hexagonal water clusters has been synthesized. The complex exhibits high thermal decomposition temperature and reversible water absorption, which were clearly demonstrated by thermal and PXRD studies on the parent and rehydrated complex after dehydration. - Abstract: A coordination polymer, {l_brace}Mn(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[NiCN]{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n}, showed that the coordination layers are stacked on top of each other sandwiching 2D ice layer of boat-shaped hexagonal water clusters . Display Omitted

  19. BL2D-SMC, the supramolecular crystallography beamline at the Pohang Light Source II, Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong Won; Eom, Kisu; Moon, Dohyun

    2016-01-01

    BL2D-SMC at the Pohang Light Source II is a supramolecular crystallography beamline based on a bending magnet. The beamline delivers high-flux tunable X-rays with energies from 8.3 to 20.7 keV and a 100 µm (horizontal) × 85 µm (vertical) full width at half-maximum focal spot. Experiments involving variable temperature, photo-excitation and gas sorption are supported by ancillary equipment and software in the beamline. The design of the beamline, its role and the main components are described.

  20. 2D water layer enclathrated between Mn(II)-Ni(CN) 4 coordination frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Ambarish; Bhowmick, Indrani; Sheldrick, William S.; Jana, Atish Dipankar; Ali, Mahammed

    2009-10-01

    A [Ni(CN) 4] 2--based two-dimensional Mn(II) coordination polymer {Mn(H 2O) 2[NiCN] 4·4H 2O}, in which the coordination layers are stacked on top of each other sandwiching 2D water layer of boat-shaped hexagonal water clusters has been synthesized. The complex exhibits high thermal decomposition temperature and reversible water absorption, which were clearly demonstrated by thermal and PXRD studies on the parent and rehydrated complex after dehydration.

  1. 2D stochastic-integral models for characterizing random grain noise in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Cherry, Matthew; Pilchak, Adam; Knopp, Jeremy S.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2014-02-18

    We extend our previous work, in which we applied high-dimensional model representation (HDMR) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) concepts to the characterization of a metallic surface that has undergone a shot-peening treatment to reduce residual stresses, and has, therefore, become a random conductivity field. That example was treated as a onedimensional problem, because those were the only data available. In this study, we develop a more rigorous two-dimensional model for characterizing random, anisotropic grain noise in titanium alloys. Such a model is necessary if we are to accurately capture the 'clumping' of crystallites into long chains that appear during the processing of the metal into a finished product. The mathematical model starts with an application of the Karhunen-Loève (K-L) expansion for the random Euler angles, θ and φ, that characterize the orientation of each crystallite in the sample. The random orientation of each crystallite then defines the stochastic nature of the electrical conductivity tensor of the metal. We study two possible covariances, Gaussian and double-exponential, which are the kernel of the K-L integral equation, and find that the double-exponential appears to satisfy measurements more closely of the two. Results based on data from a Ti-7Al sample will be given, and further applications of HDMR and ANOVA will be discussed.

  2. Directional statistics for realistic weakly interacting massive particle direct detection experiments. II. 2D readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Ben; Green, Anne M.

    2005-12-01

    The direction dependence of the WIMP direct detection rate provides a powerful tool for distinguishing a WIMP signal from possible backgrounds. We study the number of events required to discriminate a WIMP signal from an isotropic background for a detector with 2-d readout using nonparametric circular statistics. We also examine the number of events needed to (i) detect a deviation from rotational symmetry, due to flattening of the Milky Way halo and (ii) detect a deviation in the mean direction due to a tidal stream. If the senses of the recoils are measured then of order 20--70 events (depending on the plane of the 2-d readout and the detector location) will be sufficient to reject isotropy of the raw recoil angles at 90% confidence. If the senses can not be measured these number increase by roughly 2 orders of magnitude (compared with an increase of 1 order of magnitude for the case of full 3-d readout). The distributions of the reduced angles, with the (time-dependent) direction of solar motion subtracted, are far more anisotropic, however, and if the isotropy tests are applied to these angles then the numbers of events required are similar to the case of 3-d readout. A deviation from rotational symmetry will only be detectable if the Milky Way halo is significantly flattened. The deviation in the mean direction due to a tidal stream is potentially detectable, however, depending on the density and direction of the stream. The meridian plane (which contains the Earth’s spin axis) is, for all detector locations, the optimum readout plane for rejecting isotropy. However readout in this plane can not be used for detecting flattening of the Milky Way halo or a stream with direction perpendicular to the galactic plane. In these cases the optimum readout plane depends on the detector location.

  3. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  4. 77 FR 72284 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Region 4 States; Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... for Section 110(a) State Implementation Plans Pertaining to the Fine Particulate Matter (PM 2.5... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Region 4 States; Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(II) Infrastructure Requirement for the 1997 and 2006 Fine Particulate Matter...

  5. 77 FR 72291 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Region 4 States; Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Pertaining to the Fine Particulate Matter (PM 2.5 ) NAAQS'' making a finding that each state had submitted or... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Region 4 States; Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(II) Infrastructure Requirement for the 1997 and 2006 Fine Particulate Matter...

  6. Quantum damped oscillator II: Bateman's Hamiltonian vs. 2D parabolic potential barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz . E-mail: darch@phys.uni.torun.pl

    2006-04-15

    We show that quantum Bateman's system which arises in the quantization of a damped harmonic oscillator is equivalent to a quantum problem with 2D parabolic potential barrier known also as 2D inverted isotropic oscillator. It turns out that this system displays the family of complex eigenvalues corresponding to the poles of analytical continuation of the resolvent operator to the complex energy plane. It is shown that this representation is more suitable than the hyperbolic one used recently by Blasone and Jizba.

  7. Solid H2/D2 Particle Seeding and Injection System for Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Measurement of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2006-04-27

    Solid particles of the mixture of hydrogen and deuterium have certain advantages for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) of He II flow. The H2/D2 particles are near neutrally buoyant in He II and will vaporize with the helium as the experimental apparatus is warmed to room temperature. Progress of the construction of a H2/D2 particle seeding and injection system is reported in this paper. A cryogenic pulse valve is used to inject the mixture of helium, hydrogen and deuterium gas directly into a He II bath. Experiments show that the seeding quality is dependent on the back pressure, the mix ratio of the deuterium and helium gases and valve open duration. The effects of these parameters on the solid deuterium particle distribution are also discussed.

  8. 2-D Spectroscopic Observations of O II Recombination Lines in the Planetary Nebula NGC 7009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sehyun; Dinerstein, H.; Hill, G.; MacQueen, P.; Adams, J.; Blanc, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present preliminary results from 2-D spatially-resolved spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula NGC 7009, obtained in September 2007 on the McDonald Observatory 2.7m telescope utilizing the integral field unit (IFU) VIRUS-P (Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph-Prototype; Hill et al., 2006, New Astronomy Reviews, 50, 378). The instrument delivers simultaneous spectra in 247 fibers over the wavelength range 3550-5850Å at a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 5000Å. By taking three spatially dithered integrations, fully-sampled maps can be obtained for a region of 112"×112" with an angular resolution of 4.1". These observations are part of an observing program to investigate the enigma of the optical recombination lines (ORLs) such as those of O II, that appear to indicate higher oxygen abundances than the collisionally excited lines (CELs) from the same ion, in some planetary nebulae. In order to resolve this abundance discrepancy, Liu et al. (2000, MNRAS, 312, 585) proposed a dual-abundance model, which postulates that the nebulae which display this behavior contain cold, metal-rich, H-deficient inclusions where the ORLs are produced, embedded in hotter material of more normal composition from which the CELs arise. This model can provide a good fit to the integrated-light spectra, but the cold, metal-rich inclusions have yet to be spatially resolved or isolated. We have obtained fully-sampled maps of several planetary nebulae that display this anomaly, in an effort to find evidence for localized variations in the strengths of the ORLs relative to the CELs that would be expected if the cold, metal-rich gas is concentrated in spatially distinct clumps. In this poster we will present results from our observations to date, in particular from a recent VIRUS-P observing set of NGC 7009. [This research was supported by NSF grants AST-0408609/-0708245 to H.L.D., and VIRUS-P has been by the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation.

  9. Broadband 2D electronic spectrometer using white light and pulse shaping: noise and signal evaluation at 1 and 100 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Nicholas M; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Jones, Andrew C; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-04-03

    We have developed a broad bandwidth two-dimensional electronic spectrometer that operates shot-to-shot at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using an acousto-optic pulse shaper. It is called a two-dimensional white-light (2D-WL) spectrometer because the input is white-light supercontinuum. Methods for 100 kHz data collection are studied to understand how laser noise is incorporated into 2D spectra during measurement. At 100 kHz, shot-to-shot scanning of the delays and phases of the pulses in the pulse sequence produces a 2D spectrum 13-times faster and with the same signal-to-noise as using mechanical stages and a chopper. Comparing 100 to 1 kHz repetition rates, data acquisition time is decreased by a factor of 200, which is beyond the improvement expected by the repetition rates alone due to reduction in 1/f noise. These improvements arise because shot-to-shot readout and modulation of the pulse train at 100 kHz enables the electronic coherences to be measured faster than the decay in correlation between laser intensities. Using white light supercontinuum for the pump and probe pulses produces high signal-to-noise spectra on samples with optical densities <0.1 within a few minutes of averaging and an instrument response time of <46 fs thereby demonstrating that that simple broadband continuum sources, although weak, are sufficient to create high quality 2D spectra with >200 nm bandwidth.

  10. Low-dose 2D X-ray angiography enhancement using 2-axis PCA for the preservation of blood-vessel region and noise minimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Geun; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kang, Ho Chul

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing 2D angiography while maintaining a low radiation dose has become an important research topic. However, it is difficult to enhance images while preserving vessel-structure details because X-ray noise and contrast blood vessels in 2D angiography have similar intensity distributions, which can lead to ambiguous images of vessel structures. In this paper, we propose a novel and fast vessel-enhancement method for 2D angiography. We apply filtering in the principal component analysis domain for vessel regions and background regions separately, using assumptions based on energy compaction. First, we identify an approximate vessel region using a Hessian-based method. Vessel and non-vessel regions are then represented sparsely by calculating their optimal bases separately. This is achieved by identifying periodic motion in the vessel region caused by the flow of the contrast medium through the blood vessels when viewed on the time axis. Finally, we obtain noise-free images by removing noise in the new coordinate domain for the optimal bases. Our method was validated for an X-ray system, using 10 low-dose sets for training and 20 low-dose sets for testing. The results were compared with those for a high-dose dataset with respect to noise-free images. The average enhancement rate was 93.11±0.71%. The average processing time for enhancing video comprising 50-70 frames was 0.80±0.35s, which is much faster than the previously proposed technique. Our method is applicable to 2D angiography procedures such as catheterization, which requires rapid and natural vessel enhancement.

  11. Arbitrary order 2D virtual elements for polygonal meshes: part II, inelastic problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artioli, E.; da Veiga, L. Beirão; Lovadina, C.; Sacco, E.

    2017-06-01

    The present paper is the second part of a twofold work, whose first part is reported in Artioli et al. (Comput Mech, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s00466-017-1404-5), concerning a newly developed Virtual element method (VEM) for 2D continuum problems. The first part of the work proposed a study for linear elastic problem. The aim of this part is to explore the features of the VEM formulation when material nonlinearity is considered, showing that the accuracy and easiness of implementation discovered in the analysis inherent to the first part of the work are still retained. Three different nonlinear constitutive laws are considered in the VEM formulation. In particular, the generalized viscoelastic model, the classical Mises plasticity with isotropic/kinematic hardening and a shape memory alloy constitutive law are implemented. The versatility with respect to all the considered nonlinear material constitutive laws is demonstrated through several numerical examples, also remarking that the proposed 2D VEM formulation can be straightforwardly implemented as in a standard nonlinear structural finite element method framework.

  12. Superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF redshift survey. II. Comparison with simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, J.; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Tago, E.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Jõeveer, M.; Suhhonenko, I.; Hütsi, G.; Jaaniste, J.; Heinämäki, P.; Müller, V.; Knebe, A.; Tucker, D.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We investigate properties of superclusters of galaxies found in of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, and compare them with properties of superclusters from the Millennium Simulation. Methods: We study the dependence of various characteristics of superclusters on their distance from the observer, on their total luminosity, and on their multiplicity. The multiplicity is defined by the number of Density Field (DF) clusters in superclusters. Using the multiplicity we divide superclusters into four richness classes: poor, medium, rich and extremely rich. Results: We show that superclusters are asymmetrical and have a multi-branching filamentary structure, with the degree of asymmetry and filamentarity being higher for the more luminous and richer superclusters. The comparison of real superclusters with Millennium superclusters shows that most properties of simulated superclusters agree very well with real data, the main differences being in the luminosity and multiplicity distributions.

  13. Influence of 2D electrostatic effects on the high-frequency noise behavior of sub-100-nm scaled MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raul; Pardo, Daniel; Martin, Maria J.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we have performed an investigation of the consequences of dowscaling the bulk MOSFET beyond the 100 nm range by means of a particle-based Monte Carlo simulator. Taking a 250 nm gate-length ideal structure as the starting point, the constant field scaling rules (also known as "classical" scaling) are considered and the high-frequency dynamic and noise performance of transistors with 130 nm, 90 nm and 60 nm gate-lengths are studied in depth. The analysis of internal quantities such as electric fields, velocity and energy of carriers or conduction band profiles shows the increasing importance of electrostatic two-dimensional effects due to the proximity of source and drain regions even when the most ideal bias conditions are imposed. As a consequence, a loss of the transistor action for the smallest MOSFET and the degradation of the most important high-frequency figures of merit is observed. Whereas the comparative values of intrinsic noise sources (SID, SIG) are improved when reducing the dimensions and the bias voltages, the poor dynamic performance yields an overall worse noise behaviour than expected (especially for Rn and Gass), limiting at the same time the useful bias ranges and conditions for a proper low-noise configuration.

  14. Part II — CRS-beam PSDM: Kirchhoff-beam prestack depth migration using the 2D CRS stacking operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garabito, German; Stoffa, Paul L.; Ferreira, Carlos A. S.; Cruz, João C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Beam-migration methods efficiently extend the benefits of Kirchhoff migration and enhance its imaging accuracy, producing high-fidelity images of complex geological structures. The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stack method produces zero-offset (ZO) sections with a high signal-to-noise ratio and better continuity of reflection events, particularly for dipping structures, from multi-coverage data. The CRS stacking operator depends on three kinematic attributes determined from prestack data with automatic optimization procedures. These attributes have several applications: velocity model determination via tomography, the determination of projected Fresnel zones, and time and depth migration. Following the concepts of the beam-migration methods, we present a new depth migration procedure, called CRS-beam prestack depth migration (CRS-beam PSDM), that combines Kirchhoff depth migration and the CRS stacking method. This new migration approach is based on the CRS stacking operator's ability to collect paraxial contributions around each reference trace amplitude that is to be migrated through the Huygens curve. The present migration algorithm was tested on a synthetic 2D seismic dataset containing reflections from the steeply dipping interfaces. The results obtained show significant improvements when compared to conventional Kirchhoff migration. The algorithm was also applied to prestack migrate a real, low-fold, 2D seismic line acquired in the Tacutu basin, Brazil. The comparison of our two final results demonstrates improvements to image resolution and quality; thus, our new method leads to more accurate geological interpretations.

  15. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-15

    A Cd(II)–organic framework {[Cd_2(tpim)_4(SO_4)(H_2O)_2]·(SO_4)·21H_2O}{sub n} (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO{sub 4}·8/3H{sub 2}O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim){sub 2}]{sub n} chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π–π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, i.e., bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN{sup −} anions, both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}] (1A), in which the SCN{sup –} moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N{sub 3}{sup −} anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were replaced by N{sub 3}{sup −} anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated. - Highlights: • An interesting anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework is reported. • The sulfate-incorporated 2D layer compound exhibits very different anion exchange behavior with respect to SCN{sup −} and N{sub 3}{sup −}. • Both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in the 2D structure were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands, resulting in the formation of a 1D species. However, in the case of N{sub 3}{sup −} anions, only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure was replaced.

  16. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  17. Strong Cooperative Spin Crossover in 2D and 3D Fe(II)-M(I,II) Hofmann-Like Coordination Polymers Based on 2-Fluoropyrazine.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Seredyuk, Maksym; Muñoz, M Carmen; Znovjyak, Kateryna; Fritsky, Igor O; Real, José Antonio

    2016-10-17

    Self-assembling iron(II), 2-fluoropyrazine (Fpz), and [M(II)(CN)4](2-) (M(II) = Ni, Pd, Pt) or [Au(I)(CN)2](-) building blocks have afforded a new series of two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Hofmann-like spin crossover (SCO) coordination polymers with strong cooperative magnetic, calorimetric, and optical properties. The iron(II) ions, lying on inversion centers, define elongated octahedrons equatorially surrounded by four equivalent centrosymmetric μ4-[M(II)(CN)4](2-) groups. The axial positions are occupied by two terminal Fpz ligands affording significantly corrugated 2D layers {Fe(Fpz)2([M(II)(CN)4]}. The Pt and Pd derivatives undergo thermal- and light-induced SCO characterized by T1/2 temperatures centered at 155.5 and 116 K and hysteresis loops 22 K wide, while the Ni derivative is high spin at all temperatures, even at pressures of 0.7 GPa. The great stability of the high-spin state in the Ni derivative has tentatively been ascribed to the tight packing of the layers, which contrasts with that of Pt and Pd derivatives in the high- and low-spin states. The synthesis and structure of the 3D frameworks formulated {Fe(Fpz)[Pt(CN)4]}·1/2H2O and {Fe(Fpz)[Au(CN)2]2}, where Fpz acts as bridging ligand, which is also discussed. The former is high spin at all temperatures, while the latter displays very strong cooperative SCO centered at 243 K accompanied by a hysteresis loop 42.5 K wide. The crystal structures and SCO properties are compared with those of related complexes derived from pyrazine, 3-fluoropyridine, and pyridine.

  18. The 2D Hotelling filter - a quantitative noise-reducing principal-component filter for dynamic PET data, with applications in patient dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this paper we apply the principal-component analysis filter (Hotelling filter) to reduce noise from dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) patient data, for a number of different radio-tracer molecules. We furthermore show how preprocessing images with this filter improves parametric images created from such dynamic sequence. We use zero-mean unit variance normalization, prior to performing a Hotelling filter on the slices of a dynamic time-series. The Scree-plot technique was used to determine which principal components to be rejected in the filter process. This filter was applied to [11C]-acetate on heart and head-neck tumors, [18F]-FDG on liver tumors and brain, and [11C]-Raclopride on brain. Simulations of blood and tissue regions with noise properties matched to real PET data, was used to analyze how quantitation and resolution is affected by the Hotelling filter. Summing varying parts of a 90-frame [18F]-FDG brain scan, we created 9-frame dynamic scans with image statistics comparable to 20 MBq, 60 MBq and 200 MBq injected activity. Hotelling filter performed on slices (2D) and on volumes (3D) were compared. Results The 2D Hotelling filter reduces noise in the tissue uptake drastically, so that it becomes simple to manually pick out regions-of-interest from noisy data. 2D Hotelling filter introduces less bias than 3D Hotelling filter in focal Raclopride uptake. Simulations show that the Hotelling filter is sensitive to typical blood peak in PET prior to tissue uptake have commenced, introducing a negative bias in early tissue uptake. Quantitation on real dynamic data is reliable. Two examples clearly show that pre-filtering the dynamic sequence with the Hotelling filter prior to Patlak-slope calculations gives clearly improved parametric image quality. We also show that a dramatic dose reduction can be achieved for Patlak slope images without changing image quality or quantitation. Conclusions The 2D Hotelling-filtering of dynamic PET data

  19. The 2D Hotelling filter - a quantitative noise-reducing principal-component filter for dynamic PET data, with applications in patient dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Jan; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-04-10

    In this paper we apply the principal-component analysis filter (Hotelling filter) to reduce noise from dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) patient data, for a number of different radio-tracer molecules. We furthermore show how preprocessing images with this filter improves parametric images created from such dynamic sequence.We use zero-mean unit variance normalization, prior to performing a Hotelling filter on the slices of a dynamic time-series. The Scree-plot technique was used to determine which principal components to be rejected in the filter process. This filter was applied to [11C]-acetate on heart and head-neck tumors, [18F]-FDG on liver tumors and brain, and [11C]-Raclopride on brain. Simulations of blood and tissue regions with noise properties matched to real PET data, was used to analyze how quantitation and resolution is affected by the Hotelling filter. Summing varying parts of a 90-frame [18F]-FDG brain scan, we created 9-frame dynamic scans with image statistics comparable to 20 MBq, 60 MBq and 200 MBq injected activity. Hotelling filter performed on slices (2D) and on volumes (3D) were compared. The 2D Hotelling filter reduces noise in the tissue uptake drastically, so that it becomes simple to manually pick out regions-of-interest from noisy data. 2D Hotelling filter introduces less bias than 3D Hotelling filter in focal Raclopride uptake. Simulations show that the Hotelling filter is sensitive to typical blood peak in PET prior to tissue uptake have commenced, introducing a negative bias in early tissue uptake. Quantitation on real dynamic data is reliable. Two examples clearly show that pre-filtering the dynamic sequence with the Hotelling filter prior to Patlak-slope calculations gives clearly improved parametric image quality. We also show that a dramatic dose reduction can be achieved for Patlak slope images without changing image quality or quantitation. The 2D Hotelling-filtering of dynamic PET data is a computer-efficient method

  20. Crystal structures and fluorescence properties of two 2D MnII/CdII trimellitic complexes containing terpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yixia; Chai, Hongmei; Hou, Xiangyang; Wang, Jijiang; Fu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of manganese (II)/cadmium(II) salts with 1,2,4-trimellitic acid (H3tma) and 2,2‧:6‧,2-terpyridine (tpy) result in two novel complexes formulated with [M(Htma)(tpy)]·H2O (M = Mn(1) and Cd(2)). X-ray diffraction structural analyses of two complexes reveal they are isomorphic except for the different center metal ions and crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system of P(2)/n space group. The metal ion lies in a six-coordinated distorted octahedral environment coordinated with three Htma2- anions and one tpy ligand. There is an infinite two-dimensional rhombic network based on the metallic dimmers and Htma2- anions with the tpy ligands in void. Furthermore, the tpy ligands from the adjacent network weakly interact each other by π⋯π packing interactions into 3D supramolecular structure. The fluorescence properties could be assigned to the π - π* transition of organic ligands.

  1. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  2. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  3. Comparative Variable Temperature Studies of Polyamide II with a Benchtop Fourier Transform and a Miniature Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer Using 2D-COS and PCMW-2D Analysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this communication is to compare the performance of a miniaturized handheld near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a benchtop Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer. Generally, NIR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful analytical tool to study hydrogen-bonding changes of amide functionalities in solid and liquid materials and therefore variable temperature NIR measurements of polyamide II (PAII) have been selected as a case study. The information content of the measurement data has been further enhanced by exploiting the potential of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and the perturbation correlation moving window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) evaluation technique. The data provide valuable insights not only into the changes of the hydrogen-bonding structure and the recrystallization of the hydrocarbon segments of the investigated PAII but also in their sequential order. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the 2D-COS and PCMW2D results derived from the spectra measured with the miniaturized NIR instrument are equivalent to the information extracted from the data obtained with the high-performance FT-NIR instrument.

  4. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-01

    A Cd(II)-organic framework {[Cd2(tpim)4(SO4)(H2O)2]·(SO4)·21H2O}n (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO4·8/3H2O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim)2]n chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π-π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO42- anions, i.e., bridging SO42- and free SO42- anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN- anions, both the bridging and free SO42- anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN- ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim)2(SCN)2] (1A), in which the SCN- moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N3- anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO42- moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO42- were replaced by N3- anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated.

  5. Aircraft acoustics. II - Cabin noise in passenger aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, Anatolii Grigor'evich

    Results of theoretical and experimental studies of cabin noise and noise on the fuselage of passenger aircraft are presented, and methods of noise reduction are discussed. The discussion covers the principal noise sources, such as the gas jet, compressor, turbulent boundary layer, propeller, engine vibration, and air conditioning system. Cabin noise reduction methods discussed include sound and vibration insulation and sound and vibration absorption. Finally, methods for calculating cabin noise are presented.

  6. Ag(nic)2 (nic = nicotinate): a spin-canted quasi-2D antiferromagnet composed of square-planar S = 1/2 Ag(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Manson, Jamie L; Woods, Toby J; Lapidus, Saul H; Stephens, Peter W; Southerland, Heather I; Zapf, Vivien S; Singleton, John; Goddard, Paul A; Lancaster, Tom; Steele, Andrew J; Blundell, Stephen J

    2012-02-20

    Square-planar S = 1/2 Ag(II) ions in polymeric Ag(nic)(2) are linked by bridging nic monoanions to yield 2D corrugated sheets. Long-range magnetic order occurs below T(N) = 11.8(2) K due to interlayer couplings that are estimated to be about 30 times weaker than the intralayer exchange interaction.

  7. Low-cost chemiresistive sensor for volatile amines based on a 2D network of a zinc(II) Schiff-base complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabella, S.; Oliveri, I. P.; Ruffino, F.; Maccarrone, G.; Di Bella, S.

    2016-10-01

    A marked chemiresistive behavior is revealed in a nanostructured material obtained by spin-coating a solution of a bis(salycilaldiminato)Zn(II) Schiff-base (ZnSB) complex. The resulting submicron 2D network exhibits reversible changes in absorbance and resistance under the cycles of absorption and desorption of a volatile amine. These results are explained in terms of a Lewis donor-acceptor interaction between the ZnSB (acceptor) and the chemisorbed amine (donor). The 2D network of ZnSB was employed as a sensing element to fabricate a low-cost device for the volatile amines detection, showing promising results for food spoilage detection.

  8. Membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in bone and cartilage cells.

    PubMed

    Doroudi, Maryam; Plaisance, Marc C; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    1α,25(OH)2D3 regulates osteoblasts and chondrocytes via its membrane-associated receptor, protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3) in caveolae. 1α,25(OH)2D3 binding to Pdia3 leads to phospholipase-A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA) activation, stimulating cytosolic PLA2 and resulting in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release and PKCα activation, subsequently stimulating differentiation. However, how PLAA transmits the signal to cPLA2 is unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation is required for PLA2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting a similar role in 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent signaling. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the roles of CaM and CaMKII as mediators of 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PLAA-dependent activation of cPLA2 and PKCα, and downstream biological effects. The results indicated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 and PLAA-peptide increased CaMKII activity within 9 min. Silencing Cav-1, Pdia3 or Plaa in osteoblasts suppressed this effect. Similarly, antibodies against Plaa or Pdia3 blocked 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent CaMKII. Caveolae disruption abolished activation of CaMKII by 1α,25(OH)2D3 or PLAA. CaMKII-specific and CaM-specific inhibitors reduced cPLA2 and PKC activities, PGE2 release and osteoblast maturation markers in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. Camk2a-silenced but not Camk2b-silenced osteoblasts showed comparable effects. Immunoprecipitation showed increased interaction of CaM and PLAA in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. The results indicate that membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 via Pdia3 triggered the interaction between PLAA and CaM, leading to dissociation of CaM from caveolae, activation of CaMKII, and downstream PLA2 activation, and suggest that CaMKII plays a major role in membrane-mediated actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of 'Non-innocent' reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-12-15

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with 'Non-innocent' reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, Cu{sup II} ions are avoided to reduce to Cu{sup I} ions due to the existence of Nd{sup III}. It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron Cu{sup II} ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and {mu}{sub 1,1,3} mode to form Cu{sup II}-azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schlaefli symbol of {l_brace}4;6{sup 2}{r_brace}4{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 12};8{sup 10};10{sup 4}{r_brace}{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 4}{r_brace}. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the Cu{sup II} ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu-N-Cu angle nearly 98 Degree-Sign , while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron Cu{sup II} ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and exhibit interesting structure and magnetic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Non-innocent' reagents plays a key role in the process of formation of this complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D layer is formed only by Cu{sup II} ions and azido ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands reinforce 2D layers and pillar them into an infinite 3D framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic study indicates that alternating FM-AF coupling exists in the complex.

  10. A 3D complex containing novel 2D CuII-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of “Non-innocent” reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-12-01

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu2(N3)3(L)]n (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with “Non-innocent” reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, CuII ions are avoided to reduce to CuI ions due to the existence of NdIII. It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron CuII ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and μ1,1,3 mode to form CuII-azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schläfli symbol of {4;62}4{42;612;810;104}{42;64}. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the CuII ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu-N-Cu angle nearly 98°, while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron CuII ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state.

  11. The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds. X. The Chamaeleon II Pre-Main-Sequence Population as Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Juan M.; Spezzi, Loredana; Chapman, Nicholas; Evans, Neal J., II; Huard, Tracy L.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Merín, Bruno; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Covino, Elvira; Frasca, Antonio; Gandolfi, Davide; Oliveira, Isa

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the results from the combined IRAC and MIPS c2d Spitzer Legacy survey observations and complementary optical and NIR data of the Chamaeleon II (Cha II) dark cloud. We perform a census of the young population in an area of ~1.75 deg2 and study the spatial distribution and properties of the cloud members and candidate pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects and their circumstellar matter. Our census is complete down to the substellar regime (M ≈ 0.03 M⊙). From the analysis of the volume density of the PMS objects and candidates we find two groups of objects with volume densities higher than 25 M⊙ pc -3 and 5-10 members each. A multiplicity fraction of about 13% +/- 3% is observed for objects with separations 0.8'' < θ < 6.0'' (142-1065 AU). No evidence for variability between the two epochs of the c2d IRAC data set, Δ t ~ 6 hr, is detected. We estimate a star formation efficiency of 1%-4%, consistent with the estimates for Taurus and Lupus, but lower than for Cha I. This might mean that different star formation activities in the Chamaeleon clouds reflect a different history of star formation. We also find that Cha II is turning some 6-7 M⊙ into stars every Myr, which is low in comparison with the star formation rate in other c2d clouds. The disk fraction of 70%-80% that we estimate in Cha II is much higher than in other star-forming regions and indicates that the population in this cloud is dominated by objects with active accretion. Finally, the Cha II outflows are discussed; a new Herbig-Haro outflow, HH 939, driven by the classical T Tauri star Sz 50, has been discovered.

  12. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: II. Noise Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate rf SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices), coupled to a resonant input circuit, a readout tank circuit and a preamplifier, by numerically solving the corresponding Langevin equations and optimizing model parameters with respect to noise temperature. We also give approximate analytic solutions for the noise temperature, which we reduce to parameters of the SQUID and the tank circuit in the absence of the input circuit. The analytic solutions agree with numerical simulations of the full circuit to within 10%, and are similar to expressions used to calculate the noise temperature of dc SQUIDs. The best device performance is obtained when {beta}{sub L}{prime} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} is 0.6-0.8; L is the SQUID inductance, I{sub 0} the junction critical current and F{sub 0} the flux quantum. For a tuned input circuit we find an optimal noise temperature T{sub N,opt} {approx} 3Tf/f{sub c}, where T, f and f{sub c} denote temperature, signal frequency and junction characteristic frequency, respectively. This value is only a factor of 2 larger than the optimal noise temperatures obtained by approximate analytic theories carried out previously in the limit {beta}{sub L}{prime} << 1. We study the dependence of the noise temperature on various model parameters, and give examples using realistic device parameters of the extent to which the intrinsic noise temperature can be realized experimentally.

  13. Noise analysis of driven vortices of type-II superconductors - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Suresh Babu; Pal, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present the zero temperature molecular dynamics simulation of vortices in low Tc type-II superconductors. We observe power law variation of noise in the dynamical phase. In comparison with the ordered vortex flow region the disordered vortex flow region shows large power law correlation of noise.

  14. Two 2D Cd(II) coordination polymers based on asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand: synthesis, crystal structures and luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dong-Bin; Li, Meng-Meng; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Rui-Min

    2013-02-15

    Two new two-dimensional coordination polymers [Cd(3)L(2)(SCN)(6)](n) (1) and [CdLI(2)](n) (2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, TG technique, XRPD and complete single crystal structure analysis, where L is 4-(pyridine-2-yl)methyleneamino-1,2,4-trizaole. Asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand L with five- and six-membered N-containing heterocyclic rings acts as a tridentate bridging ligand to bind two Cd(II) centers through one terminal N(triazolyl) and one pyridylimine chelate unit in 1 and 2. For polymer 1, tridentate bridging ligands link Cd-(1,3-μ-SCN(-)) 1D inorganic chains to form a 2D layer network. The existence of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions between 2D hybrid layers further gives rise to a 3D supramolecular network. In comparison with 1, polymer 2 shows a 2D layer network containing hexanuclear macrometallacyclic units. The 2D layers are staggered together through the combination of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions and forming a 3D supramolecular structure. The luminescent properties of the polymers 1 and 2 were investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  15. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  16. Airframe Noise Results from the QTD II Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Stoker, Robert W.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Abeysinghe, Amal; Moe, Jefferey W.

    2007-01-01

    With continued growth in air travel, sensitivity to community noise intensifies and materializes in the form of increased monitoring, regulations, and restrictions. Accordingly, realization of quieter aircraft is imperative, albeit only achievable with reduction of both engine and airframe components of total aircraft noise. Model-scale airframe noise testing has aided in this pursuit; however, the results are somewhat limited due to lack of fidelity of model hardware, particularly in simulating full-scale landing gear. Moreover, simulation of true in-flight conditions is non-trivial if not infeasible. This paper reports on an investigation of full-scale landing gear noise measured as part of the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD2) flight test program. Conventional Boeing 777-300ER main landing gear were tested, along with two noise reduction concepts, namely a toboggan fairing and gear alignment with the local flow, both of which were down-selected from various other noise reduction devices evaluated in model-scale testing at Virginia Tech. The full-scale toboggan fairings were designed by Goodrich Aerostructures as add-on devices allowing for complete retraction of the main gear. The baseline-conventional gear, faired gear, and aligned gear were all evaluated with the high-lift system in the retracted position and deployed at various flap settings, all at engine idle power setting. Measurements were taken with flyover community noise microphones and a large aperture acoustic phased array, yielding far-field spectra, and localized sources (beamform maps). The results were utilized to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the merit of each noise reduction concept. Complete similarity between model-scale and full-scale noise reduction levels was not found and requires further investigation. Far-field spectra exhibited no noise reduction for both concepts across all angles and frequencies. Phased array beamform maps show inconclusive evidence of noise

  17. Natural and magnetic optical activity of 2-D chiral cyanido-bridged Mn(II)-Nb(IV) molecular ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Podgajny, Robert; Nitek, Wojciech; Fic, Tomasz; Görlich, Edward; Rams, Michał; Sieklucka, Barbara

    2013-08-04

    Unique two dimensional enantiopure cyanido-bridged {[Mn(II)(R-mpm)2]2[Nb(IV)(CN)8]}·4H2O and {[Mn(II)(S-mpm)2]2[Nb(IV)(CN)8]}·4H2O (-S) (mpm = α-methyl-2-pyridine-methanol) ferrimagnets with TC = 23.5 K were synthesized and characterized. They reveal natural optical activity (NOA) due to the chiral crystal structure, and magnetic optical activity (MOA) in the presence of an external magnetic field, with the strong enhancement in the magnetically ordered phase below TC.

  18. Noise properties of the EM algorithm: II. Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D W; Tsui, B M; Barrett, H H

    1994-05-01

    In an earlier paper we derived a theoretical formulation for estimating the statistical properties of images reconstructed using the iterative ML-EM algorithm. To gain insight into this complex problem, two levels of approximation were considered in the theory. These techniques revealed the dependence of the variance and covariance of the reconstructed image noise on the source distribution, imaging system transfer function, and iteration number. In this paper a Monte Carlo approach was taken to study the noise properties of the ML-EM algorithm and to test the predictions of the theory. The study also served to evaluate the approximations used in the theory. Simulated data from phantoms were used in the Monte Carlo experiments. The ML-EM statistical properties were calculated from sample averages of a large number of images with different noise realizations. The agreement between the more exact form of the theoretical formulation and the Monte Carlo formulation was better than 10% in most cases examined, and for many situations the agreement was within the expected error of the Monte Carlo experiments. Results from the studies provide valuable information about the noise characteristics of ML-EM reconstructed images. Furthermore, the studies demonstrate the power of the theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches for investigating noise properties of statistical reconstruction algorithms.

  19. Wind noise in hearing aids: II. Effect of microphone directivity.

    PubMed

    Chung, King

    2012-01-01

    The objectives were: (1) to examine the effects of a directional microphone with different directivity patterns and different microphone combinations on wind noise levels at the hearing aid output; and (2) to derive strategies appropriate for hearing aid selection and future designs. The in-situ frequency responses of a behind-the-ear hearing aid (BTE1) were matched when the hearing aid was programmed to dipole, hypercardioid, cardioids, or adaptive microphone mode. The in-situ frequency responses of another hearing aid (BTE2) were matched among an omnidirectional microphone (OMNI), an adaptive directional microphone (ADM), and a combination of an omnidirectional microphone at low frequencies and an adaptive directional microphone at high frequencies (MIXED). Flow noise was recorded at flow velocities of 0, 4.5, 9.0, and 13.5 m/s. Measurements were repeated for the hypercardioid pattern of BTE1. Flow noise recorded using directional microphones with four directivity patterns and using OMNI, ADM, and MIXED. Directional microphones with different directivity patterns generated similar flow noise levels. ADM yielded higher overall levels than OMNI and MIXED, which had similar overall levels. The adaptive directional microphone is the most versatile microphone for use in wind. The mixed microphone mode is a viable wind noise reduction option.

  20. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  1. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.

