Science.gov

Sample records for noise methods stage

  1. Two-stage method to suppress speckle noise in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Junmin; Zhou, Jinhe; Lang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaoying

    2015-10-01

    The two-stage method is proposed to suppress speckle noise in the digital hologram. Three kinds of optical denoising ways are analyzed and compared at first. The optimal one is used to reduce speckle preliminarily. At the same time, the statistical property of the speckle is changed by the optical way. Then the optimized NLM algorithm is adopted to further suppress speckle noise. The experimental system is set up, and the performance indices are calculated. The results are compared with other algorithms. It is demonstrated that the presented method can effectively suppress speckle noise in the digital hologram and the processed image is very vivid.

  2. A multi-stage method for connecting participatory sensing and noise simulations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingyuan; Che, Weitao; Zhang, Qiuju; Luo, Qingli; Lin, Hui

    2015-01-22

    Most simulation-based noise maps are important for official noise assessment but lack local noise characteristics. The main reasons for this lack of information are that official noise simulations only provide information about expected noise levels, which is limited by the use of large-scale monitoring of noise sources, and are updated infrequently. With the emergence of smart cities and ubiquitous sensing, the possible improvements enabled by sensing technologies provide the possibility to resolve this problem. This study proposed an integrated methodology to propel participatory sensing from its current random and distributed sampling origins to professional noise simulation. The aims of this study were to effectively organize the participatory noise data, to dynamically refine the granularity of the noise features on road segments (e.g., different portions of a road segment), and then to provide a reasonable spatio-temporal data foundation to support noise simulations, which can be of help to researchers in understanding how participatory sensing can play a role in smart cities. This study first discusses the potential limitations of the current participatory sensing and simulation-based official noise maps. Next, we explain how participatory noise data can contribute to a simulation-based noise map by providing (1) spatial matching of the participatory noise data to the virtual partitions at a more microscopic level of road networks; (2) multi-temporal scale noise estimations at the spatial level of virtual partitions; and (3) dynamic aggregation of virtual partitions by comparing the noise values at the relevant temporal scale to form a dynamic segmentation of each road segment to support multiple spatio-temporal noise simulations. In this case study, we demonstrate how this method could play a significant role in a simulation-based noise map. Together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of participatory noise data as dynamic input sources for

  3. 14 CFR 91.859 - Modification to meet Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... noise levels. 91.859 Section 91.859 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Noise Limits § 91.859 Modification to meet Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels. For an airplane subject to... Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels....

  4. 14 CFR 91.859 - Modification to meet Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... noise levels. 91.859 Section 91.859 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Noise Limits § 91.859 Modification to meet Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels. For an airplane subject to... Stage 3 or Stage 4 noise levels....

  5. Low Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, David E.; Neubert, Robert J.; Malmborg, Eric W.; Philbrick, Daniel H.; Spear, David A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Low Noise ADP Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes and core stators. This fan stage design was combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle, subscale model. This model is intended for use in aerodynamic performance, acoustic and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The model has a 22-inch outer fan diameter and a hub-to-top ratio of 0.426 which permits the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance designs and rig drive system. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the PW 17-inch rig previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric analysis at aerodynamic design condition are included. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is described including the material selections and stress analysis. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low cycle fatigue life, and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the fan exit guide vane and core stator to minimize noise. A fan-FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine these airfoil counts. The fan stage design was matched to a nacelle design to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. The nacelle design was developed under a separate NASA contract. The nacelle was designed with an axisymmetric inlet, cowl and nozzle for convenience in testing and fabrication. Aerodynamic analysis of the nacelle confirmed the required performance at various aircraft operating conditions.

  6. Airframe Noise Prediction Using the Sngr Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongqian; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    In this paper, the Stochastic Noise Generation and Radiation method (SNGR) is used to predict airframe noise. The SNGR method combines a stochastic model with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and it can give acceptable noise results while the computation cost is relatively low. In the method, the time-averaged mean flow field is firstly obtained by solving Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS), and a stochastic velocity is generated based on the obtained information. Then the turbulent field is used to generate the source for the Acoustic Perturbation Equations (APEs) that simulate the noise propagation. For numerical methods, timeaveraged RANS equations are solved by finite volume method, and the turbulent model is K - ɛ model; APEs are solved by finite difference method, and the numerical scheme is the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme, with explicit optimized 5-stage Rung-Kutta scheme time step. In order to test the APE solver, propagation of a Gaussian pulse in a uniform mean flow is firstly simulated and compared with the analytical solution. Then, using the method, the trailing edge noise of NACA0012 airfoil is calculated. The results are compared with reference data, and good agreements are demonstrated.

  7. A two-stage approach to removing noise from recorded music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jonathan; Goldberg, Maxim J.; Coifman, Ronald C.; Goldberg, Maxim J.; Coifman, Ronald C.

    2001-05-01

    A two-stage algorithm for removing noise from recorded music signals (first proposed in Berger et al., ICMC, 1995) is described and updated. The first stage selects the ``best'' local trigonometric basis for the signal and models noise as the part having high entropy [see Berger et al., J. Audio Eng. Soc. 42(10), 808-818 (1994)]. In the second stage, the original source and the model of the noise obtained from the first stage are expanded into dyadic trees of smooth local sine bases. The best basis for the source signal is extracted using a relative entropy function (the Kullback-Leibler distance) to compare the sum of the costs of the children nodes to the cost of their parent node; energies of the noise in corresponding nodes of the model noise tree are used as weights. The talk will include audio examples of various stages of the method and proposals for further research.

  8. Computed Tomography Images De-noising using a Novel Two Stage Adaptive Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Fadaee, Mojtaba; Shamsi, Mousa; Saberkari, Hamidreza; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal algorithm is presented for de-noising of medical images. The presented algorithm is based on improved version of local pixels grouping and principal component analysis. In local pixels grouping algorithm, blocks matching based on L2 norm method is utilized, which leads to matching performance improvement. To evaluate the performance of our proposed algorithm, peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM) evaluation criteria have been used, which are respectively according to the signal to noise ratio in the image and structural similarity of two images. The proposed algorithm has two de-noising and cleanup stages. The cleanup stage is carried out comparatively; meaning that it is alternately repeated until the two conditions based on PSNR and SSIM are established. Implementation results show that the presented algorithm has a significant superiority in de-noising. Furthermore, the quantities of SSIM and PSNR values are higher in comparison to other methods. PMID:26955565

  9. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  10. Design of a Low Speed Fan Stage for Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, W. N.; Elliot, D. B.; Nickols, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the design of a low tip speed, moderate pressure rise fan stage for demonstration of noise reduction concepts. The fan rotor is a fixed-pitch configuration delivering a design pressure ratio of 1.378 at a specific flow of 43.1 lbm/sec/sq ft. Four exit stator configurations were provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of circumferential and axial sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction tone noise. The fan stage design was combined with an axisymmetric inlet, conical convergent nozzle, and nacelle to form a powered fan-nacelle subscale model. This model has a 22-inch cylindrical flow path and employs a rotor with a 0.30 hub-to-tip radius ratio. The design is fully compatible with an existing NASA force balance and rig drive system. The stage aerodynamic and structural design is described in detail. Three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools were used to define optimum airfoil sections for both the rotor and stators. A fan noise predictive system developed by Pratt & Whitney under contract to NASA was used to determine the acoustic characteristics of the various stator configurations. Parameters varied included rotor-to-stator spacing and vane leading edge sweep. The structural analysis of the rotor and stator are described herein. An integral blade and disk configuration was selected for the rotor. Analysis confirmed adequate low cycle fatigue life, vibratory endurance strength, and aeroelastic suitability. A unique load carrying stator arrangement was selected to minimize generation of tonal noise due to sources other than rotor-stator interaction. Analysis of all static structural components demonstrated adequate strength, fatigue life, and vibratory characteristics.

  11. Two-Stage, 90-GHz, Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Xenos, Stephanie; Soria, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Cleary, Kieran A.; Ferreira, Linda; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    A device has been developed for coherent detection of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A two-stage amplifier has been designed that covers 75-110 GHz. The device uses the emerging 35-nm InP HEMT technology recently developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation primarily for use at higher frequencies. The amplifier has more than 18 dB gain and less than 35 K noise figure across the band. These devices have noise less than 30 K at 100 GHz. The development started with design activities at JPL, as well as characterization of multichip modules using existing InP. Following processing, a test campaign was carried out using single-chip modules at 100 GHz. Successful development of the chips will lead to development of multichip modules, with simultaneous Q and U Stokes parameter detection. This MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) amplifier takes advantage of performance improvements intended for higher frequencies, but in this innovation are applied at 90 GHz. The large amount of available gain ultimately leads to lower possible noise performance at 90 GHz.

  12. Comparison of the Performance of Noise Metrics as Predictions of the Annoyance of Stage 2 and Stage 3 Aircraft Overflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, Karl S.; Howe, Richard R.; Sneddon, Matthew D.; Fidell, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    Thirty audiometrically screened test participants judged the relative annoyance of two comparison (variable level) and thirty-four standard (fixed level) signals in an adaptive paired comparison psychoacoustic study. The signal ensemble included both FAR Part 36 Stage 2 and 3 aircraft overflights, as well as synthesized aircraft noise signatures and other non-aircraft signals. All test signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors, in the presence of continuous background noise, under free-field listening conditions in an anechoic chamber. Analyses of the performance of 30 noise metrics as predictors of these annoyance judgments confirmed that the more complex metrics were generally more accurate and precise predictors than the simpler methods. EPNL was somewhat less accurate and precise as a predictor of the annoyance judgments than a duration-adjusted variant of Zwicker's Loudness Level.

  13. The Traffic Noise Index: A Method of Controlling Noise Nuisance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, F. J.; Scholes, W. E.

    This building research survey is an analysis of the social nuisance caused by urban motor ways and their noise. The Traffic Noise Index is used to indicate traffic noises and their effects on architectural designs and planning, while suggesting the need for more and better window insulation and acoustical barriers. Overall concern is for--(1)…

  14. CMOS image sensor noise reduction method for image signal processor in digital cameras and camera phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Youngjin; Lee, SeongDeok; Choe, Wonhee; Kim, Chang-Yong

    2007-02-01

    Digital images captured from CMOS image sensors suffer Gaussian noise and impulsive noise. To efficiently reduce the noise in Image Signal Processor (ISP), we analyze noise feature for imaging pipeline of ISP where noise reduction algorithm is performed. The Gaussian noise reduction and impulsive noise reduction method are proposed for proper ISP implementation in Bayer domain. The proposed method takes advantage of the analyzed noise feature to calculate noise reduction filter coefficients. Thus, noise is adaptively reduced according to the scene environment. Since noise is amplified and characteristic of noise varies while the image sensor signal undergoes several image processing steps, it is better to remove noise in earlier stage on imaging pipeline of ISP. Thus, noise reduction is carried out in Bayer domain on imaging pipeline of ISP. The method is tested on imaging pipeline of ISP and images captured from Samsung 2M CMOS image sensor test module. The experimental results show that the proposed method removes noise while effectively preserves edges.

  15. Jet Noise Diagnostics Supporting Statistical Noise Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2006-01-01

    compared against measurements of mean and rms velocity statistics over a range of jet speeds and temperatures. Models for flow parameters used in the acoustic analogy, most notably the space-time correlations of velocity, have been compared against direct measurements, and modified to better fit the observed data. These measurements have been extremely challenging for hot, high speed jets, and represent a sizeable investment in instrumentation development. As an intermediate check that the analysis is predicting the physics intended, phased arrays have been employed to measure source distributions for a wide range of jet cases. And finally, careful far-field spectral directivity measurements have been taken for final validation of the prediction code. Examples of each of these experimental efforts will be presented. The main result of these efforts is a noise prediction code, named JeNo, which is in middevelopment. JeNo is able to consistently predict spectral directivity, including aft angle directivity, for subsonic cold jets of most geometries. Current development on JeNo is focused on extending its capability to hot jets, requiring inclusion of a previously neglected second source associated with thermal fluctuations. A secondary result of the intensive experimentation is the archiving of various flow statistics applicable to other acoustic analogies and to development of time-resolved prediction methods. These will be of lasting value as we look ahead at future challenges to the aeroacoustic experimentalist.

  16. 77 FR 57524 - Stage 3 Helicopter Noise Certification Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... (44 FR 42410, July 9, 1979) that proposed first ever helicopter noise certification standards that... an NPRM (Notice No. 86-3, 51 FR 7878) that proposed helicopter certification standards that were more... Noise Certification Standards AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  17. Noise-abatement method for explosives testing.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, H E; Odell, B N; Arganbright, V E

    1980-09-01

    When Lawrence Livermore Laboratory started detonating explosives at its Site 300 test location in the sparsely populated hills east of the Laboratory, residents in neighboring areas complained of sudden loud noises. A combined literature and research study, coupled with an experimental test program, indicated the combination of air temperatures and winds at various elevations was primarily responsible for blast or sound waves being returned to the surface. To solve the noise problem, the Laboratory devised a method for determining the maximum amount of explosives that could be detonated aboveground under various atmospheric conditions without creating excessive noise in populated areas. This method for predicting explosives weight limits using pressure-distance-weight nomograms and the slope of a sound-velocity curve is described in this paper. The sound-velocity curve is computed with temperature information from the U.S. Weather Bureau and wind data from a target-acquisition radar system. By following this method, the Laboratory has been able to detonate thousands of shots without creating excessive noise in nearby communities. PMID:7457390

  18. Preliminary thoughts on helicopter cabin noise prediction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, J. S.

    The problems of predicting helicopter cabin noise are discussed with particular reference to the Lynx helicopter. Available methods such as modal analysis adopted for propeller noise prediction do not cope with the higher frequency discrete tone content of helicopter gear noise, with the airborne and structureborne noise contributions. Statistical energy analysis methods may be the answer but until these are developed, one has to rely on classical noise transmission analysis and transfer function methods.

  19. A method to predict circulation control noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reger, Robert W.

    Underwater vehicles suffer from reduced maneuverability with conventional lifting append-\\ ages due to the low velocity of operation. Circulation control offers a method to increase maneuverability independent of vehicle speed. However, with circulation control comes additional noise sources, which are not well understood. To better understand these noise sources, a modal-based prediction method is developed, potentially offering a quantitative connection between flow structures and far-field noise. This method involves estimation of the velocity field, surface pressure field, and far-field noise, using only non-time-resolved velocity fields and time-resolved probe measurements. Proper orthogonal decomposition, linear stochastic estimation and Kalman smoothing are employed to estimate time-resolved velocity fields. Poisson's equation is used to calculate time-resolved pressure fields from velocity. Curle's analogy is then used to propagate the surface pressure forces to the far field. This method is developed on a direct numerical simulation of a two-dimensional cylinder at a low Reynolds number (150). Since each of the fields to be estimated are also known from the simulation, a means of obtaining the error from using the methodology is provided. The velocity estimation and the simulated velocity match well when the simulated additive measurement noise is low. The pressure field suffers due to a small domain size; however, the surface pressures estimates fare much better. The far-field estimation contains similar frequency content with reduced magnitudes, attributed to the exclusion of the viscous forces in Curle's analogy. In the absence of added noise, the estimation procedure performs quite nicely for this model problem. The method is tested experimentally on a 650,000 chord-Reynolds-number flow over a 2-D, 20% thick, elliptic circulation control airfoil. Slot jet momentum coefficients of 0 and 0.10 are investigated. Particle image velocimetry, unsteady

  20. Seismometer Self-Noise and Measuring Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; R. Sleeman,; Hutt, Charles R.; Gee, Lind S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismometer self-noise is usually not considered when selecting and using seismic waveform data in scientific research as it is typically assumed that the self-noise is negligibly small compared to seismic signals. However, instrumental noise is part of the noise in any seismic record, and in particular, at frequencies below a few mHz, the instrumental noise has a frequency-dependent character and may dominate the noise. When seismic noise itself is considered as a carrier of information, as in seismic interferometry (e.g., Chaput et al. 2012), it becomes extremely important to estimate the contribution of instrumental noise to the recordings.

  1. Noise impact evaluation method for supermarket sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocci, Gregory; Su, Rose Mary

    2001-05-01

    A large food supermarket chain is currently in a large store-building program involving several project managers who identify prospective sites, retain A/E design services, and obtain local permits for construction. There is a variety of environmental and planning issues that sometimes need special consideration; among these is environmental noise. Supermarket management has asked that consultants representing each discipline, and who work with project managers on specific projects as needed, issue guidelines as to when special consideration of their disciplines is required. This presentation describes a simple method developed for the supermarket owner that allows their project managers to judge whether there is a need for special consideration of environmental noise in store design by an acoustical consulting firm.

  2. Method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, B.R.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data. It comprises: providing receiving antenna means for receiving an electromagnetic signal. The receiving antenna means receiving impulsive noise; providing noise sensor means for receiving the impulsive noise and placing the noise sensor means so as to receive the impulsive noise that is received by the receiving antenna means and so as to minimize the reception of the electromagnetic signal; simultaneously receiving the electromagnetic signal with the receiving antenna means so as to create a signal record and receiving the impulsive noise with the noise sensor means so as to create a noise record; examining the noise record for occurrences of the impulsive noise by comparing the noise record with a threshold noise value and identifying those instances of time in which the noise record exceeds the threshold; removing those portions of the signal record which are simultaneous with the identified instances in which the noise records exceeds the threshold, wherein the signal record has reduced impulsive noise.

  3. An analytical method for designing low noise helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossler, R. B., Jr.; Bowes, M. A.; Royal, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and experimental validation of a method for analytically modeling the noise mechanism in the helicopter geared power transmission systems is described. This method can be used within the design process to predict interior noise levels and to investigate the noise reducing potential of alternative transmission design details. Examples are discussed.

  4. Apparatus and method for jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1983-08-01

    A method and apparatus for jet noise suppression through control of the static pressure of the jet and control of the rate of entrainment of ambient fluid into the jet downstream of the exhaust nozzle is disclosed. The momentum flux over an extended region of the jet is regulated, affecting Reynolds stresses in the jet and the spreading angle of the jet. Static pressure is controlled through a long hollow, porous nozzle plug centerbody which may be selectively vented to ambient conditions, connected to a vacuum source, or supplied with fluids of various densities for injection into the stream. Sound in the jet may be channeled along the nozzle plug centerbody by injecting coolant such as a cryogenic fluid throughout the center-body into the jet.

  5. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul L. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for suppressing noise in measurements by correlating functions based on at least two different measurements of a system at two different times. In one embodiment, a measurement operation is performed on at least a portion of a system that has a memory. A property of the system is measured during a first measurement period to produce a first response indicative of a first state of the system. Then the property of the system is measured during a second measurement period to produce a second response indicative of a second state of the system. The second measurement is performed after an evolution duration subsequent to the first measurement period when the system still retains a degree of memory of an aspect of the first state. Next, a first function of the first response is combined with a second function of the second response to form a second-order correlation function. Information of the system is then extracted from the second-order correlation function.

  6. A method for calculating externally blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Several basic noise components were described. These components are: (1) compact lift dipoles associated with the wing and flaps; (2) trailing edge noise associated with the last trailing edge; and (3) quadrupole noise associated with the undeflected exhaust jet and the free jet located downstream of the trailing edge. These noise components were combined to allow prediction of directivity and spectra for under the wing (UTW) slotted flaps with conventional or mixer nozzles, UTW slotless flaps, upper surface blowing (USB) slotless flaps, and engine in front of the wing slotted flaps. A digital computer program listing was given for this calculation method. Directivities and spectra calculated by this method were compared with free field data for UTW and USB configurations. The UTRC method best predicted the details of the measured noise emission, but the ANOP method best estimated the noise levels directly below these configurations.

  7. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic tests and data analysis for a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton (25,000 pound) thrust, full-size engine, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec) to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio (0.38), and to maintain adequate stall margin. The fan has 44 tip-shrouded rotor blades and 90 outlet guide vanes. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels (20 EPNdB) below current Federal Air Regulation noise standards for a full-scale fan at the takeoff, cutback, and approach conditions. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized. The suppressed fan noise was shown to be consistent with the proposed federal regulation on aircraft noise.

  8. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  9. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  10. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.20-pressure ratio fan stage designed for low noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Moore, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and the overall blade element performance of a 51 centimeter diameter fan stage is presented. The stage was designed to minimize the noise generated by rotor stator interactions. The design pressure ratio was 1.20 at a flow of 30.6 kilograms per second and a rotor blade tip speed of 228.6 meters per second. At design speed the rotor peak efficiency was 0.935. The peak efficiency of the stage, however, was 0.824. The radial distribution of rotor performance parameters at peak efficiency and design speed indicated excellent agreement with design values.

  11. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. 5: Acoustic final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Q2S(quiet two-stage) fan is a 0.836m (32.9 in.) diameter model of the STF 433 engine fan, selected in a 1972 study for an Advanced Technology Transport (ATT) airplane. Noise-control features include: low tip speed, moderate stage pressure rise, large blade-vane spacings, no inlet guide vanes, and optimum blade and vane numbers. Tests were run on the baseline Q2S fan with standard inlet and discharge ducts. Further tests were made of a translating centerbody sonic inlet device and treated discharge ducts. Results were scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan size for comparison with current two-stage fans, and were also scaled to STF 433 fan size to compare calculated ATT flyover noise with FAR 36 limits. Baseline Q2S results scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan sizes showed substantial noise reductions. Calculated unsuppressed baseline ATT flyovers averaged about 2.5 EPNdB below FAR 36 limits. Using measured sonic inlet results, scaled baseline Q2S fan results, and calculated attenuations for a 1975 technology duct liner, projected flyover noise calculations for the ATT averaged about FAR 36 limits minus 10 EPNdB. Advances in suppression technology required to meet the 1985 goal of FAR 36 limits minus 20 EPNdB are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  13. A novel de-noising method for B ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-Yong; Mo, Jia-qing; Yu, Yin-Feng; Lv, Xiao-Yi; Yu, Xiao; Jia, Zhen-Hong

    2015-12-01

    B ultrasound as a kind of ultrasonic imaging, which has become the indispensable diagnosis method in clinical medicine. However, the presence of speckle noise in ultrasound image greatly reduces the image quality and interferes with the accuracy of the diagnosis. Therefore, how to construct a method which can eliminate the speckle noise effectively, and at the same time keep the image details effectively is the research target of the current ultrasonic image de-noising. This paper is intended to remove the inherent speckle noise of B ultrasound image. The novel algorithm proposed is based on both wavelet transformation of B ultrasound images and data fusion of B ultrasound images, with a smaller mean squared error (MSE) and greater signal to noise ratio (SNR) compared with other algorithms. The results of this study can effectively remove speckle noise from B ultrasound images, and can well preserved the details and edge information which will produce better visual effects.

  14. NASA's Aeroacoustic Tools and Methods for Analysis of Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The ability to quantify aircraft noise at the source and ultimately at observers is required to develop low noise aircraft designs and flight procedures. Predicting noise at the source, accounting for scattering and propagation through the atmosphere to the observer, and assessing the perception and impact on a community requires physics-based aeroacoustics tools. Along with the analyses for aero-performance, weights and fuel burn, these tools can provide the acoustic component for aircraft MDAO (Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimization). Over the last decade significant progress has been made in advancing the aeroacoustic tools such that acoustic analyses can now be performed during the design process. One major and enabling advance has been the development of the system noise framework known as Aircraft NOise Prediction Program2 (ANOPP2). ANOPP2 is NASA's aeroacoustic toolset and is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. The toolset includes a framework that integrates noise prediction and propagation methods into a unified system for use within general aircraft analysis software. This includes acoustic analyses, signal processing and interfaces that allow for the assessment of perception of noise on a community. ANOPP2's capability to incorporate medium fidelity shielding predictions and wind tunnel experiments into a design environment is presented. An assessment of noise from a conventional and Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft using medium fidelity scattering methods combined with noise measurements from a model-scale HWB recently placed in NASA's 14x22 wind tunnel are presented. The results are in the form of community noise metrics and

  15. Two stage low noise advanced technology fan. 1: Aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Ruschak, J. T.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan was designed to reduce noise 20 db below current requirements. The first-stage rotor has a design tip speed of 365.8 m/sec and a hub/tip ratio of 0.4. The fan was designed to deliver a pressure ratio of 1.9 with an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent at a specific inlet corrected flow of 209.2kg/sec/sq m. Noise reduction devices include acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic splitter, a translating centerbody sonic inlet device, widely spaced blade rows, and the proper ratio of blades and vanes. Multiple-circular-arc rotor airfoils, resettable stators, split outer casings, and capability to go to close blade-row spacing are also included.

  16. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and methods prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150; and (b) Use of computer models to create noise contours must be in accordance with the criteria prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of noise description...

  17. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and methods prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150; and (b) Use of computer models to create noise contours must be in accordance with the criteria prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Designation of noise description...

  18. Mapping urban environmental noise: a land use regression method.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dan; Liu, Yi; Chen, Jining

    2011-09-01

    Forecasting and preventing urban noise pollution are major challenges in urban environmental management. Most existing efforts, including experiment-based models, statistical models, and noise mapping, however, have limited capacity to explain the association between urban growth and corresponding noise change. Therefore, these conventional methods can hardly forecast urban noise at a given outlook of development layout. This paper, for the first time, introduces a land use regression method, which has been applied for simulating urban air quality for a decade, to construct an urban noise model (LUNOS) in Dalian Municipality, Northwest China. The LUNOS model describes noise as a dependent variable of surrounding various land areas via a regressive function. The results suggest that a linear model performs better in fitting monitoring data, and there is no significant difference of the LUNOS's outputs when applied to different spatial scales. As the LUNOS facilitates a better understanding of the association between land use and urban environmental noise in comparison to conventional methods, it can be regarded as a promising tool for noise prediction for planning purposes and aid smart decision-making.

  19. Further studies of methods for reducing community noise around airports. [aircraft noise - aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Barry, D. J.; Kline, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified method of analysis was used in which all flights at a 'simulated' airport were assumed to operate from one runway in a single direction. For this simulated airport, contours of noise exposure forecast were obtained and evaluated. A flight schedule of the simulated airport which is representative of the 23 major U. S. airports was used. The effect of banning night-time operations by four-engine, narrow-body aircraft in combination with other noise reduction options was studied. The reductions in noise which would occur of two- and three-engine, narrow-body aircraft equipped with a refanned engine was examined. A detailed comparison of the effects of engine cutback on takeoff versus the effects of retrofitting quiet nacelles for narrow-body aircraft was also examined. A method of presenting the effects of various noise reduction options was treated.

  20. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul J. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Techniques of combining separate but correlated measurements to form a second-order or higher order correlation function to suppress the effects of noise in the initial condition of a system capable of retaining memory of an initial state of the system with a characteristic relaxation time. At least two separate measurements are obtained from the system. The temporal separation between the two separate measurements is preferably comparable to or less than the characteristic relaxation time and is adjusted to allow for a correlation between two measurements.

  1. Data analysis and noise prediction for the QF-1B experimental fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, D. B.; Chandiramani, K. L.; Piersol, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a fan noise data analysis and prediction effort using experimental data obtained from tests on the QF-1B research fan are described. Surface pressure measurements were made with flush mounted sensors installed on selected rotor blades and stator vanes and noise measurements were made by microphones located at the far field. Power spectral density analysis, time history studies, and calculation of coherence functions were made. The emphasis of these studies was on the characteristics of tones in the spectra. The amplitude behavior of spectral tones was found to have a large, often predominant, random component, suggesting that turbulent processes play an important role in the generation of tonal as well as broadband noise. Inputs from the data analysis were used in a prediction method which assumes that acoustic dipoles, produced by unsteady blade and van forces, are the important source of fan noise.

  2. Increased Fidelity in Prediction Methods For Landing Gear Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Morris, Philip J.; Lockhard, David P.

    2006-01-01

    An aeroacoustic prediction scheme has been developed for landing gear noise. The method is designed to handle the complex landing gear geometry of current and future aircraft. The gear is represented by a collection of subassemblies and simple components that are modeled using acoustic elements. These acoustic elements are generic, but generate noise representative of the physical components on a landing gear. The method sums the noise radiation from each component of the undercarriage in isolation accounting for interference with adjacent components through an estimate of the local upstream and downstream flows and turbulence intensities. The acoustic calculations are made in the code LGMAP, which computes the sound pressure levels at various observer locations. The method can calculate the noise from the undercarriage in isolation or installed on an aircraft for both main and nose landing gear. Comparisons with wind tunnel and flight data are used to initially calibrate the method, then it may be used to predict the noise of any landing gear. In this paper, noise predictions are compared with wind tunnel data for model landing gears of various scales and levels of fidelity, as well as with flight data on fullscale undercarriages. The present agreement between the calculations and measurements suggests the method has promise for future application in the prediction of airframe noise.

  3. 14 CFR 161.9 - Designation of noise description methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and methods prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150; and (b) Use of computer models to create noise contours must be in accordance with the criteria prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150....

  4. Noise simulation of aircraft engine fans by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatunin, K. R.; Arkharova, N. V.; Remizov, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation results of the civil aircraft engine fan stage noise in the far field are presented. Non-steady-state rotor-stator interaction is calculated the commercial software that solves the Navier-Stokes equations using differentturbulence models. Noise propagation to the far acoustic field is calculated by the boundary element method using acoustic Lighthill analogies without taking into account the mean current in the air inlet duct. The calculated sound pressure levels at points 50 m from the engine are presented, and the directional patterns of the acoustic radiation are shown. The use of the eddy resolving turbulence model to calculate rotor-stator interaction increases the accuracy in predicting fan stage noise.

  5. A complex noise reduction method for improving visualization of SD-OCT skin biomedical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myakinin, Oleg O.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Kornilin, Dmitry V.; Khramov, Alexander G.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we consider the original method of solving noise reduction problem for visualization's quality improvement of SD-OCT skin and tumors biomedical images. The principal advantages of OCT are high resolution and possibility of in vivo analysis. We propose a two-stage algorithm: 1) process of raw one-dimensional A-scans of SD-OCT and 2) remove a noise from the resulting B(C)-scans. The general mathematical methods of SD-OCT are unstable: if the noise of the CCD is 1.6% of the dynamic range then result distortions are already 25-40% of the dynamic range. We use at the first stage a resampling of A-scans and simple linear filters to reduce the amount of data and remove the noise of the CCD camera. The efficiency, improving productivity and conservation of the axial resolution when using this approach are showed. At the second stage we use an effective algorithms based on Hilbert-Huang Transform for more accurately noise peaks removal. The effectiveness of the proposed approach for visualization of malignant and benign skin tumors (melanoma, BCC etc.) and a significant improvement of SNR level for different methods of noise reduction are showed. Also in this study we consider a modification of this method depending of a specific hardware and software features of used OCT setup. The basic version does not require any hardware modifications of existing equipment. The effectiveness of proposed method for 3D visualization of tissues can simplify medical diagnosis in oncology.

  6. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. Volume 2: Aerodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Odegard, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data from static tests of a two-stage advanced technology fan designed to minimize noise are presented. Fan design conditions include delivery of 209.1kg/sec/sq m (42.85 lbm/sec/sq ft) specific corrected flow at an overall pressure ratio of 1.9 and an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent. The 0.836m (2.74ft) diameter first stage rotor has a hub/tip ratio of 0.4 and 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec) design tip speed. In addition to the moderate tip speed and pressure rise per stage, other noise control design features involve widely spaced blade rows and proper selection of blade-vane ratios. Aerodynamic data are presented for tests with unifrom and with hub and tip radially distorted inlet flow. Aerodynamic data are also presented for tests of this fan with acoustic treatments, including acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic ring, and a translating centerbody sonic inlet device. A complete tabulation of the overall performance data, the blade element data, and the power spectral density information relating to turbulence levels generated by the sonic inlet obtained during these tests is included. For vol. 1, see N74-33789.

  7. Experimental validation of boundary element methods for noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental validation of methods to predict radiated noise is presented. A combined finite element and boundary element model was used to predict the vibration and noise of a rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker. The predicted noise was compared to sound power measured by the acoustic intensity method. Inaccuracies in the finite element model shifted the resonance frequencies by about 5 percent. The predicted and measured sound power levels agree within about 2.5 dB. In a second experiment, measured vibration data was used with a boundary element model to predict noise radiation from the top of an operating gearbox. The predicted and measured sound power for the gearbox agree within about 3 dB.

  8. A survey of the broadband shock associated noise prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Khavaran, Abbas

    1992-01-01

    Several different prediction methods to estimate the broadband shock associated noise of a supersonic jet are introduced and compared with experimental data at various test conditions. The nozzle geometries considered for comparison include a convergent and a convergent-divergent nozzle, both axisymmetric. Capabilities and limitations of prediction methods in incorporating the two nozzle geometries, flight effect, and temperature effect are discussed. Predicted noise field shows the best agreement for a convergent nozzle geometry under static conditions. Predicted results for nozzles in flight show larger discrepancies from data and more dependable flight data are required for further comparison. Qualitative effects of jet temperature, as observed in experiment, are reproduced in predicted results.

  9. Addition of noise by scatter correction methods in PVI

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, J.S. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Harrop, R.; Atkins, M.S. . School of Computing Science)

    1994-08-01

    Effective scatter correction techniques are required to account for errors due to high scatter fraction seen in positron volume imaging (PVI). To be effective, the correction techniques must be accurate and practical, but they also must not add excessively to the statistical noise in the image. The authors have investigated the noise added by three correction methods: a convolution/subtraction method; a method that interpolates the scatter from the events outside the object; and a dual energy window method with and without smoothing of the scatter estimate. The methods were applied to data generated by Monte Carlo simulation to determine their effect on the variance of the corrected projections. The convolution and interpolation methods did not add significantly to the variance. The dual energy window subtraction method without smoothing increased the variance by a factor of more than twelve, but this factor was improved to 1.2 by smoothing the scatter estimate.

  10. Statistical methods for efficient design of community surveys of response to noise: Random coefficients regression models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomberlin, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Research studies of residents' responses to noise consist of interviews with samples of individuals who are drawn from a number of different compact study areas. The statistical techniques developed provide a basis for those sample design decisions. These techniques are suitable for a wide range of sample survey applications. A sample may consist of a random sample of residents selected from a sample of compact study areas, or in a more complex design, of a sample of residents selected from a sample of larger areas (e.g., cities). The techniques may be applied to estimates of the effects on annoyance of noise level, numbers of noise events, the time-of-day of the events, ambient noise levels, or other factors. Methods are provided for determining, in advance, how accurately these effects can be estimated for different sample sizes and study designs. Using a simple cost function, they also provide for optimum allocation of the sample across the stages of the design for estimating these effects. These techniques are developed via a regression model in which the regression coefficients are assumed to be random, with components of variance associated with the various stages of a multi-stage sample design.

  11. Near-field noise prediction for aircraft in cruising flight: Methods manual. [laminar flow control noise effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbetts, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for predicting noise at any point on an aircraft while the aircraft is in a cruise flight regime are presented. Developed for use in laminar flow control (LFC) noise effects analyses, they can be used in any case where aircraft generated noise needs to be evaluated at a location on an aircraft while under high altitude, high speed conditions. For each noise source applicable to the LFC problem, a noise computational procedure is given in algorithm format, suitable for computerization. Three categories of noise sources are covered: (1) propulsion system, (2) airframe, and (3) LFC suction system. In addition, procedures are given for noise modifications due to source soundproofing and the shielding effects of the aircraft structure wherever needed. Sample cases, for each of the individual noise source procedures, are provided to familiarize the user with typical input and computed data.

  12. Application of the Spectral Element Method to Interior Noise Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.

    1998-01-01

    The primary effort of this research project was focused the development of analytical methods for the accurate prediction of structural acoustic noise and response. Of particular interest was the development of curved frame and shell spectral elements for the efficient computational of structural response and of schemes to match this to the surrounding fluid.

  13. GAP Noise Computation By The CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A typical gap noise problem is considered in this paper using the new space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Implementation of the computation is straightforward. No turbulence model, LES (large eddy simulation) or a preset boundary layer profile is used, yet the computed frequency agrees well with the experimental one.

  14. An evaluation of methods for scaling aircraft noise perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollerhead, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    One hundred and twenty recorded sounds, including jets, turboprops, piston engined aircraft and helicopters were rated by a panel of subjects in a paired comparison test. The results were analyzed to evaluate a number of noise rating procedures in terms of their ability to accurately estimate both relative and absolute perceived noise levels. It was found that the complex procedures developed by Stevens, Zwicker and Kryter are superior to other scales. The main advantage of these methods over the more convenient weighted sound pressure level scales lies in their ability to cope with signals over a wide range of bandwidth. However, Stevens' loudness level scale and the perceived noise level scale both overestimate the growth of perceived level with intensity because of an apparent deficiency in the band level summation rule. A simple correction is proposed which will enable these scales to properly account for the experimental observations.

  15. Method and System for Active Noise Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, Mark D. (Inventor); Nguyen, Khanh Q. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Methods and systems for reducing noise generated by rotating blades of a tiltrotor aircraft. A rotor-blade pitch angle associated with the tiltrotor aircraft can be controlled utilizing a swashplate connected to rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. One or more Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) signals can be transmitted and input to a swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate. A particular blade pitch oscillation (e.g., four cycles per revolution) is there-after produced in a rotating frame of reference associated with the rotating blades in response to input of an HHC signal to the swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate to thereby reduce noise associated with the rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. The HHC signal can be transmitted and input to the swashplate control actuator to reduce noise of the tiltrotor aircraft in response to a user input utilizing an open-loop configuration.

  16. Probability Density Function Method for Langevin Equations with Colored Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2013-04-05

    We present a novel method to derive closed-form, computable PDF equations for Langevin systems with colored noise. The derived equations govern the dynamics of joint or marginal probability density functions (PDFs) of state variables, and rely on a so-called Large-Eddy-Diffusivity (LED) closure. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed PDF method for linear and nonlinear Langevin equations, describing the classical Brownian displacement and dispersion in porous media.

  17. Modeling for Airframe Noise Prediction Using Vortex Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Charlie

    2002-12-01

    Various components of the airframe are known to be a significant source of noise. With the advent of technology in quieting modern engines, airframe generated noise competes and, in certain instances, surpasses the engine noise. Airframe noise is most pronounced during aircraft approach when the engines are operating at reduced thrust, and airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears are in deployed conditions. Recent experimental studies have reaffirmed that the most significant sources of high-lift noise are from the leading-edge slat and the side edges of flaps. Studies of flow field around these structures have consistently shown that there are complicated unsteady vortical flows such as vortex shedding, secondary vortices and vortex breakdown, which are susceptible to far-field radiated sound. The near-field CFD computational data have been used to calculate the far-field acoustics by employing Ffowcs-Williams/Hawkings equation using Lighthill's analogy. However, because of the limit of current computing capacity, it is very time consuming to generate unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) computational data for aeroacoustics. Although the N-S simulations are probably necessary to reveal many complex flow phenomena that are unsteady and fully nonlinear, these simulations are not feasible to be used for parametric design. purposes. The objective of this study is thus to develop theoretical models for airframe noise predictions which have quick turn-around computing time. Since it is known that vorticity is a major mechanism responsible for noise generation on high-lift devices, vortex methods have been chosen as modeling tools. Vortex methods are much faster in comparison with other numerical methods, yet they are able to incorporate nonlinear interactions between vortices. Obviously, as with any theoretical model, assumptions have to be made and justified when such models are used in complex flow. The merit and applicability of the models for

  18. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  19. Comparison of methods for removing electromagnetic noise from electromyographic signals.

    PubMed

    Defreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare three different methods of removing noise from monopolar electromyographic (EMG) signals: (a) electrical shielding with a Faraday cage, (b) denoising with a digital notch-filter and (c) applying a bipolar differentiation with another monopolar EMG signal. Ten men and ten women (mean age = 24.0 years) performed isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors at 10-100% of their maximal voluntary contraction on two separate occasions. One trial was performed inside a Faraday tent (a flexible Faraday cage made from conductive material), and the other was performed outside the Faraday tent. The EMG signals collected outside the Faraday tent were analyzed three separate ways: as a raw signal, as a bipolar signal, and as a signal digitally notch filtered to remove 60 Hz noise and its harmonics. The signal-to-noise ratios were greatest after notch-filtering (range: 3.0-33.8), and lowest for the bipolar arrangement (1.6-10.2). Linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus force relationship were also used to compare the methods of noise removal. The results showed that a bipolar arrangement had a significantly lower linear slope coefficient when compared to the three other conditions (raw, notch and tent). These results suggested that an appropriately filtered monopolar EMG signal can be useful in situations that require a large pick-up area. Furthermore, although it is helpful, a Faraday tent (or cage) is not required to achieve an appropriate signal-to-noise ratio, as long as the correct filters are applied. PMID:22227849

  20. Method of calibrating an interferometer and reducing its systematic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Philip D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods of operation and data analysis for an interferometer so as to eliminate the errors contributed by non-responsive or unstable pixels, interpixel gain variations that drift over time, and spurious noise that would otherwise degrade the operation of the interferometer are disclosed. The methods provide for either online or post-processing calibration. The methods apply prescribed reversible transformations that exploit the physical properties of interferograms obtained from said interferometer to derive a calibration reference signal for subsequent treatment of said interferograms for interpixel gain variations. A self-consistent approach for treating bad pixels is incorporated into the methods.

  1. Analysis and design of low noise column stage in CMOS ROIC for UV GaN focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Yuan, Yonggang; Xie, Jing; Wang, Jiqiang; Ma, Ding; Wang, Ling; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    A novel column-stage structure of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for GaN ultraviolet (UV) focal plane array (FPA) working in "solar-blind" band is proposed. The column stage has better drive capability, higher dynamic range, stable bias current and low impedance. The noise voltage of the column readout stage is discussed, which has been reduced by small-current driving, column-stage sample and hold and the technology of divided-output-bus. This research on low-noise ROIC is designed for weak-current UV FPA. It is designed, simulated and laid out using the 0.35um 2P4M CMOS 5V process. The clock rate operates at 8MHz. The simulation input current sets 0.01nA. The output swing is 2.6V and power consumption is 40 mW according to the measurement results.

  2. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    2000-01-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  3. Unstructured CFD and Noise Prediction Methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Hunter, Craig A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2006-01-01

    Using unstructured mesh CFD methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) analysis has the distinct advantage of precise and fast computational mesh generation for complex propulsion and airframe integration arrangements that include engine inlet, exhaust nozzles, pylon, wing, flaps, and flap deployment mechanical parts. However, accurate solution values of shear layer velocity, temperature and turbulence are extremely important for evaluating the usually small noise differentials of potential applications to commercial transport aircraft propulsion integration. This paper describes a set of calibration computations for an isolated separate flow bypass ratio five engine nozzle model and the same nozzle system with a pylon. These configurations have measured data along with prior CFD solutions and noise predictions using a proven structured mesh method, which can be used for comparison to the unstructured mesh solutions obtained in this investigation. This numerical investigation utilized the TetrUSS system that includes a Navier-Stokes solver, the associated unstructured mesh generation tools, post-processing utilities, plus some recently added enhancements to the system. New features necessary for this study include the addition of two equation turbulence models to the USM3D code, an h-refinement utility to enhance mesh density in the shear mixing region, and a flow adaptive mesh redistribution method. In addition, a computational procedure was developed to optimize both solution accuracy and mesh economy. Noise predictions were completed using an unstructured mesh version of the JeT3D code.

  4. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 1: Aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Younghans, J. L.; Little, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec 11,650 ft/sec). The fan and booster components are designed in a scale model flow size convenient for testing with existing facility and vehicle hardware. The design corrected flow per unit annulus area at the fan face is 215 kg/sec sq m (44.0 lb m/sec sq ft) with a hub-tip ratio of 0.38 at the leading edge of the fan rotor. This results in an inlet corrected airflow of 117.9 kg/sec (259.9 lb m/sec) for the selected rotor tip diameter if 90.37 cm (35.58 in.). The variable geometry inlet is designed utilizing a combination of high throat Mach number and acoustic treatment in the inlet diffuser for noise suppression (hybrid inlet). A variable fan exhaust nozzle was assumed in conjunction with the variable inlet throat area to limit the required area change of the inlet throat at approach and hence limit the overall diffusion and inlet length. The fan exit duct design was primarily influenced by acoustic requirements, including length of suppressor wall treatment; length, thickness and position on a duct splitter for additional suppressor treatment; and duct surface Mach numbers.

  5. An efficient and robust method for predicting helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1996-01-01

    A new formulation for the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings quadrupole source, which is valid for a far-field in-plane observer, is presented. The far-field approximation is new and unique in that no further approximation of the quadrupole source strength is made and integrands with r(exp -2) and r(exp -3) dependence are retained. This paper focuses on the development of a retarded-time formulation in which time derivatives are analytically taken inside the integrals to avoid unnecessary computational work when the observer moves with the rotor. The new quadrupole formulation is similar to Farassat's thickness and loading formulation 1A. Quadrupole noise prediction is carried out in two parts: a preprocessing stage in which the previously computed flow field is integrated in the direction normal to the rotor disk, and a noise computation stage in which quadrupole surface integrals are evaluated for a particular observer position. Preliminary predictions for hover and forward flight agree well with experimental data. The method is robust and requires computer resources comparable to thickness and loading noise prediction.

  6. The cost of applying current helicopter external noise reduction methods while maintaining realistic vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowes, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical methods were developed and/or adopted for calculating helicopter component noise, and these methods were incorporated into a unified total vehicle noise calculation model. Analytical methods were also developed for calculating the effects of noise reduction methodology on helicopter design, performance, and cost. These methods were used to calculate changes in noise, design, performance, and cost due to the incorporation of engine and main rotor noise reduction methods. All noise reduction techniques were evaluated in the context of an established mission performance criterion which included consideration of hovering ceiling, forward flight range/speed/payload, and rotor stall margin. The results indicate that small, but meaningful, reductions in helicopter noise can be obtained by treating the turbine engine exhaust duct. Furthermore, these reductions do not result in excessive life cycle cost penalties. Currently available main rotor noise reduction methodology, however, is shown to be inadequate and excessively costly.

  7. Study on predicative evaluation method of noise generated by engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hirakawa, Nobuo; Mihara, Akira; Suwa, Junichi

    1995-12-31

    The engine noise accounts for a relatively large percentage among the noises generated by a motorcycle. Among the Parts of the engine, the cover is important in design as well as a source of the engine noise, being at the end of the vibration transfer path. This paper clarifies that the natural frequency of the cover with a flat surface clearly affects its vibration and noise radiation and by a modal analysis of its vibration characteristics. In addition, the authors confirmed that the calculated value of the radiated noise from the cover agrees well with the measured value.

  8. Apparatus and methods for controlling electron microscope stages

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for generating an image of a specimen with a microscope (e.g., TEM) are disclosed. In one aspect, the microscope may generally include a beam generator, a stage, a detector, and an image generator. A plurality of crystal parameters, which describe a plurality of properties of a crystal sample, are received. In a display associated with the microscope, an interactive control sphere based at least in part on the received crystal parameters and that is rotatable by a user to different sphere orientations is presented. The sphere includes a plurality of stage coordinates that correspond to a plurality of positions of the stage and a plurality of crystallographic pole coordinates that correspond to a plurality of polar orientations of the crystal sample. Movement of the sphere causes movement of the stage, wherein the stage coordinates move in conjunction with the crystallographic coordinates represented by pole positions so as to show a relationship between stage positions and the pole positions.

  9. /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method has been tested in a wide variety of experiments that have indicated the broad range of applicability of the method. The neutron multiplication factor k/sub eff/ has been satisfactorily detemined for a variety of materials including uranium metal, light water reactor fuel pins, fissile solutions, fuel plates in water, and interacting cylinders. For a uranyl nitrate solution tank which is typical of a fuel processing or reprocessing plant, the k/sub eff/ values were satisfactorily determined for values between 0.92 and 0.5 using a simple point kinetics interpretation of the experimental data. The short measurement times, in several cases as low as 1 min, have shown that the development of this method can lead to a practical subcriticality monitor for many in-plant applications. The further development of the method will require experiments oriented toward particular applications including dynamic experiments and the development of theoretical methods to predict the experimental observables.

