Science.gov

Sample records for noise reduction efforts

  1. Preliminary noise reduction efforts in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nannapaneni, Srikant; Lee, Sarah J; Kashiouris, Markos; Elmer, Jennifer L; Thakur, Lokendra K; Nelson, Sarah B; Bowron, Catherine T; Danielson, Richard D; Surani, Salim; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a significant contributor to sleep disruption in the intensive care unit (ICU) that may result in increased patient morbidity such as delirium and prolonged length of stay in ICU. We conducted a pre-post intervention study in a 24-bed tertiary care academic medical ICU to reduce the mean noise levels. Baseline dosimeter recordings of ICU noise levels demonstrated a mean noise level of 54.2 A-weighted decibels (dBA) and peak noise levels of 109.9 dBA, well above the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended levels. There were 1735 episodes of "defects" (maximum noise levels > 60 dBA). Following implementation of multipronged interventions, although the mean noise levels did not change significantly between pre- and post-intervention (54.2 vs 53.8 dBA; p = 0.96), there was a significant reduction in the number of "defects" post-intervention (1735 vs 1289, p ≤ 0.000), and the providers felt that the patients were sleeping longer in the ICU post-intervention.

  2. Objective Measures of Listening Effort: Effects of Background Noise and Noise Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. Method: To address this, the hypothesis…

  3. Listening effort and perceived clarity for normal hearing children with the use of digital noise reduction

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Samantha; McCreery, Ryan; Hoover, Brenda; Kopun, Judy G; Stelmachowicz, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate how digital noise reduction (DNR) impacts listening effort and judgment of sound clarity in children with normal hearing. It was hypothesized that, when two DNR algorithms differing in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) output are compared, the algorithm which provides the greatest improvement in overall output SNR will reduce listening effort and receive a better clarity rating from child listeners. A secondary goal was to evaluate the relation between the inversion method measurements and listening effort with DNR processing. Design Twenty-four children with normal hearing (ages 7-12 years) participated in a speech recognition task in which consonant-vowel-consonant nonwords were presented in broadband background noise. Test stimuli were recorded through two hearing aids with DNR-off and DNR-on at 0 dB and +5 dB input SNR. Stimuli were presented to listeners and verbal response time (VRT) and phoneme recognition scores were measured. The underlying assumption was that an increase in VRT reflects an in increase in listening effort. Children rated the sound clarity for each condition. The two commercially available HAs were chosen based on: 1) an inversion technique which was used to quantify the magnitude of change in SNR with the activation of DNR, and 2) a measure of magnitude-squared coherence which was used to ensure that DNR in both devices preserved the spectrum. Results One device provided a greater improvement in overall output SNR than the other. Both DNR algorithms resulted in minimal spectral distortion as measured using coherence. For both devices, VRT decreased for the DNR-on condition suggesting that listening effort decreased with DNR in both devices. Clarity ratings were also better in the DNR-on condition for both devices. The device showing the greatest improvement in output SNR with DNR engaged improved phoneme recognition scores. The magnitude of this improved phoneme recognition was not accurately

  4. Effects of noise reduction on speech intelligibility, perceived listening effort, and personal preference in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2014-10-13

    This study evaluates the perceptual effects of single-microphone noise reduction in hearing aids. Twenty subjects with moderate sensorineural hearing loss listened to speech in babble noise processed via noise reduction from three different linearly fitted hearing aids. Subjects performed (a) speech-intelligibility tests, (b) listening-effort ratings, and (c) paired-comparison ratings on noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. The perceptual effects of noise reduction differ between hearing aids. The results agree well with those of normal-hearing listeners in a previous study. None of the noise-reduction algorithms improved speech intelligibility, but all reduced the annoyance of noise. The noise reduction that scored best with respect to noise annoyance and preference had the worst intelligibility scores. The trade-off between intelligibility and listening comfort shows that preference measurements might be useful in addition to intelligibility measurements in the selection of noise reduction. Additionally, this trade-off should be taken into consideration to create realistic expectations in hearing-aid users.

  5. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  6. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  7. Emerging Community Noise Reduction Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current NASA research portfolio in the area of aircraft noise reduction is presented. The emphasis of the research described herein is on meeting the aggressive near- and mid-term national goals for reducing aircraft noise emissions, which NASA internal studies have shown to be feasible using noise reduction technologies currently being developed in-house or in partnership with NASA s industry and academic partners. While NASA has an active research effort in airframe noise reduction, this overview focuses on propulsion noise reduction only.

  8. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  9. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  10. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  11. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  12. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  13. NASA's Subsonic Jet Transport Noise Reduction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Preisser, John S.

    2000-01-01

    Although new jet transport airplanes in today s fleet are considerably quieter than the first jet transports introduced about 40 years ago, airport community noise continues to be an important environmental issue. NASA s Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction program was begun in 1994 as a seven-year effort to develop technology to reduce jet transport noise 10 dB relative to 1992 technology. This program provides for reductions in engine source noise, improvements in nacelle acoustic treatments, reductions in the noise generated by the airframe, and improvements in the way airplanes are operated in the airport environs. These noise reduction efforts will terminate at the end of 2001 and it appears that the objective will be met. However, because of an anticipated 3-8% growth in passenger and cargo operations well into the 21st Century and the slow introduction of new the noise reduction technology into the fleet, world aircraft noise impact will remain essentially constant until about 2020 to 2030 and thereafter begin to rise. Therefore NASA has begun planning with the Federal Aviation Administration, industry, universities and environmental interest groups in the USA for a new noise reduction initiative to provide technology for significant further reductions.

  14. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  15. Noise Reduction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  16. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  17. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  18. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  19. Recent Progress in Engine Noise Reduction for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the past ten years developing technologies for reducing aircraft noise. Engine noise continues to be a dominate source, particularly for aircraft departing from airports. Research efforts have concentrated on developing noise prediction methods, experimental validation, and developing noise reduction concepts that have been verified through model scale and static engine tests. Most of the work has concentrated on fan and jet components for commercial turbofan engines. In this seminar, an overview of the engine noise reduction work that was sponsored by NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program will be given, along with background information on turbofan noise sources and certification procedures. Concepts like "chevron" nozzles for jet noise reduction and swept stators for fan noise reduction will be highlighted. A preliminary assessment on how the new technologies will impact future engines will be given.

  20. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    PubMed

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  1. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  2. Active{sup 3} noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-06-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of a system of computer programs which is capable of quantifying airport community noise impact in terms of noise level, population distribution, and human subjective response to noise. The ALAMO can be used to compare the noise impact of an airport's current operating scenario with the noise impact which would result from some proposed change in airport operations. The relative effectiveness of number of noise-impact reduction alternatives is assessed for a major midwest airport. Significant reductions in noise impact are predicted for certain noise abatement strategies while others are shown to result in relatively little noise relief.

  4. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  5. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  6. UHB Engine Fan Broadband Noise Reduction Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-01-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  7. UHB engine fan broadband noise reduction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-06-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  8. Noise Reduction Technologies for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2007-01-01

    Significant progress continues to be made with noise reduction for turbofan engines. NASA has conducted and sponsored research aimed at reducing noise from commercial aircraft. Since it takes many years for technologies to be developed and implemented, it is important to have aggressive technology goals that lead the target entry into service dates. Engine noise is one of the major contributors to the overall sound levels as aircraft operate near airports. Turbofan engines are commonly used on commercial transports due to their advantage for higher performance and lower noise. The noise reduction comes from combinations of changes to the engine cycle parameters and low noise design features. In this paper, an overview of major accomplishments from recent NASA research programs for engine noise will be given.

  9. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques.

  10. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques. PMID:26373216

  11. Oscillator PM Noise Reduction From Correlated AM Noise.

    PubMed

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W; Howe, David A

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel technique for reducing the phase modulation (PM) noise of an oscillator in a steady-state condition as well as under vibration. It utilizes correlation between PM noise and amplitude modulation (AM) noise that can originate from the oscillator's loop components. A control voltage proportional to the correlated AM noise is generated and utilized in a feedforward architecture to correct for the steady state as well as the vibration-induced PM noise. An improvement of almost 10-15 dB in PM noise is observed over one decade of offset frequencies for a 635-MHz quartz-MEMS oscillator. This corresponds to more than a factor of five reductions in vibration sensitivity.

  12. Recent Progress in Engine Noise Reduction Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis; Gliebe, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Highlights from NASA-funded research over the past ten years for aircraft engine noise reduction are presented showing overall technical plans, accomplishments, and selected applications to turbofan engines. The work was sponsored by NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. Emphasis is given to only the engine noise reduction research and significant accomplishments that were investigated at Technology Readiness Levels ranging from 4 to 6. The Engine Noise Reduction sub-element was divided into four work areas: source noise prediction, model scale tests, engine validation, and active noise control. Highlights from each area include technologies for higher bypass ratio turbofans, scarf inlets, forward-swept fans, swept and leaned stators, chevron/tabbed nozzles, advanced noise prediction analyses, and active noise control for fans. Finally, an industry perspective is given from General Electric Aircraft Engines showing how these technologies are being applied to commercial products. This publication contains only presentation vu-graphs from an invited lecture given at the 41st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 6-9, 2003.

  13. Airframe Noise Reduction Studies and Clean-Airframe Noise Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Bailey, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a wing model with modified leading edge slat and trailing edge flap. The modifications were intended to reduce the surface pressure response to convected turbulence and thereby reduce the airframe noise without changing the lift at constant incidence. Tests were conducted at 70.7 and 100 m/sec airspeeds, with Reynolds numbers 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 6th power. Considerable reduction of noise radiation from the side edges of a 40 deflection single slotted flap was achieved by modification to the side edge regions or the leading edge region of the flap panel. Total far field noise was reduced 2 to 3 dB over several octaves of frequency. When these panels were installed as the aft panel of a 40 deg deflection double slotted flap, 2 dB noise reduction was achieved.

  14. Noise Reduction Through Circulation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Scott E.; Ahuja, K. K.; Englar, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Circulation control technology uses tangential blowing around a rounded trailing edge or a leading edge to change the force and moment characteristics of an aerodynamic body. This technology has been applied to circular cylinders, wings, helicopter rotors, and even to automobiles for improved aerodynamic performance. Only limited research has been conducted on the acoustic of this technology. Since wing flaps contribute to the environmental noise of an aircraft, an alternate blown high lift system without complex mechanical flaps could prove beneficial in reducing the noise of an approaching aircraft. Thus, in this study, a direct comparison of the acoustic characteristics of high lift systems employing a circulation control wing configuration and a conventional wing flapped configuration has been made. These results indicate that acoustically, a circulation control wing high lift system could be considerably more acceptable than a wing with conventional mechanical flaps.

  15. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  16. Assessing the efficacy of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylands, Julia M.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is an electronic technique, based on reverse phase cancellation, for reducing low frequency noise reaching an operators ears. This report discussed the basic concept, its capabilities and some approaches to assessing its efficacy. The technique provides a great enhancement to hearing protection and also enhances signal detection and communications capabilities. Tests of detectibility of pure tones at frequencies ranging up to 1750 Hz using ANR systems which had maximum noise attenuation between 300 and 600 Hz and masking noise typical of the SeaKing helicopter showed that improvements in detection performance extend up to 1000 Hz. ANR systems also offer improved speech intelligibility in high noise environments by reducing the upward spread of masking and adding speech pre-emphasis.

  17. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various aeronautical, operational, and land-use noise impact reduction alternatives are assessed for a major midwestern airport. Specifically, the relative effectiveness of adding sound absorbing material to aircraft engines, imposing curfews, and treating houses with acoustic insulation are examined.

  18. Prediction of Landing Gear Noise Reduction and Comparison to Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    2010-01-01

    Noise continues to be an ongoing problem for existing aircraft in flight and is projected to be a concern for next generation designs. During landing, when the engines are operating at reduced power, the noise from the airframe, of which landing gear noise is an important part, is equal to the engine noise. There are several methods of predicting landing gear noise, but none have been applied to predict the change in noise due to a change in landing gear design. The current effort uses the Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction (LGMAP) code, developed at The Pennsylvania State University to predict the noise from landing gear. These predictions include the influence of noise reduction concepts on the landing gear noise. LGMAP is compared to wind tunnel experiments of a 6.3%-scale Boeing 777 main gear performed in the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley. The geometries tested in the QFF include the landing gear with and without a toboggan fairing and the door. It is shown that LGMAP is able to predict the noise directives and spectra from the model-scale test for the baseline configuration as accurately as current gear prediction methods. However, LGMAP is also able to predict the difference in noise caused by the toboggan fairing and by removing the landing gear door. LGMAP is also compared to far-field ground-based flush-mounted microphone measurements from the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD 2) flight test. These comparisons include a Boeing 777-300ER with and without a toboggan fairing that demonstrate that LGMAP can be applied to full-scale flyover measurements. LGMAP predictions of the noise generated by the nose gear on the main gear measurements are also shown.

  19. Heuristics Made Easy: An Effort-Reduction Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Anuj K.; Oppenheimer, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a new framework for understanding and studying heuristics. The authors posit that heuristics primarily serve the purpose of reducing the effort associated with a task. As such, the authors propose that heuristics can be classified according to a small set of effort-reduction principles. The authors use this…

  20. Interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Bryce, Jeffrey W.

    1987-01-01

    Existing interior noise reduction techniques for aircraft fuselages perform reasonably well at higher frequencies, but are inadequate at low frequencies, particularly with respect to the low blade passage harmonics with high forcing levels found in propeller aircraft. A method is studied which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. Adjacent panel would oscillate at equal amplitude, to give equal acoustic source strength, but with opposite phase. Provided these adjacent panels are acoustically compact, the resulting cancellation causes the interior acoustic modes to be cut off, and therefore be nonpropagating and evanescent. This interior noise reduction method, called Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART), is being investigated theoretically and experimentally. Progress to date is discussed.

  1. Fluidic Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Henderson, Brenda; Whitmire, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Chevron mixing devices are used to reduce noise from commercial separate-flow turbofan engines. Mechanical chevron serrations at the nozzle trailing edge generate axial vorticity that enhances jet plume mixing and consequently reduces far-field noise. Fluidic chevrons generated with air injected near the nozzle trailing edge create a vorticity field similar to that of the mechanical chevrons and allow more flexibility in controlling acoustic and thrust performance than a passive mechanical design. In addition, the design of such a system has the future potential for actively controlling jet noise by pulsing or otherwise optimally distributing the injected air. Scale model jet noise experiments have been performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to investigate the fluidic chevron concept. Acoustic data from different fluidic chevron designs are shown. Varying degrees of noise reduction are achieved depending on the injection pattern and injection flow conditions. CFD results were used to select design concepts that displayed axial vorticity growth similar to that associated with mechanical chevrons and qualitatively describe the air injection flow and the impact on acoustic performance.