  2. Observation of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling in 1-D and 2-D extended structures of copper(II) terephthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Deakin, L.; Arif, A.M.; Miller, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    The reaction between CuCl{sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O and disodium terephthalate, Na{sub 2}tp, in aqueous solution simultaneously produces chain, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O:{kappa}O{prime})]copper(II), monohydrate, Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O (1), and layered, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O)]copper(II), Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2} (2), structured materials. 1 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 7}) belongs to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 space group [a = 6.3015(4) {angstrom}, b = 6.8743(4) {angstrom}, c = 22.9972(14) {angstrom}, and Z = 4] and incorporates tp in a bridging bis-monodentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. 2 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 6}) which belongs to the orthorhombic Pmc2{sub 1} space group [a = 10.7421(8) {angstrom}, b = 7.2339(10) {angstrom}, c = 5.7143(13) {angstrom}, and Z = 2] incorporates tp in a mono-bidentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a distorted square pyramid. 1 and 2 exhibit axial X-band powder EPR spectra with G{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.08, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (1) and g{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.07, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (2) at 300 K. 1 obeys the Curie-Weiss law at high temperatures ({theta} = {minus}7.2 K) and at low temperatures behaves as 1-D magnetic chains with an exchange-coupling constant of J/k{sub B} = {minus}9.15 K (H = {minus}2JS{sub 1}{center{underscore}dot}S{sub 2}). This material displays a spontaneous moment below 2 K under small applied magnetic fields, consistent with the presence of spin canting. 2 exhibits ferromagnetic interactions with {theta} = +0.8 K. Along the 1-D chain where coordinated water forms the bridge between metal centers, the coupling between Cu(II) is J/k{sub B} = +0.6 K. The fit of the magnetic susceptibility for 2 using a molecular field correction, which takes into consideration antiferromagnetic interactions between chains via the tp ligand, yields J{prime}/k{sub B} = {minus}0.13 K.

  3. A marching in space and time (MAST) solver of the shallow water equations. Part II: The 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, C.; Nasello, C.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2007-05-01

    A novel methodology for the solution of the 2D shallow water equations is proposed. The algorithm is based on a fractional step decomposition of the original system in (1) a convective prediction, (2) a convective correction, and (3) a diffusive correction step. The convective components are solved using a Marching in Space and Time (MAST) procedure, that solves a sequence of small ODEs systems, one for each computational cell, ordered according to the cell value of a scalar approximated potential. The scalar potential is sought after computing first the minimum of a functional via the solution of a large linear system and then refining locally the optimum search. Model results are compared with the experimental data of two laboratory tests and with the results of other simulations carried out for the same tests by different authors. A comparison with the analytical solution of the oblique jump test has been also considered. Numerical results of the proposed scheme are in good agreement with measured data, as well as with analytical and higher order approximation methods results. The growth of the CPU time versus the cell number is investigated successively refining the elements of an initially coarse mesh. The CPU specific time, per element and per time step, is found out to be almost constant and no evidence of Courant-Friedrichs-Levi (CFL) number limitation has been detected in all the numerical experiments.

  4. Optimizing the transverse thermal conductivity of 2D-SiC f/SiC composites, II. Experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, G. E.; Senor, D. J.; Jones, R. H.; Kowbel, Witold

    2002-12-01

    Model predictions of the transverse thermal conductivity ( Keff) are compared to experimentally determined values as a function of temperature for a commercial 2D-SiC f/SiC made by DuPont from plain weave Hi-Nicalon TM fabric and with an ICVI-SiC matrix. Two versions of the DuPont composite were examined: one with a 'thin' and one with a 'thick' pyrolytic carbon (PyC) fiber coating of thickness 0.110 and 1.044 μm, respectively. Generally good agreement of either the Hasselman-Johnson or the Markworth model predictions ( see companion paper, I. Modeling) with measured values of Keff for this composite suggest that these models can be used to predict Keff for composites with various 'non-ideal' fiber, interphase and matrix structures. Importantly, the models make it possible to separate the relative component contributions to Keff so that individual component degradation mechanisms can be examined in detail. For the two versions of the well-bonded, as-received DuPont composite made with Hi-Nicalon TM woven fabric, at 200 °C constituent values Km=22-25 W/m K (matrix thermal conductivity), Kc≈25 W/m K (PyC-coating thermal conductivity) and heq=2.4×10 7 W/m 2 K (equivalent fiber-matrix interfacial thermal conductance) were determined.

  5. An Implicit Energy-Conservative 2D Fokker-Planck Algorithm. II. Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, L.; Barnes, D. C.; Knoll, D. A.; Miley, G. H.

    2000-01-01

    Energy-conservative implicit integration schemes for the Fokker-Planck transport equation in multidimensional geometries require inverting a dense, non-symmetric matrix (Jacobian), which is very expensive to store and solve using standard solvers. However, these limitations can be overcome with Newton-Krylov iterative techniques, since they can be implemented Jacobian-free (the Jacobian matrix from Newton's algorithm is never formed nor stored to proceed with the iteration), and their convergence can be accelerated by preconditioning the original problem. In this document, the efficient numerical implementation of an implicit energy-conservative scheme for multidimensional Fokker-Planck problems using multigrid-preconditioned Krylov methods is discussed. Results show that multigrid preconditioning is very effective in speeding convergence and decreasing CPU requirements, particularly in fine meshes. The solver is demonstrated on grids up to 128×128 points in a 2D cylindrical velocity space (vr, vp) with implicit time steps of the order of the collisional time scale of the problem, τ. The method preserves particles exactly, and energy conservation is improved over alternative approaches, particularly in coarse meshes. Typical errors in the total energy over a time period of 10τ remain below a percent.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of three 2D Cd (II) coordination polymers built with terphenyl-2, 2‧, 4, 4‧-tetracarboxylate and flexible bis(imidazole)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Jiang; Tang, Long; Zhang, Mei-Li; Gao, Lou-Jun; Ren, Yi-Xia; Hou, Xiang-Yang; Fu, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Three new CdII coordination polymers, namely, {[Cd2 (L) (1, 2-bix)2(H2O)2]ṡ2H2O}n(1), [Cd2 (L) (1, 3-bix)2]n (2), and {[Cd (H2L) (1, 4-bix) (H2O)2]ṡ2H2O}n (3) [H4L = terphenyl-2, 2‧, 4, 4‧-tetracarboxylic acid, 1, n-bix = 1, n-bis(imidazol-l-ylmethyl) benzene (n = 2, 3, 4)], have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, thermogravimetric analysis, and fluorescent analysis. Complex 1 is a 2D wavelike network structure incorporating the dinuclear Cd2 (1, 2-bix)2 units, whereas complex 2 possesses a 2D stair-like network structure consisting of the dinuclear Cd2O2 units. Complex 3 features a 2D puckered network constructed by 1D [Cd (H2L)]n and 1D [Cd (1, 4-bix)]n chains. The results show that the structural diversity of the polymers is mainly attributed to the usage of diverse ancillary bis (imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-benzene isomers ligands. The thermal stabilities and photoluminescence behaviors were also investigated.

  7. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Imidazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Combining 2D and 3D QSAR Methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh C

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed for correlating the chemical composition of imidazole-5-carboxylic acid analogs and their angiotensin II [Formula: see text] receptor antagonist activity using partial least squares and k-nearest neighbor, respectively. For comparing the three different feature selection methods of 2D-QSAR, k-nearest neighbor models were used in conjunction with simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm and stepwise coupled with partial least square (PLS) showed variation in biological activity. The statistically significant best 2D-QSAR model having good predictive ability with statistical values of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was developed by SA-partial least square with the descriptors like [Formula: see text]count, 5Chain count, SdsCHE-index, and H-acceptor count, showing that increase in the values of these descriptors is beneficial to the activity. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the SA-PLS. A leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] and predicate activity [Formula: see text] = 0.7226 were obtained. The information rendered by QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of substituted imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives and also aid in designing novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  8. Bulk anisotropic excitons in type-II semiconductors built with 1D and 2D low-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyotecatl, H. A.; Del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Reyes, J. A.; Vazquez, G. J.; Montemayor-Aldrete, J. A.; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.; Cocoletzi, G. H.

    2005-08-01

    We used a simple variational approach to account for the difference in the electron and hole effective masses in Wannier-Mott excitons in type-II semiconducting heterostructures in which the electron is constrained in an one-dimensional quantum wire (1DQW) and the hole is in a two-dimensional quantum layer (2DQL) perpendicular to the wire or viceversa. The resulting Schrodinger equation is similar to that of a 3D bulk exciton because the number of free (nonconfined) variables is three; two coming from the 2DQL and one from the 1DQW. In this system the effective electron-hole interaction depends on the confinement potentials.

  9. A Coupled 2 × 2D Babcock–Leighton Solar Dynamo Model. II. Reference Dynamo Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemerle, Alexandre; Charbonneau, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid 2 × 2D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock–Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship between the surface dipole and the BMR-generating internal field, and correlation between dipole strength at cycle maximum and peak amplitude of the next cycle. The saturation of the cycle amplitude takes place through the quenching of the BMR tilt as a function of the internal field. The observed statistical scatter about the mean BMR tilt, built into the model, acts as a source of stochasticity which dominates amplitude fluctuations. The model thus can produce Dalton-like epochs of strongly suppressed cycle amplitude lasting a few cycles and can even shut off entirely following an unfavorable sequence of emergence events.

  10. Confinement of a bioinspired nonheme Fe(II) complex in 2D hexagonal mesoporous silica with metal site isolation.

    PubMed

    Jollet, Véronique; Albela, Belén; Sénéchal-David, Katell; Jégou, Pascale; Kolodziej, Emilie; Sainton, Joëlle; Bonneviot, Laurent; Banse, Frédéric

    2013-08-28

    A mixed amine pyridine polydentate Fe(II) complex was covalently tethered in hexagonal mesoporous silica of the MCM-41 type. Metal site isolation was generated using adsorbed tetramethylammonium cations acting as a patterned silanol protecting mask and trimethylsilylazane as a capping agent. Then, the amine/pyridine ligand bearing a tethering triethoxysilane group was either grafted to such a pretreated silica surface prior to or after complexation to Fe(II). These two synthetic routes, denoted as two-step and one-step, respectively, were also applied to fumed silica for comparison, except that the silanol groups were capped after tethering the metal unit. The coordination of the targeted complex was monitored using UV-visible spectrophotometry and, according to XPS, the best control was achieved inside the channels of the mesoporous silica for the two-step route. For the solid prepared according to the one-step route, tethering of the complex occurred mainly at the entrance of the channel.

  11. A critical evaluation of the PTW 2D-ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS II phantom for IMRT and VMAT verification.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohammad; Adams, Elizabeth J; Jordan, Thomas J; Clark, Catharine H; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-11-04

    Quality assurance (QA) for intensity- and volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and VMAT) has evolved substantially. In recent years, various commercial 2D and 3D ionization chamber or diode detector arrays have become available, allowing for absolute verification with near real time results, allowing for streamlined QA. However, detector arrays are limited by their resolution, giving rise to concerns about their sensitivity to errors. Understanding the limitations of these devices is therefore critical. In this study, the sensitivity and resolution of the PTW 2D-ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS II phantom combination was comprehensively characterized for use in dynamic sliding window IMRT and RapidArc verification. Measurement comparisons were made between single acquisition and a multiple merged acquisition techniques to improve the effective resolution of the 2D-ARRAY, as well as comparisons against GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film and electronic portal imaging dosimetry (EPID). The sensitivity and resolution of the 2D-ARRAY was tested using two gantry angle 0° modulated test fields. Deliberate multileaf collimator (MLC) errors of 1, 2, and 5 mm and collimator rotation errors were inserted into IMRT and RapidArc plans for pelvis and head & neck sites, to test sensitivity to errors. The radiobiological impact of these errors was assessed to determine the gamma index passing criteria to be used with the 2D-ARRAY to detect clinically relevant errors. For gamma index distributions, it was found that the 2D-ARRAY in single acquisition mode was comparable to multiple acquisition modes, as well as film and EPID. It was found that the commonly used gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference or 3 mm distance to agreement may potentially mask clinically relevant errors. Gamma index criteria of 3%/2 mm with a passing threshold of 98%, or 2%/2 mm with a passing threshold of 95%, were found to be more sensitive. We suggest that the gamma index passing thresholds may be used for guidance

  12. Photoaquation Mechanism of Hexacyanoferrate(II) Ions: Ultrafast 2D UV and Transient Visible and IR Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Marco; Auböck, Gerald; Besley, Nicholas A; Clark, Ian P; Greetham, Gregory M; Hanson-Heine, Magnus W D; Horvath, Raphael; Murphy, Thomas S; Penfold, Thomas J; Towrie, Michael; George, Michael W; Chergui, Majed

    2017-05-31

    Ferrous iron(II) hexacyanide in aqueous solutions is known to undergo photoionization and photoaquation reactions depending on the excitation wavelength. To investigate this wavelength dependence, we implemented ultrafast two-dimensional UV transient absorption spectroscopy, covering a range from 280 to 370 nm in both excitation and probing, along with UV pump/visible probe or time-resolved infrared (TRIR) transient absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As far as photoaquation is concerned, we find that excitation of the molecule leads to ultrafast intramolecular relaxation to the lowest triplet state of the [Fe(CN)6](4-) complex, followed by its dissociation into CN(-) and [Fe(CN)5](3-) fragments and partial geminate recombination, all within <0.5 ps. The subsequent time evolution is associated with the [Fe(CN)5](3-) fragment going from a triplet square pyramidal geometry, to the lowest triplet trigonal bipyramidal state in 3-4 ps. This is the precursor to aquation, which occurs in ∼20 ps in H2O and D2O solutions, forming the [Fe(CN)5(H2O/D2O)](3-) species, although some aquation also occurs during the 3-4 ps time scale. The aquated complex is observed to be stable up to the microsecond time scale. For excitation below 310 nm, the dominant channel is photooxidation with a minor aquation channel. The photoaquation reaction shows no excitation wavelength dependence up to 310 nm, that is, it reflects a Kasha Rule behavior. In contrast, the photooxidation yield increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The various intermediates that appear in the TRIR experiments are identified with the help of DFT calculations. These results provide a clear example of the energy dependence of various reactive pathways and of the role of spin-states in the reactivity of metal complexes.

  13. Interior noise in the untreated Gulfstream II Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Prydz, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Interior noise on the Gulfstream II Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft was measured using 19 wing, 22 fuselage, and 32 cabin-interior microphones to determine the sources of the cabin noise. Results from ground and flight test acoustic and vibration measurements and analyses show that the major source of cabin noise was the airborne propfan blade passage frequency tones. The radiated sound pressure levels and the richness of the harmonic content of the propfan increased with increasing altitude. The acoustic output of the propfan also depended on the shaft power, helical Mach number, and blade passage frequency.

  14. Functional Sensitivity of 2D Simultaneous Multi-Slice Echo-Planar Imaging: Effects of Acceleration on g-factor and Physiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Zeidman, Peter; Flandin, Guillaume; Moeller, Steen; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated data acquisition with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging for functional MRI studies leads to interacting and opposing effects that influence the sensitivity to blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes. Image signal to noise ratio (SNR) is decreased with higher SMS acceleration factors and shorter repetition times (TR) due to g-factor noise penalties and saturation of longitudinal magnetization. However, the lower image SNR is counteracted by greater statistical power from more samples per unit time and a higher temporal Nyquist frequency that allows for better removal of spurious non-BOLD high frequency signal content. This study investigated the dependence of the BOLD sensitivity on these main driving factors and their interaction, and provides a framework for evaluating optimal acceleration of SMS-EPI sequences. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a scenes/objects visualization task was acquired in 10 healthy volunteers at a standard neuroscience resolution of 3 mm on a 3T MRI scanner. SMS factors 1, 2, 4, and 8 were used, spanning TRs of 2800 ms to 350 ms. Two data processing methods were used to equalize the number of samples over the SMS factors. BOLD sensitivity was assessed using g-factors maps, temporal SNR (tSNR), and t-score metrics. tSNR results show a dependence on SMS factor that is highly non-uniform over the brain, with outcomes driven by g-factor noise amplification and the presence of high frequency noise. The t-score metrics also show a high degree of spatial dependence: the lower g-factor noise area of V1 shows significant improvements at higher SMS factors; the moderate-level g-factor noise area of the parahippocampal place area shows only a trend of improvement; and the high g-factor noise area of the ventral-medial pre-frontal cortex shows a trend of declining t-scores at higher SMS factors. This spatial variability suggests that the optimal SMS factor for fMRI studies is region dependent. For task

  15. Functional Sensitivity of 2D Simultaneous Multi-Slice Echo-Planar Imaging: Effects of Acceleration on g-factor and Physiological Noise

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Zeidman, Peter; Flandin, Guillaume; Moeller, Steen; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated data acquisition with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging for functional MRI studies leads to interacting and opposing effects that influence the sensitivity to blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes. Image signal to noise ratio (SNR) is decreased with higher SMS acceleration factors and shorter repetition times (TR) due to g-factor noise penalties and saturation of longitudinal magnetization. However, the lower image SNR is counteracted by greater statistical power from more samples per unit time and a higher temporal Nyquist frequency that allows for better removal of spurious non-BOLD high frequency signal content. This study investigated the dependence of the BOLD sensitivity on these main driving factors and their interaction, and provides a framework for evaluating optimal acceleration of SMS-EPI sequences. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a scenes/objects visualization task was acquired in 10 healthy volunteers at a standard neuroscience resolution of 3 mm on a 3T MRI scanner. SMS factors 1, 2, 4, and 8 were used, spanning TRs of 2800 ms to 350 ms. Two data processing methods were used to equalize the number of samples over the SMS factors. BOLD sensitivity was assessed using g-factors maps, temporal SNR (tSNR), and t-score metrics. tSNR results show a dependence on SMS factor that is highly non-uniform over the brain, with outcomes driven by g-factor noise amplification and the presence of high frequency noise. The t-score metrics also show a high degree of spatial dependence: the lower g-factor noise area of V1 shows significant improvements at higher SMS factors; the moderate-level g-factor noise area of the parahippocampal place area shows only a trend of improvement; and the high g-factor noise area of the ventral-medial pre-frontal cortex shows a trend of declining t-scores at higher SMS factors. This spatial variability suggests that the optimal SMS factor for fMRI studies is region dependent. For task

  16. Rational design of two bpy-bridged 3D and 2D Co(II) open frameworks with similar amino-acid-based Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Ze; Du, Lin; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Ming-Rong; Qian, Fen-Hua; Liu, Jing; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Qi-Hua

    2012-12-21

    Two novel bpy-bridged Co(II) Schiff base complexes have been synthesized by the hydro(solvo)thermal reactions of corresponding amino-acid-based Schiff bases, bpy and Co(NO(3))(2)·6H(2)O. The following formulae identify the two complexes: {[Co(napala)(bpy)(0.5)]·H(2)O}(n) (1) and [Co(napgly)(bpy)(0.5)](n) (2) [H(2)napala = N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylmethylidene)-D/L-alanine, H(2)napgly = N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylmethylidene)-glycine and bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine]. These two compounds have been characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, optical spectra analysis, and magnetic measurement. Complex 1 features an unprecedented threefold interpenetrated diamond network based on the fan-shaped Co(II)(4)(μ(2)-napala)(4) molecular square node and bpy linker, which represents the first example of 3D framework among the amino-acid-based Schiff base complexes with salicylaldehyde or its derivatives. In 2, adjacent Co(II) ions are bridged by μ(2)-napgly(2-) to form left- and right-handed [Co(II)(μ(2)-napgly)](n) helical chains. These two types of helical chains are sustained alternately by a symmetrical bpy co-ligand into a 2D grid-based layer. The solid-state fluorescence of complexes 1 and 2 are quenched almost completely compared with free mixed-ligands at room temperature. Moreover, magnetic studies show the dominant antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co(II) centers mediated by the syn-anti-COO(-)-bridges in both complexes.

  17. Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as type II kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors: CoMFA and CoMSIA studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wu, Shu-Guang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors have been proved to be very effective anticancer agents. Molecular docking, 3D-QSAR methods, CoMFA and CoMSIA were performed on pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as non-ATP competitive KDR inhibitors (type II). The bioactive conformation was explored by docking one potent compound 20 into the active site of KDR in its DFG-out inactive conformation. The constructed CoMFA and CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q(2) of 0.542 and 0.552, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r(2) of 0.912 and 0.955, and predicted correction coefficients r(2) (pred) of 0.913 and 0.897, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of a series of new potent KDR inhibitors.

  18. Phototoxic action of a zinc(II) phthalocyanine encapsulated into poloxamine polymeric micelles in 2D and 3D colon carcinoma cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chiarante, Nicolás; García Vior, María C; Awruch, Josefina; Marino, Julieta; Roguin, Leonor P

    2017-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy is emerging as a hopeful method for the treatment of oncological diseases. In the search of novel therapeutic strategies for colorectal cancer, in this work we reported the photocytotoxic activity of a lipophilic zinc(II) phthalocyanine on a murine colon adenocarcinoma cell line (CT26 cells). The 2,9(10),16(17),23(24) tetrakis[(2-dimethylamino)ethylsulfanyl]phthalocyaninatozinc(II), named Pc9, was encapsulated into Tetronic® 1107 polymeric poloxamine micelles (T1107) and assayed in 2D and 3D cell cultures. We showed that the formulation Pc9-T1107 was efficient to reduce cell viability after photodynamic treatment both in 2D cultures (IC50 10±2nM) as well as in CT26 spheroids (IC50 370±11nM). Cellular uptake of Pc9-T1107 was a time- and concentration-dependent process, being the phthalocyanine formulation mainly incorporated into lysosomal vesicles and endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, but not in mitochondria. Pc9-T1107 also induced the formation of reactive oxygen species immediately after cell irradiation. We also found that the phototoxic action of Pc9-T1107 was partially reversed in the presence of antioxidants, such as TROLOX and N-acetyl-cysteine. In addition, we showed that Pc9-T1107 treatment triggered an apoptotic cell death, as suggested by the detection of pyknotic nuclei, the reduction in the expression levels of procaspase-3 and the increase in caspase-3 enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. DSD2D-FLS 2010: Bdzil's 2010 DSD Code Base; Computing tb and Dn with Edits to Reduce the Noise in the Dn Field Near HE Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, John Bohdan

    2016-09-21

    The full level-set function code, DSD3D, is fully described in LA-14336 (2007) [1]. This ASCI-supported, DSD code project was the last such LANL DSD code project that I was involved with before my retirement in 2007. My part in the project was to design and build the core DSD3D solver, which was to include a robust DSD boundary condition treatment. A robust boundary condition treatment was required, since for an important local “customer,” the only description of the explosives’ boundary was through volume fraction data. Given this requirement, the accuracy issues I had encountered with our “fast-tube,” narrowband, DSD2D solver, and the difficulty we had building an efficient MPI-parallel version of the narrowband DSD2D, I decided DSD3D should be built as a full level-set function code, using a totally local DSD boundary condition algorithm for the level-­set function, phi, which did not rely on the gradient of the level-­set function being one, |grad(phi)| = 1. The narrowband DSD2D solver was built on the assumption that |grad(phi)| could be driven to one, and near the boundaries of the explosive this condition was not being satisfied. Since the narrowband is typically no more than10*dx wide, narrowband methods are discrete methods with a fixed, non-­resolvable error, where the error is related to the thickness of the band: the narrower the band the larger the errors. Such a solution represents a discrete approximation to the true solution and does not limit to the solution of the underlying PDEs under grid resolution.The full level-­set function code, DSD3D, is fully described in LA-14336 (2007) [1]. This ASCI-­supported, DSD code project was the last such LANL DSD code project that I was involved with before my retirement in 2007. My part in the project was to design and build the core DSD3D solver, which was to include a robust DSD boundary condition treatment. A robust boundary condition treatment was required, since for an important local

  20. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  1. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Facile synthesis of 2D Zn(II) coordination polymer and its crystal structure, selective removal of methylene blue and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Güneş Günay; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Şahin, Onur; Arslanoğlu, Hasan; Erucar, İlknur

    2017-09-01

    A new coordination polymer {[Zn(μ3-ppda)(H2O)(μ-bpa)Zn(μ-ppda)(μ-bpa)]·4H2O}n (1) (ppda = 1,4-phenylenediacetate, bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) has been synthesized by microwave-assisted reaction and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions. The asymmetric unit of 1 consists of two Zn(II) ions, two bpa ligands, two ppda ligands, one coordinated and four non-coordinated water molecules. In 1, ppda2- anions are linked the adjacent Zn(II) centers to generate 1D double-stranded chains. These chains are connected into 2D sheets by the bridging bpa ligands. Atomically detailed modeling was performed to compute single and binary component adsorption isotherms of H2, CO2, CH4 and N2 in complex 1. Results showed that 1 exhibits a high adsorption selectivity towards CO2 due to its high affinity for CO2. Results of this study will be helpful to guide the microwave-assisted reaction of coordination polymers to design promising adsorbents for gas storage and gas separation applications. The luminescent property of 1 and the selective removal of dyes in 1 have been also discussed. Results showed that 1 can be a potential candidate for luminescence applications and can selectively adsorb methylene blue (MB) dye molecules.

  3. Augmented anti-tumor activity of NK-92 cells expressing chimeric receptors of TGF-βR II and NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongjuan; Guo, Linghua; Song, Yuan; Zhang, Yinsheng; Lin, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Mei, Yu; Sandikin, Dedy; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-04-01

    The capacity of natural killer (NK) cells to kill tumor cells without specific antigen recognition provides an advantage over T cells and makes them potential effectors for tumor immunotherapy. However, the efficacy of NK cell adoptive therapy can be limited by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a potent immunosuppressive cytokine that can suppress NK cell function. To convert the suppressive signal induced by TGF-β to an activating signal, we genetically modified NK-92 cells to express a chimeric receptor with TGF-β type II receptor extracellular and transmembrane domains and the intracellular domain of NK cell-activating receptor NKG2D (TN chimeric receptor). NK-92 cells expressing TN receptors were resistant to TGF-β-induced suppressive signaling and did not down-regulate NKG2D. These modified NK-92 cells had higher killing capacity and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production against tumor cells compared with the control cells and their cytotoxicity could be further enhanced by TGF-β. More interestingly, the NK-92 cells expressing TN receptors were better chemo-attracted to the tumor cells expressing TGF-β. The presence of these modified NK-92 cells significantly inhibited the differentiation of human naïve CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T cells. NK-92-TN cells could also inhibit tumor growth in vivo in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft tumor model. Therefore, TN chimeric receptors can be a novel strategy to augment anti-tumor efficacy in NK cell adoptive therapy.

  4. Screening of Potential Landing Gear Noise Control Devices at Virginia Tech For QTD II Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Stoker, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the QTD II (Quiet Technology Demonstrator) program, aeroacoustic measurements of a 26%-scale, Boeing 777 main landing gear model were conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. The objective of these measurements was to perform risk mitigation studies on noise control devices for a flight test performed at Glasgow, Montana in 2005. The noise control devices were designed to target the primary main gear noise sources as observed in several previous tests. To accomplish this task, devices to reduce noise were built using stereo lithography for landing gear components such as the brakes, the forward cable harness, the shock strut, the door/strut gap and the lower truck. The most promising device was down selected from test results. In subsequent stages, the initial design of the selected lower truck fairing was improved to account for all the implementation constraints encountered in the full-scale airplane. The redesigned truck fairing was then retested to assess the impact of the modifications on the noise reduction potential. From extensive acoustic measurements obtained using a 63-element microphone phased array, acoustic source maps and integrated spectra were generated in order to estimate the noise reduction achievable with each device.

  5. Spin-crossover behavior in cyanide-bridged iron(II)-gold(I) bimetallic 2D Hofmann-like metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Gloria; Muñoz, M Carmen; Gaspar, Ana B; Real, José A

    2008-04-07

    The synthesis and characterization of new two-dimensional (2D) cyanide-bridged iron(II)-gold(I) bimetallic coordination polymers formulated, {Fe(3-Xpy)2[Au(CN)2]2} (py = pyridine; X = F (1), Cl (2), Br (3), and I (4)) and the clathrate derivative {Fe(3-Ipy)2[Au(CN)2]2}.1/2(3-Ipy) (5), are reported. The iron(II) ion lies in pseudoctahedral [FeN6] sites defined by four [Au(CN)2](-) bridging ligands and two 3-Xpy ligands occupying the equatorial and axial positions, respectively. Although only compounds 2 and 4 can be considered strictly isostructurals, all of the components of this family are made up of parallel stacks of corrugated {Fe[Au(CN)2]2}n grids. The grids are formed by edge sharing of {Fe4[Au(CN)2]4} pseudosquare moieties. The stacks are constituted of double layers sustained by short aurophilic contacts ranging from 3.016(2) to 3.1580(8) A. The Au...Au distances between consecutive double layers are in the range of 5.9562(9)-8.790(2) A. Compound 5, considered a clathrate derivative of 4, includes one-half of a 3-Ipy molecule per iron(II) atom between the double layers. Compound 1 undergoes a half-spin transition with critical temperatures Tc downward arrow = 140 K and Tc upward arrow = 145 K. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters derived from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are Delta H = 9.8 +/- 0.4 kJ mol(-1) and Delta S = 68.2 +/- 3 J K mol(-1). This spin transition is accompanied by a crystallographic phase transition from the monoclinic P2(1)/c space group to the triclinic P1 space group. At high temperatures, where 1 is 100% high-spin, there is only one crystallographically independent iron(II) site. In contrast, the low temperature structural analysis shows the occurrence of two crystallographically independent iron(II) sites with equal population, one high-spin and the other low-spin. Furthermore, 1 undergoes a complete two-step spin transition at pressures as high as 0.26 GPa. Compounds 2- 4 are high-spin iron(II) complexes according

  6. Noise Attenuation Performance of the Joint Service Aircrew Mask (JSAM) - Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) with the Lightning II Generation II Helmet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    1 Figure 2. a. F-35 Lightning II Gen II HMD b. Original ANR Earcups...Integrated System Ltd (HISL) active noise reduction ( ANR ) earcups (part number JS02591, Figure 2b), and a MBU-23/P oxygen mask with customized...F-35 Lightning II Gen II HMD b. Original ANR Earcups Table 1. JSAM-JSF Requirement (baseline Gen II HMD total attenuation data collected in

  7. Thermal detection of flux-flow noise in type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaçais, B.; Simon, Y.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we present an original method for the observation of flux-flow noise. A superconducting slab, placed in a normal magnetic field, and immersed in He II, constitutes one of the walls of a rectangular second-sound resonator. As is well known, the voltage observed in the flux-flow regime is noisy, due to irregularities in the vortex motion. Therefore, noise in Joule dissipation is expected to occur, making the slab act as a noisy second-sound transmitter. Second-sound noise is then amplified selectively on the different modes of the resonator, with amplitudes depending, in general, on the spatial distribution and coherence of the fluctuating heat sources on the sample. Thus careful and detailed second-sound analysis should provide valuable information on vortex motion and pinning, that is not necessarily given by the usual voltage noise measurements. Preliminary experiments reported in this paper are merely intended to demonstrate that we are able to detect and identify the thermal flux-flow noise, in spite of its minuteness (~10-15 W2/Hz), while obtaining reliable quantitative results.

  8. Mn(II)- and Co(II)-Catalyzed Transformation of 2-Cyanopyrimidine to Methylimidate by Sodium Azide: Isolation, Structural Characterization, and Magnetic Studies on 2D Mn(II)- and Cu(II)-Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Malay; Biswas, Surajit; Escuer, Albert; Ali, Mahammad

    2015-07-20

    The Mn(II)-mediated transformation of 2-cyanopyrimidine to methylimidate in the presence of inorganic azide is proven through isolation and structural characterization of a metal complex. Though the reaction conditions are favorable for a "click" reaction leading to the formation of tetrazole, as evidenced from recent studies, we are astonished to see the formation of methylimidate in MeOH instead of tetrazole, which is supposed to form only in the presence of catalytic amount of corresponding alkoxide ion as base. The catalytic nature of this transformation reaction was confirmed by performing these experiments under catalytic conditions and analyzing the products using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, which clearly showed ∼96% and ∼60% selectivity of methylimidate along with almost 100% conversion in the presence of Mn(II) and Co(II) as catalysts, respectively. In absence or presence of other metal ions like Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Zn(II), etc. only tetrazole formation takes place. So the present findings extended the formation of methylimidate catalyzed by metal ions in the presence of azide ion in alcoholic medium. Importantly, a probable mechanism for this unexpected transformation was framed based on the structural analysis and high-resolution mass spectrometry (electrospray ionization MS(+)) studies. The magnetic studies were also performed on complexes [Mn(L)(N3)2]n (1) and [Cu (L(2))2]n (2a), showing anti-ferromagnetic character for compound 1 and negligible coupling for the copper complex 2a.

  9. The Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem of Colloidal Particle's energy on 2D Periodic Substrates: A Monte Carlo Study of thermal noise-like fluctuation and diffusion like Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulations, we have calculated mean-square fluctuations in statistical mechanics, such as those for colloids energy configuration are set on square 2D periodic substrates interacting via a long range screened Coulomb potential on any specific and fixed substrate. Random fluctuations with small deviations from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium arise from the granular structure of them and appear as thermal diffusion with Gaussian distribution structure as well. The variations are showing linear form of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem on the energy of particles constitutive a canonical ensemble with continuous diffusion process of colloidal particle systems. The noise-like variation of the energy per particle and the order parameter versus the Brownian displacement of sum of large number of random steps of particles at low temperatures phase are presenting a markovian process on colloidal particles configuration, too.

  10. Noise and loss in balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers. I - Theory. II - Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of noise and frequency conversion for two-diode balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers is presented. The analysis is based on the equivalent circuit of the Schottky diode, having nonlinear capacitance, series resistance, and shot and thermal noise. Expressions for the conversion loss, noise temperature, and input and output impedances are determined in a form suitable for numerical analysis. In Part II, the application of the theory to practical mixers is demonstrated, and the properties of some two-diode mixers are examined. The subharmonically pumped mixer is found to be much more strongly affected by the loop inductance than the balanced mixer, and the ideal two-diode mixer using exponential diodes has a multiport noise-equivalent network (attenuator) similar to that of the ideal single-diode mixer. It is concluded that the theory can be extended to mixers with more than two diodes and will be useful for their design and analysis, provided a suitable nonlinear analysis is available to determine the diode waveforms.

  11. A unique 2D → 3D polycatenation cobalt(II)-based molecule magnet showing coexistence of paramagnetism and canted antiferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Lin, Xi; He, Zhangzhen; Lin, Zujin; Cao, Rong

    2011-04-07

    A novel entangled architecture [Co(1.5)(bpmp)(Hcda)(cda)(H(2)O)] (1) based on 4(4)-sql subunits, showing an interesting 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation structure feature, is reported. Magnetic investigation shows that compound 1 exhibits coexistence of paramagnetism and canted antiferromagnetism with Tc of 48 K.

  12. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  13. Towards the Identification of the Keeper Erosion Cause(s): Numerical Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Using the Global Cathode Model OrCa2D-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the time-dependent Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D-II) computer code show that classical enhancements of the plasma resistivity can not account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in the plume of a 25-27.5 A discharge hollow cathode. The cathode, which employs a 0.11-in diameter orifice, was operated at 5.5 sccm without an applied magnetic field using two different anode geometries. It is found that anomalous resistivity based on electron-driven instabilities improves the comparison between theory and experiment. It is also estimated that other effects such as the Hall-effect from the self-induced magnetic field, not presently included in OrCa2D-II, may contribute to the constriction of the current density streamlines thus explaining the higher plasma densities observed along the centerline.

  14. Towards the Identification of the Keeper Erosion Cause(s): Numerical Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Using the Global Cathode Model OrCa2D-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the time-dependent Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D-II) computer code show that classical enhancements of the plasma resistivity can not account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in the plume of a 25-27.5 A discharge hollow cathode. The cathode, which employs a 0.11-in diameter orifice, was operated at 5.5 sccm without an applied magnetic field using two different anode geometries. It is found that anomalous resistivity based on electron-driven instabilities improves the comparison between theory and experiment. It is also estimated that other effects such as the Hall-effect from the self-induced magnetic field, not presently included in OrCa2D-II, may contribute to the constriction of the current density streamlines thus explaining the higher plasma densities observed along the centerline.

  15. Self-assembly of alternating left- and right-handed infinite Cd(II) helicates into a 2D open framework structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujit K.; Bharadwaj, Parimal K.

    2006-08-01

    Pyrazine-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic acid (ptcH 4) reacts with Cd(NO 3) 2·6H 2O at room temperature in the presence of pyridine to form a 2D open framework built from alternating left- and right-handed helicates with the empirical formula, {[Cd 2(ptc)·(py) 5·H 2O]·5H 2O·py} n, 1. Lattice water and pyridine molecules form an intricate array of H-bonding with the 2D sheets leading to a 3D structure. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with the following lattice parameters— a=24.103(2), b=13.480(5), c=29.176(4) Å, β=109.427(3)°, V=8940(4) Å 3, Z=8, R1=0.0513, wR2=0.1552, S=1.085.

  16. Enumeration of four-connected three-dimensional nets. II. Conversion of edges of three-connected 2D nets into zigzag chains.

    PubMed

    Han; Smith

    1999-03-01

    Four-connected three-dimensional (3D) nets were systematically enumerated by converting some horizontal edges of a vertical stack of three-connected two-dimensional (2D) nets into vertical zigzag chains. 77 out of 131 2D nets were selected for enumeration, and different arrangements of zigzag edges and horizontal edges were investigated. This yielded 138 3D nets of which 19 are represented by known structures: cristobalite; tridymite; MAPO-39 (International Zeolite Association Structure Commission code ATN); svyatoslavite; Li-A(BW) (ABW); cancrinite (CAN); AlPO-31 (ATO); MAPO-36 (ATS); BaFe(2)O(4); 'nepheline hydrate' (JBW); bikitaite (BIK); KBGe(2)O(6); CsAlSi(5)O(12) (CAS); UiO-6 (OSI); Theta-1 (TON); ZSM-12 (MTW); ZSM-23 (MTT); AlPO-53C; and CIT-5 (CFI).