  10. SiPM electro-optical detection system noise suppression method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiangli; Yang, Suhui; Hu, Tao; Song, Yiheng

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the single photon detection principle of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) device is introduced. The main noise factors that infect the sensitivity of the electro-optical detection system are analyzed, including background light noise, detector dark noise, preamplifier noise and signal light noise etc. The Optical, electrical and thermodynamic methods are used to suppress the SiPM electro-optical detection system noise, which improved the response sensitivity of the detector. Using SiPM optoelectronic detector with a even high sensitivity, together with small field large aperture optical system, high cutoff narrow bandwidth filters, low-noise operational amplifier circuit, the modular design of functional circuit, semiconductor refrigeration technology, greatly improved the sensitivity of optical detection system, reduced system noise and achieved long-range detection of weak laser radiation signal. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed methods are reasonable and efficient.

  11. Two Methods of Mechanical Noise Reduction of Recorded Speech During Phonation in an MRI device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Přibil, J.; Horáček, J.; Horák, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents two methods of noise reduction of speech signal recorded in an MRI device during phonation for the human vocal tract modelling. The applied approach of noise speech signal cleaning is based on cepstral speech analysis and synthesis because the noise is mainly produced by gradient coils, has a mechanical character, and can be processed in spectral domain. Our first noise reduction method is using real cepstrum limitation and clipping the "peaks" corresponding to the harmonic frequencies of mechanical noise. The second method is coming out from substation of the short-time spectra of two signals recorded withal: the first includes speech and noise, and the second consists of noise only. The resulting speech quality was compared by spectrogram and mean periodogram methods.

  12. Introduction to Signals and Noise in an Instrumental Methods Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzberg, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    Some inherent instrument capabilities/limitations can be described in terms of signal to noise ratio (S/N). Two three-hour experiments are described to give students appreciation of the importance of signal strength and noise level in instrument performance and how S/N can be increased by choice of conditions and data manipulation. (Author/JN)

  13. Fuzzy Filtering Method for Color Videos Corrupted by Additive Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Montenegro-Monroy, Hector; Nino-de-Rivera, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for the denoising of color videos corrupted by additive noise is presented in this paper. The proposed technique consists of three principal filtering steps: spatial, spatiotemporal, and spatial postprocessing. In contrast to other state-of-the-art algorithms, during the first spatial step, the eight gradient values in different directions for pixels located in the vicinity of a central pixel as well as the R, G, and B channel correlation between the analogous pixels in different color bands are taken into account. These gradient values give the information about the level of contamination then the designed fuzzy rules are used to preserve the image features (textures, edges, sharpness, chromatic properties, etc.). In the second step, two neighboring video frames are processed together. Possible local motions between neighboring frames are estimated using block matching procedure in eight directions to perform interframe filtering. In the final step, the edges and smoothed regions in a current frame are distinguished for final postprocessing filtering. Numerous simulation results confirm that this novel 3D fuzzy method performs better than other state-of-the-art techniques in terms of objective criteria (PSNR, MAE, NCD, and SSIM) as well as subjective perception via the human vision system in the different color videos. PMID:24688428

  14. An effective, economical method of reducing environmental noise in the vivarium.

    PubMed

    Young, Maggie T; French, Alan L; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2011-07-01

    High levels of ambient noise can have detrimental effects on laboratory animal wellbeing and may affect experimental results. In addition, excessive noise can reduce technician comfort and performance. This study was performed to determine whether inexpensive, passive acoustic noise abatement measures could meaningfully reduce noise levels. Sound level measurements for various activities were obtained in the incoming processing room for pigs before and after installing gypsum acoustic paneling, covering metal-to-metal contact points with strips of adhesive-backed rubber, and replacing hard plastic wheels on transport carts with neoprene wheels. The modifications reduced the overall average noise level by 8.1 dB. Average noise levels for each activity were all less than 85 dB after the modifications. Average noise levels can be reduced effectively and economically with passive abatement methods. Intermittent spikes in noise are more difficult to control and may require attention to the individual activity.

  15. NOISE-CON 88 - noise control design: Methods and practice; Proceedings of the National Conference on Noise Control Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, June 20-22, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on such topics as noise generation and control; noise control elements; and generation, transmission, isolation, and reduction of vibration. Consideration is given to methods of noise analysis, and to the physical aspects of environmental noise (multiple sources and paths).

  16. The discovery of processing stages: Extension of Sternberg's method.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Zhang, Qiong; Borst, Jelmer P; Walsh, Matthew M

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a method for measuring the number and durations of processing stages from the electroencephalographic signal and apply it to the study of associative recognition. Using an extension of past research that combines multivariate pattern analysis with hidden semi-Markov models, the approach identifies on a trial-by-trial basis where brief sinusoidal peaks (called bumps) are added to the ongoing electroencephalographic signal. We propose that these bumps mark the onset of critical cognitive stages in processing. The results of the analysis can be used to guide the development of detailed process models. Applied to the associative recognition task, the hidden semi-Markov models multivariate pattern analysis method indicates that the effects of associative strength and probe type are localized to a memory retrieval stage and a decision stage. This is in line with a previously developed the adaptive control of thought-rational process model, called ACT-R, of the task. As a test of the generalization of our method we also apply it to a data set on the Sternberg working memory task collected by Jacobs, Hwang, Curran, and Kahana (2006). The analysis generalizes robustly, and localizes the typical set size effect in a late comparison/decision stage. In addition to providing information about the number and durations of stages in associative recognition, our analysis sheds light on the event-related potential components implicated in the study of recognition memory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Selected methods for quantification of community exposure to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, P. M., Jr.; Cawthorn, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the state-of-the-art for the quantification of community exposure to aircraft noise is presented. Physical aspects, people response considerations, and practicalities of useful application of scales of measure are included. Historical background up through the current technology is briefly presented. The developments of both single-event and multiple-event scales are covered. Selective choice is made of scales currently in the forefront of interest and recommended methodology is presented for use in computer programing to translate aircraft noise data into predictions of community noise exposure. Brief consideration is given to future programing developments and to supportive research needs.

  18. Source localization of turboshaft engine broadband noise using a three-sensor coherence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacodon, Daniel; Lewy, Serge

    2015-03-01

    Turboshaft engines can become the main source of helicopter noise at takeoff. Inlet radiation mainly comes from the compressor tones, but aft radiation is more intricate: turbine tones usually are above the audible frequency range and do not contribute to the weighted sound levels; jet is secondary and radiates low noise levels. A broadband component is the most annoying but its sources are not well known (it is called internal or core noise). Present study was made in the framework of the European project TEENI (Turboshaft Engine Exhaust Noise Identification). Its main objective was to localize the broadband sources in order to better reduce them. Several diagnostic techniques were implemented by the various TEENI partners. As regards ONERA, a first attempt at separating sources was made in the past with Turbomeca using a three-signal coherence method (TSM) to reject background non-acoustic noise. The main difficulty when using TSM is the assessment of the frequency range where the results are valid. This drawback has been circumvented in the TSM implemented in TEENI. Measurements were made on a highly instrumented Ardiden turboshaft engine in the Turbomeca open-air test bench. Two engine powers (approach and takeoff) were selected to apply TSM. Two internal pressure probes were located in various cross-sections, either behind the combustion chamber (CC), the high-pressure turbine (HPT), the free-turbine first stage (TL), or in four nozzle sections. The third transducer was a far-field microphone located around the maximum of radiation, at 120° from the intake centerline. The key result is that coherence increases from CC to HPT and TL, then decreases in the nozzle up to the exit. Pressure fluctuations from HPT and TL are very coherent with the far-field acoustic spectra up to 700 Hz. They are thus the main acoustic source and can be attributed to indirect combustion noise (accuracy decreases above 700 Hz because coherence is lower, but far-field sound spectra

  19. Fan broadband interaction noise modeling using a low-order method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    A low-order method for simulating broadband interaction noise downstream of the fan stage in a turbofan engine is explored in this paper. The particular noise source of interest is due to the interaction of the fan rotor wake with the fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs). The vanes are modeled as flat plates and the method utilizes strip theory relying on unsteady aerodynamic cascade theory at each strip. This paper shows predictions for 6 of the 9 cases from NASA's Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) and all 4 cases from the 2014 Fan Broadband Workshop Fundamental Case 2 (FC2). The turbulence in the rotor wake is taken from hot-wire data for the low speed SDT cases and the FC2 cases. Additionally, four different computational simulations of the rotor wake flow for all of the SDT rotor speeds have been used to determine the rotor wake turbulence parameters. Comparisons between predictions based on the different inputs highlight the possibility of a potential effect present in the hot-wire data for the SDT as well as the importance of accurately describing the turbulence length scale when using this model. The method produces accurate predictions of the spectral shape for all of the cases. It also predicts reasonably well all of the trends that can be considered based on the included cases such as vane geometry, vane count, turbulence level, and rotor speed.

  20. Comparison of classical statistical methods and artificial neural network in traffic noise prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Nedic, Vladimir; Despotovic, Danijela; Cvetanovic, Slobodan; Despotovic, Milan; Babic, Sasa

    2014-11-15

    Traffic is the main source of noise in urban environments and significantly affects human mental and physical health and labor productivity. Therefore it is very important to model the noise produced by various vehicles. Techniques for traffic noise prediction are mainly based on regression analysis, which generally is not good enough to describe the trends of noise. In this paper the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of traffic noise is presented. As input variables of the neural network, the proposed structure of the traffic flow and the average speed of the traffic flow are chosen. The output variable of the network is the equivalent noise level in the given time period L{sub eq}. Based on these parameters, the network is modeled, trained and tested through a comparative analysis of the calculated values and measured levels of traffic noise using the originally developed user friendly software package. It is shown that the artificial neural networks can be a useful tool for the prediction of noise with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the measured values were also used to calculate equivalent noise level by means of classical methods, and comparative analysis is given. The results clearly show that ANN approach is superior in traffic noise level prediction to any other statistical method. - Highlights: • We proposed an ANN model for prediction of traffic noise. • We developed originally designed user friendly software package. • The results are compared with classical statistical methods. • The results are much better predictive capabilities of ANN model.

  1. Advanced statistical methods for the definition of new staging models.

    PubMed

    Kates, Ronald; Schmitt, Manfred; Harbeck, Nadia

    2003-01-01

    Adequate staging procedures are the prerequisite for individualized therapy concepts in cancer, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Molecular staging markers tend to characterize specific, fundamental disease processes to a greater extent than conventional staging markers. At the biological level, the course of the disease will almost certainly involve interactions between multiple underlying processes. Since new therapeutic strategies tend to target specific processes as well, their impact will also involve interactions. Hence, assessment of the prognostic impact of new markers and their utilization for prediction of response to therapy will require increasingly sophisticated statistical tools that are capable of detecting and modeling complicated interactions. Because they are designed to model arbitrary interactions, neural networks offer a promising approach to improved staging. However, the typical clinical data environment poses severe challenges to high-performance survival modeling using neural nets, particularly the key problem of maintaining good generalization. Nonetheless, it turns out that by using newly developed methods to minimize unnecessary complexity in the neural network representation of disease course, it is possible to obtain models with high predictive performance. This performance has been validated on both simulated and real patient data sets. There are important applications for design of studies involving targeted therapy concepts and for identification of the improvement in decision support resulting from new staging markers. In this article, advantages of advanced statistical methods such as neural networks for definition of new staging models will be illustrated using breast cancer as an example.

  2. Methods for efficient correction of complex noise in outdoor video rate passive millimeter wavelength imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Baron, Joshua; Matic, Roy M.

    2012-09-01

    Passive millimeter wavelength (PMMW) video holds great promise, given its ability to see targets and obstacles through fog, smoke, and rain. However, current imagers produce undesirable complex noise. This can come as a mixture of fast shot (snowlike) noise and a slower-forming circular fixed pattern. Shot noise can be removed by a simple gain style filter. However, this can produce blurring of objects in the scene. To alleviate this, we measure the amount of Bayesian surprise in videos. Bayesian surprise measures feature change in time that is abrupt but cannot be accounted for as shot noise. Surprise is used to attenuate the shot noise filter in locations of high surprise. Since high Bayesian surprise in videos is very salient to observers, this reduces blurring, particularly in places where people visually attend. Fixed pattern noise is removed after the shot noise using a combination of non-uniformity correction and mean image wavelet transformation. The combination allows for online removal of time-varying fixed pattern noise, even when background motion may be absent. It also allows for online adaptation to differing intensities of fixed pattern noise. We also discuss a method for sharpening frames using deconvolution. The fixed pattern and shot noise filters are all efficient, which allows real time video processing of PMMW video. We show several examples of PMMW video with complex noise that is much cleaner as a result of the noise removal. Processed video clearly shows cars, houses, trees, and utility poles at 20 frames per second.

  3. New Computational Methods for the Prediction and Analysis of Helicopter Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes several new methods to predict and analyze rotorcraft noise. These methods are: 1) a combined computational fluid dynamics and Kirchhoff scheme for far-field noise predictions, 2) parallel computer implementation of the Kirchhoff integrations, 3) audio and visual rendering of the computed acoustic predictions over large far-field regions, and 4) acoustic tracebacks to the Kirchhoff surface to pinpoint the sources of the rotor noise. The paper describes each method and presents sample results for three test cases. The first case consists of in-plane high-speed impulsive noise and the other two cases show idealized parallel and oblique blade-vortex interactions. The computed results show good agreement with available experimental data but convey much more information about the far-field noise propagation. When taken together, these new analysis methods exploit the power of new computer technologies and offer the potential to significantly improve our prediction and understanding of rotorcraft noise.

  4. A hybrid method for strong low-frequency noise suppression in prestack seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chunhua; Lu, Wenkai

    2014-09-01

    Low-frequency components are important portion of seismic data in exploration geophysics, and have great effects on seismic imaging of deep subsurface and full waveform inversion. Unfortunately, seismic data usually suffers from various kinds of noises and has low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in low-frequency band, although this situation has been improved by developments of acquisition technology. In this paper, we propose a low-frequency cascade filter (LFCF) in Fourier domain for strong low-frequency noise suppression in prestack gathers. LFCF includes a 1D adaptive median filter in f-x domain and a 2D notch filter in f-k domain, which is able to process high-amplitude swell noise, random noise, and seismic interference noise. We employ traces rearrangement and spike-detection mechanisms in adaptive f-x median filter, which can handle strong noise specifically, such as wide-spreading swell noise and tug noise. And a notch filter in f-k domain is designed to separate reflection signal and random noise by different apparent velocities. Through these means, our method can effectively attenuate low-frequency random and coherent noise while simultaneously protect the signal. Experiments on synthetic example and field data are conducted, and the results demonstrate that our method is practical and effective and can preserve signal down to 2 Hz.

  5. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  6. The method of narrow-band audio classification based on universal noise background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Rui; Bao, Chang-chun

    2013-03-01

    Audio classification is the basis of content-based audio analysis and retrieval. The conventional classification methods mainly depend on feature extraction of audio clip, which certainly increase the time requirement for classification. An approach for classifying the narrow-band audio stream based on feature extraction of audio frame-level is presented in this paper. The audio signals are divided into speech, instrumental music, song with accompaniment and noise using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In order to satisfy the demand of actual environment changing, a universal noise background model (UNBM) for white noise, street noise, factory noise and car interior noise is built. In addition, three feature schemes are considered to optimize feature selection. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves a high accuracy for audio classification, especially under each noise background we used and keep the classification time less than one second.

  7. Contribution analysis of bus pass-by noise based on dynamic transfer path method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Zheng, Sifa; Hao, Peng; Lian, Xiaomin

    2011-10-01

    Bus pass-by noise has become one of the main noise sources which seriously disturb the mental and physical health of urban residents. The key of reducing bus noise is to identify major noise source. In this paper the dynamic transfer characteristic model in the process of bus acceleration is established, which can quantitatively describe the relationship between the sound source or vibration source of the vehicle and the response points outside the vehicle; also a test method has been designed, which can quickly and easily identify the contribution of the bus pass-by noise. Experimental results show that the dynamic transfer characteristic model can identify the main noise source and their contribution during the acceleration, which has significance for the bus noise reduction.

  8. Evaluation of a novel method of noise reduction using computer-simulated mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tischenko, Oleg; Hoeschen, Christoph; Dance, David R; Hunt, Roger A; Maidment, Andrew D A; Bakic, Predrag R

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of noise reduction has been tested for mammography using computer-simulated images for which the truth is known exactly. This method is based on comparing two images. The images are compared at different scales, using a cross-correlation function as a measure of similarity to define the image modifications in the wavelet domain. The computer-simulated images were calculated for noise-free primary radiation using a quasi-realistic voxel phantom. Two images corresponding to slightly different geometry were produced. Gaussian noise was added with certain properties to simulate quantum noise. The added noise could be reduced by >70% using the proposed method without any noticeable corruption of the structures. It is possible to save 50% dose in mammography by producing two images (each 25% of the dose for a standard mammogram). Additionally, a reduction of the anatomical noise and, therefore, better detection rates of breast cancer in mammography are possible.

  9. Method to Measure Total Noise Temperature of a Wireless Receiver During Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Turbiner, Dmitry (Inventor); Esterhuizen, Stephan X. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An electromagnetic signal receiver and methods for determining the noise level and signal power in a signal of interest while the receiver is operating. In some embodiments, the signal of interest is a GPS signal. The receiver includes a noise source that provides a noise signal of known power during intervals while the signal of interest is observed. By measuring a signal-to-noise ratio for the signal of interest and the noise power in the signal of interest, the noise level and signal power of the signal of interest can be computed. Various methods of making the measurements and computing the power of the signal of interest are described. Applications of the system and method are described.

  10. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  11. Using Staged Assignments as Student Spotters: Learning Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    Compares providing staged assignments for teaching research methods to providing a spotter for safety in gymnastics. Describes guidelines for a research proposal. Discusses problem definition, literature review, hypothesis development, data collection, and analysis. Argues that students must know the rules and reasons for the ideal model of…

  12. Methods for evaluating temporal trends in noise exposure

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, RL; Galusha, D; Dixon-Ernst, C; Rabinowitz, PM

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hearing conservation programs have been mandatory in many US industries since 1983. Since then, three program elements (audiometric testing, hearing protection, and training) have been the focus of much research. By comparison, little has been done on noise exposure evaluation. Design and study sample Utilizing a large dataset (>10,000 measurements over 20 years) from eight facilities operated by a multinational aluminum manufacturing company, we evaluated several approaches to assessing temporal trends in Time Weighted Average (TWA) exposures and the fraction of measurements exceeding 85 dBA by facility, by exposure group within facility, and by individual worker within facility. Results Overall, exposures declined across locations over the study period. Several facilities demonstrated substantial reductions in exposure, and the results of mean noise levels and exceedance fractions generally showed good agreement. The results of analyses at the individual level diverged with analyses by facility and exposure group within facility, suggesting that individual-level analyses, while challenging, may provide important information not available from coarser levels of analysis. Conclusions Validated metrics are needed to allow for assessment of temporal trends in noise exposure. Such metrics will improve our ability to characterize, in a standardized manner, efforts to reduce noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:24564696

  13. The Reduction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise Via a Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, John

    2000-01-01

    Engineering studies for reducing ducted fan engine noise were conducted using the noise prediction code TBIEM3D. To conduct parametric noise reduction calculations, it was necessary to advance certain theoretical and computational aspects of the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) described in and implemented in TBIEM3D. Also, enhancements and upgrades to TBIEM3D were made for facilitating the code's use in this research and by the aeroacoustics engineering community.

  14. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  15. Method and apparatus for reducing microwave oscillator output noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John (Inventor); Saunders, Jonathan E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Microwave oscilltors incorporate r.f. feedback with carrier suppression to reduce phase noise. In a direct feedback oscillator arrngement a circulator is interposed between the r.f. amplifier and the high-Q resonator. The amplifier output is applied to the slightly over-coupled input port of the resonator so that the resultant net return signal is the vectorial difference between the signals emitted and reflected from the resonator. The gain of the r.f. amplifier is chosen to regenerate the forward signal from the net return signal. In a STALO-type arrangement, the resonator is critically coupled and an r.f. amplifier added to the path of the net return signal. The sensitivity of the STALO-type feedback loop is thereby enhanced while added amplifier noise is minimized by the superposition of the signals emitted by and reflected from the resonator.

  16. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  17. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  18. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download. PMID:26465549

  19. A prediction method for broadband shock associated noise from supersonic rectangualr jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Reddy, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    Braodband shock associated noise is an important aircraft noise component of the proposed high-speed civil transport (HSCT) at take-offs and landings. For noise certification purpose one would, therefore, like to be able to predict as accurately as possible the intensity, directivity and spectral content of this noise component. The purpose of this work is to develop a semi-empirical prediction method for the broadband shock associated noise from supersonic rectangular jets. The complexity and quality of the noise prediction method are to be similar to those for circular jets. In this paper only the broadband shock associated noise of jets issued from rectangular nozzles with straight side walls is considered. Since many current aircraft propulsion systems have nozzle aspect ratios (at nozzle exit) in the range of 1 to 4, the present study has been confined to nozzles with aspect ratio less than 6. In developing the prediction method the essential physics of the problem are taken into consideration. Since the braodband shock associated noise generation mechanism is the same whether the jet is circular or round the present prediction method in a number of ways is quite similar to that for axisymmetric jets. Comparisons between predictions and measurements for jets with aspect ratio up to 6 will be reported. Efforts will be concentrated on the fly-over plane. However, side line angles and other directions will also be included.

  20. Modeling reaction noise with a desired accuracy by using the X level approach reaction noise estimator (XARNES) method.

    PubMed

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2012-07-21

    A novel computational method for modeling reaction noise characteristics has been suggested. The method can be classified as a moment closure method. The approach is based on the concept of correlation forms which are used for describing spatially extended many body problems where particle numbers change in space and time. In here, it was shown how the formalism of spatially extended correlation forms can be adapted to study well mixed reaction systems. Stochastic fluctuations in particle numbers are described by selectively capturing correlation effects up to the desired order, ξ. The method is referred to as the ξ-level Approximation Reaction Noise Estimator method (XARNES). For example, the ξ=1 description is equivalent to the mean field theory (first-order effects), the ξ=2 case corresponds to the previously developed PARNES method (pair effects), etc. The main idea is that inclusion of higher order correlation effects should lead to better (more accurate) results. Several models were used to test the method, two versions of a simple complex formation model, the Michaelis-Menten model of enzymatic kinetics, the smallest bistable reaction network, a gene expression network with negative feedback, and a random large network. It was explicitly demonstrated that increase in ξ indeed improves accuracy in all cases investigated. The approach has been implemented as automatic software using the Mathematica programming language. The user only needs to input reaction rates, stoichiometry coefficients, and the desired level of computation ξ.

  1. Sample-based engine noise synthesis using an enhanced pitch-synchronous overlap-and-add method.

    PubMed

    Jagla, Jan; Maillard, Julien; Martin, Nadine

    2012-11-01

    An algorithm for the real time synthesis of internal combustion engine noise is presented. Through the analysis of a recorded engine noise signal of continuously varying engine speed, a dataset of sound samples is extracted allowing the real time synthesis of the noise induced by arbitrary evolutions of engine speed. The sound samples are extracted from a recording spanning the entire engine speed range. Each sample is delimitated such as to contain the sound emitted during one cycle of the engine plus the necessary overlap to ensure smooth transitions during the synthesis. The proposed approach, an extension of the PSOLA method introduced for speech processing, takes advantage of the specific periodicity of engine noise signals to locate the extraction instants of the sound samples. During the synthesis stage, the sound samples corresponding to the target engine speed evolution are concatenated with an overlap and add algorithm. It is shown that this method produces high quality audio restitution with a low computational load. It is therefore well suited for real time applications. PMID:23145595

  2. Sample-based engine noise synthesis using an enhanced pitch-synchronous overlap-and-add method.

    PubMed

    Jagla, Jan; Maillard, Julien; Martin, Nadine

    2012-11-01

    An algorithm for the real time synthesis of internal combustion engine noise is presented. Through the analysis of a recorded engine noise signal of continuously varying engine speed, a dataset of sound samples is extracted allowing the real time synthesis of the noise induced by arbitrary evolutions of engine speed. The sound samples are extracted from a recording spanning the entire engine speed range. Each sample is delimitated such as to contain the sound emitted during one cycle of the engine plus the necessary overlap to ensure smooth transitions during the synthesis. The proposed approach, an extension of the PSOLA method introduced for speech processing, takes advantage of the specific periodicity of engine noise signals to locate the extraction instants of the sound samples. During the synthesis stage, the sound samples corresponding to the target engine speed evolution are concatenated with an overlap and add algorithm. It is shown that this method produces high quality audio restitution with a low computational load. It is therefore well suited for real time applications.

  3. Comparison of Two Methods of Noise Power Spectrum Determinations of Medical Radiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan; Ahmed Darwish, Zeki

    2011-03-30

    Noise in medical images is recognized as an important factor that determines the image quality. Image noise is characterized by noise power spectrum (NPS). We compared two methods of NPS determination namely the methods of Wagner and Dobbins on Lanex Regular TMG screen-film system and Hologic Lorad Selenia full field digital mammography system, with the aim of choosing the better method to use. The methods differ in terms of various parametric choices and algorithm implementations. These parameters include the low pass filtering, low frequency filtering, windowing, smoothing, aperture correction, overlapping of region of interest (ROI), length of fast Fourier transform, ROI size, method of ROI normalization, and slice selection of the NPS. Overall, the two methods agreed to the practical value of noise power spectrum between 10{sup -3}-10{sup -6} mm{sup 2} over spatial frequency range 0-10 mm{sup -1}.

  4. Measurement of Trailing Edge Noise Using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional (or phased) array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described and tested. The capabilities of this method arc evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on thc cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones placed on opposite sides of an airframe model (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods arc examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  5. Measurement Of Trailing Edge Noise using Directional Array and Coherent Output Power Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a directional array of microphones for the measurement of trailing edge (TE) noise is described. The capabilities of this method are evaluated via measurements of TE noise from a NACA 63-215 airfoil model and from a cylindrical rod. This TE noise measurement approach is compared to one that is based on the cross spectral analysis of output signals from a pair of microphones (COP method). Advantages and limitations of both methods are examined. It is shown that the microphone array can accurately measures TE noise and captures its two-dimensional characteristic over a large frequency range for any TE configuration as long as noise contamination from extraneous sources is within bounds. The COP method is shown to also accurately measure TE noise but over a more limited frequency range that narrows for increased TE thickness. Finally, the applicability and generality of an airfoil self-noise prediction method was evaluated via comparison to the experimental data obtained using the COP and array measurement methods. The predicted and experimental results are shown to agree over large frequency ranges.

  6. Method and apparatus for removing coarse unentrained char particles from the second stage of a two-stage coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Donath, Ernest E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing oversized, unentrained char particles from a two-stage coal gasification process so as to prevent clogging or plugging of the communicating passage between the two gasification stages. In the first stage of the process, recycled process char passes upwardly while reacting with steam and oxygen to yield a first stage synthesis gas containing hydrogen and oxides of carbon. In the second stage, the synthesis gas passes upwardly with coal and steam which react to yield partially gasified char entrained in a second stage product gas containing methane, hydrogen, and oxides of carbon. Agglomerated char particles, which result from caking coal particles in the second stage and are too heavy to be entrained in the second stage product gas, are removed through an outlet in the bottom of the second stage, the particles being separated from smaller char particles by a counter-current of steam injected into the outlet.

  7. A Method to Further Reduce the Perceived Noise of Low Tip Speed Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.

    2000-01-01

    The use of low tip speed, high bypass ratio fans is a method for reducing the noise of turbofan jet engines. These fans typically have a low number of rotor blades and a number of stator vanes sufficient to achieve cut-off of the blade passing tone. Their perceived noise levels are typically dominated by broadband noise caused by the rotor wake turbulence - stator interaction mechanism. A 106 bladed, 1100 ft/sec takeoff tip speed fan, the Alternative Low Noise Fan, has been tested and shown to have reduced broadband noise. This reduced noise is believed to be the result of the high rotor blade number. Although this fan with 106 blades would not be practical with materials as they exist today, a fan with 50 or so blades could be practically realized. A noise estimate has indicated that such a 50 bladed, low tip speed fan could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter than an 18 bladed fan. If achieved, this level of noise reduction would be significant and points to the use of a high blade number, low tip speed fan as a possible configuration for reduced fan noise.

  8. Optical Measurement Methods Of Disk Brake Noise Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, W. F.; Abendroth, H.

    1986-07-01

    A description is given of how the technique of image derotation is applied to the study of low frequency noise generation of disk brakes. Infra-red imaging is combined with derotation to show the heat emission distribution on the rotor surface during a braking cycle. A series of regularly spaced hot spots are observed on the rotor's surface only when juddering-type, low frequency vibrations are present. This relationship will be discussed and future areas of research will be outlined including the use of laser doppler velocimetry and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI)/T.V. Holography techniques to study this phenomena.

  9. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H., III; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2004-01-01

    In this project on the first stage (2000-Ol), we continued to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). At the second stage (2001-03), FM&AL team concentrated its efforts on solving of problems of interest to Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC), especially in the field of propulsion system enhancement. The NASA GRC R&D Directorate and LaRC Hyper-X Program specialists in a hypersonic technology jointly with the FM&AL staff conducted research on a wide region of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The last year the Hampton University School of Engineering & Technology was awarded the NASA grant, for creation of the Aeropropulsion Center, and the FM&AL is a key team of the project fulfillment responsible for research in Aeropropulsion and Acoustics (Pillar I). This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC/ FM&AL and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IMMSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The main areas of current scientific interest of the FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. This is the main subject of our other projects, of which one is presented. The last year we concentrated our efforts to analyze three main problems: (a) new effective methods fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines; (b) new re-circulation method for mixing, heat transfer and combustion enhancement in propulsion systems and domestic industry application; (c) covexity flow The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines (see, for

  10. Methods for clinical evaluation of noise reduction techniques in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Ehman, Eric C; Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Hara, Amy K; Shiung, Maria M; Jondal, Dayna; Lake, David S; Paden, Robert G; Blezek, Daniel J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Hough, David M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Most noise reduction methods involve nonlinear processes, and objective evaluation of image quality can be challenging, since image noise cannot be fully characterized on the sole basis of the noise level at computed tomography (CT). Noise spatial correlation (or noise texture) is closely related to the detection and characterization of low-contrast objects and may be quantified by analyzing the noise power spectrum. High-contrast spatial resolution can be measured using the modulation transfer function and section sensitivity profile and is generally unaffected by noise reduction. Detectability of low-contrast lesions can be evaluated subjectively at varying dose levels using phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Clinical applications with inherent high-contrast abnormalities (eg, CT for renal calculi, CT enterography) permit larger dose reductions with denoising techniques. In low-contrast tasks such as detection of metastases in solid organs, dose reduction is substantially more limited by loss of lesion conspicuity due to loss of low-contrast spatial resolution and coarsening of noise texture. Existing noise reduction strategies for dose reduction have a substantial impact on lowering the radiation dose at CT. To preserve the diagnostic benefit of CT examination, thoughtful utilization of these strategies must be based on the inherent lesion-to-background contrast and the anatomy of interest. The authors provide an overview of existing noise reduction strategies for low-dose abdominopelvic CT, including analytic reconstruction, image and projection space denoising, and iterative reconstruction; review qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating these strategies; and discuss the strengths and limitations of individual noise reduction methods. PMID:25019428

  11. Optimum Noise Reduction Methods for the Interior of Vehicles and Aircraft Cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavossi, Ph. D., Hasson M.

    The most effective methods of noise reduction in vehicles and Aircraft cabins are investigated. The first goal is to determine the optimal means of noise mitigation without change in external shape of the vehicle, or aircraft cabin exterior such as jet engine or fuselage design, with no significant added weight. The second goal is to arrive at interior designs that can be retrofitted to the existing interiors, to reduce overall noise level for the passengers. The physical phenomena considered are; relaxation oscillations, forced vibrations with non-linear damping and sub-harmonic resonances. The negative and positive damping coefficients and active noise cancelations methods are discussed. From noise power-spectrum for a prototype experimental setup, the most energetic vibration modes are determined, that require the highest damping. The proposed technique will utilize the arrangement of uniformly distributed open Helmholtz resonators, with sound absorbing surface. They are tuned to the frequencies that correspond to the most energetic noise levels. The resonators dissipate noise energy inside the vehicle, or aircraft cabin, at the peak frequencies of the noise spectrum, determined for different vehicle or aircraft cabin, interior design models.

  12. Development of an Empirical Methods for Predicting Jet Mixing Noise of Cold Flow Rectangular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James W.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an empirical method for predicting the jet mixing noise levels of cold flow rectangular jets. The report presents a detailed analysis of the methodology used in development of the prediction method. The empirical correlations used are based on narrow band acoustic data for cold flow rectangular model nozzle tests conducted in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory. There were 20 separate nozzle test operating conditions. For each operating condition 60 Hz bandwidth microphone measurements were made over a frequency range from 0 to 60,000 Hz. Measurements were performed at 16 polar directivity angles ranging from 45 degrees to 157.5 degrees. At each polar directivity angle, measurements were made at 9 azimuth directivity angles. The report shows the methods employed to remove screech tones and shock noise from the data in order to obtain the jet mixing noise component. The jet mixing noise was defined in terms of one third octave band spectral content, polar and azimuth directivity, and overall power level. Empirical correlations were performed over the range of test conditions to define each of these jet mixing noise parameters as a function of aspect ratio, jet velocity, and polar and azimuth directivity angles. The report presents the method for predicting the overall power level, the average polar directivity, the azimuth directivity and the location and shape of the spectra for jet mixing noise of cold flow rectangular jets.

  13. Method and system for dual resolution translation stage

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John Michael

    2014-04-22

    A dual resolution translation stage includes a stage assembly operable to receive an optical element and a low resolution adjustment device mechanically coupled to the stage assembly. The dual resolution stage also includes an adjustable pivot block mechanically coupled to the stage assembly. The adjustable pivot block includes a pivot shaft. The dual resolution stage further includes a lever arm mechanically coupled to the adjustable pivot block. The lever arm is operable to pivot about the pivot shaft. The dual resolution stage additionally includes a high resolution adjustment device mechanically coupled to the lever arm and the stage assembly.

  14. Apparatus and method for two-stage oxidation of wastes

    DOEpatents

    Fleischman, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for oxidizing wastes in a two-stage process. The apparatus includes an oxidation device, a gas-liquid contacting column and an electrocell. In the first stage of the process, wastes are heated in the presence of air to partially oxidize the wastes. The heated wastes produce an off-gas stream containing oxidizable materials. In the second stage, the off-gas stream is cooled and flowed through the contacting column, where the off-gas stream is contacted with an aqueous acid stream containing an oxidizing agent having at least two positive valence states. At least a portion of the oxidizable materials are transferred to the acid stream and destroyed by the oxidizing agent. During oxidation, the valence of the oxidizing agent is decreased from its higher state to its lower state. The acid stream is flowed to the electrocell, where an electric current is applied to the stream to restore the oxidizing agent to its higher valence state. The regenerated acid stream is recycled to the contacting column.

  15. Apparatus and method for two-stage oxidation of wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, S.D.

    1993-09-28

    An apparatus and method for oxidizing wastes in a two-stage process. The apparatus includes an oxidation device, a gas-liquid contacting column and an electrocell. In the first stage of the process, wastes are heated in the presence of air to partially oxidize the wastes. The heated wastes produce an off-gas stream containing oxidizable materials. In the second stage, the off-gas stream is cooled and flowed through the contacting column, where the off-gas stream is contacted with an aqueous acid stream containing an oxidizing agent having at least two positive valence states. At least a portion of the oxidizable materials are transferred to the acid stream and destroyed by the oxidizing agent. During oxidation, the valence of the oxidizing agent is decreased from its higher state to its lower state. The acid stream is flowed to the electrocell, where an electric current is applied to the stream to restore the oxidizing agent to its higher valence state. The regenerated acid stream is recycled to the contacting column.

  16. Research on Parameter Estimation Methods for Alpha Stable Noise in a Laser Gyroscope's Random Error.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyun; Li, Kui; Gao, Pengyu; Meng, Suxia

    2015-01-01

    Alpha stable noise, determined by four parameters, has been found in the random error of a laser gyroscope. Accurate estimation of the four parameters is the key process for analyzing the properties of alpha stable noise. Three widely used estimation methods-quantile, empirical characteristic function (ECF) and logarithmic moment method-are analyzed in contrast with Monte Carlo simulation in this paper. The estimation accuracy and the application conditions of all methods, as well as the causes of poor estimation accuracy, are illustrated. Finally, the highest precision method, ECF, is applied to 27 groups of experimental data to estimate the parameters of alpha stable noise in a laser gyroscope's random error. The cumulative probability density curve of the experimental data fitted by an alpha stable distribution is better than that by a Gaussian distribution, which verifies the existence of alpha stable noise in a laser gyroscope's random error.

  17. Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) Modeling Method for Gyro Random Noise Using a Robust Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei

    2015-09-30

    To solve the problem in which the conventional ARMA modeling methods for gyro random noise require a large number of samples and converge slowly, an ARMA modeling method using a robust Kalman filtering is developed. The ARMA model parameters are employed as state arguments. Unknown time-varying estimators of observation noise are used to achieve the estimated mean and variance of the observation noise. Using the robust Kalman filtering, the ARMA model parameters are estimated accurately. The developed ARMA modeling method has the advantages of a rapid convergence and high accuracy. Thus, the required sample size is reduced. It can be applied to modeling applications for gyro random noise in which a fast and accurate ARMA modeling method is required.

  18. Pseudo noise code and data transmission method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Pseudo noise ranging codes, having a predetermined chipping rate, and a pair of binary data sources, each having a bit rate no greater than one tenth the chipping rate, quadriphase, digitally modulate a suppressed carrier wave having a first frequency are examined. Two additional binary data sources, each having a bit rate that is not restricted by the chipping rate of the first carrier, quadriphase, digitally modulate a suppressed carrier wave having a second frequency. The first and second frequencies are only slightly displaced so that there is overlap in the frequency bands which modulate the two carriers. The two suppressed carrier waves are linearly combined and transmitted from a first station to a second station so that the amplitude of the transmitted first wave is controlled so as not to degrade the detectability of the second wave at the second station.

  19. Method of operating a two-stage coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Tanca, Michael C.

    1982-01-01

    A method of operating an entrained flow coal gasifier (10) via a two-stage gasification process. A portion of the coal (18) to be gasified is combusted in a combustion zone (30) with near stoichiometric air to generate combustion products. The combustion products are conveyed from the combustion zone into a reduction zone (32) wherein additional coal is injected into the combustion products to react with the combustion products to form a combustible gas. The additional coal is injected into the reduction zone as a mixture (60) consisting of coal and steam, preferably with a coal-to-steam weight ratio of approximately ten to one.

  20. A Preliminary Axial Fan Design Method with the Considerat ion of Performance and Noise Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan; Kil, Hyun Gwon

    2010-06-01

    Presented in this paper are a fan's aero-acoustic performance method and its computation procedure which combines aerodynamic flow field data, performances and noise levels of fan. The internal flow field and the performance of fan are analyzed by the through-flow modeling, inviscid pitch-averaged quasi-3D flow analysis combined with flow deviation and pressure loss distribution models. Based on the predicted internal flow field dada by the trough-flow modeling, fan noise is predicted by two models for the discrete frequency noise due to rotating steady aerodynamic thrust and blade interaction and for the broadband noise due to turbulent boundary layer and wake vortex shedding. The present predictions of the flow distribution, the performance and the noise level of fan are well agreed with actual test results.

  1. Evaluation of methods of reducing community noise impact around San Jose municipal airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glick, J. M.; Shevell, R. S.; Bowles, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    A computer simulation of the airport noise impact on the surrounding communities was used to evaluate alternate operational procedures, improved technology, and land use conversion as methods of reducing community noise impact in the airport vicinity. In addition, a constant density population distribution was analyzed for possible application to other airport communities with fairly uniform population densities and similar aircraft operational patterns. The introduction of sound absorption material (SAM) was found to reduce community noise annoyance by over 25 percent, and the introduction of refan was found to reduce community annoyance by over 60 percent. Replacing the present aircraft was found to reduce the noise problem to very small proportions, and the introduction of an advanced technology twin was found to essentially eliminate the community noise problem.

  2. A systematic molecular circuit design method for gene networks under biochemical time delays and molecular noises

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Chang, Yu-Te

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene networks in nanoscale are of nonlinear stochastic process. Time delays are common and substantial in these biochemical processes due to gene transcription, translation, posttranslation protein modification and diffusion. Molecular noises in gene networks come from intrinsic fluctuations, transmitted noise from upstream genes, and the global noise affecting all genes. Knowledge of molecular noise filtering and biochemical process delay compensation in gene networks is crucial to understand the signal processing in gene networks and the design of noise-tolerant and delay-robust gene circuits for synthetic biology. Results A nonlinear stochastic dynamic model with multiple time delays is proposed for describing a gene network under process delays, intrinsic molecular fluctuations, and extrinsic molecular noises. Then, the stochastic biochemical processing scheme of gene regulatory networks for attenuating these molecular noises and compensating process delays is investigated from the nonlinear signal processing perspective. In order to improve the robust stability for delay toleration and noise filtering, a robust gene circuit for nonlinear stochastic time-delay gene networks is engineered based on the nonlinear robust H∞ stochastic filtering scheme. Further, in order to avoid solving these complicated noise-tolerant and delay-robust design problems, based on Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy time-delay model and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) technique, a systematic gene circuit design method is proposed to simplify the design procedure. Conclusion The proposed gene circuit design method has much potential for application to systems biology, synthetic biology and drug design when a gene regulatory network has to be designed for improving its robust stability and filtering ability of disease-perturbed gene network or when a synthetic gene network needs to perform robustly under process delays and molecular noises. PMID:19038029

  3. Secondary Path Modeling Method for Active Noise Control of Power Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tong; Liang, Jiabi; Liang, Yuanbin; Wang, Lixin; Pei, Xiugao; Li, Peng

    The accuracy of the secondary path modeling is critical to the stability of active noise control system. On condition of knowing the input and output of the secondary path, system identification theory can be used to identify the path. Based on the experiment data, correlation analysis is adopted to eliminate the random noise and nonlinear harmonic in the output data in order to obtain the accurate frequency characteristic of the secondary path. After that, Levy's Method is applied to identify the transfer function of the path. Computer simulation results are given respectively, both showing the proposed off-line modeling method is feasible and applicable. At last, Levy's Method is used to attain an accurate secondary path model in the active control of transformer noise experiment and achieves to make the noise sound level decrease about 10dB.

  4. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  5. Development of hybrid method for the prediction of underwater propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Hanshin; Suh, Jung-Chun; Lee, Soogab

    2005-11-01

    Noise reduction and control is an important problem in the performance of underwater acoustic systems and in the habitability of the passenger ship for crew and passenger. Furthermore, sound generated by a propeller is critical in underwater detection and it is often related to the survivability of the vessel especially for military purpose. This paper presents a numerical study on the non-cavitating and blade sheet cavitation noises of the underwater propeller. A brief summary of numerical method with verification and results are presented. The noise is predicted using time-domain acoustic analogy. The flow field is analyzed with potential-based panel method, and then the time-dependent pressure and sheet cavity volume data are used as the input for Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulation to predict the far-field acoustics. Noise characteristics are presented according to noise sources and conditions. Through this study, the dominant noise source of the underwater propeller is analyzed, which will provide a basis for proper noise control strategies.

  6. Application of an acoustic noise removal method to aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Eaton, Frank D.; McCrae, Kim A.

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic noise removal method is used to reject engine acoustical disturbances from aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements. Removal of engine noise from atmospheric temperature measurements allows a larger wave number range to be fit while quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric temperature turbulence. The larger wave number range was found to result in a more statistically certain spectral slope estimate, with up to a 50% reduction in the standard deviation of measured spectral slopes. The noise removal technique was found to break down under conditions of weak atmospheric temperature turbulence where the engine acoustical disturbance can be several orders of magnitude larger than atmospheric temperature turbulence.

  7. Open Rotor Noise Prediction Methods at NASA Langley- A Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tinetti, Ana F.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    Open rotors are once again under consideration for propulsion of the future airliners because of their high efficiency. The noise generated by these propulsion systems must meet the stringent noise standards of today to reduce community impact. In this paper we review the open rotor noise prediction methods available at NASA Langley. We discuss three codes called ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic-Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise), FW - Hpds (Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings with penetrable data surface) and the FSC (Fast Scattering Code). The first two codes are in the time domain and the third code is a frequency domain code. The capabilities of these codes and the input data requirements as well as the output data are presented. Plans for further improvements of these codes are discussed. In particular, a method based on equivalent sources is outlined to get rid of spurious signals in the FW - Hpds code.

  8. An efficient two-phase L(1)-TV method for restoring blurred images with impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond H; Dong, Yiqiu; Hintermüller, Michael

    2010-07-01

    A two-phase image restoration method based upon total variation regularization combined with an L(1)-data-fitting term for impulse noise removal and deblurring is proposed. In the first phase, suitable noise detectors are used for identifying image pixels contaminated by noise. Then, in the second phase, based upon the information on the location of noise-free pixels, images are deblurred and denoised simultaneously. For efficiency reasons, in the second phase a superlinearly convergent algorithm based upon Fenchel-duality and inexact semismooth Newton techniques is utilized for solving the associated variational problem. Numerical results prove the new method to be a significantly advance over several state-of-the-art techniques with respect to restoration capability and computational efficiency.

  9. System and Method for Suppression of Unwanted Noise in Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul B. M. Q. (Inventor); Clem, Michelle M. (Inventor); Fagan, Amy F. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for the suppression of unwanted noise from a jet discharging into a duct are disclosed herein. The unwanted noise may be in the form of excited duct modes or howl due to super resonance. A damper member is used to reduce acoustic velocity perturbations at the velocity anti-node, associated with the half-wave resonance of the duct, weakening the resonance condition and reducing the amplitudes of the spectral peaks.

  10. Method to Measure Total Noise Temperature of a Wireless Receiver During Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Esterhuizen, Stephan; Turbiner, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure the total effective noise power in a GPS receiver, including contributions from the system temperature, the antenna temperature, interference, lossy components, etc. A known level of noise is periodically injected before the preamplifier during normal tracking, with a switch set to a very low duty cycle, so that there is insignificant signal loss for the GPS signals being tracked. Alternately, a signal of known power may be injected. The coupling port is fed with a switch that can be controlled from the receiver s digital processing section. The switch can connect the coupling port to a noise or signal source at a known power level. The combined system noise is measured, and nearly continuous noise calibrations are made. The effect from injected noise/signals on the performance of the GPS receiver can be less than 0.01 dB of SNR loss. Minimal additional components are required. The GPS receiver is used to measure the SNRs required to solve for the noise level. Because this measurement is referenced to the preamplifier input, it is insensitive to variations in the receiver gain.

  11. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective. PMID:24349105

  12. Methods for designing treatments to reduce interior noise of predominant sources and paths in a single engine light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Richard E.; Remington, Paul J.; Theobald, Mark A.; Wilby, John F.

    1985-01-01

    The sources and paths by which noise enters the cabin of a small single engine aircraft were determined through a combination of flight and laboratory tests. The primary sources of noise were found to be airborne noise from the propeller and engine casing, airborne noise from the engine exhaust, structureborne noise from the engine/propeller combination and noise associated with air flow over the fuselage. For the propeller, the primary airborne paths were through the firewall, windshield and roof. For the engine, the most important airborne path was through the firewall. Exhaust noise was found to enter the cabin primarily through the panels in the vicinity of the exhaust outlet although exhaust noise entering the cabin through the firewall is a distinct possibility. A number of noise control techniques were tried, including firewall stiffening to reduce engine and propeller airborne noise, to stage isolators and engine mounting spider stiffening to reduce structure-borne noise, and wheel well covers to reduce air flow noise.

  13. A Parameter Identification Method for Helicopter Noise Source Identification and Physics-Based Semi-Empirical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric, II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    A new physics-based parameter identification method for rotor harmonic noise sources is developed using an acoustic inverse simulation technique. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. This new method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, allowing accurate estimates of BVI noise to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions.