  2. Distributed Exhaust Nozzles for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J.; Hellman, B.; Schein, D. B.; Solomon, W. D., Jr.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to validate the jet noise reduction potential of a concept associated with distributed exhaust nozzles. Under this concept the propulsive thrust is generated by a larger number of discrete plumes issuing from an array of small or mini-nozzles. The potential of noise reduction of this concept stems from the fact that a large number of small jets will produce very high frequency noise and also, if spaced suitably, they will coalesce at a smaller velocity to produce low amplitude, low frequency noise. This is accomplished through detailed acoustic and fluid measurements along with a Computational Fluidic Dynamic (CFD) solution of the mean (DE) Distributed Exhaust nozzle flowfield performed by Northrop-Grumman. The acoustic performance is quantified in an anechoic chamber. Farfield acoustic data is acquired for a DE nozzle as well as a round nozzle of the same area. Both these types of nozzles are assessed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. The CFD analysis ensures that both nozzles issued the same amount of airflow for a given nozzle pressure ratio. Data at a variety of nozzle pressure ratios are acquired at a range of polar and azimuthal angles. Flow visualization of the DE nozzle is used to assess the fluid dynamics of the small jet interactions. Results show that at high subsonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle shifts its frequency of peak amplitude to a higher frequency relative to a round nozzle of equivalent area (from a S(sub tD) = 0.24 to 1. 3). Furthermore, the DE nozzle shows reduced sound pressure levels (as much as 4 - 8 dB) in the low frequency part of the spectrum (less than S(sub tD) = 0.24 ) compared to the round nozzle. At supersonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle does not exhibit the jet screech and the shock-associated broadband noise is reduced by as much as 12 dB.

  3. Noise reduction studies for the OV-1 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Connor, A. B.; Copeland, W. L.; Dibble, A. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been conducted to define possible modifications to the OV-1 aircraft to reduce its aural detection distance. This effort involved documenting the noise characteristics of the airplane, devising modifications to reduce the noise, estimating the reduction in detection distance, and evaluating aircraft performance as a result of these modifications. It was found that the main noise source on this aircraft is the propeller and hence modifications only to the propeller and the propeller drive system are proposed. Modifications involving only the propeller are noted to involve no increase in weight but they result in only a modest decrease in aural detection distance. In order to obtain substantial decreases in aural detection distance, modifications involving changes both to the propeller and the engine-propeller gearing are required.

  4. Simple noise reduction for diffusion weighted images.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yuto; Kanazawa, Yuki; Usuda, Takatoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Junji; Harada, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to reduce the noise in order to improve the SNR of Dw images with high b-value by using two correction schemes. This study was performed with use of phantoms made from water and sucrose at different concentrations, which were 10, 30, and 50 weight percent (wt%). In noise reduction for Dw imaging of the phantoms, we compared two correction schemes that are based on the Rician distribution and the Gaussian distribution. The highest error values for each concentration with use of the Rician distribution scheme were 7.3 % for 10 wt%, 2.4 % for 30 wt%, and 0.1 % for 50 wt%. The highest error values for each concentration with use of the Gaussian distribution scheme were 20.3 % for 10 wt%, 11.6 % for 30 wt%, and 3.4 % for 50 wt%. In Dw imaging, the noise reduction makes it possible to apply the correction scheme of Rician distribution. PMID:26984734

  5. Wing Leading Edge Concepts for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Pitera, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of wing leading edge concepts for noise reduction during high-lift operations, without compromising landing stall speeds, stall characteristics or cruise performance. High-lift geometries, which can be obtained by conventional mechanical systems or morphing structures have been considered. A systematic aerodynamic analysis procedure was used to arrive at several promising configurations. The aerodynamic design of new wing leading edge shapes is obtained from a robust Computational Fluid Dynamics procedure. Acoustic benefits are qualitatively established through the evaluation of the computed flow fields.

  6. Force Irregularity Following Maximal Effort: The After-Peak Reduction.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa; Spirduso, Waneen

    2016-08-01

    Irregularities in force output are present throughout human movement and can impair task performance. We investigated the presence of a large force discontinuity (after-peak reduction, APR) that appeared immediately following peak in maximal effort ramp contractions performed with the thumb adductor and ankle dorsiflexor muscles in 25 young adult participants (76% males, 24% females; M age 24.4 years, SD = 7.1). The after-peak reduction displayed similar parameters in both muscle groups with comparable drops in force during the after-peak reduction minima (thumb adductor: 27.5 ± 7.5% maximal voluntary contraction; ankle dorsiflexor: 25.8 ± 6.2% maximal voluntary contraction). A trend for the presence of fewer after-peak reductions with successive ramp trials was observed, suggesting a learning effect. Further investigation should explore underlying neural mechanisms contributing to the after-peak reduction. PMID:27502241

  7. High-Speed Jet Noise Reduction NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Handy, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    History shows that the problem of high-speed jet noise reduction is difficult to solve. the good news is that high performance military aircraft noise is dominated by a single source called 'jet noise' (commercial aircraft have several sources). The bad news is that this source has been the subject of research for the past 50 years and progress has been incremental. Major jet noise reduction has been achieved through changing the cycle of the engine to reduce the jet exit velocity. Smaller reductions have been achieved using suppression devices like mixing enhancement and acoustic liners. Significant jet noise reduction without any performance loss is probably not possible! Recent NASA Noise Reduction Research Programs include the High Speed Research Program, Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program, Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program - Fundamental Noise, and Quiet Aircraft Technology Program.

  8. Twin jet shielding. [for aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cuffel, R. F.; Massier, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    For an over-the-wing/under-the-wing engine configuration on an airplane, the noise produced by the upper jet flow is partially reflected by the lower jet. An analysis has been performed which can be used to predict the distribution of perceived noise levels along the ground plane at take-off for an airplane which is designed to take advantage of the over/under shielding concept. Typical contours of PNL, the shielding benefit in the shadow zone, and the EPNL values at 3.5 nautical miles from brake release as well as EPNL values at sideline at 0.35 nautical miles have been calculated. This has been done for a range of flow parameters characteristic of engines producing inverted velocity profile jets suitable for use in a supersonic cruise vehicle. Reductions up to 6.0 EPNdB in community noise levels can be realized when the over engines are operated at higher thrust and the lower engines simultaneously operated with reduced thrust keeping the total thrust constant.

  9. Reductions in Multi-Component Jet Noise by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustics Wind Tunnel to determine the extent of jet exhaust noise reduction that can be obtained using water injection in a hot jet environment. The effects of water parameters such as mass flow rate, injection location, and spray patterns on suppression of dominant noise sources in both subsonic and supersonic jets were determined, and extrapolations to full-scale engine noise reduction were made. Water jets and sprays were injected in to the shear layers of cold and hot circular jets operating at both subsonic and supersonic exhaust conditions. Use of convergent-divergent and convergent nozzles (2.7in. D) allowed for simulations of all major jet noise sources. The experimental results show that water injection clearly disrupts shock noise sources within the jet plume, with large reductions in radiated shock noise. There are smaller reductions in jet mixing noise, resulting in only a small decrease in effective perceived noise level when projections are made to full scale. The fact that the measured noise reduction in the direction upstream of the nozzle was consistently larger than in the noisier downstream direction contributed to keeping effective perceived noise reductions small. Variations in the operation of the water injection system clearly show that injection at the nozzle exit rather than further downstream is required for the largest noise reduction. Noise reduction increased with water pressure as well as with its mass flow, although the type of injector had little effect.

  10. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  11. Single source noise reduction of received HF audio: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Eric C.; Alva, Carlos O.

    2014-05-01

    This paper visits the application of single-source noise reduction on received audio over a HF channel. The noise reduction algorithm is typically used in vocoder noise processing at the transmitter before encoding. This study presents the results of the algorithm effects by objectively measuring audio quality through the use of industry standard PESQ analysis.

  12. Evaluation of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program Noise Reduction Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Rawls, John W., Jr.; Russell, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a detailed evaluation of the aircraft noise reduction technology concepts developed during the course of the NASA/FAA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. In 1992, NASA and the FAA initiated a cosponsored, multi-year program with the U.S. aircraft industry focused on achieving significant advances in aircraft noise reduction. The program achieved success through a systematic development and validation of noise reduction technology. Using the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program, the noise reduction benefit of the technologies that reached a NASA technology readiness level of 5 or 6 were applied to each of four classes of aircraft which included a large four engine aircraft, a large twin engine aircraft, a small twin engine aircraft and a business jet. Total aircraft noise reductions resulting from the implementation of the appropriate technologies for each class of aircraft are presented and compared to the AST program goals.

  13. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  14. Noise Reduction with Microphone Arrays for Speaker Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Z

    2011-12-22

    Reducing acoustic noise in audio recordings is an ongoing problem that plagues many applications. This noise is hard to reduce because of interfering sources and non-stationary behavior of the overall background noise. Many single channel noise reduction algorithms exist but are limited in that the more the noise is reduced; the more the signal of interest is distorted due to the fact that the signal and noise overlap in frequency. Specifically acoustic background noise causes problems in the area of speaker identification. Recording a speaker in the presence of acoustic noise ultimately limits the performance and confidence of speaker identification algorithms. In situations where it is impossible to control the environment where the speech sample is taken, noise reduction filtering algorithms need to be developed to clean the recorded speech of background noise. Because single channel noise reduction algorithms would distort the speech signal, the overall challenge of this project was to see if spatial information provided by microphone arrays could be exploited to aid in speaker identification. The goals are: (1) Test the feasibility of using microphone arrays to reduce background noise in speech recordings; (2) Characterize and compare different multichannel noise reduction algorithms; (3) Provide recommendations for using these multichannel algorithms; and (4) Ultimately answer the question - Can the use of microphone arrays aid in speaker identification?

  15. Circular cylinders with soft porous cover for flow noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Thomas F.; Sarradj, Ennes

    2016-03-01

    The use of porous materials is one of several approaches to passively control or minimize the generation of flow noise. In order to investigate the possible reduction of noise from struts and other protruding parts (for example components of the landing gear or pantographs), acoustic measurements were taken in a small aeroacoustic wind tunnel on a set of circular cylinders with a soft porous cover. The aim of this study was to identify those materials that result in the best noise reduction, which refers to both tonal noise and broadband noise. The porous covers were characterized by their air flow resistivity, a parameter describing the permeability of an open-porous material. The results show that materials with low air flow resistivities lead to a noticeable flow noise reduction. Thereby, the main effect of the porous cylinder covers is that the spectral peak of the aeolian tone due to vortex shedding appears much narrower, but is not suppressed completely. Based on the measurement results, a basic model for the estimation of the total peak level of the aeolian tone was derived. In addition to the minimization of the vortex shedding noise, a reduction of broadband noise can be observed, especially at higher Reynolds numbers. The noise reduction increases with decreasing air flow resistivity of the porous covers, which means that materials that are highly permeable to air result in the best noise reduction.

  16. Subjective ratings of noise-reduction hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Kuk, F K; Tyler, R S; Mims, L

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of seven commercially available noise-reduction hearing aids was evaluated using subjective ratings of continuous discourse. Subjective scales of listening comfort, speech quality, speech understanding, noise interference, and overall liking were used. Fifteen experienced hearing-aid users participated. Two hearing aids that used amplitude compression (Audiotone A-54 and Telex 363C), two hearing aids that used the Zeta Noise Blocker (two versions of a Maico SP147), and three hearing aids that proportionally attenuated the low-frequencies (Rion HB-69AS, Richards ASE-B, and Siemens 283 ASP) were evaluated. None of the noise-reduction hearing aids significantly altered group performance on any subjective scale. Individually, however, subjects responded differently to different noise-reduction hearing aids, indicating that some noise-reduction hearing aids may help some hearing-impaired individuals.

  17. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  18. Broadband Shock Noise Reduction in Turbulent Jets by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2008-01-01

    The concept of effective jet properties introduced by the author (AIAA-2007-3 645) has been extended to the estimation of broadband shock noise reduction by water injection in supersonic jets. Comparison of the predictions with the test data for cold underexpanded supersonic nozzles shows a satisfactory agreement. The results also reveal the range of water mass flow rates over which saturation of mixing noise reduction and existence of parasitic noise are manifest.

  19. Noise Reduction in Complex Biological Switches

    PubMed Central

    Cardelli, Luca; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Dalchau, Neil; Tribastone, Mirco; Tschaikowski, Max

    2016-01-01

    Cells operate in noisy molecular environments via complex regulatory networks. It is possible to understand how molecular counts are related to noise in specific networks, but it is not generally clear how noise relates to network complexity, because different levels of complexity also imply different overall number of molecules. For a fixed function, does increased network complexity reduce noise, beyond the mere increase of overall molecular counts? If so, complexity could provide an advantage counteracting the costs involved in maintaining larger networks. For that purpose, we investigate how noise affects multistable systems, where a small amount of noise could lead to very different outcomes; thus we turn to biochemical switches. Our method for comparing networks of different structure and complexity is to place them in conditions where they produce exactly the same deterministic function. We are then in a good position to compare their noise characteristics relatively to their identical deterministic traces. We show that more complex networks are better at coping with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Intrinsic noise tends to decrease with complexity, and extrinsic noise tends to have less impact. Our findings suggest a new role for increased complexity in biological networks, at parity of function. PMID:26853830

  20. Perceptually optimized gain function for cochlear implant signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Dawson, Pam W; Hersbach, Adam A

    2012-01-01

    Noise reduction in cochlear implants has achieved significant speech perception improvements through spectral subtraction and signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction techniques. Current methods use gain functions derived through mathematical optimization or motivated by normal listening psychoacoustic experiments. Although these gain functions have been able to improve speech perception, recent studies have indicated that they are not optimal for cochlear implant noise reduction. This study systematically investigates cochlear implant recipients' speech perception and listening preference of noise reduction with a range of gain functions. Results suggest an advantageous gain function and show that gain functions currently used for noise reduction are not optimal for cochlear implant recipients. Using the cochlear implant optimised gain function, a 27% improvement over the current advanced combination encoder (ACE) stimulation strategy in speech weighted noise and a 7% improvement over current noise reduction strategies were observed in babble noise conditions. The optimized gain function was also most preferred by cochlear implant recipients. The CI specific gain function derived from this study can be easily incorporated into existing noise reduction strategies, to further improve listening performance for CI recipients in challenging environments.

  1. Compression station upgrades include advanced noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, V.R.; Sherikar, S.

    1998-10-01

    Since its inception in the mid-`80s, AlintaGas` Dampier to Bunbury natural gas pipeline has been constantly undergoing a series of upgrades to boost capacity and meet other needs. Extending northward about 850 miles from near Perth to the northwest shelf, the 26-inch line was originally served by five compressor stations. In the 1989-91 period, three new compressor stations were added to increase capacity and a ninth station was added in 1997. Instead of using noise-path-treatment mufflers to reduce existing noise, it was decided to use noise-source-treatment technology to prevent noise creation in the first place. In the field, operation of these new noise-source treatment attenuators has been very quiet. If there was any thought earlier of guaranteed noise-level verification, it is not considered a priority now. It`s also anticipated that as AlintaGas proceeds with its pipeline and compressor station upgrade program, similar noise-source treatment equipment will be employed and retrofitted into older stations where the need to reduce noise and potential radiant-heat exposure is indicated.

  2. An assessment of propeller aircraft noise reduction technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, F. Bruce

    1995-01-01

    This report is a review of the literature regarding propeller airplane far-field noise reduction. Near-field and cabin noise reduction are not specifically addressed. However, some of the approaches used to reduce far-field noise produce beneficial effects in the near-field and in the cabin. The emphasis is on propeller noise reduction but engine exhaust noise reduction by muffling is also addressed since the engine noise becomes a significant part of the aircraft noise signature when propeller noise is reduced. It is concluded that there is a substantial body of information available that can be used as the basis to reduce propeller airplane noise. The reason that this information is not often used in airplane design is the associated weight, cost, and performance penalties. It is recommended that the highest priority be given to research for reducing the penalties associated with lower operating RPM and propeller diameter while increasing the number of blades. Research to reduce engine noise and explore innovative propeller concepts is also recommended.