  17. Effect of solvent polarity on the vibrational dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch in an Fe(II) complex revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Jennifer F; Slenkamp, Karla M; Lynch, Michael S; Khalil, Munira

    2013-07-25

    The vibrational dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretching vibration (ν(NO)) in sodium nitroprusside (SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O) are investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. The ν(NO) in SNP acts as a model system for the nitrosyl ligand found in metalloproteins which play an important role in the transportation and detection of nitric oxide (NO) in biological systems. We perform a 2D IR line shape study of the ν(NO) in the following solvents: water, deuterium oxide, methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol, formamide, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The frequency of the ν(NO) exhibits a large vibrational solvatochromic shift of 52 cm(-1), ranging from 1884 cm(-1) in dimethyl sulfoxide to 1936 cm(-1) in water. The vibrational anharmonicity of the ν(NO) varies from 21 to 28 cm(-1) in the solvents used in this study. The frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs) of the ν(NO) in SNP in each of the seven solvents are obtained by fitting the experimentally obtained 2D IR spectra using nonlinear response theory. The fits to the 2D IR line shape reveal that the spectral diffusion time scale of the ν(NO) in SNP varies from 0.8 to 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We compare our results with the experimentally determined FFCFs of other charged vibrational probes in polar solvents and in the active sites of heme proteins. Our results suggest that the vibrational dephasing dynamics of the ν(NO) in SNP reflect the fluctuations of the nonhomogeneous electric field created by the polar solvents around the nitrosyl and cyanide ligands. The solute solvent interactions occurring at the trans-CN ligand are sensed through the π-back-bonding network along the Fe-NO bond in SNP.

  18. Measured branching ratios for O II2D and 2P transitions in the wavelength range 530 to 800 A. [airglow spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Cunningham, A. J.; Christensen, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Branching ratios for four sets of extreme ultraviolet transitions terminating on the 2D0 and 2P0 metastable levels of ionized oxygen have been measured. The emissions were excited in both an open window hollow cathode and a capillary discharge lamp, and the branching ratios were derived from the observed intensity ratios of the multiplet pairs. The results are in good agreement with theoretical values and compare favorably, within experimental uncertainties, with line ratios obtained by EUV spectroscopy of the airglow.

  19. Impact of Cytochrome P450 2D6 Function on the Chiral Blood Plasma Pharmacokinetics of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Its Phase I and II Metabolites in Humans.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Schmidhauser, Corina; Tingelhoff, Eva H; Schmid, Yasmin; Rickli, Anna; Kraemer, Thomas; Liechti, Matthias E

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) metabolism is known to be stereoselective, with preference for S-stereoisomers. Its major metabolic step involves CYP2D6-catalyzed demethylenation to 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (DHMA), followed by methylation and conjugation. Alterations in CYP2D6 genotype and/or phenotype have been associated with higher toxicity. Therefore, the impact of CYP2D6 function on the plasma pharmacokinetics of MDMA and its phase I and II metabolites was tested by comparing extensive metabolizers (EMs), intermediate metabolizers (IMs), and EMs that were pretreated with bupropion as a metabolic inhibitor in a controlled MDMA administration study. Blood plasma samples were collected from 16 healthy participants (13 EMs and three IMs) up to 24 h after MDMA administration in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-period, cross-over design, with subjects receiving 1 week placebo or bupropion pretreatment followed by a single placebo or MDMA (125 mg) dose. Bupropion pretreatment increased the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC24) of R-MDMA (9% and 25%, respectively) and S-MDMA (16% and 38%, respectively). Bupropion reduced the Cmax and AUC24 of the CYP2D6-dependently formed metabolite stereoisomers of DHMA 3-sulfate, DHMA 4-sulfate, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA sulfate and HMMA glucuronide) by approximately 40%. The changes that were observed in IMs were generally comparable to bupropion-pretreated EMs. Although changes in stereoselectivity based on CYP2D6 activity were observed, these likely have low clinical relevance. Bupropion and hydroxybupropion stereoisomer pharmacokinetics were unaltered by MDMA co-administration. The present data might aid further interpretations of toxicity based on CYP2D6-dependent MDMA metabolism.

  20. Impact of Cytochrome P450 2D6 Function on the Chiral Blood Plasma Pharmacokinetics of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Its Phase I and II Metabolites in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Steuer, Andrea E.; Schmidhauser, Corina; Tingelhoff, Eva H.; Schmid, Yasmin; Rickli, Anna; Kraemer, Thomas; Liechti, Matthias E.

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) metabolism is known to be stereoselective, with preference for S-stereoisomers. Its major metabolic step involves CYP2D6-catalyzed demethylenation to 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (DHMA), followed by methylation and conjugation. Alterations in CYP2D6 genotype and/or phenotype have been associated with higher toxicity. Therefore, the impact of CYP2D6 function on the plasma pharmacokinetics of MDMA and its phase I and II metabolites was tested by comparing extensive metabolizers (EMs), intermediate metabolizers (IMs), and EMs that were pretreated with bupropion as a metabolic inhibitor in a controlled MDMA administration study. Blood plasma samples were collected from 16 healthy participants (13 EMs and three IMs) up to 24 h after MDMA administration in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-period, cross-over design, with subjects receiving 1 week placebo or bupropion pretreatment followed by a single placebo or MDMA (125 mg) dose. Bupropion pretreatment increased the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC24) of R-MDMA (9% and 25%, respectively) and S-MDMA (16% and 38%, respectively). Bupropion reduced the Cmax and AUC24 of the CYP2D6-dependently formed metabolite stereoisomers of DHMA 3-sulfate, DHMA 4-sulfate, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA sulfate and HMMA glucuronide) by approximately 40%. The changes that were observed in IMs were generally comparable to bupropion-pretreated EMs. Although changes in stereoselectivity based on CYP2D6 activity were observed, these likely have low clinical relevance. Bupropion and hydroxybupropion stereoisomer pharmacokinetics were unaltered by MDMA co-administration. The present data might aid further interpretations of toxicity based on CYP2D6-dependent MDMA metabolism. PMID:26967321

  1. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-02-01

    We report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a < 15e- analog noise and a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. These characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  2. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    DOE PAGES

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; ...

    2015-12-12

    In this paper, we report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e- analog noise andmore » a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. Lastly, these characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.« less

  3. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    SciTech Connect

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2015-12-12

    In this paper, we report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e- analog noise and a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. Lastly, these characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  4. Quantum-noise quenching in the correlated spontaneous-emission laser as a multiplicative noise process. II. Rigorous analysis including amplitude noise

    SciTech Connect

    Schleich, W.; Scully, M.O.; von Garssen, H.

    1988-04-15

    An analytical steady-state distribution for the phase difference psi in a correlated spontaneous-emission laser (CEL) is derived based on the amplitude and phase equations of a CEL. This distribution is shown to be an excellent approximation to that obtained from a numerical simulation of the complete set of CEL equations. In particular, the effects of amplitude noise on CEL operation are considered and it is shown that fluctuations in the relative amplitude are also noise quenched.

  5. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  6. Advance Noise Control Fan II: Test Rig Fan Risk Management Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucero, John

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995 the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) has significantly contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the physics of fan tonal noise generation. The 9'x15' WT has successfully tested multiple high speed fan designs over the last several decades. This advanced several tone noise reduction concepts to higher TRL and the validation of fan tone noise prediction codes.

  7. Ligand-controlled assembly of Cd(II) coordination polymers based on mixed ligands of naphthalene-dicarboxylate and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline: From 0D+1D cocrystal, 2D rectangular network (4,4), to 3D PtS-type architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Guocheng; Chen Yongqiang; Wang Xiuli Chen Baokuan; Lin Hongyan

    2009-03-15

    Three novel Cd(II) coordination polymers, namely, [Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)].2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(Dpq)(1,4-NDC)(H{sub 2}O)] (2), and [Cd(Dpq)(2,6-NDC)] (3) have been obtained from hydrothermal reactions of cadmium(II) nitrate with the mixed ligands dipyrido [3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (Dpq) and three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands [1,8-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,8-H{sub 2}NDC), 1,4-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,4-H{sub 2}NDC), and 2,6-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}NDC)]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the three polymers exhibit novel structures due to different naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid. Compound 1 is a novel cocrystal of left- and right-handed helical chains and binuclear complexes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through hydrogen bonds and {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 2 shows a 2D rectangular network (4,4) bridged by 1,4-NDC with two kinds of coordination modes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through inter-layer {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 3 is a new 3D coordination polymer with distorted PtS-type network. In addition, the title compounds exhibit blue/green emission in solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three novel Cd(II) compounds have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions exhibiting a systematic variation of architecture by the employment of three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands.

  8. Validation for 2D/3D registration II: The comparison of intensity- and gradient-based merit functions using a new gold standard data set

    SciTech Connect

    Gendrin, Christelle; Markelj, Primoz; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Spoerk, Jakob; Bloch, Christoph; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Bergmann, Helmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: A new gold standard data set for validation of 2D/3D registration based on a porcine cadaver head with attached fiducial markers was presented in the first part of this article. The advantage of this new phantom is the large amount of soft tissue, which simulates realistic conditions for registration. This article tests the performance of intensity- and gradient-based algorithms for 2D/3D registration using the new phantom data set. Methods: Intensity-based methods with four merit functions, namely, cross correlation, rank correlation, correlation ratio, and mutual information (MI), and two gradient-based algorithms, the backprojection gradient-based (BGB) registration method and the reconstruction gradient-based (RGB) registration method, were compared. Four volumes consisting of CBCT with two fields of view, 64 slice multidetector CT, and magnetic resonance-T1 weighted images were registered to a pair of kV x-ray images and a pair of MV images. A standardized evaluation methodology was employed. Targets were evenly spread over the volumes and 250 starting positions of the 3D volumes with initial displacements of up to 25 mm from the gold standard position were calculated. After the registration, the displacement from the gold standard was retrieved and the root mean square (RMS), mean, and standard deviation mean target registration errors (mTREs) over 250 registrations were derived. Additionally, the following merit properties were computed: Accuracy, capture range, number of minima, risk of nonconvergence, and distinctiveness of optimum for better comparison of the robustness of each merit. Results: Among the merit functions used for the intensity-based method, MI reached the best accuracy with an RMS mTRE down to 1.30 mm. Furthermore, it was the only merit function that could accurately register the CT to the kV x rays with the presence of tissue deformation. As for the gradient-based methods, BGB and RGB methods achieved subvoxel accuracy (RMS m

  9. Conversion loss and noise of microwave and millimeter-wave mixers. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D. N.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion loss and noise of microwave and millimeter-wave mixers are analyzed. Nonlinear capacitance, arbitrary embedding impedances, as well as shot, thermal and scattering noise arising in the diode, figure in the analysis. The anomalous mixer noise noted in millimeter-wave mixers by Kerr (1975) is shown to be explainable in terms of the correlation of down-converted components of the time-varying shot noise. A digital computer analysis of the conversion loss, noise, and output impedance of an 80-120-GHz mixer is also conducted.

  10. A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part II. Application to an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, G. M.; Martarelli, M.; Chiariotti, P.

    2010-07-01

    The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The work shown in this paper is the application of part of the results of the European project CREDO (Cabin Noise Reduction by Experimental and Numerical Design Optimization) carried out within the framework of the EU. Therefore the aim of this paper is to illustrate a real application of the method to the interior acoustic characterization of an Alenia Aeronautica ATR42 ground test facility, Alenia Aeronautica being a partner of the CREDO project.

  11. Photomagnetic properties of an Fe(ii) spin-crossover complex of 6-(3,5-diamino-2,4,6-triazinyl)-2,2'-bipyridine and its insertion into 2D and 3D bimetallic oxalate-based networks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, C; Desplanches, C; Clemente-Juan, J M; Clemente-León, M; Coronado, E

    2017-02-21

    The Fe(ii) complex of the L1 ligand (L1 = 6-(3,5-diamino-2,4,6-triazinyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) has been used as a templating cation for the growth of oxalate-based networks. The magnetic characterization of the [Fe(II)(L1)2](ClO4)2·CH3CN (1) precursor in the solid state has been performed for the first time showing that the low-spin (LS) state is predominating from 2 to 400 K with 10% of Fe(ii), which undergoes a gradual and irreversible spin-crossover above 350 K. 1 presents the LIESST effect with a photo-conversion close to 25% and a T(LIESST) of 49 K. During the preparation of 1, a secondary product of the formula [Fe(II)(L1)(CH3CN)2(H2O)](ClO4)2·CH3CN (2) has been obtained. The magnetic characterization of 2 shows that it contains high-spin (HS) Fe(ii). 1 has afforded two novel oxalate-based compounds, the 2D compound of the formula [Fe(II)(L1)2][Mn(II)Cr(III)(ox)3]2·(CH3NO2)6·(CH3OH)·(H2O)2 (3) and the 3D compound of the formula [Fe(II)(L1)2][Mn(II)Cr(III)(ox)3]2·(CH3CN)3 (4), which have been obtained by changing the synthetic conditions. The magnetic properties show that in 3 the inserted Fe(ii) cation remains in the LS state from 2 to 340 K and presents a partial and irreversible spin-crossover of ∼20% at higher temperatures. In 4, most of the Fe(ii) complexes remain in the LS state from 2 to 230 K and present a partial and irreversible spin-crossover of ∼50% from 230 to 400 K. 3 and 4 do not present the LIESST effect.

  12. High frequency green function for aerodynamic noise in moving media. I - General theory. II - Noise from a spreading jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how a high frequency analysis can be made for general problems involving flow-generated noise. In the parallel shear flow problem treated by Balsa (1976) and Goldstein (1982), the equation governing sound propagation in the moving medium could be transformed into a wave equation for a stationary medium with an inhomogeneous index of refraction. It is noted that the procedure of Avila and Keller (1963) was then used to construct a high frequency Green function. This procedure involves matching a solution valid in an inner region around the point source to an outer, ray-acoustics solution. This same procedure is used here to construct the Green function for a source in an arbitrary mean flow. In view of the fact that there is no restriction to parallel flow, the governing equations cannot be transformed into a wave equation; the analysis therefore proceeds from the equations of motion themselves.

  13. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  14. DO-BOD modeling of River Yamuna for national capital territory, India using STREAM II, a 2D water quality model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepshikha; Singh, Ram Karan

    2009-12-01

    The study illustrates the utility of STREAM II as a modeling package to determine the pollution load due to organic matter in the River Yamuna during its course through the National Capital Territory that is Delhi, India. The study was done for a period from 1995-2005. Model simulates the dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand parameters in a two-dimensional fashion by performing the numerical solution to a set of differential equations representing aquatic life with the help of Crank-Nicholson finite difference method. The model was simulated and calibrated through the field water-quality primary data and the secondary data which were taken from Central Pollution Control Board. The main reasons for the high river pollution is increasing population of Delhi and other states, leading to generation of huge amounts of domestic sewage into the river Yamuna. The model gave a good agreement between calibrated and observed data, thus, actualizing the validity of the model. However, discrepancies noticed during model calibrations were attributed to the assumptions adopted in the model formulation and to lack of field data.

  15. Effects of Phase Noise and Thermal Noise upon Coherent PSK Demodulation and Their Impact on Phase Noise Specifications for Terminals of the Phase II DSCS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    Anb /2I -s 4 t1 ~ PHASE NOISE CONTWB ,7 ON I ~ I I i’CESIUM. 11 PHASE NOISL -10~ -124 2TERMINALSAND OPKTM 0 -20 1: __ 2 11 1 - ~AT OPTIMUM BANDWIDITHS...ATF AT’ OPTIM ANfo-l.r- cN-.k1lT~vlT v r.,IN (,-) = . Ot -1 1;I1 1 usI C TI r(,A A - h~fA 00 (Ix. 6w a4 ~C C 1 4 T ~ <’- . (I o t, n-.4 0 Wit , I r~TI

  16. Toward the detection of gravitational waves under non-Gaussian noises II. Independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Soichiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Eda, Kazunari; Itoh, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new analysis method to deal with stationary non-Gaussian noises in gravitational wave detectors in terms of the independent component analysis. First, we consider the simplest case where the detector outputs are linear combinations of the inputs, consisting of signals and various noises, and show that this method may be helpful to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Next, we take into account the time delay between the inputs and the outputs. Finally, we extend our method to nonlinearly correlated noises and show that our method can identify the coupling coefficients and remove non-Gaussian noises. Although we focus on gravitational wave data analysis, our methods are applicable to the detection of any signals under non-Gaussian noises.

  17. Toward the detection of gravitational waves under non-Gaussian noises II. Independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    MORISAKI, Soichiro; YOKOYAMA, Jun’ichi; EDA, Kazunari; ITOH, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new analysis method to deal with stationary non-Gaussian noises in gravitational wave detectors in terms of the independent component analysis. First, we consider the simplest case where the detector outputs are linear combinations of the inputs, consisting of signals and various noises, and show that this method may be helpful to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Next, we take into account the time delay between the inputs and the outputs. Finally, we extend our method to nonlinearly correlated noises and show that our method can identify the coupling coefficients and remove non-Gaussian noises. Although we focus on gravitational wave data analysis, our methods are applicable to the detection of any signals under non-Gaussian noises. PMID:27725472

  18. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Great concern arises from recreational noise exposure, which might lead to noise-induced hearing loss in young adults. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of recreational noise exposure on hearing function in young adults. A questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposures and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). Based on the duration of exposure and self-estimated loudness of various leisure-time activities, the weekly and lifetime equivalent noise exposure were calculated. Subjects were categorized in groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure based on these values. Hearing was evaluated using audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Mean differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant differences in hearing thresholds, TEOAE amplitudes, and DPOAE amplitudes between groups with low, intermediate, or high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, one-third of our subjects exceeded the weekly equivalent noise exposure for all activities of 75 dBA. Further, the highest equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for the activities visiting nightclubs or pubs, attending concerts or festivals, and playing in a band or orchestra. Moreover, temporary tinnitus after recreational noise exposure was found in 86% of our subjects. There were no significant differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, a long-term assessment of young adults' hearing in relation to recreational noise exposure is needed.

  19. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Great concern arises from recreational noise exposure, which might lead to noise-induced hearing loss in young adults. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of recreational noise exposure on hearing function in young adults. A questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposures and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). Based on the duration of exposure and self-estimated loudness of various leisure-time activities, the weekly and lifetime equivalent noise exposure were calculated. Subjects were categorized in groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure based on these values. Hearing was evaluated using audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Mean differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant differences in hearing thresholds, TEOAE amplitudes, and DPOAE amplitudes between groups with low, intermediate, or high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, one-third of our subjects exceeded the weekly equivalent noise exposure for all activities of 75 dBA. Further, the highest equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for the activities visiting nightclubs or pubs, attending concerts or festivals, and playing in a band or orchestra. Moreover, temporary tinnitus after recreational noise exposure was found in 86% of our subjects. There were no significant differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, a long-term assessment of young adults’ hearing in relation to recreational noise exposure is needed. PMID:26356366

  20. Magnetic properties and magnetic structures of synthetic natrochalcites, NaM(II)2(D3O2)(MoO4)2, M = Co or Ni.

    PubMed

    Vilminot, Serge; André, Gilles; Bourée-Vigneron, Francoise; Baker, Peter J; Blundell, Stephen J; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2008-10-08

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures from neutron diffraction of two synthetic natrochalcites, NaM(II)2(H3O2)(MoO4)2, M = Co (1Co) or Ni (2Ni), are reported. They are isostructural (monoclinic C2/m) and consist of chains of edge-shared MO6 octahedra connected by mu-O from H3O2(-) and MoO4(2-). These chains form a three-dimensional network with O-H-O, O-Mo-O, and O-Na-O bridging 4, 3, and 4 metal ions, respectively. Both compounds behave as canted antiferromagnets but differ in their behaviors, 1Co showing a broad maximum (28 K) above the Neel transition (21 K) and the canting taking place at 13 K, some 8 K below T(N), while for 2Ni the canting takes place at T(N) (28 K). Analyses of the neutron powder diffraction data shed some light on the geometry of D3O2(-) and suggest antiferromagnetism with a propagation vector k = (0,0,0) with the moments within each chain being parallel but antiparallel to those in neighboring chains. The difference between 1Co and 2Ni is in the orientation of the moments; they are parallel to the chain axis (b-axis) for 1Co and perpendicular to it for 2Ni with a major component along the c-axis and a small one along the a-axis. The heat capacity data peak at 20.9(3) K (1Co) and 25.1(1) K (2Ni). The derived magnetic entropies, following correction of the lattice contribution using the measured data for the nonmagnetic Zn analogue, suggest S = 1/2 for 1Co but is lower than that expected for 2Ni (S = 1). In both cases, only ca. 60% of the entropy is found below the magnetic ordering temperature, suggesting considerable short-range correlations at higher temperatures. While the temperature at which the magnetic diffraction becomes observable coincides with that of at the peak in heat capacity, it is lower than T(N) observed by magnetization measurements in both cases, and there is evidence of short-range ordering in a narrow range of temperature (T(N) +/- 5 K).

  1. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  2. Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband reproducible noise maskers: II. Results for rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Early, Susan J.; Mason, Christine R.; Idrobo, Fabio; Harrison, J. Michael; Carney, Laurel H.

    2002-01-01

    Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband noise maskers was examined by using a Pavlovian-conditioned eyeblink response in rabbits. The target was a tone at 500 Hz, and the maskers were ten individual noise samples having one of two bandwidths, 200 Hz (410 Hz to 610 Hz) or 2900 Hz (100 Hz to 3 kHz). The narrowband noise maskers were created by filtering the wideband noise maskers such that the two sets of maskers had identical spectra in the 200-Hz frequency region surrounding the tone. The responses across the set of noise maskers were compared across bandwidths and across interaural configurations (N0S0 and N0Sπ). Responses across the set of noise waveforms were not strongly correlated across bandwidths; this result is inconsistent with models for binaural detection that depend only upon the narrow band of energy centered at the frequency of the target tone. Responses were correlated across interaural configurations for the wideband masker condition, but not for the narrowband masker. All of these results were consistent with the companion study of human listeners [Evilsizer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 336-345 (2002)] and with the results of human studies of binaural detection that used only wideband [Gilkey et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 78, 1207-1219 (1985)] or narrowband [Isabelle and Colburn, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 352-259 (1991)] individual noise maskers.

  3. Interior noise studies for general aviation types of aircraft. I - Field studies. II - Laboratory studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jha, S. K.; Catherines, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Sources of the interior noise level of typical light aircraft are identified for stationary conditions on the ground and in flight. In addition, the relationship between the exterior near- and far-field noise around an aircraft and the interior noise field is examined. The sound transmission paths of a light aircraft fuselage are investigated, and the relative effectiveness of several components of the fuselage for sound attenuation is assessed. The fuselage furnishes an acoustic attenuation of about 20 dB; windows and metallic areas appear to transmit approximately equal amounts of sound energy.

  4. Development of a technique for inflight jet noise simulation. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, W. S.; Stringas, E. J.; Mani, R.; Banerian, G.

    1976-01-01

    Several possible noise simulation techniques were evaluated, including closed circuit wind tunnels, free jets, rocket sleds and high speed trains. The free jet technique was selected for demonstration and verification. The first paper describes the selection and development of the technique and presents results for simulation and in-flight tests of the Learjet, F106, and Bertin Aerotrain. The second presents a theoretical study relating the two sets of noise signatures. It is concluded that the free jet simulation technique provides a satisfactory assessment of in-flight noise.

  5. Development of a technique for inflight jet noise simulation. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, W. S.; Stringas, E. J.; Mani, R.; Banerian, G.

    1976-01-01

    Several possible noise simulation techniques were evaluated, including closed circuit wind tunnels, free jets, rocket sleds and high speed trains. The free jet technique was selected for demonstration and verification. The first paper describes the selection and development of the technique and presents results for simulation and in-flight tests of the Learjet, F106, and Bertin Aerotrain. The second presents a theoretical study relating the two sets of noise signatures. It is concluded that the free jet simulation technique provides a satisfactory assessment of in-flight noise.

  6. Oxalate-based soluble 2D magnets: the series [K(18-crown-6)]3[M(II)3(H2O)4{M(III)(ox)3}3] (M(III) = Cr, Fe; M(II) = Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu; ox = C2O4(2-); 18-crown-6 = C12H24O6).

    PubMed

    Coronado, Eugenio; Galán-Mascarós, José R; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Waerenborgh, João C; Gaczyński, Piotr

    2008-08-04

    The synthesis and magnetic properties of the oxalate-based molecular soluble magnets with general formula [K(18-crown-6)] 3[M (II) 3(H 2O) 4{M (III)(ox) 3} 3] (M (III) = Cr, Fe; M (II) = Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu; ox = C 2O 4 (2-)) are here described. All the reported compounds are isostructural and built up by 2D bimetallic networks formed by alternating M (III) and M (II) ions connected through oxalate anions. Whereas the Cr (III)M (II) derivatives behave as ferromagnets with critical temperatures up to 8 K, the Fe (III)M (II) present ferri- or weak ferromagnetic ordering up to 26 K.

  7. Psychophysics of prosthetic vision: II. stochastic sampling, the phosphene image, and noise.

    PubMed

    Hallum, Luke E; Chen, Spencer C; Cloherty, Shaun L; Lovell, Nigel H

    2006-01-01

    Stimulation of the diseased retina via an intraocular electrode array is a proposed means of restoring some vision to the profoundly blind. A prosthetic device to this end would involve post-implantation calibration (analogous to cochlear implant fitting), wherein the subject indicates those discrete positions in the visual field where luminous percepts are elicited. This procedure would be a source of noise, because the indicated positions would only approximate the actual positions in the visual field. Put differently, the procedure introduces sampling jitter, and would therefore affect clinical outcomes such as mobility and reading speeds. The nature of this noise is the concern of the present paper; we derive an expression for the noise power spectrum as it relates to the statistical nature of the sampling jitter. We show that, generally, jitter has greater effect on higher spatial-frequencies, that is, those areas of the implantee's visual perception that represent fine detail are more prone to noise. More specifically, the noise spectrum depends on the characteristic function of the random variable describing the sampling jitter. Our results signal the need for experimental work that characterizes sampling jitter in implantees, plus the need for simulations that allow a better understanding of perception and the noisy phosphene image.

  8. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility. II: An attempt to validate physical metrics.

    PubMed

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Using the data presented in the accompanying paper [Hilkhuysen et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 531-539 (2012)], the ability of six metrics to predict intelligibility of speech in noise before and after noise suppression was studied. The metrics considered were the Speech Intelligibility Index (SII), the fractional Articulation Index (fAI), the coherence intelligibility index based on the mid-levels in speech (CSIImid), an extension of the Normalized Coherence Metric (NCM+), a part of the speech-based envelope power model (pre-sEPSM), and the Short Term Objective Intelligibility measure (STOI). Three of the measures, SII, CSIImid, and NCM+, overpredicted intelligibility after noise reduction, whereas fAI underpredicted these intelligibilities. The pre-sEPSM metric worked well for speech in babble but failed with car noise. STOI gave the best predictions, but overall the size of intelligibility prediction errors were greater than the change in intelligibility caused by noise suppression. Suggestions for improvements of the metrics are discussed.

  9. An unprecedented copper(I,II)-octacyanotungstate(V) 2-D network: crystal structure and magnetism of [CuII(tren)]{CuI[W(V)(CN)8]} . 1.5H2O.

    PubMed

    Korzeniak, Tomasz; Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Pelka, Robert; Balanda, Maria; Tomala, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Kazimierz; Sieklucka, Barbara

    2005-06-21

    A novel two-dimensional cyanide-bridged polymer [CuII(tren)]{CuI[W(V)(CN)8]} . 1.5H2O (tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) formed via the simultaneous in situ metal-ligand redox reaction of [Cu(tren)(OH2)]2+ and self-assembly with [W(V)(CN)8]3- consists of a {CuI[W(V)(CN)8]} square grid built of CuI centres of tetrahedral geometry coordinatively saturated by CN bridges and [W(V)(CN)8]3- capped by [CuII(tren)]2+ moieties; it exhibits ferromagnetic coupling J1 = +5.8(1) cm(-1) within the CuII-W(V) dinuclear subunits and weak antiferromagnetic coupling J2 = -0.03(1) cm(-1) between them through diamagnetic CuI spacers.

  10. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Noise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Noise-related training programs were reviewed in nine degree-granting institutions in seven states. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. The enrollment profile and average number of graduates by degree level for the past three years are given, as well as the apparent enrollment trends by degree…

  11. Thermal- and light-induced spin crossover in novel 2D Fe(II) metalorganic frameworks {Fe(4-PhPy)(2)[M(II)(CN)(x)](y)}.sH(2)O: spectroscopic, structural, and magnetic studies.

    PubMed

    Seredyuk, M; Gaspar, A B; Ksenofontov, V; Verdaguer, M; Villain, F; Gütlich, P

    2009-07-06

    Five novel two-dimensional coordination polymers {Fe(4PhPy)(2)[M(II)(CN)(4)]}.sH(2)O (4PhyPy = 4-phenylpyridine; 1: M(II) = Pd, s = 0; 2: M(II) = Ni, s = 0; 3: M(II) = Pt, s = 1) and {Fe(4PhPy)(2)[M(I)(CN)(2)](2)}.sH(2)O (4: M(I) = Ag, s = 1; 5: M(I) = Au, s = 0.5) exhibiting spin-crossover properties have been synthesized. They were characterized at various temperatures using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The occurrence of a cooperative thermal spin transition detected by the magnetic method is located at critical temperatures T(c)( downward arrow)/T(c)( upward arrow) = 163 K/203 K (1), 135 K/158 K (2), and 172 K/221 K (3), and a less cooperative one is located at T(c) = 188 K (4) and 225 K (5). Compounds 1-5 show an abrupt color change from yellow (high-spin (HS) state) to red (low-spin (LS) state) upon spin-state conversion. The dehydration of the compounds changes the type of the spin transition, making it more abrupt and shifting the critical temperature to higher temperatures. For 1 and 2, XAS provides local structural information on the contraction of the FeN(6) coordination sphere upon the HS-to-LS transition, in line with the magnetic results. Variable-temperature characterization of 1 by X-ray diffraction evidences the very abrupt phase transition with a large hysteresis. A light-induced spin conversion (LIESST effect) is detected by magnetic measurements in 1-5 below 70 K.

  12. Blast Noise Prediction. Volume II. BNOISE 3.2 Computer Program Description and Program Listing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    possible sequence in %hich the modules of the Blast Noise Prediction pro- gram , could he ordered b the user in the SlIR’S RIUN Tahles 8 through 17 summarize...cxery 1000 ni 0)1 200,) it are reasonabhle values il the o~erall land area itluded in the contour is, fairl - large) [he smaiIL ller the aucs Used...Prediction pro gram does ni~ take ito coinsidleration the eff’ects of’ wind. IHowever, it does take intoi account tenm- perat ure Inversioins. T-heref’ore

  13. 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) based cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Healy, John J.; Malallah, Ra'ed; Cui, Xiao-Guang; Ryle, James P.; Sheridan, John T.

    2017-05-01

    The 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) can describe a variety of paraxial optical systems. Digital algorithms to numerically evaluate the 2D-NS-LCTs are not only important in modeling the light field propagations but also of interest in various signal processing based applications, for instance optical encryption. Therefore, in this paper, for the first time, a 2D-NS-LCT based optical Double-random- Phase-Encryption (DRPE) system is proposed which offers encrypting information in multiple degrees of freedom. Compared with the traditional systems, i.e. (i) Fourier transform (FT); (ii) Fresnel transform (FST); (iii) Fractional Fourier transform (FRT); and (iv) Linear Canonical transform (LCT), based DRPE systems, the proposed system is more secure and robust as it encrypts the data with more degrees of freedom with an augmented key-space.

  14. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. II: Visual attention

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle P.; Pasanen, Edward G.; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Human subjects performed in several behavioral conditions requiring, or not requiring, selective attention to visual stimuli. Specifically, the attentional task was to recognize strings of digits that had been presented visually. A nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was collected during the visual presentation of the digits. The segment of the physiological response discussed here occurred during brief silent periods immediately following the SFOAE-evoking stimuli. For all subjects tested, the physiological-noise magnitudes were substantially weaker (less noisy) during the tasks requiring the most visual attention. Effect sizes for the differences were >2.0. Our interpretation is that cortico-olivo influences adjusted the magnitude of efferent activation during the SFOAE-evoking stimulation depending upon the attention task in effect, and then that magnitude of efferent activation persisted throughout the silent period where it also modulated the physiological noise present. Because the results were highly similar to those obtained when the behavioral conditions involved auditory attention, similar mechanisms appear to operate both across modalities and within modalities. Supplementary measurements revealed that the efferent activation was spectrally global, as it was for auditory attention. PMID:24732070

  15. Estimates of auditory risk from outdoor impulse noise. II: Civilian firearms.

    PubMed

    Flamme, Gregory A; Wong, Adam; Liebe, Kevin; Lynd, James

    2009-01-01

    Firearm impulses are common noise exposures in the United States. This study records, describes and analyzes impulses produced outdoors by civilian firearms with respect to the amount of auditory risk they pose to the unprotected listener under various listening conditions. Risk estimates were obtained using three contemporary damage risk criteria (DRC) including a waveform parameter-based approach (peak SPL and B-duration), an energy-based criterion (A-weighted SEL and equivalent continuous level) and a physiological model (AHAAH). Results from these DRC were converted into a number of maximum permissible unprotected exposures to facilitate interpretation. Acoustic characteristics of firearm impulses differed substantially across guns, ammunition, and microphone location. The type of gun, ammunition and the microphone location all significantly affected estimates of auditory risk from firearms. Vast differences in maximum permissible exposures were observed; the rank order of the differences varied with the source of the impulse. Unprotected exposure to firearm noise is not recommended, but people electing to fire a gun without hearing protection should be advised to minimize auditory risk through careful selection of ammunition and shooting environment. Small-caliber guns with long barrels and guns loaded with the least powerful ammunition tend to be associated with the least auditory risk.

  16. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. II: visual attention.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle P; Pasanen, Edward G; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    Human subjects performed in several behavioral conditions requiring, or not requiring, selective attention to visual stimuli. Specifically, the attentional task was to recognize strings of digits that had been presented visually. A nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was collected during the visual presentation of the digits. The segment of the physiological response discussed here occurred during brief silent periods immediately following the SFOAE-evoking stimuli. For all subjects tested, the physiological-noise magnitudes were substantially weaker (less noisy) during the tasks requiring the most visual attention. Effect sizes for the differences were >2.0. Our interpretation is that cortico-olivo influences adjusted the magnitude of efferent activation during the SFOAE-evoking stimulation depending upon the attention task in effect, and then that magnitude of efferent activation persisted throughout the silent period where it also modulated the physiological noise present. Because the results were highly similar to those obtained when the behavioral conditions involved auditory attention, similar mechanisms appear to operate both across modalities and within modalities. Supplementary measurements revealed that the efferent activation was spectrally global, as it was for auditory attention.

  17. 1D and 2D assembly structures by imidazole···chloride hydrogen bonds of iron(II) complexes [Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))3]Cl·Y (HL(n-Pr) = 2-methylimidazol-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl; Y = AsF6, BF4) and their spin states.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Takeshi; Nishi, Koshiro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Iijima, Seiichiro; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Kojima, Masaaki

    2011-12-07

    Two Fe(II) complexes fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)]Cl·Y (Y = AsF(6) (1) and BF(4) (2)) were synthesized, where HL(n-Pr) is 2-methylimidazole-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl. Each complex-cation has the same octahedral N(6) geometry coordinated by three bidentate ligands and assumes facial-isomerism, fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) with Δ- and Λ-enantiomorphs. Three imidazole groups per Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) are hydrogen-bonded to three Cl(-) ions or, from the viewpoint of the Cl(-) ion, one Cl(-) ion is hydrogen-bonded to three neighbouring fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) cations. The 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds between Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) and Cl(-) generate two kinds of assembly structures. The directions of the 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds and hence the resulting assembly structures are determined by the size of the anion Y, though Y is not involved into the network structure and just accommodated in the cavity. Compound 1 has a 1D ladder structure giving a larger cavity, in which the Δ- and Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) enantiomorphs are bridged by two NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 has a 2D network structure with a net unit of a cyclic trimer of {fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+)···Cl(-)}(3) giving a smaller cavity, in which Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) species with the same chirality are linked by NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds to give a homochiral 2D network structure. Magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectral measurements demonstrated that compound 1 showed an abrupt one-step spin crossover with 4.0 K thermal hysteresis of T(c↓) = 125.5 K and T(c↑) = 129.5 K and compound 2 showed no spin transition and stayed in the high-spin state over the 5-300 K temperature range.

  18. Propeller aircraft interior noise model. II - Scale-model and flight-test comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    A program for predicting the sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission of airborne exterior noise is validated through comparisons of predictions with both scale-model test results and measurements obtained in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. The program produced unbiased predictions for the case of the scale-model tests, with a standard deviation of errors of about 4 dB. For the case of the flight tests, the predictions revealed a bias of 2.62-4.28 dB (depending upon whether or not the data for the fourth harmonic were included) and the standard deviation of the errors ranged between 2.43 and 4.12 dB. The analytical model is shown to be capable of taking changes in the flight environment into account.

  19. Statistical processes limiting the noise of a screen-film system: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Jacob; Shaw, Rodney; Yampolsky, Michael

    1995-05-01

    In a recent publication we demonstrated that the increase in image noise which results from exposing a film via a phosphor screen can be attributed entirely to the increased extent of the autocorrelation interval introduced by the screen, and not to any change in the shape or scale of the probability distribution function which governs the fluctuations about the mean level. This result implies that the (0,0)-value of the autocovariance function is independent of the degree of so-called quantum mottle and since the autocovariance function, ACV(x,y), and the Wiener Spectrum, WS(u,v), are Fourier transform pairs, it follows that the integral of the Wiener Spectrum over all spatial frequencies (u,v) must share this independence. Since this result was counterintuitive to existing assumptions of the role of screen and film in defining the Wiener Spectrum (i.e., a simple additive combination of quantum mottle and film grain), we now investigate this relationship in more detail in order to provide a more complete insight. For this purpose we have simulated a set of controlled images which correspond to a wide range of screen correlation intervals, from 192 micrometers down to uncorrelated film noise. Included in this simulation we have also explored the role of the overall amplification factor, i.e., the average number of image grains associated with an x-ray quantum. The results of these simulations are presented here, and confirm our previous findings, by establishing the invariance of the scale (0,0) value of the ACV.