  14. Advances in the development of common noise assessment methods in Europe: The CNOSSOS-EU framework for strategic environmental noise mapping.

    PubMed

    Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Paviotti, Marco; Anfosso-Lédée, Fabienne; Van Maercke, Dirk; Shilton, Simon; Jones, Nigel

    2014-06-01

    The Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) requires EU Member States to determine the exposure to environmental noise through strategic noise mapping and to elaborate action plans in order to reduce noise pollution, where necessary. A common framework for noise assessment methods (CNOSSOS-EU) has been developed by the European Commission in co-operation with the EU Member States to be applied for strategic noise mapping as required by the Environment Noise Directive (2002/49/EC). CNOSSOS-EU represents a harmonised and coherent approach to assess noise levels from the main sources of noise (road traffic, railway traffic, aircraft and industrial) across Europe. This paper outlines the process behind the development of CNOSSOS-EU and the parts of the CNOSSOS-EU core methodological framework which were developed during phase A of the CNOSSOS-EU process (2010-2012), whilst focusing on the main scientific and technical issues that were addressed, and the implementation challenges that are being faced before it can become fully operational in the EU MS. PMID:24582156

  15. Advances in the development of common noise assessment methods in Europe: The CNOSSOS-EU framework for strategic environmental noise mapping.

    PubMed

    Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Paviotti, Marco; Anfosso-Lédée, Fabienne; Van Maercke, Dirk; Shilton, Simon; Jones, Nigel

    2014-06-01

    The Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) requires EU Member States to determine the exposure to environmental noise through strategic noise mapping and to elaborate action plans in order to reduce noise pollution, where necessary. A common framework for noise assessment methods (CNOSSOS-EU) has been developed by the European Commission in co-operation with the EU Member States to be applied for strategic noise mapping as required by the Environment Noise Directive (2002/49/EC). CNOSSOS-EU represents a harmonised and coherent approach to assess noise levels from the main sources of noise (road traffic, railway traffic, aircraft and industrial) across Europe. This paper outlines the process behind the development of CNOSSOS-EU and the parts of the CNOSSOS-EU core methodological framework which were developed during phase A of the CNOSSOS-EU process (2010-2012), whilst focusing on the main scientific and technical issues that were addressed, and the implementation challenges that are being faced before it can become fully operational in the EU MS.

  16. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 2: One-third octave data tabulations and selected narrowband traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The raw-acoustic data corrected to standard day, from acoustic tests performed on a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton thrust, full-size engine, which has application on an advanced transport aircraft, are presented. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio, and to maintain adequate stall margin. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized.

  17. Applications of Response Surface-Based Methods to Noise Analysis in the Conceptual Design of Revolutionary Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Geoffrey A.; Olson, Erik D.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of noise in today's air transportation system, there have arisen needs to incorporate noise considerations in the conceptual design of revolutionary aircraft. Through the use of response surfaces, complex noise models may be converted into polynomial equations for rapid and simplified evaluation. This conversion allows many of the commonly used response surface-based trade space exploration methods to be applied to noise analysis. This methodology is demonstrated using a noise model of a notional 300 passenger Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) transport. Response surfaces are created relating source noise levels of the BWB vehicle to its corresponding FAR-36 certification noise levels and the resulting trade space is explored. Methods demonstrated include: single point analysis, parametric study, an optimization technique for inverse analysis, sensitivity studies, and probabilistic analysis. Extended applications of response surface-based methods in noise analysis are also discussed.

  18. System and method for motor fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Nowak, Michael P.; Dimino, Steven A.

    2010-12-07

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to acquire at least on additional set of real-time operating current data from the motor during operation, redefine the noise component present in each additional set of real-time operating current data, and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  19. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Solano, David A; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise. PMID:27300844

  20. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise.

  1. A method of estimating the noise level in a chaotic time series.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, A W; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, W K

    2008-06-01

    An attempt is made in this study to estimate the noise level present in a chaotic time series. This is achieved by employing a linear least-squares method that is based on the correlation integral form obtained by Diks in 1999. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated using five artificial chaotic time series, the Henon map, the Lorenz equation, the Duffing equation, the Rossler equation and the Chua's circuit whose dynamical characteristics are known a priori. Different levels of noise are added to the artificial chaotic time series and the estimated results indicate good performance of the proposed method. Finally, the proposed method is applied to estimate the noise level present in some real world data sets. PMID:18601482

  2. Assessment of an ICA-based noise reduction method for multi-channel auditory evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirahmadizoghi, Siavash; Bell, Steven; Simpson, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work a new independent component analysis (ICA) based method for noise reduction in evoked potentials is evaluated on for auditory late responses (ALR) captured with a 63-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) from 10 normal-hearing subjects. The performance of the new method is compared with a single channel alternative in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR), the number of channels with an SNR above an empirically derived statistical critical value and an estimate of hearing threshold. The results show that the multichannel signal processing method can significantly enhance the quality of the signal and also detected hearing thresholds significantly lower than with the single channel alternative.

  3. A new method for in-flight radiometric noise assessment: application to SPOT5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, V. éronique; Chaffaut, Francois-Xavier; Kubik, Philippe; Lebegue, Laurent; Valorge, Christophe; Jung, Mathieu

    2004-11-01

    Since SPOT1 launch in February 1986 and until SPOT5 launch in May 2002, the methods and means to insure the best quality of the images delivered to SPOT IMAGE customers have been continuously improved and updated. The quality of the corrected images is quantified through several figures of merit, including, for radiometric quality, the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). Radiometric noise is due to two separate phenomena: -column-wise noise: it represents on-board image chain performances. -line-wise noise: normalization defects (radiometric model deviations) may lead to visible "columns" on a uniform landscape. For each image, these two noises are combined in an "image noise" that quantifies the variations of the digital numbers on a uniform landscape. Different techniques can be used to assess these different noises in-flight. For SPOT1 to SPOT4, the on-board lamp is used for both normalization and SNR assessment. For SPOT5, without lamp unit, we use images acquired over the quasi-uniform landscapes of Antarctic and Greenland for normalization. However, uniformity of these landscapes is not sufficient to accurately measure the SNR. So, a new method experimented during SPOT3 in-flight commissioning phase and operational for SPOT5 is applied. It consists in using two images of the same landscape acquired simultaneously to eliminate the landscape contribution. This paper focuses on the presentation of this new method and compares its accuracy to the other methods. Finally, a comparison between flight measurements and ground measurements before launch is given.

  4. Influence of cavity shape on hydrodynamic noise by a hybrid LES-FW-H method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Shu-Xin; Liu, Yu-Hong; Chen, Chao-Ying

    2011-09-01

    The flow past various mechanical cavity, which is a common structure on the surface of the underwater vehicle, and generating hydrodynamic noise has attracted considerable attention in recent years. In this paper, a hybrid method is presented to investigate the hydrodynamic noise induced by mechanical cavities with various shapes. With this method, the noise sources in the near wall turbulences or in the wake are computed by the large eddy simulation (LES) and the generation and propagation of the acoustic waves are solved by the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy method with acoustic source terms extracted from the time-dependent solutions of the unsteady flow. The feasibility and reliability of the current method was verified by comparing with experimental data (Wang, 2009). The 2D cavity models with different cross-section shapes and 3D cavity models with different cavity mouth shapes (rectangular and circular) are developed to study the influence of cavity shape on the hydrodynamic noise. By comparing the flow mechanisms, wall pressure fluctuations, near-field and far-field sound propagation distributions, it is found that the quadrangular cavity with equal depths of leading-edge and trailing-edge is preferred for its inducing lower hydrodynamic noise than the cylindrical cavity does.

  5. The Reduction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise Via A Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Dunn, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a Boundary Integral Equation Method (BIEM) for the prediction of ducted fan engine noise is discussed. The method is motivated by the need for an efficient and versatile computational tool to assist in parametric noise reduction studies. In this research, the work in reference 1 was extended to include passive noise control treatment on the duct interior. The BEM considers the scattering of incident sound generated by spinning point thrust dipoles in a uniform flow field by a thin cylindrical duct. The acoustic field is written as a superposition of spinning modes. Modal coefficients of acoustic pressure are calculated term by term. The BEM theoretical framework is based on Helmholtz potential theory. A boundary value problem is converted to a boundary integral equation formulation with unknown single and double layer densities on the duct wall. After solving for the unknown densities, the acoustic field is easily calculated. The main feature of the BIEM is the ability to compute any portion of the sound field without the need to compute the entire field. Other noise prediction methods such as CFD and Finite Element methods lack this property. Additional BIEM attributes include versatility, ease of use, rapid noise predictions, coupling of propagation and radiation both forward and aft, implementable on midrange personal computers, and valid over a wide range of frequencies.

  6. Pilot study of methods and equipment for in-home noise level measurements

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, Richard L.; Heikkinen, Maire S.A.; Williams, Christopher C.; Viet, Susan Marie; Dellarco, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the auditory and non-auditory effects of noise has increased dramatically over the past decade, but indoor noise exposure measurement methods have not advanced appreciably, despite the introduction of applicable new technologies. This study evaluated various conventional and smart devices for exposure assessment in the National Children's Study. Three devices were tested: a sound level meter (SLM), a dosimeter, and a smart device with a noise measurement application installed. Instrument performance was evaluated in a series of semi-controlled tests in office environments over 96-hour periods, followed by measurements made continuously in two rooms (a child's bedroom and a most used room) in nine participating homes over a 7-day period with subsequent computation of a range of noise metrics. The SLMs and dosimeters yielded similar A-weighted average noise levels. Levels measured by the smart devices often differed substantially (showing both positive and negative bias, depending on the metric) from those measured via SLM and dosimeter, and demonstrated attenuation in some frequency bands in spectral analysis compared to SLM results. Virtually all measurements exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's 45 dBA day-night limit for indoor residential exposures. The measurement protocol developed here can be employed in homes, demonstrates the possibility of measuring long-term noise exposures in homes with technologies beyond traditional SLMs, and highlights potential pitfalls associated with measurements made by smart devices. PMID:27053775

  7. Research on the effect of noise at different times of day: Models, methods and findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Social surveys of residents' responses to noise at different times of day are reviewed. Some of the discrepancies in published reports about the importance of noise at different times of day are reduced when the research findings are classified according to the type of time of day reaction model, the type of time of day weight calculated and the method which is used to estimate the weight. When the estimates of nighttime weights from 12 studies are normalized, it is found that they still disagree, but do not support stronger nighttime weights than those used in existing noise indices. Challenges to common assumptions in nighttime response models are evaluated. Two of these challenges receive enough support to warrant further investigation: the impact of changes in numbers of noise events may be less at night than in the day and nighttime annoyance may be affected by noise levels in other periods. All existing social survey results in which averages of nighttime responses were plotted by nighttime noise levels are reproduced.

  8. Method of independently operating a group of stages within a diffusion cascade

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Manson; Fruit, Allen J.; Levey, Horace B.

    1976-06-08

    1. A method of operating a group of the diffusion stages of a productive diffusion cascade with countercurrent flow, said group comprising a top and a bottom stage, which comprises isolating said group from said cascade, circulating the diffused gas produced in said top stage to the feed of said bottom stage while at the same time circulating the undiffused gas from said bottom stage to the feed of said top stage whereby major changes in

  9. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  10. Cox regression methods for two-stage randomization designs.

    PubMed

    Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Helterbrand, Jeffrey D

    2007-06-01

    Two-stage randomization designs (TSRD) are becoming increasingly common in oncology and AIDS clinical trials as they make more efficient use of study participants to examine therapeutic regimens. In these designs patients are initially randomized to an induction treatment, followed by randomization to a maintenance treatment conditional on their induction response and consent to further study treatment. Broader acceptance of TSRDs in drug development may hinge on the ability to make appropriate intent-to-treat type inference within this design framework as to whether an experimental induction regimen is better than a standard induction regimen when maintenance treatment is fixed. Recently Lunceford, Davidian, and Tsiatis (2002, Biometrics 58, 48-57) introduced an inverse probability weighting based analytical framework for estimating survival distributions and mean restricted survival times, as well as for comparing treatment policies at landmarks in the TSRD setting. In practice Cox regression is widely used and in this article we extend the analytical framework of Lunceford et al. (2002) to derive a consistent estimator for the log hazard in the Cox model and a robust score test to compare treatment policies. Large sample properties of these methods are derived, illustrated via a simulation study, and applied to a TSRD clinical trial. PMID:17425633

  11. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  12. Electrochemical noise methods applied to the study of organic coatings and pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwagen, G.P.; Talhnan, D.E.; Touzain, S.; Smith, A.; Twite, R.; Balbyshev, V.; Pae, Y.

    1998-12-31

    The use of electrochemical noise methods (ENM) to examine organic coatings was first performed in 1986 by Skerry and Eden. The technique uses the spontaneous voltage and current noise that occurs between two identical coated electrodes in electrolyte immersion to determine resistance properties of the coating as well as low frequency noise impedance data for the system. It is a non-perturbing measurement, and one that allows judgment and ranking of coating systems performance. This paper will summarize work in the lab over the past five years on the use of ENM for examining the properties of organic coatings and pretreatment over metals. They have studied marine coatings, pipeline coatings, coil coatings, electrodeposited organic coatings (e-coats), and aircraft coatings by this method and found it to be useful, especially when used in conjunction with impedance and other electrochemical techniques.

  13. Note: A simple method to suppress the artificial noise for velocity map imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhengbo E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Chunsheng; Qu, Zehua; Tang, Zichao E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn

    2015-04-15

    A simple method has been proposed to suppress artificial noise from the counts with respect to the central line (or point) for the reconstructed 3D images with cylindrical symmetry in the velocity-map imaging spectroscopy. A raw 2D projection around the z-axis (usually referred to as central line) for photodetachment, photoionization, or photodissociation experiments is pre-processed via angular tailored method to avoid the signal counts distributed near the central line (or point). Two types of photoelectron velocity-map imaging (O{sup −} and Au{sup −} ⋅ NH{sub 3}) are demonstrated to give rise to the 3D images with significantly reduced central line noise after pre-processing operation. The major advantages of the pre-operation are the ability of suppression of central-line noise to resolve weak structures or vibrational excitation in atoms or molecules near photon threshold.

  14. A Direct Method for Calculating Instrument Noise Levels in Side-by-Side Seismometer Evaluations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, L. Gary

    1989-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The subject of determining the inherent system noise levels present in modem broadband closed loop seismic sensors has been an evolving topic ever since closed loop systems became available. Closed loop systems are unique in that the system noise can not be determined via a blocked mass test as in older conventional open loop seismic sensors. Instead, most investigators have resorted to performing measurements on two or more systems operating in close proximity to one another and to analyzing the outputs of these systems with respect to one another to ascertain their relative noise levels. The analysis of side-by-side relative performance is inherently dependent on the accuracy of the mathematical modeling of the test configuration. This report presents a direct approach to extracting the system noise levels of two linear systems with a common coherent input signal. The mathematical solution to the problem is incredibly simple; however the practical application of the method encounters some difficulties. Examples of expected accuracies are presented as derived by simulating real systems performance using computer generated random noise. In addition, examples of the performance of the method when applied to real experimental test data are shown.

  15. [Application of a modified method of wavelet noise removing to noisy ICP-AES spectra].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-guo; Zhang, Zhan-xia

    2003-06-01

    A new method for noise removal from signal by the wavelet transform was developed. Compared with analytical signal, noise has higher frequency and smaller amplitude. By the new wavelet filtering method, the high frequency components were first removed, and then the small ones in the remaining transformed vectors were discarded. The proposed approach was evaluated by the processing of simulated and experimental noisy ICP-AES spectra. Different amounts of noise were added to a Gaussian peak to obtain a series of noisy ICP spectra. The simulated noisy spectra with R (signal to noise ratio) = 6 and N (data number) = 51, and with R = 6 and N = 17 were used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method. The performances of noise removal by the wavelet smoothing, the wavelet denoising and the proposed technique were compared. It was found that using the new approach, the relative errors of peak height would be no more than 5% for spectra with normal sampling points and R > or = 2. Moreover, the baseline could be easily defined, which was helpful to the accurate measurement of peak height. Experimental spectra of Al and V at low concentrations were processed by the proposed method. Intense noises were efficiently removed and the spectra became smoother without underestimating the analytical signal. The distortion of V 303.310 nm line was substantially rectified. The linear correlation coefficients between the peak heights in the reconstructed spectra and the concentrations were found to be 0.9953 for Al and 0.9836 for V, respectively. PMID:12953539

  16. Feasibility study of noise analysis methods on virtual thermal reactor subcriticality monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, C.; Lee, D.; Lee, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis results of Rossi-alpha, cross-correlation, Feynman-alpha, and Feynman difference methods applied to the subcriticality monitoring of nuclear reactors. A thermal spectrum Godiva model has been designed for the analysis of the four methods. This Godiva geometry consists of a spherical core containing the isotopes of H-l, U-235 and U-238, and the H{sub 2}O reflector outside the core. A Monte Carlo code, McCARD, is used in real time mode to generate virtual detector signals to analyze the feasibility of the four methods. The analysis results indicate that the four methods can be used with high accuracy for the continuous monitoring of subcriticality. In addition to that, in order to analyze the impact of the random noise contamination on the accuracy of the noise analysis, the McCARD-generated signals are contaminated with arbitrary noise. It is noticed that, even when the detector signals are contaminated, the four methods can predict the subcriticality with reasonable accuracy. Nonetheless, in order to reduce the adverse impact of the random noise, eight detector signals, rather than a single signal, are generated from the core, one signal from each equally divided eighth part of the core. The preliminary analysis with multiple virtual detector signals indicates that the approach of using many detectors is promising to improve the accuracy of criticality prediction and further study will be performed in this regard. (authors)

  17. [Immunological characteristics of the 2-stage method of smallpox vaccination].

    PubMed

    Marennikova, S S; Matsevich, G R; Sokolova, A F; Shul'ga, L G; Manenkova, G M

    1977-05-01

    As a result of observations carried out on children the authors present immunological characteristics of two-stage smallpox vaccination at different intervals (1 to 60 days) between the injection of inactivated and live vaccine. There proved to be acceleration and intensification of antibody formation after two-stage immunization in comparison with the rutine vaccination. A seven-day interval between the injection of the inactivated and live preparations was recommended on the basis of the data obtained.

  18. A NOISE ADAPTIVE FUZZY EQUALIZATION METHOD FOR PROCESSING SOLAR EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2013-08-15

    A new image enhancement tool ideally suited for the visualization of fine structures in extreme ultraviolet images of the corona is presented in this paper. The Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization method is particularly suited for the exceptionally high dynamic range images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. This method produces artifact-free images and gives significantly better results than methods based on convolution or Fourier transform which are often used for that purpose.

  19. A method for calculating strut and splitter plate noise in exit ducts: Theory and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portions of a four-year analytical and experimental investigation relative to noise radiation from engine internal components in turbulent flow are summarized. Spectra measured for such airfoils over a range of chord, thickness ratio, flow velocity, and turbulence level were compared with predictions made by an available rigorous thin-airfoil analytical method. This analysis included the effects of flow compressibility and source noncompactness. Generally good agreement was obtained. This noise calculation method for isolated airfoils in turbulent flow was combined with a method for calculating transmission of sound through a subsonic exit duct and with an empirical far-field directivity shape. These three elements were checked separately and were individually shown to give close agreement with data. This combination provides a method for predicting engine internally generated aft-radiated noise from radial struts and stators, and annular splitter rings. Calculated sound power spectra, directivity, and acoustic pressure spectra were compared with the best available data. These data were for noise caused by a fan exit duct annular splitter ring, larger-chord stator blades, and turbine exit struts.

  20. A method to establish seismic noise baselines for automated station assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Hutt, C.R.; Gee, L.S.; Benz, H.M.; Buland, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for quantifying station noise baselines and characterizing the spectral shape of out-of-nominal noise sources. Our intent is to automate this method in order to ensure that only the highest-quality data are used in rapid earthquake products at NEIC. In addition, the station noise baselines provide a valuable tool to support the quality control of GSN and ANSS backbone data and metadata. The procedures addressed here are currently in development at the NEIC, and work is underway to understand how quickly changes from nominal can be observed and used within the NEIC processing framework. The spectral methods and software used to compute station baselines and described herein (PQLX) can be useful to both permanent and portable seismic stations operators. Applications include: general seismic station and data quality control (QC), evaluation of instrument responses, assessment of near real-time communication system performance, characterization of site cultural noise conditions, and evaluation of sensor vault design, as well as assessment of gross network capabilities (McNamara et al. 2005). Future PQLX development plans include incorporating station baselines for automated QC methods and automating station status report generation and notification based on user-defined QC parameters. The PQLX software is available through the USGS (http://earthquake. usgs.gov/research/software/pqlx.php) and IRIS (http://www.iris.edu/software/ pqlx/).

  1. Improved Kalman filter method for measurement noise reduction in multi sensor RFID systems.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ki Hwan; Lee, Seung Joon; Kyung, Yeo Sun; Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Min Chul; Jung, Kyung Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the range of available radio frequency identification (RFID) tags has been widened to include smart RFID tags which can monitor their varying surroundings. One of the most important factors for better performance of smart RFID system is accurate measurement from various sensors. In the multi-sensing environment, some noisy signals are obtained because of the changing surroundings. We propose in this paper an improved Kalman filter method to reduce noise and obtain correct data. Performance of Kalman filter is determined by a measurement and system noise covariance which are usually called the R and Q variables in the Kalman filter algorithm. Choosing a correct R and Q variable is one of the most important design factors for better performance of the Kalman filter. For this reason, we proposed an improved Kalman filter to advance an ability of noise reduction of the Kalman filter. The measurement noise covariance was only considered because the system architecture is simple and can be adjusted by the neural network. With this method, more accurate data can be obtained with smart RFID tags. In a simulation the proposed improved Kalman filter has 40.1%, 60.4% and 87.5% less mean squared error (MSE) than the conventional Kalman filter method for a temperature sensor, humidity sensor and oxygen sensor, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was also verified with some experiments.

  2. Open Rotor Tone Shielding Methods for System Noise Assessments Using Multiple Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced aircraft designs such as the hybrid wing body, in conjunction with open rotor engines, may allow for significant improvements in the environmental impact of aviation. System noise assessments allow for the prediction of the aircraft noise of such designs while they are still in the conceptual phase. Due to significant requirements of computational methods, these predictions still rely on experimental data to account for the interaction of the open rotor tones with the hybrid wing body airframe. Recently, multiple aircraft system noise assessments have been conducted for hybrid wing body designs with open rotor engines. These assessments utilized measured benchmark data from a Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic interaction effects test. The measured data demonstrated airframe shielding of open rotor tonal and broadband noise with legacy F7/A7 open rotor blades. Two methods are proposed for improving the use of these data on general open rotor designs in a system noise assessment. The first, direct difference, is a simple octave band subtraction which does not account for tone distribution within the rotor acoustic signal. The second, tone matching, is a higher-fidelity process incorporating additional physical aspects of the problem, where isolated rotor tones are matched by their directivity to determine tone-by-tone shielding. A case study is conducted with the two methods to assess how well each reproduces the measured data and identify the merits of each. Both methods perform similarly for system level results and successfully approach the experimental data for the case study. The tone matching method provides additional tools for assessing the quality of the match to the data set. Additionally, a potential path to improve the tone matching method is provided.

  3. A method of gear defect intelligent detection based on transmission noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-fang; Zhao, Yun; Lin, Jia-chun; Guo, Mian

    2015-02-01

    A new approach was proposed by combing Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) algorithm and Back Propagation (BP) neural network for detection of gear through transmission noise analysis. Then feature values of the feature signals are calculated. The feature values which have a great difference for different defect types are chosen to build an eigenvector. BP neural network is used to train and learn on the eigenvector for recognition of gear defects intelligently. In this study, a comparative experiment has been performed among normal gears, cracked gears and eccentric gears with fifteen sets of different gears. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect gear defect features carried by the transmission noise effectively.

  4. Method of pedestal and common-mode noise correction for switched-capacitor analog memories

    DOEpatents

    Britton, C.L.

    1997-09-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for correcting common-mode noise and pedestal noise in a multichannel array of switched-capacitor analog memories wherein each analog memory is connected to an associated analog-to-digital converter. The apparatus comprises a single differential element in two different embodiments. In a first embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a buffer. In the second embodiment, the differential dement is a reference analog memory connected to a reference analog-to-digital connected to an array of digital summing circuits. 4 figs.

  5. Method of pedestal and common-mode noise correction for switched-capacitor analog memories

    DOEpatents

    Britton, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for correcting common-mode noise and pedestal noise in a multichannel array of switched-capacitor analog memories wherein each analog memory is connected to an associated analog-to-digital converter. The apparatus comprises a single differential element in two different embodiments. In a first embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a buffer. In the second embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a reference analog-to-digital connected to an array of digital summing circuits. 4 figs.

  6. Method of pedestal and common-mode noise correction for switched-capacitor analog memories

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Charles L.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting common-mode noise and pedestal noise in a multichannel array of switched-capacitor analog memories wherein each analog memory is connected to an associated analog-to-digital converter. The apparatus comprises a single differential element in two different embodiments. In a first embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a buffer. In the second embodiment, the differential dement is a reference analog memory connected to a reference analog-to-digital connected to an array of digital summing circuits.

  7. Method of pedestal and common-mode noise correction for switched-capacitor analog memories

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting common-mode noise and pedestal noise in a multichannel array of switched-capacitor analog memories wherein each analog memory is connected to an associated analog-to-digital converter. The apparatus comprises a single differential element in two different embodiments. In a first embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a buffer. In the second embodiment, the differential element is a reference analog memory connected to a reference analog-to-digital connected to an array of digital summing circuits.

  8. Noise reduction in computed tomography using a multiplicative continuous-time image reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    In clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT), filtered back-projection as a transform method and iterative reconstruction such as the maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) method are known methods to reconstruct tomographic images. As the other reconstruction method, we have presented a continuous-time image reconstruction (CIR) system described by a nonlinear dynamical system, based on the idea of continuous methods for solving tomographic inverse problems. Recently, we have also proposed a multiplicative CIR system described by differential equations based on the minimization of a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence. We prove theoretically that the divergence measure decreases along the solution to the CIR system, for consistent inverse problems. In consideration of the noisy nature of projections in clinical CT, the inverse problem belongs to the category of ill-posed problems. The performance of a noise-reduction scheme for a new (previously developed) CIR system was investigated by means of numerical experiments using a circular phantom image. Compared to the conventional CIR and the ML-EM methods, the proposed CIR method has an advantage on noisy projection with lower signal-to-noise ratios in terms of the divergence measure on the actual image under the same common measure observed via the projection data. The results lead to the conclusion that the multiplicative CIR method is more effective and robust for noise reduction in CT compared to the ML-EM as well as conventional CIR methods.

  9. Low-noise multiple watermarks technology based on complex double random phase encoding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jihong; Lu, Rongwen; Sun, Liujie; Zhuang, Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Based on double random phase encoding method (DRPE), watermarking technology may provide a stable and robust method to protect the copyright of the printing. However, due to its linear character, DRPE exist the serious safety risk when it is attacked. In this paper, a complex coding method, which means adding the chaotic encryption based on logistic mapping before the DRPE coding, is provided and simulated. The results testify the complex method will provide better security protection for the watermarking. Furthermore, a low-noise multiple watermarking is studied, which means embedding multiple watermarks into one host printing and decrypt them with corresponding phase keys individually. The Digital simulation and mathematic analysis show that with the same total embedding weight factor, multiply watermarking will improve signal noise ratio (SNR) of the output printing image significantly. The complex multiply watermark method may provide a robust, stability, reliability copyright protection with higher quality printing image.

  10. The non-contact precision measurement and noise reduction method for liquid volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jintao; Liu, Ziyong; Tong, Lin; Zhang, Long; Guo, Ligong; Bao, Xuesong

    2011-12-01

    Liquid volume is one important metrology method for commercial transaction in international trade, and vertical tank is used as main metrology tool. One non-contact optical measurement system was raised by using laser scanning method. The coordinates of vertical tank shell were acquired by phase-shift ranging method and angular measurement, and the set of coordinates is named as data cloud. The measurement errors of distance and angle are 2mm and 2" respectively. Wavelet was applied to noise reduction and curve feature extraction for data cloud. Iterative method was used to deduce the radius at each course height. One 1000m3 vertical tank used as test object, comparison experiment was carried out with strap method (international arbitral standard). The experimental results show that the noise due to tank shell surface characteristics and laser scanning devices could be filtered satisfactorily, and the local curve features of tank shell were described correctly.

  11. Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul (Inventor); Joshi, Suresh M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method to provide active noise control to reduce noise and vibration in reverberant acoustic enclosures such as aircraft, vehicles, appliances, instruments, industrial equipment and the like is presented. A continuous-time multi-input multi-output (MIMO) state space mathematical model of the plant is obtained via analytical modeling and system identification. Compensation is designed to render the mathematical model passive in the sense of mathematical system theory. The compensated system is checked to ensure robustness of the passive property of the plant. The check ensures that the passivity is preserved if the mathematical model parameters are perturbed from nominal values. A passivity-based controller is designed and verified using numerical simulations and then tested. The controller is designed so that the resulting closed-loop response shows the desired noise reduction.

  12. A New Method for Reduction of Photomultiplier Signal-Induced Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, Andrea; DeYoung, Russell

    2000-01-01

    For lidar measurements of ozone, photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector signal-induced noise represents a fundamental problem that complicates the extraction of information from lidar data. A new method is developed to significantly reduce signal-induced noise in lidar receiver PMT detectors. The electron optics of the lidar photomultiplier detector is modified to filter the source of signal-induced noise. A mesh electrode external to the PMT is utilized to control photoemission and disorient electron trajectories from the photocathode to the first dynode. Experiments were taken both with simulated and actual lidar return signals at Langley Research Center. Results show at least 40 percent more accurate ozone number density values with a mesh voltage of 60 V applied than with no voltage applied.

  13. Signal processing method and system for noise removal and signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren

    2009-04-14

    A signal processing method and system combining smooth level wavelet pre-processing together with artificial neural networks all in the wavelet domain for signal denoising and extraction. Upon receiving a signal corrupted with noise, an n-level decomposition of the signal is performed using a discrete wavelet transform to produce a smooth component and a rough component for each decomposition level. The n.sup.th level smooth component is then inputted into a corresponding neural network pre-trained to filter out noise in that component by pattern recognition in the wavelet domain. Additional rough components, beginning at the highest level, may also be retained and inputted into corresponding neural networks pre-trained to filter out noise in those components also by pattern recognition in the wavelet domain. In any case, an inverse discrete wavelet transform is performed on the combined output from all the neural networks to recover a clean signal back in the time domain.

  14. System and method for bearing fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.; Harley, Ronald G.; Theisen, Peter J.

    2010-08-17

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to repeatedly receive real-time operating current data from the operating motor and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  15. Musical-Noise Analysis in Methods of Integrating Microphone Array and Spectral Subtraction Based on Higher-Order Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yu; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro; Kondo, Kazunobu

    2010-12-01

    We conduct an objective analysis on musical noise generated by two methods of integrating microphone array signal processing and spectral subtraction. To obtain better noise reduction, methods of integrating microphone array signal processing and nonlinear signal processing have been researched. However, nonlinear signal processing often generates musical noise. Since such musical noise causes discomfort to users, it is desirable that musical noise is mitigated. Moreover, it has been recently reported that higher-order statistics are strongly related to the amount of musical noise generated. This implies that it is possible to optimize the integration method from the viewpoint of not only noise reduction performance but also the amount of musical noise generated. Thus, we analyze the simplest methods of integration, that is, the delay-and-sum beamformer and spectral subtraction, and fully clarify the features of musical noise generated by each method. As a result, it is clarified that a specific structure of integration is preferable from the viewpoint of the amount of generated musical noise. The validity of the analysis is shown via a computer simulation and a subjective evaluation.

  16. Assessment of volumetric noise and resolution performance for linear and nonlinear CT reconstruction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu; Christianson, Olav; Wilson, Joshua M.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: For nonlinear iterative image reconstructions (IR), the computed tomography (CT) noise and resolution properties can depend on the specific imaging conditions, such as lesion contrast and image noise level. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a reliable method to measure the noise and resolution properties under clinically relevant conditions. This study aimed to develop a robust methodology to measure the three-dimensional CT noise and resolution properties under such conditions and to provide guidelines to achieve desirable levels of accuracy and precision. Methods: The methodology was developed based on a previously reported CT image quality phantom. In this methodology, CT noise properties are measured in the uniform region of the phantom in terms of a task-based 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS{sub task}). The in-plane resolution properties are measured in terms of the task transfer function (TTF) by applying a radial edge technique to the rod inserts in the phantom. The z-direction resolution properties are measured from a supplemental phantom, also in terms of the TTF. To account for the possible nonlinearity of IR, the NPS{sub task} is measured with respect to the noise magnitude, and the TTF with respect to noise magnitude and edge contrast. To determine the accuracy and precision of the methodology, images of known noise and resolution properties were simulated. The NPS{sub task} and TTF were measured on the simulated images and compared to the truth, with criteria established to achieve NPS{sub task} and TTF measurements with <10% error. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology, measurements were performed on a commercial CT system using five dose levels, two slice thicknesses, and three reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 5, SAFIRE5). Results: To achieve NPS{sub task} measurements with <10% error, the

  17. Design method of automotive powertrain mounting system based on vibration and noise limitations of vehicle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Ang; Lv, Zhao-Ping; Rakheja, Subhash

    2016-08-01

    The design logic and calculation method for determining mount stiffness and damping for a Powertrain Mounting System (PMS) based on reductions of vehicle vibration and noise contributed by mounts is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the design target for a PMS with regard to vibration and noise limitations of vehicle level contributed form mounts is described. Then a vehicle model with 13 Degree of Freedoms (DOFs) is proposed, which includes 6DOFs for the powertrain, 3 DOFs for the car body and 4DOFs for the four unsprung mass, and the dynamic equation for the model is derived. Some widely used models, such as the 6 DOFs model of the powertrain for the design calculation of a PMS, the 7 DOFs model (Body's 3 DOFs; unsprung mass's 4 DOFs) and the 9 DOFs model (powertrain's 6 DOFs; Body's 3 DOFs) for ride analysis of a vehicle, are the specific cases of the presented model of 13 DOF. Thirdly, the calculation method for obtaining the vibration of seat track and evaluation point and the noise at driver right ear is presented based on the mount forces and the vibration and noise transfer functions. An optimization process is proposed to get the mount stiffness and damping based on minimization of vehicle vibration and noise, and the optimized stiffness is validated by comparing the calculated vibration and noise and limitations. In the end of this paper, the natural frequencies and mode energies for the powertrain, the body and the unsprung mass are calculated using different models and the results are compared and analyzed.

  18. An adaptive segment method for smoothing lidar signal based on noise estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhao; Luo, Pingping

    2014-10-01

    An adaptive segmentation smoothing method (ASSM) is introduced in the paper to smooth the signal and suppress the noise. In the ASSM, the noise is defined as the 3σ of the background signal. An integer number N is defined for finding the changing positions in the signal curve. If the difference of adjacent two points is greater than 3Nσ, the position is recorded as an end point of the smoothing segment. All the end points detected as above are recorded and the curves between them will be smoothed separately. In the traditional method, the end points of the smoothing windows in the signals are fixed. The ASSM creates changing end points in different signals and the smoothing windows could be set adaptively. The windows are always set as the half of the segmentations and then the average smoothing method will be applied in the segmentations. The Iterative process is required for reducing the end-point aberration effect in the average smoothing method and two or three times are enough. In ASSM, the signals are smoothed in the spacial area nor frequent area, that means the frequent disturbance will be avoided. A lidar echo was simulated in the experimental work. The echo was supposed to be created by a space-born lidar (e.g. CALIOP). And white Gaussian noise was added to the echo to act as the random noise resulted from environment and the detector. The novel method, ASSM, was applied to the noisy echo to filter the noise. In the test, N was set to 3 and the Iteration time is two. The results show that, the signal could be smoothed adaptively by the ASSM, but the N and the Iteration time might be optimized when the ASSM is applied in a different lidar.

  19. Method for inserting noise in digital mammography to simulate reduction in radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2015-03-01

    The quality of clinical x-ray images is closely related to the radiation dose used in the imaging study. The general principle for selecting the radiation is ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"). The practical optimization, however, remains challenging. It is well known that reducing the radiation dose increases the quantum noise, which could compromise the image quality. In order to conduct studies about dose reduction in mammography, it would be necessary to acquire repeated clinical images, from the same patient, with different dose levels. However, such practice would be unethical due to radiation related risks. One solution is to simulate the effects of dose reduction in clinical images. This work proposes a new method, based on the Anscombe transformation, which simulates dose reduction in digital mammography by inserting quantum noise into clinical mammograms acquired with the standard radiation dose. Thus, it is possible to simulate different levels of radiation doses without exposing the patient to new levels of radiation. Results showed that the achieved quality of simulated images generated with our method is the same as when using other methods found in the literature, with the novelty of using the Anscombe transformation for converting signal-independent Gaussian noise into signal-dependent quantum noise.

  20. Efficient gradient projection methods for edge-preserving removal of Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, R.; Boccacci, P.; Zanni, L.; Bertero, M.

    2009-04-01

    Several methods based on different image models have been proposed and developed for image denoising. Some of them, such as total variation (TV) and wavelet thresholding, are based on the assumption of additive Gaussian noise. Recently the TV approach has been extended to the case of Poisson noise, a model describing the effect of photon counting in applications such as emission tomography, microscopy and astronomy. For the removal of this kind of noise we consider an approach based on a constrained optimization problem, with an objective function describing TV and other edge-preserving regularizations of the Kullback-Leibler divergence. We introduce a new discrepancy principle for the choice of the regularization parameter, which is justified by the statistical properties of the Poisson noise. For solving the optimization problem we propose a particular form of a general scaled gradient projection (SGP) method, recently introduced for image deblurring. We derive the form of the scaling from a decomposition of the gradient of the regularization functional into a positive and a negative part. The beneficial effect of the scaling is proved by means of numerical simulations, showing that the performance of the proposed form of SGP is superior to that of the most efficient gradient projection methods. An extended numerical analysis of the dependence of the solution on the regularization parameter is also performed to test the effectiveness of the proposed discrepancy principle.

  1. A new measurement method for separating airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircraft type panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical basis for and experimental validation of a measurement method for separating airborne and structure borne noise radiated by aircraft type panels are presented. An extension of the two microphone, cross spectral, acoustic intensity method combined with existing theory of sound radiation of thin shell structures of various designs, is restricted to the frequency range below the coincidence frequency of the structure. Consequently, the method lends itself to low frequency noise problems such as propeller harmonics. Both an aluminum sheet and two built up aircraft panel designs (two aluminum panels with frames and stringers) with and without added damping were measured. Results indicate that the method is quick, reliable, inexpensive, and can be applied to thin shell structures of various designs.

  2. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  3. Methods to improve traffic flow and noise exposure estimation on minor roads.

    PubMed

    Morley, David W; Gulliver, John

    2016-09-01

    Address-level estimates of exposure to road traffic noise for epidemiological studies are dependent on obtaining data on annual average daily traffic (AADT) flows that is both accurate and with good geographical coverage. National agencies often have reliable traffic count data for major roads, but for residential areas served by minor roads, especially at national scale, such information is often not available or incomplete. Here we present a method to predict AADT at the national scale for minor roads, using a routing algorithm within a geographical information system (GIS) to rank roads by importance based on simulated journeys through the road network. From a training set of known minor road AADT, routing importance is used to predict AADT on all UK minor roads in a regression model along with the road class, urban or rural location and AADT on the nearest major road. Validation with both independent traffic counts and noise measurements show that this method gives a considerable improvement in noise prediction capability when compared to models that do not give adequate consideration to minor road variability (Spearman's rho. increases from 0.46 to 0.72). This has significance for epidemiological cohort studies attempting to link noise exposure to adverse health outcomes.

  4. Methods to improve traffic flow and noise exposure estimation on minor roads.

    PubMed

    Morley, David W; Gulliver, John

    2016-09-01

    Address-level estimates of exposure to road traffic noise for epidemiological studies are dependent on obtaining data on annual average daily traffic (AADT) flows that is both accurate and with good geographical coverage. National agencies often have reliable traffic count data for major roads, but for residential areas served by minor roads, especially at national scale, such information is often not available or incomplete. Here we present a method to predict AADT at the national scale for minor roads, using a routing algorithm within a geographical information system (GIS) to rank roads by importance based on simulated journeys through the road network. From a training set of known minor road AADT, routing importance is used to predict AADT on all UK minor roads in a regression model along with the road class, urban or rural location and AADT on the nearest major road. Validation with both independent traffic counts and noise measurements show that this method gives a considerable improvement in noise prediction capability when compared to models that do not give adequate consideration to minor road variability (Spearman's rho. increases from 0.46 to 0.72). This has significance for epidemiological cohort studies attempting to link noise exposure to adverse health outcomes. PMID:27350039

  5. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  6. Statistical Methods and Tools for Hanford Staged Feed Tank Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to technically evaluate the current approach to staged feed sampling of high-level waste (HLW) sludge to meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for transfer from tank farms to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The current sampling and analysis approach is detailed in the document titled Initial Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria, 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014, Revision 0 (Arakali et al. 2011). The goal of this current work is to evaluate and provide recommendations to support a defensible, technical and statistical basis for the staged feed sampling approach that meets WAC data quality objectives (DQOs).

  7. Enhanced propagation modeling of directional aviation noise: A hybrid parabolic equation-fast field program method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Joyce E.

    2011-12-01

    Commercial air traffic is anticipated to increase rapidly in the coming years. The impact of aviation noise on communities surrounding airports is, therefore, a growing concern. Accurate prediction of noise can help to mitigate the impact on communities and foster smoother integration of aerospace engineering advances. The problem of accurate sound level prediction requires careful inclusion of all mechanisms that affect propagation, in addition to correct source characterization. Terrain, ground type, meteorological effects, and source directivity can have a substantial influence on the noise level. Because they are difficult to model, these effects are often included only by rough approximation. This dissertation presents a model designed for sound propagation over uneven terrain, with mixed ground type and realistic meteorological conditions. The model is a hybrid of two numerical techniques: the parabolic equation (PE) and fast field program (FFP) methods, which allow for physics-based inclusion of propagation effects and ensure the low frequency content, a factor in community impact, is predicted accurately. Extension of the hybrid model to a pseudo-three-dimensional representation allows it to produce aviation noise contour maps in the standard form. In order for the model to correctly characterize aviation noise sources, a method of representing arbitrary source directivity patterns was developed for the unique form of the parabolic equation starting field. With this advancement, the model can represent broadband, directional moving sound sources, traveling along user-specified paths. This work was prepared for possible use in the research version of the sound propagation module in the Federal Aviation Administration's new standard predictive tool.

  8. Development of a Jet Noise Prediction Method for Installed Jet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes development of the Jet3D noise prediction method and its application to heated jets with complex three-dimensional flow fields and installation effects. Noise predictions were made for four separate flow bypass ratio five nozzle configurations tested in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory. These configurations consist of a round core and fan nozzle with and without pylon, and an eight chevron core nozzle and round fan nozzle with and without pylon. Predicted SPL data were in good agreement with experimental noise measurements up to 121 inlet angle, beyond which Jet3D under predicted low frequency levels. This is due to inherent limitations in the formulation of Lighthill's Acoustic Analogy used in Jet3D, and will be corrected in ongoing development. Jet3D did an excellent job predicting full scale EPNL for nonchevron configurations, and captured the effect of the pylon, correctly predicting a reduction in EPNL. EPNL predictions for chevron configurations were not in good agreement with measured data, likely due to the lower mixing and longer potential cores in the CFD simulations of these cases.

  9. Decision criteria in dual discrimination tasks estimated using external-noise methods.

    PubMed

    Zak, Ido; Katkov, Mikhail; Gorea, Andrei; Sagi, Dov

    2012-07-01

    According to classical signal detection theory (SDT), in simple detection or discrimination tasks, observers use a decision parameter based on their noisy internal response to set a boundary between "yes" and "no" responses. Experimental paradigms where performance is limited by internal noise cannot be used to provide an unambiguous measure of the decision criterion and its variability. Here, unidimensional external noise is used to estimate a criterion and its variability in stimulus space. Within this paradigm, the criterion is defined as the stimulus value separating the two response alternatives. This paradigm allows the assessment of interactions between criteria assigned to different targets in dual tasks. Previous studies suggested that observers' criteria interacted or even collapsed to one (hence, nonoptimal) criterion. An alternative interpretation of those results is that observers equated their false alarm (FA) rates. The external-noise method enables the confrontation of the two hypotheses. It is shown that the variability of observers' criterion in stimulus space is about 1.6 times their measured sensory threshold, suggesting that the presence of external noise increases decision uncertainty. Observers' stimulus criterion settings are close to SDT predictions in single tasks, but not in dual tasks where the two criteria tend to "attract" each other. Observers maintain distinct FA rates even when SDT predicts equal rates. Observers trained in psychophysics or provided with basic notions of SDT exemplified with the present experimental design manage to better separate their criteria in some conditions. PMID:22351481

  10. Comparison of direct measurement methods for headset noise exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Nassrallah, Flora G; Giguere, Christian; Dajani, Hilmi R; Ellaham, Nicolas N

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of noise exposure from communication headsets poses a methodological challenge. Although several standards describe methods for general noise measurements in occupational settings, these are not directly applicable to noise assessments under communication headsets. For measurements under occluded ears, specialized methods have been specified by the International Standards Organization (ISO 11904) such as the microphone in a real ear and manikin techniques. Simpler methods have also been proposed in some national standards such as the use of general purpose artificial ears and simulators in conjunction with single number corrections to convert measurements to the equivalent diffuse field. However, little is known about the measurement agreement between these various methods and the acoustic manikin technique. Twelve experts positioned circum-aural, supra-aural and insert communication headsets on four different measurement setups (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3.3 artificial ears, and acoustic manikin). Fit-refit measurements of four audio communication signals were taken under quiet laboratory conditions. Data were transformed into equivalent diffuse-field sound levels using third-octave procedures. Results indicate that the Type 1 artificial ear is not suited for the measurement of sound exposure under communication headsets, while Type 2 and Type 3.3 artificial ears are in good agreement with the acoustic manikin technique. Single number corrections were found to introduce a large measurement uncertainty, making the use of the third-octave transformation preferable.

  11. Comparison of direct measurement methods for headset noise exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Nassrallah, Flora G; Giguere, Christian; Dajani, Hilmi R; Ellaham, Nicolas N

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of noise exposure from communication headsets poses a methodological challenge. Although several standards describe methods for general noise measurements in occupational settings, these are not directly applicable to noise assessments under communication headsets. For measurements under occluded ears, specialized methods have been specified by the International Standards Organization (ISO 11904) such as the microphone in a real ear and manikin techniques. Simpler methods have also been proposed in some national standards such as the use of general purpose artificial ears and simulators in conjunction with single number corrections to convert measurements to the equivalent diffuse field. However, little is known about the measurement agreement between these various methods and the acoustic manikin technique. Twelve experts positioned circum-aural, supra-aural and insert communication headsets on four different measurement setups (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3.3 artificial ears, and acoustic manikin). Fit-refit measurements of four audio communication signals were taken under quiet laboratory conditions. Data were transformed into equivalent diffuse-field sound levels using third-octave procedures. Results indicate that the Type 1 artificial ear is not suited for the measurement of sound exposure under communication headsets, while Type 2 and Type 3.3 artificial ears are in good agreement with the acoustic manikin technique. Single number corrections were found to introduce a large measurement uncertainty, making the use of the third-octave transformation preferable. PMID:26960783

  12. Comparison of direct measurement methods for headset noise exposure in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Nassrallah, Flora G.; Giguère, Christian; Dajani, Hilmi R.; Ellaham, Nicolas N.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of noise exposure from communication headsets poses a methodological challenge. Although several standards describe methods for general noise measurements in occupational settings, these are not directly applicable to noise assessments under communication headsets. For measurements under occluded ears, specialized methods have been specified by the International Standards Organization (ISO 11904) such as the microphone in a real ear and manikin techniques. Simpler methods have also been proposed in some national standards such as the use of general purpose artificial ears and simulators in conjunction with single number corrections to convert measurements to the equivalent diffuse field. However, little is known about the measurement agreement between these various methods and the acoustic manikin technique. Twelve experts positioned circum-aural, supra-aural and insert communication headsets on four different measurement setups (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3.3 artificial ears, and acoustic manikin). Fit-refit measurements of four audio communication signals were taken under quiet laboratory conditions. Data were transformed into equivalent diffuse-field sound levels using third-octave procedures. Results indicate that the Type 1 artificial ear is not suited for the measurement of sound exposure under communication headsets, while Type 2 and Type 3.3 artificial ears are in good agreement with the acoustic manikin technique. Single number corrections were found to introduce a large measurement uncertainty, making the use of the third-octave transformation preferable. PMID:26960783

  13. Stage 3 bucket shank bypass holes and related method

    DOEpatents

    Leone, Sal Albert; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    In a multi-stage turbine wherein at least one turbine wheel supports a row of buckets for rotation, and wherein the turbine wheel is located axially between first and second annular fixed arrays of nozzles, a cooling air circuit for purging a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles comprising a flowpath through a shank portion of one or more buckets connecting a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the first fixed annular array of nozzles with the wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles.