  3. Critical Low-Noise Technologies Being Developed for Engine Noise Reduction Systems Subproject

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's previous Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program delivered the initial technologies for meeting a 10-year goal of a 10-dB reduction in total aircraft system noise. Technology Readiness Levels achieved for the engine-noise-reduction technologies ranged from 4 (rig scale) to 6 (engine demonstration). The current Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project is building on those AST accomplishments to achieve the additional noise reduction needed to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise's 10-year goal, again validated through a combination of laboratory rig and engine demonstration tests. In order to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise goal for future aircraft of a 50- reduction in the perceived noise level, reductions of 4 dB are needed in both fan and jet noise. The primary objectives of the Engine Noise Reduction Systems (ENRS) subproject are, therefore, to develop technologies to reduce both fan and jet noise by 4 dB, to demonstrate these technologies in engine tests, and to develop and experimentally validate Computational Aero Acoustics (CAA) computer codes that will improve our ability to predict engine noise.

  4. Seismic exploration noise reduction in the Marginal Ice Zone.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Dag; Sagen, Hanne

    2014-07-01

    A sonobuoy field was deployed in the Marginal Ice Zone of the Fram Strait in June 2011 to study the spatial variability of ambient noise. High noise levels observed at 10-200 Hz are attributed to distant (1400 km range) seismic exploration. The noise levels decreased with range into the ice cover; the reduction is fitted by a spreading loss model with a frequency-dependent attenuation factor less than for under-ice interior Arctic propagation. Numerical modeling predicts transmission loss of the same order as the observed noise level reduction and indicates a significant loss contribution from under-ice interaction. PMID:24993237

  5. Recent Developments in U.S. Engine Noise Reduction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Envia, Edmane; Huff, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research in the United States has made considerable progress over the past 10 years for both subsonic and supersonic flight applications. The Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program started in 1994 and will be completed in 2001 without major changes to program plans and funding levels. As a result, significant progress has been made toward the goal of reducing engine source noise by 6 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise level in decibels). This paper will summarize some of the significant accomplishments from the subsonic engine noise research performed over the past 10 years. The review is by no means comprehensive and only represents a sample of major accomplishments.

  6. Definition of 1992 Technology Aircraft Noise Levels and the Methodology for Assessing Airplane Noise Impact of Component Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumasaka, Henry A.; Martinez, Michael M.; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the methodology for assessing the impact of component noise reduction on total airplane system noise. The methodology is intended to be applied to the results of individual study elements of the NASA-Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program, which will address the development of noise reduction concepts for specific components. Program progress will be assessed in terms of noise reduction achieved, relative to baseline levels representative of 1992 technology airplane/engine design and performance. In this report, the 1992 technology reference levels are defined for assessment models based on four airplane sizes - an average business jet and three commercial transports: a small twin, a medium sized twin, and a large quad. Study results indicate that component changes defined as program final goals for nacelle treatment and engine/airframe source noise reduction would achieve from 6-7 EPNdB reduction of total airplane noise at FAR 36 Stage 3 noise certification conditions for all of the airplane noise assessment models.

  7. A differential magnetoelectric heterostructure: Internal noise reduction and external noise cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaojin; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, D.

    2015-12-01

    A differential heterostructure design which has a capability to reduce the internal noise and reject the external vibration noise for Metglas magnetostrictive foils/Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 piezofiber based-magnetoelectric (ME) laminated composite has been studied. The internal noise reduction is equivalent to that offered by sensor array stacks, and the external noise cancellation is based on a differential method (i.e., ME signal is in-phase but vibration noise is anti-phase). The ability of the structure to reduce the internal noise, and cancel the external vibration noise by a 10-fold attenuation factor, allows for practical applications of these sensors in real-world environments where contamination of magnetic signals by external vibrational noise increases the equivalent magnetic noise.

  8. Wind fence enclosures for infrasonic wind noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Abbott, JohnPaul; Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    A large porous wind fence enclosure has been built and tested to optimize wind noise reduction at infrasonic frequencies between 0.01 and 10 Hz to develop a technology that is simple and cost effective and improves upon the limitations of spatial filter arrays for detecting nuclear explosions, wind turbine infrasound, and other sources of infrasound. Wind noise is reduced by minimizing the sum of the wind noise generated by the turbulence and velocity gradients inside the fence and by the area-averaging the decorrelated pressure fluctuations generated at the surface of the fence. The effects of varying the enclosure porosity, top condition, bottom gap, height, and diameter and adding a secondary windscreen were investigated. The wind fence enclosure achieved best reductions when the surface porosity was between 40% and 55% and was supplemented by a secondary windscreen. The most effective wind fence enclosure tested in this study achieved wind noise reductions of 20-27 dB over the 2-4 Hz frequency band, a minimum of 5 dB noise reduction for frequencies from 0.1 to 20 Hz, constant 3-6 dB noise reduction for frequencies with turbulence wavelengths larger than the fence, and sufficient wind noise reduction at high wind speeds (3-6 m/s) to detect microbaroms. PMID:25786940

  9. Wind Noise Reduction in a Non-Porous Subsurface Windscreen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Shams, Qamar A.; Knight, H. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of wind noise reduction were conducted on a box-shaped, subsurface windscreen made of closed cell polyurethane foam. The windscreen was installed in the ground with the lid flush with the ground surface. The wind was generated by means of a fan, situated on the ground, and the wind speed was measured at the center of the windscreen lid with an ultrasonic anemometer. The wind speed was controlled by moving the fan to selected distances from the windscreen. The wind noise was measured on a PCB Piezotronics 3†electret microphone. Wind noise spectra were measured with the microphone exposed directly to the wind (atop the windscreen lid) and with the microphone installed inside the windscreen. The difference between the two spectra comprises the wind noise reduction. At wind speeds of 3, 5, and 7 m/s, the wind noise reduction is typically 15 dB over the frequency range of 0.1-20 Hz.

  10. Perceptual effects of noise reduction by time-frequency masking of noisy speech.

    PubMed

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2012-10-01

    Time-frequency masking is a method for noise reduction that is based on the time-frequency representation of a speech in noise signal. Depending on the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), each time-frequency unit is either attenuated or not. A special type of a time-frequency mask is the ideal binary mask (IBM), which has access to the real SNR (ideal). The IBM either retains or removes each time-frequency unit (binary mask). The IBM provides large improvements in speech intelligibility and is a valuable tool for investigating how different factors influence intelligibility. This study extends the standard outcome measure (speech intelligibility) with additional perceptual measures relevant for noise reduction: listening effort, noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. Four types of time-frequency masking were evaluated: the original IBM, a tempered version of the IBM (called ITM) which applies limited and non-binary attenuation, and non-ideal masking (also tempered) with two different types of noise-estimation algorithms. The results from ideal masking imply that there is a trade-off between intelligibility and sound quality, which depends on the attenuation strength. Additionally, the results for non-ideal masking suggest that subjective measures can show effects of noise reduction even if noise reduction does not lead to differences in intelligibility.

  11. A study on noise reduction using ICA for Magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Masaki; Ishibashi, Hidenori; Adachi, Masaharu; Uchikawa, Yoshinori; Kotani, Makoto

    In the biomagnetic measurement, the biomagnetic signal is extremely weak compared with environmental magnetic noise. Therefore, it is important to reduce the noise component. There are many noise-reduction studies for MEG using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The ICA method is expectable to extract and remove noise components from the brain magnetic field measurement data. However, in these researches, each obtained independent components are artificially distinguished to the noise and the signal. We propose a method of distinguishing to the noise and the signal automatically by using the signal subspace method for vector brain magnetic field. By applying this method to a phantom data and Auditory Evoked Field data, it is shown improvement of the signal to noise ratio and estimated accuracy.

  12. Supersonic Jet Noise Reductions Predicted with Increased Jet Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, predictions are made of noise radiation from single, supersonic, axisymmetric jets. We examine the effects of changes in operating conditions and the effects of simulated enhanced mixing that would increase the spreading rate of the jet shear layer on radiated noise levels. The radiated noise in the downstream direction is dominated by mixing noise and it is well described by the instability wave noise radiation analysis. A numerical prediction scheme is used for the mean flow providing an efficient method to obtain the mean flow development for various operating conditions and to simulate the enhanced mixing. Using far field radiated noise measurements as a reference, the calculations predict that enhanced jet spreading results in a reduction of radiated noise.

  13. Adaptive noise reduction circuit for a sound reproduction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); O'Connell, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise reduction circuit for a hearing aid having an adaptive filter for producing a signal which estimates the noise components present in an input signal. The circuit includes a second filter for receiving the noise-estimating signal and modifying it as a function of a user's preference or as a function of an expected noise environment. The circuit also includes a gain control for adjusting the magnitude of the modified noise-estimating signal, thereby allowing for the adjustment of the magnitude of the circuit response. The circuit also includes a signal combiner for combining the input signal with the adjusted noise-estimating signal to produce a noise reduced output signal.

  14. Revolutionary Concepts for Helicopter Noise Reduction: SILENT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan; Cox, Charles; Booth, Earl R., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of a NASA initiative to reduce helicopter main rotor noise, a Phase 1 study has been performed of candidate noise reduction concepts. Both conventional and novel design technologies have been analyzed that reduce the community impact of helicopter operations. In this study the noise reduction potential and design implications are assessed for conventional means of noise reduction, e.g., tip speed reduction, tip shapes and airfoil tailoring, and for two innovative design concepts: modulated blade spacing and x-force control. Main rotor designs that incorporate modulated blade spacing are shown to have reduced peak noise levels in most flight operations. X-force control alters the helicopter's force balance whereby the miss distance between main rotor blades and shed vortices can be controlled. This control provides a high potential to mitigate BVI noise radiation. Each concept is evaluated using best practice design and analysis methods, achieving the study's aim to significantly reduce noise with minimal performance degradation and no vibration increase. It is concluded that a SILENT main rotor design, incorporating the modulated blade spacing concept, offers significantly reduced noise levels and the potential of a breakthrough in how a helicopter's sound is perceived and judged. The SILENT rotor represents a definite advancement in the state-of-the-art and is selected as the design concept for demonstration in Phase 2. A Phase 2 Implementation Plan is developed for whirl cage and wind tunnel evaluations of a scaled model SILENT rotor.

  15. Active flow control for Aeolian tone noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Pope, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the use of active flow control for the purpose of noise reduction. As a simple demonstration of such techniques, several methods for controlling the wake and resulting noise production by a cylinder in a uniform stream are evaluated numerically.

  16. Jet Noise Reduction by Microjets - A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of injecting tiny secondary jets (microjets ) on the radiated noise from a subsonic primary jet is studied experimentally. The microjets are injected on to the primary jet near the nozzle exit with variable port geometry, working fluid and driving pressure. A clear noise reduction is observed that improves with increasing jet pressure. It is found that smaller diameter ports with higher driving pressure, but involving less thrust and mass fraction, can produce better noise reduction. A collection of data from the present as well as past experiments is examined in an attempt to correlate the noise reduction with the operating parameters. The results indicate that turbulent mixing noise reduction, as monitored by OASPL at a shallow angle, correlates with the ratio of jet to primary jet driving pressures normalized by the ratio of corresponding diameters (p d /pjD). With gaseous injection, the spectral amplitudes decrease at lower frequencies while an increase is noted at higher frequencies. It is apparent that this amplitude crossover is at least partly due to shock-associated noise from the underexpanded jets themselves. Such crossover is not seen with water injection since the flow in that case is incompressible and there is no shock-associated noise. Centerline velocity data show that larger noise reduction is accompanied by faster jet decay as well as significant reduction in turbulence intensities. While a physical understanding of the dependence of noise reduction on p d /pjD remains unclear, given this correlation, an analysis explains the observed dependence of the effect on various other parameters.

  17. SAR Speckle Noise Reduction Using Wiener Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joo, T. H.; Held, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are degraded by speckle. A multiplicative speckle noise model for SAR images is presented. Using this model, a Wiener filter is derived by minimizing the mean-squared error using the known speckle statistics. Implementation of the Wiener filter is discussed and experimental results are presented. Finally, possible improvements to this method are explored.

  18. Smooth local subspace projection for nonlinear noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Chelidze, David

    2014-03-15

    Many nonlinear or chaotic time series exhibit an innate broad spectrum, which makes noise reduction difficult. Local projective noise reduction is one of the most effective tools. It is based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and works for both map-like and continuously sampled time series. However, POD only looks at geometrical or topological properties of data and does not take into account the temporal characteristics of time series. Here, we present a new smooth projective noise reduction method. It uses smooth orthogonal decomposition (SOD) of bundles of reconstructed short-time trajectory strands to identify smooth local subspaces. Restricting trajectories to these subspaces imposes temporal smoothness on the filtered time series. It is shown that SOD-based noise reduction significantly outperforms the POD-based method for continuously sampled noisy time series.

  19. Listening effort and speech intelligibility in listening situations affected by noise and reverberation.

    PubMed

    Rennies, Jan; Schepker, Henning; Holube, Inga; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the combined effect of noise and reverberation on listening effort and speech intelligibility to predictions of the speech transmission index (STI). Listening effort was measured in normal-hearing subjects using a scaling procedure. Speech intelligibility scores were measured in the same subjects and conditions: (a) Speech-shaped noise as the only interfering factor, (b) + (c) fixed signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0 or 7 dB and reverberation as detrimental factors, and (d) reverberation as the only detrimental factor. In each condition, SNR and reverberation were combined to produce STI values of 0.17, 0.30, 0.43, 0.57, and 0.70, respectively. Listening effort always decreased with increasing STI, thus enabling a rough prediction, but a significant bias was observed indicating that listening effort was lower in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI for one type of impulse responses. Accordingly, speech intelligibility increased with increasing STI and was significantly better in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI. Further analyses showed that the broadband reverberation time is not always a good estimate of speech degradation in reverberation and that different speech materials may differ in their robustness toward detrimental effects of reverberation. PMID:25373965

  20. Evaluation of noise reduction techniques for digital hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Vijay; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2003-10-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss have increased difficulty in understanding speech in noisy backgrounds. To combat this issue, there has been a major thrust in recent years toward the development of noise reduction algorithms. The goals of this paper are to quantify the relative benefits of different single-microphone noise reduction algorithms, and to investigate the interaction between the noise reduction and dynamic range compression algorithms. Noise reduction techniques evaluated in this paper include spectral subtraction-based techniques, a wavelet-packet-based technique and a matching pursuit-based technique. All algorithms were tested with HINT signals with SNR levels ranging from -5 to 15 dB, and two different noise types viz. the speech-shaped noise and multi-talker babble. Performance was quantified using the ITU standardized PESQ measure which computes the perceptual similarity between the enhanced signal and the original signal. Initial PESQ results showed that the spectral subtraction-based techniques perform superior to that of the wavelet-packet and matching pursuit-based approaches and that the compression time constants have an impact on the overall performance. Perceptual data collected from hearing impaired listeners on sound quality and noise reduction performance will be presented and their correlation with the objective measurements will be discussed.

  1. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  2. Review of Aircraft Engine Fan Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft turbofan engines incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Both careful aerodynamic design of the fan and proper installation of the fan into the system are requirements for achieving the performance and acoustic objectives. The design and installation characteristics of high performance aircraft engine fans will be discussed along with some lessons learned that may be applicable to spaceflight fan applications.