  20. Intercomparison of methods for image quality characterization. II. Noise power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James T. III; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Chen Ying

    2006-05-15

    Second in a two-part series comparing measurement techniques for the assessment of basic image quality metrics in digital radiography, in this paper we focus on the measurement of the image noise power spectrum (NPS). Three methods were considered: (1) a method published by Dobbins et al. [Med. Phys. 22, 1581-1593 (1995)] (2) a method published by Samei et al. [Med. Phys. 30, 608-622 (2003)], and (3) a new method sanctioned by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1, 2003), developed as part of an international standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency. In addition to an overall comparison of the estimated NPS between the three techniques, the following factors were also evaluated for their effect on the measured NPS: horizontal versus vertical directional dependence, the use of beam-limiting apertures, beam spectrum, and computational methods of NPS analysis, including the region-of-interest (ROI) size and the method of ROI normalization. Of these factors, none was found to demonstrate a substantial impact on the amplitude of the NPS estimates ({<=}3.1% relative difference in NPS averaged over frequency, for each factor considered separately). Overall, the three methods agreed to within 1.6%{+-}0.8% when averaged over frequencies >0.15 mm{sup -1}.

  1. New insights into insect's silent flight. Part II: sound source and noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Geng, Biao; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Geng; Dong, Haibo

    2016-11-01

    The flapping flight of aerial animals has excellent aerodynamic performance but meanwhile generates low noise. In this study, the unsteady flow and acoustic characteristics of the flapping wing are numerically investigated for three-dimensional (3D) models of Tibicen linnei cicada at free forward flight conditions. Single cicada wing is modelled as a membrane with prescribed motion reconstructed by Wan et al. (2015). The flow field and acoustic field around the flapping wing are solved with immersed-boundary-method based incompressible flow solver and linearized-perturbed-compressible-equations based acoustic solver. The 3D simulation allows examination of both directivity and frequency composition of the produced sound in a full space. The mechanism of sound generation of flapping wing is analyzed through correlations between acoustic signals and flow features. Along with a flexible wing model, a rigid wing model is also simulated. The results from these two cases will be compared to investigate the effects of wing flexibility on sound generation. This study is supported by NSF CBET-1313217 and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0071.

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis of zinc(II)-phosphonate coordination polymers with different dimensionality (0D, 2D, 3D) and dimensionality change in the solid phase (0D→3D) induced by temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Zapico, Eva; Montejo-Bernardo, Jose; Fernández-González, Alfonso; García, José R. García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-05-15

    Three new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO)(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Zn{sub 3}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 3.40} (2) and [Zn{sub 5}(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 0.32} (3), with different structural dimensionality (0D, 2D and 3D, respectively) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/c) forming discrete dimeric units bonded through H-bonds, while compounds 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic (P−1) and the monoclinic (C2/c) systems, respectively. Compound 3, showing three different coordination numbers (4, 5 and 6) for the zinc atoms, has also been obtained by thermal treatment of 1 (probed by high-temperature XRPD experiments). The crystalline features of these compounds, related to the coordination environments for the zinc atoms in each structure, provoke the increase of the relative fluorescence for 2 and 3, compared to the free phenanthroline. Thermal analysis (TG and DSC) and XPS studies have been also carried out for all compounds. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination compounds of zinc with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid (H{sub 2}PPA) and phenanthroline have been obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline structure depends on the different coordination environments of the zinc atoms (see two comparative Zn{sub 6}-moieties). The influence of the different coordination modes of H{sub 2}PPA with the central atom in all structures have been studied, being found new coordination modes for this ligand. Several compounds show a significant increase in relative fluorescence with respect to the free phenanthroline. - Highlights: • Compounds have been obtained modifying the reaction time and the rate of

  3. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  4. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency. PMID:28350374

  5. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  6. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  7. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  8. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and Homeland Defense. As a part of the E-2D AHE radar modernization effort, the Navy also invested in integrating a full glass cockpit and full...Communication Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management capability. The glass cockpit will also provide the capability for the pilot or co-pilot to...hours at a station distance of 200nm Flat Turn Service Ceiling =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission profile =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission

  9. Fundamental performance assessment of 2-D myocardial elastography in a phased-array configuration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Lee, Wei-Ning; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-10-01

    Two-dimensional myocardial elastography, an RF-based, speckle-tracking technique, uses 1-D cross-correlation and recorrelation methods in a 2-D search, and can estimate and image the 2-D transmural motion and deformation of the myocardium so as to characterize the cardiac function. Based on a 3-D finite-element (FE) canine left-ventricular model, a theoretical framework was previously developed by our group to evaluate the estimation quality of 2-D myocardial elastography using a linear array. In this paper, an ultrasound simulation program, Field II, was used to generate the RF signals of a model of the heart in a phased-array configuration and under 3-D motion conditions; thus simulating a standard echocardiography exam. The estimation method of 2-D myocardial elastography was adapted for use with such a configuration. All elastographic displacements and strains were found to be in good agreement with the FE solutions, as indicated by the mean absolute error (MAE) between the two. The classified first and second principal strains approximated the radial and circumferential strains, respectively, in the phased-array configuration. The results at different sonographic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(s)) showed that the MAEs of the axial, lateral, radial, and circumferential strains remained relatively constant when the SNR(s) was equal to or higher than 20 dB. The MAEs of the strain estimation were not significantly affected when the acoustic attenuation was included in the simulations. A significantly reduced number of scatterers could be used to speed up the simulation, without sacrificing the estimation quality.The proposed framework can further be used to assess the estimation quality, explore the theoretical limitation and investigate the effects of various parameters in 2-D myocardial elastography under more realistic conditions.

  10. Magneto-optical disk drive technology using multiple fiber-coupled flying optical heads. Part II. Laser noise considerations.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Jeffrey P; Tselikov, Alexander A; Gray, George R; Zhang, Yongwei; Gangopadhyay, Shubhagat

    2002-02-10

    A magneto-optical data storage system utilizing single-mode fiber is capable of providing high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recording if laser noise sources are properly managed. In particular, mode partition noise (MPN) associated with use of a Fabry-Perot laser diode can be a significant problem in a fiber-based system. The various mechanisms leading to MPN as well as to laser phase noise are discussed in the context of a system constructed with polarization-maintaining fiber. The primary noise mechanisms include spurious fiber-endface reflections and errors in the quarter-wave plate on the recording head. An understanding of these effects is essential for fabrication of a fiber-based recording system with suitable SNR performance.

  11. Experimental validation of equations for 2D DIC uncertainty quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) equations have been derived for predicting matching uncertainty in two-dimensional image correlation a priori. These equations include terms that represent the image noise and image contrast. Researchers at the University of South Carolina have extended previous 1D work to calculate matching errors in 2D. These 2D equations have been coded into a Sandia National Laboratories UQ software package to predict the uncertainty for DIC images. This paper presents those equations and the resulting error surfaces for trial speckle images. Comparison of the UQ results with experimentally subpixel-shifted images is also discussed.

  12. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  13. Cardiovascular effects of impulse noise, road traffic noise, and intermittent pink noise at LAeq = 75 dB, as a function of sex, age, and level of anxiety: a comparative study. II. Digital pulse level and blood pressure data.

    PubMed

    Petiot, J C; Parrot, J; Lobreau, J P; Smolik, H J

    1992-01-01

    In a previous paper, in which the experimental conditions of the present research are fully described (Parrot et al., this issue), heart rate (HR) was studied in 60 male and in 60 female subjects in response to a pile-driver noise (P), a gunfire noise (G), a road traffic noise (T), and an intermittent pink noise (R), all noises being emitted at the same LAeq = 75 dB for 15 min. Digital pulse level (PL) responses were concomitantly surveyed by the use of pulse oximetry, allowing continuous arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) readings. An index of pulse reactivity (PRI) could be calculated. Arterial blood pressure was measured 7 times from the beginning to the end of each trial. At rest, within the last minutes preceding each exposure to any of the 4 noises, no difference for conditions or for age in prestimulus PL was observed. In all cases, sex is a highly significant source of variation: Mean resting SaO2 values are higher in women than in men. Mean SaO2 at rest was also found to be significantly higher in anxious (Am) than in anxiety-free (Nm) men. When the noise was on for 15 min, increase in PL prevailed to be in most cases in men. In contrast, decrease or near-zero changes prevailed in 1 case out of 2 in the female subgroups. In all groups, the mean PRIs are significantly higher in men. In no case did the age factor prove to be a significant source of PRI variation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Bioinformatics research on inter-racial difference in drug metabolism II. Analysis on relationship between enzyme activities of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and their relevant genotypes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takako; Ochiai, Hirohide; Asell, Fredrik; Yokono, Yoshiya; Kikuchi, Yoshiharu; Nitta, Masashi; Hama, Yoshimasa; Yamaguchi, Shizuyo; Hashimoto, Munehiro; Taki, Katsuhiko; Nakata, Kotoko; Aida, Yoshitaka; Ohashi, Akira; Ozawa, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme activities of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 show a genetic polymorphism, and the frequency of poor metabolizers (PMs) on these enzymes depends on races. We have analyzed frequencies of mutant alleles and PMs based on the published data in previous study (Shimizu, T. et al.: Bioinformatics research on inter-racial difference in drug metabolism, I. Analysis on frequencies of mutant alleles and poor metabolizers on CYP2D6 and CYP2C19.). The study shows that there were racial differences in the frequencies of each mutant allele and PMs. In the present study, the correlation between genotypes and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities was investigated. The result showed that enzyme activities varied according to the genotypes of subjects even in the same race. On the other hand, if subjects had the same genotypes, almost no racial differences were observed in drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. From these results, it was supposed that the racial differences in activities of these enzymes could be explained by the differences in distribution of genotypes. It would be possible to explain the racial differences in drug-metabolizing enzyme activities based on the differences on individual pharmacogenetic background information, not merely by comparison of frameworks such as races and nations.

  15. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source distribution, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of both Earth structure and noise generation. First, we develop an inversion strategy based on a 2D finite-difference code using adjoint techniques. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: i) the capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution and ii) possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus (http://salvus.io). It allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface and the corresponding sensitivity kernels for the distribution of noise sources and Earth structure. By studying the effect of noise sources on correlation functions in 3D, we validate the aforementioned inversion strategy and prepare the

  16. Characterization and 2D NMR study of the stable [9-21, 15-27] 2 disulfide intermediate in the folding of the 3 disulfide trypsin inhibitor EETI II.

    PubMed Central

    Le-Nguyen, D.; Heitz, A.; Chiche, L.; el Hajji, M.; Castro, B.

    1993-01-01

    The three disulfide Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II (EETI II) reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) and reoxidation of the fully reduced derivative have been examined. A common stable intermediate has been observed for both processes. Isolation and sequencing of carboxymethylated material showed that the intermediate lacks the [2-19] bridge. The NMR study showed a very strong structural conservation as compared to the native EETI II, suggesting that the bridges are the [9-21] and [15-27] native ones. The differences occurred in sections 2-7 (containing the free cysteine 2 and the Arg 4-Ile 5 active site) and 19-21 (containing the second free cysteine). Distance geometry calculations and restrained molecular dynamics refinements were also in favor of a [9-21, 15-27] arrangement and resulted in a well-conserved (7-28) segment. PMID:8443596

  17. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  18. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  19. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  20. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model.

  1. Back-scattering correction and further extensions of Amiet's trailing-edge noise model. Part II: Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Stéphane; Roger, Michel

    2009-06-01

    The analytical model of the trailing-edge noise of an airfoil derived in the first part of this study is assessed by first comparing the predictions with alternative analytical and numerical computations found in the literature. Comparisons are also made with experimental data. The data are either taken from the literature or collected in a series of new experiments run in open-jet anechoic wind tunnels. Several configurations have been investigated, ranging from a flat plate to symmetric and cambered, thick and thin airfoils, at various angles of attack triggering various flow regimes at different Reynolds numbers. The comparisons address the distribution of the far-field radiated noise both in frequency and radiation angle. The transfer function between the wall-pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the trailing edge and the noise radiated in the far field is found experimentally to be roughly independent of the flow conditions encountered on the airfoil, as far as the mean flow remains attached. The good agreement of the present predictions with both the measurements and the alternative theories not only emphasises the relevance and accuracy of the model but also stresses the effect of the finite chord length in the noise generation and radiation mechanisms. Moderate airfoil camber and angle of attack are shown to be of secondary importance on the noise radiation, even though they fully determine the sources of the noise through the flow field. All comparisons make the model accurate enough provided precise flow data are available.

  2. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  3. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  4. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Rapid-scan coherent 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Draeger, Simon; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-02-20

    We developed pulse-shaper-assisted coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in liquids using fluorescence detection. A customized pulse shaper facilitates shot-to-shot modulation at 1 kHz and is employed for rapid scanning over all time delays. A full 2D spectrum with 15 × 15 pixels is obtained in approximately 6 s of measurement time (plus further averaging if needed). Coherent information is extracted from the incoherent fluorescence signal via 27-step phase cycling. We exemplify the technique on cresyl violet in ethanol and recover literature-known oscillations as a function of population time. Signal-to-noise behavior is analyzed as a function of the amount of averaging. Rapid scanning provides a 2D spectrum with a root-mean-square error of < 0.05 after 1 min of measurement time.

  6. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  7. Homoleptic Iron(II) Complexes with the Ionogenic Ligand 6,6'-Bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine: Spin Crossover Behavior in a Singular 2D Spin Crossover Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Seredyuk, Maksym; Piñeiro-López, Lucía; Muñoz, M Carmen; Martínez-Casado, Francisco J; Molnár, Gábor; Rodriguez-Velamazán, José Alberto; Bousseksou, Azzedine; Real, José Antonio

    2015-08-03

    Deprotonation of the ionogenic tetradentate ligand 6,6'-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine [H2bipy(ttr)2] in the presence of Fe(II) in solution has afforded an anionic mononuclear complex and a neutral two-dimensional coordination polymer formulated as, respectively, NEt3H{Fe[bipy(ttr)2][Hbipy(ttr)2]}·3MeOH (1) and {Fe[bipy(ttr)2]}n (2). The anions [Hbipy(ttr)2](-) and [bipy(ttr)2](2-) embrace the Fe(II) centers defining discrete molecular units 1 with the Fe(II) ion lying in a distorted bisdisphenoid dodecahedron, a rare example of octacoordination in the coordination environment of this cation. The magnetic behavior of 1 shows that the Fe(II) is high-spin, and its Mössbauer spectrum is characterized by a relatively large average quadrupole splitting, ΔEQ = 3.42 mm s(-1). Compound 2 defines a strongly distorted octahedral environment for Fe(II) in which one [bipy(ttr)2](-) anion coordinates the equatorial positions of the Fe(II) center, while the axial positions are occupied by peripheral N-tetrazole atoms of two adjacent {Fe[bipy(ttr)2]}(0) moieties thereby generating an infinite double-layer sheet. Compound 2 undergoes an almost complete spin crossover transition between the high-spin and low-spin states centered at about 221 K characterized by an average variation of enthalpy and entropy ΔH(av) = 8.27 kJ mol(-1), ΔS(av) = 37.5 J K(-1) mol(-1), obtained from calorimetric DSC measurements. Photomagnetic measurements of 2 at 10 K show an almost complete light-induced spin state trapping (LIESST) effect which denotes occurrence of antiferromagnetic coupling between the excited high-spin species and TLIESST = 52 K. The crystal structure of 2 has been investigated in detail at various temperatures and discussed.

  8. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  9. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, optical properties and DFT studies of a new 2D layered iodide bridged Pb(II) coordination polymer with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali; Bakhtiari, Akbar; Gheleji, Hojjat

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) coordination polymer [Pb2(μ-I)2(μ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(μ-dpp-N,N)I2]n (dpp=2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) is reported. As determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, the dpp ligand simultaneously adopts a bis-bidentate and bis-monodentate coordination mode in the crystal structure of compound. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. According to the DFT calculations, the observed emission of the compound at 600 nm in solid phase could be attributed to arise from an excited LLCT state (dpp-π* [C-2p and N-2p states, CBs] to I-6p state [VBs]). The linear optical properties of the compound are also calculated by DFT method. The structure of the compound in solution phase is discussed based on the measured 1H NMR and fluorescence spectra in DMSO. TGA studies indicate that the compound is thermally stable up to 210 °C.

  10. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  11. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  12. A Two-Microphone Noise Reduction System for Cochlear Implant Users with Nearby Microphones—Part II: Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompis, Martin; Bertram, Matthias; Senn, Pascal; Müller, Joachim; Pelizzone, Marco; Häusler, Rudolf

    2008-12-01

    Users of cochlear implants (auditory aids, which stimulate the auditory nerve electrically at the inner ear) often suffer from poor speech understanding in noise. We evaluate a small (intermicrophone distance 7 mm) and computationally inexpensive adaptive noise reduction system suitable for behind-the-ear cochlear implant speech processors. The system is evaluated in simulated and real, anechoic and reverberant environments. Results from simulations show improvements of 3.4 to 9.3 dB in signal to noise ratio for rooms with realistic reverberation and more than 18 dB under anechoic conditions. Speech understanding in noise is measured in 6 adult cochlear implant users in a reverberant room, showing average improvements of 7.9-9.6 dB, when compared to a single omnidirectional microphone or 1.3-5.6 dB, when compared to a simple directional two-microphone device. Subjective evaluation in a cafeteria at lunchtime shows a preference of the cochlear implant users for the evaluated device in terms of speech understanding and sound quality.

  13. Oxycline formation induced by Fe(II) oxidation in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage modeled using a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality model - CE-QUAL-W2.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ester; Galván, Laura; Cánovas, Carlos Ruiz; Soria-Píriz, Sara; Arbat-Bofill, Marina; Nardi, Albert; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-08-15

    The Sancho reservoir is an acid mine drainage (AMD)-contaminated reservoir located in the Huelva province (SW Spain) with a pH close to 3.5. The water is only used for a refrigeration system of a paper mill. The Sancho reservoir is holomictic with one mixing period per year in the winter. During this mixing period, oxygenated water reaches the sediment, while under stratified conditions (the rest of the year) hypoxic conditions develop at the hypolimnion. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was calibrated for the Sancho Reservoir to predict the thermocline and oxycline formation, as well as the salinity, ammonium, nitrate, phosphorous, algal, chlorophyll-a, and iron concentrations. The version 3.7 of the model does not allow simulating the oxidation of Fe(II) in the water column, which limits the oxygen consumption of the organic matter oxidation. However, to evaluate the impact of Fe(II) oxidation on the oxycline formation, Fe(II) has been introduced into the model based on its relationship with labile dissolved organic matter (LDOM). The results show that Fe oxidation is the main factor responsible for the oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion of the Sancho Reservoir. The limiting factors for green algal growth have also been studied. The model predicted that ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate were not limiting factors for green algal growth. Light appeared to be one of the limiting factors for algal growth, while chlorophyll-a and dissolved oxygen concentrations could not be fully described. We hypothesize that dissolved CO2 is one of the limiting nutrients due to losses by the high acidity of the water column. The sensitivity tests carried out support this hypothesis. Two different remediation scenarios have been tested with the calibrated model: 1) an AMD passive treatment plant installed at the river, which removes completely Fe, and 2) different depth water extractions. If no Fe was introduced into the reservoir, water quality would significantly improve in only two years

  14. Virtual sensors for active noise control in acoustic-structural coupled enclosures using structural sensing: part II--Optimization of structural sensor placement.

    PubMed

    Halim, Dunant; Cheng, Li; Su, Zhongqing

    2011-04-01

    The work proposed an optimization approach for structural sensor placement to improve the performance of vibro-acoustic virtual sensor for active noise control applications. The vibro-acoustic virtual sensor was designed to estimate the interior sound pressure of an acoustic-structural coupled enclosure using structural sensors. A spectral-spatial performance metric was proposed, which was used to quantify the averaged structural sensor output energy of a vibro-acoustic system excited by a spatially varying point source. It was shown that (i) the overall virtual sensing error energy was contributed additively by the modal virtual sensing error and the measurement noise energy; (ii) each of the modal virtual sensing error system was contributed by both the modal observability levels for the structural sensing and the target acoustic virtual sensing; and further (iii) the strength of each modal observability level was influenced by the modal coupling and resonance frequencies of the associated uncoupled structural/cavity modes. An optimal design of structural sensor placement was proposed to achieve sufficiently high modal observability levels for certain important panel- and cavity-controlled modes. Numerical analysis on a panel-cavity system demonstrated the importance of structural sensor placement on virtual sensing and active noise control performance, particularly for cavity-controlled modes.

  15. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, optical properties and DFT studies of a new 2D layered iodide bridged Pb(II) coordination polymer with 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Saghatforoush, Lotfali Bakhtiari, Akbar; Gheleji, Hojjat

    2015-01-15

    The synthesis of two dimensional (2D) coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} (dpp=2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) is reported. As determined by X-ray diffraction of a twinned crystal, the dpp ligand simultaneously adopts a bis–bidentate and bis–monodentate coordination mode in the crystal structure of compound. The electronic band structure along with density of states (DOS) calculated by the DFT method indicates that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. According to the DFT calculations, the observed emission of the compound at 600 nm in solid phase could be attributed to arise from an excited LLCT state (dpp-π{sup ⁎} [C-2p and N-2p states, CBs] to I-6p state [VBs]). The linear optical properties of the compound are also calculated by DFT method. The structure of the compound in solution phase is discussed based on the measured {sup 1}H NMR and fluorescence spectra in DMSO. TGA studies indicate that the compound is thermally stable up to 210 °C. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure and emission spectra of [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} is presented. The electronic band structure and linear optical properties of the compound are calculated by the DFT method. - Highlights: • Two dimensional [Pb{sub 2}(µ-I){sub 2}(µ-dpp-N,N,N,N)(µ-dpp-N,N)I{sub 2}]{sub n} has been prepared. • The structure of the compound is determined by XRD of a twinned crystal. • DFT calculations indicate that the compound is an indirect band gap semiconductor. • As shown by DFT calculations, the emission band of the compound is LLCT. • Solution phase structure of compound is explored by {sup 1}H NMR and emission spectra.

  16. VIEWNET: a neural architecture for learning to recognize 3D objects from multiple 2D views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Bradski, Gary

    1994-10-01

    A self-organizing neural network is developed for recognition of 3-D objects from sequences of their 2-D views. Called VIEWNET because it uses view information encoded with networks, the model processes 2-D views of 3-D objects using the CORT-X 2 filter, which discounts the illuminant, regularizes and completes figural boundaries, and removes noise from the images. A log-polar transform is taken with respect to the centroid of the resulting figure and then re-centered to achieve 2-D scale and rotation invariance. The invariant images are coarse coded to further reduce noise, reduce foreshortening effects, and increase generalization. These compressed codes are input into a supervised learning system based on the Fuzzy ARTMAP algorithm which learns 2-D view categories. Evidence from sequences of 2-D view categories is stored in a working memory. Voting based on the unordered set of stored categories determines object recognition. Recognition is studied with noisy and clean images using slow and fast learning. VIEWNET is demonstrated on an MIT Lincoln Laboratory database of 2-D views of aircraft with and without additive noise. A recognition rate of up to 90% is achieved with one 2-D view category and of up to 98.5% correct with three 2-D view categories.

  17. RNA folding pathways and kinetics using 2D energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Senter, Evan; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA folding pathways play an important role in various biological processes, such as (i) the hok/sok (host-killing/suppression of killing) system in E. coli to check for sufficient plasmid copy number, (ii) the conformational switch in spliced leader (SL) RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, which controls trans splicing of a portion of the '5 exon, and (iii) riboswitches--portions of the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNA that regulate genes by allostery. Since RNA folding pathways are determined by the energy landscape, we describe a novel algorithm, FFTbor2D, which computes the 2D projection of the energy landscape for a given RNA sequence. Given two metastable secondary structures A, B for a given RNA sequence, FFTbor2D computes the Boltzmann probability p(x, y) = Z(x,y)/Z that a secondary structure has base pair distance x from A and distance y from B. Using polynomial interpolationwith the fast Fourier transform,we compute p(x, y) in O(n(5)) time and O(n(2)) space, which is an improvement over an earlier method, which runs in O(n(7)) time and O(n(4)) space. FFTbor2D has potential applications in synthetic biology, where one might wish to design bistable switches having target metastable structures A, B with favorable pathway kinetics. By inverting the transition probability matrix determined from FFTbor2D output, we show that L. collosoma spliced leader RNA has larger mean first passage time from A to B on the 2D energy landscape, than 97.145% of 20,000 sequences, each having metastable structures A, B. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/FFTbor2D. The program FFTbor2D is implemented in C++, with optional OpenMP parallelization primitives.

  18. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  19. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jade; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco; Heng, Ik Siong; Font, José A.

    2017-02-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers.

  20. Volumetric Elasticity Imaging with a 2D CMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ted G.; Hall, Timothy J.; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S.; Barbone, Paul E.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a two-dimensional (2D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare 3D elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared to three different methods of 3D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes, and plane independent guided search. The cross correlation between the pre-deformation and motion-compensated post-deformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction. PMID:20510188

  1. Volumetric elasticity imaging with a 2-D CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ted G; Hall, Timothy J; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S; Barbone, Paul E; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-06-01

    This article reports the use of a two-dimensional (2-D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio-frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2-D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared with three different methods of 3-D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2-D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes and plane independent guided search. The cross-correlation between the predeformation and motion-compensated postdeformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3-D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3-D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction.

  2. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  3. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  4. Thermal- and pressure-induced cooperative spin transition in the 2D and 3D coordination polymers {Fe(5-Br-pmd)z[M(CN)x]y} (M=AgI, AuI, NiII, PdII, PtII).

    PubMed

    Agustí, Gloria; Gaspar, Ana Belén; Muñoz, M Carmen; Real, José Antonio

    2007-11-12

    A new family of cyanide-based spin-crossover polymers with the general formula {Fe(5-Br-pmd)z[M(CN)x]y} [M=AgI (1), AuI (2), NiII (3), PdII (4), PtII (5); 5-Br-pmd=5-bromopyrimidine; z=1 or 2, x=2 or 4, and y=2 or 1] have been synthesized and characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). At 293 K, compound 1 presents the monoclinic space group C2/c, whereas at 120 K, it changes to the monoclinic space group P21/c. At 293 K, the crystal structure of 1 displays an uninodal three-dimensional network whose nodes, constituted of FeII, lie at the inversion center of an elongated octahedron. The equatorial bond lengths are defined by the N atoms of four [AgI(CN)2]- groups belonging to two crystallographically nonequivalent AgI atoms, Ag(1) and Ag(2). They are shorter than those of the axial positions occupied by the N atoms of the 5-Br-pmd ligands. The Fe-N average bond length of 2.1657(7) A is consistent with a high-spin (HS) state for the FeII ions. At 120 K, the crystal structure changes refer mainly to the FeII environment. There are two crystallographically independent FeII ions at this temperature, Fe(1) and Fe(2), which adopt the HS and low-spin (LS) states, respectively. The average Fe-N bond length for Fe(1) [2.174(5) A] and Fe(2) [1.955(5) A] agrees well with the reported magnetic data at this temperature. The spin transition of the FeII ions labeled as Fe(1) is found to be centered at Tc downward arrow=149 K and Tc upward arrow=167 K and accompanied by a drastic change of color from orange (HS) to red (LS). Magnetic susceptibility measurements under applied hydrostatic pressure performed on 1 have shown a linear displacement of the transition to higher temperatures while the hysteresis width remains unaltered in the interval of pressures of 105 Pa to 0.34 GPa. A further increase of the pressure induces the spin transition in the Fe(2

  5. The Wigner distribution and 2D classical maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhr, Jamal

    2017-07-01

    The Wigner spacing distribution has a long and illustrious history in nuclear physics and in the quantum mechanics of classically chaotic systems. In this paper, a novel connection between the Wigner distribution and 2D classical mechanics is introduced. Based on a well-known correspondence between the Wigner distribution and the 2D Poisson point process, the hypothesis that typical pseudo-trajectories of a 2D ergodic map have a Wignerian nearest-neighbor spacing distribution (NNSD) is put forward and numerically tested. The standard Euclidean metric is used to compute the interpoint spacings. In all test cases, the hypothesis is upheld, and the range of validity of the hypothesis appears to be robust in the sense that it is not affected by the presence or absence of: (i) mixing; (ii) time-reversal symmetry; and/or (iii) dissipation.

  6. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  7. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zohar, Y. C.; Yochelis, S.; Dahmen, K. A.; Jung, G.; Paltiel, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments. PMID:23677142

  8. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. For all Type I and II projects, a highway agency shall: (a) Identify land uses or activities that may be affected by noise from...

  9. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. For all Type I and II projects, a highway agency shall: (a) Identify land uses or activities that may be affected by noise from...

  10. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and postoperative pain perception.

    PubMed

    Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Stabryła, Piotr; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2017-07-01

    It has not been established whether sex differences in pain perception are influenced by prenatal sex hormones. Digit ratio as an indicator of prenatal hormone exposure can be used as a simple measure of the influence of prenatal hormones on pain sensitivity or perception in adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine a correlation between the 2D:4D ratio and pain perception in the postoperative period after rhinoplasty. A prospective cohort study of 100 patients (50 women of the mean age of 30.74±8.09years and 50 men of the mean age of 30.98±10.86years) who underwent posttraumatic rhinoplasty due to the nose trauma in Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic. The following measurements were taken the day before a surgery: body height, waist and hip circumference, II and IV digits' lengths and body weight. All subjects filled in a questionnaire including 0-10-point VAS scales to assess postoperative pain 1h after an operation (AO), 6h AO, 12h AO, 24h AO and 48h AO. Women with low 2D:4D reported significantly more pain 1h after an operation than women with high 2D:4D. Similar correlation was observed for low 2D:4D in women 48h AO. In men, low 2D:4D was associated with lower postoperative pain 12h AO (p=0.029). In conclusion, we showed that low 2D:4D in women was associated with high postoperative pain, and low right 2D:4D in men was associated with low postoperative pain. This may suggest that intrauterine estrogen exposure makes women more resistant to pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Two novel Krebs-type polyoxoanions [Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-XW 9O 33) 2] 12- (X = Sb III, Bi III) resulting in 2D layer structures linked by copper(I) ions and copper(II) complex groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Shuxia; Feng, Dan; Zhang, Chundan; Sun, Ping; Ma, Fengji

    2009-11-01

    Two sandwich-type organic-inorganic hybrid polyoxotungstates [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-SbW 9O 33) 2]·16H 2O ( 1) and [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-BiW 9O 33) 2]·22H 2O ( 2) (en = ethylenediamine) have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The polyoxoanions in 1 and 2 are composed of two trivacant (B-β-XW 9O 33) 9- (X = Sb III ( 1), Bi III ( 2)) subunits joined together by two Cu(I) ions and two W(VI) ions resulting in two novel Krebs-type sandwich structures. These polyoxoanions are further connected by Cu(I) ions and [Cu II(en) 2] 2+ coordination cations, and afford the first copper(I)-linked 2D layer structure constructed from Krebs-type polyoxotungstates. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 and 2 modified carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) have been studied. The results indicate that they have good electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of nitrite.

  12. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  13. Experimental validation of 2-D generalized geometric super resolved approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Amikam; Zalevsky, Zeev; Cohen, Nadav; Hadas, Zadok; Marom, Emanuel; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we generalize the method of using a 2-D moving binary random mask to overcome the geometrical resolution limitation of an imaging sensor. The spatial blurring is caused by the size of the imaging sensor pixels which yield insufficient spatial sampling. The mask is placed in an intermediate image plane and can be shifted in any direction while keeping the sensor as well as all other optical components fixed. Out of the set of images that are captured and registered, a high resolution image can be composed. In addition, this proposed approach reduces the amount of required computations and it has an improved robustness to spatial noise.

  14. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  15. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  16. Preliminary 2D numerical modeling of common granular problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyser, Emmanuel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Granular studies received an increasing interest during the last decade. Many scientific investigations were successfully addressed to acknowledge the ubiquitous behavior of granular matter. We investigate liquid impacts onto granular beds, i.e. the influence of the packing and compaction-dilation transition. However, a physically-based model is still lacking to address complex microscopic features of granular bed response during liquid impacts such as compaction-dilation transition or granular bed uplifts (Wyser et al. in review). We present our preliminary 2D numerical modeling based on the Discrete Element Method (DEM) using nonlinear contact force law (the Hertz-Mindlin model) for disk shape particles. The algorithm is written in C programming language. Our 2D model provides an analytical tool to address granular problems such as i) granular collapses and ii) static granular assembliy problems. This provides a validation framework of our numerical approach by comparing our numerical results with previous laboratory experiments or numerical works. Inspired by the work of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005), we studied i) the axisymetric collapse of granular columns. We addressed the scaling between the initial aspect ratio and the final runout distance. Our numerical results are in good aggreement with the previous studies of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005). ii) Reproducing static problems for regular and randomly stacked particles provides a valid comparison to results of Egholm (2007). Vertical and horizontal stresses within the assembly are quite identical to stresses obtained by Egholm (2007), thus demonstating the consistency of our 2D numerical model. Our 2D numerical model is able to reproduce common granular case studies such as granular collapses or static problems. However, a sufficient small timestep should be used to ensure a good numerical consistency, resulting in higher computational time. The latter becomes critical

  17. Photoplethysmograph signal reconstruction based on a novel motion artifact detection-reduction approach. Part II: Motion and noise artifact removal.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, S M A; Dao, Duy K; Chong, Jo Woon; McManus, David; Darling, Chad; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new method to reconstruct motion and noise artifact (MNA) contaminated photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. A method to detect MNA corrupted data is provided in a companion paper. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on an iterative motion artifact removal (IMAR) approach, which utilizes the singular spectral analysis algorithm to remove MNA artifacts so that the most accurate estimates of uncorrupted heart rates (HRs) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) values recorded by a pulse oximeter can be derived. Using both computer simulations and three different experimental data sets, we show that the proposed IMAR approach can reliably reconstruct MNA corrupted data segments, as the estimated HR and SpO2 values do not significantly deviate from the uncorrupted reference measurements. Comparison of the accuracy of reconstruction of the MNA corrupted data segments between our IMAR approach and the time-domain independent component analysis (TD-ICA) is made for all data sets as the latter method has been shown to provide good performance. For simulated data, there were no significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 values starting from 10 dB down to -15 dB for both white and colored noise contaminated PPG data using IMAR; for TD-ICA, significant differences were observed starting at 10 dB. Two experimental PPG data sets were created with contrived MNA by having subjects perform random forehead and rapid side-to-side finger movements show that; the performance of the IMAR approach on these data sets was quite accurate as non-significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 were found compared to non-contaminated reference values, in most subjects. In comparison, the accuracy of the TD-ICA was poor as there were significant differences in reconstructed HR and SpO2 values in most subjects. For non-contrived MNA corrupted PPG data, which were collected with subjects performing walking and stair climbing tasks, the IMAR significantly

  18. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  19. HSCT nozzle source noise programs at Pratt and Whitney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Alfred M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: 20 dB jet noise suppression; ejector nozzle technology program - noise reduction vs. flow augmentation; mixer ejector nozzle technology challenges; 1989 High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) 2-D ejector model test in NASA's 9 x 15 ft. tunnel; tertiary airflow 1989 2-D ejector test; shock noise dominates 2-D ejector test; lessons learned - 2-D mixer/ejector in 9 x 15 ft. tunnel; 1990 HSCT axisymmetric ejector model test in Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); axisymmetric mixer/ejector mach contours - peak and valley - NASTAR pre-test predictions; tertiary airflow objectives accomplished - 1990 AXI model; and HSCT low noise exhaust technology programs.

  20. Optical CDMA system using 2-D run-length limited code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maw-Yang; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, time-spreading wavelength-hopping optical CDMA system using 2-D run-length limited code is investigated. The run-length limited code we use here is predicated upon spatial coding scheme, which can improve system performance significantly. In our proposed system, we employ carrier-hopping prime code and its shifted version as signature sequences. Based on the zero auto-correlation sidelobes property of signature sequence, we propose a two-state trellis coding architecture, which utilizes 2-D parallel detection scheme. The proposed scheme is compact and simple that can be applied to more complicated trellis to further enhance system performance. Multiple access interference is the main deterioration factor in optical CDMA system that affects system performance adversely. Aside from the multiple access interference, some of the adverse impacts of system performance are also taken into consideration, which include thermal noise, shot noise, relative intensity noise, and beat noise.

  1. Temporary changes in hearing after exposure to shooting noise.

    PubMed

    Pawlaczyk-Luszczyńska, Małgorzata; Dudarewicz, Adam; Bak, Marek; Fiszer, Marta; Kotyło, Piotr; Sliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2004-01-01

    Firearm is a common source of impulse noise that may potentially damage hearing organ. It has been suggested that otoacoustic emissions, particularly transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), might be more sensitive than pure-tone audiometry (PTA) in the assessment of changes to cochlea caused by noise. The aim of this study was to: (i) evaluate exposure to impulse noise from small-caliber weapons, (ii) compare the post-exposure changes in hearing measured by PTA and TEOAE and correlate them with noise parameters. The study included 18 male hunters (group I) and 28 candidate policemen (group II) exposed to impulse noise from small firearms during target practices. Group I was unprotected during shooting, whereas group II used commonly available hearing protectors. PTA and TEOAE were performed before and 2-10 min after shooting. Exposure to impulse noise was evaluated by in situ measurements. Groups I and II were exposed to 3-4 and 4-144 impulses of noise at mean C-weighted peak sound pressure levels of 154 dB and 156 dB, respectively. No post-exposure audiometric threshold shift was observed in group I. Significant reductions of TEOAE levels were found both for the whole response (-2.2 dB SPL) and for 1/2 -octave band responses in the frequency range of 1000-4000 Hz (from -1.6 to -3.0 dB SPL). These changes were not correlated with C-weighted peak sound pressure levels or equivalent-continuous A-weighted sound pressure level. Significant correlation was found for peak sound pressure and maximum sound pressure levels in 1/3-octave bands in the frequency range corresponding with the main part of the acoustic energy of impulses (correlation coefficients r from -0.58 to -0.77, p < 0.05). In group II neither PTA nor TEOAE showed significant hearing impairment after shooting. The results show that even short-term exposure to impulse noise from small-calibre firearms might cause temporary hearing impairment measured by TEOAE. Therefore, the use of earmuffs is

  2. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  3. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  4. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  5. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  6. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  7. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  8. A novel hybrid motion detection algorithm based on 2D histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaomeng; Wang, Haiying

    2015-03-01

    This article proposes a novel hybrid motion detection algorithm based on 2-D (2-Dimensional) spatio-temporal states histogram. The new algorithm combines the idea of image change detection based on 2-D histogram and spatio-temporal entropy image segmentation. It quantifies the continuity of pixel state in time and space domain which are called TDF (Time Domain Filter) and SDF (Space Domain Filter) respectively. After this, put both channels of output data from TDF and SDF into a 2-D histogram. In the 2-D histogram, a curve division method helps to separate the foreground state points and the background ones more accurately. Innovatively, the new algorithm converts the video sequence to its histogram sequence, and transforms the difference of pixel's value in the video sequence into the difference of pixel's position in the 2-D histogram. Experimental results on different types of scenes added Gaussian noise shows that the proposed technique has strong ability of detecting moving objects.