  14. Introducing GAMER: A fast and accurate method for ray-tracing galaxies using procedural noise

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  15. A method for image quality evaluation considering adaptation to luminance of surround and noise in stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn Jin

    2010-09-01

    This study intends to quantify the effects of the surround luminance and noise of a given stimulus on the shape of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and to propose an adaptive image quality evaluation method. The proposed image evaluation method extends a model called square-root integral (SQRI). The non-linear behaviour of the human visual system was taken into account by using CSF. This model can be defined as the square root integration of multiplication between display modulation transfer function and CSF. The CSF term in the original SQRI was replaced by the surround adaptive CSF quantified in this study and it is divided by the Fourier transform of a given stimulus for compensating for the noise adaptation.

  16. A Noise-Filtering Method for Link Prediction in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Link prediction plays an important role in both finding missing links in networked systems and complementing our understanding of the evolution of networks. Much attention from the network science community are paid to figure out how to efficiently predict the missing/future links based on the observed topology. Real-world information always contain noise, which is also the case in an observed network. This problem is rarely considered in existing methods. In this paper, we treat the existence of observed links as known information. By filtering out noises in this information, the underlying regularity of the connection information is retrieved and then used to predict missing or future links. Experiments on various empirical networks show that our method performs noticeably better than baseline algorithms. PMID:26788737

  17. Rotor noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-08-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  18. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  19. A Four-Stage Method for Developing Early Interventions for Alcohol among Aboriginal Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushquash, Christopher J.; Comeau, M. Nancy; McLeod, Brian D.; Stewart, Sherry H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details a four-stage methodology for developing early alcohol interventions for at-risk Aboriginal youth. Stage 1 was an integrative approach to Aboriginal education that upholds Aboriginal traditional wisdom supporting respectful relationships to the Creator, to the land and to each other. Stage 2 used quantitative methods to…

  20. Noise Computation of a Shock-Containing Supersonic Axisymmetric Jet by the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    The space-time conservation element solution element (CE/SE) method is employed to numerically study the near-field of a typical under-expanded jet. For the computed case-a circular jet with Mach number M(j) = 1.19-the shock-cell structure is in good agreement with experimental results. The computed noise field is in general agreement with the experiment, although further work is needed to properly close the screech feedback loop.

  1. Analysis of Vibration and Noise of Construction Machinery Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and Spectral Correlation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuebiao; Zhou, Yiqi; Yu, Gang; Lu, Dan

    In order to analyze the effect of engine vibration on cab noise of construction machinery in multi-frequency bands, a new method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and spectral correlation analysis is proposed. Firstly, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of vibration and noise signals were obtained by EEMD method, and then the IMFs which have the same frequency bands were selected. Secondly, we calculated the spectral correlation coefficients between the selected IMFs, getting the main frequency bands in which engine vibration has significant impact on cab noise. Thirdly, the dominated frequencies were picked out and analyzed by spectral analysis method. The study result shows that the main frequency bands and dominated frequencies in which engine vibration have serious impact on cab noise can be identified effectively by the proposed method, which provides effective guidance to noise reduction of construction machinery.

  2. Determination of two-stroke engine exhaust noise by the method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. D.; Brown, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    A computational technique was developed for the method of characteristics solution of a one-dimensional flow in a duct as applied to the wave action in an engine exhaust system. By using the method, it was possible to compute the unsteady flow in both straight pipe and tuned expansion chamber exhaust systems as matched to the flow from the cylinder of a small two-stroke engine. The radiated exhaust noise was then determined by assuming monopole radiation from the tailpipe outlet. Very good agreement with experiment on an operation engine was achieved in the calculation of both the third octave radiated noise and the associated pressure cycles at several locations in the different exhaust systems. Of particular interest is the significance of nonlinear behavior which results in wave steepening and shock wave formation. The method computes the precise paths on the x-t plane of a finite number of C(sub +), C(sub -) and P characteristics, thereby obtaining high accuracy in determining the tailpipe outlet velocity and the radiated noise.

  3. Determination of two-stroke engine exhaust noise by the method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. D.; Brown, G. L.

    1982-06-01

    A computational technique was developed for the method of characteristics solution of a one-dimensional compressible, unsteady flow in a duct as applied to the wave action in an engine exhaust system. By using the method it was possible to compute the detailed flow in both straight pipe and tuned expansion chamber exhaust systems as matched to the flow from the cylinder of a small two-stroke engine. The radiated exhaust noise was then determined by assuming monopole radiation from the tailpipe outlet. Very good agreement with experiment on an operating engine has been achieved in the calculation of both the third-octave radiated noise and the associated pressure cycles at several locations in the different exhaust systems. Of particular interest is the significance of non-linear behavior which results in wave steepening and shock wave formation. The calculation method developed differs from those of others, principally that of Blair and that of Karnopp, Dwyer and Margolis. Its essential feature is the computation of the precise paths on the x-t plane of a finite number of C+, C- and P characteristics, to provide high accuracy in determining the tailpipe outlet velocity and hence radiated noise.

  4. Determination of two-stroke engine exhaust noise by the method of characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. D.; Brown, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A computational technique was developed for the method of characteristics solution of a one-dimensional flow in a duct as applied to the wave action in an engine exhaust system. By using the method, it was possible to compute the unsteady flow in both straight pipe and tuned expansion chamber exhaust systems as matched to the flow from the cylinder of a small two-stroke engine. The radiated exhaust noise was then determined by assuming monopole radiation from the tailpipe outlet. Very good agreement with experiment on an operation engine was achieved in the calculation of both the third octave radiated noise and the associated pressure cycles at several locations in the different exhaust systems. Of particular interest is the significance of nonlinear behavior which results in wave steepening and shock wave formation. The method computes the precise paths on the x-t plane of a finite number of C(sub +), C(sub -) and P characteristics, thereby obtaining high accuracy in determining the tailpipe outlet velocity and the radiated noise.

  5. A fully digital readout employing extended counting method to achieve very low quantization noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayahan, Huseyin; Ceylan, Ömer; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a digital ROIC for staring type arrays with extending counting method to realize very low quantization noise while achieving a very high charge handling capacity. Current state of the art has shown that digital readouts with pulse frequency method can achieve charge handling capacities higher than 3Ge- with quantization noise higher than 1000e-. Even if the integration capacitance is reduced, it cannot be lower than 1-3 fF due to the parasitic capacitance of the comparator. For achieving a very low quantization noise of 200 electrons in a power efficient way, a new method based on measuring the time to measure the remaining charge on the integration capacitor is proposed. With this approach SNR of low flux pixels are significantly increased while large flux pixels can store electrons as high as 2.33Ge-. A prototype array of 32x32 pixels with 30μm pitch is implemented in 90nm CMOS process technology for verification. Simulation results are given for complete readout.

  6. Method for calculating self-noise spectra and operating ranges for seismographic inertial sensors and recorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Followill, F.; Hutt, Charles R.; Kromer, R.P.; Nigbor, R.L.; Ringler, A.T.; Steim, J.M.; Wielandt, E.

    2010-01-01

    can be compared. For purposes of instrument operational performance, we provide a means of evaluating signal and noise and the range between them in a manner representative of time-domain instrument performance. We call these “operating range diagrams” (ORDs), plots of instrument self noise and clipping level; the “operating range” is the range between these values. For frequency-domain performance we elect to show self noise as an rPSD that may be compared to another instrument's noise or to ambient Earth noise (e.g., Peterson 1993); however, to limit the number of arbitrary choices required to merge transient and stationary signals we do not compare the rPSD to transient signals in the frequency domain. Our solution for a time-domain comparison is not new but rather builds upon the consensus of the first and second Guidelines for Seismometer Testing workshops (Hutt et al. 2009) and long established practice in acoustics. We propose this method as a standard for characterizing seismic instruments, and it has been endorsed by the second workshop (Hutt et al. 2009, 2010) and the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) Working Group (2008) and recent ANSS procurement specifications.

  7. Assessment of methods for simplified traffic noise mapping of small cities: Casework of the city of Valdivia, Chile.

    PubMed

    Bastián-Monarca, Nicolás A; Suárez, Enrique; Arenas, Jorge P

    2016-04-15

    In many countries such as Chile, there is scarce official information for generating accurate noise maps. Therefore, specific simplification methods are becoming a real need for the acoustic community in developing countries. Thus, the main purpose of this work was to evaluate and apply simplified methods to generate a cost-effective traffic noise map of a small city of Chile. The experimental design involved the simplification of the cartographic information on buildings by clustering the households within a block, and the classification of the vehicular traffic flows into categories to generate an inexpensive noise map. The streets have been classified according to the official road classification of the country. Segregation of vehicles from light, heavy and motorbikes is made to account for traffic flow. In addition, a number of road traffic noise models were compared with noise measurements and consequently the road traffic model RLS-90 was chosen to generate the noise map of the city using the Computer Aided Noise Abatement (CadnaA) software. It was observed a direct dependence between noise levels and traffic flow versus each category of street used. The methodology developed in this study appears to be convenient in developing countries to obtain accurate approximations to develop inexpensive traffic noise maps. PMID:26845180

  8. A statistical method for characterizing the noise in nonlinearly reconstructed images from undersampled MR data: the POCS example.

    PubMed

    Sabati, Mohammad; Peng, Haidong; Lauzon, M Louis; Frayne, Richard

    2013-11-01

    The projection-onto-convex-sets (POCS) algorithm is a powerful tool for reconstructing high-resolution images from undersampled k-space data. It is a nonlinear iterative method that attempts to estimate values for missing data. The convergence of the algorithm and its other deterministic properties are well established, but relatively little is known about how noise in the source data influences noise in the final reconstructed image. In this paper, we present an experimental treatment of the statistical properties in POCS and investigate 12 stochastic models for its noise distribution beside its nonlinear point spread functions. Statistical results show that as the ratio of the missing k-space data increases, the noise distribution in POCS images is no longer Rayleigh as with conventional linear Fourier reconstruction. Instead, the probability density function for the noise is well approximated by a lognormal distribution. For small missing data ratios, however, the noise remains Rayleigh distributed. Preliminary results show that in the presence of noise, POCS images are often dominated by POCS-enhanced noise rather than POCS-induced artifacts. Implicit in this work is the presentation of a general statistical method that can be used to assess the noise properties in other nonlinear reconstruction algorithms.

  9. An improved peer group method to filter impulsive noise for color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuhong; Jiang, Huageng; Feng, Jinting

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an improved filter method based on the lately proposed method of IFPGF[1] which is peer group-based. The IFPGF method improves the trade-off between computational efficiency and filtering quality of previous peer group-based methods and gains a good filtering quality at relatively low density of noisy pixels. But when the noisy density goes high(≥20%), the IFPGF method cannot work well. So in this paper, we propose an improved method to fix the drawbacks on filtering the salt-and-pepper impulsive noise. Experimental results suggest that the proposed method is able to outperform the classical vector filters and the recent proposed p eer group-based filters, including IFPGF.

  10. Direct computation of the noise radiated by a subsonic cavity flow and application of integral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloerfelt, X.; Bailly, C.; Juvé, D.

    2003-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the acoustic field generated by the flow over a cavity using two different and complementary numerical methods. First, a Direct Numerical Simulation of the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations is performed to obtain directly the radiated noise. The results of the acoustic and aerodynamic fields are compared to the experimental data in the literature. Second, this reference solution is compared to solutions provided by hybrid methods using the flowfield computed inside the cavity combined with an integral formulation to evaluate the far-field noise. Numerical issues of three integral methods are studied: the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings analogy that extends Lighthill's theory to account for solid boundaries and two Wave Extrapolation Methods from a control surface, the Kirchhoff and porous Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings methods. All methods show a good agreement with the Direct Numerical Simulation, but the first one is more expensive owing to an additional volume integral. However, the analogy can help in the analysis of wave patterns, by separating the direct waves from the reflected ones. The wave extrapolation methods from a surface are more efficient and provide a complementary tool to extend Computational Aeroacoustics near field to the very far field.

  11. The Application of a Boundary Integral Equation Method to the Prediction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tweed, J.; Farassat, F.

    1999-01-01

    The prediction of ducted fan engine noise using a boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is considered. Governing equations for the BIEM are based on linearized acoustics and describe the scattering of incident sound by a thin, finite-length cylindrical duct in the presence of a uniform axial inflow. A classical boundary value problem (BVP) is derived that includes an axisymmetric, locally reacting liner on the duct interior. Using potential theory, the BVP is recast as a system of hypersingular boundary integral equations with subsidiary conditions. We describe the integral equation derivation and solution procedure in detail. The development of the computationally efficient ducted fan noise prediction program TBIEM3D, which implements the BIEM, and its utility in conducting parametric noise reduction studies are discussed. Unlike prediction methods based on spinning mode eigenfunction expansions, the BIEM does not require the decomposition of the interior acoustic field into its radial and axial components which, for the liner case, avoids the solution of a difficult complex eigenvalue problem. Numerical spectral studies are presented to illustrate the nexus between the eigenfunction expansion representation and BIEM results. We demonstrate BIEM liner capability by examining radiation patterns for several cases of practical interest.

  12. Occurring mechanism and restraining method research of numerical noise signal in penetration simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Wang, Yabin

    2016-08-01

    In hard target penetration simulation, the existing researches of the convergence of results are mainly concentrating in the corresponding relationship between penetration depth and mesh scales. However, the influence of the mesh difference on the penetration resistance and acceleration signals are seldom refer to. This paper presents the occurring mechanism and restraining method of numerical noise signal in penetration simulation. First, the concept of the noise signal izs proposed. By taking a 3D penetration simulation as example, the influence of the noise signal on the penetration resistance in different mesh scales and impact velocity is studied. To ensure the convergence of the computational results, the grid scale of the target is encrypted to 1:1:8. In addition, modern spectrum analysis method is introduced to further analyze the penetration resistance signal. The research results presented is useful to improve the computational accuracy of high speed projectile penetration simulation, and provide important reference for carrying out structural design and optimization of fuze system.

  13. Multi-stage temperature compensation method for Lamb wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworakowski, Ziemowit; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    One of the important issues related to the applications of Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is their undesired sensitivity to variation of environmental conditions. Temperature is the main factor that can affect wave propagation and hence significantly reduce performance of a SHM system. Therefore, there is a need for development of robust monitoring methods with low sensitivity to temperature variations. This paper is aimed at verification of efficiency of four methods designed for damage detection using Lamb wave measurements performed in variable environmental conditions. The methods investigated in the comparison are the following: optimal baseline selection approach, the damage index based on a signal alignment with respect to instantaneous phase, and a group measurement approach capable of distinguishing local damage-related changes from temperature-induced global ones. The fourth method relies on fusion all these solutions simultaneously. The methods' ability to damage detection is compared using a specimen that is subjected to large temperature changes. It is found that although all the methods have their strengths and weaknesses, a cooperation of all solutions allows for significant increase of the damage detection efficiency.

  14. Single Tracking Location Methods Suppress Speckle Noise in Shear Wave Velocity Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Elegbe, Etana C.; McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    In ultrasound-based elastography methods, the estimation of shear wave velocity typically involves the tracking of speckle motion due to an applied force. The errors in the estimates of tissue displacement, and thus shear wave velocity, are generally attributed to electronic noise and decorrelation due to physical processes. We present our preliminary findings on another source of error, namely, speckle-induced bias in phase estimation. We find that methods that involve tracking in a single location, as opposed to multiple locations, are less sensitive to this source of error since the measurement is differential in nature and cancels out speckle-induced phase errors. PMID:23493611

  15. [Research on ECG de-noising method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition and wavelet transform using improved threshold function].

    PubMed

    Ye, Linlin; Yang, Dan; Wang, Xu

    2014-06-01

    A de-noising method for electrocardiogram (ECG) based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and wavelet threshold de-noising theory is proposed in our school. We decomposed noised ECG signals with the proposed method using the EEMD and calculated a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Then we selected IMFs and reconstructed them to realize the de-noising for ECG. The processed ECG signals were filtered again with wavelet transform using improved threshold function. In the experiments, MIT-BIH ECG database was used for evaluating the performance of the proposed method, contrasting with de-noising method based on EEMD and wavelet transform with improved threshold function alone in parameters of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and mean square error (MSE). The results showed that the ECG waveforms de-noised with the proposed method were smooth and the amplitudes of ECG features did not attenuate. In conclusion, the method discussed in this paper can realize the ECG denoising and meanwhile keep the characteristics of original ECG signal. PMID:25219236

  16. [Research on ECG de-noising method based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition and wavelet transform using improved threshold function].

    PubMed

    Ye, Linlin; Yang, Dan; Wang, Xu

    2014-06-01

    A de-noising method for electrocardiogram (ECG) based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and wavelet threshold de-noising theory is proposed in our school. We decomposed noised ECG signals with the proposed method using the EEMD and calculated a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Then we selected IMFs and reconstructed them to realize the de-noising for ECG. The processed ECG signals were filtered again with wavelet transform using improved threshold function. In the experiments, MIT-BIH ECG database was used for evaluating the performance of the proposed method, contrasting with de-noising method based on EEMD and wavelet transform with improved threshold function alone in parameters of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and mean square error (MSE). The results showed that the ECG waveforms de-noised with the proposed method were smooth and the amplitudes of ECG features did not attenuate. In conclusion, the method discussed in this paper can realize the ECG denoising and meanwhile keep the characteristics of original ECG signal.

  17. An objective method and measuring equipment for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcars. [acoustic diagnostics on automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacprowski, J.; Motylewski, J.; Miazga, J.

    1974-01-01

    An objective method and apparatus for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcar engines are reported. The method and apparatus let us know whether the noisiness of the vehicle under test exceeds the admissible threshold levels given by appropriate standards and if so what is the main source of the excessive noise. The method consists in measuring both the overall noise level and the sound pressure levels in definite frequency bands while the engine speed is controlled as well and may be fixed at prescribed values. Whenever the individually adjusted threshold level has been exceeded in any frequency band, a self-sustaining control signal is sent.

  18. Comparison of Methods for Identifying Noise Sources in Far-Field Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Andrew; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Three different methods of extracting intermittent wave packets from unstructured background within complex time series signals were analyzed and compared. The algorithms are denoted ``cross correlation,'' ``denoising,'' and ``TFLE (Time-Frequency-Lag event)'' methods respectively. All three methods utilize Mexican Hat or Morlet wavelets for the transformation of time domain signals into time-frequency domain signals. Within the denoising and cross correlation algorithms, events are identified through comparison of high energy excerpts of each signal captured by individual far-field microphones, while the TFLE algorithm simply defines events by their contributions to positive correlation values. The goal of this analysis is to quantify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods. The results lend themselves to determining the validity of these methods as noise source identification algorithms to be used in jet noise characterization. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL; and by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering REU Program at SU.

  19. A Method for Estimating Noise from Full-Scale Distributed Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Schein, David B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to estimate the full-scale noise suppression from a scale model distributed exhaust nozzle (DEN) is presented. For a conventional scale model exhaust nozzle, Strouhal number scaling using a scale factor related to the nozzle exit area is typically applied that shifts model scale frequency in proportion to the geometric scale factor. However, model scale DEN designs have two inherent length scales. One is associated with the mini-nozzles, whose size do not change in going from model scale to full scale. The other is associated with the overall nozzle exit area which is much smaller than full size. Consequently, lower frequency energy that is generated by the coalesced jet plume should scale to lower frequency, but higher frequency energy generated by individual mini-jets does not shift frequency. In addition, jet-jet acoustic shielding by the array of mini-nozzles is a significant noise reduction effect that may change with DEN model size. A technique has been developed to scale laboratory model spectral data based on the premise that high and low frequency content must be treated differently during the scaling process. The model-scale distributed exhaust spectra are divided into low and high frequency regions that are then adjusted to full scale separately based on different physics-based scaling laws. The regions are then recombined to create an estimate of the full-scale acoustic spectra. These spectra can then be converted to perceived noise levels (PNL). The paper presents the details of this methodology and provides an example of the estimated noise suppression by a distributed exhaust nozzle compared to a round conic nozzle.

  20. Discrete Data Qualification System and Method Comprising Noise Series Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Christopher; Wong, Edmond; Melcher, Kevin; Bickford, Randall

    2013-01-01

    A Sensor Data Qualification (SDQ) function has been developed that allows the onboard flight computers on NASA s launch vehicles to determine the validity of sensor data to ensure that critical safety and operational decisions are not based on faulty sensor data. This SDQ function includes a novel noise series fault detection algorithm for qualification of the output data from LO2 and LH2 low-level liquid sensors. These sensors are positioned in a launch vehicle s propellant tanks in order to detect propellant depletion during a rocket engine s boost operating phase. This detection capability can prevent the catastrophic situation where the engine operates without propellant. The output from each LO2 and LH2 low-level liquid sensor is a discrete valued signal that is expected to be in either of two states, depending on whether the sensor is immersed (wet) or exposed (dry). Conventional methods for sensor data qualification, such as threshold limit checking, are not effective for this type of signal due to its discrete binary-state nature. To address this data qualification challenge, a noise computation and evaluation method, also known as a noise fault detector, was developed to detect unreasonable statistical characteristics in the discrete data stream. The method operates on a time series of discrete data observations over a moving window of data points and performs a continuous examination of the resulting observation stream to identify the presence of anomalous characteristics. If the method determines the existence of anomalous results, the data from the sensor is disqualified for use by other monitoring or control functions.

  1. Methods and Tools for Monitoring and Prediction of the Large-Scale Environmental Impact of Railway Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELBERS, F. B. J.

    2000-03-01

    Due to environmental impact regulations there is a demand for methods and tools to determine noise reception levels near railway lines. Currently, a wide variety of methods and tools is available. Fast computers now enable us to develop powerful tools that combine simplified prediction methods with GIS systems. These new systems allow the study of noise reception levels and environmental impact on a large-scale (complete network, national or international), while more detailed and labour-intensive methods and tools are used when demanded by law. This paper presents a brief overview of the noise prediction methods and tools used in the Netherlands. The focus is on the advantages and restrictions of the different methods. Finally, the paper gives an overview of the actual advantages and restrictions of the recently extended Gerano method Gerano98 (Geographic Railway Noise). Gerano was originally based on the “basic Dutch calculation rules for railway noise”. Gerano98 was extended using simplified prediction schemes for the most relevant parts of the “detailed Dutch calculation rules for railway noise”. This most recent calculation method, combined with geographic input features, provides the possibility of determining noise impact and the noise measures to be taken on both the medium and large scale. Examples of the application of the methods and tools to specific (medium- and large-scale) projects are provided. The medium-scale project presents the results of a selection of the prefered line between Amsterdam and Zwolle. The large-scale project (the complete Dutch railway network) shows the results of the comparison of noise measures at source with noise barriers or housing insulation. For both projects the applicability and the usefulness of the methods in these situations is discussed. In conclusion four developments of the Gerano concept are described which have recently been finished or will be so in the near future.

  2. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  3. Separation of combustion noise and piston-slap in diesel engine—Part II: Separation of combustion noise and piston-slap using blind source separation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servière, C.; Lacoume, J.-L.; El Badaoui, M.

    2005-11-01

    This paper is devoted to blind separation of combustion noise and piston-slap in diesel engines. The two phenomena are recovered only from signals issued from accelerometers placed on one of the cylinders. A blind source separation (BSS) method is developed, based on a convolutive model of non-stationary mixtures. We introduce a new method based on the joint diagonalisation of the time varying spectral matrices of the observation records and a new technique to handle the problem of permutation ambiguity in the frequency domain. This method is then applied to real data and the estimated sources are validated by several physical arguments. So, the contribution of the piston-slap and the combustion noise can be recovered for all the sensors. The energy of the two phenomena can then be given with regards to the position of the accelerometers.

  4. Single-stage, low-noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 4: Fan aerodynamics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Silverman, I.; Little, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Test results at design speed show fan total pressure ratio, weight flow, and adiabatic efficiency to be 2.2, 2.9, and 1.8% lower than design goal values. The hybrid acoustic inlet (which utilizes a high throat Mach number and acoustic wall treatment for noise suppression) demonstrated total pressure recoveries of 98.9% and 98.2% at takeoff and approach. Exhaust duct pressure losses differed between the hardwall duct and treated duct with splitter by about 0.6% to 2.0% in terms of fan exit average total pressure (depending on operating condition). When the measured results were used to estimate pressure losses, a cruise sfc penalty of 0.68%, due to the acoustically treated duct, was projected.

  5. Optical communication with two-photon coherent stages. I - Quantum-state propagation and quantum-noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P.; Shapiro, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the ultimate performance limitations imposed by quantum effects, it is also essential to consider optimum quantum-state generation. Certain 'generalized' coherent states of the radiation field possess novel quantum noise characteristics that offer the potential for greatly improved optical communications. These states have been called two-photon coherent states because they can be generated, in principle, by stimulated two-photon processes. The use of two-photon coherent state (TCS) radiation in free-space optical communications is considered. A simple theory of quantum state propagation is developed. The theory provides the basis for representing the free-space channel in a quantum-mechanical form convenient for communication analysis. The new theory is applied to TCS radiation.

  6. A Fixed-Pattern Noise Correction Method Based on Gray Value Compensation for TDI CMOS Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenwang; Xu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xinlei; Nie, Kaiming; Jin, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    In order to eliminate the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) in the output image of time-delay-integration CMOS image sensor (TDI-CIS), a FPN correction method based on gray value compensation is proposed. One hundred images are first captured under uniform illumination. Then, row FPN (RFPN) and column FPN (CFPN) are estimated based on the row-mean vector and column-mean vector of all collected images, respectively. Finally, RFPN are corrected by adding the estimated RFPN gray value to the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding row, and CFPN are corrected by subtracting the estimated CFPN gray value from the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding column. Experimental results based on a 128-stage TDI-CIS show that, after correcting the FPN in the image captured under uniform illumination with the proposed method, the standard-deviation of row-mean vector decreases from 5.6798 to 0.4214 LSB, and the standard-deviation of column-mean vector decreases from 15.2080 to 13.4623 LSB. Both kinds of FPN in the real images captured by TDI-CIS are eliminated effectively with the proposed method. PMID:26389917

  7. A Fixed-Pattern Noise Correction Method Based on Gray Value Compensation for TDI CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenwang; Xu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xinlei; Nie, Kaiming; Jin, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    In order to eliminate the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) in the output image of time-delay-integration CMOS image sensor (TDI-CIS), a FPN correction method based on gray value compensation is proposed. One hundred images are first captured under uniform illumination. Then, row FPN (RFPN) and column FPN (CFPN) are estimated based on the row-mean vector and column-mean vector of all collected images, respectively. Finally, RFPN are corrected by adding the estimated RFPN gray value to the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding row, and CFPN are corrected by subtracting the estimated CFPN gray value from the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding column. Experimental results based on a 128-stage TDI-CIS show that, after correcting the FPN in the image captured under uniform illumination with the proposed method, the standard-deviation of row-mean vector decreases from 5.6798 to 0.4214 LSB, and the standard-deviation of column-mean vector decreases from 15.2080 to 13.4623 LSB. Both kinds of FPN in the real images captured by TDI-CIS are eliminated effectively with the proposed method.

  8. A Fixed-Pattern Noise Correction Method Based on Gray Value Compensation for TDI CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenwang; Xu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xinlei; Nie, Kaiming; Jin, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    In order to eliminate the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) in the output image of time-delay-integration CMOS image sensor (TDI-CIS), a FPN correction method based on gray value compensation is proposed. One hundred images are first captured under uniform illumination. Then, row FPN (RFPN) and column FPN (CFPN) are estimated based on the row-mean vector and column-mean vector of all collected images, respectively. Finally, RFPN are corrected by adding the estimated RFPN gray value to the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding row, and CFPN are corrected by subtracting the estimated CFPN gray value from the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding column. Experimental results based on a 128-stage TDI-CIS show that, after correcting the FPN in the image captured under uniform illumination with the proposed method, the standard-deviation of row-mean vector decreases from 5.6798 to 0.4214 LSB, and the standard-deviation of column-mean vector decreases from 15.2080 to 13.4623 LSB. Both kinds of FPN in the real images captured by TDI-CIS are eliminated effectively with the proposed method. PMID:26389917

  9. A Real-time Auto-detection Method for Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) Noise Detection in CMOS Active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, R.; Zhao, R.; Ma, Y.; Li, B.; Wei, X.; Wang, J.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-07-01

    CMOS Active pixel sensors (CMOS APS) are attractive for use in the innermost layers of charged particle trackers, due to their good tradeoffs among the key performances. However, CMOS APS can be greatly influenced by random telegraph signal (RTS) noise, which can cause particle tracking or energy calculation failures. In-depth research of pixels' RTS behavior stimulates the interest of the methods for RTS noise detection, reconstruction and parameters extraction. In this paper, a real-time auto-detection method is proposed, using real-time Gaussian noise standard deviation as the detection threshold. Experimental results show that, compared with current methods using signal standard deviation as the thresholds, the proposed method is more sensitive in multi-level RTS detection and more effective in the case of RTS noise degradation.

  10. Methods for addressing noise and error in controlled source electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, Kristopher

    Controlled source electromagnetic geophysical surveys are excellent ways to obtain information about the conductivity structure of the earth, with applications including hydrocarbon and mining prospecting, hydrogeophysical detection and monitoring, and civil and archaeological studies. Invariably, however, various types of noise and errors obscure signal for desired targets, making interpretation difficult. In the case of time-lapse surveys, the magnitude of the measured difference is often on the order of the noise. Complex conductivity effects distort the measurements, leading to incorrect inversion results. This work develops a method for extracting signal from noisy electromagnetic data sets from both time- and frequency-domain surveys using a novel application of the equivalent source technique. It improves data contaminated by uncorrelated random noise, such as that due to receiver coil misalignment and location errors in time-domain EM surveys, and can remove static shifts in the observed electric field amplitude data due to near-surface geologic features in frequency-domain EM surveys. The equivalent source method can either be applied individually to data from each measured time-gate or frequency, or simultaneously to data from all times or frequencies measured. The method can be used in addition to traditional processing techniques and requires little user input. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through application to single-survey and time-lapsed noisy time- and frequency-domain EM data, both synthetically generated and collected in the field. The presence of low-frequency (≤ 1 kHz) polarization effects in earth porous materials noticeably increases the amplitude and decreases the phase of measured electromagnetic fields in frequency-domain surveys. By analyzing the sensitivity of cross-well EM measurements to the in-phase and quadrature conductivities, the contribution of the quadrature conductivity (directly associated with the low

  11. Apparatus, Method, and Computer Program for a Resolution-Enhanced Pseudo-Noise Code Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Steven X. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus, method, and computer program for a resolution enhanced pseudo-noise coding technique for 3D imaging is provided. In one embodiment, a pattern generator may generate a plurality of unique patterns for a return to zero signal. A plurality of laser diodes may be configured such that each laser diode transmits the return to zero signal to an object. Each of the return to zero signal includes one unique pattern from the plurality of unique patterns to distinguish each of the transmitted return to zero signals from one another.

  12. Near Field Screech Noise Computation for an Underexpanded Supersonic Jet by the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is employed to numerically study the near-field axisymmetric screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle. For the computed cases, corresponding to fully expanded Mach numbers of 1.10, 1.15 and 1.19, the self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels are in good agreement with experimental results.

  13. New high resolution Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) characterization method for resistive RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, M.; Diaz, J.; Crespo-Yepes, A.; Gonzalez, M. B.; Martin-Martinez, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Nafria, M.; Campabadal, F.; Aymerich, X.

    2016-01-01

    Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) is one of the main reliability problems of resistive switching-based memories. To understand the physics behind RTN, a complete and accurate RTN characterization is required. The standard equipment used to analyse RTN has a typical time resolution of ∼2 ms which prevents evaluating fast phenomena. In this work, a new RTN measurement procedure, which increases the measurement time resolution to 2 μs, is proposed. The experimental set-up, together with the recently proposed Weighted Time Lag (W-LT) method for the analysis of RTN signals, allows obtaining a more detailed and precise information about the RTN phenomenon.

  14. An advanced synthetic eddy method for the computation of aerofoil-turbulence interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Haeri, Sina

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an advanced method to synthetically generate flow turbulence via an inflow boundary condition particularly designed for three-dimensional aeroacoustic simulations. The proposed method is virtually free of spurious noise that might arise from the synthetic turbulence, which enables a direct calculation of propagated sound waves from the source mechanism. The present work stemmed from one of the latest outcomes of synthetic eddy method (SEM) derived from a well-defined vector potential function creating a divergence-free velocity field with correct convection speeds of eddies, which in theory suppresses pressure fluctuations. In this paper, a substantial extension of the SEM is introduced and systematically optimised to create a realistic turbulence field based on von Kármán velocity spectra. The optimised SEM is then combined with a well-established sponge-layer technique to quietly inject the turbulent eddies into the domain from the upstream boundary, which results in a sufficiently clean acoustic field. Major advantages in the present approach are: a) that genuinely three-dimensional turbulence is generated; b) that various ways of parametrisation can be created to control/characterise the randomly distributed eddies; and, c) that its numerical implementation is efficient as the size of domain section through which the turbulent eddies should be passing can be adjusted and minimised. The performance and reliability of the proposed SEM are demonstrated by a three-dimensional simulation of aerofoil-turbulence interaction noise.

  15. Development of an impact noise reduction method by the adding of a small thickness elastomeric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arz, Jean-Pierre

    The starting point of this Ph.D. is the industrial issue submitted to the ETS by the company Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP) of the noise reduction of the tracked drive mechanism of snowmobiles. The overall goal of is to develop a method to predict the impact noise reduction obtained by the adding of an elastomeric layer specimen of small thickness between the impacting body and the impacted structure which is a complex structure (i.e. a structure whose geometry is complex and whose composition involves several materials). To reach this overall goal, three specific goals have been fixed: (1) characterize the behavior under impact of different small thickness elastomeric layers; (2) predict the impact force generated when an elastomeric layer is added on a complex vibrating structure; and (3) validate experimentally the whole method by applying it to the impact noise reduction of a bar of the snowmobile track. To reach the first specific goal (characterize the behavior under impact of different small thickness elastomeric layers), a specific experimental characterization method has been developed. Firstly, an experimental device has been realized to submit the elastomeric layer specimens to the reproducible impact conditions of an impact hammer. The measurement of the penetration depth of the hammer into the elastomeric layer is achieved by recording its motion with a high-speed camera and by detecting its position by further analysis on the individual images. Secondly, the experimental curves obtained are analyzed to point out their main characteristics and choose an appropriate impact model. Thirdly, the contact force parameters are estimated from the experimental results and from the impact model. Using this method, eight impacted elastomeric specimens have been characterized. The results show that a more precise characterization than hardness is obtained. To reach the second specific goal (predict the impact force generated when an elastomeric layer is

  16. A hybrid fault diagnosis method based on second generation wavelet de-noising and local mean decomposition for rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiwen; He, Zhengjia; Guo, Wei; Tang, Zhangchun

    2016-03-01

    In order to extract fault features of large-scale power equipment from strong background noise, a hybrid fault diagnosis method based on the second generation wavelet de-noising (SGWD) and the local mean decomposition (LMD) is proposed in this paper. In this method, a de-noising algorithm of second generation wavelet transform (SGWT) using neighboring coefficients was employed as the pretreatment to remove noise in rotating machinery vibration signals by virtue of its good effect in enhancing the signal-noise ratio (SNR). Then, the LMD method is used to decompose the de-noised signals into several product functions (PFs). The PF corresponding to the faulty feature signal is selected according to the correlation coefficients criterion. Finally, the frequency spectrum is analyzed by applying the FFT to the selected PF. The proposed method is applied to analyze the vibration signals collected from an experimental gearbox and a real locomotive rolling bearing. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has better performances such as high SNR and fast convergence speed than the normal LMD method.

  17. A hybrid fault diagnosis method based on second generation wavelet de-noising and local mean decomposition for rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiwen; He, Zhengjia; Guo, Wei; Tang, Zhangchun

    2016-03-01

    In order to extract fault features of large-scale power equipment from strong background noise, a hybrid fault diagnosis method based on the second generation wavelet de-noising (SGWD) and the local mean decomposition (LMD) is proposed in this paper. In this method, a de-noising algorithm of second generation wavelet transform (SGWT) using neighboring coefficients was employed as the pretreatment to remove noise in rotating machinery vibration signals by virtue of its good effect in enhancing the signal-noise ratio (SNR). Then, the LMD method is used to decompose the de-noised signals into several product functions (PFs). The PF corresponding to the faulty feature signal is selected according to the correlation coefficients criterion. Finally, the frequency spectrum is analyzed by applying the FFT to the selected PF. The proposed method is applied to analyze the vibration signals collected from an experimental gearbox and a real locomotive rolling bearing. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has better performances such as high SNR and fast convergence speed than the normal LMD method. PMID:26753616

  18. Efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood quantum state from measurements with additive Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Gambetta, Jay M; Smith, Graeme

    2012-02-17

    We provide an efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood mixed quantum state (with density matrix ρ) given a set of measurement outcomes in a complete orthonormal operator basis subject to Gaussian noise. Our method works by first changing basis yielding a candidate density matrix μ which may have nonphysical (negative) eigenvalues, and then finding the nearest physical state under the 2-norm. Our algorithm takes at worst O(d(4)) for the basis change plus O(d(3)) for finding ρ where d is the dimension of the quantum state. In the special case where the measurement basis is strings of Pauli operators, the basis change takes only O(d(3)) as well. The workhorse of the algorithm is a new linear-time method for finding the closest probability distribution (in Euclidean distance) to a set of real numbers summing to one.

  19. Method to Produce Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection System Resistant to High Aeroacoustic Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor); Calamito, Dominic P. (Inventor); Jong, Anthony (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing a three dimensional angle interlock ceramic fiber which is stable to high aeroacoustic noise of about 170 decibels and to high temperatures of about 2500 F is disclosed. The method uses multiple separate strands of a ceramic fiber or ceramic tow suitable for weaving having multiple warp fibers and multiple fill fibers woven with a modified fly-shuttle loom or rapier shuttleless loom which has nip rolls, a modified fabric advancement mechanism and at least eight harnesses in connection with a Dobby pattern chain utilizing sufficient heddles for each warp fiber and a reed which accommodates at least 168 ends per inch. The method produces a multilayered top fabric, rib fabric and single-layered bottom fabric.

  20. New method to remove the electronic noise for absolutely calibrating low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P.; Laubach, Mitchell A.

    2014-08-01

    A new method to remove the electronic noise in order to absolutely calibrate low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision is proposed and validated with experiments using a digitizer-based data acquisition system. This method utilizes the fall time difference between the electronic noise (about 0.5 ns) and the real PMT signal (about 2.4 ns for Hamamatsu H10570 PMT assembly). Using this technique along with a convolution algorithm, the electronic noise and the real signals are separated very well, even including the very small signals heavily influenced by the electronic noise. One application that this method allows is for us to explore the energy relationship for gamma sensing in Cherenkov radiators while maintaining the fastest possible timing performance and high dynamic range.

  1. Noise analysis for high speed CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Li-yuan; Liu, Jian; Wu, Nan-jian

    2015-04-01

    Noise performance of the high speed image sensor is a bottle neck for its low illumination applications. As the foremost stage circuit, pixel noise is an important portion of high speed image sensor system. This paper has discussed and analyzed the different noise source of the 4T pixel and influence on the image quality of high speed image sensor in detail. We proposed circuit model of pixel with ideal correlated double sampler to simulate the noise source distribution in the pixel and noise reducing methods. Pixel random readout noise can be effectively reduced to 5.44e by optimizing the gate size of the reset transistor.

  2. Registration method for infrared images under conditions of fixed-pattern noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Sui, Xiubao

    2012-05-01

    This paper proposes a new registration method for infrared images under conditions of fixed-pattern noise (FPN). Conventional registration techniques are susceptible to FPN and it is therefore very desirable to have a registration algorithm that is tolerant to FPN. For this purpose, we utilize the difference of the cross-power spectrum of two discrete shifted images to suppress the noise power spectrum while the shifts information is well preserved. In particular, we show that the phase of the cross-power spectrum difference is a periodic two-dimensional binary stripe signal with the exact shifts determined to subpixel accuracy by the number of periods of the phase difference along each frequency axis. Robust estimates of shifts can be obtained by transforming its discontinuities to Hough domain. Experimental results show that the proposed method exhibits robust and accurate registration performance even for the noisy images that could not be handled by conventional registration algorithms. We have also incorporated this technique to a registration-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) framework, indicating that our registration technique is able to estimate motion parameters reliably, leading to satisfactory NUC result.

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Intercomparison of methods for image quality characterization. II. Noise power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James T. III; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Chen Ying

    2006-05-15

    Second in a two-part series comparing measurement techniques for the assessment of basic image quality metrics in digital radiography, in this paper we focus on the measurement of the image noise power spectrum (NPS). Three methods were considered: (1) a method published by Dobbins et al. [Med. Phys. 22, 1581-1593 (1995)] (2) a method published by Samei et al. [Med. Phys. 30, 608-622 (2003)], and (3) a new method sanctioned by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1, 2003), developed as part of an international standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency. In addition to an overall comparison of the estimated NPS between the three techniques, the following factors were also evaluated for their effect on the measured NPS: horizontal versus vertical directional dependence, the use of beam-limiting apertures, beam spectrum, and computational methods of NPS analysis, including the region-of-interest (ROI) size and the method of ROI normalization. Of these factors, none was found to demonstrate a substantial impact on the amplitude of the NPS estimates ({<=}3.1% relative difference in NPS averaged over frequency, for each factor considered separately). Overall, the three methods agreed to within 1.6%{+-}0.8% when averaged over frequencies >0.15 mm{sup -1}.

  5. Comparison of methods of predicting community response to impulsive and nonimpulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-01-01

    Several scientific, regulatory, and policy-coordinating bodies have developed methods for predicting community response to sonic booms. The best known of these is the dosage-response relationship of Working Group 84 of the National Academy of Science's Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics. This dosage-response relationship between C-weighted DayNight Average Sound Level and the prevalence of annoyance with high energy impulsive sounds was derived from limited amounts of information about community response to regular, prolonged, and expected exposure to artillery and sonic booms. U.S. Army Regulation 201 adapts this approach to predictions of the acceptability of impulsive noise exposure in communities. This regulation infers equivalent degrees of effect with respect to a well known dosage-response relationship for general (nonimpulsive) transportation noise. Differences in prevalence of annoyance predicted by various relationships lead to different predictions of the compatibility of land uses with sonic boom exposure. An examination of these differences makes apparent several unresolved issues in current practice for predicting and interpreting the prevalence of annoyance due to sonic boom exposure.

  6. Noise prediction of a subsonic turbulent round jet using the lattice-Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Phoi-Tack; Mongeau, Luc; Lyrintzis, Anastasios

    2010-01-01

    The lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) was used to study the far-field noise generated from a Mach, Mj=0.4, unheated turbulent axisymmetric jet. A commercial code based on the LBM kernel was used to simulate the turbulent flow exhausting from a pipe which is 10 jet radii in length. Near-field flow results such as jet centerline velocity decay rates and turbulence intensities were in agreement with experimental results and results from comparable LES studies. The predicted far field sound pressure levels were within 2 dB from published experimental results. Weak unphysical tones were present at high frequency in the computed radiated sound pressure spectra. These tones are believed to be due to spurious sound wave reflections at boundaries between regions of varying voxel resolution. These “VR tones” did not appear to bias the underlying broadband noise spectrum, and they did not affect the overall levels significantly. The LBM appears to be a viable approach, comparable in accuracy to large eddy simulations, for the problem considered. The main advantages of this approach over Navier–Stokes based finite difference schemes may be a reduced computational cost, ease of including the nozzle in the computational domain, and ease of investigating nozzles with complex shapes. PMID:20815448

  7. Comparison of methods of predicting community response to impulsive and nonimpulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-02-01

    Several scientific, regulatory, and policy-coordinating bodies have developed methods for predicting community response to sonic booms. The best known of these is the dosage-response relationship of Working Group 84 of the National Academy of Science's Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics. This dosage-response relationship between C-weighted DayNight Average Sound Level and the prevalence of annoyance with high energy impulsive sounds was derived from limited amounts of information about community response to regular, prolonged, and expected exposure to artillery and sonic booms. U.S. Army Regulation 201 adapts this approach to predictions of the acceptability of impulsive noise exposure in communities. This regulation infers equivalent degrees of effect with respect to a well known dosage-response relationship for general (nonimpulsive) transportation noise. Differences in prevalence of annoyance predicted by various relationships lead to different predictions of the compatibility of land uses with sonic boom exposure. An examination of these differences makes apparent several unresolved issues in current practice for predicting and interpreting the prevalence of annoyance due to sonic boom exposure.

  8. The Prediction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise Via a Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Tweed, J.

    1996-01-01

    A computationally efficient Boundary Integral Equation Method (BIEM) for the prediction of ducted fan engine noise is presented. The key features of the BIEM are its versatility and the ability to compute rapidly any portion of the sound field without the need to compute the entire field. Governing equations for the BIEM are based on the assumptions that all acoustic processes are linear, generate spinning modes, and occur in a uniform flow field. An exterior boundary value problem (BVP) is defined that describes the scattering of incident sound by an engine duct with arbitrary profile. Boundary conditions on the duct walls are derived that allow for passive noise control treatment. The BVP is recast as a system of hypersingular boundary integral equations for the unknown duct surface quantities. BIEM solution methodology is demonstrated for the scattering of incident sound by a thin cylindrical duct with hard walls. Numerical studies are conducted for various engine parameters and continuous portions of the total pressure field are computed. Radiation and duct propagation results obtained are in agreement with the classical results of spinning mode theory for infinite ducts.

  9. Monte Carlo evaluation of accuracy and noise properties of two scatter correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Y. |; Eberl, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1996-12-31

    Two independent scatter correction techniques, transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS) and triple-energy window (TEW) method, were evaluated in terms of quantitative accuracy and noise properties using Monte Carlo simulation (EGS4). Emission projections (primary, scatter and scatter plus primary) were simulated for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl for numerical chest phantoms. Data were reconstructed with ordered-subset ML-EM algorithm including attenuation correction using the transmission data. In the chest phantom simulation, TDCS provided better S/N than TEW, and better accuracy, i.e., 1.0% vs -7.2% in myocardium, and -3.7% vs -30.1% in the ventricular chamber for {sup 99m}Tc with TDCS and TEW, respectively. For {sup 201}Tl, TDCS provided good visual and quantitative agreement with simulated true primary image without noticeably increasing the noise after scatter correction. Overall TDCS proved to be more accurate and less noisy than TEW, facilitating quantitative assessment of physiological functions with SPECT.