  3. Identification of Noise Sources and Design of Noise Reduction Measures for a Pneumatic Nail Gun

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Vignesh; Zechmann, Edward

    2015-01-01

    An experimental-analytical procedure was implemented to reduce the operating noise level of a nail gun, a commonly found power tool in a construction site. The procedure is comprised of preliminary measurements, identification and ranking of major noise sources and application of noise controls. Preliminary measurements show that the impact noise transmitted through the structure and the exhaust related noise were found to be the first and second major contributors. Applying a noise absorbing foam on the outside of the nail gun body was found to be an effective noise reduction technique. One and two-volume small mufflers were designed and applied to the exhaust side of the nail gun which reduced not only the exhaust noise but also the impact noise. It was shown that the overall noise level could be reduced by as much as 3.5 dB, suggesting that significant noise reduction is possible in construction power tools without any significant increase of the cost. PMID:26366038

  4. Single and Multiple Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R.

    2012-01-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow. PMID:22923425

  5. Single and multiple microphone noise reduction strategies in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R

    2012-06-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow.

  6. Potential for Landing Gear Noise Reduction on Advanced Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Nickol, Craig L.; Burley, Casey L.; Guo, Yueping

    2016-01-01

    The potential of significantly reducing aircraft landing gear noise is explored for aircraft configurations with engines installed above the wings or the fuselage. An innovative concept is studied that does not alter the main gear assembly itself but does shorten the main strut and integrates the gear in pods whose interior surfaces are treated with acoustic liner. The concept is meant to achieve maximum noise reduction so that main landing gears can be eliminated as a major source of airframe noise. By applying this concept to an aircraft configuration with 2025 entry-into-service technology levels, it is shown that compared to noise levels of current technology, the main gear noise can be reduced by 10 EPNL dB, bringing the main gear noise close to a floor established by other components such as the nose gear. The assessment of the noise reduction potential accounts for design features for the advanced aircraft configuration and includes the effects of local flow velocity in and around the pods, gear noise reflection from the airframe, and reflection and attenuation from acoustic liner treatment on pod surfaces and doors. A technical roadmap for maturing this concept is discussed, and the possible drag increase at cruise due to the addition of the pods is identified as a challenge, which needs to be quantified and minimized possibly with the combination of detailed design and application of drag reduction technologies.

  7. Subjective Listening Effort and Electrodermal Activity in Listening Situations with Reverberation and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Haeder, Kristina; Imbery, Christina; Weber, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Disturbing factors like reverberation or ambient noise can impair speech recognition and raise the listening effort needed for successful communication in daily life. Situations with high listening effort are thought to result in increased stress for the listener. The aim of this study was to explore possible measures to determine listening effort in situations with varying background noise and reverberation. For this purpose, subjective ratings of listening effort, speech recognition, and stress level, together with the electrodermal activity as a measure of the autonomic stress reaction, were investigated. It was expected that the electrodermal activity would show different stress levels in different acoustic situations and might serve as an alternative to subjective ratings. Ten young normal-hearing and 17 elderly hearing-impaired subjects listened to sentences from the Oldenburg sentence test either with stationary background noise or with reverberation. Four listening situations were generated, an easy and a hard one for each of the two disturbing factors, which were related to each other by the Speech Transmission Index. The easy situation resulted in 100% and the hard situation resulted in 30 to 80% speech recognition. The results of the subjective ratings showed significant differences between the easy and the hard listening situations in both subject groups. Two methods of analyzing the electrodermal activity values revealed similar, but nonsignificant trends. Significant correlations between subjective ratings and physiological electrodermal activity data were observed for normal-hearing subjects in the noise situation. PMID:27698257

  8. Compressor lubrication and noise reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bayyouk, J.A.; Waser, M.P.

    1988-06-14

    An oil lubrication and noise suppression system is described comprising: an oil sump: a crankshaft rotatable about an axis and defining a centrifugal oil pump: an oil pickup tube extending into the oil sump and secured to the crankshaft coaxial with the axis and rotatable with the crankshaft about the axis as a unit; and an impeller axially asymmetrically mounted on the pickup tube within the oil sump whereby upon rotation of the crankshaft, the oil pickup tube and the impeller as a unit causes the production of froth and the pumping of oil while preventing the formation of a stable vortex.

  9. Fifty Years of Fluidic Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The paper reviews 50 years of research investigating jet noise reduction through fluidic injection. Both aqueous and gaseous injection concepts for supersonic and subsonic jet exhausts are discussed. Aqueous injection reduces jet noise by reducing main jet temperature through evaporation and main jet velocity through momentum transfer between water droplets and the main jet. In the launch vehicle environment where large quantities of fluid do not have to be carried with the vehicle, water injection is very effective at reducing excess overpressures. For in-flight use, aqueous injection is problematic as most studies show that either large quantities of water or high injection pressures are required to achieve noise reduction. The most effective noise reduction injection systems require water pressures above 2000 kPa (290 psi) and water-to-mainjet mass flow rates above 10% to achieve overall sound pressure level reductions of roughly 6 dB in the peak jet noise direction. Injection at lower pressure (roughly 1034 kPa or 150 psi) has resulted in a 1.6 EPNdb reduction in effective perceived noise level. Gaseous injection reduces noise through jet plume modifications resulting from the introduction of streamwise vorticity in the main jet. In subsonic single-stream jets, air injection usually produces the largest overall sound pressure level reductions (roughly 2 dB) in the peak jet noise direction. In dual-stream jets, properly designed injection systems can reduce overall sound pressure levels and effective perceived noise levels but care must be taken to choose injector designs that limit sound pressure level increases at high frequencies. A reduction of 1.0 EPNdB has been achieved with injection into the fan and core streams. However, air injection into dual-stream subsonic jets has received little attention and the potential for noise reduction is uncertain at this time. For dual-stream supersonic jets, additional research needs to be conducted to determine if

  10. Noise reduction by dynamic signal preemphasis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Takegoshi, K

    2011-02-01

    In this work we propose an approach to reduce the digitization noise for a given dynamic range, i.e., the number of bits, of an analog to digital converter used in an NMR receiver. In this approach, the receiver gain is dynamically increased so that the free induction decay is recorded in such an emphasized way that the decaying signal is digitized using as many number of bits as possible, and at the stage of data processing, the original signal profile is restored by applying the apodization that compensates the effect of the preemphasis. This approach, which we call APodization after Receiver gain InCrement during Ongoing sequence with Time (APRICOT), is performed in a solid-state system containing a pair of (13)C spins, one of which is fully isotopically labeled and the other is naturally abundant. It is demonstrated that the exceedingly smaller peak buried in the digitization noise in the conventional approach can be revealed by employing APRICOT. PMID:21177130

  11. Noise reduction by dynamic signal preemphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Takegoshi, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this work we propose an approach to reduce the digitization noise for a given dynamic range, i.e., the number of bits, of an analog to digital converter used in an NMR receiver. In this approach, the receiver gain is dynamically increased so that the free induction decay is recorded in such an emphasized way that the decaying signal is digitized using as many number of bits as possible, and at the stage of data processing, the original signal profile is restored by applying the apodization that compensates the effect of the preemphasis. This approach, which we call APodization after Receiver gain InCrement during Ongoing sequence with Time (APRICOT), is performed in a solid-state system containing a pair of 13C spins, one of which is fully isotopically labeled and the other is naturally abundant. It is demonstrated that the exceedingly smaller peak buried in the digitization noise in the conventional approach can be revealed by employing APRICOT.

  12. Reduction of Wake-Stator Interaction Noise Using Passive Porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the potential of Passive Porosity Technology as a mechanism to reduce interaction noise in turbomachinery by reducing the fluctuating forces acting on the vane surfaces. To do so, a typical fan stator airfoil was subjected to the effects of a transversely moving wake; time histories of the primitive aerodynamic variables, obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions, were then input into an acoustic prediction code. This procedure was performed on the solid airfoil to obtain a baseline, and on a series of porous configurations in order to isolate those that yield maximum noise reductions without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the stator. It was found that communication between regions of high pressure differential - made possible by the use of passive porosity - is necessary to significantly alter the noise radiation pattern of the stator airfoil. In general, noise reductions were obtained for those configurations incorporating passive porosity in the region between x/c is approximately 0.15 on the suction side of the airfoil and x/c is approximately 0.20 on the pressure side. Reductions in overall radiated noise of approximately 1.0 dB were obtained. The noise benefit increased to about 2.5 dB when the effects of loading noise alone were considered.

  13. On-chip digital noise reduction for integrated CMOS Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullmann, Markus; Schluessler, Jens-Uwe; Schueffny, Rene

    2003-06-01

    We propose an on-line noise reduction system especially designed for noisy CMOS image sensors. Image sequences from CMOS sensors in general are corrupted by two types of noise, temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). It is shown how the FPN component can be estimated from a sequence. We studied the theoretical performance of two different approaches called direct and indirect FPN estimation. We show that indirect estimation gives superior performance, both theoretically and by simulations. The FPN estimates can be used to improve the image quality by compensating it. We assess the quality of the estimates by the achievable SNR gains. Using those results a dedicated filtering scheme has been designed to accomplish both temporal noise reduction and FPN correction by applying a single noise filter. It allows signal gains of up to 12dB and provides a high visual quality of the results. We further analyzed and optimized the memory size and bandwidth requirements of our scheme and conclude that it is possible to implement it in hardware. The required memory size is 288kByte and the memory access rate is 70MHz. Our algorithm allows the integration of noisy CMOS sensors with digital noise reduction and other circuitry on a system-on-chip solution.

  14. Reduction of internal noise in auditory perceptual learning.

    PubMed

    Jones, Pete R; Moore, David R; Amitay, Sygal; Shub, Daniel E

    2013-02-01

    This paper examines what mechanisms underlie auditory perceptual learning. Fifteen normal hearing adults performed two-alternative, forced choice, pure tone frequency discrimination for four sessions. External variability was introduced by adding a zero-mean Gaussian random variable to the frequency of each tone. Measures of internal noise, encoding efficiency, bias, and inattentiveness were derived using four methods (model fit, classification boundary, psychometric function, and double-pass consistency). The four methods gave convergent estimates of internal noise, which was found to decrease from 4.52 to 2.93 Hz with practice. No group-mean changes in encoding efficiency, bias, or inattentiveness were observed. It is concluded that learned improvements in frequency discrimination primarily reflect a reduction in internal noise. Data from highly experienced listeners and neural networks performing the same task are also reported. These results also indicated that auditory learning represents internal noise reduction, potentially through the re-weighting of frequency-specific channels.

  15. Low-frequency noise reduction of lightweight airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getline, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the noise attenuation characteristics of aircraft type fuselage structural panels were presented. Of particular interest was noise attenuation at low frequencies, below the fundamental resonances of the panels. All panels were flightweight structures for transport type aircraft in the 34,050 to 45,400 kg (75,000 to 100,000 pounds) gross weight range. Test data include the results of vibration and acoustic transmission loss tests on seven types of isotropic and orthotropically stiffened, flat and curved panels. The results show that stiffness controlled acoustically integrated structures can provide very high noise reductions at low frequencies without significantly affecting their high frequency noise reduction capabilities.

  16. Status of the JT8D refan noise reduction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes measures being taken to suppress jet noise in the JT8D engine and reports on some preliminary acoustic tests to evaluate noise characteristics of the engine. To reduce noise generation without sacrificing other essential engine performance or durability characteristics, the two stage fan will be replaced by a larger-diameter single stage fan. Refanned engines have an increased bypass ratio that contributes to the reduction of jet exhaust noise. Advanced acoustical design features will be incorporated in the larger, single-stage fan, and acoustic treatment will be incorporated in both the engine and the nacelle. First tests have shown that engine component noise levels are about as predicted and the acoustic treatment sections tested to date are providing predicted levels of attenuation. Further work is required to demonstrate engine performance goals and compatibility with 727 and DC-9 installations.

  17. Future developments in transport aircraft noise reduction technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During the past 13 years, important advances in the technology of aircraft noise control have resulted from industry and government research programs. Quieter commercial transport airplanes have entered the fleet and additional new designs now committed to production will begin service in a few years. This paper indicates the noise reductions that will be achieved by the quieter transports that will replace the older designs and remarks on the outlook for still quieter designs.

  18. Reduction of voluntary dehydration during effort in hot environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohar, E.; Adar, R.; Gilat, T.; Tennenbaum, J.; Nir, M.

    1982-01-01

    During an experimental marching trip the daily positive fluid balance was preserved by providing a wide choice of beverages during the hours of the day. It was found that the beverage most suitable for drinking in large quantities during periods of effort was a cold drink with sweetened (citrus) fruit taste. Carbonated drinks, including beer, but milk also, were found unsuitable for this purpose.

  19. Re-engining - The sound case for aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, K.

    1991-06-01

    The paper reviews the history of legislation to reduce jet-powered aircraft noise, particularly in the U.S.A. Recently introduced legislation is discussed and the paper goes on to explain the fundamental advantage of re-engining as a means of reducing aircraft noise. Th Rolls-Royce Tay engine is introduced and the two re-engine programs already launched are described. The expected large reductions in noise level which result from re-engining are illustrated. The paper concludes with a discussion on new programs, on the current airline business scene and on some aspects of the economics of re-engining.

  20. Amplitude Noise Reduction of Ion Lasers with Optical Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    A reduction in amplitude noise on the output of a multi-mode continuous-wave Ar-ion laser was previously demonstrated when a fraction of the output power was retroreflected back into the laser cavity. This result was reproduced in the present work and a Fabry-Perot etalon was used to monitor the longitudinal mode structure of the laser. A decrease in the number of operating longitudinal cavity modes was observed simultaneously with the introduction of the optical feedback and the onset of the amplitude noise reduction. The noise reduction is a result of a reduced number of lasing modes, resulting in less mode beating and amplitude fluctuations of the laser output power.

  1. Salt and hypertension: is salt dietary reduction worth the effort?

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Tiberio M; Schmieder, Roland E; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-05-01

    In numerous epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental studies, dietary sodium intake has been linked to blood pressure, and a reduction in dietary salt intake has been documented to lower blood pressure. In young subjects, salt intake has a programming effect in that blood pressure remains elevated even after a high salt intake has been reduced. Elderly subjects, African Americans, and obese patients are more sensitive to the blood pressure-lowering effects of a decreased salt intake. Depending on the baseline blood pressure and degree of salt intake reduction, systolic blood pressure can be lowered by 4 to 8 mm Hg. A greater decrease in blood pressure is achieved when a reduced salt intake is combined with other lifestyle interventions, such as adherence to Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. A high salt intake has been shown to increase not only blood pressure but also the risk of stroke, left ventricular hypertrophy, and proteinuria. Adverse effects associated with salt intake reduction, unless excessive, seem to be minimal. However, data linking a decreased salt intake to a decrease in morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients are not unanimous. Dietary salt intake reduction can delay or prevent the incidence of antihypertensive therapy, can facilitate blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients receiving medical therapy, and may represent a simple cost-saving mediator to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  2. Non-adaptive robust filters for speckle noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frery, Alejandro C.; Santanna, Sidnei J. S.

    1993-06-01

    After briefly reviewing some classical filters for speckle removal, five filters with characteristics of robustness, suitable for speckle noise reduction, are derived and implemented. These filters are the ones based on the trimmed maximum likelihood and moments estimators, the ones based on the median, on the inter-quartile range, and on the median absolute deviation. Assuming that observations within a synthetic aperture radar image are outcomes of independent Rayleigh random variables, these filters exhibit a good performance from both the signal-to-noise reduction and from the edge preserving criteria. The problem of filtering in an image is posed as an estimation problem.