  9. Generation of two-mode bright squeezed light using a noise-suppressed amplified diode laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Kasai, Katsuyuki

    2006-12-25

    We present the generation of nonclassical state using an amplified diode laser as a light source. The intensity noise of an amplified diode laser was significantly suppressed and reached the shot noise limit at 15 MHz using both a filter cavity and resonant optical feedback. Frequency doubling efficiency of 66% and up to 120 mW output power of green has been achieved in cw second-harmonic generation from 1080 nm to 540 nm. Bright two-mode amplitude-squeezed state was generated from a type-II nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier pumped by generated green light. The measured noise reduction is 2.1+/-0.2 dB below the shot-noise level.

  10. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  11. Fully automated 2D-3D registration and verification.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Andreas; Carrell, Tom; Penney, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Clinical application of 2D-3D registration technology often requires a significant amount of human interaction during initialisation and result verification. This is one of the main barriers to more widespread clinical use of this technology. We propose novel techniques for automated initial pose estimation of the 3D data and verification of the registration result, and show how these techniques can be combined to enable fully automated 2D-3D registration, particularly in the case of a vertebra based system. The initialisation method is based on preoperative computation of 2D templates over a wide range of 3D poses. These templates are used to apply the Generalised Hough Transform to the intraoperative 2D image and the sought 3D pose is selected with the combined use of the generated accumulator arrays and a Gradient Difference Similarity Measure. On the verification side, two algorithms are proposed: one using normalised features based on the similarity value and the other based on the pose agreement between multiple vertebra based registrations. The proposed methods are employed here for CT to fluoroscopy registration and are trained and tested with data from 31 clinical procedures with 417 low dose, i.e. low quality, high noise interventional fluoroscopy images. When similarity value based verification is used, the fully automated system achieves a 95.73% correct registration rate, whereas a no registration result is produced for the remaining 4.27% of cases (i.e. incorrect registration rate is 0%). The system also automatically detects input images outside its operating range.

  12. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  13. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  14. Comparison of Ising spin glass noise to flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C

    2010-06-18

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs. We present Monte Carlo simulations of 2D and 3D Ising spin glasses that produce magnetization noise S(M) consistent with flux noise. At low frequencies S(M) is a maximum at the critical temperature T(C) in three dimensions, implying that flux noise should be a maximum at T(C). The second spectra of the magnetization noise and the noise in the susceptibility are consistent with experimentally measured SQUID inductance noise.

  15. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. For all Type I and II... construction of the project. The identification is to be performed during the project development studies....

  16. Rare events in a finite 2D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Ning

    The dynamics of physical systems are always subject to thermal fluctuations or noise. These perturbations will make the stable states of the deterministic part of the dynamical system become only metastable states. When the amplitude of the perturbation is small, the transitions from one metastable state to another are rare events. One such example is the magnetization switching between the two metastable states of 2D Ising model at T < Tc. The 2D Ising model displays two metastable states below the critical temperature Tc. These metastable states are characterized by spontaneous magnetization per spin that tend to m = +/-1 as temperature T → 0. A finite-size Ising system performs transitions from one metastable phase to another due to thermal fluctuations. Such phase transitions often involve growth or birth of a thermally activated critical nucleus, which is statistically a rare event when the noise is small. It may occur via homogeneous nucleation or heterogeneous nucleation, depending on whether the nucleus is formed in system with periodic boundary condition or with boundary condition of Dirichlet or Neumann type. In this thesis, we study the influences of an applied bulk field and local boundary fields to the critical points (minimums and saddle) of noised-driven phase transitions arising in a finite 2D Ising system in both frameworks of the Ginzburg-Landau theory and lattice spins. We use the string method to numerically allocate the minimum energy path (MEP) and the profile of the energy barrier along it. In the framework of Ginzburg-Landau, we introduce an interface energy functional as a sharp interface limit of the Ginzburg-Landau energy, and compare the numerical results from the string method to the analytical results from this interface energy. In the framework of lattice spin model, we first applied the Transition Path Theory to the system to get the transition rate functional that is suitable for both theoretical and numerical purpose. Then the

  17. Conjugation of organoruthenium(II) 3-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines and indolo[3,2-d]benzazepines to recombinant human serum albumin: a strategy to enhance cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Iryna N; Casini, Angela; Edafe, Fabio; Novak, Maria S; Arion, Vladimir B; Dyson, Paul J; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2011-12-19

    Following our strategy of coupling cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors with organometallic moieties to improve their physicochemical properties and bioavailability, five organoruthenium complexes (1c-5c) of the general formula [RuCl(η(6)-arene)(L)]Cl have been synthesized in which the arene is 4-formylphenoxyacetyl-η(6)-benzylamide and L is a Cdk inhibitor [3-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines (L1-L3) and indolo[3,2-d]benzazepines (L4 and L5)]. All of the compounds were characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. Upon prolonged standing (2-3 months) at room temperature, the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions of 1c and 2c(-HCl) afforded residues, which after recrystallization from EtOH and EtOH/H(2)O, respectively, were shown by X-ray diffraction to be cis,cis-[Ru(II)Cl(2)(DMSO)(2)(L1)]·H(2)O and mer-[Ru(II)Cl(DMSO)(3)(L2-H)]·H(2)O. Compound 5c, with a coordinated amidine unit, undergoes E/Z isomerization in solution. The antiproliferative activities and effects on the cell cycle of the new compounds were evaluated. Complexes 1c-5c are moderately cytotoxic to cancer cells (CH1, SW480, A549, A2780, and A2780cisR cell lines). Therefore, in order to improve their antiproliferative effects, as well as their drug targeting and delivery to cancer cells, 1c-5c were conjugated to recombinant human serum albumin, potentially exploiting the so-called "enhanced permeability and retention" effect that results in the accumulation of macromolecules in tumors. Notably, a marked increase in cytotoxicity of the albumin conjugates was observed in all cases.

  18. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  19. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  20. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  1. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  2. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  3. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  4. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 2D Magneto-Optical Trapping of Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew T.; Yeo, Mark; Stuhl, Benjamin K.; Collopy, Alejandra L.; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). In a 1D magneto-optical trap (MOT), we characterize the magneto-optical trapping force and decrease the transverse temperature by an order of magnitude, from 25 to 2 mK, limited by interaction time. In a 2D MOT, we enhance the intensity of the YO beam and reduce the transverse temperature in both transverse directions. The approach demonstrated here can be applied to many molecular species and can also be extended to 3D.

  6. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  7. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  8. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  9. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  10. Analysis of stochastic phenomena in 2D Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, I.; Ryashko, L.; Slepukhina, E.

    2016-10-01

    In mathematical research of neuronal activity, conceptual models play an important role. We consider 2D Hindmarsh-Rose model, which exhibits the fundamental property of neuron, the excitability. We study how random disturbances affect this property. The effects of noise are analysed in the parametric zone where the deterministic model is characterized by the coexistence of two stable equilibria. We show that under random disturbances, noise-induced transitions between the attractors occur, forming a new complex dynamic regime of stochastic bursting. It is confirmed by changes of distribution of random trajectories and interspike intervals. For the analysis of this noise-induced phenomenon, we apply the stochastic sensitivity technique and confidence domains method. We suggest a method for estimation of threshold noise intensity corresponding to the onset of noise-induced bursting. We show that the obtained values are in a good agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  11. Bayesian 2D Current Reconstruction from Magnetic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Colin B.; Bierbaum, Matthew K.; Nowack, Katja; Sethna, James P.

    We employ a Bayesian image reconstruction scheme to recover 2D currents from magnetic flux imaged with scanning SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interferometric Devices). Magnetic flux imaging is a versatile tool to locally probe currents and magnetic moments, however present reconstruction methods sacrifice resolution due to numerical instability. Using state-of-the-art blind deconvolution techniques we recover the currents, point-spread function and height of the SQUID loop by optimizing the probability of measuring an image. We obtain uncertainties on these quantities by sampling reconstructions. This generative modeling technique could be used to develop calibration protocols for scanning SQUIDs, to diagnose systematic noise in the imaging process, and can be applied to many tools beyond scanning SQUIDs.

  12. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  13. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L.; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi -Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  14. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  15. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  16. A method to calibrate a camera using perpendicularity of 2D lines in the target observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Zheng, Anqi; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Camera calibration based on point features leads the main trends in vision-based measurement systems for both fundamental researches and potential applications. However, the calibration results tend to be affected by the precision of the feature point extraction in the camera images. As the point features are noise sensitive, line features are more appropriate to provide a stable calibration due to the noise immunity of line features. We propose a calibration method using the perpendicularity of the lines on a 2D target. The objective function of the camera internal parameters is theoretically constructed by the reverse projections of the image lines on a 2D target in the world coordinate system. We experimentally explore the performances of the perpendicularity method and compare them with the point feature methods at different distances. By the perpendicularity and the noise immunity of the lines, our work achieves a relatively higher calibration precision.

  17. A method to calibrate a camera using perpendicularity of 2D lines in the target observations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guan; Zheng, Anqi; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Camera calibration based on point features leads the main trends in vision-based measurement systems for both fundamental researches and potential applications. However, the calibration results tend to be affected by the precision of the feature point extraction in the camera images. As the point features are noise sensitive, line features are more appropriate to provide a stable calibration due to the noise immunity of line features. We propose a calibration method using the perpendicularity of the lines on a 2D target. The objective function of the camera internal parameters is theoretically constructed by the reverse projections of the image lines on a 2D target in the world coordinate system. We experimentally explore the performances of the perpendicularity method and compare them with the point feature methods at different distances. By the perpendicularity and the noise immunity of the lines, our work achieves a relatively higher calibration precision. PMID:27713566

  18. Valley and spin currents in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-03-01

    In two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), carriers are indexed by both the spin and the valley pseudospin (labelling the degenerate band extrema in momentum space). 2D TMDs is therefore an ideal laboratory for exploring these internal quantum degrees of freedom for new electronics, and controlling the flow of spin and pseudospin is at the heart of such applications. We will discuss two mechanisms for generating spin and valley currents of electrons in 2D group-VIB TMDs: (I) the valley and spin Hall effects arising from the Berry curvatures; and (II) the nonlinear valley and spin currents arising from Fermi pocket anisotropy. The two effects have distinct scaling with the electric field, and different dependence of the current direction on the field direction and crystalline axis. We will discuss the possibility to observe and distinguish the two effects as distinct patterns of polarized electroluminescence at p-n junction in 2D TMDs. The nonlinear current response also makes possible the generation of pure spin and valley flows without net charge current, either by an AC bias or by an inhomogeneous temperature distribution. We will also discuss the valley Hall effect of charged excitons in monolayer TMDs, which arises from the effective coupling of the excitonic valley pseudospin to its center of mass motion by the exchange interaction between the electron and hole constituents. The work is supported by the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong SAR (HKU17305914P, HKU9/CRF/13G), and the Croucher Foundation under the Croucher Innovation Award.

  19. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  20. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  1. Low frequency noise assessment in n- and p-channel sub-10 nm triple-gate FinFETs: Part II: Measurements and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, D.; Cretu, B.; Simoen, E.; Carin, R.; Veloso, A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A.

    2017-02-01

    Low frequency noise measurements are used as a non-destructive diagnostic tool in order to evaluate the quality of the gate oxide and the silicon film of sub-10 nm triple-gate Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) FinFETs. It was found that the carrier number fluctuations explain the 1/f noise in moderate inversion for n- and p-FinFETs, which allows estimating the gate oxide trap densities. The noise spectroscopy with respect to temperature (study of the generation-recombination noise) led to the identification of the traps located in the transistors silicon film.

  2. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  3. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  4. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Esteves, Richard J; Arachchige, Indika U.; Pestov, Dmitry; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-11

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe{sub 2} framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  5. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  6. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  7. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  8. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  9. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  10. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  11. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  12. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  13. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Suneev Anil Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-06

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  14. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: c2d Spitzer final data release (DR4) (Evans+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Bourke, T.; Harvey, P. M.; Kessler, J. E.; Koerner, D. W.; Lee, C. W.; Mundy, L. G.; Myers, P. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Pontoppidan, K.; Sargent, A. I.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Young, C. H.; Young, K. E.

    2014-05-01

    This is the final delivery (DR4, Fall 2006 and Fall 2007) of the Spitzer Space Telescope "From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks" (c2d) Legacy Project. The data are also available as Enhanced Products from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). c2d has delivered 867 catalogs. IRSA has merged these delivered catalogs into four groups - Clouds, Off-Cloud, Cores, Stars - and serves them through the general catalog search engine Gator. Many of the delivered catalogs, images and spectra are accessible through IRSA's general search service, Atlas. As a service to its users, the CDS has downloaded a dataset containing most of the c2d data (but not all columns) from the IRSA archive. The individual catalogs are listed below: C2D Fall '07 Full CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 High Reliability (HREL) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 Full STARS Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) STARS Catalog These tables have been merged into a single table at CDS. All three SIRTF instruments (Infrared Array Camera [IRAC], Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF [MIPS], and Infrared Spectrograph [IRS]) were used to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. (1 data file).

  16. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  17. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  18. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  20. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  1. Microscopic theory of Smith-Purcell radiation from 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, D. Yu.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    The theory of Smith-Purcell effect for a 2D photonic crystal is constructed from the first principles proceeding from Maxwell's equations and microscopic characteristics of particles the crystal consists of. Two-dimensionality 2D is thought in two ways: i) the photonic crystal is an arranged system of particles disposed in a monolayer, ii) the periodicity is in two different directions. We derive the expression for the spectral and angular distribution of arising Smith-Purcell radiation. We analyse the features distinctive for the 2D photonic crystal and show that its spatial distribution differs drastically from the distribution of the radiation from conventional diffraction gratings.

  2. Elimination of signals tilting caused by B0 field inhomogeneity using 2D-lineshape reference deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheberstov, Kirill F.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Cheshkov, Dmitry A.; Jeannerat, Damien

    2017-08-01

    An efficient approach for reference deconvolution of two-dimensional spectra aiming at the correction of static field inhomogeneity was established. In comparison to known techniques, a great improvement was achieved using the cross-section along the diagonal of the reference peak instead of its full 2D line shape. The method is termed pseudo-2D diagonal deconvolution. The approach developed allows suppressing the two-dimensional peaks tilting caused by the magnetic field inhomogeneity, while keeping the signal-to-noise ratio constant. Long-known method of 2D reference deconvolution (true-2D reference deconvolution) was also applied for comparison. The neutral and resolution-enhancing pseudo-2D deconvolutions were successfully applied for the resolution of complex overlapping multiplets and for measuring small scalar coupling constants. The new algorithm for the elimination of shape distortion of two-dimensional peaks showed to be promising in the perspective of an automated analysis of 2D correlation NMR spectra.

  3. High-response hybrid quantum dots- 2D conductor phototransistors: recent progress and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablon, Kimberly A.; Sergeev, Andrei; Najmaei, Sina; Dubey, Madan

    2017-03-01

    Having been inspired by the tremendous progress in material nanoscience and device nanoengineering, hybrid phototransistors combine solution processed colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with graphene or two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor materials. Novel detectors demonstrate ultrahigh photoconductive gain, high and selective photoresponse, low noise, and very high responsivity in visible- and near-infrared ranges. The outstanding performance of phototransistors is primarily due to the strong, selective, and size tunable absorption of QDs and fast charge transfer in 2D high mobility conductors. However, the relatively small mobility of QD nanomaterials was a technological barrier, which limited the operating rate of devices. Very recent innovations in detector design and significant progress in QD ligand engineering provide effective tools for further qualitative improvements. This article reviews the recent progress in material science, nanophysics, and device engineering related to hybrid phototransistors. Detectors based on various QD nanomaterials and several 2D conductors are compared, and advantages and disadvantages of various nanomaterials for applications in hybrid phototransistors are identified. We also benchmark the experimental characteristics with model results that establish interrelations and tradeoffs between detector characteristics, such as responsivity, dark and noise currents, the photocarrier lifetime, response, and noise bandwidths. We have shown that the most recent phototransistors demonstrate performance limited by the fundamental generation recombination noise in high gain devices. Interrelation between the dynamic range of the detector and the detector sensitivity is discussed. The review is concluded with a brief discussion of the remaining challenges and possible significant improvements in the performance of hybrid phototransistors.

  4. Non-Iterative Rigid 2D/3D Point-Set Registration Using Semidefinite Programming.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Yuehaw; Kapoor, Ankur

    2016-07-01

    We describe a convex programming framework for pose estimation in 2D/3D point-set registration with unknown point correspondences. We give two mixed-integer nonlinear program (MINLP) formulations of the 2D/3D registration problem when there are multiple 2D images, and propose convex relaxations for both the MINLPs to semidefinite programs that can be solved efficiently by interior point methods. Our approach to the 2D/3D registration problem is non-iterative in nature as we jointly solve for pose and correspondence. Furthermore, these convex programs can readily incorporate feature descriptors of points to enhance registration results. We prove that the convex programs exactly recover the solution to the MINLPs under certain noiseless condition. We apply these formulations to the registration of 3D models of coronary vessels to their 2D projections obtained from multiple intra-operative fluoroscopic images. For this application, we experimentally corroborate the exact recovery property in the absence of noise and further demonstrate robustness of the convex programs in the presence of noise.

  5. 2-D nonlinear IIR-filters for image processing - An exploratory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; Sartori, M.

    1991-01-01

    A new nonlinear IIR filter structure is introduced and its deterministic properties are analyzed. It is shown to be better suited for image processing applications than its linear shift-invariant counterpart. The new structure is obtained from causality inversion of a 2D quarterplane causal linear filter with respect to the two directions of propagation. It is demonstrated, that by using this design, a nonlinear 2D lowpass filter can be constructed, which is capable of effectively suppressing Gaussian or impulse noise without destroying important image information.

  6. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system has a low noise floor. This makes the CMUT a promising technology for deep tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  7. Coherent-pulse 2D crystallography using a free-electron laser x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, A P; Schropp, A; Reime, B; Stadler, L-M; Singer, A; Gulden, J; Streit-Nierobisch, S; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Feldhaus, J; Staier, F; Barth, R; Rosenhahn, A; Grunze, M; Nisius, T; Wilhein, T; Stickler, D; Stillrich, H; Frömter, R; Oepen, H-P; Martins, M; Pfau, B; Günther, C M; Könnecke, R; Eisebitt, S; Faatz, B; Guerassimova, N; Honkavaara, K; Kocharyan, V; Treusch, R; Saldin, E; Schreiber, S; Schneidmiller, E A; Yurkov, M V; Weckert, E; Vartanyants, I A

    2009-01-23

    Coherent diffractive imaging for the reconstruction of a two-dimensional (2D) finite crystal structure with a single pulse train of free-electron laser radiation at 7.97 nm wavelength is demonstrated. This measurement shows an advance on traditional coherent imaging techniques by applying it to a periodic structure. It is also significant that this approach paves the way for the imaging of the class of specimens which readily form 2D, but not three-dimensional crystals. We show that the structure is reconstructed to the detected resolution, given an adequate signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. 2-D nonlinear IIR-filters for image processing - An exploratory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; Sartori, M.

    1991-01-01

    A new nonlinear IIR filter structure is introduced and its deterministic properties are analyzed. It is shown to be better suited for image processing applications than its linear shift-invariant counterpart. The new structure is obtained from causality inversion of a 2D quarterplane causal linear filter with respect to the two directions of propagation. It is demonstrated, that by using this design, a nonlinear 2D lowpass filter can be constructed, which is capable of effectively suppressing Gaussian or impulse noise without destroying important image information.

  9. Elite collegiate tennis athletes have lower 2D: 4D ratios than those of nonathlete controls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Chen; Su, Borcherng; Kan, Nai-Wen; Lai, Su-Ling; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chi, Chung-Pu; Chang, Ching-Chyuan; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2015-03-01

    The ratio of the length of the second finger (index finger) to the fourth finger (ring finger) (2D:4D ratio) is a putative marker for prenatal hormones. Physiological research has suggested a low 2D:4D ratio correlates with high athletic ability. Athletes of specific sports (e.g., American football) have lower 2D:4D ratios than those of nonathletes, whereas athletes of some sports (e.g., rowing, gymnastics, and soccer) do not. This study investigated the 2D:4D ratios among collegiate tennis athletes, elite collegiate tennis athletes, and nonelite collegiate tennis athletes and compared them with nonathletes of both sexes. The participants included 43 elite collegiate tennis athletes (Level I intercollegiate athletes in Taiwan; 27 males and 16 females), 107 nonelite collegiate tennis athletes (Level II athletes; 55 males and 52 females), and 166 nonathlete college students (80 males and 86 females). The principle findings suggest that (a) regardless of sex, collegiate tennis athletes have lower 2D:4D values than those of nonathletes; (b) elite collegiate tennis athletes have lower 2D:4D values than those of nonathletes; (c) among females but not males, athletes and nonelite athletes have lower 2D:4D values than those of nonathletes; and (d) males have lower 2D:4D values than those of females.

  10. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  11. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  12. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  13. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  14. Gas sensing in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengxue; Jiang, Chengbao; Wei, Su-huai

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered inorganic nanomaterials have attracted huge attention due to their unique electronic structures, as well as extraordinary physical and chemical properties for use in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysts, energy generation and storage, and chemical sensors. Graphene and related layered inorganic analogues have shown great potential for gas-sensing applications because of their large specific surface areas and strong surface activities. This review aims to discuss the latest advancements in the 2D layered inorganic materials for gas sensors. We first elaborate the gas-sensing mechanisms and introduce various types of gas-sensing devices. Then, we describe the basic parameters and influence factors of the gas sensors to further enhance their performance. Moreover, we systematically present the current gas-sensing applications based on graphene, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), functionalized GO or rGO, transition metal dichalcogenides, layered III-VI semiconductors, layered metal oxides, phosphorene, hexagonal boron nitride, etc. Finally, we conclude the future prospects of these layered inorganic materials in gas-sensing applications.

  15. 2D packing using the Myriad framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatburn, Luke T.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    2004-02-01

    Myriad is a framework for building networked and distributed vision systems and is described in a companion paper in this conference. Myriad allows the components of a multi-camera, multi-user vision system (web-cameras, image processing engines, intelligent device controllers, databases and the user interface terminals) to be interconnected and operated together, even if they are physically separated by many hundreds, or thousands, of kilometres. This is achieved by operating them as Internet services. The principal objective in this article is to illustrate the simplicity of harmonising visual control with an existing system using Myriad. However, packing of 2-dimensional blob-like objects is of considerable commercial importance in some industries and involves robotic handling and/or cutting. The shapes to be packed may be cut from sheet metal, glass, cloth, leather, wood, card, paper, composite board, or flat food materials. In addition, many 3D packing applications can realistically be tackled only by regarding them as multi-layer 2D applications. Using Myriad to perform 2D packing, a set of blob-like input objects ("shapes") can be digitised using a standard camera (e.g. a "webcam"). The resulting digital images are then analysed, using a separate processing engine, perhaps located on a different continent. The packing is planned by another processing system, perhaps on a third continent. Finally, the assembly is performed using a robot, usually but not necessarily, located close to the camera.

  16. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  17. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  18. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  19. Rayleigh scattering in sapphire test mass for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors:. II: Rayleigh scattering induced noise in a laser interferometric-wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Notcutt, M.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    1999-10-01

    We present the level of noise induced by Rayleigh-scattered light from sapphire test mass, the limit of scattering loss on build-up power inside the interferometer and finally the tolerable absorption loss in order to meet the specification of the interferometer sensitivity. The results show that the Rayleigh scattering induced noise remains below h˜10 -25 Hz -1/2 and a higher tolerance on the absorption level in sapphire substrate compared with silica substrate.

  20. 2D Radiative Transfer in Magnetically Confined Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Anzer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically confined structures in the solar atmosphere exhibit a large complexity in their shapes and physical conditions. As an example, we show the case of so-called magnetic dips in prominences which are in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. For such models we solve 2D non-LTE multilevel problem for hydrogen with PRD in Lyman resonance lines. The iterative technique used is based on the MALI approach with simple diagonal ALO and SC formal solver. To compute the hydrogen ionization balance, the preconditioned MALI equations are linearized with respect to atomic level populations and electron density and solved iteratively using the Newton-Raphson scheme. Two additional problems are addressed: (i) an adequate iteration method for cases when the column-mass scale is used in one of the two dimensions but varies along the other dimension (which has a geometrical scaling); and (ii) a possibility of using AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) algorithms to account for steep 2D gradients of selected variables (temperature, density, etc.).

  1. A simple approach to quantifying the noise-ENSO interaction. Part II: the role of coupling between the warm pool and equatorial zonal wind anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Aaron F. Z.; Jin, Fei Fei; Stuecker, Malte F.

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic forcing has been used conceptually to explain ENSO irregularity. More recently, the concept of state-dependent (multiplicative) stochastic forcing has been explored as an explanation of a number of ENSO properties. By calculating the state-dependence factor of ENSO zonal wind stress noise forcing on SST, we are able to separate the additive and multiplicative components of the wind stress noise forcing of ENSO. Spatially, the months with large additive or multiplicative components all resemble previous studies on westerly wind bursts. They differ from each other in that the wind stresses are significantly stronger during months with a large multiplicative noise component. It is further shown that when the multiplicative noise component is large, there have been large values of the wind stress noise in the preceding months. This is not true of the months when the additive component is large. The multi-month growth of the wind stress from the multiplicative noise process is shown to be related to an eastward migration of the western Pacific Warm Pool, which is coupled to the wind stress through convection. This process is shown to be significantly weakened in a climate model when the ocean and atmosphere are uncoupled.

  2. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  3. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  4. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  5. Airframe Noise Reduction Studies and Clean-Airframe Noise Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Bailey, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a wing model with modified leading edge slat and trailing edge flap. The modifications were intended to reduce the surface pressure response to convected turbulence and thereby reduce the airframe noise without changing the lift at constant incidence. Tests were conducted at 70.7 and 100 m/sec airspeeds, with Reynolds numbers 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 6th power. Considerable reduction of noise radiation from the side edges of a 40 deflection single slotted flap was achieved by modification to the side edge regions or the leading edge region of the flap panel. Total far field noise was reduced 2 to 3 dB over several octaves of frequency. When these panels were installed as the aft panel of a 40 deg deflection double slotted flap, 2 dB noise reduction was achieved.

  6. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  7. Variational regularized 2-D nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Woo, W L; Dlay, S S

    2012-05-01

    A novel approach for adaptive regularization of 2-D nonnegative matrix factorization is presented. The proposed matrix factorization is developed under the framework of maximum a posteriori probability and is adaptively fine-tuned using the variational approach. The method enables: (1) a generalized criterion for variable sparseness to be imposed onto the solution; and (2) prior information to be explicitly incorporated into the basis features. The method is computationally efficient and has been demonstrated on two applications, that is, extracting features from image and separating single channel source mixture. In addition, it is shown that the basis features of an information-bearing matrix can be extracted more efficiently using the proposed regularized priors. Experimental tests have been rigorously conducted to verify the efficacy of the proposed method.

  8. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  9. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  10. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  11. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  12. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  13. Jamming in 2D Prolate Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott

    2003-11-01

    We have been looking at how 2D piles of prolate (L/D>1) granular materials respond when disturbed. A test object is pushed slowly through a horizontal network of particles; the packing fraction and particle aspect ratio can be varied independently. Particles are cut from square brass rods; the square cross-section reduces the chances of a particle rolling on top of another and keeps the pile two-dimensinal. The initial condition of the pile is quantified with an orientational order parameter which measures the inter-particle alignment. At a critical packing fraction the pile jams and the force needed to push the test object through the pile increases. The jammed state also corresponds to an increase in the number of particles undergoing large-scale motion. This is revealed both in video analysis, which measures particle rearrangments within the pile, and in the number of particles that are pushed off the end of the table.

  14. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  15. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  16. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  17. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  18. A Multi Directional Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Designed with 2-D Eigenfilter Approach: Application to Ultrasound Speckle Reduction.

    PubMed

    Nagare, Mukund B; Patil, Bhushan D; Holambe, Raghunath S

    2017-02-01

    B-Mode ultrasound images are degraded by inherent noise called Speckle, which creates a considerable impact on image quality. This noise reduces the accuracy of image analysis and interpretation. Therefore, reduction of speckle noise is an essential task which improves the accuracy of the clinical diagnostics. In this paper, a Multi-directional perfect-reconstruction (PR) filter bank is proposed based on 2-D eigenfilter approach. The proposed method used for the design of two-dimensional (2-D) two-channel linear-phase FIR perfect-reconstruction filter bank. In this method, the fan shaped, diamond shaped and checkerboard shaped filters are designed. The quadratic measure of the error function between the passband and stopband of the filter has been used an objective function. First, the low-pass analysis filter is designed and then the PR condition has been expressed as a set of linear constraints on the corresponding synthesis low-pass filter. Subsequently, the corresponding synthesis filter is designed using the eigenfilter design method with linear constraints. The newly designed 2-D filters are used in translation invariant pyramidal directional filter bank (TIPDFB) for reduction of speckle noise in ultrasound images. The proposed 2-D filters give better symmetry, regularity and frequency selectivity of the filters in comparison to existing design methods. The proposed method is validated on synthetic and real ultrasound data which ensures improvement in the quality of ultrasound images and efficiently suppresses the speckle noise compared to existing methods.

  19. Suppression of ITI by array head reading and 2D-equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Suzuto, R.; Osawa, H.; Okamoto, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Muraoka, H.

    2017-05-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic recording (TDMR) by shingled magnetic recording (SMR) draws attention as a next generation technology to increase the recording density in hard disk drive (HDD). It is shown that the two-dimensional finite impulse response (2D-FIR) filter provides gain the reproducing waveforms from an array head with 3 readers in the TDMR under a specification of 4 Tbit/inch.2 We evaluate the effect of the intertrack interference (ITI) reduction by 2D-FIR using the correlation between the real FIR filter output and the partial response class-I (PR1) signal corresponding to recording sequence by the computer simulation. The results show that the 2D-FIR filter is effective to mitigate ITI and improves the signal-to-noise ratio at the discriminate point by about 0.6 dB.

  20. Numerical investigation of 3D effects on a 2D-dominated shocked mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Weber, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    A nominally two-dimensional interface, unstable to the Rayleigh-Taylor or Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, will become three-dimensional at high Reynolds numbers due to the growth of background noise and 3D effects like vortex stretching. This three-dimensionality changes macroscopic features, such as the perturbation growth rate and mixing, as it enhances turbulent dissipation. In this study, a 2D perturbation with small-scale, 3D fluctuations is modeled using the hydrodynamics code Miranda. A Mach 1.95 shockwave accelerates a helium-over-SF6 interface, similar to the experiments of Motl et al. ["Experimental validation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov scaling law over large density ratio and shock strength ranges," Phys. Fluids 21(12), 126102 (2009)], to explore the regime where a 2D dominated flow will experience 3D effects. We report on the structure, growth, and mixing of the post-shocked interface in 2D and 3D.

  1. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Low 2D:4D values are associated with video game addiction.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Zenses, Eva-Maria; Lenz, Bernd; Stoessel, Christina; Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Rehbein, Florian; Kliem, Sören; Mößle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Androgen-dependent signaling regulates the growth of the fingers on the human hand during embryogenesis. A higher androgen load results in lower 2D:4D (second digit to fourth digit) ratio values. Prenatal androgen exposure also impacts brain development. 2D:4D values are usually lower in males and are viewed as a proxy of male brain organization. Here, we quantified video gaming behavior in young males. We found lower mean 2D:4D values in subjects who were classified according to the CSAS-II as having at-risk/addicted behavior (n = 27) compared with individuals with unproblematic video gaming behavior (n = 27). Thus, prenatal androgen exposure and a hyper-male brain organization, as represented by low 2D:4D values, are associated with problematic video gaming behavior. These results may be used to improve the diagnosis, prediction, and prevention of video game addiction.

  3. Low 2D:4D Values Are Associated with Video Game Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Zenses, Eva-Maria; Lenz, Bernd; Stoessel, Christina; Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Rehbein, Florian; Kliem, Sören; Mößle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Androgen-dependent signaling regulates the growth of the fingers on the human hand during embryogenesis. A higher androgen load results in lower 2D:4D (second digit to fourth digit) ratio values. Prenatal androgen exposure also impacts brain development. 2D:4D values are usually lower in males and are viewed as a proxy of male brain organization. Here, we quantified video gaming behavior in young males. We found lower mean 2D:4D values in subjects who were classified according to the CSAS-II as having at-risk/addicted behavior (n = 27) compared with individuals with unproblematic video gaming behavior (n = 27). Thus, prenatal androgen exposure and a hyper-male brain organization, as represented by low 2D:4D values, are associated with problematic video gaming behavior. These results may be used to improve the diagnosis, prediction, and prevention of video game addiction. PMID:24236143

  4. Use of marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) for accelerated 2D MRI relaxometry and diffusometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamini, Dan; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring multidimensional (e.g., 2D) relaxation spectra in NMR and MRI clinical applications is a holy grail of the porous media and biomedical MR communities. The main bottleneck is the inversion of Fredholm integrals of the first kind, an ill-conditioned problem requiring large amounts of data to stabilize a solution. We suggest a novel experimental design and processing framework to accelerate and improve the reconstruction of such 2D spectra that uses a priori information from the 1D projections of spectra, or marginal distributions. These 1D marginal distributions provide powerful constraints when 2D spectra are reconstructed, and their estimation requires an order of magnitude less data than a conventional 2D approach. This marginal distributions constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is demonstrated here with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-water phantom that has 3 distinct peaks in the 2D D-T1 space. The stability, sensitivity to experimental parameters, and accuracy of this new approach are compared with conventional methods by serially subsampling the full data set. While the conventional, unconstrained approach performed poorly, the new method had proven to be highly accurate and robust, only requiring a fraction of the data. Additionally, synthetic T1 -T2 data are presented to explore the effects of noise on the estimations, and the performance of the proposed method with a smooth and realistic 2D spectrum. The proposed framework is quite general and can also be used with a variety of 2D MRI experiments (D-T2,T1 -T2, D -D, etc.), making these potentially feasible for preclinical and even clinical applications for the first time.

  5. Reconfigurable 2D cMUT-ASIC arrays for 3D ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongkeun; Jung, Sungjin; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seunghun; Na, Junseok; Yang, Ikseok; Kwon, Oh-kyong; Kim, Dongwook

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementations of the complete 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer electronics and its analog front-end module for transmitting high voltage ultrasound pulses and receiving its echo signals to realize 3D ultrasound image. In order to minimize parasitic capacitances and ultimately improve signal-to- noise ratio (SNR), cMUT has to be integrate with Tx/Rx electronics. Additionally, in order to integrate 2D cMUT array module, significant optimized high voltage pulser circuitry, low voltage analog/digital circuit design and packaging challenges are required due to high density of elements and small pitch of each element. We designed 256(16x16)- element cMUT and reconfigurable driving ASIC composed of 120V high voltage pulser, T/R switch, low noise preamplifier and digital control block to set Tx frequency of ultrasound and pulse train in each element. Designed high voltage analog ASIC was successfully bonded with 2D cMUT array by flip-chip bonding process and it connected with analog front-end board to transmit pulse-echo signals. This implementation of reconfigurable cMUT-ASIC-AFE board enables us to produce large aperture 2D transducer array and acquire high quality of 3D ultrasound image.

  6. 2D/3D velocity model for the high resolution 2D and 3D seismic data from the CO2SINK Ketzin Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A.; Asch, G.; Lueth, S.; Goetz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seismic traveltime inversion, traveltime tomography and seismic reflection techniques have been applied for two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) data acquired in conjunction with characterization and monitoring aspects at a carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage site at Ketzin, Germany (the CO2SINK project) (S.Yordkayhun, 2008). A seismic source comparison from the 2D pilot study regarding acquisition parameters have been tested at the side has shown the weight drop source is suitable concerning the signal penetration, frequency content of the data and minimizing time and costs for the 3D data acquisition. For the Ketzin seismic data, the ability to obtain an accurate 2D/3D interval velocity model is limited by the acquisition geometry, source-generated noise and time shifts due to the near-surface effects producing severe distortions in the data. Moreover, these time shifts are comparable to the dominant periods of the reflections and to the size of structures to be imaged. Therefore, a combination of seismic refraction and state-of-the-art processing techniques, including careful static corrections and more accurate velocity analysis, has resulted in key improvements of the images and has allowed new information about the 2D/3D interval velocities. The results from these studies together with borehole information, hydrogeologic models and seismic modeling will be combined into an integrated 2D/3D velocity model. After that a careful 2D/3D depth migration is to be provided. It can be used as a database for the future monitoring program at the site.