  10. Comparison between two methods for forward calculation of ambient noise H/V spectral ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Jerez, A.; Luzón, F.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Santoyo, M. A.; Albarello, D.; Lunedei, E.; Campillo, M.; Iturrarán-Viveros, U.

    2011-12-01

    The analysis of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of ambient noise (NHVSR) is a valuable tool for seismic prospecting, particularly if both a dense spatial sampling and a low-cost procedure are required. Unfortunately, the computation method still lacks of a unanimously accepted theoretical basis and different approaches are currently being used for inversion of the ground structure from the measured H/V curves. Two major approaches for forward calculation of NHVSRs in a layered medium are compared in this work. The first one was developed by Arai and Tokimatsu (2004) and recently improved by Albarello and Lunedei (2011). It consists of a description of the wavefield as generated by Far Surface point Forces (FSF method). The second one is based on the work of Sánchez-Sesma et al. (2011) who consider ambient noise as a Diffuse WaveField (DWF method), taking advantage of the proportionality between its Fourier-transformed autocorrelation (power spectrum) and the imaginary part of the Green function when source and receiver are the same. In both methods, the NHVSR is written as (PH/PV)1/2, where PH and PV are the horizontal and vertical power spectra. In the FSF method these quantities are given by PV∝⊙m(1+1/2χm2α2)(ARm/kRm)2 PH∝⊙m{(1+1/2χm2α2)(ARm/kRm)2χm2+1/2α2(ALm/kLm)2} where kRm, χm and ARm are wavenumber, ellipticity and medium response of the m-th Rayleigh wave mode; kLm and ALm correspond to the m-th Love wave mode and α is the horizontal-to-vertical load ratio of the ambient noise sources. Some common factors are omitted in the expressions of PV and PH. On the other hand, the DWF method deals with the full wavefield including both surface and body waves. In order to make the comparison easier, and taking into account that surface waves are often the dominant components in wide spectral ranges, body wave contributions are neglected here. In this case, the PH and PV power spectra for the DWF method are reduced to the simple expressions: PV

  11. Automatic Assessment and Reduction of Noise using Edge Pattern Analysis in Non-Linear Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2004-01-01

    Noise is the primary visibility limit in the process of non-linear image enhancement, and is no longer a statistically stable additive noise in the post-enhancement image. Therefore novel approaches are needed to both assess and reduce spatially variable noise at this stage in overall image processing. Here we will examine the use of edge pattern analysis both for automatic assessment of spatially variable noise and as a foundation for new noise reduction methods.

  12. Estimation of the four-wave mixing noise probability-density function by the multicanonical Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Neokosmidis, Ioannis; Kamalakis, Thomas; Chipouras, Aristides; Sphicopoulos, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The performance of high-powered wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical networks can be severely degraded by four-wave-mixing- (FWM-) induced distortion. The multicanonical Monte Carlo method (MCMC) is used to calculate the probability-density function (PDF) of the decision variable of a receiver, limited by FWM noise. Compared with the conventional Monte Carlo method previously used to estimate this PDF, the MCMC method is much faster and can accurately estimate smaller error probabilities. The method takes into account the correlation between the components of the FWM noise, unlike the Gaussian model, which is shown not to provide accurate results. PMID:15648621

  13. Efficient embryonic culture method for the Japanese striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata, and its early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Atsushi; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    The morphogenesis of snake embryos is an elusive yet fascinating research target for developmental biologists. However, few data exist on development of early snake embryo due to limited availability of pregnant snakes, and the need to harvest early stage embryos directly from pregnant snakes before oviposition without knowing the date of fertilization. We established an ex vivo culture method for early snake embryos using the Japanese striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata. This method, which we named "sausage-style (SS) culture", allows us to harvest snake embryos at specific stages for each experiment. Using this SS culture system, we calculated somite formation rate at early stages before oviposition. The average somite formation rate between 6/7 and 12/13 somite stages was 145.9 min, between 60/70 and 80/91 somite stages 42.4 min, and between 113-115 and 126/127 somite stages 71 min. Thus, somite formation rate that we observed during early snake embryogenesis was changed over time. We also describe a developmental staging series for E. quadrivirgata. This is the first report of a developmental series of early snake embryogenesis prior to oviposition by full-color images with high-resolution. We propose that the SS culture system is an easy method for treating early snake embryos ex vivo.

  14. Method for the reduction of signal-induced noise in photomultiplier tubes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, C K; De Young, R J

    2000-04-20

    A new method to reduce photomultiplier tube detector signal-induced noise (SIN) in a lidar system is successfully demonstrated. A metal ring electrode placed external to the photomultiplier tube photocathode is pulsed during the intense near-field lidar return with a potential between 15 and 500 V, resulting in a significant reduction in SIN. The effect of the metal ring voltage on the decay time constant and the magnitude of a simulated lidar signal is presented. Optimal experimental conditions for the use of this device in lidar receivers, such that the lidar decay time constant is not affected, are determined. Mechanisms for this SIN suppression system are discussed in detail, and data were recorded to show that the voltage on the metal ring functions by altering the photomultiplier electron optics.

  15. Expert Knowledge-Based Automatic Sleep Stage Determination by Multi-Valued Decision Making Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bei; Sugi, Takenao; Kawana, Fusae; Wang, Xingyu; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    In this study, an expert knowledge-based automatic sleep stage determination system working on a multi-valued decision making method is developed. Visual inspection by a qualified clinician is adopted to obtain the expert knowledge database. The expert knowledge database consists of probability density functions of parameters for various sleep stages. Sleep stages are determined automatically according to the conditional probability. Totally, four subjects were participated. The automatic sleep stage determination results showed close agreements with the visual inspection on sleep stages of awake, REM (rapid eye movement), light sleep and deep sleep. The constructed expert knowledge database reflects the distributions of characteristic parameters which can be adaptive to variable sleep data in hospitals. The developed automatic determination technique based on expert knowledge of visual inspection can be an assistant tool enabling further inspection of sleep disorder cases for clinical practice.

  16. Investigation of noise properties in grating-based x-ray phase tomography with reverse projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between noise variance and spatial resolution in grating-based x-ray phase computed tomography (PCT) imaging is investigated with reverse projection extraction method, and the noise variances of the reconstructed absorption coefficient and refractive index decrement are compared. For the differential phase contrast method, the noise variance in the differential projection images follows the same inverse-square law with spatial resolution as in conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging projections. However, both theoretical analysis and simulations demonstrate that in PCT the noise variance of the reconstructed refractive index decrement scales with spatial resolution follows an inverse linear relationship at fixed slice thickness, while the noise variance of the reconstructed absorption coefficient conforms with the inverse cubic law. The results indicate that, for the same noise variance level, PCT imaging may enable higher spatial resolution than conventional absorption computed tomography (ACT), while ACT benefits more from degraded spatial resolution. This could be a useful guidance in imaging the inner structure of the sample in higher spatial resolution. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups, the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-YW-N42 and Y4545320Y2), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475170, 11205157, 11305173, 11205189, 11375225, 11321503, 11179004, and U1332109).

  17. A Semi-Empirical Noise Modeling Method for Helicopter Maneuvering Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Schmitz, Fredric; Sickenberger, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A new model for Blade-Vortex Interaction noise generation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. Acoustic and performance data from both flight and wind tunnels are used to derive a non-dimensional and analytical performance/acoustic model that describes BVI noise in steady flight. The model is extended to transient maneuvering flight (pure pitch and roll transients) by using quasisteady assumptions throughout the prescribed maneuvers. Ground noise measurements, taken during maneuvering flight of a Bell 206B helicopter, show that many of the noise radiation details are captured. The result is a computationally efficient Blade-Vortex Interaction noise model with sufficient accuracy to account for transient maneuvering flight. The code can be run in real time to predict transient maneuver noise and is suitable for use in an acoustic mission-planning tool.

  18. Method and apparatus for advanced staged combustion utilizing forced internal recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Rabovitser, Iosif K.; Knight, Richard A.; Cygan, David F.; Nester, Serguei; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2003-12-16

    A method and apparatus for combustion of a fuel in which a first-stage fuel and a first-stage oxidant are introduced into a combustion chamber and ignited, forming a primary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the total heat output produced by combustion of the first-stage fuel and the first-stage oxidant is removed from the primary combustion zone, forming cooled first-stage combustion products. A portion of the cooled first-stage combustion products from a downstream region of the primary combustion zone is recirculated to an upstream region of primary combustion zone. A second-stage fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the primary combustion zone and ignited, forming a secondary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the heat from the secondary combustion zone is removed. In accordance with one embodiment, a third-stage oxidant is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the secondary combustion zone, forming a tertiary combustion zone.

  19. Improved implementation of the fk and Capon methods for array analysis of seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Gibbons, S. J.; Näsholm, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    The frequency-wavenumber (fk) and Capon methods are widely used in seismic array studies of background or ambient noise to infer the backazimuth and slowness of microseismic sources. We present an implementation of these techniques for the analysis of microseisms (0.05-2 Hz) which draws on array signal processing literature from a range of disciplines. The presented techniques avoid frequency mixing in the cross-power spectral density and therefore yield an accurate slowness vector estimation of the incoming seismic waves. Using synthetic data, we show explicitly how the frequency averaged broad-band approach can result in a slowness-shifted spectrum. The presented implementation performs the slowness estimations individually for each frequency bin and sums the resulting slowness spectra over a specific frequency range. This may be termed an incoherently averaged signal, or IAS, approach. We further modify the method through diagonal loading to ensure a robust solution. The synthetic data show good agreement between the analytically derived and inferred error in slowness. Results for real (observed) data are compared between the approximate and IAS methods for two different seismic arrays. The IAS method results in the improved resolution of features, particularly for the Capon spectrum, and enables, for instance, Rg and Lg arrivals from similar backazimuths to be separated in the case of real data.

  20. Method for determinating the ISO-noise levels by simulated aircraft flight operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobor, A.

    Models are presented for the evaluation of perceived aircraft noise level as a function of aircraft position and time. The O-point in the engine noise emission coordinates was assumed to be permanently fixed at the aircraft's center of gravity. Changes in the noise characteristics were calculated as a function of the engine energy level, the Doppler effect, and the momentary distance between the aircraft and observer. Results of the adaptation of these models to noise in the vicinity of the Budapest-Ferihegy International Airport are indicated schematically.

  1. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  2. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  3. Thermal conductance measurements for the development of ultra low-noise transition-edge sensors with a new method for measuring the noise equivalent power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostem, Karwan; Glowacka, Dorota M.; Goldie, David J.; Withington, Stafford

    2008-07-01

    Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) are sensitive devices used in astronomical detectors. Recent projects in ground-based and space astronomy demand the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of the TES to be reduced to the limits needed for accurate measurements, for example, of the B-mode polarisation of the CMB. Thus, we have measured thermal conductance of SixNy bridges of various geometries, and present the results that give insight into the phonon transport mechanism inside these low-dimensional structures. We also present a new method for measuring the NEP of TESs using an on-chip black body radiator.

  4. Noise attenuation methods for the medium energy electron measurementsin the radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Satoshi; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Takashima, Takeshi; Hirahara, Masafumi; Asamura, Kazushi

    In the Earth's radiation belt, extremely energetic electrons (in the megaelectronvolt range), so-called killer electrons, are trapped; they can damage or "kill" satellites. Furthermore, they also can cause damages to human bodies. Generation mechanisms of killer electrons have been studied more than a few decades, and much progress has been made for the last decade. Theoretical studies show that killer electrons are accelerated via the cyclotron resonance with whistler chorus waves. Accordingly, the generation of whistler chorus is the key for the enhancement of killer electrons. However, excitation mechanisms of whistler chorus waves are not fully understood. Although theories predict that they are excited by medium energy electrons (5-80 keV), it is not confirmed by observations. Therefore, the simultaneous observations of medium energy electrons and whistler waves are one of the top priorities of space science communities. The combination of cusp type electrostatic analyser (CEA) and avalanche photodiode (APD) is a very promising way for the medium energy electron measurements. The novel design of CEA enables practical size of over-all system, with 2-pi rad field-of-view; one can obtain the full solid angle coverage by using a satellite spin motion. APD is a kind of p-n junction semiconductor with an internal gain, which enables reliable conversion from count rates to the true flux. In the Earth's radiation belt, however, it is significantly difficult to accurately measure electron fluxes, due to the contamination by penetrating high energy particles, such as solar protons and killer electrons. In order to solve the issue, we propose the method of noise attenuation, by using the combination of anti-coincidence and pulse height analyses. Although high energy particles are detected by APD, they can be rejected by choosing the appropriate thickness of the detector, and by analysing pulse heights. On the basis of the high energy electron irradiation test, we

  5. The Discovery of Processing Stages: Extension of Sternberg’s Method

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John R.; Zhang, Qiong; Borst, Jelmer P.; Walsh, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method for measuring the number and durations of processing stages from the electroencephalographic (EEG) signal and apply it to the study of associative recognition. Using an extension of past research that combines multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) with hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs), the approach identifies on a trial-by-trial basis where brief sinusoidal peaks (called bumps) are added to the ongoing EEG signal. We propose that these bumps mark the onset of critical cognitive stages in processing. The results of the analysis can be used to guide the development of detailed process models. Applied to the associative recognition task, the HSMM-MVPA method indicates that the effects of associative strength and probe type are localized to a memory retrieval stage and a decision stage. This is in line with a previously developed ACT-R process model of the task. As a test of the generalization of our method we also apply it to a data set on the Sternberg working memory task collected by Jacobs et al. (2006). The analysis generalizes robustly, and localizes the typical set size effect in a late comparison/decision stage. In addition to providing information about the number and durations of stages in associative recognition, our analysis sheds light on the ERP components implicated in the study of recognition memory. PMID:27135600

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio-based quality assessment method for ICESat/GLAS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Li, Guicai; Pan, Feifei; Xi, Xiaohuan; Luo, Shezhou

    2014-10-01

    Data quality determines the accuracy of results associated with remote sensing data processing and applications. However, few effective studies have been carried out on quality assessment methods for the full-waveform light detecting and ranging data. Using the geoscience laser altimeter system (GLAS) waveform data as an example, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-based waveform quality assessment method is proposed to analyze the relationship between the SNR and its controlling factors, i.e., laser type, laser using time, topographic relief, and land cover type, and study the impacts of these factors on the quality of the GLAS waveform data. Results show that the SNR-based data quality assessment method can quantitatively and effectively assess the GLAS waveform data quality. The SNR linearly attenuates with the laser using time, and the attenuation rate varies with laser type. The topographic relief is inversely correlated with the SNR of the GLAS data. As the land cover structure (especially the vertical structure) becomes more complex, the SNR of the GLAS data decreases. It was found that land cover types in descending order of the SNR values are desert, farmland, water body, grassland, city, and forest.

  7. Taking the Headaches out of Anesthetizing "Drosophila": A Cheap & Easy Method of Constructing Carbon Dioxide Staging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiss, Thomas; Hughes, Bobby

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is an excellent alternative to conventional methods of anesthetizing fruit flies as it is non-flammable and odorless. We have devised a method of constructing carbon dioxide stages used to keep "Drosophila" immobilized cheaply and easily using empty micropipette tip containers. (Contains 6 figures.)

  8. De-noising and retrieving algorithm of Mie lidar data based on the particle filter and the Fernald method.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Pan, Zengxin; Mao, Feiyue; Gong, Wei; Chen, Shihua; Min, Qilong

    2015-10-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of an atmospheric lidar decreases rapidly as range increases, so that maintaining high accuracy when retrieving lidar data at the far end is difficult. To avoid this problem, many de-noising algorithms have been developed; in particular, an effective de-noising algorithm has been proposed to simultaneously retrieve lidar data and obtain a de-noised signal by combining the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Fernald method. This algorithm enhances the retrieval accuracy and effective measure range of a lidar based on the Fernald method, but sometimes leads to a shift (bias) in the near range as a result of the over-smoothing caused by the EnKF. This study proposes a new scheme that avoids this phenomenon using a particle filter (PF) instead of the EnKF in the de-noising algorithm. Synthetic experiments show that the PF performs better than the EnKF and Fernald methods. The root mean square error of PF are 52.55% and 38.14% of that of the Fernald and EnKF methods, and PF increases the SNR by 44.36% and 11.57% of that of the Fernald and EnKF methods, respectively. For experiments with real signals, the relative bias of the EnKF is 5.72%, which is reduced to 2.15% by the PF in the near range. Furthermore, the suppression impact on the random noise in the far range is also made significant via the PF. An extensive application of the PF method can be useful in determining the local and global properties of aerosols.

  9. Analysis of noise properties of a class of exact methods of inverting the 2-D exponential radon transform

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Metz, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    A general approach that the authors proposed elsewhere reveals the intrinsic relationship among methods for inversion of the 2-D exponential Radon transform described by Bellini et al., by Tretiak and Metz, by Hawkins et al., and by Inouye et al. Moreover, the approach provides an infinite class of linear methods for inverting the 2-D exponential Radon transform. In the work reported here, they systematically investigated the noise characteristics of the methods in this class, obtaining analytical forms for the autocovariance and the variance of the images reconstructed by use of various methods. The noise properties of a new quasi-optimal method were then compared theoretically to those of other methods of the class. The analysis demonstrates that the quasi-optimal method achieves smaller global variance in the reconstructed images than do the other methods of the class. Extensive numerical simulation studies confirm this prediction.

  10. Brief communication: a proposed osteological method for the estimation of pubertal stage in human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Shapland, Fiona; Lewis, Mary E

    2013-06-01

    Puberty forms an important threshold between childhood and adulthood, but this subject has received little attention in bioarchaeology. The new application of clinical methods to assess pubertal stage in adolescent skeletal remains is explored, concentrating on the development of the mandibular canine, hamate, hand phalanges, iliac crest and distal radius. Initial results from the medieval cemetery of St. Peter's Church, Barton-upon-Humber, England suggest that application of these methods may provide insights into aspects of adolescent development. This analysis indicates that adolescents from this medieval site were entering the pubertal growth spurt at a similar age to their modern counterparts, but that the later stages of pubertal maturation were being significantly delayed, perhaps due to environmental stress. Continued testing and refinement of these methods on living adolescents is still necessary to improve our understanding of their significance and accuracy in predicting pubertal stages.

  11. Development of Novel Methods for the Reduction of Noise and Weight in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Over the 70-year evolution of the helicopter, man's understanding of vibration control has greatly increased. However, in spite of the increased performance, the extent of helicopter vibration problems has not significantly diminished. Crew vibration and noise remains important factors in the design of all current helicopters. With more complex and critical demands being placed on aircrews, it is essential that vibration and noise not impair their performance. A major source of helicopter cabin noise (which has been measured at a sound pressure level of over 100 dB) is the gearbox. Reduction of this noise has been a goal of NASA and the U.S. Army. Gear mesh noise is typically in the frequency range of 1000 to 3000 Hz, a range important for speech. A requirement for U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission project has been a 10-dB reduction compared to current designs. A combined analytical/experimental effort has been underway, since the end of the 80's, to study effects of design parameters on noise production. The noise generated by the gear mesh can be transmitted to the surrounding media through the bearings that support the gear shaft. Therefore, the use of fluid film bearings instead of rolling element bearings could reduce the transmission noise by 10 dB. In addition, the fluid film bearings that support the gear shaft can change the dynamics of the gear assembly by providing damping to the system and by being softer than rolling element bearings. Wave bearings can attenuate, and filter, the noise generated by a machine component due to the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients. The attenuation ratio could be as large as 35-40 dB. The noise components at higher frequencies than a synchronous frequency can be almost eliminated.

  12. Noise and blast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. C.; Garinther, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Noise and blast environments are described, providing a definition of units and techniques of noise measurement and giving representative booster-launch and spacecraft noise data. The effects of noise on hearing sensitivity and performance are reviewed, and community response to noise exposure is discussed. Physiological, or nonauditory, effects of noise exposure are also treated, as are design criteria and methods for minimizing the noise effects of hearing sensitivity and communications. The low level sound detection and speech reception are included, along with subjective and behavioral responses to noise.

  13. A New System Noise Measuring Method Using a 2-Bit Analog-to-Digital Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatake, Aki; Kameno, Seiji; Takeda, Koji

    2010-10-01

    We propose a new measuring method for the system noise temperature, Tsys, using a 2-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Statistics of the digitized signal in a four-level quantization gives us information about the bias voltage and the variance, which reflects the power of the input signal. A comparison of the variances in hot and sky circumstances yields Tsys without a power meter. We performed experimental tests using the Kagoshima 6 m radio telescope and a 2-bit ADC. The linearity in the power-variance relation was better than 99% within the dynamic range of 10 dB. Digitally measured Tsys was in agreement with that of a conventional measurement with a power meter, although the temperatures differed by 1.8%, or less, for elevations of 10°-88°. No significant impact was found by the bias voltages within a range of -3.7% to +12.8% with respect to the threshold voltage. The proposed method is available for existing interferometers that have a multilevel ADC, and release us from troubles caused by power meters.

  14. LCD displays performance comparison by MTF measurement using the white noise stimulus method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Escofet, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    The amount of images produced to be viewed as soft copies on output displays are significantly increasing. This growing occurs at the expense of the images targeted to hard copy versions on paper or any other physical support. Even in the case of high quality hard copy production, people working in professional imaging uses different displays in selecting, editing, processing and showing images, from laptop screen to specialized high end displays. Then, the quality performance of these devices is crucial in the chain of decisions to be taken in image production. Metrics of this quality performance can help in the equipment acquisition. Different metrics and methods have been described to determine the quality performance of CRT and LCD computer displays in clinical area. One of most important metrics in this field is the device spatial frequency response obtained measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF). This work presents a comparison between the MTF of three different LCD displays, Apple MacBook Pro 15", Apple LED Cinema Display 24" and Apple iPhone4, measured by the white noise stimulus method, over vertical and horizontal directions. Additionally, different displays show particular pixels structure pattern. In order to identify this pixel structure, a set of high magnification images is taken from each display to be related with the respective vertical and horizontal MTF.

  15. A Method for Simulation of Rotorcraft Fly-In Noise for Human Response Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Christian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The low frequency content of rotorcraft noise allows it to be heard over great distances. This factor contributes to the disruption of natural quiet in national parks and wilderness areas, and can lead to annoyance in populated areas. Further, it can result in detection at greater distances compared to higher altitude fixed wing aircraft operations. Human response studies conducted in the field are made difficult since test conditions are difficult to control. Specifically, compared to fixed wing aircraft, the source noise itself may significantly vary over time even for nominally steady flight conditions, and the propagation of that noise is more variable due to low altitude meteorological conditions. However, it is possible to create the salient features of rotorcraft fly-in noise in a more controlled laboratory setting through recent advancements made in source noise synthesis, propagation modeling and reproduction. This paper concentrates on the first two of these. In particular, the rotorcraft source noise pressure time history is generated using single blade passage signatures from the main and tail rotors. These may be obtained from either acoustic source noise predictions or back-propagation of ground-based measurements. Propagation effects include atmospheric absorption, spreading loss, Doppler shift, and ground plane reflections.

  16. A method for determining internal noise criteria based on practical speech communication applied to helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Doyle, L. B.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the internal noise environment of helicopters and the ability of personnel to understand commands and instructions was studied. A test program was conducted to relate speech intelligibility to a standard measurement called Articulation Index. An acoustical simulator was used to provide noise environments typical of Army helicopters. Speech material (command sentences and phonetically balanced word lists) were presented at several voice levels in each helicopter environment. Recommended helicopter internal noise criteria, based on speech communication, were derived and the effectiveness of hearing protection devices were evaluated.

  17. Methods for Predicting Potential Impacts of Pile-Driving Noise on Endangered Sturgeon During Bridge Construction.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Justin; Jacobs, Fred; Conway, Robert; Popper, Arthur N; Moese, Mark; Rollino, John; Racca, Roberto; Martin, Bruce; MacGillivray, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The potential impacts of pile-driving noise on Hudson River sturgeon during construction of the New NY Bridge were predicted. Abundance data for shortnose and Atlantic sturgeon derived from fisheries sampling were combined with data about the spatial extent of pile-driving noise. This approach was used to calculate the number of sturgeon that could occur within sound level isopleths exceeding peak and cumulative noise criteria used by the National Marine Fisheries Service to determine the incidental take of sturgeon. The number of sturgeon subject to the potential onset of physiological effects during pile driving was predicted to be 35-41 fish for each species.

  18. Health condition identification of multi-stage planetary gearboxes using a mRVM-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Liu, Zongyao; Wu, Xionghui; Li, Naipeng; Chen, Wu; Lin, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Multi-stage planetary gearboxes are widely applied in aerospace, automotive and heavy industries. Their key components, such as gears and bearings, can easily suffer from damage due to tough working environment. Health condition identification of planetary gearboxes aims to prevent accidents and save costs. This paper proposes a method based on multiclass relevance vector machine (mRVM) to identify health condition of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. In this method, a mRVM algorithm is adopted as a classifier, and two features, i.e. accumulative amplitudes of carrier orders (AACO) and energy ratio based on difference spectra (ERDS), are used as the input of the classifier to classify different health conditions of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. To test the proposed method, seven health conditions of a two-stage planetary gearbox are considered and vibration data is acquired from the planetary gearbox under different motor speeds and loading conditions. The results of three tests based on different data show that the proposed method obtains an improved identification performance and robustness compared with the existing method.

  19. Aerodynamic performance of 0.5 meter-diameter, 337 meter-per-second tip speed, 1.5 pressure-ratio, single-stage fan designed for low noise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Overall and blade-element aerodynamic performance of a 0.271-scale model of QF-1 are presented, examined, and then compared and evaluated with that from similar low noise fan stage designs. The tests cover a wide range of speeds and weight flows along with variations in stator setting angle and stator axial spacing from the rotor. At design speed with stator at design setting angle and a fixed distance between stage measuring stations, there were no significant effects of increasing the axial spacing between rotor stator from 1.0 to 3.5 rotor chords on stage overall pressure ratio, efficiency or stall margin.

  20. Penalized Ordinal Regression Methods for Predicting Stage of Cancer in High-Dimensional Covariate Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Amanda Elswick; Jackson-Cook, Colleen K; Lyon, Debra E; Archer, Kellie J

    2015-01-01

    The pathological description of the stage of a tumor is an important clinical designation and is considered, like many other forms of biomedical data, an ordinal outcome. Currently, statistical methods for predicting an ordinal outcome using clinical, demographic, and high-dimensional correlated features are lacking. In this paper, we propose a method that fits an ordinal response model to predict an ordinal outcome for high-dimensional covariate spaces. Our method penalizes some covariates (high-throughput genomic features) without penalizing others (such as demographic and/or clinical covariates). We demonstrate the application of our method to predict the stage of breast cancer. In our model, breast cancer subtype is a nonpenalized predictor, and CpG site methylation values from the Illumina Human Methylation 450K assay are penalized predictors. The method has been made available in the ordinalgmifs package in the R programming environment. PMID:26052223

  1. Method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth, low noise mechanical I/O for computer systems

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  2. Assessment of the Contrast to Noise Ratio in PET Scanners with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The PET scanner simulated was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution. Image quality was assessed in terms of the CNR. CNR was estimated from coronal reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3, 15 and 21) and various iterations (2 to 20). CNR values were found to decrease when both iterations and subsets increase. Two (2) iterations were found to be optimal. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in image quality assessment of PET scanners.

  3. [Denoising and assessing method of additive noise in the ultraviolet spectrum of SO2 in flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Sun, Chang-Ku; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yu-Mei

    2009-11-01

    The problem of denoising and assessing method of the spectrum of SO2 in flue gas was studied based on DOAS. The denoising procedure of the additive noise in the spectrum was divided into two parts: reducing the additive noise and enhancing the useful signal. When obtaining the absorption feature of measured gas, a multi-resolution preprocessing method of original spectrum was adopted for denoising by DWT (discrete wavelet transform). The signal energy operators in different scales were used to choose the denoising threshold and separate the useful signal from the noise. On the other hand, because there was no sudden change in the spectra of flue gas in time series, the useful signal component was enhanced according to the signal time dependence. And the standard absorption cross section was used to build the ideal absorption spectrum with the measured gas temperature and pressure. This ideal spectrum was used as the desired signal instead of the original spectrum in the assessing method to modify the SNR (signal-noise ratio). There were two different environments to do the proof test-in the lab and at the scene. In the lab, SO2 was measured several times with the system using this method mentioned above. The average deviation was less than 1.5%, while the repeatability was less than 1%. And the short range experiment data were better than the large range. In the scene of a power plant whose concentration of flue gas had a large variation range, the maximum deviation of this method was 2.31% in the 18 groups of contrast data. The experimental results show that the denoising effect of the scene spectrum was better than that of the lab spectrum. This means that this method can improve the SNR of the spectrum effectively, which is seriously polluted by additive noise. PMID:20101989

  4. Mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss indicate multiple methods of prevention.

    PubMed

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Yamashita, Daisuke; Minami, Shujiro B; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Miller, Josef M

    2007-04-01

    Recent research has shown the essential role of reduced blood flow and free radical formation in the cochlea in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The amount, distribution, and time course of free radical formation have been defined, including a clinically significant late formation 7-10 days following noise exposure, and one mechanism underlying noise-induced reduction in cochlear blood flow has finally been identified. These new insights have led to the formulation of new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms of NIHL; and, from these, we have identified interventions that prevent NIHL, even with treatment onset delayed up to 3 days post-noise. It is essential to now assess the additive effects of agents intervening at different points in the cell death pathway to optimize treatment efficacy. Finding safe and effective interventions that attenuate NIHL will provide a compelling scientific rationale to justify human trials to eliminate this single major cause of acquired hearing loss.

  5. Reduction of speckle noise from optical coherence tomography images using multi-frame weighted nuclear norm minimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Damber; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a speckle noise reduction method for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images called multi-frame weighted nuclear norm minimization (MWNNM). This method is a direct extension of weighted nuclear norm minimization (WNNM) in the multi-frame framework since an adequately denoised image could not be achieved with single-frame denoising methods. The MWNNM method exploits multiple B-scans collected from a small area of a SD-OCT volumetric image, and then denoises and averages them together to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio B-scan. The results show that the image quality metrics obtained by denoising and averaging only five nearby B-scans with MWNNM method is considerably better than those of the average image obtained by registering and averaging 40 azimuthally repeated B-scans.

  6. Method for removal of random noise in eddy-current testing system

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    Eddy-current response voltages, generated during inspection of metallic structures for anomalies, are often replete with noise. Therefore, analysis of the inspection data and results is difficult or near impossible, resulting in inconsistent or unreliable evaluation of the structure. This invention processes the eddy-current response voltage, removing the effect of random noise, to allow proper identification of anomalies within and associated with the structure.

  7. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  8. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  9. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  10. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  11. Hot-stage microscopy for determination of API fragmentation: comparison with other methods.

    PubMed

    Šimek, Michal; Grünwaldová, Veronika; Kratochvíl, Bohumil

    2016-08-01

    Although the fragmentation of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is a phenomenon that is mentioned in many literature sources, no well-suited analytical tools for its investigation are currently known. We used the hot-stage microscopy method, already presented in our previous work, and studied the real fragmentation of the tadalafil particles in model tablets which were prepared under different compaction pressures. The morphology, spectral imaging and evaluation of plastic and elastic energies were also analyzed to support the hot-stage method. The prepared blend of tadalafil and excipients was compacted under a several forces from 5 to 35 kN to reveal the trend of fragmentation. The exact fragmentation of tadalafil with increased compaction pressure was revealed by the hot-stage microscopic method and it was in good agreement with plastic and elastic energies. Conversely, spectral imaging, which is being used for this analysis, was considered to be inaccurate methodology as mainly agglomerates, not individual particles, were measured. The availability of the hot-stage microscopic method equips pharmaceutical scientists with an in vitro assessment technique that will more reliably determine the fragmentation of the API in finished tablets and the behavior of the particles when compacted.

  12. Runoff nutrient transport as affected by land application method, swine growth stage, and runoff rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to measure the effects of slurry application method, swine growth stage, and flow rate on runoff nutrient transport. Swine slurry was obtained from production units containing grower pigs, finisher pigs, or sows and gilts. The swine slurry was applied using broadcast, disk, ...

  13. Efficient evaluation of neuron populations receiving colored-noise current based on a refractory density method.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Graham, Lyle J

    2008-01-01

    The expected firing probability of a stochastic neuron is approximated by a function of the expected subthreshold membrane potential, for the case of colored noise. We propose this approximation in order to extend the recently proposed white noise model [A. V. Chizhov and L. J. Graham, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011924 (2007)] to the case of colored noise, applying a refractory density approach to conductance-based neurons. The uncoupled neurons of a single population receive a common input and are dispersed by the noise. Within the framework of the model the effect of noise is expressed by the so-called hazard function, which is the probability density for a single neuron to fire given the average membrane potential in the presence of a noise term. To derive the hazard function we solve the Kolmogorov-Fokker-Planck equation for a mean voltage-driven neuron fluctuating due to colored noisy current. We show that a sum of both a self-similar solution for the case of slow changing mean voltage and a frozen stationary solution for fast changing mean voltage gives a satisfactory approximation for the hazard function in the arbitrary case. We demonstrate the quantitative effect of a temporal correlation of noisy input on the neuron dynamics in the case of leaky integrate-and-fire and detailed conductance-based neurons in response to an injected current step.

  14. Structure-borne low-frequency noise from multi-span bridges: A prediction method and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X. D.; Wu, D. J.; Li, Q.; Botteldooren, D.

    2016-04-01

    Structure-borne noise from railway bridges at far-field points is an important indicator in environmental noise assessment. However, studies that predict structure-borne noise tend to model only single-span bridges, thus ignoring the sound pressure radiating from adjacent spans. To simulate the noise radiating from multi-span bridges induced by moving vehicles, the vibrations of a multi-span bridge are first obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction simulation using the mode superposition method. A procedure based on the 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) boundary element method (BEM) is then presented to promote the efficiency of acoustical computation compared with the 3D BEM. The simulated results obtained from both the single-span and multi-span bridge models are compared with the measured results. The sound predictions calculated from the single-span model are accurate only for a minority of near-field points. In contrast, the sound pressures calculated from the multi-span bridge model match the measured results in both the time and frequency domains for all of the near-field and far-field points. The number of bridge spans required in the noise simulation is then recommended related to the distance between the track center and the field points of interest. The spatial distribution of multi-span structure-borne noise is also studied. The variation in sound pressure levels is insignificant along the length of the bridge, which validates the finding that the sound test section can be selected at an arbitrary plane perpendicular to the multi-span bridge.

  15. Generalized binomial τ-leap method for biochemical kinetics incorporating both delay and intrinsic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, André; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.; Burrage, Kevin

    2008-05-01

    The delay stochastic simulation algorithm (DSSA) by Barrio et al. [Plos Comput. Biol. 2, 117(E) (2006)] was developed to simulate delayed processes in cell biology in the presence of intrinsic noise, that is, when there are small-to-moderate numbers of certain key molecules present in a chemical reaction system. These delayed processes can faithfully represent complex interactions and mechanisms that imply a number of spatiotemporal processes often not explicitly modeled such as transcription and translation, basic in the modeling of cell signaling pathways. However, for systems with widely varying reaction rate constants or large numbers of molecules, the simulation time steps of both the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and the DSSA can become very small causing considerable computational overheads. In order to overcome the limit of small step sizes, various τ-leap strategies have been suggested for improving computational performance of the SSA. In this paper, we present a binomial τ-DSSA method that extends the τ-leap idea to the delay setting and avoids drawing insufficient numbers of reactions, a common shortcoming of existing binomial τ-leap methods that becomes evident when dealing with complex chemical interactions. The resulting inaccuracies are most evident in the delayed case, even when considering reaction products as potential reactants within the same time step in which they are produced. Moreover, we extend the framework to account for multicellular systems with different degrees of intercellular communication. We apply these ideas to two important genetic regulatory models, namely, the hes1 gene, implicated as a molecular clock, and a Her1/Her 7 model for coupled oscillating cells.

  16. Numerical modeling of multi-mode active control of turbofan tonal noise using a boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Laralee Gordon

    A numerical model was developed to investigate the possibility of implementing active control (ANC) to minimize noise radiation from high-bypass turbofan engines. Previous experimental work on the NASA Glenn Research Center active noise control fan (ANCF) was encouraging, but the question remained whether the modal approach investigated could be effective on real engines. The engine model developed for this research project uses an indirect boundary element method, implemented with Sysnoise, and a multi-mode Newton's algorithm, implemented with MATLAB(TM), to simulate the active control. Noise from the inlet was targeted. Both the experimental and numerical results based on the NASA ANCF simplified cylindrical engine geometry indicate overall reductions in the m = 2 component of the noise. Reductions obtained at the numerical sensor rings range from 17 dB to 63 dB and at a plane in the duct inlet, -8 dB to 33 dB. Rings mounted on the inlet duct are unable to accurately predict the total reduction of the inlet field, but the controller is still able to effectively reduce the total acoustic field. Generally, one sensor ring and one actuator ring per propagating mode were necessary to control the inlet field. At frequencies close to the cut-off frequency of a mode, an additional sensor and actuator ring were needed to adequately control the inlet field due to the evanescent mode. A more realistic, but still axisymmetric, engine geometry based on the GE CF6-80C engine was developed and the same algorithm used. Reductions obtained at the sensor rings range from 4 dB to 56 dB and at the duct inlet plane, from 12 dB to 26 dB. The overall far field noise radiation from the engine remained unchanged (0.4 dB) or decreased slightly (3.6 dB). The inlet noise was controlled at all frequencies but the noise from the exhaust was increased. The effect of inlet control on the exhaust radiation suggests the need for a controller that targets both the inlet and exhaust noise

  17. Non-linearity in Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the effects of non-linearity, some of the mechanisms responsible for non-linearity, and methods for measuring non-linearity in Johnson noise thermometry. Mechanisms considered include quantum tunnelling, bipolar junction transistor and junction field-effect transistor amplifiers, feedback, clipping, output-stage crossover, quantization and dither. It is found that even- and odd-order effects behave differently in correlator-based noise thermometers, with the dominant even-order effects contributing as intermodulation products whereas the dominant odd-order contributions are third-order and at the same frequencies as the parent signals. Possible test methods include the use of discrete tones, changes in spectral shape, and direct measurement using reference noise powers. For correlators operated at constant noise power, direct measurement of non-linearity using reference noise powers enables corrections to be made with negligible additional uncertainty and measurement time.

  18. Study on adjoint-based optimization method for multi-stage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Tian, Yong; Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Shao, Weiwei; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-10-01

    Adjoint-based optimization method is a hotspot in turbomachinery. First, this paper presents principles of adjoint method from Lagrange multiplier viewpoint. Second, combining a continuous route with thin layer RANS equations, we formulate adjoint equations and anti-physical boundary conditions. Due to the multi-stage environment in turbomachinery, an adjoint interrow mixing method is introduced. Numerical techniques of solving flow equations and adjoint equations are almost the same, and once they are converged respectively, the gradients of an objective function to design variables can be calculated using complex method efficiently. Third, integrating a shape perturbation parameterization and a simple steepest descent method, a frame of adjoint-based aerodynamic shape optimization for multi-stage turbomachinery is constructed. At last, an inverse design of an annular cascade is employed to validate the above approach, and adjoint field of an Aachen 1.5 stage turbine demonstrates the conservation and areflexia of the adjoint interrow mixing method. Then a direct redesign of a 1+1 counter-rotating turbine aiming to increase efficiency and apply constraints to mass flow rate and pressure ratio is taken.

  19. Analysis of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise with application to adaptive-passive and active alleviation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauszig, Lionel Christian

    This study focuses on detection and analysis methods of helicopter blade-vortex interactions (BVI) and applies these methods to two different BVI noise alleviation schemes---an adaptive-passive and an active scheme. A standard free-wake analysis based on relaxation methods is extended in this study to compute high-resolution blade loading, to account for blade-to-blade dissimilarities, and dual vortices when there is negative loading at the blade tips. The free-wake geometry is still calculated on a coarse azimuthal grid and then interpolated to a high-resolution grid to calculate the BVI induced impulsive loading. Blade-to-blade dissimilarities are accounted by allowing the different blades to release their own vortices. A number of BVI detection criteria, including the spherical method (a geometric criterion developed in this thesis) are critically examined. It was determined that high-resolution azimuthal discretization is required in virtually all detection methods except the spherical method which detected the occurrence of parallel BVI even while using a low-resolution azimuthal mesh. Detection methods based on inflow and blade loads were, in addition, found to be sensitive to vortex core size. While most BVI studies use the high-resolution airloads to compute BVI noise, the total noise can often be due to multiple dominant interactions on the advancing and retreating sides. A methodology is developed to evaluate the contribution of an individual interaction to the total BVI noise, based on using the loading due to an individual vortex as an input to the acoustic code WOPWOP. The adaptive-passive BVI alleviation method considered in this study comprises of reducing the length of one set of opposite blades (of a 4-bladed rotor) in low-speed descent. Results showed that differential coning resulting from the blade dissimilarity increases the blade-vortex miss-distances and reduces the BVI noise by 4 dB. The Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART

  20. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  1. Methods for Estimating Kidney Disease Stage Transition Probabilities Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lola; Small, Dylan; Stewart, Walter F.; Roy, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diseases are often described by stages of severity. Clinical decisions about what to do are influenced by the stage, whether a patient is progressing, and the rate of progression. For chronic kidney disease (CKD), relatively little is known about the transition rates between stages. To address this, we used electronic health records (EHR) data on a large primary care population, which should have the advantage of having both sufficient follow-up time and sample size to reliably estimate transition rates for CKD. However, EHR data have some features that threaten the validity of any analysis. In particular, the timing and frequency of laboratory values and clinical measurements are not determined a priori by research investigators, but rather, depend on many factors, including the current health of the patient. We developed an approach for estimating CKD stage transition rates using hidden Markov models (HMMs), when the level of information and observation time vary among individuals. To estimate the HMMs in a computationally manageable way, we used a “discretization” method to transform daily data into intervals of 30 days, 90 days, or 180 days. We assessed the accuracy and computation time of this method via simulation studies. We also used simulations to study the effect of informative observation times on the estimated transition rates. Our simulation results showed good performance of the method, even when missing data are non-ignorable. We applied the methods to EHR data from over 60,000 primary care patients who have chronic kidney disease (stage 2 and above). We estimated transition rates between six underlying disease states. The results were similar for men and women. PMID:25848580

  2. Methods of Designing Two-stage Winner Trials with Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung J.; Li, Yulin; Yang, Jay; Zhang, Xiaosha

    2014-01-01

    In drug development, especially for oncology studies, a recent proposal is to combine a costly phase II dose selection study with a subsequent phase III study into a single trial that compares the selected (winning) dose from the first stage with the control group. This design may also be used in phase III trials, in which the winning active treatment regimen, selected at the first stage, is compared with the control group at the second stage. This design is known as a two-stage winner design, as proposed by Shun et al [1] for continuous outcomes. Time-to-event data are often analyzed in oncology trials. In order to derive the critical value and power of this design, per Shun et al [1], it is essential to calculate the asymptotic covariance and correlation of the log-rank statistics for survival outcomes between the two stages. In this paper, we derive the asymptotic covariance and correlation, and provide additional approximate design parameters. Examples are given to illustrate the method, and simulations are performed to evaluate the veracity of these approximate design parameters. PMID:24347247

  3. Minimally Invasive Methods for Staging in Lung Cancer: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Carlos; Ortega, Francisco; Arenas, Alex; Majid, Adnan; Folch, Erik; Jantz, Michael A.; Fernandez-Bussy, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a procedure that provides access to the mediastinal staging; however, EBUS cannot be used to stage all of the nodes in the mediastinum. In these cases, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for complete staging. Objective. To provide a synthesis of the evidence on the diagnostic performance of EBUS + EUS in patients undergoing mediastinal staging. Methods. Systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic yield of EBUS + EUS compared with surgical staging. Two researchers performed the literature search, quality assessments, data extractions, and analyses. We produced a meta-analysis including sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio analysis. Results. Twelve primary studies (1515 patients) were included; two were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and ten were prospective trials. The pooled sensitivity for combined EBUS + EUS was 87% (CI 84–89%) and the specificity was 99% (CI 98–100%). For EBUS + EUS performed with a single bronchoscope group, the sensitivity improved to 88% (CI 83.1–91.4%) and specificity improved to 100% (CI 99-100%). Conclusion. EBUS + EUS is a highly accurate and safe procedure. The combined procedure should be considered in selected patients with lymphadenopathy noted at stations that are not traditionally accessible with conventional EBUS.

  4. Operative and anesthetic outcomes in endometrial cancer staging via three minimally invasive methods.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nicole D; Axtell, Allison E; Lentz, Scott E

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to compare operative and anesthetic outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive endometrial cancer staging, with lymphadenectomy performed via transperitoneal, extraperitoneal, or robotic-assisted methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients (24 transperitoneal, 19 extraperitoneal, and 23 robotic) were identified who underwent laparoscopic-assisted endometrial cancer staging with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Patients were divided into three groups based on method of para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Anesthetic and surgical times were longest in the extraperitoneal group. Patients undergoing robotic surgery had the shortest hospital stay and lowest conversion rate to laparotomy. Patients undergoing robotic lymphadenectomy had more pelvic and para-aortic nodes removed compared with the transperitoneal method. There was no difference in number of para-aortic nodes removed in the robotic versus extraperitoneal methods. The extraperitoneal group had highest peak end-tidal CO2 levels and highest narcotic requirements, while patients in the robotic group had highest peak inflation pressures and lowest pain scores. There were no differences in complication rates amongst the three groups. Robotic-assisted staging is superior to other minimally invasive methods in terms of most operative outcomes. Extraperitoneal lymphadenectomy is equivalent to robotic surgery where number of aortic nodes is concerned, but is associated with higher end-tidal CO2 levels and narcotic requirements. Peak inflation pressures were highest in the robotic group, with no apparent adverse consequences. PMID:27628475

  5. A detection method for streak artifacts and radiological noise in a non-uniform region in a CT image.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kuniharu; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Enchi, Yukihiro; Niimi, Takanaga

    2010-01-01

    By using the CT images obtained by subtracting two CT images acquired under the same conditions and slice locations, we have devised a method for detecting streak artifacts in non-uniform regions and only radiological noise components in CT images. A chest phantom was scanned using 16- and 64-multidetector row helical CT scanners with various mAs values at 120kVp. The upper lung slice image was employed as a target image for evaluating the streak artifacts and radiological noise. One hundred parallel line segments with a length of 80 pixels were placed on the subtracted CT image, and the largest CT value in each CT value profile was employed as a feature variable of the streak artifacts; these feature variables were analyzed with the extreme value theory (Gumbel distribution). To detect only the radiological noise, all CT values contained in the 100 line profile were plotted on normal probability paper and the standard deviation was estimated from the inclination of its fitted line for the CT value plots. The two detection methods devised in this study were able to evaluate the streak artifacts and radiological noise in the CT images with high accuracy.

  6. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Nic Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used.

  7. A general procedure to generate models for urban environmental-noise pollution using feature selection and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of environmental noise in urban environments requires the solution of a complex and non-linear problem, since there are complex relationships among the multitude of variables involved in the characterization and modelling of environmental noise and environmental-noise magnitudes. Moreover, the inclusion of the great spatial heterogeneity characteristic of urban environments seems to be essential in order to achieve an accurate environmental-noise prediction in cities. This problem is addressed in this paper, where a procedure based on feature-selection techniques and machine-learning regression methods is proposed and applied to this environmental problem. Three machine-learning regression methods, which are considered very robust in solving non-linear problems, are used to estimate the energy-equivalent sound-pressure level descriptor (LAeq). These three methods are: (i) multilayer perceptron (MLP), (ii) sequential minimal optimisation (SMO), and (iii) Gaussian processes for regression (GPR). In addition, because of the high number of input variables involved in environmental-noise modelling and estimation in urban environments, which make LAeq prediction models quite complex and costly in terms of time and resources for application to real situations, three different techniques are used to approach feature selection or data reduction. The feature-selection techniques used are: (i) correlation-based feature-subset selection (CFS), (ii) wrapper for feature-subset selection (WFS), and the data reduction technique is principal-component analysis (PCA). The subsequent analysis leads to a proposal of different schemes, depending on the needs regarding data collection and accuracy. The use of WFS as the feature-selection technique with the implementation of SMO or GPR as regression algorithm provides the best LAeq estimation (R(2)=0.94 and mean absolute error (MAE)=1.14-1.16 dB(A)).