  3. A Landing Gear Noise Reduction Study Based on Computational Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Landing gear is one of the more prominent airframe noise sources. Techniques that diminish gear noise and suppress its radiation to the ground are highly desirable. Using a hybrid computational approach, this paper investigates the noise reduction potential of devices added to a simplified main landing gear model without small scale geometric details. The Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to predict the noise at far-field observer locations from surface pressure data provided by unsteady CFD calculations. Because of the simplified nature of the model, most of the flow unsteadiness is restricted to low frequencies. The wheels, gear boxes, and oleo appear to be the primary sources of unsteadiness at these frequencies. The addition of fairings around the gear boxes and wheels, and the attachment of a splitter plate on the downstream side of the oleo significantly reduces the noise over a wide range of frequencies, but a dramatic increase in noise is observed at one frequency. The increased flow velocities, a consequence of the more streamlined bodies, appear to generate extra unsteadiness around other parts giving rise to the additional noise. Nonetheless, the calculations demonstrate the capability of the devices to improve overall landing gear noise.

  4. Broadband Noise Reduction of a Low-Speed Fan Noise Using Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through the use of rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a continuous trailing edge slot. Hollow blades with interior guide vanes create flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the blade root to the trailing edge. A previous paper documented the substantial tonal reductions of this Trailing Edge Rotor Blowing (TERB) fan. This report documents the broadband characteristics of TERB. The Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF), located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof-of-concept test bed. Two-component hotwire data behind the rotor, unsteady surface pressures on the stator vane, and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates of 1.1, 1.5, and 1.8 percent of the total fan mass flow. The results indicate a substantial reduction in the rotor wake turbulent velocity and in the stator vane unsteady surface pressures. Based on the physics of the noise generation, these indirect measurements indicate the prospect of broadband noise reduction. However, since the broadband noise generated by the ANCF is rotor-dominated, any change in the rotor-stator interaction broadband noise levels is barely distinguishable in the farfield measurements.

  5. 4-D noise-based seismology at volcanoes: Ongoing efforts and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, Florent; Rivet, Diane; Obermann, Anne; Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Lecocq, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring magma pressure buildup at depth and transport to surface is a key point for improving volcanic eruption prediction. Seismic waves, through their velocity dependence to stress perturbations, can provide crucial information on the temporal evolution of the mechanical properties of volcanic edifices. In this article, we review past and ongoing efforts for extracting accurate information of temporal changes of seismic velocities at volcanoes continuously in time using records of ambient seismic noise. We will first introduce the general methodology for retrieving accurate seismic velocity changes from seismic noise records and discuss the origin of seismic velocity temporal changes in rocks. We will then discuss in a second part how noise-based monitoring can improve our knowledge about magmatic activity at a long (years) to a short (days) time scale taking example from Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion). We will also mention ongoing efforts for operational noise-based seismic monitoring on volcanoes. Further, we will discuss perspectives for improving the spatial localization of detected velocity changes at depth with a special focus on the use of dense seismic arrays. In the last part, we will finally explore the complex response of volcanic regions to seismic shaking with an example from Japan and show how imaging seismic velocity susceptibility allows characterizing the state of pressurized fluids in volcanic regions.

  6. An assessment of psychological noise reduction by landscape plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Bao, Zhi Yi; Zhu, Zhu Jun

    2011-04-01

    The emphasis in the term 'Green Transportation' is on the word 'green'. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire) with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG). Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants' actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene) were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects' emotional processing, which we term 'psychological noise reduction'.

  7. Computational Evaluation of Airframe Noise Reduction Concepts at Full Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Duda, Benjamin; Hazir, Andreas; Fares, Ehab

    2016-01-01

    High-fidelity simulations focused on full-scale evaluation of new technologies for mitigating flap and landing gear noise are presented. These noise reduction concepts were selected because of their superior acoustic performance, as demonstrated during NASA wind tunnel tests of an 18%-scale, semi-span model of a Gulfstream aircraft. The full-scale, full-aircraft, time-accurate simulations were performed with the lattice Boltzmann PowerFLOW(Registered Trademark) solver for free air at a Mach number of 0.2. Three aircraft configurations (flaps deflected at 39? without and with main gear deployed, and 0? flaps with main gear extended) were used to determine the aero-acoustic performance of the concepts on component-level (individually) and system-level (concurrent applica-tion) bases. Farfield noise spectra were obtained using a Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. Comparison of the predicted spectra without (baseline) and with the noise treatments applied showed that noise reduction benefits between 2-3 dB for the flap and 1.3-1.7 dB for the main landing gear are obtained. It was also found that the full extent of the benefits is being masked by the noise generated from the flap brackets and main gear cavities, which act as prominent secondary sources.

  8. Supersonic jet noise reduction by coaxial rectangular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Manes, J. P.; Massey, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    A physical understanding of noise reduction mechanisms in supersonic, single, and coaxial rectangular jets is quantified and obtained, with emphasis on shock noise reduction. For all conditions, corresponding acoustic measurements for an equivalent round jet are also obtained so that the noise characteristics of the two types of jets can be compared directly to quantify the noise reductions. Comparisons are thus provided for a single rectangular nozzle vs a single equivalent round nozzle, and a coaxial rectangular nozzle vs an equivalent round nozzle. It is shown that different operating conditions and nozzle arrangements for the same thrust, total exit area, and mass flow rate can produce different noise levels. With at least one stream operated supersonically, the coaxial rectangular nozzle operated in the inverted-velocity profile is always quieter than in the normal velocity profile mode for the same thrust, exit area, and mass flow rate. In general, the coaxial rectangular nozzle is shown to be quieter than an equivalent circular nozzle only for those conditions for which both nozzles are operated supersonically.

  9. Airframe self-noise: Four years of research. [aircraft noise reduction for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A critical assessment of the state of the art in airframe self-noise is presented. Full-scale data on the intensity, spectra and directivity of this noise source are evaluated in the light of the comprehensive theory developed by Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkins. Vibration of panels on commercial aircraft is identified as a possible additional source of airframe noise. The present understanding and methods for prediction of other component sources - airfoils, struts, and cavities - are discussed, and areas for further research as well as potential methods for airframe noise reduction are identified. Finally, the various experimental methods which have been developed for airframe noise research are discussed and sample results are presented.

  10. The technology on noise reduction of the APD detection circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-ying; Zheng, Yong-chao; Cui, Jian-yong

    2013-09-01

    The laser pulse detection is widely used in the field of laser range finders, laser communications, laser radar, laser Identification Friend or Foe, et al, for the laser pulse detection has the advantage of high accuracy, high sensitivity and strong anti-interference. The avalanche photodiodes (APD) has the advantage of high quantum efficiency, high response speed and huge gain. The APD is particularly suitable for weak signal detection. The technology that APD acts as the photodetector for weak signal reception and amplification is widely used in laser pulse detection. The APD will convert the laser signal to weak electrical signal. The weak signal is amplified, processed and exported by the circuit. In the circuit design, the optimal signal detection is one key point in photoelectric detection system. The issue discusses how to reduce the noise of the photoelectric signal detection circuit and how to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, related analysis and practice included. The essay analyzes the mathematical model of the signal-to-noise ratio for photoelectric conversion and the noise of the APD photoelectric detection system. By analysis the bandwidth of the detection system is determined, and the circuit devices are selected that match the APD. In the circuit design separated devices with low noise are combined with integrated operational amplifier for the purpose of noise reduction. The methods can effectively suppress the noise, and improve the detection sensitivity.

  11. Mass-reduction effort of the electric and hybrid vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R. B.; Jahnle, H. A.

    1980-03-01

    Weight reduction, cost competitiveness, and elimination of the intrusion beam resulted from the redesign and fabrication using composite materials of the door outer panel and intrusion beam from a 1977 Chevrolet Impala. The basis of the redesign involved replacing these two steel parts with a single compression molding using the unique approach of simultaneously curing a sheet molding compound outside panel with a continuous glass-fiber intrusion strap. A weight reduction of nearly 11 pounds per door was achieved. Additional weight savings are possible by taking advantage of the elimination of the intrusion beam to design thinner door structures. The parts-consolidation approach allows the composite structures to be cost-competitive with the original steel design for both the lower-production car models and for the near- to mid-term production contemplated for electric and hybrid vehicles using current state-of-the-art composite production techniques. In addition to the design, prototype fabrication, and costing phases, two appendices containing materials description, properties, and compression-molding production requirements are included.

  12. Prediction of Turbulent Jet Mixing Noise Reduction by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional control volume formulation is developed for the determination of jet mixing noise reduction due to water injection. The analysis starts from the conservation of mass, momentum and energy for the confrol volume, and introduces the concept of effective jet parameters (jet temperature, jet velocity and jet Mach number). It is shown that the water to jet mass flow rate ratio is an important parameter characterizing the jet noise reduction on account of gas-to-droplet momentum and heat transfer. Two independent dimensionless invariant groups are postulated, and provide the necessary relations for the droplet size and droplet Reynolds number. Results are presented illustrating the effect of mass flow rate ratio on the jet mixing noise reduction for a range of jet Mach number and jet Reynolds number. Predictions from the model show satisfactory comparison with available test data on perfectly expanded hot supersonic jets. The results suggest that significant noise reductions can be achieved at increased flow rate ratios.

  13. Development of Novel Methods for the Reduction of Noise and Weight in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Over the 70-year evolution of the helicopter, man's understanding of vibration control has greatly increased. However, in spite of the increased performance, the extent of helicopter vibration problems has not significantly diminished. Crew vibration and noise remains important factors in the design of all current helicopters. With more complex and critical demands being placed on aircrews, it is essential that vibration and noise not impair their performance. A major source of helicopter cabin noise (which has been measured at a sound pressure level of over 100 dB) is the gearbox. Reduction of this noise has been a goal of NASA and the U.S. Army. Gear mesh noise is typically in the frequency range of 1000 to 3000 Hz, a range important for speech. A requirement for U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission project has been a 10-dB reduction compared to current designs. A combined analytical/experimental effort has been underway, since the end of the 80's, to study effects of design parameters on noise production. The noise generated by the gear mesh can be transmitted to the surrounding media through the bearings that support the gear shaft. Therefore, the use of fluid film bearings instead of rolling element bearings could reduce the transmission noise by 10 dB. In addition, the fluid film bearings that support the gear shaft can change the dynamics of the gear assembly by providing damping to the system and by being softer than rolling element bearings. Wave bearings can attenuate, and filter, the noise generated by a machine component due to the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients. The attenuation ratio could be as large as 35-40 dB. The noise components at higher frequencies than a synchronous frequency can be almost eliminated.

  14. A Background Noise Reduction Technique Using Adaptive Noise Cancellation for Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalt, Taylor B.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background noise in wind tunnel environments poses a challenge to acoustic measurements due to possible low or negative Signal to Noise Ratios (SNRs) present in the testing environment. This paper overviews the application of time domain Adaptive Noise Cancellation (ANC) to microphone array signals with an intended application of background noise reduction in wind tunnels. An experiment was conducted to simulate background noise from a wind tunnel circuit measured by an out-of-flow microphone array in the tunnel test section. A reference microphone was used to acquire a background noise signal which interfered with the desired primary noise source signal at the array. The technique s efficacy was investigated using frequency spectra from the array microphones, array beamforming of the point source region, and subsequent deconvolution using the Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) algorithm. Comparisons were made with the conventional techniques for improving SNR of spectral and Cross-Spectral Matrix subtraction. The method was seen to recover the primary signal level in SNRs as low as -29 dB and outperform the conventional methods. A second processing approach using the center array microphone as the noise reference was investigated for more general applicability of the ANC technique. It outperformed the conventional methods at the -29 dB SNR but yielded less accurate results when coherence over the array dropped. This approach could possibly improve conventional testing methodology but must be investigated further under more realistic testing conditions.

  15. A beamformer post-filter for cochlear implant noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Hersbach, Adam A; Grayden, David B; Fallon, James B; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-04-01

    Cochlear implant users have limited ability to understand speech in noisy conditions. Signal processing methods to address this issue that use multiple microphones typically use beamforming to perform noise reduction. However, the effectiveness of the beamformer is diminished as the number of interfering noises increases and the acoustic environment becomes more diffuse. A multi-microphone noise reduction algorithm that aims to address this issue is presented in this study. The algorithm uses spatial filtering to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and attenuates time-frequency elements that have poor SNR. The algorithm was evaluated by measuring intelligibility of speech embedded in 4-talker babble where the interfering talkers were spatially separated and changed location during the test. Twelve cochlear implant users took part in the evaluation, which demonstrated a significant mean improvement of 4.6 dB (standard error 0.4, P < 0.001) in speech reception threshold compared to an adaptive beamformer. The results suggest that a substantial improvement in performance can be gained for cochlear implant users in noisy environments where the noise is spatially separated from the target speech.

  16. Aeroacoustic Evaluation of Flap and Landing Gear Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Ravetta, Patricio A.

    2014-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements for a semi-span, 18% scale, high-fidelity Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The model was used as a test bed to conduct detailed studies of flap and main landing gear noise sources and to determine the effectiveness of numerous noise mitigation concepts. Using a traversing microphone array in the flyover direction, an extensive set of acoustic data was obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the information was acquired with the model in a landing configuration with the flap deflected 39 deg and the main landing gear alternately installed and removed. Data were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24 over directivity angles between 56 deg and 116 deg, with 90 deg representing the overhead direction. Measured acoustic spectra showed that several of the tested flap noise reduction concepts decrease the sound pressure levels by 2 - 4 dB over the entire frequency range at all directivity angles. Slightly lower levels of noise reduction from the main landing gear were obtained through the simultaneous application of various gear devices. Measured aerodynamic forces indicated that the tested gear/flap noise abatement technologies have a negligible impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  17. New circuit theory of multiconductor transmission lines resulting from a new practice of noise reduction

    PubMed Central

    TOKI, Hiroshi; SATO, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In modern life, we are surrounded by and filled with electromagnetic noise caused by the dominant use of energy in the form of electricity. This situation is brought about by the fact that the noise is not understood theoretically. A new practice of noise reduction was introduced for the construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The key concept is a symmetric three-line circuit that arranges power supplies, noise filters and magnets around a third central ground line. A continuous theoretical effort forced us to find a new circuit theory involving a multiconductor transmission-line system starting from Maxwell’s equations without any approximation. We discuss the essence of all of these experimental and theoretical developments with the hope to remove unnecessary electromagnetic noise not only from power supplies, but also from all electric devices. The newly derived circuit theory of multiconductor transmission lines is universal, and establishes the validity of the practice of noise reduction. PMID:24522153

  18. An overview of flow control for fan noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Matthew; Burdisso, R. A.; Ng, W.

    2005-09-01

    The dominant tonal noise source from modern high-bypass-ratio turbofan aircraft engines is due to the impingement of viscous fan rotor wakes onto the downstream stator row. Prior research conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig has demonstrated that significant tonal noise attenuation can be achieved by injecting 1.2% to 1.8% of the fan throughflow along a slot in the trailing edge of the rotor. Efforts presented in this paper have focused on reducing the required blowing mass flow while maintaining equivalent noise attenuation levels. Two primary approaches were investigated: blowing in circumferentially non-uniform patterns (i.e., blowing on every other blade), and optimizing the injection scheme itself. The concept of blowing on alternate rotors was experimentally tested in the ANCF rig using NASA's current slot-blown rotors, and improved attenuation efficiencies were found (although the overall attenuation levels were less). Cascade wind tunnel tests of several different injection schemes were conducted, and the best-performing configuration was incorporated into a new rotor design for experimental validation in the ANCF rig. These rotors achieved similar tonal noise attenuation levels as the slot-blown configuration, but they required injecting less than 0.75% of the fan throughflow.