  7. Calcium-dependent activation and autolysis of Arabidopsis metacaspase 2d.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naohide; Lam, Eric

    2011-03-25

    Metacaspases (MCPs) are members of a new family of cysteine proteases found in plants, fungi, and protozoa that are structurally related to metazoan caspases. Recent studies showed that plant MCPs are arginine/lysine-specific cysteine proteases with caspase-like processing activities in vitro and in vivo, and some of the plant type II MCPs exhibit Ca(2+) dependence for their endopeptidase activity in vitro. However, the mechanisms and biological relevance of Ca(2+) dependence and self-processing of plant MCPs remains unclear. Here we show that recombinant AtMCP2d, the most abundantly expressed member of Arabidopsis type II MCPs at the transcriptional level, exhibits a strict Ca(2+) dependence for its catalytic activation that is apparently mediated by intramolecular self-cleavage mechanism. However, rapid inactivation of AtMCP2d activity concomitant with Ca(2+)-induced self-processing at multiple internal sites was observed. Because active AtMCP2d can cleave its inactive form, intermolecular cleavage (autolysis) of AtMCP2d could also occur under our assay conditions. Ca(2+)-induced self-processing of recombinant AtMCP2d was found to correlate with the sequential appearance of at least six intermediates, including self-cleaved forms, during the proenzyme purification process. Six of these peptides were characterized, and the cleavage sites were mapped through N-terminal protein sequencing. Mutation analysis of AtMCP2d revealed that cleavage after Lys-225, which is a highly conserved residue among the six Arabidopsis type II MCPs, is critical for the catalytic activation by Ca(2+), and we demonstrate that this residue is essential for AtMCP2d activation of H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in yeast. Together, our results provide clues to understand the mode of regulation for this class of proteases.

  8. Impact of Air Injection on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Norum, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to review the program to determine impact of core fluidic chevrons on noise produced by dual stream jets (i.e., broadband shock noise - supersonic, and mixing noise - subsonic and supersonic). The presentation reviews the sources of jet noise. It shows designs of Generation II Fluidic Chevrons. The injection impacts shock structure and stream disturbances through enhanced mixing. This may impact constructive interference between acoustic sources. The high fan pressures may inhibit mixing produced by core injectors. A fan stream injection may be required for better noise reduction. In future the modification of Gen II nozzles to allow for some azimuthal control: will allow for higher mass flow rates and will allow for shallower injection angles A Flow field study is scheduled for spring, 2008 The conclusions are that injection can reduce well-defined shock noise and injection reduces mixing noise near peak jet noise angle

  9. Reduced complexity of multi-track joint 2-D Viterbi detectors for bit-patterned media recording channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myint, L. M. M.; Warisarn, C.

    2017-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) interference is one of the prominent challenges in ultra-high density recording system such as bit patterned media recording (BPMR). The multi-track joint 2-D detection technique with the help of the array-head reading can tackle this problem effectively by jointly processing the multiple readback signals from the adjacent tracks. Moreover, it can robustly alleviate the impairments due to track mis-registration (TMR) and media noise. However, the computational complexity of such detectors is normally too high and hard to implement in a reality, even for a few multiple tracks. Therefore, in this paper, we mainly focus on reducing the complexity of multi-track joint 2-D Viterbi detector without paying a large penalty in terms of the performance. We propose a simplified multi-track joint 2-D Viterbi detector with a manageable complexity level for the BPMR's multi-track multi-head (MTMH) system. In the proposed method, the complexity of detector's trellis is reduced with the help of the joint-track equalization method which employs 1-D equalizers and 2-D generalized partial response (GPR) target. Moreover, we also examine the performance of a full-fledged multi-track joint 2-D detector and the conventional 2-D detection. The results show that the simplified detector can perform close to the full-fledge detector, especially when the system faces high media noise, with the significant low complexity.

  10. Antenna coupled detectors for 2D staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritz, Michael A.; Kolasa, Borys; Lail, Brian; Burkholder, Robert; Chen, Leonard

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW)/sub-mmW/THz region of the electro-magnetic spectrum enables imaging thru clothing and other obscurants such as fog, clouds, smoke, sand, and dust. Therefore considerable interest exists in developing low cost millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) systems. Previous MMWI systems have evolved from crude mechanically scanned, single element receiver systems into very complex multiple receiver camera systems. Initial systems required many expensive mmW integrated-circuit low-noise amplifiers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of the existing systems, attempts have been made to develop new mmW imaging sensors employing direct detection arrays. In this paper, we report on Raytheon's recent development of a unique focal plane array technology, which operates broadly from the mmW through the sub-mmW/THz region. Raytheon's innovative nano-antenna based detector enables low cost production of 2D staring mmW focal plane arrays (mmW FPA), which not only have equivalent sensitivity and performance to existing MMWI systems, but require no mechanical scanning.

  11. Tracking of deformable target in 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Lucas; Marchal, Maud; Le Bras, Anthony; Dardenne, Guillaume; Krupa, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for automatically tracking deformable target within 2D ultrasound images. Our approach uses only dense information combined with a physically-based model and has therefore the advantage of not using any fiducial marker nor a priori knowledge on the anatomical environment. The physical model is represented by a mass-spring damper system driven by different types of forces where the external forces are obtained by maximizing image similarity metric between a reference target and a deformed target across the time. This deformation is represented by a parametric warping model where the optimal parameters are estimated from the intensity variation. This warping function is well-suited to represent localized deformations in the ultrasound images because it directly links the forces applied on each mass with the motion of all the pixels in its vicinity. The internal forces constrain the deformation to physically plausible motions, and reduce the sensitivity to the speckle noise. The approach was validated on simulated and real data, both for rigid and free-form motions of soft tissues. The results are very promising since the deformable target could be tracked with a good accuracy for both types of motion. Our approach opens novel possibilities for computer-assisted interventions where deformable organs are involved and could be used as a new tool for interactive tracking of soft tissues in ultrasound images.

  12. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  14. Comparative metabolic capabilities and inhibitory profiles of CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.10, and CYP2D6.17.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongwu; He, Minxia M; Liu, Houfu; Wrighton, Steven A; Wang, Li; Guo, Bin; Li, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) gene are a major cause of pharmacokinetic variability in human. Although the poor metabolizer phenotype is known to be caused by two null alleles leading to absence of functional CYP2D6 protein, the large variability among individuals with functional alleles remains mostly unexplained. Thus, the goal of this study was to examine the intrinsic enzymatic differences that exist among the several active CYP2D6 allelic variants. The relative catalytic activities (enzyme kinetics) of three functionally active human CYP2D6 allelic variants, CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.10, and CYP2D6.17, were systematically investigated for their ability to metabolize a structurally diverse set of clinically important CYP2D6-metabolized drugs [atomoxetine, bufuralol, codeine, debrisoquine, dextromethorphan, (S)-fluoxetine, nortriptyline, and tramadol] and the effects of various CYP2D6-inhibitors [cocaine, (S)-fluoxetine, (S)-norfluoxetine, imipramine, quinidine, and thioridazine] on these three variants. The most significant difference observed was a consistent but substrate-dependent decease in the catalytic efficiencies of cDNA-expressed CYP2D6.10 and CYP2D6.17 compared with CYP2D6.1, yielding 1.32 to 27.9 and 7.33 to 80.4% of the efficiency of CYP2D6.1, respectively. The most important finding from this study is that there are mixed effects on the functionally reduced allelic variants in enzyme-substrate affinity or enzyme-inhibitor affinity, which is lower, higher, or comparable to that for CYP2D6.1. Considering the rather high frequencies of CYP2D6*10 and CYP2D6*17 alleles for Asians and African Americans, respectively, these data provide further insight into ethnic differences in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. However, as with all in vitro to in vivo extrapolations, caution should be applied to the clinical consequences.

  15. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  16. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  17. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  18. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  19. ADAM10 new selective inhibitors reduce NKG2D ligand release sensitizing Hodgkin lymphoma cells to NKG2D-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Maria Raffaella; Camodeca, Caterina; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Venè, Roberta; Tosetti, Francesca; Dapino, Irene; Costa, Delfina; Musso, Alessandra; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) resistant to conventional therapies is increasing, making of interest the search for new schemes of treatment. Members of the "A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases" (ADAMs) family, mainly ADAM10 or ADAM17, have been proposed as therapeutic targets in solid tumors and some ADAMs inhibitors have been shown to exert antitumor effects. We have previously described an overexpression of ADAM10 in HL, together with increased release of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) and reduced activation of effector T lymphocytes with anti-lymphoma capacity. Aim of the present work was to verify whether inhibition of ADAM10 in HL cells could restore the triggering of NKG2D-dependent anti-lymphoma T cell response. As no selective ADAM10 blockers have been reported so far, we synthesized the two hydroxamate compounds LT4 and MN8 with selectivity for ADAM10 over metalloproteases (MMPs), LT4 showing higher specificity for ADAM10 over ADAM17. We show that (i) HL lymph nodes (LN) and cultured HL cells express high levels of the mature active membrane form of ADAM10; (ii) ADAM10 is the major sheddase for the NKG2D-L in HL cells; (iii) the new LT4 and MN8 compounds strongly reduce the shedding of NKG2D-L by HL cell lines and enhance the binding of NKG2D receptor; (iv) of note, these new ADAM10 inhibitors increase the sensitivity of HL cell lines to NKG2D-dependent cell killing exerted by natural killer and γδ T cells. Overall, the biologic activity of LT4 and MN8 appears to be more potent than that of the commercial inhibitor GI254023X.

  20. ADAM10 new selective inhibitors reduce NKG2D ligand release sensitizing Hodgkin lymphoma cells to NKG2D-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Zocchi, Maria Raffaella; Camodeca, Caterina; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Venè, Roberta; Tosetti, Francesca; Dapino, Irene; Costa, Delfina; Musso, Alessandra; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) resistant to conventional therapies is increasing, making of interest the search for new schemes of treatment. Members of the “A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases” (ADAMs) family, mainly ADAM10 or ADAM17, have been proposed as therapeutic targets in solid tumors and some ADAMs inhibitors have been shown to exert antitumor effects. We have previously described an overexpression of ADAM10 in HL, together with increased release of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) and reduced activation of effector T lymphocytes with anti-lymphoma capacity. Aim of the present work was to verify whether inhibition of ADAM10 in HL cells could restore the triggering of NKG2D-dependent anti-lymphoma T cell response. As no selective ADAM10 blockers have been reported so far, we synthesized the two hydroxamate compounds LT4 and MN8 with selectivity for ADAM10 over metalloproteases (MMPs), LT4 showing higher specificity for ADAM10 over ADAM17. We show that (i) HL lymph nodes (LN) and cultured HL cells express high levels of the mature active membrane form of ADAM10; (ii) ADAM10 is the major sheddase for the NKG2D-L in HL cells; (iii) the new LT4 and MN8 compounds strongly reduce the shedding of NKG2D-L by HL cell lines and enhance the binding of NKG2D receptor; (iv) of note, these new ADAM10 inhibitors increase the sensitivity of HL cell lines to NKG2D-dependent cell killing exerted by natural killer and γδ T cells. Overall, the biologic activity of LT4 and MN8 appears to be more potent than that of the commercial inhibitor GI254023X. PMID:27467923

  1. Impact of Signal-to-Noise Ratio in a Hyperspectral Sensor on the Accuracy of Biophysical Parameter Estimation in Case II Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-13

    experimental results,” Appl. Opt. 44(3), 412–422 (2005). 51. I. M. Levin and E. Levina , “Effect of atmospheric interference and sensor noise in...consistent with the results obtained by Levin and Levina [51]. 3.3.2. Estimates from semi-analytical algorithms The semi-analytical algorithms

  2. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  3. A novel edge detection for buried target extraction after SVD-2D wavelet processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Peng, Su-ping; Yang, Feng

    2014-07-01

    In this letter, a novel approach to analyze the edge and recognize targets of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) images is proposed. The performance of target recognition depends on the accuracy of edge detection. Cross-correlation calculation of the separated background and target signals is introduced to improve the accuracy. A novel edge detection scheme designed based on wavelet modulus maxima is applied on the cross-correlation profiles to reduce the false detection possibility caused by the noise. A novel filtering scheme based on singular value decomposition (SVD)-2D wavelet procedure is proposed to separate the target from background. The procedure can not only enhance the target reflection while suppressing the noise by improving the signal to noise ratio (SNR), but also separate the background and reflection signals. Experimental results including simulation and field application justify the effect of this scheme.

  4. A real-time multi-scale 2D Gaussian filter based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haibo; Gai, Xingqin; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter has been widely used in feature extraction (e.g. SIFT, edge etc.), image segmentation, image enhancement, image noise removing, multi-scale shape description etc. However, their computational complexity remains an issue for real-time image processing systems. Aimed at this problem, we propose a framework of multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter based on FPGA in this paper. Firstly, a full-hardware architecture based on parallel pipeline was designed to achieve high throughput rate. Secondly, in order to save some multiplier, the 2-D convolution is separated into two 1-D convolutions. Thirdly, a dedicate first in first out memory named as CAFIFO (Column Addressing FIFO) was designed to avoid the error propagating induced by spark on clock. Finally, a shared memory framework was designed to reduce memory costs. As a demonstration, we realized a 3 scales 2-D Gaussian filter on a single ALTERA Cyclone III FPGA chip. Experimental results show that, the proposed framework can computing a Multi-scales 2-D Gaussian filtering within one pixel clock period, is further suitable for real-time image processing. Moreover, the main principle can be popularized to the other operators based on convolution, such as Gabor filter, Sobel operator and so on.

  5. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  6. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  7. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  8. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  9. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  10. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  11. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  12. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  13. Controlling Structural Anisotropy of Anisotropic 2D Layers in Pseudo-1D/2D Material Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Kedi; Suslu, Aslihan; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Yano, Aliya; Soignard, Emmanuel; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Shen, Yuxia; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2017-07-10

    Chemical vapor deposition and growth dynamics of highly anisotropic 2D lateral heterojunctions between pseudo-1D ReS2 and isotropic WS2 monolayers are reported for the first time. Constituent ReS2 and WS2 layers have vastly different atomic structure, crystallizing in anisotropic 1T' and isotropic 2H phases, respectively. Through high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and angle-resolved Raman spectroscopy, this study is able to provide the very first atomic look at intimate interfaces between these dissimilar 2D materials. Surprisingly, the results reveal that ReS2 lateral heterojunctions to WS2 produce well-oriented (highly anisotropic) Re-chains perpendicular to WS2 edges. When vertically stacked, Re-chains orient themselves along the WS2 zigzag direction, and consequently, Re-chains exhibit six-fold rotation, resulting in loss of macroscopic scale anisotropy. The degree of anisotropy of ReS2 on WS2 largely depends on the domain size, and decreases for increasing domain size due to randomization of Re-chains and formation of ReS2 subdomains. Present work establishes the growth dynamics of atomic junctions between novel anisotropic/isotropic 2D materials, and overall results mark the very first demonstration of control over anisotropy direction, which is a significant leap forward for large-scale nanomanufacturing of anisotropic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Analysis of helicopter noise data using international helicopter noise certification procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Rickley, E. J.; Levanduski, D. A.; Woolridge, S. B.

    1986-03-01

    The results of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) noise measurement flight test program involving seven helicopters are documented. Noise levels were established using the basic testing, reduction and analysis techniques specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) for helicopter noise certification, supplemented with some procedural refinements contained in ICAO Working Group II recommendations for incorporation into the standard.

  15. Noise suppression by quantum control before and after the noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamura, Hiroaki; Kawakubo, Ryûitirô; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the possibility of protecting the state of a quantum system that goes through noise by measurements and operations before and after the noise process. The aim is to seek the optimal protocol that makes the input and output states as close as possible and to clarify the role of the measurements therein. We consider two cases: one can perform quantum measurements and operations (i) only after the noise process and (ii) both before and after. We prove in a two-dimensional Hilbert space that, in case (i), the noise suppression is essentially impossible for all types of noise and, in case (ii), the optimal protocol for the depolarizing noise is either the "do nothing" protocol or the "discriminate and reprepare" protocol. These protocols are not "truly quantum" and can be considered as classical. They involve no measurement or only use the measurement outcomes. These results describe the fundamental limitations in quantum mechanics from the viewpoint of control theory. Finally, we conjecture that a statement similar to case (ii) holds for higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces and present some numerical evidence.

  16. How to COAAD Images. II. A Coaddition Image that is Optimal for Any Purpose in the Background-dominated Noise Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackay, Barak; Ofek, Eran O.

    2017-02-01

    Image coaddition is one of the most basic operations that astronomers perform. In Paper I, we presented the optimal ways to coadd images in order to detect faint sources and to perform flux measurements under the assumption that the noise is approximately Gaussian. Here, we build on these results and derive from first principles a coaddition technique that is optimal for any hypothesis testing and measurement (e.g., source detection, flux or shape measurements, and star/galaxy separation), in the background-noise-dominated case. This method has several important properties. The pixels of the resulting coadded image are uncorrelated. This image preserves all the information (from the original individual images) on all spatial frequencies. Any hypothesis testing or measurement that can be done on all the individual images simultaneously, can be done on the coadded image without any loss of information. The PSF of this image is typically as narrow, or narrower than the PSF of the best image in the ensemble. Moreover, this image is practically indistinguishable from a regular single image, meaning that any code that measures any property on a regular astronomical image can be applied to it unchanged. In particular, the optimal source detection statistic derived in Paper I is reproduced by matched filtering this image with its own PSF. This coaddition process, which we call proper coaddition, can be understood as the maximum signal-to-noise ratio measurement of the Fourier transform of the image, weighted in such a way that the noise in the entire Fourier domain is of equal variance. This method has important implications for multi-epoch seeing-limited deep surveys, weak lensing galaxy shape measurements, and diffraction-limited imaging via speckle observations. The last topic will be covered in depth in future papers. We provide an implementation of this algorithm in MATLAB.

  17. Photo-electroactive ternary chalcogenido-indate-stannates with a unique 2-D porous structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Pu, Ya-Yang; Zhao, Xiao-Wei; Qian, Li-Wen; Bian, Guo-Qing; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2015-03-14

    A lot of ternary In-Sb-Q (Q = S, Se) chalcogenido-metalates with amines or complex cations have been recently reported for their diverse structures, however, such a type of In-Sn-Q chalcogenido-metalate has been rarely announced. Herein, we report a series of 2-D In-Sn-Q compounds prepared using a metal-phenanthroline cationic template, [M(Phen)3](In2Sn2Q8)·(amine)·nH2O (M = Ni(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); amine = cyclohexylamine (Cha) or 1,6-diaminohexane (Dah); Q = S or Se). Their anions are isostructural and a 2-D porous network with large 16-tetrahedron-rings. The 2-D network joint of In-Sn-Q is a (In/Sn)3Q3 six-membered ring, which is different from the Sn3Q4 pseudosemicube of most 2-D Sn-Q binary compounds. The materials exhibit photocurrent response properties measured using a photo-electrochemical cell. The result shows that (1) the selenides exhibit more intense photocurrents than the sulfides and (2) the current intensity is related to the metal-phenanthroline cations.

  18. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A compendium is presented of documents on noise. The articles presented are categorized in the following sections: noise sources, noise detection and measurement, noise abatement and control, physical effects of noise, psychological and physiological effects of noise, noise regulations and standards, patents and contracts, and noise research.

  19. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of CH2D radical in a slit supersonic jet: isotopic symmetry breaking in the CH stretching manifold.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Melanie A; Savage, Chandra; Dong, Feng; Sharp-Williams, Erin N; McCoy, Anne B; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-06-21

    First high-resolution infrared absorption spectra in the fundamental symmetric/asymmetric CH stretching region of isotopically substituted methyl radical, CH(2)D, are reported and analyzed. These studies become feasible in the difference frequency spectrometer due to (i) high density radical generation via dissociative electron attachment to CH(2)DI in a discharge, (ii) low rotational temperatures (23 K) from supersonic cooling in a slit expansion, (iii) long absorption path length (64 cm) along the slit axes, and (iv) near shot noise limited absorption sensitivity (5 × 10(-7)/√(Hz)). The spectra are fully rovibrationally resolved and fit to an asymmetric top rotational Hamiltonian to yield rotational/centrifugal constants and vibrational band origins. In addition, the slit expansion collisionally quenches the transverse velocity distribution along the laser probe direction, yielding sub-Doppler resolution of spin-rotation structure and even partial resolution of nuclear hyperfine structure for each rovibrational line. Global least-squares fits to the line shapes provide additional information on spin-rotation and nuclear hyperfine constants, which complement and clarify previous FTIR studies [K. Kawaguchi, Can. J. Phys. 79, 449 (2001)] of CH(2)D in the out-of-plane bending region. Finally, analysis of the spectral data from the full isotopomeric CH(m)D(3-m) series based on harmonically coupled Morse oscillators establishes a predictive framework for describing the manifold of planar stretching vibrations in this fundamental combustion radical.

  20. Piezoelectricity of 2D nanomaterials: characterization, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Meguid, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    The discovery of piezoelectricity in 2D nanomaterials represents a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future technologies. This article reviews recent progress in the characterization, properties evaluation, and applications of piezoelectricity of 2D piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs). To begin, an introduction to the existing 2D PNs, which exhibit a wide range of atomic structures and configurations, is presented. The nanoscale measurements and associated experimental techniques as well as the atomic simulations of the piezoelectric properties of 2D PNs are then summarized. Some of the pertinent parameters, which govern the piezoelectric properties of 2D PNs, are discussed. Furthermore, our article concludes with some potential applications including piezotronics, piezophototronics, and energy harvesting of 2D PNs, which can open the doors to the innovative design of next-generation nanoelectronics and nanodevices. Finally, we highlight perspectives and challenges for the future development of 2D PNs.

  1. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    particular attention paid to the case of Gaussian canyon . The solution to the three-dimensional wave equation in Cartesian co-ordinates can be written...in terms of a modal decomposition, carried out in the vertical and across- canyon horizontal directions. Work Completed 1. Nx2D and 3D Noise PE...azimuth in the Hudson Canyon [Figure 2). Additionally, the PE-reciprocity noise model was used to estimate the size, speed and distance from the

  2. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  3. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  4. Arabidopsis metacaspase 2d is a positive mediator of cell death induced during biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naohide; Lam, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteases such as caspases play important roles in programmed cell death (PCD) of metazoans. Plant metacaspases (MCPs), a family of cysteine proteases structurally related to caspases, have been hypothesized to be ancestors of metazoan caspases, despite their different substrate specificity. Arabidopsis thaliana contains six type II MCP genes (AtMCP2a-f). Whether and how these individual members are involved in controlling PCD in plants remains largely unknown. Here we investigated the function and regulation of AtMCP2d, the predominant and constitutively expressed member of type II MCPs, in stress-inducible PCD. Two AtMCP2d mutants (mcp2d-1 and mcp2d-3) exhibited reduced sensitivity to PCD-inducing mycotoxin fumonisin B1 as well as oxidative stress inducers, whereas AtMCP2d over-expressors were more sensitive to these agents, and exhibited accelerated cell-death progression. We found that AtMCP2d exclusively localizes to the cytosol, and its accumulation and self-processing patterns were age-dependent in leaves. Importantly, active proteolytic processing of AtMCP2d proteins dependent on its catalytic activity was observed in mature leaves during mycotoxin-induced cell death. We also found that mcp2d-1 leaves exhibited reduced cell death in response to Pseudomonas syringae carrying avirulent gene avrRpt2, and that self-processing of AtMCP2d was also detected in wild-type leaves in response to this pathogen. Furthermore, increases in processed AtMCP2d proteins were found to correlate with conditional cell-death induction in two lesion-mimic mutants (cpr22 and ssi4) that exhibit spontaneous cell-death phenotypes. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that AtMCP2d plays a positive regulatory role in biotic and abiotic stress-induced PCD.

  5. Performance Analysis of Error Probabilities for Arbitrary 2-D Signaling with I/Q Unbalances over Nakagami-m Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeyoon; Yoon, Dongweon; Park, Sang Kyu

    Recently, we provided closed-form expressions involving two-dimensional (2-D) joint Gaussian Q-function for the symbol error rate (SER) and bit error rate (BER) of an arbitrary 2-D signal with I/Q unbalances over an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel [1]. In this letter, we extend the expressions to Nakagami-m fading channels. Using Craig representation of the 2-D joint Gaussian Q-function, we derive an exact and general expression for the error probabilities of arbitrary 2-D signaling with I/Q phase and amplitude unbalances over Nakagami-m fading channels.

  6. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, R. B.; Smith, G. C.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J. W.

    1997-02-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 × 640 mm 2. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3He plus 100 kPa CF 4, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10 5 events per secod. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 Å neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 × 5 mm 2) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  7. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W.; Smith, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4} and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2{angstrom} neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  8. Delamination monitoring in CFRP laminated plates under noisy conditions using complex-wavelet 2D curvature mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Cao, Maosen; Li, Ximing; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław; Bai, Runbo

    2017-10-01

    Delamination monitoring in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminated plates is crucial to ensure the integrity and safety of the structures that accommodate the plates. To identify delaminations in CFRP laminated plates, the two-dimensional (2D) curvature mode shape method is a prevailing method that features instant and simultaneous determination of the presence and location of the delamination. However, this method has two noticeable deficiencies in characterizing incipient small-sized delaminations, namely lack of damage sensitivity and inadequate noise robustness. To this end, this study proposes a new dynamics feature of the complex-wavelet 2D curvature mode shape to discriminate small-sized delaminations. This feature is delicately formulated based on the integration of the 2D curvature mode shape with the complex wavelet. The complex-wavelet 2D curvature mode shape is superior to the 2D curvature mode shape by virtue of its stronger damage sensitivity and noise robustness. These merits can be attributed to the adjustable localization and the multi-scale properties of the second-order Gabor wavelet, respectively. Proof of concept of the complex-wavelet 2D curvature mode shape is numerically undertaken in a finite-element laminated CFRP plate with a small-sized delamination, with emphasis on sensitivity to damage and robustness against noise. The applicability of the feature is experimentally validated on a CFRP laminated plate with a small-sized delamination, whose mode shapes are acquired via the non-contact measurement using a scanning laser vibrometer. The numerical and experimental results show that the complex-wavelet 2D curvature mode shape can effectively designate the presence and location of the delaminations in CFRP laminated plates under noisy conditions.

  9. How does C-VIEW image quality compare with conventional 2D FFDM?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jeffrey S. Wells, Jered R.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The FDA approved the use of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in 2011 as an adjunct to 2D full field digital mammography (FFDM) with the constraint that all DBT acquisitions must be paired with a 2D image to assure adequate interpretative information is provided. Recently manufacturers have developed methods to provide a synthesized 2D image generated from the DBT data with the hope of sparing patients the radiation exposure from the FFDM acquisition. While this much needed alternative effectively reduces the total radiation burden, differences in image quality must also be considered. The goal of this study was to compare the intrinsic image quality of synthesized 2D C-VIEW and 2D FFDM images in terms of resolution, contrast, and noise. Methods: Two phantoms were utilized in this study: the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom (ACR phantom) and a novel 3D printed anthropomorphic breast phantom. Both phantoms were imaged using a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 3D system. Analysis of the ACR phantom includes both visual inspection and objective automated analysis using in-house software. Analysis of the 3D anthropomorphic phantom includes visual assessment of resolution and Fourier analysis of the noise. Results: Using ACR-defined scoring criteria for the ACR phantom, the FFDM images scored statistically higher than C-VIEW according to both the average observer and automated scores. In addition, between 50% and 70% of C-VIEW images failed to meet the nominal minimum ACR accreditation requirements—primarily due to fiber breaks. Software analysis demonstrated that C-VIEW provided enhanced visualization of medium and large microcalcification objects; however, the benefits diminished for smaller high contrast objects and all low contrast objects. Visual analysis of the anthropomorphic phantom showed a measureable loss of resolution in the C-VIEW image (11 lp/mm FFDM, 5 lp/mm C-VIEW) and loss in detection of small microcalcification

  10. 2-D Optical CDMA Networks Using MWPM, Double Hard Limiters and Modified Carrier-Hopping Prime Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Le-Ngoc, Tho

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional optical code division multiple access (2-D-OCDMA) scheme using multiwavelength pulse modulation (MWPM), double optical hard limiters (DHL), and modified carrier-hopping prime sequences (MCHP) to increase the achievable system capacity. Design criteria to reduce multiaccess interference (MAI) are established and indicate that suitable signature sequences for 2-D-OCDMA/MWPM must have good cross-correlation property in terms of both time shift and wavelength shift. Performance analysis of 2-D-OCDMA/MWPM/DHL systems in the presence of MAI and photo detector shot noise is developed. Simulation and analytical results are in very good agreement and indicate that the proposed 2-D-OCDMA/MWPM/DHL systems using MCHP sequences can offer a much larger capacity than others, suitable for applications in broadband fiber-optic access networks.

  11. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  12. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  13. Specific Heat Studies of a 2D S = 1/2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, Christopher; Xiao, Fan; Gerber, Simon; Kenzelmann, Michel; Xu, Nu; Sandvik, Anders

    We report on the field-dependent specific heat of a highly two-dimensional Heisenberg, S = 1/2 antiferromagnet (2D QHAF), [Cu(pz)2(2-OHpy)2](ClO4)2 , where pz = pyrazine and 2-OHpy = 2-pyridone. The copper atoms and pyrazine molecules form distorted rectangular layers of pyrazine-bridged copper(II) ions with the pyridone molecules normal to the layers, providing exceptional spacing between layers. The zero-field specific heat of this compound (1.8 - 35 K) is compared to the recent QMC simulations of the specific heat for the 2D QHAF. Under applied field, the temperature dependence of the specific heat varies smoothly, but no field-induced ordering is observed. This behavior differs from the field-induced ordering in the 2D QHAF Cu(pz)2(ClO4)2 reported previously.

  14. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  15. Zero-dimensional noise: the best mask you never saw.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel H; Meese, Tim S

    2012-09-29

    The transmission of weak signals through the visual system is limited by internal noise. Its level can be estimated by adding external noise, which increases the variance within the detecting mechanism, causing masking. But experiments with white noise fail to meet three predictions: (a) noise has too small an influence on the slope of the psychometric function, (b) masking occurs even when the noise sample is identical in each two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) interval, and (c) double-pass consistency is too low. We show that much of the energy of 2D white noise masks extends well beyond the pass-band of plausible detecting mechanisms and that this suppresses signal activity. These problems are avoided by restricting the external noise energy to the target mechanisms by introducing a pedestal with a mean contrast of 0% and independent contrast jitter in each 2AFC interval (termed zero-dimensional [0D] noise). We compared the jitter condition to masking from 2D white noise in double-pass masking and (novel) contrast matching experiments. Zero-dimensional noise produced the strongest masking, greatest double-pass consistency, and no suppression of perceived contrast, consistent with a noisy ideal observer. Deviations from this behavior for 2D white noise were explained by cross-channel suppression with no need to appeal to induced internal noise or uncertainty. We conclude that (a) results from previous experiments using white pixel noise should be re-evaluated and (b) 0D noise provides a cleaner method for investigating internal variability than pixel noise. Ironically then, the best external noise stimulus does not look noisy.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: comparison of 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo, 2D T2*weighted gradient-recalled echo and 3D T2-weighted variable flip-angle turbo spin echo sequences.

    PubMed

    Meindl, T; Wirth, S; Weckbach, S; Dietrich, O; Reiser, M; Schoenberg, S O

    2009-03-01

    To compare an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution T2-weighted (w) MR sequence and its reformations with conventional sequences for imaging of the cervical spine. Fifteen volunteers were examined at 1.5 T using sagittal and axial 3D T2-w, sagittal and axial 2D T2w, and axial 2D T2*w MR sequences. Axial reformations of the sagittal 3D dataset were generated (3D MPR T2w). Signal-to-noise and image homogeneity were evaluated in a phantom and in vivo. Visibility of ten anatomical structures of the cervical spine was evaluated. Artifacts were assessed. For statistical analysis, Cohen's kappa, Wilcoxon matched pairs, and t-testing were utilized. There were no significant differences in homogeneity between the sequences. Sagittal 3D T2w enabled better delineation of nerve roots, neural foramina, and intraforaminal structures compared to sagittal 2D T2w. Axial 3D T2w and axial 3D MPR T2w resulted in superior visibility of most anatomical structures compared to axial 2D T2w and comparable results to 2D T2*w concerning the spinal cord, nerve roots, intraforaminal structures, and fat. Artifacts were most pronounced in axial 2D T2w and axial 3D T2w. Acquisition of a 3D T2w data set is feasible in the cervical spine with superior delineation of anatomical structures compared to 2D sequences.

  17. Distribution of noise sources for seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Rychert, Catherine; Gerstoft, Peter

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate that the distribution of seismic noise sources affects the accuracy of Green's function estimates and therefore isotropic and anisotropic tomographic inversions for both velocity and attenuation. We compare three methods for estimating seismic noise source distributions and quantify the potential error in phase velocity, azimuthal anisotropy and attenuation estimates due to inhomogenous source distributions. The methods include: (1) least-squares inversion of beamformer output, (2) a least-squares inversion of year long stacked noise correlation functions assuming both a 2-D plane wave source density model and (3) a 3-D plane wave source density model. We use vertical component data from the 190 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network and some US Array stations for 2008. The good agreement between the three models suggests the 2-D plane wave model, with the fewest number of unknown parameters, is generally sufficient to describe the noise density function for tomographic inversions. At higher frequencies, 3-D and beamforming models are required to resolve peaks in energy associated with body waves. We illustrate and assess isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic phase velocity and attenuation uncertainties for the noise source distribution in southern California by inverting isotropic lossless synthetic Fourier transformed noise correlation function predictions from modelled 2-D source distribution. We find that the variation in phase velocity with azimuth from inhomogeneous source distribution yields up to 1 per cent apparent peak-to-peak anisotropy. We predict apparent attenuation coefficients from our lossless synthetics on the same order of magnitude as those previously reported for the region from ambient noise. Since noise source distributions are likely inhomogeneous varying regionally and with time, we recommend that noise correlation studies reporting attenuation and anisotropy incorporate source density information.

  18. Noise sensitivity: A neurophenomenological perspective.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the current limitations of noise sensitivity research and the benefit of undertaking a neurophenomenological approach of investigation. It begins by questioning the invariance of noise sensitivity across different studies and contexts and argues that these are issues associated with the psychometric construct rather than the underlying reaction patterns. It suggest that our definition and operationalization of noise sensitivity might have been misspecified and that it needs to be revised on the basis of heuristically derived first-person data about our experiences of noise. It then shows why the basic principles of the neurophenomenological program are applicable to psychoacoustic research. Namely, it argues that phenomenological training leading to reflexive introspection and verbalization of our susceptibility to noise might have three-fold implication - (i) it will generate deeper understanding of noise sensitivity which will then allow us to deduce a hierarchical structure of meaning and concepts to supplement and be fed to quantitative research, (ii) it will provide better interpretation of neuroimaging and electroencephalographic data related to noise reaction and perception, which in turn will allow a process of reciprocal validation, (iii) and, most importantly, it presents a promising technique for emotional regulation of noise processing via modulation of the amygdalar function, when a state of awareness of this processing has been achieved.

  19. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  20. Visualizing dispersive features in 2D image via minimum gradient method

    DOE PAGES

    He, Yu; Wang, Yan; Shen, Zhi -Xun

    2017-07-24

    Here, we developed a minimum gradient based method to track ridge features in a 2D image plot, which is a typical data representation in many momentum resolved spectroscopy experiments. Through both analytic formulation and numerical simulation, we compare this new method with existing DC (distribution curve) based and higher order derivative based analyses. We find that the new method has good noise resilience and enhanced contrast especially for weak intensity features and meanwhile preserves the quantitative local maxima information from the raw image. An algorithm is proposed to extract 1D ridge dispersion from the 2D image plot, whose quantitative applicationmore » to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on high temperature superconductors is demonstrated.« less

  1. Visualizing dispersive features in 2D image via minimum gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Wang, Yan; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2017-07-01

    We developed a minimum gradient based method to track ridge features in a 2D image plot, which is a typical data representation in many momentum resolved spectroscopy experiments. Through both analytic formulation and numerical simulation, we compare this new method with existing DC (distribution curve) based and higher order derivative based analyses. We find that the new method has good noise resilience and enhanced contrast especially for weak intensity features and meanwhile preserves the quantitative local maxima information from the raw image. An algorithm is proposed to extract 1D ridge dispersion from the 2D image plot, whose quantitative application to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on high temperature superconductors is demonstrated.

  2. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-05-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties.

  3. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties. PMID:27143413

  4. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Robin, A; Lhuillier, E; Xu, X Z; Ithurria, S; Aubin, H; Ouerghi, A; Dubertret, B

    2016-05-04

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1-1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties.

  5. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  6. Differential cytochrome P450 2D metabolism alters tafenoquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H; Potter, Brittney M J; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Smith, Bryan; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  8. [Study on the processing of leech by FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Ning; Wu, Yan-Wen; Ouyang, Jie; Sun, Su-Qin; Chen, Shun-Cong

    2011-04-01

    The chemical differences of traditional Chinese medicine leech before and after processing were analyzed by FTIR and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The result showed that the leech was high in protein, with characteristic peaks of amide I, II bands. Comparing the IR spectra of samples, the primary difference was that the characteristic peak of fresh leech was at 1 543 cm(-1), while that of crude and processed leech was at 1 535 cm(-1). A 2D-IR spectrum with heating perturbation was used to track the processing dynamics of leech In the 2D-IR correlation spectra, fresh leech exhibited stronger automatic peaks of the amide I and II bands than that of processed leech, which indicates that the protein components of the fresh leech were more sensitive to heat perturbation than the processed one. Moreover, the result of FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectra validated that the 3-dimensional structure of protein was damaged and hydrogen bonds were broken after processing, which resulted in the inactivation of protein. The fatty acids and cholesterol components of leech were also oxidized in this process.

  9. Controlling of stochastic resonance and noise enhanced stability induced by harmonic noises in a bistable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Long, Fei; Zhang, Pei; Nie, Lin-Ru

    2017-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) and noise enhanced stability (NES) in a bistable system driven by an additive harmonic noise and a multiplicative harmonic noise is investigated. Through numerical simulation, we obtained the power spectrum by the Fourier transformation on time series. The results indicate that (i) for certain values of the parameters of additive harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the noise intensity D, the SR phenomenon occurs. It means we can control the SR phenomenon by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise; (ii) the NES phenomenon occurs at certain values of the parameters of multiplicative harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the multiplicative noise intensity Q. Most important, the NES phenomenon can also be controlled by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise.