  8. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Morris H.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2001-01-01

    Three connected sub-projects were conducted under reported project. Partially, these sub-projects are directed to solving the problems conducted by the HU/FM&AL under two other NASA grants. The fundamental idea uniting these projects is to use untraditional 3D corrugated nozzle designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust lost and even with thrust augmentation. Such additional approaches are: (1) to add some solid, fluid, or gas mass at discrete locations to the main supersonic gas stream to minimize the negative influence of strong shock waves forming in propulsion systems; this mass addition may be accompanied by heat addition to the main stream as a result of the fuel combustion or by cooling of this stream as a result of the liquid mass evaporation and boiling; (2) to use porous or permeable nozzles and additional shells at the nozzle exit for preliminary cooling of exhaust hot jet and pressure compensation for non-design conditions (so-called continuous ejector with small mass flow rate; and (3) to propose and analyze new effective methods fuel injection into flow stream in air-breathing engines. Note that all these problems were formulated based on detailed descriptions of the main experimental facts observed at NASA Glenn Research Center. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of finding theoretical explanations for experimental facts and the creation of the accurate numerical simulation technique and prediction theory for solutions for current problems in propulsion systems solved by NASA and Navy agencies. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analysis for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The F&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations, and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. We will present some management activity

  9. Computational methods in the prediction of advanced subsonic and supersonic propeller induced noise: ASSPIN users' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the computational aspects of propeller noise prediction in the time domain and the use of high speed propeller noise prediction program ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic and Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise). These formulations are valid in both the near and far fields. Two formulations are utilized by ASSPIN: (1) one is used for subsonic portions of the propeller blade; and (2) the second is used for transonic and supersonic regions on the blade. Switching between the two formulations is done automatically. ASSPIN incorporates advanced blade geometry and surface pressure modelling, adaptive observer time grid strategies, and contains enhanced numerical algorithms that result in reduced computational time. In addition, the ability to treat the nonaxial inflow case has been included.

  10. Analysis of different methods to calculate electrochemical noise resistance using a three-electrode cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brusamarello, V.; Lago, A.; Franco, C.V.

    2000-03-01

    In a theoretical approach, the noise resistance parameter (R{sub n}) (in time domain) was deduced from an electric equivalent model proposed by Bertocci and coworkers for a cell with three identical electrodes. The voltage and current were measured. The R{sub n} and resistance of spectral noise (R{sub sn} and R{sub snO} [defined elsewhere]) were estimated for mild steel (MS) and stainless steel (SS) Type 304L (UNS S30403) electrodes immersed in four different solutions. The obtained results were converted into corrosion rate and finally compared with data measured with linear polarization resistance (LRP) and mass loss techniques. Electrochemical noise (EN) techniques had better agreement with other techniques in high corrosion rates. Furthermore, dispersed results were measured in low-activity systems.

  11. Method for detecting the signature of noise-induced structures in spatiotemporal data sets: an application to excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huett, Marc-Thorsten

    2003-05-01

    We formulate mathematical tools for analyzing spatiotemporal data sets. The tools are based on nearest-neighbor considerations similar to cellular automata. One of the analysis tools allows for reconstructing the noise intensity in a data set and is an appropriate method for detecting a variety of noise-induced phenomena in spatiotemporal data. The functioning of these methods is illustrated on sample data generated with the forest fire model and with networks of nonlinear oscillators. It is seen that these methods allow the characterization of spatiotemporal stochastic resonance (STSR) in experimental data. Application of these tools to biological spatiotemporal patterns is discussed. For one specific example, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, it is seen, how transitions between different patterns are clearly marked by changes in the spatiotemporal observables.

  12. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Hardin, Jay C.; Mosiane, Lotlamoreng; Kaushal, Patel; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2000-01-01

    In this project, we continue to develop the previous joint research between the Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) at Hampton University (HU) and the Jet Noise Team (JNT) at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC). The FM&AL was established at Hampton University in June of 1996 and has conducted research under two NASA grants: NAG-1-1835 (1996-99), and NAG-1-1936 (1997-00). In addition, the FM&AL has jointly conducted research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TsAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant #RE2-136 (1996-99). The goals of the FM&AL programs are twofold: (1) to improve the working efficiency of the FM&AUs team in generating new innovative ideas and in conducting research in the field of fluid dynamics and acoustics, basically for improvement of supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines, and (2) to attract promising minority students to this research and training and, in cooperation with other HU departments, to teach them basic knowledge in Aerodynamics, Gas Dynamics, and Theoretical and Experimental Methods in Aeroacoustics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The research at the HU FM&AL supports reduction schemes associated with the emission of engine pollutants for commercial aircraft and concepts for reduction of observables for military aircraft. These research endeavors relate to the goals of the NASA Strategic Enterprise in Aeronautics concerning the development of environmentally acceptable aircraft. It is in this precise area, where the US aircraft industry, academia, and Government are in great need of trained professionals and which is a high priority goal of the Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) Program, that the HU FM&AL can make its most important contribution. The main achievements for the reporting period in the development of concepts for noise reduction and improvement in efficiency for jet exhaust nozzles and inlets for aircraft engines

  13. The stages of implementation completion for evidence-based practice: protocol for a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This protocol describes the ‘development of outcome measures and suitable methodologies for dissemination and implementation approaches,’ a priority for implementation research. Although many evidence-based practices (EBPs) have been developed, large knowledge gaps remain regarding how to routinely move EBPs into usual care. The lack of understanding of ‘what it takes’ to install EBPs has costly public health consequences, including a lack of availability of the most beneficial services, wasted efforts and resources on failed implementation attempts, and the potential for engendering reluctance to try implementing new EBPs after failed attempts. The Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC) is an eight-stage tool of implementation process and milestones, with stages spanning three implementation phases (pre-implementation, implementation, sustainability). Items delineate the date that a site completes implementation activities, yielding an assessment of duration (time to complete a stage), proportion (of stage activities completed), and a general measure of how far a site moved in the implementation process. Methods/Design We propose to extend the SIC to EBPs operating in child service sectors (juvenile justice, schools, substance use, child welfare). Both successful and failed implementation attempts will be scrutinized using a mixed methods design. Stage costs will be measured and examined. Both retrospective data (from previous site implementation efforts) and prospective data (from newly adopting sites) will be analyzed. The influence of pre-implementation on implementation and sustainability outcomes will be examined (Aim 1). Mixed methods procedures will focus on increasing understanding of the process of implementation failure in an effort to determine if the SIC can provide early detection of sites that are unlikely to succeed (Aim 2). Study activities will include cost mapping of SIC stages and an examination of the relationship between

  14. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O’Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method’s discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  15. Development of a Test of Suprathreshold Acuity in Noise in Brazilian Portuguese: A New Method for Hearing Screening and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Nara; Desgualdo-Pereira, Liliane; Paglialonga, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a speech-in-noise test for hearing screening and surveillance in Brazilian Portuguese based on the evaluation of suprathreshold acuity performances. The SUN test (Speech Understanding in Noise) consists of a list of intervocalic consonants in noise presented in a multiple-choice paradigm by means of a touch screen. The test provides one out of three possible results: “a hearing check is recommended” (red light), “a hearing check would be advisable” (yellow light), and “no hearing difficulties” (green light) (Paglialonga et al., Comput. Biol. Med. 2014). This novel test was developed in a population of 30 normal hearing young adults and 101 adults with varying degrees of hearing impairment and handicap, including normal hearing. The test had 84% sensitivity and 76% specificity compared to conventional pure-tone screening and 83% sensitivity and 86% specificity to detect disabling hearing impairment. The test outcomes were in line with the degree of self-perceived hearing handicap. The results found here paralleled those reported in the literature for the SUN test and for conventional speech-in-noise measures. This study showed that the proposed test might be a viable method to identify individuals with hearing problems to be referred to further audiological assessment and intervention. PMID:25247181

  16. Method of calculating gas dynamics and heat transfer in single stage refrigeration units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhitomirskiy, I. S.; Popolskiy, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized mathematical model of gas-dynamic and heat transfer processes in single-stage regenerative installations operating in Stirling, MacMahon, Gifford-MacMahon, and pulsating tube cycles is proposed. A numerical method os solving initial equations on a digital computer is given. This makes it possible to calculate the change in the thermodynamic parameters in the working cycle in different machine components, as well as the dependence of cold productivity on the temperature level in the steady regime.

  17. Simplified two-stage method to B-phycoerythrin recovery from Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Jorge; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2006-11-21

    A simplified two-stage method for B-phycoerythrin (BPE) recovery from Porphyridium cruentum was developed. The proposed method involved cell disruption by sonication and primary recovery by aqueous two-phase partition. The evaluation of two different methods of cell disruption and the effect of increasing concentration of cell homogenate from P. cruentum culture upon aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) performance was carried out to avoid the use of precipitation stages. Cell disruption by sonication proved to be superior over manual maceration since a five time increase in the concentration of B-phycoerythrin release was achieved. An increase in the concentration of crude extract from disrupted P. cruentum cells loaded to the ATPS (from 10 to 40%, w/w) proved to be suitable to increase the product purity and benefited the processing of highly concentrated disrupted extract. Kinetics studies of phase separation performed suggested the use of batch settlers with height/diameter (H/D) ratio less than one to reduce the necessary time for the phases to separate. The proposed ATPS stage comprising of 29% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000g/mol, 9% (w/w) potassium phosphate, tie-line length (TLL) of 45% (w/w), volume ratio (V(R)) of 4.5, pH 7.0 and 40% (w/w) crude extract loaded in a batch settler with H/D ratio of 0.5 proved to be efficient for the recovery of 90% of B-phycoerythrin at the top PEG-rich phase. The purity of B-phycoerythrin increased up to 4.0 times after the two-stage method. The results reported here demonstrate the potential implementation of a strategy to B-phycoerythrin recovery with a purity of 3.2 (estimated by the absorbance relation of 545-280nm) from P. cruentum.

  18. A method for predicting static-to-flight effects on coaxial jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, William D.; Chinoy, Cyrus B.

    2016-08-01

    Previously-published work has provided a theoretical modelling of the jet noise from coaxial nozzle configurations in the form of component sources which can each be quantified in terms of modified single-stream jets. This modelling has been refined and extended to cover a wide range of the operating conditions of aircraft turbofan engines with separate exhaust flows, encompassing area ratios from 0.8 to 4. The objective has been to establish a basis for predicting the static-to-flight changes in the coaxial jet noise by applying single-stream flight effects to each of the sources comprising the modelling of the coaxial jet noise under static conditions. Relatively few experimental test points are available for validation although these do cover the full extent of the jet conditions and area ratios considered. The experimental results are limited in their frequency range by practical considerations but the static-to-flight changes in the third-octave SPLs are predicted to within a standard deviation of 0.4 dB although the complex effects of jet refraction and convection cause the errors to increase at low flight emission angles to the jet axis. The modelling also provides useful insights into the mechanisms involved in the generation of coaxial jet noise and has facilitated the identification of inadequacies in the experimental simulation of flight effects.

  19. Experimental method for reactor-noise measurements of effective beta. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.

    1981-09-01

    A variance-to-mean noise technique, modified to eliminate systematic errors from drifting of reactor power, has been used to infer integral values of effective beta for uranium and plutonium fueled fast reactor modk-ups. The measurement technique, including corrections for a finite detector-electrometer time response, is described together with preliminary beta measurement results.

  20. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB. PMID:26712765

  1. Anti-noise algorithm of lidar data retrieval by combining the ensemble Kalman filter and the Fernald method.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feiyue; Gong, Wei; Li, Chen

    2013-04-01

    The lidar signal-to-noise ratio decreases rapidly with an increase in range, which severely affects the retrieval accuracy and the effective measure range of a lidar based on the Fernald method. To avoid this issue, an alternative approach is proposed to simultaneously retrieve lidar data accurately and obtain a de-noised signal as a by-product by combining the ensemble Kalman filter and the Fernald method. The dynamical model of the new algorithm is generated according to the lidar equation to forecast backscatter coefficients. In this paper, we use the ensemble sizes as 60 and the factor δ(1/2) as 1.2 after being weighed against the accuracy and the time cost based on the performance function we define. The retrieval and de-noising results of both simulated and real signals demonstrate that our method is practical and effective. An extensive application of our method can be useful for the long-term determining of the aerosol optical properties.

  2. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-12-26

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB.

  3. Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh method for efficient prediction of tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, efficient numerical method is proposed for predicting tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit. The proposed method is based on Hybrid Computational Aero-Acoustic (H-CAA) techniques combined with Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh (U-FRPM) method. The U-FRPM method is developed by extending the FRPM method proposed by Ewert et al. and is utilized to synthesize turbulence flow field from unsteady RANS solutions. The H-CAA technique combined with U-FRPM method is applied to predict broadband as well as tonal noises of a centrifugal fan unit in a household refrigerator. Firstly, unsteady flow field driven by a rotating fan is computed by solving the RANS equations with Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. Main source regions around the rotating fan are identified by examining the computed flow fields. Then, turbulence flow fields in the main source regions are synthesized by applying the U-FRPM method. The acoustic analogy is applied to model acoustic sources in the main source regions. Finally, the centrifugal fan noise is predicted by feeding the modeled acoustic sources into an acoustic solver based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The sound spectral levels predicted using the current numerical method show good agreements with the measured spectra at the Blade Pass Frequencies (BPFs) as well as in the high frequency range. On the more, the present method enables quantitative assessment of relative contributions of identified source regions to the sound field by comparing predicted sound pressure spectrum due to modeled sources.

  4. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  5. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  6. Identifying P-phase arrivals with noise: An improved Kurtosis method based on DWT and STA/LTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Shang, Xueyi; Wang, Zewei; Dong, Longjun; Weng, Lei

    2016-10-01

    A discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and short time average to long time average (STA/LTA)-based Kurtosis algorithm (W-S/L-K method) is proposed to pick the arrival time of the P-phase; this method advantageously combines the outstanding ability of retrieving the P-phase arrival information from wavelet coefficients at high resolutions with inherent reliability in obtaining the P-phase arrival time using the STA/LTA picking method. The W-S/L-K method uses local maximum amplitudes and local kurtosis onsets from the wavelet detail components to determine the P-phase arrival times reliably and accurately. It was tested and verified using microseismic data collected from the Yongshaba mine. The results show that the W-S/L-K method's rates of picking errors smaller than 5 ms, 10 ms, and 15 ms were 58%, 86%, and 97.5%, respectively, and the W-S/L-K method was able to pick higher quality P-phase arrival times than those determined using the Kurtosis, Skewness, STA/LTA, Kurtosis + STA/LTA, and Skewness + STA/LTA methods. The proposed method provides a reliable technique for accurately picking P-phase arrival times, especially for signals with low signal to noise ratios (SNRs), heavy tails, and spikes. Moreover, it is able to detect pure noise.

  7. Coupled mutation finder: A new entropy-based method quantifying phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of significant compensatory mutation signals in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is often complicated by noise. A challenging problem in bioinformatics is remains the separation of significant signals between two or more non-conserved residue sites from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. Determination of these non-conserved residue sites is as important as the recognition of strictly conserved positions for understanding of the structural basis of protein functions and identification of functionally important residue regions. In this study, we developed a new method, the Coupled Mutation Finder (CMF) quantifying the phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations. Results To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we analyzed essential sites of two human proteins: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and glucokinase (GCK). Our results suggest that the CMF is able to separate significant compensatory mutation signals from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. The vast majority of compensatory mutation sites found by the CMF are related to essential sites of both proteins and they are likely to affect protein stability or functionality. Conclusions The CMF is a new method, which includes an MSA-specific statistical model based on multiple testing procedures that quantify the error made in terms of the false discovery rate and a novel entropy-based metric to upscale BLOSUM62 dissimilar compensatory mutations. Therefore, it is a helpful tool to predict and investigate compensatory mutation sites of structural or functional importance in proteins. We suggest that the CMF could be used as a novel automated function prediction tool that is required for a better understanding of the structural basis of proteins. The CMF server is freely accessible at http://cmf.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de. PMID:22963049

  8. A novel method to improve noise figure for double-pass L-band EDFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Ling; Liu, Yange; Wang, Chao; Liu, Lihui; Xiong, Lingyun; Yuan, Shuzhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a noise figure improved double-pass L-band EDFA based on HiBi fiber loop mirror as the ASE suppressor. By utilizing a HiBi fiber loop mirror as the wavelength-dependent reflector, the ASE light has been weakened to a large extend, which increases the inversion ion population at the input end of erbium-doped fiber. Therefore, the noise figure of this double-pass EDFA has been much improved. Compared with that of the conventional double-pass structure based on 3dB fiber loop mirror, the NF of our novel configuration is reduced by 2.06~5.33dB for the ten sampled signal wavelength (1580.84nm~1588.48nm).

  9. Stochastic optimal control and estimation methods adapted to the noise characteristics of the sensorimotor system.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2005-05-01

    Optimality principles of biological movement are conceptually appealing and straightforward to formulate. Testing them empirically, however, requires the solution to stochastic optimal control and estimation problems for reasonably realistic models of the motor task and the sensorimotor periphery. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of incorporating biologically plausible noise into such models. Here we extend the linear-quadratic-gaussian framework--currently the only framework where such problems can be solved efficiently--to include control-dependent, state-dependent, and internal noise. Under this extended noise model, we derive a coordinate-descent algorithm guaranteed to converge to a feedback control law and a nonadaptive linear estimator optimal with respect to each other. Numerical simulations indicate that convergence is exponential, local minima do not exist, and the restriction to nonadaptive linear estimators has negligible effects in the control problems of interest. The application of the algorithm is illustrated in the context of reaching movements. A Matlab implementation is available at www.cogsci.ucsd.edu/~todorov.

  10. Advanced Methods for Aircraft Engine Thrust and Noise Benefits: Nozzle-Inlet Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Morgan, Morris H.; Povitsky, Alex; Schkolnikov, Natalia; Njoroge, Norman; Coston, Calvin; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory at Hampton University (HU/FM&AL) jointly with the NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted four connected subprojects under the reporting project. Basically, the HU/FM&AL Team has been involved in joint research with the purpose of theoretical explanation of experimental facts and creation of accurate numerical simulation techniques and prediction theory for solution of current problems in propulsion systems of interest to the NAVY and NASA agencies. This work is also supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations and possible experimental tests at the Hampton University campus. The fundamental idea uniting these subprojects is to use nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle and inlet designs and additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. These subprojects are: (1) Aeroperformance and acoustics of Bluebell-shaped and Telescope-shaped designs; (2) An analysis of sharp-edged nozzle exit designs for effective fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines: triangular-round, diamond-round and other nozzles; (3) Measurement technique improvement for the HU Low Speed Wind Tunnel; a new course in the field of aerodynamics, teaching and training of HU students; experimental tests of Mobius-shaped screws: research and training; (4) Supersonic inlet shape optimization. The main outcomes during this reporting period are: (l) Publications: The AIAA Paper #00-3170 was presented at the 36th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 17-19 June, 2000, Huntsville, AL. The AIAA

  11. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  12. Aeroelastic Computations of a Compressor Stage Using the Harmonic Balance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of a compressor stage were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solver that uses the harmonic balance method to solve the governing equations. The three dimensional solver models the unsteady flow field due to blade vibration using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The formulation enables the study of the effect of blade row interaction through the inclusion of coupling modes between blade rows. It also enables the study of nonlinear effects of high amplitude blade vibration by the inclusion of higher harmonics of the fundamental blade vibration frequency. In the present work, the solver is applied to study in detail the aeroelastic characteristics of a transonic compressor stage. Various parameters were included in the study: number of coupling modes, blade row axial spacing, and operating speeds. Only the first vibration mode is considered with amplitude of oscillation in the linear range. Both aeroelastic stability (flutter) of rotor blade and unsteady loading on the stator are calculated. The study showed that for the stage considered, the rotor aerodynamic damping is not influenced by the presence of the stator even when the axial spacing is reduced by nearly 25 percent. However, the study showed that blade row interaction effects become important for the unsteady loading on the stator when the axial spacing is reduced by the same amount.

  13. A two-stage inexact joint-probabilistic programming method for air quality management under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lv, Y; Huang, G H; Li, Y P; Yang, Z F; Sun, W

    2011-03-01

    A two-stage inexact joint-probabilistic programming (TIJP) method is developed for planning a regional air quality management system with multiple pollutants and multiple sources. The TIJP method incorporates the techniques of two-stage stochastic programming, joint-probabilistic constraint programming and interval mathematical programming, where uncertainties expressed as probability distributions and interval values can be addressed. Moreover, it can not only examine the risk of violating joint-probability constraints, but also account for economic penalties as corrective measures against any infeasibility. The developed TIJP method is applied to a case study of a regional air pollution control problem, where the air quality index (AQI) is introduced for evaluation of the integrated air quality management system associated with multiple pollutants. The joint-probability exists in the environmental constraints for AQI, such that individual probabilistic constraints for each pollutant can be efficiently incorporated within the TIJP model. The results indicate that useful solutions for air quality management practices have been generated; they can help decision makers to identify desired pollution abatement strategies with minimized system cost and maximized environmental efficiency. PMID:21067860

  14. [Fractal dimension and histogram method: algorithm and some preliminary results of noise-like time series analysis].

    PubMed

    Pancheliuga, V A; Pancheliuga, M S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work a methodological background for the histogram method of time series analysis is developed. Connection between shapes of smoothed histograms constructed on the basis of short segments of time series of fluctuations and the fractal dimension of the segments is studied. It is shown that the fractal dimension possesses all main properties of the histogram method. Based on it a further development of fractal dimension determination algorithm is proposed. This algorithm allows more precision determination of the fractal dimension by using the "all possible combination" method. The application of the method to noise-like time series analysis leads to results, which could be obtained earlier only by means of the histogram method based on human expert comparisons of histograms shapes. PMID:23755565

  15. An efficient method for nonnegatively constrained Total Variation-based denoising of medical images corrupted by Poisson noise.

    PubMed

    Landi, G; Piccolomini, E Loli

    2012-01-01

    Medical images obtained with emission processes are corrupted by noise of Poisson type. In the paper the denoising problem is modeled in a Bayesian statistical setting by a nonnegatively constrained minimization problem, where the objective function is constituted by a data fitting term, the Kullback-Leibler divergence, plus a regularization term, the Total Variation function, weighted by a regularization parameter. Aim of the paper is to propose an efficient numerical method for the solution of the constrained problem. The method is a Newton projection method, where the inner system is solved by the Conjugate Gradient method, preconditioned and implemented in an efficient way for this specific application. The numerical results on simulated and real medical images prove the effectiveness of the method, both for the accuracy and the computational cost.

  16. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  17. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  18. Development of a Transient Acoustic Boundary Element Method to Predict the Noise Signature of Swimming Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Moored, Keith; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Animals have evolved flexible wings and fins to efficiently and quietly propel themselves through the air and water. The design of quiet and efficient bio-inspired propulsive concepts requires a rapid, unified computational framework that integrates three essential features: the fluid mechanics, the elastic structural response, and the noise generation. This study focuses on the development, validation, and demonstration of a transient, two-dimensional acoustic boundary element solver accelerated by a fast multipole algorithm. The resulting acoustic solver is used to characterize the acoustic signature produced by a vortex street advecting over a NACA 0012 airfoil, which is representative of vortex-body interactions that occur in schools of swimming fish. Both 2S and 2P canonical vortex streets generated by fish are investigated over the range of Strouhal number 0 . 2 < St < 0 . 4 , and the acoustic signature of the airfoil is quantified. This study provides the first estimate of the noise signature of a school of swimming fish. Lehigh University CORE Grant.

  19. Methods for Processing and Interpretation of AIS Signals Corrupted by Noise and Packet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poļevskis, J.; Krastiņš, M.; Korāts, G.; Skorodumovs, A.; Trokšs, J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors deal with the operation of Automatic Identification System (AIS) used in the marine traffic monitoring to broadcast messages containing information about the vessel: id, payload, size, speed, destination etc., meant primarily for avoidance of ship collisions. To extend the radius of AIS operation, it is envisaged to dispose its receivers on satellites. However, in space, due to a large coverage area, interfering factors are especially pronounced - such as packet collision, Doppler's shift and noise impact on AIS message receiving, pre-processing and decoding. To assess the quality of an AIS receiver's operation, a test was carried out in which, varying automatically frequency, amplitude, noise, and other parameters, the data on the ability of the receiver's ability to decode AIS signals are collected. In the work, both hardware- and software-based AIS decoders were tested. As a result, quite satisfactory statistics has been gathered - both on the common and the differing features of such decoders when operating in space. To obtain reliable data on the software-defined radio AIS receivers, further research is envisaged.

  20. Noise Reduction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  1. A Two-Stage Method to Determine Optimal Product Sampling considering Dynamic Potential Market

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhineng; Lu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops an optimization model for the diffusion effects of free samples under dynamic changes in potential market based on the characteristics of independent product and presents a two-stage method to figure out the sampling level. The impact analysis of the key factors on the sampling level shows that the increase of the external coefficient or internal coefficient has a negative influence on the sampling level. And the changing rate of the potential market has no significant influence on the sampling level whereas the repeat purchase has a positive one. Using logistic analysis and regression analysis, the global sensitivity analysis gives a whole analysis of the interaction of all parameters, which provides a two-stage method to estimate the impact of the relevant parameters in the case of inaccuracy of the parameters and to be able to construct a 95% confidence interval for the predicted sampling level. Finally, the paper provides the operational steps to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation and an innovational way to estimate the sampling level. PMID:25821847

  2. A two-stage method to determine optimal product sampling considering dynamic potential market.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhineng; Lu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops an optimization model for the diffusion effects of free samples under dynamic changes in potential market based on the characteristics of independent product and presents a two-stage method to figure out the sampling level. The impact analysis of the key factors on the sampling level shows that the increase of the external coefficient or internal coefficient has a negative influence on the sampling level. And the changing rate of the potential market has no significant influence on the sampling level whereas the repeat purchase has a positive one. Using logistic analysis and regression analysis, the global sensitivity analysis gives a whole analysis of the interaction of all parameters, which provides a two-stage method to estimate the impact of the relevant parameters in the case of inaccuracy of the parameters and to be able to construct a 95% confidence interval for the predicted sampling level. Finally, the paper provides the operational steps to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation and an innovational way to estimate the sampling level.

  3. Psychoacoustic Analysis of Synthesized Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okcu, Selen; Rathsam, Jonathan; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    An aircraft noise synthesis capability is being developed so the annoyance caused by proposed aircraft can be assessed during the design stage. To make synthesized signals as realistic as possible, high fidelity simulation is required for source (e.g., engine noise, airframe noise), propagation and receiver effects. This psychoacoustic study tests whether the jet noise component of synthesized aircraft engine noise can be made more realistic using a low frequency oscillator (LFO) technique to simulate fluctuations in level observed in recordings. Jet noise predictions are commonly made in the frequency domain based on models of time-averaged empirical data. The synthesis process involves conversion of the frequency domain prediction into an audible pressure time history. However, because the predictions are time-invariant, the synthesized sound lacks fluctuations observed in recordings. Such fluctuations are hypothesized to be perceptually important. To introduce time-varying characteristics into jet noise synthesis, a method has been developed that modulates measured or predicted 1/3-octave band levels with a (<20Hz) LFO. The LFO characteristics are determined through analysis of laboratory jet noise recordings. For the aft emission angle, results indicate that signals synthesized using a generic LFO are perceived as more similar to recordings than those using no LFO, and signals synthesized with an angle-specific LFO are more similar to recordings than those synthesized with a generic LFO.

  4. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  5. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  6. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  7. A two-stage method for microcalcification cluster segmentation in mammography by deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Arikidis, N.; Kazantzi, A.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Karahaliou, A.; Costaridou, L.; Vassiou, K.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Segmentation of microcalcification (MC) clusters in x-ray mammography is a difficult task for radiologists. Accurate segmentation is prerequisite for quantitative image analysis of MC clusters and subsequent feature extraction and classification in computer-aided diagnosis schemes. Methods: In this study, a two-stage semiautomated segmentation method of MC clusters is investigated. The first stage is targeted to accurate and time efficient segmentation of the majority of the particles of a MC cluster, by means of a level set method. The second stage is targeted to shape refinement of selected individual MCs, by means of an active contour model. Both methods are applied in the framework of a rich scale-space representation, provided by the wavelet transform at integer scales. Segmentation reliability of the proposed method in terms of inter and intraobserver agreements was evaluated in a case sample of 80 MC clusters originating from the digital database for screening mammography, corresponding to 4 morphology types (punctate: 22, fine linear branching: 16, pleomorphic: 18, and amorphous: 24) of MC clusters, assessing radiologists’ segmentations quantitatively by two distance metrics (Hausdorff distance—HDIST{sub cluster}, average of minimum distance—AMINDIST{sub cluster}) and the area overlap measure (AOM{sub cluster}). The effect of the proposed segmentation method on MC cluster characterization accuracy was evaluated in a case sample of 162 pleomorphic MC clusters (72 malignant and 90 benign). Ten MC cluster features, targeted to capture morphologic properties of individual MCs in a cluster (area, major length, perimeter, compactness, and spread), were extracted and a correlation-based feature selection method yielded a feature subset to feed in a support vector machine classifier. Classification performance of the MC cluster features was estimated by means of the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (Az ± Standard Error) utilizing

  8. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  9. A signal filtering method for improved quantification and noise discrimination in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Payne, Tristan G; Southam, Andrew D; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Viant, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Direct-infusion electrospray-ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (DI ESI FT-ICR MS) is increasingly being utilized in metabolomics, including the high sensitivity selected ion monitoring (SIM)-stitching approach. Accurate signal quantification and the discrimination of real signals from noise remain major challenges for this approach, with both adversely affected by factors including ion suppression during electrospray, ion-ion interactions in the detector cell, and thermally-induced white noise. This is particularly problematic for complex mixture analysis where hundreds of metabolites are present near the noise level. Here we address relative signal quantification and noise discrimination issues in SIM-stitched DI ESI FT-ICR MS-based metabolomics. Using liver tissue, we first optimized the number of scans (n) acquired per SIM window to address the balance between quantification accuracy versus acquisition time (and thus sample throughput); a minimum of n = 5 is recommended. Secondly, we characterized and computationally-corrected an effect whereby an ion's intensity is dependent upon its location within a SIM window, exhibiting a 3-fold higher intensity at the high m/z end. This resulted in significantly improved quantification accuracy. Finally, we thoroughly characterized a three-stage filter to discriminate noise from real signals, which comprised a signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) hard threshold, then a "replicate" filter (retaining only peaks in r-out-of-3 replicate analyses), and then a "sample" filter (retaining only peaks in >s% of biological samples). We document the benefits of three-stage filtering versus one- and two-stage filters, and show the importance of selecting filter parameters that balance the confidence that a signal is real versus the total number of peaks detected.

  10. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  11. Dynamic frequency-noise spectrum measurement for a frequency-swept DFB laser with short-delayed self-heterodyne method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Qin, Jie; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Tong, Yitian; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-11-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a short-delayed self-heterodyne method with 15.5m delay to get a large-frequency-range laser frequency-noise spectrum over 10Hz to 50 MHz, and an averaging approach to extract the intrinsic frequency noise of a frequency-swept laser. With these two techniques, dynamic frequency-noise spectrum of a frequency-swept DFB laser when free running and servo-controlled are both measured. This measurement method permits accurate and insightful investigation of laser stability.

  12. A hybrid method for hydrodynamic-kinetic flow Part I: A particle-grid method for reducing stochastic noise in kinetic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Alaia, Alessandro; Puppo, Gabriella

    2011-06-20

    In this work we present a hybrid particle-grid Monte Carlo method for the Boltzmann equation, which is characterized by a significant reduction of the stochastic noise in the kinetic regime. The hybrid method is based on a first order splitting in time to separate the transport from the relaxation step. The transport step is solved by a deterministic scheme, while a hybrid DSMC-based method is used to solve the collision step. Such a hybrid scheme is based on splitting the solution in a collisional and a non-collisional part at the beginning of the collision step, and the DSMC method is used to solve the relaxation step for the collisional part of the solution only. This is accomplished by sampling only the fraction of particles candidate for collisions from the collisional part of the solution, performing collisions as in a standard DSMC method, and then projecting the particles back onto a velocity grid to compute a piecewise constant reconstruction for the collisional part of the solution. The latter is added to a piecewise constant reconstruction of the non-collisional part of the solution, which in fact remains unchanged during the relaxation step. Numerical results show that the stochastic noise is significantly reduced at large Knudsen numbers with respect to the standard DSMC method. Indeed in this algorithm, the particle scheme is applied only on the collisional part of the solution, so only this fraction of the solution is affected by stochastic fluctuations. But since the collisional part of the solution reduces as the Knudsen number increases, stochastic noise reduces as well at large Knudsen numbers.

  13. Comparing regression methods for the two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, J C; Heidenreich, W F

    2004-11-15

    In the statistical analysis of cohort data with risk estimation models, both Poisson and individual likelihood regressions are widely used methods of parameter estimation. In this paper, their performance has been tested with the biologically motivated two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model of carcinogenesis. To exclude inevitable uncertainties of existing data, cohorts with simple individual exposure history have been created by Monte Carlo simulation. To generate some similar properties of atomic bomb survivors and radon-exposed mine workers, both acute and protracted exposure patterns have been generated. Then the capacity of the two regression methods has been compared to retrieve a priori known model parameters from the simulated cohort data. For simple models with smooth hazard functions, the parameter estimates from both methods come close to their true values. However, for models with strongly discontinuous functions which are generated by the cell mutation process of transformation, the Poisson regression method fails to produce reliable estimates. This behaviour is explained by the construction of class averages during data stratification. Thereby, some indispensable information on the individual exposure history was destroyed. It could not be repaired by countermeasures such as the refinement of Poisson classes or a more adequate choice of Poisson groups. Although this choice might still exist we were unable to discover it. In contrast to this, the individual likelihood regression technique was found to work reliably for all considered versions of the TSCE model. PMID:15490436

  14. Centrifugal compressor surge detecting method based on wavelet analysis of unsteady pressure fluctuations in typical stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmaylov, R.; Lebedev, A.

    2015-08-01

    Centrifugal compressors are complex energy equipment. Automotive control and protection system should meet the requirements: of operation reliability and durability. In turbocompressors there are at least two dangerous areas: surge and rotating stall. Antisurge protecting systems usually use parametric or feature methods. As a rule industrial system are parametric. The main disadvantages of anti-surge parametric systems are difficulties in mass flow measurements in natural gas pipeline compressor. The principal idea of feature method is based on the experimental fact: as a rule just before the onset of surge rotating or precursor stall established in compressor. In this case the problem consists in detecting of unsteady pressure or velocity fluctuations characteristic signals. Wavelet analysis is the best method for detecting onset of rotating stall in spite of high level of spurious signals (rotating wakes, turbulence, etc.). This method is compatible with state of the art DSP systems of industrial control. Examples of wavelet analysis application for detecting onset of rotating stall in typical stages centrifugal compressor are presented. Experimental investigations include unsteady pressure measurement and sophisticated data acquisition system. Wavelet transforms used biorthogonal wavelets in Mathlab systems.

  15. Comparison of predicted engine core noise with current and proposed aircraft noise certification requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    Predicted engine core noise levels are compared with measured total aircraft noise levels and with current and proposed federal noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made at the FAR-36 measuring stations and include consideration of both full- and cutback-power operation at takeoff. In general, core noise provides a barrier to achieving proposed EPA stage 5 noise levels for all types of aircraft. More specifically, core noise levels will limit further reductions in aircraft noise levels for current widebody commercial aircraft.

  16. When stable-stage equilibrium is unlikely: integrating transient population dynamics improves asymptotic methods

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Raymond L.; Raventos, Josep; Ackerman, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Evaluation of population projection matrices (PPMs) that are focused on asymptotically based properties of populations is a commonly used approach to evaluate projected dynamics of managed populations. Recently, a set of tools for evaluating the properties of transient dynamics has been expanded to evaluate PPMs and to consider the dynamics of populations prior to attaining the stable-stage distribution, a state that may never be achieved in disturbed or otherwise ephemeral habitats or persistently small populations. This study re-evaluates data for a tropical orchid and examines the value of including such analyses in an integrative approach. Methods Six small populations of Lepanthes rubripetala were used as a model system and the R software package popdemo was used to produce estimates of the indices for the asymptotic growth rate (lambda), sensitivities, reactivity, first-time step attenuation, maximum amplification, maximum attenuation, maximal inertia and maximal attenuation. The response in lambda to perturbations of demographic parameters using transfer functions and multiple perturbations on growth, stasis and fecundity were also determined. The results were compared with previously published asymptotic indices. Key Results It was found that combining asymptotic and transient dynamics expands the understanding of possible population changes. Comparison of the predicted density from reactivity and first-time step attenuation with the observed change in population size in two orchid populations showed that the observed density was within the predicted range. However, transfer function analysis suggests that the traditional approach of measuring perturbation of growth rates and persistence (inertia) may be misleading and is likely to result in erroneous management decisions. Conclusions Based on the results, an integrative approach is recommended using traditional PPMs (asymptotic processes) with an evaluation of the diversity of dynamics

  17. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  18. Refinements to the method of epicentral location based on surface waves from ambient seismic noise: introducing Love waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levshin, Anatoli L.; Barmin, Mikhail P.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mendoza, Carlos; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a modification to a previous method of regional seismic event location based on Empirical Green’s Functions (EGFs) produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long ambient noise time-series recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh- and Love-wave energy on the vertical and transverse components, respectively, and we utilize these signals between about 5 and 12 s period. The previous method, based exclusively on Rayleigh waves, may yield biased epicentral locations for certain event types with hypocentral depths between 2 and 5 km. Here we present theoretical arguments that show how Love waves can be introduced to reduce or potentially eliminate the bias. We also present applications of Rayleigh- and Love-wave EGFs to locate 10 reference events in the western United States. The separate Rayleigh and Love epicentral locations and the joint locations using a combination of the two waves agree to within 1 km distance, on average, but confidence ellipses are smallest when both types of waves are used.

  19. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  20. The influence of noise on BOLD-mediated vessel size imaging analysis methods

    PubMed Central

    Germuska, Michael A; Meakin, James A; Bulte, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Vessel size imaging (VSI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that aims to provide quantitative measurements of tissue microvasculature. An emerging variation of this technique uses the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect as the source of the imaging contrast. Gas challenges have the advantage over contrast injection techniques in that they are noninvasive and easily repeatable because of the fast washout of the contrast. However, initial results from BOLD-VSI studies are somewhat contradictory, with substantially different estimates of the mean vessel radius. Owing to BOLD-VSI being an emerging technique, there is not yet a standard processing methodology, and different techniques have been used to calculate the mean vessel radius and reject uncertain estimates. In addition, the acquisition methodology and signal modeling vary from group to group. Owing to these differences, it is difficult to determine the source of this variation. Here we use computer modeling to assess the impact of noise on the accuracy and precision of different BOLD-VSI calculations. Our results show both potential overestimates and underestimates of the mean vessel radius, which is confirmed with a validation study at 3T. PMID:23942365

  1. Methods for mitigating the effect of noise, interference, and model error on microwave breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burfeindt, Matthew J.

    Microwave inverse scattering shows promise for meeting important clinical needs in breast imaging that arise due to drawbacks in traditional imaging technologies. The dielectric contrast between different breast tissue types, the 3-D nature of various inverse scattering algorithms, as well as microwave technology's relative safety and low cost motivate a microwave-based approach. However, challenges remain for this type of imaging technique, as it requires solving a linear system that is ill-posed and underdetermined, thus making it sensitive to noise, interference, and mismatch between the assumed and actual properties of the propagation environment. In this document, we report a series of studies performed with the goal of mitigating the effect of these types of signal errors on the imaging results. We conduct a numerical feasibility study to demonstrate the efficacy of microwave breast imaging using an enclosed array of miniaturized, multi-band patch antennas designed to account for the ill-posed nature of the imaging problem. We then conduct several experimental studies with an array prototype, wherein we characterize the sensitivity of the array to model error as well as create experimental reconstructions of both geometrically-simple objects and an MRI-derived 3-D-printed breast phantom. Lastly, we incorporate a beamforming-enhancement into the imaging algorithm with the goal of making it less sensitive to signal error.

  2. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  3. Stage design

    DOEpatents

    Shacter, J.

    1975-12-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage.

  4. The Two-Stage Examination: A Method to Assess Individual Competence and Collaborative Problem Solving in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Morton, David A.; Pippitt, Karly; Lamb, Sara; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Effectively solving problems as a team under stressful conditions is central to medical practice; however, because summative examinations in medical education must test individual competence, they are typically solitary assessments. Approach Using two-stage examinations, in which students first answer questions individually (Stage 1) and then discuss them in teams prior to resubmitting their answers (Stage 2), is one method for rectifying this discordance. On the basis of principles of social constructivism, the authors hypothesized that two-stage examinations would lead to better retention of, specifically, items answered incorrectly at Stage 1. In fall 2014, they divided 104 first-year medical students into two groups of 52 students. Groups alternated each week between taking one- and two-stage examinations such that each student completed 6 one-stage and 6 two-stage examinations. The authors reassessed 61 concepts on a final examination and, using the Wilcoxon signed ranked tests, compared performance for all concepts and for just those students initially missed, between Stages 1 and 2. Outcomes Final examination performance on all previously assessed concepts was not significantly different between the one-and two-stage conditions (P = .77); however, performance on only concepts that students initially answered incorrectly on a prior examination improved by 12% for the two-stage condition relative to the one-stage condition (P = .02, r = 0.17). Next Steps Team assessment may be most useful for assessing concepts students find difficult, as opposed to all content. More research is needed to determine whether these results apply to all medical school topics and student cohorts. PMID:27049544

  5. Polarisation analysis of magnetotelluric time series using a wavelet-based scheme: A method for detection and characterisation of cultural noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalas, M.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Marcuello, A.

    2013-05-01

    The identification and elimination of cultural noise that affects magnetotelluric (MT) time series presents a challenge in the vicinity of industrialised, urban or farming areas. Most noise sources are fixed in space and create a signal with certain polarisation properties. In this paper, we propose a new method for detection and characterisation of cultural noise sources in magnetotelluric time series based on polarisation analysis of the electromagnetic signal in the time-frequency domain using a wavelet scheme. We tested the proposed method with synthetic polarised signals and experimental time series corresponding to a field experiment with a controlled EM source and several MT real cases. The results demonstrated the difference between the polarisation properties of the natural MT signal and the signal contaminated by a controlled source or by cultural noise.

  6. ICESat Observations of Inland Surface Water Stage, Slope, and Extent: a New Method for Hydrologic Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    River discharge and changes in lake, reservoir and wetland water storage are critical terms in the global surface water balance, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for adequate observations from in-situ networks are poor (Alsdorf et al., 2003). The NASA-sponsored Surface Water Working Group has established a framework for advancing satellite observations of river discharge and water storage changes which focuses on obtaining measurements of water surface height (stage), slope, and extent. Satellite laser altimetry, which can achieve centimeter-level elevation precision for single, small laser footprints, provides a method to obtain these inland water parameters and contribute to global water balance monitoring. Since its launch in January, 2003 the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), a NASA Earth Observing System mission, has achieved over 540 million laser pulse observations of ice sheet, ocean surface, land topography, and inland water elevations and cloud and aerosol height distributions. By recording the laser backscatter from 80 m diameter footprints spaced 175 m along track, ICESat acquires globally-distributed elevation profiles, using a 1064 nm laser altimeter channel, and cloud and aerosol profiles, using a 532 nm atmospheric lidar channel. The ICESat mission has demonstrated the following laser altimeter capabilities relevant to observations of inland water: (1) elevation measurements with a precision of 2 to 3 cm for flat surfaces, suitable for detecting river surface slopes along long river reaches or between multiple crossings of a meandering river channel, (2) from the laser backscatter waveform, detection of water surface elevations beneath vegetation canopies, suitable for measuring water stage in flooded forests, (3) single pulse absolute elevation accuracy of about 50 cm (1 sigma) for 1 degree sloped surfaces, with calibration work in progress indicating that a final accuracy of about 12 cm (1 sigma) will be

  7. Technical Note: Measuring contrast- and noise-dependent spatial resolution of an iterative reconstruction method in CT using ensemble averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lifeng Vrieze, Thomas J.; Leng, Shuai; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The spatial resolution of iterative reconstruction (IR) in computed tomography (CT) is contrast- and noise-dependent because of the nonlinear regularization. Due to the severe noise contamination, it is challenging to perform precise spatial-resolution measurements at very low-contrast levels. The purpose of this study was to measure the spatial resolution of a commercially available IR method using ensemble-averaged images acquired from repeated scans. Methods: A low-contrast phantom containing three rods (7, 14, and 21 HU below background) was scanned on a 128-slice CT scanner at three dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 16, 8, and 4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using two filtered-backprojection (FBP) kernels (B40 and B20) and a commercial IR method (sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction, SAFIRE, Siemens Healthcare) with two strength settings (I40-3 and I40-5). The same scan was repeated 100 times at each dose level. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated based on the edge profile measured on the ensemble-averaged images. Results: The spatial resolution of the two FBP kernels, B40 and B20, remained relatively constant across contrast and dose levels. However, the spatial resolution of the two IR kernels degraded relative to FBP as contrast or dose level decreased. For a given dose level at 16 mGy, the MTF{sub 50%} value normalized to the B40 kernel decreased from 98.4% at 21 HU to 88.5% at 7 HU for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 82.1% for I40-5. At 21 HU, the relative MTF{sub 50%} value decreased from 98.4% at 16 mGy to 90.7% at 4 mGy for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 85.6% for I40-5. Conclusions: A simple technique using ensemble averaging from repeated CT scans can be used to measure the spatial resolution of IR techniques in CT at very low contrast levels. The evaluated IR method degraded the spatial resolution at low contrast and high noise levels.

  8. A Method for Calculating the Area of Zostera marina Leaves from Digital Images with Noise Induced by Humidity Content

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of eelgrass, nowadays anthropogenic influences have produced deleterious effects in many meadows worldwide. Transplantation plots are commonly used as a feasible remediation scheme. The characterization of eelgrass biomass and its dynamics is an important input for the assessment of the overall status of both natural and transplanted populations. Particularly, in restoration plots it is desirable to obtain nondestructive assessments of these variables. Allometric models allow the expression of above ground biomass and productivity of eelgrass in terms of leaf area, which provides cost effective and nondestructive assessments. Leaf area in eelgrass can be conveniently obtained by the product of associated length and width. Although these variables can be directly measured on most sampled leaves, digital image methods could be adapted in order to simplify measurements. Nonetheless, since width to length ratios in eelgrass leaves could be even negligible, noise induced by leaf humidity content could produce misidentification of pixels along the peripheral contour of leaves images. In this paper, we present a procedure aimed to produce consistent estimations of eelgrass leaf area in the presence of the aforementioned noise effects. Our results show that digital image procedures can provide reliable, nondestructive estimations of eelgrass leaf area. PMID:24892089

  9. A method for calculating the area of Zostera marina leaves from digital images with noise induced by humidity content.

    PubMed

    Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia; Echavarria-Heras, Hector

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of eelgrass, nowadays anthropogenic influences have produced deleterious effects in many meadows worldwide. Transplantation plots are commonly used as a feasible remediation scheme. The characterization of eelgrass biomass and its dynamics is an important input for the assessment of the overall status of both natural and transplanted populations. Particularly, in restoration plots it is desirable to obtain nondestructive assessments of these variables. Allometric models allow the expression of above ground biomass and productivity of eelgrass in terms of leaf area, which provides cost effective and nondestructive assessments. Leaf area in eelgrass can be conveniently obtained by the product of associated length and width. Although these variables can be directly measured on most sampled leaves, digital image methods could be adapted in order to simplify measurements. Nonetheless, since width to length ratios in eelgrass leaves could be even negligible, noise induced by leaf humidity content could produce misidentification of pixels along the peripheral contour of leaves images. In this paper, we present a procedure aimed to produce consistent estimations of eelgrass leaf area in the presence of the aforementioned noise effects. Our results show that digital image procedures can provide reliable, nondestructive estimations of eelgrass leaf area.