  19. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  20. Reduction of Altitude Diffuser Jet Noise Using Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.; Langford, Lester A.

    2014-01-01

    A feasibility study on the effects of injecting water into the exhaust plume of an altitude rocket diffuser for the purpose of reducing the far-field acoustic noise has been performed. Water injection design parameters such as axial placement, angle of injection, diameter of injectors, and mass flow rate of water have been systematically varied during the operation of a subscale altitude test facility. The changes in acoustic far-field noise were measured with an array of free-field microphones in order to quantify the effects of the water injection on overall sound pressure level spectra and directivity. The results showed significant reductions in noise levels were possible with optimum conditions corresponding to water injection at or just upstream of the exit plane of the diffuser. Increasing the angle and mass flow rate of water injection also showed improvements in noise reduction. However, a limit on the maximum water flow rate existed as too large of flow rate could result in un-starting the supersonic diffuser.

  1. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexandre F; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  2. Reduction of Altitude Diffuser Jet Noise Using Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.; Langford, Lester A.

    2011-01-01

    A feasibility study on the effects of injecting water into the exhaust plume of an altitude rocket diffuser for the purpose of reducing the far-field acoustic noise has been performed. Water injection design parameters such as axial placement, angle of injection, diameter of injectors, and mass flow rate of water have been systematically varied during the operation of a subscale altitude test facility. The changes in acoustic far-field noise were measured with an array of free-field microphones in order to quantify the effects of the water injection on overall sound pressure level spectra and directivity. The results showed significant reductions in noise levels were possible with optimum conditions corresponding to water injection at or just upstream of the exit plane of the diffuser. Increasing the angle and mass flow rate of water injection also showed improvements in noise reduction. However, a limit on the maximum water flow rate existed as too large of flow rate could result in un-starting the supersonic diffuser.

  3. Noise Reduction for a MEMS-Gyroscope-Based Head Mouse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiaying; Gerdtman, Christer; Lindén, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, four different signal processing algorithms which can be applied to reduce the noise from a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse are presented. MEMS-gyroscopes are small, light, cheap and widely used in many electrical products. MultiPos, a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse system was designed for persons with movement disorders. Noise such as physiological tremor and electrical noise is a common problem for the MultiPos system. In this study four different signal processing algorithms were applied and evaluated by simulation in MATLAB and implementation in a dsPIC, with aim to minimize the noise in MultiPos. The algorithms were low-pass filter, Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm, Kalman filter and Weighted Fourier Linear Combiner (WFLC) algorithm. Comparisons and system tests show that these signal processing algorithms can be used to improve the MultiPos system. The WFLC algorithm was found the best method for noise reduction in the application of a MEMS-gyroscope-based head mouse.

  4. Physiological Noise Reduction Using Volumetric Functional Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Wang, Fu-Nien; Belliveau, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological noise arising from a variety of sources can significantly degrade the detection of task-related activity in BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. If whole head spatial coverage is desired, effective suppression of oscillatory physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations is quite difficult without external monitoring, since traditional EPI acquisition methods cannot sample the signal rapidly enough to satisfy the Nyquist sampling theorem, leading to temporal aliasing of noise. Using a combination of high speed magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) and digital filtering, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress cardiac and respiratory noise without auxiliary monitoring, while achieving whole head spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. Our systematic study of the effects of different moving average (MA) digital filters demonstrates that a MA filter with a 2 s window can effectively reduce the variance in the hemodynamic baseline signal, thereby achieving 57-58% improvements in peak z-statistic values compared to unfiltered InI or spatially smoothed EPI data (FWHM =8.6 mm). In conclusion, the high temporal sampling rates achievable with InI permit significant reductions in physiological noise using standard temporal filtering techniques that result in significant improvements in hemodynamic response estimation. PMID:21954026

  5. USB noise reduction by nozzle and flap modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of concepts for reducing upper surface blown flap noise at the source through flap modifications and special nozzles is reviewed. In particular, recent results obtained on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of flaps with porous surfaces near the trailing edge and multi-slotted nozzles are reviewed. Considerable reduction (6-10 db) of the characteristic low frequency peak is shown. The aerodynamic performance is compared with conventional systems, and prospects for future improvements are discussed.

  6. Aircraft noise reduction technology. [to show impact on individuals and communities, component noise sources, and operational procedures to reduce impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Aircraft and airport noise reduction technology programs conducted by NASA are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) effects of aircraft noise on individuals and communities, (2) status of aircraft source noise technology, (3) operational procedures to reduce the impact of aircraft noise, and (4) NASA relations with military services in aircraft noise problems. References to more detailed technical literature on the subjects discussed are included.

  7. Study of noise reduction characteristics of double-wall panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Quayle, B.; Stevenson, S.; Graham, M.

    1983-01-01

    The noise reduction characteristics of general aviation type, flat, double-wall structures were investigated. The experimental study was carried out on 20-by-20 inch panels with an exposed area of 18 by 18 inches. A frequency range from 20 to 5000 Hz was covered. The experimental results, in general, follow the expected trends. At low frequencies the double-wall structures are no better than the single-wall structures. However, for depths normally used in the general aviation industry, the double-wall panels are very attractive. The graphite-spoxy skin panels have higher noise reduction at very low frequencies ( 100 Hz) than the Kevlar skin panels. But the aluminum panels have higher noise reduction in the high frequency region, due to their greater mass. Use of fiberglass insulation is not effective in the low frequency region, and at times it is even negative. But the insulation is effective in the high-frequency region. The theoretical model for predicting the transmission loss of these multilayered panels is also discussed.

  8. Single-channel noise reduction using optimal rectangular filtering matrices.

    PubMed

    Long, Tao; Chen, Jingdong; Benesty, Jacob; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2013-02-01

    This paper studies the problem of single-channel noise reduction in the time domain and presents a block-based approach where a vector of the desired speech signal is recovered by filtering a frame of the noisy signal with a rectangular filtering matrix. With this formulation, the noise reduction problem becomes one of estimating an optimal filtering matrix. To achieve such estimation, a method is introduced to decompose a frame of the clean speech signal into two orthogonal components: One correlated and the other uncorrelated with the current desired speech vector to be estimated. Different optimization cost functions are then formulated from which non-causal optimal filtering matrices are derived. The relationships among these optimal filtering matrices are discussed. In comparison with the classical sample-based technique that uses only forward prediction, the block-based method presented in this paper exploits both the forward and backward prediction as well as the temporal interpolation and, therefore, can improve the noise reduction performance by fully taking advantage of the speech property of self correlation. There is also a side advantage of this block-based method as compared to the sample-based technique, i.e., it is computationally more efficient and, as a result, more suitable for practical implementation. PMID:23363124

  9. Single-channel noise reduction using optimal rectangular filtering matrices.

    PubMed

    Long, Tao; Chen, Jingdong; Benesty, Jacob; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2013-02-01

    This paper studies the problem of single-channel noise reduction in the time domain and presents a block-based approach where a vector of the desired speech signal is recovered by filtering a frame of the noisy signal with a rectangular filtering matrix. With this formulation, the noise reduction problem becomes one of estimating an optimal filtering matrix. To achieve such estimation, a method is introduced to decompose a frame of the clean speech signal into two orthogonal components: One correlated and the other uncorrelated with the current desired speech vector to be estimated. Different optimization cost functions are then formulated from which non-causal optimal filtering matrices are derived. The relationships among these optimal filtering matrices are discussed. In comparison with the classical sample-based technique that uses only forward prediction, the block-based method presented in this paper exploits both the forward and backward prediction as well as the temporal interpolation and, therefore, can improve the noise reduction performance by fully taking advantage of the speech property of self correlation. There is also a side advantage of this block-based method as compared to the sample-based technique, i.e., it is computationally more efficient and, as a result, more suitable for practical implementation.

  10. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  11. Minimizing noise in fiberglass aquaculture tanks: Noise reduction potential of various retrofits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, J.; Frankel, A.S.; Ellison, W.T.; Summerfelt, S.; Popper, A.N.; Mazik, P.; Bebak, J.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment used in intensive aquaculture systems, such as pumps and blowers can produce underwater sound levels and frequencies within the range of fish hearing. The impacts of underwater noise on fish are not well known, but limited research suggests that subjecting fish to noise could result in impairment of the auditory system, reduced growth rates, and increased stress. Consequently, reducing sound in fish tanks could result in advantages for cultured species and increased productivity for the aquaculture industry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction potential of various retrofits to fiberglass fish culture tanks. The following structural changes were applied to tanks to reduce underwater noise: (1) inlet piping was suspended to avoid contact with the tank, (2) effluent piping was disconnected from a common drain line, (3) effluent piping was insulated beneath tanks, and (4) tanks were elevated on cement blocks and seated on insulated padding. Four combinations of the aforementioned structural changes were evaluated in duplicate and two tanks were left unchanged as controls. Control tanks had sound levels of 120.6 dB re 1 ??Pa. Each retrofit contributed to a reduction of underwater sound. As structural changes were combined, a cumulative reduction in sound level was observed. Tanks designed with a combination of retrofits had sound levels of 108.6 dB re 1 ??Pa, a four-fold reduction in sound pressure level. Sound frequency spectra indicated that the greatest sound reductions occurred between 2 and 100 Hz and demonstrated that nearby pumps and blowers created tonal frequencies that were transmitted into the tanks. The tank modifications used during this study were simple and inexpensive and could be applied to existing systems or considered when designing aquaculture facilities. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical image noise reduction using the Sylvester-Lyapunov equation.

    PubMed

    Sanches, João M; Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S

    2008-09-01

    Multiplicative noise is often present in medical and biological imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and fluorescence microscopy. Noise reduction in medical images is a difficult task in which linear filtering algorithms usually fail. Bayesian algorithms have been used with success but they are time consuming and computationally demanding. In addition, the increasing importance of the 3-D and 4-D medical image analysis in medical diagnosis procedures increases the amount of data that must be efficiently processed. This paper presents a Bayesian denoising algorithm which copes with additive white Gaussian and multiplicative noise described by Poisson and Rayleigh distributions. The algorithm is based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion, and edge preserving priors which avoid the distortion of relevant anatomical details. The main contribution of the paper is the unification of a set of Bayesian denoising algorithms for additive and multiplicative noise using a well-known mathematical framework, the Sylvester-Lyapunov equation, developed in the context of the Control theory.

  13. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, James A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    The focus is on a noise control method which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. An interior noise reduction called alternate resonance tuning (ART) is described both theoretically and experimentally. Problems dealing with tuning single paneled wall structures for optimum noise reduction using the ART methodology are presented, and three theoretical problems are analyzed. The first analysis is a three dimensional, full acoustic solution for tuning a panel wall composed of repeating sections with four different panel tunings within that section, where the panels are modeled as idealized spring-mass-damper systems. The second analysis is a two dimensional, full acoustic solution for a panel geometry influenced by the effect of a propagating external pressure field such as that which might be associated with propeller passage by a fuselage. To reduce the analysis complexity, idealized spring-mass-damper panels are again employed. The final theoretical analysis presents the general four panel problem with real panel sections, where the effect of higher structural modes is discussed. Results from an experimental program highlight real applications of the ART concept and show the effectiveness of the tuning on real structures.

  14. Serration Design Methodology for Wind Turbine Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, J.; Singh, A.; Madsen, J.; Arce León, C.

    2016-09-01

    Trailing edge serrations are today an established method to reduce the aeroacoustic noise from wind turbine blades. In this paper, a brief introduction to the aerodynamic and acoustic design procedure used at LM Wind Power is given. Early field tests on serrations, retrofitted to the turbine blades, gave preliminary indication of their noise reduction potential. However, a multitude of challenges stand in the way of any proof of concept and a viable commercial product. LM undertook a methodical test and validation procedure to understand the impact of design parameters on serration performance, and quantify the uncertainties associated with the proposed designs. Aerodynamic and acoustic validation tests were carried out in number of wind tunnel facilities. Models were written to predict the aerodynamic, acoustic and structural performance of the serrations. LM serration designs have evolved over the period of time to address constraints imposed by aero performance, structural reliability, manufacturing and installation. The latest LM serration offering was tested in the field on three different wind turbines. A consistent noise reduction in excess of 1.5 dB was achieved in the field for all three turbines.

  15. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  16. Critical Propulsion and Noise reduction Technologies for Future Commercial Subsonic Engines. Area of Interest 14.3: Separate Flow Exhaust System Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Hoff, G. E.; Barter, J. W.; Brausch, J. F.; Gliebe, P. R.; Coffin, R. S.; Martens, S.; Delaney, B. R.; Dalton, W. N.; Mengle, V. G.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation discusses: Project Objectives, Approach and Goal; Baseline Nozzles and Test Cycle Definition; Repeatability and Baseline Nozzle Results; Noise Reduction Concepts; Noise Reduction Tests Configurations of BPR=5 Internal Plug Nozzle adn Acoustic Results; Noise Reduction Test Configurations of BPR=5 External Plug Nozzle and Acoustic Results; and Noise Reduction Tests Configurations of BPR=8 External Plug Nozzle and Acoustic Results.

  17. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes: Noise reduction through a cavity-backed flexible plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Vandam, C. P. G.

    1978-01-01

    A prediction method is reported for noise reduction through a cavity-backed panel. The analysis takes into account only cavity modes in one direction. The results of this analysis were to find the effect of acoustic stiffness of a backing cavity on the panel behavior. The resulting changes in the noise reduction through the panel are significant.

  18. The cost of applying current helicopter external noise reduction methods while maintaining realistic vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowes, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical methods were developed and/or adopted for calculating helicopter component noise, and these methods were incorporated into a unified total vehicle noise calculation model. Analytical methods were also developed for calculating the effects of noise reduction methodology on helicopter design, performance, and cost. These methods were used to calculate changes in noise, design, performance, and cost due to the incorporation of engine and main rotor noise reduction methods. All noise reduction techniques were evaluated in the context of an established mission performance criterion which included consideration of hovering ceiling, forward flight range/speed/payload, and rotor stall margin. The results indicate that small, but meaningful, reductions in helicopter noise can be obtained by treating the turbine engine exhaust duct. Furthermore, these reductions do not result in excessive life cycle cost penalties. Currently available main rotor noise reduction methodology, however, is shown to be inadequate and excessively costly.

  19. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  20. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  1. Edge Preserved Speckle Noise Reduction Using Integrated Fuzzy Filters.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M L; Rohit, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiographic images are inherent with speckle noise which makes visual reading and analysis quite difficult. The multiplicative speckle noise masks finer details, necessary for diagnosis of abnormalities. A novel speckle reduction technique based on integration of geometric, wiener, and fuzzy filters is proposed and analyzed in this paper. The denoising applications of fuzzy filters are studied and analyzed along with 26 denoising techniques. It is observed that geometric filter retains noise and, to address this issue, wiener filter is embedded into the geometric filter during iteration process. The performance of geometric-wiener filter is further enhanced using fuzzy filters and the proposed despeckling techniques are called integrated fuzzy filters. Fuzzy filters based on moving average and median value are employed in the integrated fuzzy filters. The performances of integrated fuzzy filters are tested on echocardiographic images and synthetic images in terms of image quality metrics. It is observed that the performance parameters are highest in case of integrated fuzzy filters in comparison to fuzzy and geometric-fuzzy filters. The clinical validation reveals that the output images obtained using geometric-wiener, integrated fuzzy, nonlocal means, and details preserving anisotropic diffusion filters are acceptable. The necessary finer details are retained in the denoised echocardiographic images.