  10. Quasi 2D Materials: Raman Nanometrology and Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahil, Khan Mohammad Farhan

    Quasi two-dimensional (2D) materials obtained by the "graphene-like" exfoliation attracted tremendous attention. Such materials revealed unique electronic, thermal and optical properties, which can be potentially used in electronics, thermal management and energy conversion. This dissertation research addresses two separate but synergetic problems: (i) preparation and optical characterization of quasi-2D films of the bismuth-telluride (Bi 2Te3) family of materials, which demonstrate both thermoelectric and topological insulator properties; and (ii) investigation of thermal properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and few-layer graphene (FLG). The first part of dissertation reports properties of the exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb 2Te3. Both non-resonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra have been investigated. It was found that the crystal symmetry breaking in few-quintuple films results in appearance of A1u-symmetry Raman peaks, which are not active in the bulk crystals. The scattering spectra measured under the 633-nm wavelength excitation reveals a number of resonant features, which could be used for analysis of the electronic and phonon processes in these materials. The obtained results help to understand the physical mechanisms of Raman scattering in the few-quintuple-thick films and can be used for nanometrology of topological insulator films on various substrates. The second part of the dissertation is dedicated to investigation of properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and FLG. It was found that the optimized mixture of graphene and multilayer graphene---produced by the high-yield inexpensive liquid-phase-exfoliation technique---can lead to an extremely strong enhancement of the cross-plane thermal conductivity K of the composite. The "laser flash" measurements revealed a record-high enhancement of K by 2300 % in the graphene-based polymer at the filler loading fraction f =10 vol. %. It was

  11. Outliner Resistant Filtering and Smoothing. 2D Version.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-04

    Consider a stationary Gaussian information process transmitted through an additive noise channel. The noise and information processes are mutually independent, and the noise process modeled as nominally Gaussian with additive outliers. For the above system model a theory is developed for outliers resistant filtering and smoothing operations. We then design specific such nonlinear operations, and we study

  12. PreMosa: extracting 2D surfaces from 3D microscopy mosaics.

    PubMed

    Blasse, Corinna; Saalfeld, Stephan; Etournay, Raphaël; Sagner, Andreas; Eaton, Suzanne; Myers, Eugene W

    2017-08-15

    A significant focus of biological research is to understand the development, organization and function of tissues. A particularly productive area of study is on single layer epithelial tissues in which the adherence junctions of cells form a 2D manifold that is fluorescently labeled. Given the size of the tissue, a microscope must collect a mosaic of overlapping 3D stacks encompassing the stained surface. Downstream interpretation is greatly simplified by preprocessing such a dataset as follows: (i) extracting and mapping the stained manifold in each stack into a single 2D projection plane, (ii) correcting uneven illumination artifacts, (iii) stitching the mosaic planes into a single, large 2D image and (iv) adjusting the contrast. We have developed PreMosa, an efficient, fully automatic pipeline to perform the four preprocessing tasks above resulting in a single 2D image of the stained manifold across which contrast is optimized and illumination is even. Notable features are as follows. First, the 2D projection step employs a specially developed algorithm that actually finds the manifold in the stack based on maximizing contrast, intensity and smoothness. Second, the projection step comes first, implying all subsequent tasks are more rapidly solved in 2D. And last, the mosaic melding employs an algorithm that globally adjusts contrasts amongst the 2D tiles so as to produce a seamless, high-contrast image. We conclude with an evaluation using ground-truth datasets and present results on datasets from Drosophila melanogaster wings and Schmidtae mediterranea ciliary components. PreMosa is available under https://cblasse.github.io/premosa. blasse@mpi-cbg.de or myers@mpi-cbg.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Active Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depuru-Mohan, N. K.; Doty, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Jet noise is often a dominant component of aircraft noise, particularly at takeoff. To meet the stringent noise regulations, the aircraft industry is in a pressing need of advanced noise reduction concepts. In the present study, the potential of piezoelectrically-activated chevrons for jet noise reduction was experimentally investigated. The perturbations near the nozzle exit caused by piezoelectrically-activated chevrons could be used to modify the growth rate of the mixing layer and thereby potentially reduce jet noise. These perturbations are believed to increase the production of small-scale disturbances at the expense of large-scale turbulent structures. These large-scale turbulent structures are responsible for the dominant portion of the jet mixing noise, particularly low-frequency noise. Therefore, by exciting the static chevron geometry through piezoelectric actuators, an additional acoustic benefit could possibly be achieved. To aid in the initial implementation of this concept, several flat-faced faceted nozzles (four, six, and eight facets) were investigated. Among the faceted nozzles, it was found that the eight-faceted nozzle behaves very similarly to the round nozzle. Furthermore, among the faceted nozzles with static chevrons, the four-faceted nozzle with static chevrons was found to be most effective in terms of jet noise reduction. The piezoelectrically-activated chevrons reduced jet noise up to 2 dB compared to the same nozzle geometry without excitation. This benefit was observed over a wide range of excitation frequencies by applying very low voltages to the piezoelectric actuators.

  14. Nanoparticle plasmonics for 2D-photovoltaics: mechanisms, optimization, and limits.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Carl; Kasemo, Bengt

    2009-07-06

    Plasmonic nanostructures placed within or near photovoltaic (PV) layers are of high current interest for improving thin film solar cells. We demonstrate, by electrodynamics calculations, the feasibility of a new class of essentially two dimensional (2D) solar cells based on the very large optical cross sections of plasmonic nanoparticles. Conditions for inducing absorption in extremely thin PV layers via plasmon near-fields, are optimized in 2D-arrays of (i) core-shell particles, and (ii) plasmonic particles on planar layers. At the plasmon resonance, a pronounced optimum is found for the extinction coefficient of the PV material. We also characterize the influence of the dielectric environment, PV layer thickness and nanoparticle shape, size and spatial distribution. The response of the system is close to that of a 2D effective medium layer, and subject to a 50% absorption limit when the dielectric environment around the 2D layer is symmetric. In this case, a plasmon induced absorption of about 40% is demonstrated in PV layers as thin as 10 nm, using silver nanoparticle arrays of only 1 nm effective thickness. In an asymmetric environment, the useful absorption may be increased significantly for the same layer thicknesses. These new types of essentially 2D solar cells are concluded to have a large potential for reducing solar electricity costs.

  15. Assessment of 2D:4D in subjects with anteroposterior mandibular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Sridhar; Gurumurthy, Bhuvaneswari

    2013-07-01

    To compare 2D:4D ratio which is determined by testosterone levels with patients having orthognathic, retrognathic and prognathic mandibles. The study was performed at Chennai, on 320 subjects of which, 60 subjects (32 males and 28 females) had retrognathic mandible; 55 subjects (25 males and 30 females) had prognathic mandible and 205 subjects (98 males and 107 females) had normal mandible. All the subjects had a normal maxilla and were in the age group of 18 to 25 years. 2D:4D ratio was determined using the photocopies of the ventral surface of right hand made with vernier calipers of 0.01 mm accuracy. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Student's t- test, ANOVA test and TukeyHSD test. (i) Low 2D:4D is seen in subjects with mandibular prognathism, (ii) Among females, low 2D:4D is seen only in prognathic mandible. These findings highlight the fact that testosterone plays an important role in mandibular growth. Thus 2D:4D, a least invasive and reproducible procedure can be used as an early marker for mandibular progathism, and as a diagnostic tool in correlating the mandibular growth with causal relations between hormones and craniofacial development.

  16. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  17. Direct Self-Assembly of a 2D and 3D Star of David.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Kun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Bolarinwa, Olapeju; Wang, Jing; Li, Yiming; Yin, Guang-Qiang; Rivera, Edwin; Yang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Changlin; Xu, Bingqian; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-04-06

    Two- and three-dimensional metallosupramolecules shaped like a Star of David were synthesized by the self-assembly of a tetratopic pyridyl ligand with a 180° diplatinum(II) motif and Pd(II) ions, respectively. In contrast to other strategies, such as template-directed synthesis and stepwise self-assembly, this design enables the formation of 2D and 3D structures in one step and high yield. The structures were characterized by both one-dimensional ((1) H, (13) C, (31) P) and two-dimensional (COSY, NOESY, DOSY) NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS, ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), AFM, and TEM. The stabilities of the 2D and 3D structures were measured and compared by gradient tandem mass spectrometry (gMS(2) ). The high stability of the 3D Star of David was correlated to its high density of coordination sites (DOCS).

  18. Improving Gabor noise.

    PubMed

    Lagae, Ares; Lefebvre, Sylvain; Dutré, Philip

    2011-08-01

    We have recently proposed a new procedural noise function, Gabor noise, which offers a combination of properties not found in the existing noise functions. In this paper, we present three significant improvements to Gabor noise: 1) an isotropic kernel for Gabor noise, which speeds up isotropic Gabor noise with a factor of roughly two, 2) an error analysis of Gabor noise, which relates the kernel truncation radius to the relative error of the noise, and 3) spatially varying Gabor noise, which enables spatial variation of all noise parameters. These improvements make Gabor noise an even more attractive alternative for the existing noise functions.

  19. PIV and Acoustic Investigation for a 2D Wind Turbine Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guannan; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a 2D airfoil designed for wind turbine applications using PIV and surface pressure measurements. The experiments were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with/without large scale unsteadiness in the flow and with/without active closed loop blowing control on the suction surface of the airfoil. This study also measured the acoustic signal emitted from the same type of airfoil with six far field microphones in an anechoic chamber and the results indicated that the unsteadiness in the freestream affected the noise characteristics of the airfoil significantly. Funded by DoE through University of Minnesota Wind Energy Consortium.

  20. High Sensitivity 1-D and 2-D Microwave Spectroscopy via Cryogenic Buffer Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David; Eibenberger, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    All rotationally resolved spectroscopic methods rely on sources of cold molecules. For the last three decades, the workhorse technique for producing highly supersaturated samples of cold molecules has been the pulsed supersonic jet. We present here progress on our alternative method, cryogenic buffer gas cooling. Our high density, continuous source, and low noise temperature allow us to record microwave spectra at unprecedented sensitivity, with a dynamic range in excess of 10^6 achievable in a few minutes of integration time. This high sensitivity enables new protocols in both 1-D and 2-D microwave spectroscopy, including sensitive chiral analysis via nonlinear three wave mixing and applications as an analytical chemistry tool

  1. Interrogating Fiber Formation Kinetics with Automated 2D-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasfeld, David B.; Ling, Yun L.; Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    A new method for collecting 2D-IR spectra that utilizes both a pump-probe beam geometry and a mid-IR pulse shaper is used to gain a fuller understanding of fiber formation in the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). We extract structural kinetics in order to better understand aggregation in hIAPP, the protein component of the amyloid fibers found to inhibit insulin production in type II diabetes patients.

  2. Assessment of Domestic Appliance Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jeanette Rosamond

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The aims of this study were: (i) to identify the factors involved in eliciting a subjective reaction to domestic appliance noise, (ii) to identify the noise index (or indices) that correlate highly with a subjective reaction to the noise, and (iii) to investigate the contribution of domestic appliance noise to an individual's daily noise dose. Two series of experimental studies were carried out using several examples of each of five types of domestic appliances. One determined the index values of domestic appliance noise--namely L_{WA} (using ISO 3741), L_{pA} , L_{pD}, L _{p}, PNL, L_{Aeq, 30 sec}, L_{Amax} and L_{AX}; the other determined subjective reactions to domestic appliance noise (judgements of noisiness, annoyance, the acceptability of the appliance noise and appraisals of usefulness). The success or failure of the research hypotheses was assessed statistically by analysis of variance, regression analysis, log linear analysis, Hotelling test, bootstrapping, t-test and post-hoc comparisons. Ratings of annoyance, noisiness and the acceptability of the noise of the appliance were found to be interrelated and interdependent, and not influenced by appraisals of usefulness of the appliances. Noisiness ratings were the most consistent of the subjective ratings investigated, and were influenced by the duration of the exposure, and the actual appliance type under investigation. Significant correlations were obtained between noisiness ratings and all the noise indices under investigation. However, statistical analysis demonstrated that L_ {WA} correlated less successfully with noisiness ratings than all other indices. L_ {Amax},L_{Aeq,30 sec }, and L_{AX} indices were the most successful. It is therefore suggested that the labelling of domestic appliance noise consist of L_{WA} and L _{Aeq} as measured in a standardised test environment. The percentage contribution of domestic appliance noise to the total

  3. Computationally Efficient 2D DOA Estimation with Uniform Rectangular Array in Low-Grazing Angle

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junpeng; Hu, Guoping; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Fenggang; Xiao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient spatial differencing matrix set (SDMS) method for two-dimensional direction of arrival (2D DOA) estimation with uniform rectangular arrays (URAs) in a low-grazing angle (LGA) condition. By rearranging the auto-correlation and cross-correlation matrices in turn among different subarrays, the SDMS method can estimate the two parameters independently with one-dimensional (1D) subspace-based estimation techniques, where we only perform difference for auto-correlation matrices and the cross-correlation matrices are kept completely. Then, the pair-matching of two parameters is achieved by extracting the diagonal elements of URA. Thus, the proposed method can decrease the computational complexity, suppress the effect of additive noise and also have little information loss. Simulation results show that, in LGA, compared to other methods, the proposed methods can achieve performance improvement in the white or colored noise conditions. PMID:28245634

  4. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-03-15

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  6. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  7. Low Noise Exhaust Nozzle Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Balan, C.; Mengle, V.; Brausch, J. F.; Shin, H.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry have been assessing the economic viability and environmental acceptability of a second-generation supersonic civil transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Development of a propulsion system that satisfies strict airport noise regulations and provides high levels of cruise and transonic performance with adequate takeoff performance, at an acceptable weight, is critical to the success of any HSCT program. The principal objectives were to: 1. Develop a preliminary design of an innovative 2-D exhaust nozzle with the goal of meeting FAR36 Stage III noise levels and providing high levels of cruise performance with a high specific thrust for Mach 2.4 HSCT with a range of 5000 nmi and a payload of 51,900 lbm, 2. Employ advanced acoustic and aerodynamic codes during preliminary design, 3. Develop a comprehensive acoustic and aerodynamic database through scale-model testing of low-noise, high-performance, 2-D nozzle configurations, based on the preliminary design, and 4. Verify acoustic and aerodynamic predictions by means of scale-model testing. The results were: 1. The preliminary design of a 2-D, convergent/divergent suppressor ejector nozzle for a variable-cycle engine powered, Mach 2.4 HSCT was evolved, 2. Noise goals were predicted to be achievable for three takeoff scenarios, and 3. Impact of noise suppression, nozzle aerodynamic performance, and nozzle weight on HSCT takeoff gross weight were assessed.

  8. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  9. Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis and 2D-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Meleady, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) continues to be one of the most versatile and widely used techniques to study the proteome of a biological system. In particular, a modified version of 2D-PAGE, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), which uses differential labeling of protein samples with up to three fluorescent tags, offers greater sensitivity and reproducibility over conventional 2D-PAGE gels for differential quantitative analysis of protein expression between experimental groups. Both these methods have distinct advantages in the separation and identification of thousands of individual proteins species including protein isoforms and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss the principles of 2D-PAGE and 2D-DIGE including limitations to the methods. 2D-PAGE and 2D-DIGE continue to be popular methods in bioprocessing-related research (particularly on recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells), which will also be discussed in the review chapter.

  10. Simulation of Rio Grande floodplain inundation Using FLO-2D

    Treesearch

    J. S. O' Brien; W. T. Fullerton

    1999-01-01

    Spring floodplain inundation is important to the natural functions of the Rio Grande bosque biological community including cottonwood tree germination and recruitment. To predict floodplain inundation, a two-dimensional flood routing model FLO-2D will be applied to various reaches of the Rio Grande. FLO-2D will assess overbank flooding in terms of the area of...

  11. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  12. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  13. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  14. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2009-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume three; 1. The effects of coloured quadratic noise on a turbulent transition in liquid He II J. T. Tough; 2. Electrohydrodynamic instability of nematic liquid crystals: growth process and influence of noise S. Kai; 3. Suppression of electrohydrodynamic instabilities by external noise Helmut R. Brand; 4. Coloured noise in dye laser fluctuations R. Roy, A. W. Yu and S. Zhu; 5. Noisy dynamics in optically bistable systems E. Arimondo, D. Hennequin and P. Glorieux; 6. Use of an electronic model as a guideline in experiments on transient optical bistability W. Lange; 7. Computer experiments in nonlinear stochastic physics Riccardo Mannella; 8. Analogue simulations of stochastic processes by means of minimum component electronic devices Leone Fronzoni; 9. Analogue techniques for the study of problems in stochastic nonlinear dynamics P. V. E. McClintock and Frank Moss; Index.

  15. INVITED ARTICLE: Towards dense, realistic granular media in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The development of an applicable theory for granular matter—with both qualitative and quantitative value—is a challenging prospect, given the multitude of states, phases and (industrial) situations it has to cover. Given the general balance equations for mass, momentum and energy, the limiting case of dilute and almost elastic granular gases, where kinetic theory works perfectly well, is the starting point. In most systems, low density co-exists with very high density, where the latter is an open problem for kinetic theory. Furthermore, many additional nonlinear phenomena and material properties are important in realistic granular media, involving, e.g.: (i) multi-particle interactions and elasticity (ii) strong dissipation, (iii) friction, (iv) long-range forces and wet contacts, (v) wide particle size distributions and (vi) various particle shapes. Note that, while some of these issues are more relevant for high density, others are important for both low and high densities; some of them can be dealt with by means of kinetic theory, some cannot. This paper is a review of recent progress towards more realistic models for dense granular media in 2D, even though most of the observations, conclusions and corrections given are qualitatively true also in 3D. Starting from an elastic, frictionless and monodisperse hard sphere gas, the (continuum) balance equations of mass, momentum and energy are given. The equation of state, the (Navier-Stokes level) transport coefficients and the energy-density dissipation rate are considered. Several corrections are applied to those constitutive material laws—one by one—in order to account for the realistic physical effects and properties listed above.

  16. Plasmonics of 2D Nanomaterials: Properties and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Li, Ziwei; Chi, Cheng; Shan, Hangyong; Zheng, Liheng

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonics has developed for decades in the field of condensed matter physics and optics. Based on the classical Maxwell theory, collective excitations exhibit profound light‐matter interaction properties beyond classical physics in lots of material systems. With the development of nanofabrication and characterization technology, ultra‐thin two‐dimensional (2D) nanomaterials attract tremendous interest and show exceptional plasmonic properties. Here, we elaborate the advanced optical properties of 2D materials especially graphene and monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), review the plasmonic properties of graphene, and discuss the coupling effect in hybrid 2D nanomaterials. Then, the plasmonic tuning methods of 2D nanomaterials are presented from theoretical models to experimental investigations. Furthermore, we reveal the potential applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics and photodetections, based on the development of 2D nanomaterials, we make a prospect for the future theoretical physics and practical applications. PMID:28852608

  17. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  18. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  19. Plasmonics of 2D Nanomaterials: Properties and Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Li, Ziwei; Chi, Cheng; Shan, Hangyong; Zheng, Liheng; Fang, Zheyu

    2017-08-01

    Plasmonics has developed for decades in the field of condensed matter physics and optics. Based on the classical Maxwell theory, collective excitations exhibit profound light-matter interaction properties beyond classical physics in lots of material systems. With the development of nanofabrication and characterization technology, ultra-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials attract tremendous interest and show exceptional plasmonic properties. Here, we elaborate the advanced optical properties of 2D materials especially graphene and monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), review the plasmonic properties of graphene, and discuss the coupling effect in hybrid 2D nanomaterials. Then, the plasmonic tuning methods of 2D nanomaterials are presented from theoretical models to experimental investigations. Furthermore, we reveal the potential applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics and photodetections, based on the development of 2D nanomaterials, we make a prospect for the future theoretical physics and practical applications.

  20. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  1. Construction of 2D lateral pseudoheterostructures by strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Haifeng; Zhuang, Jincheng; Slattery, Ashley D.; Wang, Liang; Xu, Zhongfei; Xu, Xun; Mitchell, David; Zheng, Tian; Li, Songlin; Higgins, Michael; Ren, Long; Sun, Ziqi; Xue Dou, Shi; Du, Yi; Hao, Weichang

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) lateral heterostructures host unconventional physical properties due to their controllable band-offset tuning and interfacial sensitive characteristic. The lattice mismatch results in the difficulties to construct the perfect atomic interface in such 2D lateral heterostructures, which in turn limits their desirable properties and performances in applications. In this work, strain-modulated 2D lateral pseudoheterogeneous structures are designed and realized in the single-component 2D BiOBr nanosheets by taking advantage of their strain-sensitive crystal and electronic structures. The pseudoheterogeneous interface without atomic mismatch can be feasibly modulated by local strain distribution, which exhibits similar local electronic band structure of corresponding heterostructures. Significant enhancement in charge separation at the pseudoheterostructure was demonstrated under visible light irradiation, which is given rise to the controllable electronic band alignment across the interface. The construction of the lateral pseudoheterostructure offers a feasible and promising way to build unprecedented 2D systems with exciting properties.

  2. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  3. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼ 50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter.

  4. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  5. Digit ratio (2D:4D) in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Kilduff, L P; Trivers, R

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of second to fourth digit length (2D:4D) is a correlate of prenatal testosterone. High 2D:4D is associated with low prenatal testosterone, and reduced sensitivity to testosterone. Klinefelter's syndrome (KS; 47 XXY) affects the endocrine system, such that low testosterone levels are found in KS foetuses, new-borns and adults. To date, there are no published data regarding the pattern of 2D:4D in KS males. Here we consider 2D:4D in KS individuals (n = 51), their relatives (16 fathers and 15 mothers) and an unaffected control sample of 153 men and 153 women. Adult KS individuals were taller than their fathers and had shorter fingers than fathers and male controls. Compared with fathers, male controls and mothers, KS males had shorter fingers relative to height. With regard to 2D:4D, KS individuals had higher 2D:4D than fathers (right and left hands), male controls (right and left hands) and mothers (left hands). Among KS males older than 13 years there were 34 individuals currently prescribed testosterone and nine not prescribed. In comparison to the former, the latter individuals had higher right 2D:4D and higher right-left 2D:4D. We conclude that KS males have mean 2D:4D values similar to those found in female population norms. In addition, testosterone supplementation in KS males may be most common for individuals with low right 2D:4D. © 2012 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  6. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  7. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  8. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  9. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  10. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  11. Solid chemistry of the Zn{sup II}/1,2,4-triazolate/anion system: Separation of 2D isoreticular layers tuned by the terminal counteranions X (X=Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}, SCN{sup -})

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sanping; Sun Shu; Gao Shengli

    2008-12-15

    An array of 2D isoreticular layers, viz. [Zn(atrz)X]{sub {infinity}} (1.X; X=Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}; atrz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole anion), [Zn{sub 4}(atrz){sub 4}(SCN){sub 4}.H{sub 2}O]{sub {infinity}} (1.SCN.H{sub 2}O) and [Zn(trz)X]{sub {infinity}} (2.X; X=Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}; trz=1,2,4-triazole anion), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compounds 1.X and 1.SCN.H{sub 2}O are constructed from binuclear planar Zn{sub 2}(atrz){sub 2} subunits and exhibit (4,4) topological network when the subunits are simplified as four-connected nodes. Based on changing the terminal counteranions X (X=Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}, SCN{sup -}), the average interlayer separations of 1.X and 1.SCN.H{sub 2}O are enlarged, which equal to 5.851, 6.153, 6.651 and 8.292 A, respectively. As a result, H{sub 2}O molecules reside in the spaces between two adjacent layers of 1.SCN.H{sub 2}O. 2 and 1 are the isomorphous structures. In common with 1, the interlayer separations of 2.X are widened with increasing the ion radius. Solid-state luminescence properties and thermogravimetric analyses of 1 and 2 were investigated, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Based on employing the various terminal counteranions X (X=Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}, SCN{sup -}) the average interlayer separations of four 2D isoreticular layer compounds [Zn(atrz)X]{sub {infinity}} are gradually enlarged, which equal to 5.851, 6.153, 6.651 and 8.292 A, respectively. As a result, guest H{sub 2}O molecules reside in the space between two adjacent layers of [Zn{sub 4}(atrz){sub 4}(SCN){sub 4}.H{sub 2}O]{sub {infinity}}.

  12. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  13. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  14. High Velocity Jet Noise Source Location and Reduction. Task 3 - Experimental Investigation of Suppression Principles. Volume II - Parametric Testing and Source Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    to waa r 4 q E wit W 71, II "A A /’_ ___ __ __ a , r64-3n.-Dlimatar Conical Nozzle # AT-3M In. 2 . t 14) e, Col c ts 1A.o vo0 11A.00 1U0.40 o I o q...aa.echuii facility. A summary of physical and opeating Scharacterii. offh t two vy waa shown in Figure 3-17, The nae deep- dish mirror was designcd to...01’ ------------ - - - n I.- . , * I-V,0 a .a CQCO. 0, O’ 0 0ý- c:v.~.t LPV cca-t 0c r- m~9 mItWmm09ýc’ w LE ~ ý’ J. % 0: !1.. g.OO O𔃺. 0~o.oo.j Uil

  15. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. CYP2D6 Polymorphisms in Patients with Porphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Lavandera, Jimena V.; Parera, Victoria E.; Batlle, Alcira; Buzaleh, Ana María

    2006-01-01

    The cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoenzymes, a superfamily of heme proteins which are the terminal oxidases of the mixed function oxidases system, metabolize more than 70% of all clinically approved drugs. The highly polymorphic CYP2D6 isoform metabolizes more than 25% of most common drugs, and the phenotypes of the 70-plus allelic variants range from compromised to excessive enzymatic activity. Porphyrias are a group of inherited or acquired metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis, due to a specific decrease in the activity of one of the enzymes of the heme pathway. Clinical signs and symptoms of porphyrias are frequently associated with exposure to precipitating agents, including clinically approved drugs. CYP enzymes, including CYP2D6, participate in the metabolism of some porphyrinogenic drugs, leading to the deregulation of heme biosynthesis. Considering that some of the drugs not recommended for use in porphyric patients are metabolized by CYP2D6, the presence of CYP2D6 polymorphisms in porphyric patients would influence the triggering of the disease when these individuals receive a precipitating agent that is metabolized by CYP2D6. To investigate CYP2D6 polymorphisms in porphyric patients, healthy Argentinean volunteers, porphyric patients, and a group of individuals with high levels of iron were studied. Results indicated that the CYP2D6*3 and CYP2D6*4 alleles, in particular, would be linked to the onset of disease. Predictive genotyping for CYP2D6 in porphyric patients holds promise as a method to improve the clinical efficacy of drug therapy and to personalize drug administration for these patients. PMID:17225875

  17. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  18. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  19. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  1. Theory of 2D crystals: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Rafael; Chirolli, Luca; Prada, Elsa; Silva-Guillén, Jose Angel; San-Jose, Pablo; Guinea, Francisco

    2017-07-31

    This tutorial review presents an overview of the basic theoretical aspects of two-dimensional (2D) crystals. We revise essential aspects of graphene and the new families of semiconducting 2D materials, like transition metal dichalcogenides or black phosphorus. Minimal theoretical models for various materials are presented. Some of the exciting new possibilities offered by 2D crystals are discussed, such as manipulation and control of quantum degrees of freedom (spin and pseudospin), confinement of excitons, control of the electronic and optical properties with strain engineering, or unconventional superconducting phases.

  2. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  3. Quantum Noise in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacobino, E.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Poizat, J. Ph.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Zhang, T.-C.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the intensity noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using different types of line narrowing techniques at room temperature. We have measured an intensity squeezing of 1.2 dB with grating-extended cavity lasers and 1.4 dB with injection locked lasers (respectively 1.6 dB and 2.3 dB inferred at the laser output). We have observed that the intensity noise of a free-running nominally single mode laser diode results from a cancellation effect between large anti-correlated fluctuations of the main mode and of weak longitudinal side modes. Reducing the side modes by line narrowing techniques results in intensity squeezing.

  4. A 2-D Piston Effect Solution for the Relaxation in the MISTE Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilert, Mark

    2003-01-01

    When a large density stratification is no longer a problem in a microgravity environment, one would like to increase the sample size in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for a specific heat measurement. To reduce the equilibration time associated with the large sample size, we designed a cylindrical cell containing a stack of plates that separate the bulk fluid into 60 equally thin layers. To understand the thermal behavior of the whole cell, we analyzed the thermal behavior of a 2-D composite system of a cylindrical near-critical fluid layer in contact with a cylindrical copper plate. In this 2-D analysis, the circumference boundary of the two cylindrical layers is subjected to a step temperature change. The solution of this 2-D composite system includes the piston effect that speeds up the equilibration in the near-critical fluid layer and the pure diffusion in the copper plate. The results of this analysis indicate that the characteristic length for the equilibration of the stacked cell is determined by an effective thickness of a single fluid layer instead of the total height of the cylindrical cell.

  5. 2D-3D registration for brain radiation therapy using a 3D CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munbodh, R.; Moseley, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report results of an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration framework for patient positioning and monitoring during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two intensity-based similarity measures, the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Maximum Likelihood with Gaussian noise (MLG) derived from the statistics of transmission images. A useful image frequency band was identified from the bone-to-no-bone ratio. Validation was performed on gold-standard data consisting of 3D kV CBCT scans and 2D kV radiographs of an anthropomorphic head phantom acquired at 23 different poses with parameter variations along six degrees of freedom. At each pose, a single limited field of view kV radiograph was registered to the reference CBCT. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters along the x, y and z axes for ICC were varphix: 0.08(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.03(0.03)°, tx: 0.13(0.11) mm, ty: 0.08(0.06) mm and tz: 0.44(0.23) mm. For MLG, the corresponding results were varphix: 0.10(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.05(0.07)°, tx: 0.11(0.13) mm, ty: 0.05(0.05) mm and tz: 0.44(0.31) mm. It is feasible to accurately estimate all six transformation parameters from a 3D CBCT of the head and a single 2D kV radiograph within an intensity-based registration framework that incorporates the physics of transmission images.

  6. Lipid-gramicidin interactions: dynamic structure of the boundary lipid by 2D-ELDOR.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Crepeau, Richard H; Borbat, Petr P; Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H

    2003-05-01

    The use of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) for the characterization of the boundary lipid in membrane vesicles of DPPC and gramicidin A' (GA) is reported. We show that 2D-ELDOR, with its enhanced spectral resolution to dynamic structure as compared with continuous-wave electron spin resonance, provides a reliable and useful way of studying lipid-protein interactions. The 2D-ELDOR spectra of the end-chain spin label 16-PC in DPPC/GA vesicles is composed of two components, which are assigned to the bulk lipids (with sharp auto peaks and crosspeaks) and to the boundary lipids (with broad auto peaks). Their distinction is clearest for higher temperatures and higher GA concentrations. The quantitative analysis of these spectra shows relatively faster motions and very low ordering for the end chain of the bulk lipids, whereas the boundary lipids show very high "y-ordering" and slower motions. The y-ordering represents a dynamic bending at the end of the boundary lipid acyl chain, which can then coat the GA molecules. These results are consistent with the previous studies by Ge and Freed (1999) using continuous-wave electron spin resonance, thereby supporting their model for GA aggregation and H(II) phase formation for high GA concentrations. Improved instrumental and simulation methods have been employed.

  7. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-15

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO{sub 2})(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO{sub 3}(COOH)]{sup 2−} anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from Zn{sup II} cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19–59 GPa). - Graphical Abstract: The compression mechanism and elastic constants for a 2D Uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound are reported. - Highlights: • The response to pressure of a uranium carboxyphosphonoate compound has been studied. • High-pressure single-crystal XRD data for this 2D uranium compound were collected. • Elastic constants for this material have been determined. • The compression mechanism for the compound has been elucidated.

  8. Genomics of Dementia: APOE- and CYP2D6-Related Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Martínez, Rocío; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Carril, Juan C.; Lombardi, Valter; Carrera, Iván; Corzo, Lola; Tellado, Iván; Leszek, Jerzy; McKay, Adam; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a major problem of health in developed societies. Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia, and mixed dementia account for over 90% of the most prevalent forms of dementia. Both genetic and environmental factors are determinant for the phenotypic expression of dementia. AD is a complex disorder in which many different gene clusters may be involved. Most genes screened to date belong to different proteomic and metabolomic pathways potentially affecting AD pathogenesis. The ε4 variant of the APOE gene seems to be a major risk factor for both degenerative and vascular dementia. Metabolic factors, cerebrovascular disorders, and epigenetic phenomena also contribute to neurodegeneration. Five categories of genes are mainly involved in pharmacogenomics: genes associated with disease pathogenesis, genes associated with the mechanism of action of a particular drug, genes associated with phase I and phase II metabolic reactions, genes associated with transporters, and pleiotropic genes and/or genes associated with concomitant pathologies. The APOE and CYP2D6 genes have been extensively studied in AD. The therapeutic response to conventional drugs in patients with AD is genotype specific, with CYP2D6-PMs, CYP2D6-UMs, and APOE-4/4 carriers acting as the worst responders. APOE and CYP2D6 may cooperate, as pleiotropic genes, in the metabolism of drugs and hepatic function. The introduction of pharmacogenetic procedures into AD pharmacological treatment may help to optimize therapeutics. PMID:22482072

  9. 2D versus 3D cross-correlation-based radial and circumferential strain estimation using multiplane 2D ultrafast ultrasound in a 3D atherosclerotic carotid artery model.

    PubMed

    Fekkes, Stein; Swillens, Abigail E S; Hansen, Hendrik H G; Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Iannaccone, Francesco; Segers, Patrick; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-08-25

    Three-dimensional strain estimation might improve the detection and localization of high strain regions in the carotid artery for identification of vulnerable plaques. This study compares 2D vs. 3D displacement estimation in terms of radial and circumferential strain using simulated ultrasound images of a patient specific 3D atherosclerotic carotid artery model at the bifurcation embedded in surrounding tissue generated with ABAQUS software. Global longitudinal motion was superimposed to the model based on literature data. A Philips L11-3 linear array transducer was simulated which transmitted plane waves at 3 alternating angles at a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. Inter-frame radiofrequency ultrasound data were simulated in Field II for 191 equally spaced longitudinal positions of the internal carotid artery. Accumulated radial and circumferential displacements were estimated using tracking of the inter-frame displacements estimated by a two-step normalized cross-correlation method and displacement compounding. Least squares strain estimation was performed to determine accumulated radial and circumferential strain. The performance of the 2D and 3D method was compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated strains with respect to the reference strains obtained from the model. More accurate strain images were obtained using the 3D displacement estimation for the entire cardiac cycle. The 3D technique clearly outperformed the 2D technique in phases with high inter-frame longitudinal motion. In fact the large inter-frame longitudinal motion rendered it impossible to accurately track the tissue and cumulate strains over the entire cardiac cycle with the 2D technique.

  10. 2-D Versus 3-D Cross-Correlation-Based Radial and Circumferential Strain Estimation Using Multiplane 2-D Ultrafast Ultrasound in a 3-D Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Model.

    PubMed

    Fekkes, Stein; Swillens, Abigail E S; Hansen, Hendrik H G; Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Iannaccone, Francesco; Segers, Patrick; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) strain estimation might improve the detection and localization of high strain regions in the carotid artery (CA) for identification of vulnerable plaques. This paper compares 2-D versus 3-D displacement estimation in terms of radial and circumferential strain using simulated ultrasound (US) images of a patient-specific 3-D atherosclerotic CA model at the bifurcation embedded in surrounding tissue generated with ABAQUS software. Global longitudinal motion was superimposed to the model based on the literature data. A Philips L11-3 linear array transducer was simulated, which transmitted plane waves at three alternating angles at a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. Interframe (IF) radio-frequency US data were simulated in Field II for 191 equally spaced longitudinal positions of the internal CA. Accumulated radial and circumferential displacements were estimated using tracking of the IF displacements estimated by a two-step normalized cross-correlation method and displacement compounding. Least-squares strain estimation was performed to determine accumulated radial and circumferential strain. The performance of the 2-D and 3-D methods was compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated strains with respect to the reference strains obtained from the model. More accurate strain images were obtained using the 3-D displacement estimation for the entire cardiac cycle. The 3-D technique clearly outperformed the 2-D technique in phases with high IF longitudinal motion. In fact, the large IF longitudinal motion rendered it impossible to accurately track the tissue and cumulate strains over the entire cardiac cycle with the 2-D technique.

  11. Noise exposure and noise induced hearing loss among Kuala Lumpur traffic point duty personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomas, N; Mariah, A Nor; Fuad, A; Kuljit, S; Philip, R

    2007-06-01

    Thirty-two points in Kuala Lumpur were selected where traffic personnel were on duty. Sound level readings were taken three times a day. Generally, the traffic noise levels were between 75 dBA to 85 dBA. The maximum sound level recorded was 108.2 dBA. Noise emitted by traffic equipment and vehicles were up to 133 dBA. Results of audiometric tests revealed that out of 30 who were tested, 24 or 80% were positive for noise-induced hearing loss. A questionnaire survey revealed a lack of knowledge on occupational safety and personal protective equipment.

  12. Evidence for assortative mating on digit ratio (2D:4D), a biomarker for prenatal androgen exposure.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Dressler, Stefan G; Manning, John T

    2007-07-01

    The second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) presents an anatomical sex difference in humans. On average, men tend to have lower 2D:4D compared with women. There is fairly strong evidence for a role of the 2D:4D ratio as a biomarker for the organizational (permanent) effects of prenatal testosterone on the brain and behaviour. Recently, an accumulating research programme has shown 2D:4D to be related to a multitude of sex-dependent, hormonally influenced biosocial traits and phenotypes which reach into the domains of ability, behaviour, fertility, health, personality and sexuality. This study investigated the degree of assortative mating (spousal similarity) in a sample of 239 native Austrian couples of parental or grandparental age, all of them having reproduced. Results included: (i) significant spousal correlations of +0.19 and +0.18 for right-hand and left-hand 2D:4D, respectively, and +0.24 for average 2D:4D; (ii) no assortative mating effect on the right-minus-left difference in 2D:4D; (iii) indications consistent with a possible generational decrease of spousal similarity in 2D:4D; (iv) a prevalence of couples with a lower right-hand 2D:4D observed in the husband compared with his wife; and (v) relations of spousal 2D:4D patterns to spousal age differences, such that matings of men with more male-typical trait expressions (namely, a generally low right-hand 2D:4D or showing a lower right-minus-left 2D:4D difference than their wives) implicated larger male-minus-female age differences, i.e. younger wives. It is argued that assortative mating on 2D:4D operates indirectly and may be mediated through the assortment on other, more perceptible, physical traits and psychological phenotypes that entertain associations with 2D:4D and are relevant for courtship and mate choice.