  10. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies.

    PubMed

    Parks, Nathan A; Gannon, Matthew A; Long, Stephanie M; Young, Madeleine E

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB ) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets.

  11. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  12. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  13. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1982-02-01

    Detailed prediction methods for specific aircraft noise sources are given. These sources are airframe noise, combustion noise, fan noise, single and dual stream jet noise, and turbine noise. Modifications to the NASA methods which comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization standard method for aircraft noise prediction are given.

  14. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  15. The implementation method of stage video monitoring system based on network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yihua; Zhang, Xiaodong; Feng, Zhicong; Luan, Zhenhui

    2016-01-01

    In view of the problems of inflexible saving and calling data and low reliability and being difficult to compatiable with other system for domestic stage video monitoring system, the authors proposed a video supervision and scheduling system of stage based on IP camera. Audio and video technology, multimedia technology and computer network technology were used in the stage video surveillance and scheduling system. The structure of the system were designed and the main functions of the system were tested. The results show that this system can satisfy the modern stage performance effect and monitoring requirements.

  16. Universal method for crosstalk noise and transmission loss analysis for N-port nonblocking optical router for photonic networks-on-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiyuan; Zhang, Zhendong; Song, Tingting; He, Chao; Li, Jiachao; Wang, Guijin

    2016-05-01

    Crosstalk noise and transmission loss are two key elements in determining the performance of optical routers. We propose a universal method for crosstalk noise and transmission loss analysis for the N-port nonblocking optical router used in photonic networks-on-chip. Utilizing this method, we study the crosstalk noise and transmission loss for the five-, six-, seven-, and eight-port optical routers. We ascertain that the crosstalk noise and transmission loss are different for different input-output pairs. For the five-port optical router, the maximum crosstalk noise ranges from 0 to -7.07 dBm, and the transmission loss ranges from -9.05 to -0.51 dB. Furthermore, based on the crosstalk noise and transmission loss, we analyze optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and bit error ratio (BER) for the five-, six-, seven-, and eight-port nonblocking optical routers. As the number of ports increases, the minimum average OSNR decreases and the average BER increases. In addition, in order to present the performance of the routers more visually, a fiber-optic communications system is designed to simulate the transmission processes of the signals of the different paths of the routers in Optisystem. The results show that the power amplitude of the input signal is obviously higher than the corresponding output signal. With this method, we can easily evaluate the transmission loss, crosstalk noise, OSNR, and BER of high-radix nonblocking optical routers and conveniently study the performance of the N-port optical router.

  17. Rapid method for recovery of strongylid third stage larvae of parasitic nematodes from small soil samples.

    PubMed

    Knapp-Lawitzke, Friederike; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2014-07-01

    Livestock with access to pasture is generally exposed to infections with parasitic nematode species by uptake of infective third stage larvae (L3) with the grass. L3 can survive on pasture and particularly also in the soil up to several months and sometimes even longer, depending on temperature and humidity. As indicators for health and productivity of grazing animals it is important to determine the intensity and species spectrum of parasitic nematode larvae by analysing grass as well as soil samples. A rapid method for the recovery of L3 using a centrifugal-flotation technique from soil samples of 50-500 g was developed. The method takes advantage of the low specific weight of larvae to separate them from equal sized soil and debris particles by centrifuging them in a saturated sugar solution. A stack of differently sized sieves is used to achieve elimination of larger particles, dust and sugar from the sample to enable easy counting of larvae. Independent of the number of larvae used for inoculation of the samples a mean recovery of 75.3% was obtained. The recovery rates obtained ranged between 60.8% and 88.0% which demonstrates a considerably lower variability compared to earlier approaches and therefore a more precise estimation of the actual numbers of parasite larvae in soil is achieved. Further advantages over already developed methods are the use of easy, affordable and eco-friendly materials, the simplicity of the procedure and a faster processing time with the possibility to examine up to 20 samples per day.

  18. Stable iteratively regularized gradient method for nonlinear irregular equations under large noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokurin, Mihail Yu

    2006-02-01

    We consider an iteratively regularized version of the method of gradient descent for solving nonlinear irregular equations F(x) = 0 in a Hilbert space. When studying regularization methods for such equations with noisy operators F, traditional conditions on available approximations {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}} amount to error estimates of the form \\Vert {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x)- F(x) \\Vert \\leq \\delta , for x from a neighbourhood of a solution. Convergence of the methods is usually established on the assumption that the error level δ → 0, i.e. that noisy elements {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) strongly converge to the exact value F(x). In this paper we analyse approximating properties of the regularized gradient method assuming that {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) may converge to F(x) only weakly. We suggest an a priori stopping rule for the gradient iteration and give error estimates for obtained approximate solutions in terms of levels of strong and weak perturbations of the original operator. The main theorem generalizes recent results of Bakushinsky and Kokurin (2004 Iterative Methods for Approximate Solution of Inverse Problems (Dordrecht: Springer)) on the stopping of regularized gradient method under strong perturbations of F.

  19. Two-stage method for purification of ceruloplasmin based on its interaction with neomycin.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Romanico, D N; Zakharova, E T; Vasilyev, V B

    2012-06-01

    A two-stage chromatography that yields highly purified ceruloplasmin (CP) from human plasma and from rat and rabbit serum is described. The isolation procedure is based on the interaction of CP with neomycin, and it provides a high yield of CP. Constants of inhibition by gentamycin, kanamycin, and neomycin of oxidase activity of CP in its reaction with p-phenylenediamine were assayed. The lowest K(i) for neomycin (11 µM) corresponded to the highest specific adsorption of CP on neomycin-agarose (10 mg CP/ml of resin). Isolation of CP from 1.4 liters of human plasma using ion-exchange chromatography on UNO-Sphere Q and affinity chromatography on neomycin-agarose yields 348 mg of CP with 412-fold purification degree. Human CP preparation obtained with A(610)/A(280) ~ 0.052 contained neither immunoreactive prothrombin nor active thrombin. Upon storage at 37°C under sterile conditions, the preparation remained stable for two months. Efficient preparation of highly purified CP from rat and rabbit sera treated according to a similar protocol suggests the suitability of our method for isolation of CP from plasma and serum of other animals. The yield of CP in three separate purifications was no less than 78%.

  20. Colorectal cancer: Current imaging methods and future perspectives for the diagnosis, staging and therapeutic response evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kekelidze, Maka; D’Errico, Luigia; Pansini, Michele; Tyndall, Anthony; Hohmann, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    In the last 10 years the mortality rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) has decreased by more than 20% due to the rising developments in diagnostic techniques and optimization of surgical, neoadjuvant and palliative therapies. Diagnostic methods currently used in the evaluation of CRC are heterogeneous and can vary within the countries and the institutions. This article aims to discuss in depth currently applied imaging modalities such as virtual computed tomography colonoscopy, endorectal ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of CRC. Special focus is put on the potential of recent diagnostic developments as diffusion weighted imaging MRI, MRI biomarkers (dynamic enhanced MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET) combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and new hepatobiliary MRI contrast agents. The precise role, advantage and disadvantages of these modalities are evaluated controversially in local staging, metastatic spread and treatment monitoring of CRC. Finally, the authors will touch upon the future perspectives in functional imaging evaluating the role of integrated FDG-PET/CT with perfusion CT, MRI spectroscopy of primary CRC and hepatic transit time analysis using contrast enhanced ultrasound and MRI in the detection of liver metastases. Validation of these newer imaging techniques may lead to significant improvements in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:24379567

  1. Spleen Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a New Method for Staging Liver Fibrosis in a Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore spleen hemodynamic alteration in liver fibrosis with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and to determine how to stage liver fibrosis with spleen DCE-MRI parameters. Materials and Methods Sixteen piglets were prospectively used to model liver fibrosis staged by liver biopsy, and underwent spleen DCE-MRI on 0, 5th, 9th, 16th and 21st weekend after modeling this disease. DCE-MRI parameters including time to peak (TTP), positive enhancement integral (PEI), maximum slope of increase (MSI) and maximum slope of decrease (MSD) of spleen were measured, and statistically analyzed to stage this disease. Results Spearman's rank correlation tests showed that TTP tended to increase with increasing stages of liver fibrosis (r = 0.647, P<0.001), and that PEI tended to decrease from stage 0 to 4 (r = −0.709, P<0.001). MSD increased slightly from stage 0 to 2 (P>0.05), and decreased from stage 2 to 4 (P<0.05). MSI increased from stage 0 to 1, and decreased from stage 1 to 4 (all P>0.05). Mann-Whitney tests demonstrated that TTP and PEI could classify fibrosis between stage 0 and 1–4, between 0–1 and 2–4, between 0–2 and 3–4, or between 0–3 and 4 (all P<0.01). MSD could discriminate between 0–2 and 3–4 (P = 0.006), or between 0–3 and 4 (P = 0.012). MSI could not differentiate between any two stages. Receiver operating characteristic analysis illustrated that area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of TTP was larger than of PEI for classifying stage ≥1 and ≥2 (AUC = 0.851 and 0.783, respectively). PEI could best classify stage ≥3 and 4 (AUC = 0.903 and 0.96, respectively). Conclusion Spleen DCE-MRI has potential to monitor spleen hemodynamic alteration and classify liver fibrosis stages. PMID:24376732

  2. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. [test methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Peschier, T. D.; Durenberger, D.; Vandam, K.; Shu, T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical and semi-empirical methods for determining the transmission of sound through isolated panels and predicting panel transmission loss are described. Test results presented include the influence of plate stiffness and mass and the effects of pressurization and vibration damping materials on sound transmission characteristics. Measured and predicted results are presented in tables and graphs.

  3. [Rehabilitation method for churg-strauss syndrome from early stage: considering functional prognosis of mononeuritis multiplex].

    PubMed

    Hashida, Goichi; Kan, Akiko; Inoue, Satoru; Abe, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    We report our rehabilitation experience for two patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS). To improve their functional prognoses, we started rehabilitation program compensating for their activity of daily livings from their early stage. Also, we paid special attention to prescribed drug effect and adverse effect. Since patients with the mononeuritis multiplex have restricted weakness in the muscles ruled by a specific nerve, rehabilitation approaches including orthoses should start to improve the compensatory ability of normal adjacent muscles even in their early stages. In addition, since functional improvement may be gradual and take some years from onset, we should start rehabilitation in their early stage to improve their functional prognoses.

  4. A Proposal of Mouth Extraction Method with Suppressed Noise by Using Luminance Transform and Chromatic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Naoya; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Funahashi, Takuma; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu

    In this paper, we propose a mouth extraction method based on an integrated combination of color difference features, texture information characterized by the CFI (Co-occurrence Frequency Image) feature of the pixels, and the topological features of the extracted mouth region. The negative known that the ill effects caused by the presence of a mustache can be successfully suppressed by using the proposed method. Mouth extraction is performed by using the CIE L*a*b* color space and its behavior was investigated. The system brings L* of CIE L*a*b* to the same value in all the pixels. The presence of a mustache and/or wrinkles around the mouth affects the extraction. Mustache color and skin color are closer to the gray scale than mouth color. If the system brings L* to the same value in all the pixels, mouth extraction would be unaffected by the presence of a shadow or mustache. Moreover, the weight of a* of CIE L*a*b* could provide a strong affect for emphasizing the difference between mouth and the surrounding skin region. In the proposed method, the input image is binarized by referring to the CFI of the converted image. When the boundary between the mouth and the skin is not clear, CFI, the frequency of occurrence of a pixel pair of the image, is referred to detect such a boundary, because the frequency at the boundary is always low. We present the experimental results obtained and show that proposed method can be successfully used for mouth extraction.

  5. Phase-space overlap measures. II. Design and implementation of staging methods for free-energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Kofke, David A

    2005-08-22

    We consider staged free-energy calculation methods in the context of phase-space overlap relations, and argue that the selection of work-based methods should be guided by consideration of the phase-space overlap of the systems of interest. Stages should always be constructed such that work is performed only into a system that has a phase-space subset relation with the starting system. Thus multiple stages are required if the systems of interest are not such that one forms a phase-space subset with the other. Three two-stage methods are possible, termed umbrella sampling, overlap sampling, and funnel sampling. The last is appropriate for cases in which the subset relation holds, but only in the extreme, meaning that one system's important phase space constitutes a very small portion of the others. Umbrella sampling is most suitable for nonoverlap systems, and overlap sampling is appropriate for systems exhibiting partial phase-space overlap. We review recently introduced metrics that characterize phase-space overlap, showing that the performance of the single- and two-stage methods is consistent with the phase-space picture. We also demonstrate that a recently introduced bias-detection measure is effective in identifying inaccuracy in single- and multistage calculations. The examples used are the chemical-potential calculation for a Lennard-Jones liquid at moderate and at high densities, the same for model water at ambient conditions, and a process of charging a neutral ion in water.

  6. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Nathan A.; Gannon, Matthew A.; Long, Stephanie M.; Young, Madeleine E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets. PMID:26903849

  7. A psychoacoustic method for studying the necessary and sufficient perceptual cues of American English fricative consonants in noise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feipeng; Trevino, Andrea; Menon, Anjali; Allen, Jont B.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study on plosives, the 3-Dimensional Deep Search (3DDS) method for the exploration of the necessary and sufficient cues for speech perception was introduced (Li et al., (2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127(4), 2599–2610). Here, this method is used to isolate the spectral cue regions for perception of the American English fricatives /∫, ʒ, s, z, f, v, θ, ð/ in time, frequency, and intensity. The fricatives are analyzed in the context of consonant-vowel utterances, using the vowel /ɑ/. The necessary cues were found to be contained in the frication noise for /∫, ʒ, s, z, f, v/. 3DDS analysis isolated the cue regions of /s, z/ between 3.6 and 8 [kHz] and /∫, ʒ/ between 1.4 and 4.2 [kHz]. Some utterances were found to contain acoustic components that were unnecessary for correct perception, but caused listeners to hear non-target consonants when the primary cue region was removed; such acoustic components are labeled “conflicting cue regions.” The amplitude modulation of the high-frequency frication region by the fundamental F0 was found to be a sufficient cue for voicing. Overall, the 3DDS method allows one to analyze the effects of natural speech components without initial assumptions about where perceptual cues lie in time-frequency space or which elements of production they correspond to. PMID:23039459

  8. Membrane covered duct lining for high-frequency noise attenuation: prediction using a Chebyshev collocation method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lixi

    2008-11-01

    A spectral method of Chebyshev collocation with domain decomposition is introduced for linear interaction between sound and structure in a duct lined with flexible walls backed by cavities with or without a porous material. The spectral convergence is validated by a one-dimensional problem with a closed-form analytical solution, and is then extended to the two-dimensional configuration and compared favorably against a previous method based on the Fourier-Galerkin procedure and a finite element modeling. The nonlocal, exact Dirichlet-to-Neumann boundary condition is embedded in the domain decomposition scheme without imposing extra computational burden. The scheme is applied to the problem of high-frequency sound absorption by duct lining, which is normally ineffective when the wavelength is comparable with or shorter than the duct height. When a tensioned membrane covers the lining, however, it scatters the incident plane wave into higher-order modes, which then penetrate the duct lining more easily and get dissipated. For the frequency range of f=0.3-3 studied here, f=0.5 being the first cut-on frequency of the central duct, the membrane cover is found to offer an additional 0.9 dB attenuation per unit axial distance equal to half of the duct height.

  9. Signal optimization, noise reduction, and systematic error compensation methods in long-path DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, Emilio; Donati, Alessandro

    1998-12-01

    The increment of the exploitable optical path represents one of the most important efforts in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments improvement. The methods that allow long path measurements in the UV region are presented and discussed in this paper. These methods have been experimented in the new Italian DOAS instrument - SPOT - developed and manufactured by Kayser Italia. The system was equipped with a tele-controlled optical shuttle on the light source unit, allowing background radiation measurement. Wavelength absolute calibration of spectra by means of a collimated UV beam from a mercury lamp integrated in the telescope has been exploited. Besides, possible thermal effects on the dispersion coefficients of the holographic grating have been automatically compensated by means of a general non-linear fit during the spectral analysis session. Measurements in bistatic configuration have been performed in urban areas at 1300 m and 2200 m in three spectral windows from 245 to 380 nm. Measurements with these features are expected in the other spectral windows on path lengths ranging from about 5 to 10 km in urban areas. The DOAS technique can be used in field for very fast measurements in the 245-275 nm spectral range, on path lengths up to about 2500 m.

  10. MRI noise estimation and denoising using non-local PCA.

    PubMed

    Manjón, José V; Coupé, Pierrick; Buades, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for MRI denoising that exploits both the sparseness and self-similarity properties of the MR images. The proposed method is a two-stage approach that first filters the noisy image using a non local PCA thresholding strategy by automatically estimating the local noise level present in the image and second uses this filtered image as a guide image within a rotationally invariant non-local means filter. The proposed method internally estimates the amount of local noise presents in the images that enables applying it automatically to images with spatially varying noise levels and also corrects the Rician noise induced bias locally. The proposed approach has been compared with related state-of-the-art methods showing competitive results in all the studied cases. PMID:25725303

  11. A real-time de-noising method applied for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis in surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Shuyue; Shi, Chunfei; Ou, Huichao; Song, Hong; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing technology will likely become a type of label-free technology for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA); however, it needs some improvement with regard to high-speed and high-resolution measurement. We studied a type of real-time de-noising (RD) data processing method for SPR sensorgrams based on moving average; it can immediately distinguish ultra-weak signals during the process of experiment, and can display a low-noise sensorgram in real time. A flow injection analysis experiment and a CM5 sensorchip affinity experiment are designed to evaluate the characteristics of the RD method. High noise suppression ability and low signal distortion risks of the RD method have been proved. The RD method does not significantly distort signals of the sensorgram in the molecular affinity experiment, and K D values of the RD method essentially coincide with those of the raw sensorgram with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Meanwhile, by the RD method denoising the sensorgram with an ultralow SNR that is closer to the condition of the transient and weak molecular interactions, the kinetic constant can be more accurately analyzed, whereas it cannot be realized for the raw sensorgram. The crucial function and significance of the RD method are primarily embodied in the measurement limit of SPR sensing.

  12. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  13. Method and apparatus for linear low-frequency feedback in monolithic low-noise charge amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi

    2006-02-14

    A charge amplifier includes an amplifier, feedback circuit, and cancellation circuit. The feedback circuit includes a capacitor, inverter, and current mirror. The capacitor is coupled across the signal amplifier, the inverter is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier, and the current mirror is coupled to the input of the signal amplifier. The cancellation circuit is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier. A method of charge amplification includes providing a signal amplifier; coupling a first capacitor across the signal amplifier; coupling an inverter to the output of the signal amplifier; coupling a current mirror to the input of the signal amplifier; and coupling a cancellation circuit to the output of the signal amplifier. A front-end system for use with radiation sensors includes a charge amplifier and a current amplifier, shaping amplifier, baseline stabilizer, discriminator, peak detector, timing detector, and logic circuit coupled to the charge amplifier.

  14. Room-temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry and methods of the same

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Cunningham, Christopher T.

    2016-08-02

    In one embodiment, a heterodyne detection system for detecting light includes a first input aperture configured to receive first light from a scene input, a second input aperture configured to receive second light from a local oscillator input, a broadband local oscillator configured to provide the second light to the second input aperture, a dispersive element configured to disperse the first light and the second light, and a final condensing lens coupled to an infrared detector. The final condensing lens is configured to concentrate incident light from a primary condensing lens onto the infrared detector, and the infrared detector is a square-law detector capable of sensing the frequency difference between the first light and the second light. More systems and methods for detecting light are described according to other embodiments.

  15. Room-temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry and methods of the same

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G; Tringe, Joseph W

    2014-12-02

    In one embodiment, a heterodyne detection system for detecting light includes a first input aperture adapted for receiving a first light from a scene input, a second input aperture adapted for receiving a second light from a local oscillator input, a broadband local oscillator adapted for providing the second light to the second input aperture, a dispersive element adapted for dispersing the first light and the second light, and a final condensing lens coupled to an infrared detector. The final condensing lens is adapted for concentrating incident light from a primary condensing lens onto the detector, and the detector is a square-law detector capable of sensing the frequency difference between the first light and the second light. More systems and methods for detecting light are disclosed according to more embodiments.

  16. Room-temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry and methods of the same

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Cunningham, Christopher Thomas

    2014-08-26

    In one embodiment, a heterodyne detection system for detecting light includes a first input aperture adapted for receiving first light from a scene input, a second input aperture adapted for receiving second light from a local oscillator input, a broadband local oscillator adapted for providing the second light to the second input aperture, a dispersive element adapted for dispersing the first light and the second light, and a final condensing lens coupled to an infrared detector. The final condensing lens is adapted for concentrating incident light from a primary condensing lens onto the infrared detector, and the infrared detector is a square-law detector capable of sensing the frequency difference between the first light and the second light. More systems and methods for detecting light are described according to other embodiments.

  17. Community reactions to aircraft noise in the vicinity of airport: A comparative study of the social surveys using interview method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osada, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on the reports of community reactions to aircraft noise. The direct and immediate reactions to aircraft noise such as perceived noisiness, interference with conversations, etc. and various emotional influences were most remarkable; indirect and long term influences such as disturbance of mental work and physical symptoms were less remarkable.

  18. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  19. Three-stage sorption type cryogenic refrigeration systems and methods employing heat regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A three-stage sorption type cryogenic refrigeration system, each stage containing a fluid having a respectively different boiling point, is presented. Each stage includes a compressor in which a respective fluid is heated to be placed in a high pressure gaseous state. The compressor for that fluid which is heated to the highest temperature is enclosed by the other two compressors to permit heat to be transferred from the inner compressor to the surrounding compressors. The system may include two sets of compressors, each having the structure described above, with the interior compressors of the two sets coupled together to permit selective heat transfer therebetween, resulting in more efficient utilization of input power.

  20. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  1. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise management program handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Timothy D.; Shekell, Ted K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  2. A joint resonance frequency estimation and in-band noise reduction method for enhancing the detectability of bearing fault signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozchalooi, I. Soltani; Liang, Ming

    2008-05-01

    The vibration signal measured from a bearing contains vital information for the prognostic and health assessment purposes. However, when bearings are installed as part of a complex mechanical system, the measured signal is often heavily clouded by various noises due to the compounded effect of interferences of other machine elements and background noises present in the measuring device. As such, reliable condition monitoring would not be possible without proper de-noising. This is particularly true for incipient bearing faults with very weak signature signals. A new de-noising scheme is proposed in this paper to enhance the vibration signals acquired from faulty bearings. This de-noising scheme features a spectral subtraction to trim down the in-band noise prior to wavelet filtering. The Gabor wavelet is used in the wavelet transform and its parameters, i.e., scale and shape factor are selected in separate steps. The proper scale is found based on a novel resonance estimation algorithm. This algorithm makes use of the information derived from the variable shaft rotational speed though such variation is highly undesirable in fault detection since it complicates the process substantially. The shape factor value is then selected by minimizing a smoothness index. This index is defined as the ratio of the geometric mean to the arithmetic mean of the wavelet coefficient moduli. De-noising results are presented for simulated signals and experimental data acquired from both normal and faulty bearings with defective outer race, inner race, and rolling element.

  3. A method to filter out the effect of river stage fluctuation on groundwater level using time series models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heesung; Park, Eungyu; Yoon, Pilsun; Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Gyoo-Bum

    2016-04-01

    A method to filter out the effect of river stage fluctuations on groundwater level was designed using an artificial neural network-based time series model of groundwater level prediction. The designed method was applied to daily groundwater level data near the Gangjeong-Koryeong Barrage in the Nakdong river, South Korea. First, one-step ahead direct prediction time series models were successfully developed for both cases of before and after the barrage construction using past measurement data of rainfall, river stage, and groundwater level as inputs. The correlation coefficient values between observed and predicted data were over 0.97. Based on the direct prediction models, recursive prediction models for the simulation of groundwater level fluctuations were designed. The effect of river stage fluctuation on groundwater level data was filtered out by setting a constant value for river stage inputs of the recursive time series models. The hybrid water table fluctuation method was employed to estimate the groundwater recharge using the filtered data. The calculated ratios of groundwater recharge to precipitation before and after the barrage construction were 11.0% and 4.3%, respectively. It is expected that the proposed method can be a useful tool for groundwater level prediction and recharge estimation in the riverside area.

  4. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  7. Acoustic Prediction Methodology and Test Validation for an Efficient Low-Noise Hybrid Wing Body Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ronald T. (Compiler)

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to: (1) Develop a hybrid wing body subsonic transport configuration with noise prediction methods to meet the circa 2007 NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+2 noise goal of -52 dB cum relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 (-42 dB cum re: Stage 4) while achieving a -25% fuel burned compared to current transports (re :B737/B767); (2) Develop improved noise prediction methods for ANOPP2 for use in predicting FAR 36 noise; (3) Design and fabricate a wind tunnel model for testing in the LaRC 14 x 22 ft low speed wind tunnel to validate noise predictions and determine low speed aero characteristics for an efficient low noise Hybrid Wing Body configuration. A medium wide body cargo freighter was selected to represent a logical need for an initial operational capability in the 2020 time frame. The Efficient Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body (ELNHWB) configuration N2A-EXTE was evolved meeting the circa 2007 NRA N+2 fuel burn and noise goals. The noise estimates were made using improvements in jet noise shielding and noise shielding prediction methods developed by UC Irvine and MIT. From this the Quiet Ultra Integrated Efficient Test Research Aircraft #1 (QUIET-R1) 5.8% wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated.

  8. A method for predicting DCT-based denoising efficiency for grayscale images corrupted by AWGN and additive spatially correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Aleksey S.; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Egiazarian, Karen O.

    2015-03-01

    Results of denoising based on discrete cosine transform for a wide class of images corrupted by additive noise are obtained. Three types of noise are analyzed: additive white Gaussian noise and additive spatially correlated Gaussian noise with middle and high correlation levels. TID2013 image database and some additional images are taken as test images. Conventional DCT filter and BM3D are used as denoising techniques. Denoising efficiency is described by PSNR and PSNR-HVS-M metrics. Within hard-thresholding denoising mechanism, DCT-spectrum coefficient statistics are used to characterize images and, subsequently, denoising efficiency for them. Results of denoising efficiency are fitted for such statistics and efficient approximations are obtained. It is shown that the obtained approximations provide high accuracy of prediction of denoising efficiency.

  9. [Research of the EEMD method to pulse analysis of traditional Chinese medicine based on different amplitudes of the added white noise].

    PubMed

    Yan, Haixia; Qin, Kairong; Wang, Yiqin; Li, Fufeng; Run, Fengying; Hong, Yujian; Hao, Jiming

    2011-02-01

    The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) can be used to overcome the mode mixing problem of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) effectively. The EEMD method and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used to analyze pulse signals of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The amplitudes of the added white noise were about 0.1 and 0.2 time standard deviation of the investigated signal respectively. The difference of average frequency and average energy of every mode between normal pulse, slippery pulse, wiry pulse and wiry-slippery pulse were demonstrated based on different amplitudes of the added white noise. The results showed that it is more in line with clinical practice when the amplitude of the added white noise is about 0.2 time standard deviation of the investigated signal.

  10. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  11. Analyzing nocturnal noise stratification.

    PubMed

    Rey Gozalo, Guillermo; Barrigón Morillas, Juan Miguel; Gómez Escobar, Valentín

    2014-05-01

    Pollution associated to traffic can be considered as one of the most relevant pollution sources in our cities; noise is one of the major components of traffic pollution; thus, efforts are necessary to search adequate noise assessment methods and low pollution city designs. Different methods have been proposed for the evaluation of noise in cities, including the categorization method, which is based on the functionality concept. Until now, this method has only been studied (with encouraging results) for short-term, diurnal measurements, but nocturnal noise presents a behavior clearly different on respect to the diurnal one. In this work 45 continuous measurements of approximately one week each in duration are statistically analyzed to identify differences between the proposed categories. The results show that the five proposed categories highlight the noise stratification of the studied city in each period of the day (day, evening, and night). A comparison of the continuous measurements with previous short-term measurements indicates that the latter can be a good approximation of the former in diurnal period, reducing the resource expenditure for noise evaluation. Annoyance estimated from the measured noise levels was compared with the response of population obtained from a questionnaire with good agreement. The categorization method can yield good information about the distribution of a pollutant associated to traffic in our cities in each period of the day and, therefore, is a powerful tool for town planning and the design of pollution prevention policies.

  12. Influence of phenological stages and method of distillation on Iranian cultivated Bay leaves volatile oil.

    PubMed

    Amin, Gh; Sourmaghi, M H Salehi; Jaafari, S; Hadjagaee, R; Yazdinezhad, A

    2007-09-01

    Leaves of Bay (Laurus nobilis L.) were collected in different phonological stages and air-dried. Volatile oil of the leaves were obtained using hydro- and steam distillation and the chemical composition were analyzed by GC and GC/Mass and identified in comparison with authentic compounds. The yield of essential oil were 0.8 to 1.5 v/w% and the major compounds were; 1,8 Cineol, alpha-terpinyl acetate and Sabinene. Because of the interesting yield of the oil and presence of 1,8-Cineol as the major compounds, the bearing ripe fruit stage in the mid of September is the best time for harvesting the Bay leaves in Iran.

  13. Welding deformation analysis based on improved equivalent strain method to cover external constraint during cooling stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Jun; Jang, Beom-Seon; Kang, Sung-Wook

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, external restraints imposed normal to the plate during the cooling stage were determined to be effective for reduction of the angular distortion of butt-welded or fillet-welded plate. A welding analysis model under external force during the cooling stage was idealized as a prismatic member subjected to pure bending. The external restraint was represented by vertical force on both sides of the work piece and bending stress forms in the transverse direction. The additional bending stress distribution across the plate thickness was reflected in the improved inherent strain model, and a set of inherent strain charts with different levels of bending stress were newly calculated. From an elastic linear FE analysis using the inherent strain values taken from the chart and comparing them with those from a 3D thermal elasto-plastic FE analysis, welding deformation can be calculated.

  14. System and method for single-phase, single-stage grid-interactive inverter

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Liming; Li, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides for the integration of distributed renewable energy sources/storages utilizing a cascaded DC-AC inverter, thereby eliminating the need for a DC-DC converter. The ability to segment the energy sources and energy storages improves the maintenance capability and system reliability of the distributed generation system, as well as achieve wide range reactive power compensation. In the absence of a DC-DC converter, single stage energy conversion can be achieved to enhance energy conversion efficiency.

  15. Forskolin improves the cryosurvival of in vivo-derived porcine embryos at very early stages using two vitrification methods.

    PubMed

    Gomis, J; Cuello, C; Sanchez-Osorio, J; Gil, M A; Parrilla, I; Angel, M A; Vazquez, J M; Roca, J; Martinez, E A

    2013-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effect of forskolin on the viability of in vivo-derived porcine embryos vitrified by the superfine open pulled straw (SOPS) or solid surface vitrification (SSV) methods at the 2-cell, 4-cell, and blastocyst stages. Zygotes, 2- to 4-cell embryos, and morulae were obtained from superovulated sows. After collection, embryos were cultured for 24h with 0 or 10 μM forskolin and then vitrified using the SOPS and SSV method, or not vitrified (fresh controls). Fresh and vitrified-warmed 2-cells, 4-cells, and blastocysts were cultured for additional 96 h, 72 h and 24 h, respectively. At the end of the culture, embryos were evaluated for progression to the blastocyst stage and total cell number. The vitrification method did not affect any of the parameters evaluated for any embryo stage. Forskolin increased (P<0.01) the blastocyst formation and the final developmental stage of vitrified 2- and 4-cell embryos. However, these embryos exhibited lower (P<0.003) blastocyst formation rates than their fresh counterparts. The total cell number and hatching rate were similar in both groups (vitrified and fresh) of 2- and 4-cell embryos. Vitrified blastocysts exhibited viabilities, final developmental stages, hatching rates, and total cell numbers that were similar to those of their fresh counterparts, regardless of the addition of forskolin. In conclusion, the SOPS and SSV methods are suitable for the cryopreservation of in vivo-derived 2- to 4-cell porcine embryos. Pre-treatment with forskolin for 24h before vitrification improves the cryotolerance of 2- and 4-cell porcine embryos.

  16. Aquifer response to stream-stage and recharge variations. II. Convolution method and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; DeSimone, L.A.; Moench, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this second of two papers, analytical step-response functions, developed in the companion paper for several cases of transient hydraulic interaction between a fully penetrating stream and a confined, leaky, or water-table aquifer, are used in the convolution integral to calculate aquifer heads, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage that occur in response to streamstage fluctuations and basinwide recharge or evapotranspiration. Two computer programs developed on the basis of these step-response functions and the convolution integral are applied to the analysis of hydraulic interaction of two alluvial stream-aquifer systems in the northeastern and central United States. These applications demonstrate the utility of the analytical functions and computer programs for estimating aquifer and streambank hydraulic properties, recharge rates, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage. Analysis of the water-table aquifer adjacent to the Blackstone River in Massachusetts suggests that the very shallow depth of water table and associated thin unsaturated zone at the site cause the aquifer to behave like a confined aquifer (negligible specific yield). This finding is consistent with previous studies that have shown that the effective specific yield of an unconfined aquifer approaches zero when the capillary fringe, where sediment pores are saturated by tension, extends to land surface. Under this condition, the aquifer's response is determined by elastic storage only. Estimates of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, and recharge for a water-table aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River in eastern Iowa, determined by the use of analytical methods, are in close agreement with those estimated by use of a more complex, multilayer numerical model of the aquifer. Streambank leakance of the semipervious streambank materials also was estimated for the site. The streambank-leakance parameter may be considered to be a general (or lumped

  17. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration at supersonic speeds in the NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The Mach 3 staging was dominated by shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. The inference space was partitioned into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The underlying aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle were estimated using piecewise-continuous lower-order polynomial functions. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. Augmenting the central composite designs to full third-order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria was evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting lower-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  18. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Deloach, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A collection of statistical and mathematical techniques referred to as response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration using data obtained on small-scale models at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The simulated Mach 3 staging was dominated by multiple shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. This motivated a partitioning of the overall inference space into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using cuboidal and spherical central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The primary goal was to approximate the underlying overall aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle using relatively simple, lower-order polynomial functions that were piecewise-continuous across the full independent variable ranges of interest. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. The potential benefits of augmenting the central composite designs to full third order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria were also evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting low-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  19. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  20. Informed RESTORE: A method for robust estimation of diffusion tensor from low redundancy datasets in the presence of physiological noise artifacts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin-Ching; Walker, Lindsay; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2012-11-01

    Physiological noise artifacts, especially those originating from cardiac pulsation and subject motion, are common in clinical Diffusion tensor-MRI acquisitions. Previous works show that signal perturbations produced by artifacts can be severe and neglecting to account for their contribution can result in erroneous diffusion tensor values. The Robust Estimation of Tensors by Outlier Rejection (RESTORE) method has been shown to be an effective strategy for improving tensor estimation on a voxel-by-voxel basis in the presence of artifactual data points in diffusion-weighted images. In this article, we address potential instabilities that may arise when using RESTORE and propose practical constraints to improve its usability. Moreover, we introduce a method, called informed RESTORE designed to remove physiological noise artifacts in datasets acquired with low redundancy (less than 30-40 diffusion-weighted image volumes)--a condition in which the original RESTORE algorithm may converge to an incorrect solution. This new method is based on the notion that physiological noise is more likely to result in signal dropouts than signal increases. Results from both Monte Carlo simulation and clinical diffusion data indicate that informed RESTORE performs very well in removing physiological noise artifacts for low redundancy diffusion-weighted image datasets.

  1. Noise sources and noise suppression in CMOS imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Hancock, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms for noise coupling in CMOS imagers are complex, since unlike a CCD, a CMOS imager has to be considered as a full digital-system-on-a-chip, with a highly sensitive front-end. In this paper, we analyze the noise sources in a photodiode CMOS imager, and model their propagation through the signal chain to determine the nature and magnitude of noise coupling. We present methods for reduction of noise, and present measured data to show their viability. For temporal read noise reduction, we present pixel signal chain design techniques to achieve near 2 electrons read noise. We model the front-end reset noise both for conventional photodiode and CTIA type of pixels. For the suppression of reset noise, we present a column feedback-reset method to reduce reset noise below 6 electrons. For spatial noise reduction, we present the design of column signal chain that suppresses both spatial noise and power supply coupling noise. We conclude by identifying problems in low-noise design caused by dark current spatial distribution.

  2. Optimization of mammography with respect to anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Svensson, B.; Danielsson, M.; Lazzari, B.; Cederström, B.

    2011-03-01

    Beam quality optimization in mammography traditionally considers detection of a target obscured by quantum noise on a homogenous background. It can be argued that this scheme does not correspond well to the clinical imaging task because real mammographic images contain a complex superposition of anatomical structures, resulting in anatomical noise that may dominate over quantum noise. Using a newly developed spectral mammography system, we measured the correlation and magnitude of the anatomical noise in a set of mammograms. The results from these measurements were used as input to an observer-model optimization that included quantum noise as well as anatomical noise. We found that, within this framework, the detectability of tumors and microcalcifications behaved very differently with respect to beam quality and dose. The results for small microcalcifications were similar to what traditional optimization methods would yield, which is to be expected since quantum noise dominates over anatomical noise at high spatial frequencies. For larger tumors, however, low-frequency anatomical noise was the limiting factor. Because anatomical structure has similar energy dependence as tumor contrast, optimal x-ray energy was significantly higher and the useful energy region wider than traditional methods suggest. Measurements on a tissue phantom confirmed these theoretical results. Furthermore, since quantum noise constitutes only a small fraction of the noise, the dose could be reduced substantially without sacrificing tumor detectability. Exposure settings used clinically are therefore not necessarily optimal for this imaging task. The impact of these findings on the mammographic imaging task as a whole is, however, at this stage unclear.

  3. Analysis of targeting method for closed-loop guidance of a multi-stage space launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eun-Jung; Cho, Sangbum; Roh, Woong-Rae

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the orbit insertion targeting problem for guidance of a multi-stage space launch vehicle. To design guidance algorithm for a particular mission target, the orbit designation method should be determined first, as the target orbit of closed-loop guidance during the upper stage flight is usually specified at the end of the final stage. We investigate some advantages of this single target approach over the one with intermediate targets in addition to the final target by comparing them in various flight conditions using an explicit guidance algorithm. We notice that in some cases application of the single targeting can be rather tricky and thus propose here an extended version of the single targeting algorithm that can be applied to problems where the target orbit plane has to be changed during the upper stages flight. We also demonstrate that this pseudo-single target method can be applied to these kinds of problems smoothly in contrast to the conventional single target algorithms by conducting numerical simulations for disturbed off-nominal conditions as well as for the nominal condition.

  4. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  5. School Noise and Its Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikenberrgy, Larry D.

    1974-01-01

    Sources of noises affecting schools and their hindrance of learning are presented. Noise levels for different activities are tabled and possible methods for controlling such noises are suggested. Internal to the school, shop and music levels are the most severe. More care in site selection and design considerations are recommended. (LS)

  6. Assessment and evaluation of noise controls on roof bolting equipment and a method for predicting sound pressure levels in underground coal mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matetic, Rudy J.

    Over-exposure to noise remains a widespread and serious health hazard in the U.S. mining industries despite 25 years of regulation. Every day, 80% of the nation's miners go to work in an environment where the time weighted average (TWA) noise level exceeds 85 dBA and more than 25% of the miners are exposed to a TWA noise level that exceeds 90 dBA, the permissible exposure limit (PEL). Additionally, MSHA coal noise sample data collected from 2000 to 2002 show that 65% of the equipment whose operators exceeded 100% noise dosage comprise only seven different types of machines; auger miners, bulldozers, continuous miners, front end loaders, roof bolters, shuttle cars (electric), and trucks. In addition, the MSHA data indicate that the roof bolter is third among all the equipment and second among equipment in underground coal whose operators exceed 100% dosage. A research program was implemented to: (1) determine, characterize and to measure sound power levels radiated by a roof bolting machine during differing drilling configurations (thrust, rotational speed, penetration rate, etc.) and utilizing differing types of drilling methods in high compressive strength rock media (>20,000 psi). The research approach characterized the sound power level results from laboratory testing and provided the mining industry with empirical data relative to utilizing differing noise control technologies (drilling configurations and types of drilling methods) in reducing sound power level emissions on a roof bolting machine; (2) distinguish and correlate the empirical data into one, statistically valid, equation, in which, provided the mining industry with a tool to predict overall sound power levels of a roof bolting machine given any type of drilling configuration and drilling method utilized in industry; (3) provided the mining industry with several approaches to predict or determine sound pressure levels in an underground coal mine utilizing laboratory test results from a roof bolting

  7. A unified analysis of exact methods of inverting the 2-D exponential radon transform, with implications for noise control in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, C.E.; Pan, X.

    1995-12-01

    Exact methods of inverting the two-dimensional (2-D) exponential Radon transform have been proposed by Bellini et al. and by Inouye et al., both of whom worked in the spatial-frequency domain to estimate the 2-D Fourier transform of the unattenuated sinogram; by Hawkins et al., who worked with circularly harmonic Bessel transforms; and by Tretiak and Metz, who followed filtering of appropriately-modified projections by exponentially-weighted backprojection. With perfect sampling, all four of these methods are exact in the absence of projection-data noise, but empirical studies have shown that they propagate noise differently, and no underlying theoretical relationship among the methods has been evident. In this paper, an analysis of the 2-D Fourier transform of the modified sinogram reveals that all previously-proposed linear methods can be interpreted as special cases of a broad class of methods, and that each method in the class can be implemented, in principle, by any one of four distinct techniques. Moreover, the analysis suggests a new member of the class that is predicted to have noise properties better than those of previously proposed members.

  8. Evaluation of a Cubature Kalman Filtering-Based Phase Unwrapping Method for Differential Interferograms with High Noise in Coal Mining Areas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanli; Bian, Zhengfu; Liu, Zhenguo; Zhang, Qiuzhao

    2015-01-01

    Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar has been shown to be effective for monitoring subsidence in coal mining areas. Phase unwrapping can have a dramatic influence on the monitoring result. In this paper, a filtering-based phase unwrapping algorithm in combination with path-following is introduced to unwrap differential interferograms with high noise in mining areas. It can perform simultaneous noise filtering and phase unwrapping so that the pre-filtering steps can be omitted, thus usually retaining more details and improving the detectable deformation. For the method, the nonlinear measurement model of phase unwrapping is processed using a simplified Cubature Kalman filtering, which is an effective and efficient tool used in many nonlinear fields. Three case studies are designed to evaluate the performance of the method. In Case 1, two tests are designed to evaluate the performance of the method under different factors including the number of multi-looks and path-guiding indexes. The result demonstrates that the unwrapped results are sensitive to the number of multi-looks and that the Fisher Distance is the most suitable path-guiding index for our study. Two case studies are then designed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed phase unwrapping method based on Cubature Kalman filtering. The results indicate that, compared with the popular Minimum Cost Flow method, the Cubature Kalman filtering-based phase unwrapping can achieve promising results without pre-filtering and is an appropriate method for coal mining areas with high noise. PMID:26153776

  9. Evaluation of a Cubature Kalman Filtering-Based Phase Unwrapping Method for Differential Interferograms with High Noise in Coal Mining Areas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanli; Bian, Zhengfu; Liu, Zhenguo; Zhang, Qiuzhao

    2015-07-06

    Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar has been shown to be effective for monitoring subsidence in coal mining areas. Phase unwrapping can have a dramatic influence on the monitoring result. In this paper, a filtering-based phase unwrapping algorithm in combination with path-following is introduced to unwrap differential interferograms with high noise in mining areas. It can perform simultaneous noise filtering and phase unwrapping so that the pre-filtering steps can be omitted, thus usually retaining more details and improving the detectable deformation. For the method, the nonlinear measurement model of phase unwrapping is processed using a simplified Cubature Kalman filtering, which is an effective and efficient tool used in many nonlinear fields. Three case studies are designed to evaluate the performance of the method. In Case 1, two tests are designed to evaluate the performance of the method under different factors including the number of multi-looks and path-guiding indexes. The result demonstrates that the unwrapped results are sensitive to the number of multi-looks and that the Fisher Distance is the most suitable path-guiding index for our study. Two case studies are then designed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed phase unwrapping method based on Cubature Kalman filtering. The results indicate that, compared with the popular Minimum Cost Flow method, the Cubature Kalman filtering-based phase unwrapping can achieve promising results without pre-filtering and is an appropriate method for coal mining areas with high noise.

  10. TNM-Like Classification: A New Proposed Method for Heart Failure Staging

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Francesco; D'Ambrosi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is an acute or chronic syndrome, that causes a lot of damaging effects to every system. The involvement of different systems is variably related to age and others comorbidities. The severity of organ damage is often proportional to the duration of heart failure. The typology of HF and the duration determine which organs will be affected and vice versa the severity of organ damage supplies precious information about prognosis and outcome of patients with heart failure. Moreover, a classification based not only on symptomatic and syndromic typical features of heart failure, but also on functional data of each system, could allow us to apply the most appropriate therapies, to obtain a more accurate prognosis, and to employ necessary and not redundant human and financial resources. With an eye on the TNM staging used in oncology, we drawn up a classification that will consider the different involvement of organs such as lungs, kidneys, and liver in addition to psychological pattern and quality of life in HF patients. For all these reasons, it is our intention to propose a valid and more specific classification available for the clinical staging of HF that takes into account pathophysiological and structural changes that can remark prognosis and management of HF. PMID:24376377

  11. Analysis of the dominant vibration frequencies of rail bridges for structure-borne noise using a power flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    The use of concrete bridges in urban rail transit systems has raised many concerns regarding low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-borne noise due to the vibration of bridges when subjected to moving trains. Understanding the mechanism that determines the dominant frequencies of bridge vibrations is essential for both vibration and noise reduction. This paper presents a general procedure based on the force method to obtain the power flows within a coupled vehicle-track-bridge system, the point mobility of the system and the dynamic interaction forces connecting various components. The general coupling system consists of multi-rigid-bodies for the vehicles, infinite Euler beams representing the rails, two-dimensional or three-dimensional elements of the concrete bridges, and spring-dashpot pairs to model the wheel-rail contacts, the vehicle suspensions, the rail pads and the bridge bearings. The dynamic interaction of the coupled system is solved in the frequency domain by assuming the combined wheel-rail roughness moves forward relative to the stationary vehicles. The proposed procedure is first applied to a rail on discrete supports and then to a real urban rail transit U-shaped concrete bridge. The computed results show that the wheel-rail contact forces, the power flows to the rail/bridge subsystem and the accelerations of the bridge are primarily dominated by the contents around the natural frequency of a single wheel adhered to the elastically supported rail. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same rigid body, then δmnab(ω) can be expressed as δmnab(ω)=-{(}/{Mlω}, where Ml is the mass of the lth rigid body. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same infinite rail, δmnab(ω) can be expressed as [8] δmnab(ω)=-j{((e-je)}/{4EIk}, where xm and xn are the x-coordinates of the mth and nth spring

  12. Calibration of the straightness and orthogonality error of a laser feedback high-precision stage using self-calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongmin; Kim, Kihyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Sangdon

    2014-12-01

    An ultra high-precision 3-DOF air-bearing stage is developed and calibrated in this study. The stage was developed for the transportation of a glass or wafer with x and y following errors in the nanometer regime. To apply the proposed stage to display or semiconductor fabrication equipment, x and y straightness errors should be at the sub-micron level and the x-y orthogonality error should be in the region of several arcseconds with strokes of several hundreds of mm. Our system was designed to move a 400 mm stroke on the x axis and a 700 mm stroke on the y axis. To do this, 1000 mm and 550 mm bar-type mirrors were adopted for real time Δx and Δy laser measurements and feedback control. In this system, with the laser wavelength variation and instability being kept to a minimum through environmental control, the straightness and orthogonality become purely dependent upon the surface shape of the bar mirrors. Compensation for the distortion of the bar mirrors is accomplished using a self-calibration method. The successful application of the method nearly eliminated the straightness and orthogonality errors of the stage, allowing their specifications to be fully satisfied. As a result, the straightness and orthogonality errors of the stage were successfully decreased from 4.4 μm to 0.8 μm and from 0.04° to 2.48 arcsec, respectively.