  2. Programmable noise bandwidth reduction by means of digital averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poklemba, John J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Predetection noise bandwidth reduction is effected by a pre-averager capable of digitally averaging the samples of an input data signal over two or more symbols, the averaging interval being defined by the input sampling rate divided by the output sampling rate. As the averaged sample is clocked to a suitable detector at a much slower rate than the input signal sampling rate the noise bandwidth at the input to the detector is reduced, the input to the detector having an improved signal to noise ratio as a result of the averaging process, and the rate at which such subsequent processing must operate is correspondingly reduced. The pre-averager forms a data filter having an output sampling rate of one sample per symbol of received data. More specifically, selected ones of a plurality of samples accumulated over two or more symbol intervals are output in response to clock signals at a rate of one sample per symbol interval. The pre-averager includes circuitry for weighting digitized signal samples using stored finite impulse response (FIR) filter coefficients. A method according to the present invention is also disclosed.

  3. Effects of noise reduction on AM and FM perception.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Calcus, Axelle; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Lorenzi, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The goal of noise reduction (NR) algorithms in digital hearing aid devices is to reduce background noise whilst preserving as much of the original signal as possible. These algorithms may increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an ideal case, but they generally fail to improve speech intelligibility. However, due to the complex nature of speech, it is difficult to disentangle the numerous low- and high-level effects of NR that may underlie the lack of speech perception benefits. The goal of this study was to better understand why NR algorithms do not improve speech intelligibility by investigating the effects of NR on the ability to discriminate two basic acoustic features, namely amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) cues, known to be crucial for speech identification in quiet and in noise. Here, discrimination of complex, non-linguistic AM and FM patterns was measured for normal hearing listeners using a same/different task. The stimuli were generated by modulating 1-kHz pure tones by either a two-component AM or FM modulator with patterns changed by manipulating component phases. Modulation rates were centered on 3 Hz. Discrimination of AM and FM patterns was measured in quiet and in the presence of a white noise that had been passed through a gammatone filter centered on 1 kHz. The noise was presented at SNRs ranging from -6 to +12 dB. Stimuli were left as such or processed via an NR algorithm based on the spectral subtraction method. NR was found to yield small but systematic improvements in discrimination for the AM conditions at favorable SNRs but had little effect, if any, on FM discrimination. A computational model of early auditory processing was developed to quantify the fidelity of AM and FM transmission. The model captured the improvement in discrimination performance for AM stimuli at high SNRs with NR. However, the model also predicted a relatively small detrimental effect of NR for FM stimuli in contrast with the average

  4. Digital noise reduction: outcomes from laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Bentler, Ruth; Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Kettel, Jerrica; Hurtig, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a digital noise reduction (DNR) scheme implemented in a current commercial hearing aid. In a double-blinded design, three conditions of onset time (4, 8, 16 seconds) were randomly assigned to the 25 subjects, plus one condition wherein the noise-reduction feature was disengaged. Subsequently, a fifth trial/condition, wherein the subject had access to three memories in which the different onsets were programmed, was carried out. For each of the five conditions, the subjects had an at-home trial, prior to obtaining self-report measures. Laboratory measures of speech perception showed no effect of the DNR, with or without the provision of visual cues. Laboratory-based ratings of ease of listening showed DNR-on (all onset times) to be rated significantly better than DNR-off; for ratings of listening comfort, the 4-second onset time was rated significantly lower (poorer) than the 8-second onset or the DNR-off condition; for ratings of sound quality, DNR-on or -off had no differential effect. Self-report measures indicated significantly higher aversiveness in the DNR-off condition compared to the pre-test scores. PMID:18698521

  5. Low-Speed Fan Noise Reduction With Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Tweedt, Daniel L.; Fite, E. Brian; Envia, Edmane

    2002-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a trailing edge slot. Composite hollow rotor blades with internal flow passages were designed based on analytical codes modeling the internal flow. The hollow blade with interior guide vanes creates flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the root of the blade to the trailing edge. The impact of the rotor wake-stator interaction on the acoustics was also predicted analytically. The Active Noise Control Fan, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof- of-concept test bed. In-duct mode and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates (defined as mass supplied to trailing edge blowing system divided by fan mass flow) ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 percent. The first three blade passing frequency harmonics at fan rotational speeds of 1700 to 1900 rpm were analyzed. The acoustic tone power levels (PWL) in the inlet and exhaust were reduced 11.5 and -0.1, 7.2 and 11.4, 11.8 and 19.4 PWL dB, respectively. The farfield tone power levels at the first three harmonics were reduced 5.4, 10.6, and 12.4 dB PWL. At selected conditions, two-component hotwire and stator vane unsteady surface pressures were acquired. These measurements illustrate the physics behind the noise reduction.

  6. Noise reduction technologies implemented in head-worn preprocessors for improving cochlear implant performance in reverberant noise fields.

    PubMed

    Chung, King; Nelson, Lance; Teske, Melissa

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a multichannel adaptive directional microphone and a modulation-based noise reduction algorithm could enhance cochlear implant performance in reverberant noise fields. A hearing aid was modified to output electrical signals (ePreprocessor) and a cochlear implant speech processor was modified to receive electrical signals (eProcessor). The ePreprocessor was programmed to flat frequency response and linear amplification. Cochlear implant listeners wore the ePreprocessor-eProcessor system in three reverberant noise fields: 1) one noise source with variable locations; 2) three noise sources with variable locations; and 3) eight evenly spaced noise sources from 0° to 360°. Listeners' speech recognition scores were tested when the ePreprocessor was programmed to omnidirectional microphone (OMNI), omnidirectional microphone plus noise reduction algorithm (OMNI + NR), and adaptive directional microphone plus noise reduction algorithm (ADM + NR). They were also tested with their own cochlear implant speech processor (CI_OMNI) in the three noise fields. Additionally, listeners rated overall sound quality preferences on recordings made in the noise fields. Results indicated that ADM+NR produced the highest speech recognition scores and the most preferable rating in all noise fields. Factors requiring attention in the hearing aid-cochlear implant integration process are discussed.

  7. CMOS image sensor noise reduction method for image signal processor in digital cameras and camera phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Youngjin; Lee, SeongDeok; Choe, Wonhee; Kim, Chang-Yong

    2007-02-01

    Digital images captured from CMOS image sensors suffer Gaussian noise and impulsive noise. To efficiently reduce the noise in Image Signal Processor (ISP), we analyze noise feature for imaging pipeline of ISP where noise reduction algorithm is performed. The Gaussian noise reduction and impulsive noise reduction method are proposed for proper ISP implementation in Bayer domain. The proposed method takes advantage of the analyzed noise feature to calculate noise reduction filter coefficients. Thus, noise is adaptively reduced according to the scene environment. Since noise is amplified and characteristic of noise varies while the image sensor signal undergoes several image processing steps, it is better to remove noise in earlier stage on imaging pipeline of ISP. Thus, noise reduction is carried out in Bayer domain on imaging pipeline of ISP. The method is tested on imaging pipeline of ISP and images captured from Samsung 2M CMOS image sensor test module. The experimental results show that the proposed method removes noise while effectively preserves edges.

  8. Tip Fence for Reduction of Lift-Generated Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor); Storms, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a unique lift-generated noise reduction apparatus. This apparatus includes a plurality of tip fences that are secured to the trailing and leading assemblies of the high-lift system, as close as possible to the discontinuities where the vortices are most likely to form. In one embodiment, these tip fences are secured to some or all of the outboard and inboard tips of the wing slats and flaps. The tip fence includes a generally flat, or an aerodynamically shaped plate or device that could be formed of almost any rigid material, such as metal, wood, plastic, fiber glass, aluminum, etc. In a preferred embodiment, the tip fences extend below and perpendicularly to flaps and the slats to which they are attached, such that these tip fences are aligned with the nominal free stream velocity of the aircraft. In addition to reducing airframe noise, the tip fence tends to decrease drag and to increase lift, thus improving the overall aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. Another advantage presented by the tip fence lies in the simplicity of its design, its elegance, and its ready ability to fit on the wing components, such as the flaps and the slats. Furthermore, it does not require non-standard materials or fabrication techniques, and it can be readily, easily and inexpensively retrofited on most of the existing aircraft, with minimal design changes.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  10. Wake Management Strategies for Reduction of Turbomachinery Fan Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of our work was to evaluate and test several wake management schemes for the reduction of turbomachinery fan noise. Throughout the course of this work we relied on several tools. These include 1) Two-dimensional steady boundary-layer and wake analyses using MISES (a thin-shear layer Navier-Stokes code), 2) Two-dimensional unsteady wake-stator interaction simulations using UNSFLO, 3) Three-dimensional, steady Navier-Stokes rotor simulations using NEWT, 4) Internal blade passage design using quasi-one-dimensional passage flow models developed at MIT, 5) Acoustic modeling using LINSUB, 6) Acoustic modeling using VO72, 7) Experiments in a low-speed cascade wind-tunnel, and 8) ADP fan rig tests in the MIT Blowdown Compressor.

  11. Emergent Adaptive Noise Reduction from Communal Cooperation of Sensor Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas M.; Lodding, Kenneth N.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, the realization of small, inexpensive, and powerful devices with sensors, computers, and wireless communication has promised the development of massive sized sensor networks with dense deployments over large areas capable of high fidelity situational assessments. However, most management models have been based on centralized control and research has concentrated on methods for passing data from sensor devices to the central controller. Most implementations have been small but, as it is not scalable, this methodology is insufficient for massive deployments. Here, a specific application of a large sensor network for adaptive noise reduction demonstrates a new paradigm where communities of sensor/computer devices assess local conditions and make local decisions from which emerges a global behaviour. This approach obviates many of the problems of centralized control as it is not prone to single point of failure and is more scalable, efficient, robust, and fault tolerant

  12. Computational Analyses of Offset Stream Nozzles for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance, III; Foster, Lancert; Wiese,Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Wind computational fluid dynamics code was used to perform a series of simulations on two offset stream nozzle concepts for jet noise reduction. The first concept used an S-duct to direct the secondary stream to the lower side of the nozzle. The second concept used vanes to turn the secondary flow downward. The analyses were completed in preparation of tests conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. The offset stream nozzles demonstrated good performance and reduced the amount of turbulence on the lower side of the jet plume. The computer analyses proved instrumental in guiding the development of the final test configurations and giving insight into the flow mechanics of offset stream nozzles. The computational predictions were compared with flowfield results from the jet rig testing and showed excellent agreement.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Structural Acousticcontrol Interior Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Bevan, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    The research results contained in this technical report were performed under the NASA grant entitled "Experimental and Numerical Structural Acoustic Control for Interior Noise Reduction". The report is based essentially on partial progress of the Ph.D. dissertation prepared by Jeffrey S. Bevan under direct guidance of Dr. Chuh Mei. The document presents a finite element formulation and control of sound radiated from cylindrical panels embedded with piezoceramic actuators. The extended MIN6 shallow shell element is fully electrical-structural coupled. A piezoelectric modal actuator participation (PMAP) is defined which indicates the actuator performance to each of the offending modes. Genetic algorithm is also employed to validate the sensor and actuator locations determined by the PMAP criteria. The work was conducted at the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University. Mr. Travis L. Turner, Structural Acoustics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center is the technical monitor.

  14. Turbofan Noise Reduction Associated With Increased Bypass Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced 22-in. scale model turbofan, typical of a current-generation aircraft engine design by GE Aircraft Engines, was tested in NASA Glenn Research Center s 9- by 15- Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to explore the far-field acoustic effects of an increased bypass nozzle area at simulated aircraft speeds of takeoff, approach, and landing. The wind-tunnel-scale model consisted of the bypass stage fan, stators, and nacelle (including the fan exit nozzle) of a typical turbofan. This fan-stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry, which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. A baseline nozzle was selected, and the nozzle area was chosen for maximum performance at sea-level conditions. Two additional nozzles were also tested--one with a 5.4-percent increase in nozzle area over the baseline nozzle (sized for design point conditions), corresponding to a 5-percent increase in fan weight flow, and another nozzle with a 10.9-percent increase in nozzle area over the baseline nozzle (sized for maximum weight flow at sea-level conditions), corresponding to a 7.5 percent increase in fan weight flow. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level reductions of 2 dB or more (left graph) while the stage adiabatic efficiency (right graph) and thrust (final graph) actually increased by several percentage points. These noise-reduction benefits were seen to include both rotor-interaction tones and broadband noise, and were evident throughout the range of measured sideline angles.

  15. Automatic Assessment and Reduction of Noise using Edge Pattern Analysis in Non-Linear Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2004-01-01

    Noise is the primary visibility limit in the process of non-linear image enhancement, and is no longer a statistically stable additive noise in the post-enhancement image. Therefore novel approaches are needed to both assess and reduce spatially variable noise at this stage in overall image processing. Here we will examine the use of edge pattern analysis both for automatic assessment of spatially variable noise and as a foundation for new noise reduction methods.

  16. High-Temperature Smart Structures for Engine Noise Reduction and Performance Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; McKillip, Robert M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    One of key NASA goals is to develop and integrate noise reduction technology to enable unrestricted air transportation service to all communities. One of the technical priorities of this activity has been to account for and reduce noise via propulsion/airframe interactions, identifying advanced concepts to be integrated with the airframe to mitigate these noise-producing mechanisms. An adaptive geometry chevron using embedded smart structures technology offers the possibility of maximizing engine performance while retaining and possibly enhancing the favorable noise characteristics of current designs. New high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) materials technology enables the devices to operate in both low-temperature (fan) and high-temperature (core) exhaust flows. Chevron-equipped engines have demonstrated reduced noise in testing and operational use. It is desirable to have the noise benefits of chevrons in takeoff/landing conditions, but have them deployed into a minimum drag position for cruise flight. The central feature of the innovation was building on rapidly maturing HTSMA technology to implement a next-generation aircraft noise mitigation system centered on adaptive chevron flow control surfaces. In general, SMA-actuated devices have the potential to enhance the demonstrated noise reduction effectiveness of chevron systems while eliminating the associated performance penalty. The use of structurally integrated smart devices will minimize the mechanical and subsystem complexity of this implementation. The central innovations of the effort entail the modification of prior chevron designs to include a small cut that relaxes structural stiffness without compromising the desired flow characteristics over the surface; the reorientation of SMA actuation devices to apply forces to deflect the chevron tip, exploiting this relaxed stiffness; and the use of high-temperature SMA (HTSMA) materials to enable operation in the demanding core chevron environment

  17. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Cetacean and Sound Mapping Effort: Continuing Forward with an Integrated Ocean Noise Strategy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jolie; Ferguson, Megan; Gedamke, Jason; Hatch, Leila; Southall, Brandon; Van Parijs, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    To help manage chronic and cumulative impacts of human activities on marine mammals, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) convened two working groups, the Underwater Sound Field Mapping Working Group (SoundMap) and the Cetacean Density and Distribution Mapping Working Group (CetMap), with overarching effort of both groups referred to as CetSound, which (1) mapped the predicted contribution of human sound sources to ocean noise and (2) provided region/time/species-specific cetacean density and distribution maps. Mapping products were presented at a symposium where future priorities were identified, including institutionalization/integration of the CetSound effort within NOAA-wide goals and programs, creation of forums and mechanisms for external input and funding, and expanded outreach/education. NOAA is subsequently developing an ocean noise strategy to articulate noise conservation goals and further identify science and management actions needed to support them.