  13. Physico-chemical spectroscopic mapping of the planetary nebula NGC 40 and the 2D_NEB, a new 2D algorithm to study ionized nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Monteiro, H.; Richards, J. W.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the physical and chemical conditions of the planetary nebula NGC 40 through spatially resolved spectroscopic maps. We also introduce a new algorithm -2D_NEB- based on the well-established IRAF nebular package, which was developed to enable the use of the spectroscopic maps to easily estimate the astrophysical quantities of ionized nebulae. The 2D_NEB was benchmarked, and we clearly show that it works properly, since it compares nicely with the IRAF nebular software. Using this software, we derive the maps of several physical parameters of NGC 40. From these maps, we conclude that Te[N II] shows only a slight temperature variation from region to region, with its values constrained between ˜8000 and 9500 K. Electron densities, on the other hand, have a much more prominent spatial variation, as Ne[S II] values vary from ˜1000 to 3000 cm-3. Maps of the chemical abundances also show significant variations. From the big picture of our work, we strongly suggest that analysis with spatial resolution be mandatory for more complete study of the physical and chemical properties of planetary nebulae.

  14. Reconstruction-based 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel 3D/2D registration method, where first, a 3D image is reconstructed from a few 2D X-ray images and next, the preoperative 3D image is brought into the best possible spatial correspondence with the reconstructed image by optimizing a similarity measure. Because the quality of the reconstructed image is generally low, we introduce a novel asymmetric mutual information similarity measure, which is able to cope with low image quality as well as with different imaging modalities. The novel 3D/2D registration method has been evaluated using standardized evaluation methodology and publicly available 3D CT, 3DRX, and MR and 2D X-ray images of two spine phantoms, for which gold standard registrations were known. In terms of robustness, reliability and capture range the proposed method outperformed the gradient-based method and the method based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).

  15. Orbifold reduction and 2d (0,2) gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Lee, Sangmin; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2017-03-01

    We introduce Orbifold Reduction, a new method for generating 2 d (0 , 2) gauge theories associated to D1-branes probing singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds starting from 4 d N=1 gauge theories on D3-branes probing toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds. The new procedure generalizes dimensional reduction and orbifolding. In terms of T-dual configurations, it generates brane brick models starting from brane tilings. Orbifold reduction provides an agile approach for generating 2 d (0 , 2) theories with a brane realization. We present three practical applications of the new algorithm: the connection between 4 d Seiberg duality and 2 d triality, a combinatorial method for generating theories related by triality and a 2 d (0 , 2) generalization of the Klebanov-Witten mass deformation.

  16. Studying Zeolite Catalysts with a 2D Model System

    SciTech Connect

    Boscoboinik, Anibal

    2016-12-07

    Anibal Boscoboinik, a materials scientist at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses the surface-science tools and 2D model system he uses to study catalysis in nanoporous zeolites, which catalyze reactions in many industrial processes.

  17. Materials science: Screen printing of 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Duck; Hone, James

    2017-04-01

    Atomically thin semiconductors have been made by transferring the oxide 'skin' of a liquid metal to substrates. This opens the way to the low-cost mass production of 2D semiconductors at the sizes needed for electronics applications.

  18. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  19. Exact Solution of Ising Model in 2d Shortcut Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, O.

    We give the exact solution to the Ising model in the shortcut network in the 2D limit. The solution is found by mapping the model to the square lattice model with Brascamp and Kunz boundary conditions.

  20. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  1. Negative Terahertz Photoconductivity in 2D Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Sun, Jing

    2017-09-13

    The remarkable specialties of 2D layered materials like the wide spectral coverage, high strength and great flexibility endow ultrathin 2D layered materials the potential to meet the criteria of next generation optoelectronic devices. Photoconductivity is one of the critical parameters of materials applied to optoelectronics. Different to the traditional semiconductors, specific ultrathin 2D layers present anomalous negative photoconductivity. This opens a new avenue for designing novel optoelectronic devices. Deep understanding of the fundamentals in this anomalous response is important for design and optimization of devices. In this review, we provide an overview into the observation of negative photoconductivity in 2D layered materials including graphene, topological insulators and transitional mental dichalcogenides. We also summarize the recent reports about the investigations of the fundamental mechanism using ultrafast terahertz spectroscopies. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing the existing challenges and proposing the possible prospects of this research direction. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  3. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  4. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  5. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  6. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  7. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  8. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  9. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  10. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  11. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  12. phase_space_cosmo_fisher: Fisher matrix 2D contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alejo

    2016-11-01

    phase_space_cosmo_fisher produces Fisher matrix 2D contours from which the constraints on cosmological parameters can be derived. Given a specified redshift array and cosmological case, 2D marginalized contours of cosmological parameters are generated; the code can also plot the derivatives used in the Fisher matrix. In addition, this package can generate 3D plots of qH^2 and other cosmological quantities as a function of redshift and cosmology.

  13. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  14. Supported and Free-Standing 2D Semimetals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    of this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE-A), although not a van der Waals 2D solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 2D quantum size...this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE- A), although not a van der Waals 20 solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 20 quantum size...Brongersma and S.R. Bank, "Rare- earth monopnictide alloys for tunable, epitaxial metals" in preparation. iii. S. Rahimi, E. M. Krivoy, J. Lee, M. E

  15. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  16. Application of 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Tan, Mingshu; Ding, Kequan

    2005-10-01

    Recently, we proposed a 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence [Bo Liao, A 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence, Chem. Phys. Lett. 401 (2005) 196-199]. Based on this representation, we consider properties of mutations and compute the similarities among 11 mitochondrial sequences belonging to different species. The elements of the similarity matrix are used to construct phylogenic tree. Unlike most existing phylogeny construction methods, the proposed method does not require multiple alignment.

  17. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  18. A Stochastic Simulation Framework for the Prediction of Strategic Noise Mapping and Occupational Noise Exposure Using the Random Walk Approach

    PubMed Central

    Haron, Zaiton; Bakar, Suhaimi Abu; Dimon, Mohamad Ngasri

    2015-01-01

    Strategic noise mapping provides important information for noise impact assessment and noise abatement. However, producing reliable strategic noise mapping in a dynamic, complex working environment is difficult. This study proposes the implementation of the random walk approach as a new stochastic technique to simulate noise mapping and to predict the noise exposure level in a workplace. A stochastic simulation framework and software, namely RW-eNMS, were developed to facilitate the random walk approach in noise mapping prediction. This framework considers the randomness and complexity of machinery operation and noise emission levels. Also, it assesses the impact of noise on the workers and the surrounding environment. For data validation, three case studies were conducted to check the accuracy of the prediction data and to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of this approach. The results showed high accuracy of prediction results together with a majority of absolute differences of less than 2 dBA; also, the predicted noise doses were mostly in the range of measurement. Therefore, the random walk approach was effective in dealing with environmental noises. It could predict strategic noise mapping to facilitate noise monitoring and noise control in the workplaces. PMID:25875019

  19. A stochastic simulation framework for the prediction of strategic noise mapping and occupational noise exposure using the random walk approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Lim Ming; Haron, Zaiton; Yahya, Khairulzan; Bakar, Suhaimi Abu; Dimon, Mohamad Ngasri

    2015-01-01

    Strategic noise mapping provides important information for noise impact assessment and noise abatement. However, producing reliable strategic noise mapping in a dynamic, complex working environment is difficult. This study proposes the implementation of the random walk approach as a new stochastic technique to simulate noise mapping and to predict the noise exposure level in a workplace. A stochastic simulation framework and software, namely RW-eNMS, were developed to facilitate the random walk approach in noise mapping prediction. This framework considers the randomness and complexity of machinery operation and noise emission levels. Also, it assesses the impact of noise on the workers and the surrounding environment. For data validation, three case studies were conducted to check the accuracy of the prediction data and to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of this approach. The results showed high accuracy of prediction results together with a majority of absolute differences of less than 2 dBA; also, the predicted noise doses were mostly in the range of measurement. Therefore, the random walk approach was effective in dealing with environmental noises. It could predict strategic noise mapping to facilitate noise monitoring and noise control in the workplaces.

  20. Effect of cyp2d6*10 allele on the pharmacokinetics of loratadine in chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ophelia Q P; Shi, X J; Tomlinson, B; Chow, Moses S S

    2005-09-01

    Loratadine is known to be a substrate for both CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 based on a previous in vitro study. In view of the large interindividual variability in loratadine pharmacokinetics and the greater genetically determined variability of CYP2D6 activity than of CYP3A4 in vivo, we hypothesized that CYP2D6 polymorphisms may contribute to the pharmacokinetic variability of loratadine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CYP2D6 genotype (specifically the CYP2D6*10 allele) on the pharmacokinetics of loratadine in Chinese subjects. Three groups of healthy male Chinese subjects were enrolled: group I, homozygous CYP2D6*1 (*1/*1, n=4); group II, heterozygous CYP2D6*10 (*1/*10 or *2/*10, n=6); and group III, homozygous CYP2D6*10 (*10/*10, n=7) carriers. Each subject received a single oral dose of 20 mg of loratadine under fasting conditions. Multiple blood samples were collected over 48 h, and the plasma concentrations of loratadine and its metabolite desloratadine were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. In comparing homozygous CYP2D6*10 (group III) to heterozygous CYP2D6*10 (group II) to homozygous CYP2D6*1 (group I) subjects, loratadine oral clearance values were 7.17+/- 2.54 versus 11.06+/-1.70 versus 14.59+/-2.43 l/h/kg, respectively [one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), p<0.01], and the corresponding metabolic ratios [area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC)(desloratadine)/AUC(loratadine)] were 1.55+/-0.73 versus 2.47+/- 0.46 versus 3.32+/- 0.49, respectively (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05), indicating a gene-dose effect. The results demonstrated that CYP2D6 polymorphism prevalent in the Chinese population significantly affected loratadine pharmacokinetics.

  1. 2D IR cross peaks reveal hydrogen-deuterium exchange with single residue specificity.

    PubMed

    Dunkelberger, Emily B; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-12-12

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a (13)C(18)O isotope-labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide ovispirin bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min(-1), which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10-labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min(-1). Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements.

  2. 2D IR Cross Peaks Reveal Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange with Single Residue Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using 2D IR (two dimensional infrared) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a 13C18O isotope labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min−1, which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10 labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min−1. Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements. PMID:23659731

  3. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  4. Regulation of NKG2D ligand gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Traherne, James A; Ashiru, Omodele; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2006-03-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D has seven known host ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related MIC and ULBP/RAET genes. Why there is such diversity of NKG2D ligands is not known but one hypothesis is that they are differentially expressed in different tissues in response to different stresses. To explore this, we compared expression patterns and promoters of NKG2D ligand genes. ULBP/RAET genes were transcribed independent of each other in a panel of cell lines. ULBP/RAET gene expression was upregulated on infection with human cytomegalovirus; however, a clinical strain, Toledo, induced expression more slowly than did a laboratory strain, AD169. ULBP4/RAET1E was not induced by infection with either strain. To investigate the mechanisms behind the similarities and differences in NKG2D ligand gene expression a comparative sequence analysis of NKG2D ligand gene putative promoter regions was conducted. Sequence alignments demonstrated that there was significant sequence diversity; however, one region of high similarity between most of the genes is evident. This region contains a number of potential transcription factor binding sites, including those involved in shock responses and sites for retinoic acid-induced factors. Promoters of some NKG2D ligand genes are polymorphic and several sequence alterations in these alleles abolished putative transcription factor binding.

  5. CYP2D6 variability in populations from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nancy; Flores-Angulo, Carlos; Villegas, Cecilia; Mora, Yuselin

    2016-12-01

    CYP2D6 is an important cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of about 25% of currently prescribed drugs. The presence of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 gene may modulate enzyme level and activity, thereby affecting individual responses to pharmacological treatments. The most prevalent diseases in the admixed population from Venezuela are cardiovascular and cancer, whereas viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases, particularly malaria, are prevalent in Amerindian populations; in the treatment of these diseases, several drugs that are metabolized by CYP2D6 are used. In this work, we reviewed the data on CYP2D6 variability and predicted metabolizer phenotypes, in healthy volunteers of two admixed and five Amerindian populations from Venezuela. The Venezuelan population is very heterogeneous as a result of the genetic admixture of three major ethnical components: Europeans, Africans and Amerindians. There are noticeable inter-regional and inter-population differences in the process of mixing of this population. Hitherto, there are few published studies in Venezuela on CYP2D6; therefore, it is necessary to increase research in this regard, in particular to develop studies with a larger sample size. There is a considerable amount of work remaining before CYP2D6 is integrated into clinical practice in Venezuela.

  6. Dirac Magnon Nodal Loops in Quasi-2D Quantum Magnets.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2017-07-31

    In this report, we propose a new concept of one-dimensional (1D) closed lines of Dirac magnon nodes in two-dimensional (2D) momentum space of quasi-2D quantum magnetic systems. They are termed "2D Dirac magnon nodal-line loops". We utilize the bilayer honeycomb ferromagnets with intralayer coupling J and interlayer coupling J L , which is realizable in the honeycomb chromium compounds CrX3 (X ≡ Br, Cl, and I). However, our results can also exist in other layered quasi-2D quantum magnetic systems. Here, we show that the magnon bands of the bilayer honeycomb ferromagnets overlap for J L  ≠ 0 and form 1D closed lines of Dirac magnon nodes in 2D momentum space. The 2D Dirac magnon nodal-line loops are topologically protected by inversion and time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, we show that they are robust against weak Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction Δ DM  < J L and possess chiral magnon edge modes.

  7. [2D:4D finger ratio and language development].

    PubMed

    Albores-Gallo, L; Fernández-Guasti, A; Hernández-Guzmán, L; List-Hilton, C

    A possible hormonal influence in language development has been suggested in the recent years. The 2D:4D finger ratio is an indirect measure for prenatal androgen exposure. It is negatively related to prenatal testosterone and positively related to prenatal estrogen, resulting in a lower ratio for men and a larger ratio for women. It can be explored in children as young as 2 years old. To study if an association exists between the 2D:4D finger ratio and language development (vocabulary) and/or language problems. The lengths of the second digit (index finger) (2D) and the fourth digit (ring finger) (4D) were measured in 97 preschoolers and the Language Development Survey was administered to the parents. A weak negative correlation between language development (vocabulary) and right 2D:4D ratio was found in both sexes for children aged 4 or less years, significant only in boys. A strong negative correlation between language articulation problems and right 2D:4D ratio in both sexes for children aged 3 or less years, and a lower negative correlation between articulation problems and right 2D:4D ratio were found for boys aged 4 or less years. Findings suggest an important role for testosterone in language development (vocabulary) and a possible influence on articulation problems, probably through higher testosterone levels.

  8. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  9. Structural noise tolerance of photonic crystal optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odontsengel, Nyam-Erdene; Cai, DongSheng; Cole, James B.

    2016-12-01

    Using nonstandard (NS) finite difference time domain (FDTD) scheme to perform 2D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, we investigate how the optical properties of 2D photonic crystals (PCs) are affected by various different kinds of structural noises in the PC lattice. While the transmission spectrum is strongly affected by noises, the position and the depth of the band gap in the transmission spectrum are remarkably robust. It is shown that rather coarse numerical grids can be used to evaluate various PC structures in NS-FDTD EM simulations. The combination of noises affects transmission spectrum in the same way as the most influential individual noise. It is shown that reducing the most influential individual noise is a very efficient method to make PC more accurate.

  10. Helicopter rotor noise investigation during ice accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baofeng

    An investigation of helicopter rotor noise during ice accretion is conducted using experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods. This research is the acoustic part of a joint helicopter rotor icing physics, modeling, and detection project at The Pennsylvania State University Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence (VLRCOE). The current research aims to provide acoustic insight and understanding of the rotor icing physics and investigate the feasibility of detecting rotor icing through noise measurements, especially at the early stage of ice accretion. All helicopter main rotor noise source mechanisms and their change during ice accretion are discussed. Changes of the thickness noise, steady loading noise, and especially the turbulent boundary layer - trailing edge (TBL-TE) noise due to ice accretion are identified and studied. The change of the discrete frequency noise (thickness noise and steady loading noise) due to ice accretion is calculated by using PSU-WOPWOP, an advanced rotorcraft acoustic prediction code. The change is noticeable, but too small to be used in icing detection. The small thickness noise change is due to the small volume of the accreted ice compared to that of the entire blade, although a large iced airfoil shape is used. For the loading noise calculation, two simplified methods are used to generate the loading on the rotor blades, which is the input for the loading noise calculation: 1) compact loading from blade element momentum theory, icing effects are considered by increasing the drag coefficient; and 2) pressure loading from the 2-D CFD simulation, icing effects are considered by using the iced airfoil shape. Comprehensive rotor broadband noise measurements are carried out on rotor blades with different roughness sizes and rotation speeds in two facilities: the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Maryland Acoustic Chamber (UMAC). In both facilities the

  11. Self-Assembly of Shaped Nanoparticles into Free-Standing 2D and 3D Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Li, Weikun; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Peng; He, Jie; Xu, Shaoyi; Liao, Yonggui; Zhu, Jintao; Xie, Xiaolin; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-27

    This article describes a novel supramolecular assembly-mediated strategy for the organization of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with different shapes (e.g., spheres, rods, and cubes) into large-area, free-standing 2D and 3D superlattices. This robust approach involves two major steps: (i) the organization of polymer-tethered NPs within the assemblies of supramolecular comblike block copolymers (CBCPs), and (ii) the disassembly of the assembled CBCP structures to produce free-standing NP superlattices. It is demonstrated that the crystal structures and lattice constants of the superlattices can be readily tailored by varying the molecular weight of tethered polymers, the volume fraction of NPs, and the matrix of CBCPs. This template-free approach may open a new avenue for the assembly of NPs into 2D and 3D structures with a wide range of potential applications.

  12. Couette shear of an ideal 2D photo-elastic granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert; Zheng, Hu; Barés, Jonathan; Wang, Dong

    2016-11-01

    In this study, Couette shear experiments are conducted using 2D photoelastic granular particles, which allows us to apply infinite shear strain to the granular system. We obtain force information at the granular scale using the calibrated photo-elastic grain force response. The whole granular system is density matched in salt solution, which guarantees an ideal 2D system without basal friction between the particles and the table. The viscosity is negligible at the very small shear strain rate (0.017 rpm). This talk will address two main points: i) how does the system reach a jammed state; ii) how does system reach a long term stable state and what are the properties of that state. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR1206351, NASA Grant No. NNX15AD38G and the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Hysteretic Spin Crossover in Two-Dimensional (2D) Hofmann-Type Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Lu; Su, Yu-Jun; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek; Ni, Zhao-Ping; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-09-08

    Three new two-dimensional (2D) Hofmann-type coordination polymers with general formula [Fe(3-NH2py)2M(CN)4] (3-NH2py = 3-aminopyridine, M = Ni (1), Pd (2), Pt (3)) have been synthesized. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that they exhibited cooperative spin crossover (SCO) with remarkable hysteretic behaviors. Their hysteresis widths are 25, 37, and 30 K for 1-3, respectively. The single-crystal structure of 1 suggest that the pseudo-octahedral Fe sites are equatorially bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) to form 2D grids and axially coordinated by 3-NH2py ligands. The intermolecular interactions between layers (the offset face-to-face π···π interactions, hydrogen bonds, and weak N(amino)···Ni(II) contacts) together with the covalent bonds bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) units are responsible to the significant cooperativity.

  14. 2D Hexagonal Boron Nitride (2D-hBN) Explored for the Electrochemical Sensing of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamar F; Brownson, Dale A C; Randviir, Edward P; Smith, Graham C; Banks, Craig E

    2016-10-04

    Crystalline 2D hexagonal boron nitride (2D-hBN) nanosheets are explored as a potential electrocatalyst toward the electroanalytical sensing of dopamine (DA). The 2D-hBN nanosheets are electrically wired via a drop-casting modification process onto a range of commercially available carbon supporting electrodes, including glassy carbon (GC), boron-doped diamond (BDD), and screen-printed graphitic electrodes (SPEs). 2D-hBN has not previously been explored toward the electrochemical detection/electrochemical sensing of DA. We critically evaluate the potential electrocatalytic performance of 2D-hBN modified electrodes, the effect of supporting carbon electrode platforms, and the effect of "mass coverage" (which is commonly neglected in the 2D material literature) toward the detection of DA. The response of 2D-hBN modified electrodes is found to be largely dependent upon the interaction between 2D-hBN and the underlying supporting electrode material. For example, in the case of SPEs, modification with 2D-hBN (324 ng) improves the electrochemical response, decreasing the electrochemical oxidation potential of DA by ∼90 mV compared to an unmodified SPE. Conversely, modification of a GC electrode with 2D-hBN (324 ng) resulted in an increased oxidation potential of DA by ∼80 mV when compared to the unmodified electrode. We explore the underlying mechanisms of the aforementioned examples and infer that electrode surface interactions and roughness factors are critical considerations. 2D-hBN is utilized toward the sensing of DA in the presence of the common interferents ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). 2D-hBN is found to be an effective electrocatalyst in the simultaneous detection of DA and UA at both pH 5.0 and 7.4. The peak separations/resolution between DA and UA increases by ∼70 and 50 mV (at pH 5.0 and 7.4, respectively, when utilizing 108 ng of 2D-hBN) compared to unmodified SPEs, with a particularly favorable response evident in pH 5.0, giving rise to a

  15. Capabilities using 2-D DIGE in proteomics research : the new gold standard for 2-D gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rozanas, Christine R; Loyland, Stacey M

    2008-01-01

    The use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for differential analysis in proteomics was revolutionized by the introduction of 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). This fluorescence-based technique allows the use of multiplexed samples and an internal standard that virtually eliminates gel-to-gel variability, resulting in increased confidence that differences found between samples are due to real induced changes, rather than inherent biological variation or experimental variability. 2-D DIGE has quickly become the "gold standard" for gel-based proteomics for studying tissues, as well as cell culture and bodily fluids such as serum or plasma. This chapter will describe the basic 2-D DIGE technique using minimal labeling, image acquisition using high-quality fluorescence scanners, and software capable of analyzing the multiplexed images and normalizing the data using the internal standard.

  16. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  17. Four novel ULBP splice variants are ligands for human NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Xi, Xueyan; Wang, Zhun; Dong, Liling; Hao, Zhiyong; Cui, Lianxian; Ma, Chi; He, Wei

    2008-08-01

    UL16-binding proteins [ULBPs, also termed as retinoic acid early transcripts (RAET1) molecules] are frequently expressed by malignant transformed cells and stimulate anti-tumor immune responses mediated by NKG2D-positive NK cells, CD8(+) alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we identified four novel functional splice variants of ULBPs including ULBP4-I, ULBP4-II, ULBP4-III and RAET1G3 in HepG2 liver carcinoma cells, WISH human amnion cells, Hep-2 larynx carcinoma cells and K562 leukemia cells, respectively, by reverse transcription-PCR and T vector cloning strategy. Analysis of alignments of amino acid sequences of the splice variants illustrated that there were important modifications between splice variants and their individual parental ULBP. All ULBP4 splice variants (ULBP4-I, ULBP4-II and ULBP4-III) were type 1 membrane-spanning molecules and had the ability to bind with human NKG2D receptor in vitro. Ectopic expressions of ULBP4 and ULBP4 splice variants resulted in the enhanced cytotoxic sensitivity of target cells against NK cells, which could be blocked by anti-NKG2D mAb. Moreover, co-culture-free soluble forms of ULBP4 splice variants (their alpha1 + alpha2 ectodomains) and RAET1G3 (soluble splice variant of RAET1G2) with NK cells down-regulated the cell surface expression of NKG2D. Finally, immobilized in a plate-bound form of RAET1G3 stimulated NK cells to secrete IFN-gamma. Taken together, all the identified functional splice variants will help to advance our knowledge regarding the overall functions of ULBP gene family.

  18. An automated pipeline to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changki; Vink, Martin; Hu, Minghui; Love, James; Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2011-01-01

    Electron crystallography relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and is particularly well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. To obtain 2D crystals from purified membrane proteins, the detergent in a protein-lipid-detergent ternary mixture must be removed, generally by dialysis, under conditions favoring reconstitution into proteoliposomes and formation of well-ordered lattices. To identify these conditions a wide range of parameters such as pH, lipid composition, lipid-to-protein ratio, ionic strength and ligands must be screened in a procedure involving four steps: crystallization, specimen preparation for electron microscopy, image acquisition, and evaluation. Traditionally, these steps have been carried out manually and, as a result, the scope of 2D crystallization trials has been limited. We have therefore developed an automated pipeline to screen the formation of 2D crystals. We employed a 96-well dialysis block for reconstitution of the target protein over a wide range of conditions designed to promote crystallization. A 96-position magnetic platform and a liquid handling robot were used to prepare negatively stained specimens in parallel. Robotic grid insertion into the electron microscope and computerized image acquisition ensures rapid evaluation of the crystallization screen. To date, 38 2D crystallization screens have been conducted for 15 different membrane proteins, totaling over 3000 individual crystallization experiments. Three of these proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals. Our automated pipeline outperforms traditional 2D crystallization methods in terms of throughput and reproducibility. PMID:20349145

  19. Alternative representations of an image via the 2D wavelet transform: application to character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Jean-Pierre; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Bouyoucef, Karim; Murenzi, Romain

    1995-06-01

    Both in 1D (signal analysis) and 2D (image processing), the wavelet transform (WT) has become by now a standard tool. Although the discrete version, based on multiresolution analysis, is probably better known, the continous WT (CWT) plays a crucial role for the detection and analysis of particular features in a signal, and we will focus here on the latter. In 2D however, one faces a practical problem. Indeed, the full parameter space of the wavelet transform of an image is 4D. It yields a representation of the image in position parameters (range and perception angle), as well as scale and anisotropy angle. The real challenge is to compute and visualize the full continuous wavelet transform in all four variables--obviously a demanding task. Thus, in order to obtain a manageable tool, some of the variables must be frozen. In other words, one must limit oneself to sections of the parameter space, usually 2D or 3D. For 2D sections, two variables are fixed and the transform is viewed as a function of the two remaing ones, and similarly for 3D sections. Among the six possible 2D sections, two play a privileged role. They yield respectively the position representation, which is the standard one, and the scale-angle representation, which has been proposed and studied systematically by two of us in a number of works. In this paper we will review these results and investigate the four remaining 2D representations. We will also make some comments on possible applications of 3D sections. The most spectacular property of the CWT is its ability at detecting discontinuities in a signal. In an image, this means in particular the sharp boundary between two regions of different luminosity, that is, a contour or an edge. Even more prominent in the transform are the corners of a given contour, for instance the contour of a letter. In a second part, we will exploit this property of the CWT and describe how one may design an algorithm for automatic character recognition (here we

  20. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, K.; Ermert, L. A.; Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source location, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of noise generation. We introduce an operator-based formulation for the computation of correlation functions and apply the continuous adjoint method that allows us to compute first and second derivatives of misfit functionals with respect to source distribution and Earth structure efficiently. Based on these developments we design an inversion scheme using a 2D finite-difference code. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: The capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution. Possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus, which allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface.

  1. Characterization of SH2D1A missense mutations identified in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease patients.

    PubMed

    Morra, M; Simarro-Grande, M; Martin, M; Chen, A S; Lanyi, A; Silander, O; Calpe, S; Davis, J; Pawson, T; Eck, M J; Sumegi, J; Engel, P; Li, S C; Terhorst, C

    2001-09-28

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by extreme susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus. The XLP disease gene product SH2D1A (SAP) interacts via its SH2 domain with a motif (TIYXXV) present in the cytoplasmic tail of the cell-surface receptors CD150/SLAM, CD84, CD229/Ly-9, and CD244/2B4. Characteristically, the SH2D1A three-pronged interaction with Tyr(281) of CD150 can occur in absence of phosphorylation. Here we analyze the effect of SH2D1A protein missense mutations identified in 10 XLP families. Two sets of mutants were found: (i) mutants with a marked decreased protein half-life (e.g. Y7C, S28R, Q99P, P101L, V102G, and X129R) and (ii) mutants with structural changes that differently affect the interaction with the four receptors. In the second group, mutations that disrupt the interaction between the SH2D1A hydrophobic cleft and Val +3 of its binding motif (e.g. T68I) and mutations that interfere with the SH2D1A phosphotyrosine-binding pocket (e.g. C42W) abrogated SH2D1A binding to all four receptors. Surprisingly, a mutation in SH2D1A able to interfere with Thr -2 of the CD150 binding motif (mutant T53I) severely impaired non-phosphotyrosine interactions while preserving unaffected the binding of SH2D1A to phosphorylated CD150. Mutant T53I, however, did not bind to CD229 and CD224, suggesting that SH2D1A controls several critical signaling pathways in T and natural killer cells. Because no correlation is present between identified types of mutations and XLP patient clinical presentation, additional unidentified genetic or environmental factors must play a strong role in XLP disease manifestations.

  2. Developing a Neural Network to Act as a Noise Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-02

    This study uses the neural network simulator called NETS to determine if neural networks could perform a non-linear filtering operation to remove...noise from two-dimensional (2-D) data and produce a noise-free image. Application is geared toward the development and performance of neural network filters...including the development of an optional neural network architecture and the use of-criteria in determining how accurate the net filtered noise-to produce a noise-free image.

  3. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-08-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  4. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  5. Upgraded immersive input display device (I2D2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremper, David; Brosky, Andy

    2007-04-01

    In an effort to reduce the effects of ambient light on the read-ability of military displays, the Naval Research Lab began investigating and developing advanced hand-held displays. Analysis and research of display technologies with consideration for vulnerability to environmental conditions resulted in the complete design and fabrication of the handheld Immersive Input Display Device (I2D2) monocular. The I2D2 combines an OLED SVGA micro-display with an optics configuration and a rubber pressure-eyecup which allows view-ability only when the eyecup is depressed. This feature allows the I2D2 to be used during the day, while not allowing ambient light to affect the readability. It simultaneously controls light leakage, effectively eliminating the illumination, and thus preserving the tactical position, of the user in the dark. This paper will focus on the upgraded I2D2 system as it compares to the I2D2 presented at SPIE 2006.

  6. Mermin-Wagner fluctuations in 2D amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Kaiser, Herbert; Klix, Christian L.; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2017-02-01

    In a recent commentary, J. M. Kosterlitz described how D. Thouless and he got motivated to investigate melting and suprafluidity in two dimensions [Kosterlitz JM (2016) J Phys Condens Matter 28:481001]. It was due to the lack of broken translational symmetry in two dimensions—doubting the existence of 2D crystals—and the first computer simulations foretelling 2D crystals (at least in tiny systems). The lack of broken symmetries proposed by D. Mermin and H. Wagner is caused by long wavelength density fluctuations. Those fluctuations do not only have structural impact, but additionally a dynamical one: They cause the Lindemann criterion to fail in 2D in the sense that the mean squared displacement of atoms is not limited. Comparing experimental data from 3D and 2D amorphous solids with 2D crystals, we disentangle Mermin-Wagner fluctuations from glassy structural relaxations. Furthermore, we demonstrate with computer simulations the logarithmic increase of displacements with system size: Periodicity is not a requirement for Mermin-Wagner fluctuations, which conserve the homogeneity of space on long scales.

  7. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future.

  8. 2D Materials for Optical Modulation: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoliang; Wu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yipei; Guo, Xin; Tong, Limin

    2017-02-21

    Owing to their atomic layer thickness, strong light-material interaction, high nonlinearity, broadband optical response, fast relaxation, controllable optoelectronic properties, and high compatibility with other photonic structures, 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have been attracting increasing attention for photonic applications. By tuning the carrier density via electrical or optical means that modifies their physical properties (e.g., Fermi level or nonlinear absorption), optical response of the 2D materials can be instantly changed, making them versatile nanostructures for optical modulation. Here, up-to-date 2D material-based optical modulation in three categories is reviewed: free-space, fiber-based, and on-chip configurations. By analysing cons and pros of different modulation approaches from material and mechanism aspects, the challenges faced by using these materials for device applications are presented. In addition, thermal effects (e.g., laser induced damage) in 2D materials, which are critical to practical applications, are also discussed. Finally, the outlook for future opportunities of these 2D materials for optical modulation is given.

  9. Rotation invariance principles in 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Gellrich, Niels C.; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-05-01

    2D/3D patient-to-computed tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 2D/3D registration is the fast that finding a registration includes sovling a minimization problem in six degrees-of-freedom in motion. This results in considerable time expenses since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations aroudn a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of its original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a pelvis. We conclude that this hardware-indepenent optimization of 2D/3D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  10. Regulation of ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Anita R; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of an encounter between a cytotoxic cell and a potential target cell depends on the balance of signals from inhibitory and activating receptors. Natural Killer group 2D (NKG2D) has recently emerged as a major activating receptor on T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In both humans and mice, multiple different genes encode ligands for NKG2D, and these ligands are non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The NKG2D–ligand interaction triggers an activating signal in the cell expressing NKG2D and this promotes cytotoxic lysis of the cell expressing the ligand. Most normal tissues do not express ligands for NKG2D, but ligand expression has been documented in tumour and virus-infected cells, leading to lysis of these cells. Tight regulation of ligand expression is important. If there is inappropriate expression in normal tissues, this will favour autoimmune processes, whilst failure to up-regulate the ligands in pathological conditions would favour cancer development or dissemination of intracellular infection. PMID:17614877

  11. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  12. Mermin-Wagner fluctuations in 2D amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Kaiser, Herbert; Klix, Christian L; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2017-02-21

    In a recent commentary, J. M. Kosterlitz described how D. Thouless and he got motivated to investigate melting and suprafluidity in two dimensions [Kosterlitz JM (2016) J Phys Condens Matter 28:481001]. It was due to the lack of broken translational symmetry in two dimensions-doubting the existence of 2D crystals-and the first computer simulations foretelling 2D crystals (at least in tiny systems). The lack of broken symmetries proposed by D. Mermin and H. Wagner is caused by long wavelength density fluctuations. Those fluctuations do not only have structural impact, but additionally a dynamical one: They cause the Lindemann criterion to fail in 2D in the sense that the mean squared displacement of atoms is not limited. Comparing experimental data from 3D and 2D amorphous solids with 2D crystals, we disentangle Mermin-Wagner fluctuations from glassy structural relaxations. Furthermore, we demonstrate with computer simulations the logarithmic increase of displacements with system size: Periodicity is not a requirement for Mermin-Wagner fluctuations, which conserve the homogeneity of space on long scales.

  13. Mermin–Wagner fluctuations in 2D amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Kaiser, Herbert; Klix, Christian L.; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In a recent commentary, J. M. Kosterlitz described how D. Thouless and he got motivated to investigate melting and suprafluidity in two dimensions [Kosterlitz JM (2016) J Phys Condens Matter 28:481001]. It was due to the lack of broken translational symmetry in two dimensions—doubting the existence of 2D crystals—and the first computer simulations foretelling 2D crystals (at least in tiny systems). The lack of broken symmetries proposed by D. Mermin and H. Wagner is caused by long wavelength density fluctuations. Those fluctuations do not only have structural impact, but additionally a dynamical one: They cause the Lindemann criterion to fail in 2D in the sense that the mean squared displacement of atoms is not limited. Comparing experimental data from 3D and 2D amorphous solids with 2D crystals, we disentangle Mermin–Wagner fluctuations from glassy structural relaxations. Furthermore, we demonstrate with computer simulations the logarithmic increase of displacements with system size: Periodicity is not a requirement for Mermin–Wagner fluctuations, which conserve the homogeneity of space on long scales. PMID:28137872

  14. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  15. 2D DIGE saturation labeling for minute sample amounts.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The 2D DIGE technique, based on fluorophores covalently linked to amino acid side chain residues and the concept of an internal standard, has significantly improved reproducibility, sensitivity, and the dynamic range of protein quantification. In saturation DIGE, sulfhydryl groups of cysteines are labeled with cyanine dyes to completion, providing a so far unraveled sensitivity for protein detection and quantification in 2D gel-based proteomic experiments. Only a few micrograms of protein per 2D gel facilitate the analysis of about 2,000 analytes from complex mammalian cell or tissue samples. As a consequence, 2D saturation DIGE is the method of choice when only minute sample amounts are available for quantitative proteome analysis at the level of proteins rather than peptides. Since very low amounts of samples have to be handled in a reproducible manner, saturation DIGE-based proteomic experiments are technically demanding. Moreover, successful saturation DIGE approaches require a strict adherence to adequate reaction conditions at each step. This chapter is dedicated to colleagues already experienced in 2D PAGE protein separation and intends to support the establishment of this ultrasensitive technique in proteomic workgroups. We provide basic guidelines for the experimental design and discuss crucial aspects concerning labeling chemistry, sample preparation, and pitfalls caused by labeling artifacts. A detailed step-by-step protocol comprises all aspects from initial sample preparation to image analysis and statistical evaluation. Furthermore, we describe the generation of preparative saturation DIGE gels necessary for mass spectrometry-based spot identification.

  16. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  17. Perspective: Echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter; Shalit, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Recently, various spectroscopic techniques have been developed, which can measure the 2D response of the inter-molecular degrees of freedom of liquids in the THz regime. By employing hybrid Raman-THz pulse sequences, the inherent experimental problems of 2D-Raman spectroscopy are circumvented completely, culminating in the recent measurement of the 2D-Raman-THz responses of water and aqueous salt solutions. This review article focuses on the possibility to observe echoes in such experiments, which would directly reveal the inhomogeneity of the typically extremely blurred THz bands of liquids, and hence the heterogeneity of local structures that are transiently formed, in particular, in a hydrogen-bonding liquid such as water. The generation mechanisms of echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy are explained, which differ from those in "conventional" 2D-IR spectroscopy in a subtle but important manner. Subsequently, the circumstances are discussed, under which echoes are expected, revealing a physical picture of the information co