  13. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile; Tsang, K M; Chan, W L

    2014-03-01

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  14. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile; Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-03-01

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  15. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile; Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-03-15

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Design and ergonomics. Methods for integrating ergonomics at hand tool design stage.

    PubMed

    Marsot, Jacques; Claudon, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    As a marked increase in the number of musculoskeletal disorders was noted in many industrialized countries and more specifically in companies that require the use of hand tools, the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) launched in 1999 a research project on the topic of integrating ergonomics into hand tool design, and more particularly to a design of a boning knife. After a brief recall of the difficulties of integrating ergonomics at the design stage, the present paper shows how 3 design methodological tools--Functional Analysis, Quality Function Deployment and TRIZ--have been applied to the design of a boning knife. Implementation of these tools enabled us to demonstrate the extent to which they are capable of responding to the difficulties of integrating ergonomics into product design. PMID:15028190

  17. News Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

  18. RKN Methods Based on Exact Flows of Both Internal Stages and Update for Solving Perturbed Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongli; Wu, Xinyuan; Fang, Yonglei; You, Xiong

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, extended Runge-Kutta-Nyström type methods for perturbed oscillators with low frequency are presented, which inherit the framework of RKN method and make full use of the special feature of the true flows. Following the line of J.Butcher, E.Hairer and G.Wanner, we develop a new kind of trees to derive the order conditions for the new methods.

  19. Trends in aircraft noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Conrad, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Flight vehicles are characterized according to their manner of operation and type of propulsion system; and their associated sources of noise are identified. Available noise reduction technology as it relates to engine cycle design and to powerplant component design is summarized. Such components as exhaust jets, fans, propellers, rotors, blown flaps, and reciprocating-engine exhausts are discussed, along with their noise reduction potentials. Significant aircraft noise reductions are noted to have been accomplished by the application of available technology in support of noise certification rules. Further noise reductions to meet more stringent future noise regulations will require substantial additional technology developments. Improved analytical prediction methods, and well-controlled validation experiments supported by advanced-design aeroacoustic facilities, are required as a basis for an effective integrated systems approach to aircraft noise control.

  20. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods. PMID:25757257

  1. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods.

  2. Post-processing method to reduce noise while preserving high time resolution in aethalometer real-time black carbon data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time aerosol black carbon (BC) data, presented at time resolutions on the order of seconds to minutes, is desirable in field and source characterization studies measuring rapidly varying concentrations of BC. The Optimized Noise-reduction Averaging (ONA) algorithm has been d...

  3. Reduction method for low-frequency noise of GaAs junction field-effect transistor at a cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sasaki, M.; Akiba, M.

    2002-03-01

    A GaAs junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is a promising candidate for low-frequency, low-noise, and low-power cryogenic electronics to read out high-impedance photodetectors. We report on the spectral noise characteristics of a SONY n-type GaAs JFET, operating at the depression mode, at a cryogenic temperature of 4.2 K. If the GaAs JFET is turned on at 4.2 K, a random telegraph signal (RTS) is found to be the dominant noise source at low frequencies. However, the switching rate of RTS can be drastically reduced if the GaAs JFET is heated up to 55 K and cooled down again to 4.2 K while keeping the same drain current flow. We refer to this phenomenon as the thermal cure (TC). With TC, low-frequency noise can be reduced to below 1 μV/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. The critical temperature for TC is found to be ˜35 K for our GaAs JFET.

  4. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2002-01-01

    Low power EM waves are used to detect motions of vocal tract tissues of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech. A voiced excitation function is derived. The excitation function provides speech production information to enhance speech characterization and to enable noise removal from human speech.

  5. Two-Stage Design Method for Enhanced Inductive Energy Transmission with Q-Constrained Planar Square Loops

    PubMed Central

    Eteng, Akaa Agbaeze; Abdul Rahim, Sharul Kamal; Leow, Chee Yen; Chew, Beng Wah; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Q-factor constraints are usually imposed on conductor loops employed as proximity range High Frequency Radio Frequency Identification (HF-RFID) reader antennas to ensure adequate data bandwidth. However, pairing such low Q-factor loops in inductive energy transmission links restricts the link transmission performance. The contribution of this paper is to assess the improvement that is reached with a two-stage design method, concerning the transmission performance of a planar square loop relative to an initial design, without compromise to a Q-factor constraint. The first stage of the synthesis flow is analytical in approach, and determines the number and spacing of turns by which coupling between similar paired square loops can be enhanced with low deviation from the Q-factor limit presented by an initial design. The second stage applies full-wave electromagnetic simulations to determine more appropriate turn spacing and widths to match the Q-factor constraint, and achieve improved coupling relative to the initial design. Evaluating the design method in a test scenario yielded a more than 5% increase in link transmission efficiency, as well as an improvement in the link fractional bandwidth by more than 3%, without violating the loop Q-factor limit. These transmission performance enhancements are indicative of a potential for modifying proximity HF-RFID reader antennas for efficient inductive energy transfer and data telemetry links. PMID:26890878

  6. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  7. Landslide noise.

    PubMed

    Cadman, J D; Goodman, R E

    1967-12-01

    Acoustical monitoring of real landslides has revealed the existence of subaudible noise activity prior to failure and has enabled prediction of the depth of the seat of sliding when conducted in boreholes beneath the surface. Recordings of noise generated in small slopes of moist sand, tilted to failure in laboratory tests, have been analyzed to determine the foci of discrete subaudible noise events. The noises emitted shortly before failure were plotted close to the true sliding surface observed after failure. The foci of earlier events lay either within the central portion of the sliding mass or in a region behind the failure surface. The head and toe zones were devoid of strong seismic activity. PMID:17734306

  8. Systemic irradiation for selected stage IV and recurrent pediatric solid tumors: method, toxicity, and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Wharam, M.D.; Kaizer, H.; Leventhal, B.G.; Munoz, L.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.; Elfenbein, G.J.; Order, S.E.

    1980-02-01

    Eight patients with advanced pediatric solid tumors received either sequential upper and lower half-body irradiation (HBI) (7.5 rad/min to 500 rad total) or total body irradiation (TBI) (7.5 rad/min to 800 rad total) as part of two multimodality treatment regimens. All patients received combination chemotherapy; drugs were determined by the tumor type. The TBI regimen was selected for two patients who had progression of disease with conventional chemotherapy and for two patients with stage IV neuroblastoma. This intensive regimen consisted of bone marrow harvesting, followed by local radiation to gross disease, marrow-ablative chemotherapy, TBI, and re-infusion of the cryopreserved autologous marrow. Significant acute toxicity was followed by hematologic reconstitution in each patient within seven weeks. At this writing, two patients survived, one of whom is disease free two and one half years without maintenance chemotherapy. A less intensive, outpatient regimen was selected for four patients; three had a complete or good partial response to chemotherapy. The fourth patient had tumor-involved bone marrow not responsive to chemotherapy and was therefore ineligible for marrow cryopreservation and TBI. Each of these four patients received HBI after chemotherapy and local radiation to the primary and/or metastatic sites. Acute toxicity was limited to nausea and vomiting. Significant leukopenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in three patients. All four patients were alive 10 to 26 months post HBI. This pilot study demonstrates that chemotherapy can be integrated with local fractionated radiation, and systemic radiation given as HBI or TBI with acceptable toxicity; sufficient bone marrow stem cells can be harvested after conventional chemotherapy and then cryopreserved to permit hematologic reconstitution of the patient who receives marrow ablative therapy.

  9. Effects of planting method and seed mix richness on the early stages of tallgrass prairie restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.; Bright, J.B.; Drobney, P.; Larson, J.L.; Palaia, N.; Rabie, P.A.; Vacek, S.; Wells, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tallgrass prairie restoration has been practiced for more than 75. years, yet few studies have systematically tested restoration methods over large geographic regions with the intent of refining methodology. In this study, we used three planting methods (dormant-season broadcast, growing-season broadcast and growing-season drill) fully crossed with three levels of seed species richness (10, 20, and 34 spp). We replicated the study on nine former agricultural fields located from east-central Iowa (Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge) to northwestern Minnesota (Litchfield, Fergus Falls and Morris Wetland Management Districts), USA, within the northern tallgrass prairie biome. Objectives were to evaluate the relative influences of planting method, seed mix richness, and their interactions, on (1) planted cover (both total and by guild) and richness, (2) exotic species cover, and (3) non-planted native species cover. Optimal techniques varied between the two study areas: the dormant broadcast method produced greater cover of planted species at the Minnesota sites and the growing-season drill method produced greater cover of planted species at Iowa sites. The dormant broadcast method strongly favored establishment of perennial forbs while the growing-season drill favored warm-season grasses. Although increasing richness of the seed mix produced greater planted species richness, this did not result in greater resistance to exotic invasion. We conclude that, if planting during the growing season, drilling seed is preferable to broadcasting, but if the choice is between broadcasting seed in the dormant or growing season, the dormant season is preferred. ?? 2011.

  10. Method to improve the noise figure and saturation power in multi-contact semiconductor optical amplifiers: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Carney, Kevin; Lennox, Robert; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramon; Philippe, Severine; Surre, Frederic; Bradley, Louise; Landais, Pascal

    2013-03-25

    The consequences of tailoring the longitudinal carrier density along the active layer of a multi-contact bulk semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) are investigated using a rate equation model. It is shown that both the noise figure and output power saturation can be optimized for a fixed total injected bias current. The simulation results are validated by comparison with experiment using a multi-contact SOA. The inter-contact resistance is increased using a focused ion beam in order to optimize the carrier density control. A chip noise figure of 3.8 dB and a saturation output power of 9 dBm are measured experimentally for a total bias current of 150 mA.

  11. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  13. A two-stage method to correct aberrations induced by slide slant in bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yilun; Bradley, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    To achieve optimal image quality in bright field microscopy, the slide surface should be perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. However, in the recently proposed "slanted scan" slide acquisition technique, scan speed is increased by purposely slanting the slide by a small angle (of 3-5°) so that multiple focal depths can be imaged simultaneously. In this case, the slanted slide introduces a bend in the point spread function (PSF), resulting in a coma and other aberrations that degrade image quality. In this paper, we propose a two-stage deconvolution method specifically designed to correct the aberrations induced by a slanted scan, but with general applicability to high-resolution bright-field microscopy. Specifically, we initially apply phase deconvolution to correct the dominating coma aberration, before applying a conventional semi-blind deconvolution method to further improve image resolution and contrast. We also propose a novel method to estimate the degree of coma aberration and the PSF of the optics utilising actual cytology specimens. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated quantitatively on simulated data, against a ground-truth (object) image, and qualitatively on cervical cytology specimens. Results demonstrate both improved convergence speed of the two-stage approach, especially when correcting the bend in the PSF, and a resultant image quality that is comparable to a conventionally (flat) scanned specimen. PMID:27182660

  14. A 2.5-dimensional method for the prediction of structure-borne low-frequency noise from concrete rail transit bridges.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Song, Xiaodong; Wu, Dingjun

    2014-05-01

    Predicting structure-borne noise from bridges subjected to moving trains using the three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM) is a time consuming process. This paper presents a two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) BEM-based procedure for simulating bridge-borne low-frequency noise with higher efficiency, yet no loss of accuracy. The two-dimensional (2D) BEM of a bridge with a constant cross section along the track direction is adopted to calculate the spatial modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) of the bridge using the space-wave number transforms of its 3D modal shapes. The MATVs calculated using the 2.5D method are then validated by those computed using the 3D BEM. The bridge-borne noise is finally obtained through the MATVs and modal coordinate responses of the bridge, considering time-varying vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction. The presented procedure is applied to predict the sound pressure radiating from a U-shaped concrete bridge, and the computed results are compared with those obtained from field tests on Shanghai rail transit line 8. The numerical results match well with the measured results in both time and frequency domains at near-field points. Nevertheless, the computed results are smaller than the measured ones for far-field points, mainly due to the sound radiation from adjacent spans neglected in the current model.

  15. Suppression of shot noise and spontaneous radiation in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-08-23

    Shot noise in the electron beam distribution is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers, which may affect applications ranging from single- and multi-stage HGHG FELs to an FEL amplifier for coherent electron cooling. This noise also imposes a fundamental limit of about 10{sup 6} on FEL gain, after which SASE FELs saturate. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing this shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. For more than a half-century, a traditional passive method has been used successfully in practical low-energy microwave electronic devices to suppress shot noise. Recently, it was proposed for this purpose in FELs. However, being passive, the method has some significant limitations and is hardly suitable for the highly inhomogeneous beams of modern high-gain FELs. I present a novel active method of suppressing, by many orders-of-magnitude, the shot noise in relativistic electron beams. I give a theoretical description of the process, and detail its fundamental limitation.

  16. Two-stage Rydberg charge exchange: An efficient method for production of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hessels, E.A.; Homan, D.M.; Cavagnero, M.J.

    1998-03-01

    An efficient method for production of cold antihydrogen ({bar H}) is proposed. Alkali-metal atoms laser excited to a Rydberg state are charge exchanged with cold trapped positrons, producing Rydberg states of positronium. In a second Rydberg-state charge exchange, the positronium atoms give up their Rydberg positrons to cold trapped antiprotons, producing Rydberg states of {bar H}. These {bar H} atoms soon decay down to the ground state, and, because they are cold, could be trapped in a magnetic trap. The efficiency of the process results from the extremely large cross sections for Rydberg charge exchange. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations indicate an {bar H} instantaneous production rate of 10{sup 6}/s. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Methods for determining healthy body weight in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kathy Schiro

    2006-07-01

    Several formulas for calculating desirable body weight are used in chronic kidney failure patients. Ideal body weight (IBW) derived from Metropolitan Life Insurance tables has been available since the 1950s. The Hamwi formula was proposed in the 1960s as a simple tool for quickly estimating desirable body weight, especially in people with diabetes. Since the 1970s, National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys I, II, and III have provided an in-depth evaluation of the average body weights of Americans. These standard body weights (SBW) are often interpreted to be normal and healthy weight goals. Body mass index (BMI) has also been studied for decades and is used internationally as the standard for determining healthy weight, especially in relationship to obesity. These 4 methods are discussed and compared along with a brief review of the history of using the adjusted body weight (ABW) formulas, followed by recommendations for clinical practice.

  18. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  19. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  20. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  1. Proceedings of the 1986 international conference on noise control engineering. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, R.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on noise pollution. Topics include: noise sources, noise of chain conveyors in mining, control of noise sources in power plants, noise control elements, vibration, a method of noise control in a nuclear power plant, biological effects of noise, statistical audio dosimetry, and power house noise control.

  2. An overset grid method for large eddy simulation of turbomachinery stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaofeng; Duchaine, Florent; Papadogiannis, Dimitrios; Duran, Ignacio; Moreau, Stéphane; Gicquel, Laurent Y. M.

    2014-10-01

    A coupling method based on the overset grid approach has been successfully developed to couple multi-copies of a massively-parallel unstructured compressible LES solver AVBP for turbomachinery applications. As proper LES predictions require minimizing artificial dissipation as well as dispersion of turbulent structures, the numerical treatment of the moving interface between stationary and rotating components has been thoroughly tested on cases involving acoustical wave propagation, vortex propagation through a translating interface and a cylinder wake through a rotating interface. Convergence and stability of the coupled schemes show that a minimum number of overlapping points are required for a given scheme. The current accuracy limitation is locally given by the interpolation scheme at the interface, but with a limited and localized error. For rotor-stator type applications, the moving interface only introduces a spurious weak tone at the rotational frequency provided the latter is correctly sampled. The approach has then been applied to the QinetiQ MT1 high-pressure transonic experimental turbine to illustrate the potential of rotor/stator LES in complex, high Reynolds-number industrial turbomachinery configurations. Both wave propagation and generation are considered. Mean LES statistics agree well with experimental data and bring improvement over previous RANS or URANS results.

  3. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  4. A Two-Stage Estimation Method for Random Coefficient Differential Equation Models with Application to Longitudinal HIV Dynamic Data

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yun; Zhu, Li-Xing

    2011-01-01

    We propose a two-stage estimation method for random coefficient ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. A maximum pseudo-likelihood estimator (MPLE) is derived based on a mixed-effects modeling approach and its asymptotic properties for population parameters are established. The proposed method does not require repeatedly solving ODEs, and is computationally efficient although it does pay a price with the loss of some estimation efficiency. However, the method does offer an alternative approach when the exact likelihood approach fails due to model complexity and high-dimensional parameter space, and it can also serve as a method to obtain the starting estimates for more accurate estimation methods. In addition, the proposed method does not need to specify the initial values of state variables and preserves all the advantages of the mixed-effects modeling approach. The finite sample properties of the proposed estimator are studied via Monte Carlo simulations and the methodology is also illustrated with application to an AIDS clinical data set. PMID:22171150

  5. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft System Noise Assessment with Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Olson, Erik D.

    2010-01-01

    A system noise assessment of a hybrid wing body configuration was performed using NASA s best available aircraft models, engine model, and system noise assessment method. A propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects experimental database for key noise sources and interaction effects was used to provide data directly in the noise assessment where prediction methods are inadequate. NASA engine and aircraft system models were created to define the hybrid wing body aircraft concept as a twin engine aircraft with a 7500 nautical mile mission. The engines were modeled as existing technology high bypass ratio turbofans. The baseline hybrid wing body aircraft was assessed at 22 dB cumulative below the FAA Stage 4 certification level. To determine the potential for noise reduction with relatively near term technologies, seven other configurations were assessed beginning with moving the engines two fan nozzle diameters upstream of the trailing edge and then adding technologies for reduction of the highest noise sources. Aft radiated noise was expected to be the most challenging to reduce and, therefore, the experimental database focused on jet nozzle and pylon configurations that could reduce jet noise through a combination of source reduction and shielding effectiveness. The best configuration for reduction of jet noise used state-of-the-art technology chevrons with a pylon above the engine in the crown position. This configuration resulted in jet source noise reduction, favorable azimuthal directivity, and noise source relocation upstream where it is more effectively shielded by the limited airframe surface, and additional fan noise attenuation from acoustic liner on the crown pylon internal surfaces. Vertical and elevon surfaces were also assessed to add shielding area. The elevon deflection above the trailing edge showed some small additional noise reduction whereas vertical surfaces resulted in a slight noise increase. With the effects of the configurations from the

  6. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  7. Noise properties of Hilbert transform evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavliček, Pavel; Svak, Vojtěch

    2015-08-01

    The Hilbert transform is a standard method for the calculation of the envelope and phase of a modulated signal in optical measurement methods. Usually, the intensity of light is converted into an electric signal at a detector. Therefore the actual spatially or temporally sampled signal is always affected by noise. Because the noise values of individual samples are independent, the noise can be considered as white. If the envelope and phase are calculated from the noised signal, they will also be affected by the noise. We calculate the variance and spectral density of both the envelope noise and the phase noise. We determine which parameters influence the variance and spectral density of both the envelope noise and the phase noise. Finally, we determine the influence of the noise on the measurement uncertainty in white-light interferometry and fringe-pattern analysis.

  8. Phase-based x-ray scattering—A possible method to detect cancer cells in a very early stage

    SciTech Connect

    Feye-Treimer, U. Treimer, W.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This theoretical work contains a detailed investigation of the potential and sensitivity of phase-based x-ray scattering for cancer detection in biopsies if cancer is in a very early stage of development. Methods: Cancer cells in their early stage of development differ from healthy ones mainly due to their faster growing cell nuclei and the enlargement of their densities. This growth is accompanied by an altered nucleus–plasma relation for the benefit of the cell nuclei, that changes the physical properties especially the index of refraction of the cell and the one of the cell nuclei. Interaction of radiation with matter is known to be highly sensitive to small changes of the index of refraction of matter; therefore a detection of such changes of volume and density of cell nuclei by means of high angular resolved phase-based scattering of x rays might provide a technique to distinguish malignant cells from healthy ones ifthe cell–cell nucleus system is considered as a coherent phase shifting object. Then one can observe from a thin biopsy which represents a monolayer of cells (no multiple scattering) that phase-based x-ray scattering curves from healthy cells differ from those of cancer cells in their early stage of development. Results: Detailed calculations of x-ray scattering patterns from healthy and cancer cell nuclei yield graphs and numbers with which one can distinguish healthy cells from cancer ones, taking into account that both kinds of cells occur in a tissue within a range of size and density. One important result is the role and the influence of the (lateral) coherence width of the radiation on the scattering curves and the sensitivity of phase-based scattering for cancer detection. A major result is that a larger coherence width yields a larger sensitivity for cancer detection. Further import results are calculated limits for critical sizes and densities of cell nuclei in order to attribute the investigated tissue to be healthy or

  9. Defect Detection in Correlated Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogandžić, Aleksandar; Eua-Anant, Nawanat

    2004-02-01

    We present methods for detecting NDE defect signals in correlated noise having unknown covariance. The proposed detectors are derived using the statistical theory of generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) tests and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). We consider both real and complex data models. To allow accurate estimation of the noise covariance, we incorporate secondary data containing only noise into detector design. Probability distributions of the GLR test statistics are derived under the null hypothesis, i.e. assuming that the signal is absent, and used for detector design. We apply the proposed methods to simulated and experimental data and demonstrate their superior performance compared with the detectors that neglect noise correlation.

  10. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions.

  11. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  12. Application de méthodes intégrales au calcul du bruit de cavitéComputation of cavity noise using integral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloerfelt, Xavier; Bailly, Christophe; Juvé, Daniel

    A direct numerical simulation of the sound radiated by a flow over a 2-D subsonic cavity is performed using Computational AeroAcoustics tools. The simulation is consistent with Karamcheti's experiments. The numerical results are used as a reference to study two integral formulations: the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy and a wave extrapolation method based on FW-H equation. These hybrid approaches agree with the direct computation by DNS data and provide powerful tools to compute far-field noise. To cite this article: X. Gloerfelt et al., C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 13-20

  13. Improved NASA-ANOPP Noise Prediction Computer Code for Advanced Subsonic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, K. B.; Janardan, B. A.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experience using ANOPP to predict turbofan engine flyover noise suggests that it over-predicts overall EPNL by a significant amount. An improvement in this prediction method is desired for system optimization and assessment studies of advanced UHB engines. An assessment of the ANOPP fan inlet, fan exhaust, jet, combustor, and turbine noise prediction methods is made using static engine component noise data from the CF6-8OC2, E(3), and QCSEE turbofan engines. It is shown that the ANOPP prediction results are generally higher than the measured GE data, and that the inlet noise prediction method (Heidmann method) is the most significant source of this overprediction. Fan noise spectral comparisons show that improvements to the fan tone, broadband, and combination tone noise models are required to yield results that more closely simulate the GE data. Suggested changes that yield improved fan noise predictions but preserve the Heidmann model structure are identified and described. These changes are based on the sets of engine data mentioned, as well as some CFM56 engine data that was used to expand the combination tone noise database. It should be noted that the recommended changes are based on an analysis of engines that are limited to single stage fans with design tip relative Mach numbers greater than one.

  14. How to Map Noise.

    PubMed

    Hinton, John

    2002-01-01

    Noise mapping is a method of presenting complex noise information in a clear and simple way either on a physical map or in a database. This mapping information can be either calculated or measured using a variety of techniques and methods. Furthermore, the results of such exercises can be presented in many different ways and used for a number of different purposes. This paper attempts to examine these issues in the light of the "mapping requirements" outlined in the recently proposed Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council, relating to the Assessment and Management of Environmental Noise (Comm (2000) 468 final). This proposed Directive was laid before the Parliament and Council in the autumn of 2000. The First Reading of the proposal was successfully negotiated just before Christmas 2000. The Second Reading is likely to commence shortly.

  15. Signal-to-noise velocity peaks difference: a new method for evaluating the handwriting movement fluency in children with dysgraphia.

    PubMed

    Danna, Jérémy; Paz-Villagrán, Vietminh; Velay, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated handwriting movement dysfluency related to dysgraphia. A new variable, the Signal-to-Noise velocity peaks difference (SNvpd), was proposed to describe abnormal velocity fluctuations in cursive handwriting. This variable was compared to two variables most frequently used variables for assessing handwriting fluency. This comparison was carried out for three different groups, children with dysgraphia, proficient children, and adults, all of whom wrote the same single word. The adults were taken as the reference. Results revealed that, of the three variables studied, the SNvpd proved most efficient in discriminating children with dysgraphia, and that furthermore, it had the significant advantage of facilitating the localization of dysfluency peaks within a word. Our results also showed that the movement dysfluency of children with dysgraphia was specific to certain letters. In light of these results, we discuss the methodological and theoretical relevance of this new variable to the analysis of handwriting movement with the aim of characterizing dysgraphia.

  16. Universal Linear Fit Identification: A Method Independent of Data, Outliers and Noise Distribution Model and Free of Missing or Removed Data Imputation.

    PubMed

    Adikaram, K K L B; Hussein, M A; Effenberger, M; Becker, T

    2015-01-01

    Data processing requires a robust linear fit identification method. In this paper, we introduce a non-parametric robust linear fit identification method for time series. The method uses an indicator 2/n to identify linear fit, where n is number of terms in a series. The ratio Rmax of amax - amin and Sn - amin*n and that of Rmin of amax - amin and amax*n - Sn are always equal to 2/n, where amax is the maximum element, amin is the minimum element and Sn is the sum of all elements. If any series expected to follow y = c consists of data that do not agree with y = c form, Rmax > 2/n and Rmin > 2/n imply that the maximum and minimum elements, respectively, do not agree with linear fit. We define threshold values for outliers and noise detection as 2/n * (1 + k1) and 2/n * (1 + k2), respectively, where k1 > k2 and 0 ≤ k1 ≤ n/2 - 1. Given this relation and transformation technique, which transforms data into the form y = c, we show that removing all data that do not agree with linear fit is possible. Furthermore, the method is independent of the number of data points, missing data, removed data points and nature of distribution (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) of outliers, noise and clean data. These are major advantages over the existing linear fit methods. Since having a perfect linear relation between two variables in the real world is impossible, we used artificial data sets with extreme conditions to verify the method. The method detects the correct linear fit when the percentage of data agreeing with linear fit is less than 50%, and the deviation of data that do not agree with linear fit is very small, of the order of ±10-4%. The method results in incorrect detections only when numerical accuracy is insufficient in the calculation process. PMID:26571035

  17. Universal Linear Fit Identification: A Method Independent of Data, Outliers and Noise Distribution Model and Free of Missing or Removed Data Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Adikaram, K. K. L. B.; Becker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Data processing requires a robust linear fit identification method. In this paper, we introduce a non-parametric robust linear fit identification method for time series. The method uses an indicator 2/n to identify linear fit, where n is number of terms in a series. The ratio Rmax of amax − amin and Sn − amin*n and that of Rmin of amax − amin and amax*n − Sn are always equal to 2/n, where amax is the maximum element, amin is the minimum element and Sn is the sum of all elements. If any series expected to follow y = c consists of data that do not agree with y = c form, Rmax > 2/n and Rmin > 2/n imply that the maximum and minimum elements, respectively, do not agree with linear fit. We define threshold values for outliers and noise detection as 2/n * (1 + k1) and 2/n * (1 + k2), respectively, where k1 > k2 and 0 ≤ k1 ≤ n/2 − 1. Given this relation and transformation technique, which transforms data into the form y = c, we show that removing all data that do not agree with linear fit is possible. Furthermore, the method is independent of the number of data points, missing data, removed data points and nature of distribution (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) of outliers, noise and clean data. These are major advantages over the existing linear fit methods. Since having a perfect linear relation between two variables in the real world is impossible, we used artificial data sets with extreme conditions to verify the method. The method detects the correct linear fit when the percentage of data agreeing with linear fit is less than 50%, and the deviation of data that do not agree with linear fit is very small, of the order of ±10−4%. The method results in incorrect detections only when numerical accuracy is insufficient in the calculation process. PMID:26571035

  18. Ripening stage and extraction method effects on physical properties, polyphenol composition and antioxidant activities of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Rebey, Iness Bettaieb; Kefi, Sarra; Bourgou, Soumaya; Ouerghemmi, Ines; Ksouri, Riadh; Tounsi, Moufida Saidani; Marzouk, Brahim

    2014-12-01

    The effects of two extraction methods, used at three ripening stages on the total polyphenol contents and the antioxidant activities of Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed extracts were studied. The ripening stage effect on some physical properties of cumin seed was significant. The increase of dry matter (from 10.3 to 87.5%) during ripeness was correlated negatively with that of moisture content (from 89.7 to 12.5%). Besides results showed that the full ripe seeds were richer on polyphenols and condensed tannin than unripe ones, and consequently exhibited higher antioxidant activities. However, the unripe seeds had a higher total flavonoid content compared to those of half ripe and full ripe ones. The comparison of two extraction methods showed that soxhlet extracts contained the greatest amount of polyphenols and flavonoids, while maceration samples exhibited higher antiradical and bleaching power assay. Total phenolic contents and IC50 (concentration required to cause a 50% DPPH inhibition) values in cumin seed during their maturation allowed to conclude that antioxidant activity does not depend only on the high content of total phenolics but also on the phenolic composition. A total of 19 phenolic compounds were successfully identified by HPLC analysis during the ripening of cumin seeds. Rosmarinic acid was the major phenolic acid for the unripe seeds. Furthermore, half ripe and full ripe seeds were dominated by p-coumaric acid. These compounds might be considered as interesting bioactive natural substances that may be used in several fields, such as nutraceuticals, cosmetics and agro-food industry.

  19. Prediction of Externally Blown Flap Noise and Turbomachinery Strut Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods were developed for predicting externally blown flap (EBF) noise and turbomachinery strut noise. Noise radiated by under-the-wing and upper-surface-blowing EBF configurations is calculated as a sum of lift dipole noise, trailing edge noise, and jet quadrupole noise. Resulting predictions of amplitudes and spectra generally were in good agreement with data from small-scale models. These data cover a range of exhaust velocity, flap deflection, exhaust nozzle position, exhaust nozzle shape, and ratio of exhaust nozzle diameter to wing chord. A semi-empirical method for predicting dipole noise radiation from a strut with incident turbulence was in good agreement with data. Leading-edge regions made of perforated plate backed by a bulk acoustic absorber achieved up to 7 db reduction of strut noise caused by incident turbulence at high frequencies. Radial turbulence in a turbofan exit duct was found to have a relatively high level associated with the mean velocity defect in the rotor blade wakes. Use of these turbulence spectra and a dipole noise radiation equation gave general prediction of measured aft-radiated sound power caused by a splitter ring in a full-scale fan exit duct.

  20. Signal-to-noise assessment for diffusion tensor imaging with single data set and validation using a difference image method with data from a multicenter study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiyue J.; Chia, Jonathan M.; Ahmed, Shaheen; Rollins, Nancy K.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To describe a quantitative method for determination of SNR that extracts the local noise level using a single diffusion data set. Methods: Brain data sets came from a multicenter study (eight sites; three MR vendors). Data acquisition protocol required b = 0, 700 s/mm{sup 2}, fov = 256 × 256 mm{sup 2}, acquisition matrix size 128 × 128, reconstruction matrix size 256 × 256; 30 gradient encoding directions and voxel size 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3}. Regions-of-interest (ROI) were placed manually on the b = 0 image volume on transverse slices, and signal was recorded as the mean value of the ROI. The noise level from the ROI was evaluated using Fourier Transform based Butterworth high-pass filtering. Patients were divided into two groups, one for filter parameter optimization (N = 17) and one for validation (N = 10). Six white matter areas (the genu and splenium of corpus callosum, right and left centrum semiovale, right and left anterior corona radiata) were analyzed. The Bland–Altman method was used to compare the resulting SNR with that from the difference image method. The filter parameters were optimized for each brain area, and a set of “global” parameters was also obtained, which represent an average of all regions. Results: The Bland–Altman analysis on the validation group using “global” filter parameters revealed that the 95% limits of agreement of percent bias between the SNR obtained with the new and the reference methods were −15.5% (median of the lower limit, range [−24.1%, −8.9%]) and 14.5% (median of the higher limits, range [12.7%, 18.0%]) for the 6 brain areas. Conclusions: An FT-based high-pass filtering method can be used for local area SNR assessment using only one DTI data set. This method could be used to evaluate SNR for patient studies in a multicenter setting.

  1. Time series modeling with pruned multi-layer perceptron and 2-stage damped least-squares method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyant, Cyril; Tamas, Wani; Paoli, Christophe; Balu, Aurélia; Muselli, Marc; Nivet, Marie-Laure; Notton, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) defines a family of artificial neural networks often used in TS modeling and forecasting. Because of its "black box" aspect, many researchers refuse to use it. Moreover, the optimization (often based on the exhaustive approach where "all" configurations are tested) and learning phases of this artificial intelligence tool (often based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm; LMA) are weaknesses of this approach (exhaustively and local minima). These two tasks must be repeated depending on the knowledge of each new problem studied, making the process, long, laborious and not systematically robust. In this paper a pruning process is proposed. This method allows, during the training phase, to carry out an inputs selecting method activating (or not) inter-nodes connections in order to verify if forecasting is improved. We propose to use iteratively the popular damped least-squares method to activate inputs and neurons. A first pass is applied to 10% of the learning sample to determine weights significantly different from 0 and delete other. Then a classical batch process based on LMA is used with the new MLP. The validation is done using 25 measured meteorological TS and cross-comparing the prediction results of the classical LMA and the 2-stage LMA.

  2. Aerodynamic Noise Generated by Shinkansen Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KITAGAWA, T.; NAGAKURA, K.

    2000-03-01

    The noise value (A -weighted sound pressure level, SLOW) generated by Shinkansen trains, now running at 220-300 km/h, should be less than 75 dB(A) at the trackside. Shinkansen noise, such as rolling noise, concrete support structure noise, and aerodynamic noise are generated by various parts of Shinkansen trains. Among these aerodynamic noise is important because it is the major contribution to the noise generated by the coaches running at high speed. In order to reduce the aerodynamic noise, a number of improvements to coaches have been made. As a result, the aerodynamic noise has been reduced, but it still remains significant. In addition, some aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars remains. In order to investigate the contributions of these noises, a method of analyzing Shinkansen noise has been developed and applied to the measured data of Shinkansen noise at speeds between 120 and 315 km/h. As a result, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) Aerodynamic noise generated from the upper parts of cars was reduced considerably by smoothing car surfaces. (2) Aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars has a major influence upon the wayside noise.

  3. An ultralow noise preamplifier for low frequency noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Cannatà, Gianluca; Scandurra, Graziella; Ciofi, Carmine

    2009-11-01

    Low frequency noise measurements are among the most sensitive tools for the investigation of the quality and of the reliability of semiconductor devices. The sensitivity that can be obtained depends on the background noise of the low noise preamplifier coupled to the device under test (DUT) that, at very low frequencies, is dominated by flicker noise. The low frequency noise produced by the DUT, on the other end, is very often the most interesting signal to be detected and analyzed. In this work we propose a very simple topology for the realization of a general purpose low noise preamplifier whose noise performances, at very low frequencies (below 10 Hz), are significantly better than those that can be obtained by the most popular commercial instrumentation. Indeed, a gain of 80 dB with a pass band extending from a few tens of mHz up to a few kHz with an equivalent input voltage noise as low as 14 nV/square root(Hz) (100 mHz), 1.4 nV/square root(Hz) (1 Hz), 1.0 nV/square root(Hz) (10 Hz), and 0.8 nV/square root(Hz) (1 kHz) are consistently obtained by using quite standard electronic components and with no need for trimming and/or calibration steps. Moreover, the junction field-effect transistor input stage of the amplifier is characterized by an equivalent input current noise below 4 fA/square root(Hz) in the entire bandwidth, resulting in negligible background noise degradation for DUT impedances in excess of 100 kohms. PMID:19947746

  4. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  5. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-04-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  6. A system for automated noise parameter measurements on MR preamplifiers and application to high B(0) fields.

    PubMed

    Lagore, Russell L; Roberts, Brodi Roduta; Possanzini, Cecilia; Saylor, Charles; Fallone, B Gino; De Zanche, Nicola

    2014-08-01

    A noise figure and noise parameter measurement system was developed that consists of a combination spectrum and network analyzer, preamplifier, programmable power supply, noise source, tuning board, and desktop computer. The system uses the Y-factor method for noise figure calculation and allows calibrations to correct for a decrease in excess noise ratio between the noise source and device under test, second stage (system) noise, ambient temperature variations, and available gain of the device under test. Noise parameters are extracted by performing noise figure measurements at several source impedance values obtained by adjusting an electronically controlled tuner. Results for several amplifiers at 128 MHz and 200 MHz agree with independent measurements and with the corresponding datasheets. With some modifications, the system was also used to characterize the noise figure of MRI preamplifiers in strong static magnetic fields up to 9.4 T. In most amplifiers tested the gain was found to be reduced by the magnetic field, while the noise figure increased. These changes are detrimental to signal quality (SNR) and are dependent on the electron mobility and design of the amplifier's semiconductor devices. Consequently, gallium arsenide (GaAs) field-effect transistors are most sensitive to magnetic fields due to their high electron mobility and long, narrow channel, while silicon-germanium (SiGe) bipolar transistor amplifiers are largely immune due to their very thin base.

  7. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N+1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called 'N+1' aircraft - designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, 'N' airplanes - are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are analytically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  8. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N(+)1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2010-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called "N+1" aircraft--designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, "N" airplanes--are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are empirically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  9. Fan noise research at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    Results of recent NASA research to reduce aircraft turbofan noise are described. As the bypass ratio of a turbofan engine increases from 5 to as much as 20, the dominant source of engine noise is the fan. A primary mechanism of tone noise generation is the rotor blade wakes interacting with downstream stator vanes. Methods of analyzing rotor-stator tone noise generation are described and sample results are given. The role of an acoustic modal description is emphasized. Wind tunnel tests of model fans and nacelles are described including a novel rotating microphone technique for modal measurement. Sample far field results are given showing the effects of inlet length, and modal measurements are shown which point to a new generation mechanism. Concepts for active fan noise control at the source are addressed. Implications of the research which have general relevance to fan noise generation and control are discussed.

  10. Fan noise research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Results of recent NASA research to reduce aircraft turbofan noise are described. As the bypass ratio of a turbofan engine increases from 5 to as much as 20, the dominant source of engine noise is the fan. A primary mechanism of tone noise generation is the rotor blade wakes interacting with downstream stator vanes. Methods of analyzing rotor-stator tone noise generation are described and sample results are given. The role of an acoustic modal description is emphasized. Wind tunnel tests of model fans and nacelles are described including a novel rotating microphone technique for modal measurement. Sample far field results are given showing the effects of inlet length, and modal measurements are shown which point to a new generation mechanism. Concepts for active fan noise control at the source are addressed. Implications of the research which have general relevance to fan noise generation and control are discussed.

  11. Passive Phase Noise Cancellation Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M. C.; Lifshitz, Ron; Karabalin, R. B.; Villanueva, L. G.; Matheny, M. H.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method for reducing phase noise in oscillators, thereby improving their frequency precision. The noise reduction is realized by a passive device consisting of a pair of coupled nonlinear resonating elements that are driven parametrically by the output of a conventional oscillator at a frequency close to the sum of the linear mode frequencies. Above the threshold for parametric instability, the coupled resonators exhibit self-oscillations which arise as a response to the parametric driving, rather than by application of active feedback. We find operating points of the device for which this periodic signal is immune to frequency noise in the driving oscillator, providing a way to clean its phase noise. We present results for the effect of thermal noise to advance a broader understanding of the overall noise sensitivity and the fundamental operating limits. PMID:23004985

  12. A high-order positivity-preserving single-stage single-step method for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Feng, Xiao; Seal, David C.; Tang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a high-order finite difference weighted ENO (WENO) method for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The proposed method is single-stage (i.e., it has no internal stages to store), single-step (i.e., it has no time history that needs to be stored), maintains a discrete divergence-free condition on the magnetic field, and has the capacity to preserve the positivity of the density and pressure. To accomplish this, we use a Taylor discretization of the Picard integral formulation (PIF) of the finite difference WENO method proposed in Christlieb et al. (2015) [23], where the focus is on a high-order discretization of the fluxes (as opposed to the conserved variables). We use the version where fluxes are expanded to third-order accuracy in time, and for the fluid variables space is discretized using the classical fifth-order finite difference WENO discretization. We use constrained transport in order to obtain divergence-free magnetic fields, which means that we simultaneously evolve the magnetohydrodynamic (that has an evolution equation for the magnetic field) and magnetic potential equations alongside each other, and set the magnetic field to be the (discrete) curl of the magnetic potential after each time step. In this work, we compute these derivatives to fourth-order accuracy. In order to retain a single-stage, single-step method, we develop a novel Lax-Wendroff discretization for the evolution of the magnetic potential, where we start with technology used for Hamilton-Jacobi equations in order to construct a non-oscillatory magnetic field. The end result is an algorithm that is similar to our previous work Christlieb et al. (2014) [8], but this time the time stepping is replaced through a Taylor method with the addition of a positivity-preserving limiter. Finally, positivity preservation is realized by introducing a parameterized flux limiter that considers a linear combination of high and low-order numerical fluxes. The choice of the free

  13. Speech enhancement using a generic noise codebook.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sriram; Rao Naidu, D Hanumantha

    2012-08-01

    Although single-microphone noise reduction methods perform well in stationary noise environments, their performance in non-stationary conditions remains unsatisfactory. Use of prior knowledge about speech and noise power spectral densities in the form of trained codebooks has been previously shown to address this limitation. While it is possible to use trained speech codebooks in a practical system, the variety of noise types encountered in practice makes the use of trained noise codebooks less practical. This letter presents a method that uses a generic noise codebook for speech enhancement that can be generated on-the-fly and provides good performance.

  14. System and method of reducing motion-induced noise in the optical detection of an ultrasound signal in a moving body of material

    DOEpatents

    Habeger, Jr., Charles C.; LaFond, Emmanuel F.; Brodeur, Pierre; Gerhardstein, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method to reduce motion-induced noise in the detection of ultrasonic signals in a moving sheet or body of material. An ultrasonic signal is generated in a sheet of material and a detection laser beam is moved along the surface of the material. By moving the detection laser in the same direction as the direction of movement of the sheet of material the amount of noise induced in the detection of the ultrasonic signal is reduced. The scanner is moved at approximately the same speed as the moving material. The system and method may be used for many applications, such in a paper making process or steel making process. The detection laser may be directed by a scanner. The movement of the scanner is synchronized with the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal under the scanner. A photodetector may be used to determine when a ultrasonic pulse has been directed to the moving sheet of material so that the scanner may be synchronized the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal.

  15. A new fourth-order four stage explicit trigonometrically-fitted Runge-Kutta-Nyström method for solving periodic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demba, Musa A.; Senu, Norazak; Ismail, Fudziah

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new fourth order four stage explicit trigonometrically-fitted Runge-Kutta-Nyström (ETFRKN) method for the numerical solution of second order initial value problems with periodic solutions based on Simos technique is constructed. The numerical results show the efficiency of the new method in comparison with other existing methods.

  16. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  17. Measuring gene expression noise in early Drosophila embryos: nucleus-to-nucleus variability

    PubMed Central

    Golyandina, Nina E.; Holloway, David M.; Lopes, Francisco J.P.; Spirov, Alexander V.; Spirova, Ekaterina N.; Usevich, Konstantin D.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of noise in gene expression has widely attracted the attention of experimentalists and theoreticians. Experimentally, the approaches based on in vivo fluorescent reporters in single cells appear to be straightforward and effective tools for bacteria and yeast. However, transferring these approaches to multicellular organisms presents many methodological problems. Here we describe our approach to measure between-nucleus variability (noise) in the primary morphogenetic gradient of Bicoid (Bcd) in the precellular blastoderm stage of fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos. The approach is based on the comparison of results for fixed immunostained embryos with observations of live embryos carrying fluorescent Bcd (Bcd-GFP). We measure the noise using two-dimensional Singular Spectrum Analysis (2D SSA). We have found that the nucleus-to-nucleus noise in Bcd intensity, both for live (Bcd-GFP) and for fixed immunstained embryos, tends to be signal-independent. In addition, the character of the noise is sensitive to the nuclear masking technique used to extract quantitative intensities. Further, the method of decomposing the raw quantitative expression data into a signal (expression surface) and residual noise affects the character of the residual noise. We find that careful masking of confocal images and use of appropriate computational tools to decompose raw expression data into trend and noise makes it possible to extract and study the biological noise of gene expression. PMID:22723811

  18. Measuring gene expression noise in early Drosophila embryos: nucleus-to-nucleus variability.

    PubMed

    Golyandina, Nina E; Holloway, David M; Lopes, Francisco J P; Spirov, Alexander V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Usevich, Konstantin D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of noise in gene expression has widely attracted the attention of experimentalists and theoreticians. Experimentally, the approaches based on in vivo fluorescent reporters in single cells appear to be straightforward and effective tools for bacteria and yeast. However, transferring these approaches to multicellular organisms presents many methodological problems. Here we describe our approach to measure between-nucleus variability (noise) in the primary morphogenetic gradient of Bicoid (Bcd) in the precellular blastoderm stage of fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos. The approach is based on the comparison of results for fixed immunostained embryos with observations of live embryos carrying fluorescent Bcd (Bcd-GFP). We measure the noise using two-dimensional Singular Spectrum Analysis (2D SSA). We have found that the nucleus-to-nucleus noise in Bcd intensity, both for live (Bcd-GFP) and for fixed immunstained embryos, tends to be signal-independent. In addition, the character of the noise is sensitive to the nuclear masking technique used to extract quantitative intensities. Further, the method of decomposing the raw quantitative expression data into a signal (expression surface) and residual noise affects the character of the residual noise. We find that careful masking of confocal images and use of appropriate computational tools to decompose raw expression data into trend and noise makes it possible to extract and study the biological noise of gene expression.

  19. Aircraft noise synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.; Grandle, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A second-generation Aircraft Noise Synthesis System has been developed to provide test stimuli for studies of community annoyance to aircraft flyover noise. The computer-based system generates realistic, time-varying, audio simulations of aircraft flyover noise at a specified observer location on the ground. The synthesis takes into account the time-varying aircraft position relative to the observer; specified reference spectra consisting of broadband, narrowband, and pure-tone components; directivity patterns; Doppler shift; atmospheric effects; and ground effects. These parameters can be specified and controlled in such a way as to generate stimuli in which certain noise characteristics, such as duration or tonal content, are independently varied, while the remaining characteristics, such as broadband content, are held constant. The system can also generate simulations of the predicted noise characteristics of future aircraft. A description of the synthesis system and a discussion of the algorithms and methods used to generate the simulations are provided. An appendix describing the input data and providing user instructions is also included.

  20. Brief communication: a proposed method for the assessment of pubertal stage in human skeletal remains using cervical vertebrae maturation.

    PubMed

    Shapland, Fiona; Lewis, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of age-at-death in non-adult skeletal remains is under constant review. However, in many past societies an individual's physical maturation may have been more important in social terms than their exact age, particularly during the period of adolescence. In a recent article (Shapland and Lewis: Am J Phys Anthropol 151 (2013) 302-310) highlighted a set of dental and skeletal indicators that may be useful in mapping the progress of the pubertal growth spurt. This article presents a further skeletal indicator of adolescent development commonly used by modern clinicians: cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM). This method is applied to a collection of 594 adolescents from the medieval cemetery of St. Mary Spital, London. Analysis reveals a potential delay in ages of attainment of the later CVM stages compared with modern adolescents, presumably reflecting negative environmental conditions for growth and development. The data gathered on CVM is compared to other skeletal indicators of pubertal maturity and long bone growth from this site to ascertain the usefulness of this method on archaeological collections.