  18. Noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter and M-transform.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter (TF epsilon-filter) and time-frequency M-transform (TF M-transform). Musical noise is an offensive noise generated due to noise reduction in the time-frequency domain such as spectral subtraction and TF epsilon-filter. It has a deleterious effect on speech recognition. To solve the problem, M-transform is introduced. M-transform is a linear transform based on M-sequence. The method combining the time-domain epsilon-filter (TD epsilon-filter) and time-domain M-transform (TD M-transform) can reduce not only white noise but also impulse noise. Musical noise is isolated in the time-frequency domain, which is similar to impulse noise in the time domain. On these prospects, this paper aims to reduce musical noise by improving M-transform for the time-frequency domain. Noise reduction by using TD M-transform and the TD epsilon-filter is first explained to clarify its features. Then, an improved method applying M-transform to the time-frequency domain, namely TF M-transform, is described. Noise reduction combining the TF epsilon-filter and TF M-transform is also proposed. The proposed method can reduce not only high-level nonstationary noise but also musical noise. Experimental results are also given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  19. Design and optimization of a noise reduction system for infrasonic measurements using elements with low acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Alcoverro, Benoit; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2005-04-01

    The implementation of the infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the enforcement of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) increases the effort in the design of suitable noise reducer systems. In this paper we present a new design consisting of low impedance elements. The dimensioning and the optimization of this discrete mechanical system are based on numerical simulations, including a complete electroacoustical modeling and a realistic wind-noise model. The frequency response and the noise reduction obtained for a given wind speed are compared to statistical noise measurements in the [0.02-4] Hz frequency band. The effects of the constructive parameters-the length of the pipes, inner diameters, summing volume, and number of air inlets-are investigated through a parametric study. The studied system consists of 32 air inlets distributed along an overall diameter of 16 m. Its frequency response is flat up to 4 Hz. For a 2 m/s wind speed, the maximal noise reduction obtained is 15 dB between 0.5 and 4 Hz. At lower frequencies, the noise reduction is improved by the use of a system of larger diameter. The main drawback is the high-frequency limitation introduced by acoustical resonances inside the pipes.

  20. Flap Side Edge Liners for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhari, Meelan M. (Inventor); Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    One or more acoustic liners comprising internal chambers or passageways that absorb energy from a noise source on the aircraft are disclosed. The acoustic liners may be positioned at the ends of flaps of an aircraft wing to provide broadband noise absorption and/or dampen the noise producing unsteady flow features, and to reduce the amount of noise generated due to unsteady flow at the inboard and/or outboard end edges of a flap.

  1. Background Noise Reduction Using Adaptive Noise Cancellation Determined by the Cross-Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Fuller, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Background noise due to flow in wind tunnels contaminates desired data by decreasing the Signal-to-Noise Ratio. The use of Adaptive Noise Cancellation to remove background noise at measurement microphones is compromised when the reference sensor measures both background and desired noise. The technique proposed modifies the classical processing configuration based on the cross-correlation between the reference and primary microphone. Background noise attenuation is achieved using a cross-correlation sample width that encompasses only the background noise and a matched delay for the adaptive processing. A present limitation of the method is that a minimum time delay between the background noise and desired signal must exist in order for the correlated parts of the desired signal to be separated from the background noise in the crosscorrelation. A simulation yields primary signal recovery which can be predicted from the coherence of the background noise between the channels. Results are compared with two existing methods.

  2. Statistical Analysis of speckle noise reduction techniques for echocardiographic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Kalpana; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, Manojkumar

    2011-12-01

    Echocardiography is the safe, easy and fast technology for diagnosing the cardiac diseases. As in other ultrasound images these images also contain speckle noise. In some cases this speckle noise is useful such as in motion detection. But in general noise removal is required for better analysis of the image and proper diagnosis. Different Adaptive and anisotropic filters are included for statistical analysis. Statistical parameters such as Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) calculated for performance measurement. One more important aspect that there may be blurring during speckle noise removal. So it is prefered that filter should be able to enhance edges during noise removal.

  3. Jet Noise Reduction Potential From Emerging Variable Cycle Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts utilized ejectors, inverted velocity profiles, and fluidic shields. One of the ejector concepts was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other ejector concept produced discrete-frequency tones that degraded the acoustic performance of the model. The concept incorporating an inverted velocity profile and fluid shield produced overall-sound-pressure-level reductions of 6 dB relative to a single stream nozzle at the peak jet noise angle for some nozzle pressure ratios. Flow separations in the nozzle degraded the acoustic performance of the inverted velocity profile model at low nozzle pressure ratios.

  4. Jet Noise Reduction Potential from Emerging Variable Cycle Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts utilized ejectors, inverted velocity profiles, and fluidic shields. One of the ejector concepts was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other ejector concept produced discrete-frequency tones that degraded the acoustic performance of the model. The concept incorporating an inverted velocity profile and fluid shield produced overall-sound-pressure-level reductions of 6 dB relative to a single stream nozzle at the peak jet noise angle for some nozzle pressure ratios. Flow separations in the nozzle degraded the acoustic performance of the inverted velocity profile model at low nozzle pressure ratios.

  5. Workshop on Jet Exhaust Noise Reduction for Tactical Aircraft - NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    Jet noise from supersonic, high performance aircraft is a significant problem for takeoff and landing operations near air bases and aircraft carriers. As newer aircraft with higher thrust and performance are introduced, the noise tends to increase due to higher jet exhaust velocities. Jet noise has been a subject of research for over 55 years. Commercial subsonic aircraft benefit from changes to the engine cycle that reduce the exhaust velocities and result in significant noise reduction. Most of the research programs over the past few decades have concentrated on commercial aircraft. Progress has been made by introducing new engines with design features that reduce the noise. NASA has recently started a new program called "Fundamental Aeronautics" where three projects (subsonic fixed wing, subsonic rotary wing, and supersonics) address aircraft noise. For the supersonics project, a primary goal is to understand the underlying physics associated with jet noise so that improved noise prediction tools and noise reduction methods can be developed for a wide range of applications. Highlights from the supersonics project are presented including prediction methods for broadband shock noise, flow measurement methods, and noise reduction methods. Realistic expectations are presented based on past history that indicates significant jet noise reduction cannot be achieved without major changes to the engine cycle. NASA s past experience shows a few EPNdB (effective perceived noise level in decibels) can be achieved using low noise design features such as chevron nozzles. Minimal thrust loss can be expected with these nozzles (< 0.5%) and they may be retrofitted on existing engines. In the long term, it is desirable to use variable cycle engines that can be optimized for lower jet noise during takeoff operations and higher thrust for operational performance. It is also suggested that noise experts be included early in the design process for engine nozzle systems to participate

  6. Advanced noise reduction techniques for ultra-low phase noise optical-to-microwave division with femtosecond fiber combs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Zhenyu; Lours, Michel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Kersalé, Yann; Luiten, Andre N; Le Coq, Yann; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2011-05-01

    We report what we believe to be the lowest phase noise optical-to-microwave frequency division using fiber-based femtosecond optical frequency combs: a residual phase noise of -120 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset from an 11.55 GHz carrier frequency. Furthermore, we report a detailed investigation into the fundamental noise sources which affect the division process itself. Two frequency combs with quasi-identical configurations are referenced to a common ultrastable cavity laser source. To identify each of the limiting effects, we implement an ultra-low noise carrier-suppression measurement system, which avoids the detection and amplification noise of more conventional techniques. This technique suppresses these unwanted sources of noise to very low levels. In the Fourier frequency range of ∼200 Hz to 100 kHz, a feed-forward technique based on a voltage-controlled phase shifter delivers a further noise reduction of 10 dB. For lower Fourier frequencies, optical power stabilization is implemented to reduce the relative intensity noise which causes unwanted phase noise through power-to-phase conversion in the detector. We implement and compare two possible control schemes based on an acousto-optical modulator and comb pump current. We also present wideband measurements of the relative intensity noise of the fiber comb. PMID:21622045

  7. Noise reduction tests of large-scale-model externally blown flap using trailing-edge blowing and partial flap slot covering. [jet aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.; Burns, R. J.; Wagner, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Noise data were obtained with a large-scale cold-flow model of a two-flap, under-the-wing, externally blown flap proposed for use on future STOL aircraft. The noise suppression effectiveness of locating a slot conical nozzle at the trailing edge of the second flap and of applying partial covers to the slots between the wing and flaps was evaluated. Overall-sound-pressure-level reductions of 5 db occurred below the wing in the flyover plane. Existing models of several noise sources were applied to the test results. The resulting analytical relation compares favorably with the test data. The noise source mechanisms were analyzed and are discussed.

  8. Technical note: Signal resolution increase and noise reduction in a CCD digitizer.

    PubMed

    González, A; Martínez, J A; Tobarra, B

    2004-03-01

    Increasing output resolution is assumed to improve noise characteristics of a CCD digitizer. In this work, however, we have found that as the quantization step becomes lower than the analog noise (present in the signal before its conversion to digital) the noise reduction becomes significantly lower than expected. That is the case for values of sigma(an)/delta larger than 0.6, where sigma(an) is the standard deviation of the analog noise and delta is the quantization step. The procedure is applied to a commercially available CCD digitizer, and noise reduction by means of signal resolution increase is compared to that obtained by low pass filtering.

  9. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  10. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  11. Acoustical and Perceptual Comparison of Noise Reduction and Compression in Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noise reduction and dynamic-range compression are generally applied together in hearing aids but may have opposite effects on amplification. This study evaluated the acoustical and perceptual effects of separate and combined processing of noise reduction and compression. Design: Recordings of the output of 4 hearing aids for speech in…

  12. Noise-induced reduction of inner-ear microphonic response: dependence on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Drescher, D G

    1974-07-19

    The rate of reduction of chinchilla cochlear microphonic response with exposure to steady noise is less at lower body temperatures and greater at higher body temperatures. Before exposure to noise, this auditory response is invariant within the range of temperatures employed. The mechanism of reduction of cochlear response appears to involve processes sensitive to body temperature.

  13. Estimation of Broadband Shock Noise Reduction in Turbulent Jets by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Lonerjan, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of effective jet properties introduced by the authors (AIAA-2007-3645) has been extended to the estimation of broadband shock noise reduction by water injection in supersonic jets. Comparison of the predictions with the test data for cold underexpanded supersonic nozzles shows a satisfactory agreement. The results also reveal the range of water mass flow rates over which saturation of mixing noise reduction and existence of parasitic noise are manifest.

  14. The Near Noise Field of Static Jets and Some Model Studies of Devices for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, Leslie W; Hubbard, Harvey H

    1956-01-01

    An experimental study is presented of the pressure fluctuations near jet exhaust streams made during unchoked operation of a turbojet engine and a 1-inch-diameter high-temperature model jet and during choked operation of various sizes of model jets with unheated air. The tests for unchoked operation indicate a random spectrum of rather narrow band width which varies in frequency content with axial position along the jet. Pressure surveys from the model tests along lines parallel to the 15 degree jet boundary indicate that the station of greatest pressure fluctuations is determined by the jet velocity and the radial distance, with a tendency of the maximum to shift downstream as either parameter is increased. From model tests the magnitude of the fluctuations appears to increase as about the second power of jet velocity at points just outside the jet boundary and as increasingly higher powers of jet velocity as distance from the boundary is increased. A laboratory method of noise reduction with model jets was found to produce large decreases in the magnitude of the lower-frequency components of the spectra and thereby also to reduce the total radiated energy. Choked operation of model jets with unheated air indicates the appearance of a discrete-frequency component of very large magnitude. Shadowgraph records of the flow show that this condition is associated with the appearance of flow formations suggestive of partly formed toroidal vortices in the vicinity of the shocks. Elimination of these formations is found to eliminate the discrete component and thereby to reduce the overall noise level.

  15. Reduction of classroom noise levels using group contingencies.

    PubMed

    Ring, Brandon M; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Eubanks, Sean L; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants received real-time graphed feedback of noise levels and had the opportunity to earn monetary group reinforcement for maintaining a low number of noise violations. Results suggested that feedback and monetary reinforcement reduced the number of noise violations.

  16. Reduction of classroom noise levels using group contingencies.

    PubMed

    Ring, Brandon M; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Eubanks, Sean L; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants received real-time graphed feedback of noise levels and had the opportunity to earn monetary group reinforcement for maintaining a low number of noise violations. Results suggested that feedback and monetary reinforcement reduced the number of noise violations. PMID:25175843

  17. CT image noise reduction using rotational-invariant feature in Stockwell transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jian; Li, Zhoubo; Yu, Lifeng; Warner, Joshua; Blezek, Daniel; Erickson, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction and other noise reduction methods have been employed in CT to improve image quality and to reduce radiation dose. The non-local means (NLM) filter emerges as a popular choice for image-based noise reduction in CT. However, the original NLM method cannot incorporate similar structures if they are in a rotational format, resulting in ineffective denoising in some locations of the image and non-uniform noise reduction across the image. We have developed a novel rotational-invariant image texture feature derived from the multiresolutional Stockwell-transform (ST), and applied it to CT image noise reduction so that similar structures can be identified and fully utilized even when they are in different orientations. We performed a computer simulation study in CT to demonstrate better efficiency in terms of utilizing redundant information in the image and more uniform noise reduction achieved by ST than by NLM.

  18. Comparative intelligibility investigation of single-channel noise-reduction algorithms for Chinese, Japanese, and English.

    PubMed

    Li, Junfeng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Jianping; Yan, Yonghong; Hu, Yi; Akagi, Masato; Loizou, Philipos C

    2011-05-01

    A large number of single-channel noise-reduction algorithms have been proposed based largely on mathematical principles. Most of these algorithms, however, have been evaluated with English speech. Given the different perceptual cues used by native listeners of different languages including tonal languages, it is of interest to examine whether there are any language effects when the same noise-reduction algorithm is used to process noisy speech in different languages. A comparative evaluation and investigation is taken in this study of various single-channel noise-reduction algorithms applied to noisy speech taken from three languages: Chinese, Japanese, and English. Clean speech signals (Chinese words and Japanese words) were first corrupted by three types of noise at two signal-to-noise ratios and then processed by five single-channel noise-reduction algorithms. The processed signals were finally presented to normal-hearing listeners for recognition. Intelligibility evaluation showed that the majority of noise-reduction algorithms did not improve speech intelligibility. Consistent with a previous study with the English language, the Wiener filtering algorithm produced small, but statistically significant, improvements in intelligibility for car and white noise conditions. Significant differences between the performances of noise-reduction algorithms across the three languages were observed.

  19. Comparative intelligibility investigation of single-channel noise-reduction algorithms for Chinese, Japanese, and Englisha

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Jianping; Yan, Yonghong; Hu, Yi; Akagi, Masato; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of single-channel noise-reduction algorithms have been proposed based largely on mathematical principles. Most of these algorithms, however, have been evaluated with English speech. Given the different perceptual cues used by native listeners of different languages including tonal languages, it is of interest to examine whether there are any language effects when the same noise-reduction algorithm is used to process noisy speech in different languages. A comparative evaluation and investigation is taken in this study of various single-channel noise-reduction algorithms applied to noisy speech taken from three languages: Chinese, Japanese, and English. Clean speech signals (Chinese words and Japanese words) were first corrupted by three types of noise at two signal-to-noise ratios and then processed by five single-channel noise-reduction algorithms. The processed signals were finally presented to normal-hearing listeners for recognition. Intelligibility evaluation showed that the majority of noise-reduction algorithms did not improve speech intelligibility. Consistent with a previous study with the English language, the Wiener filtering algorithm produced small, but statistically significant, improvements in intelligibility for car and white noise conditions. Significant differences between the performances of noise-reduction algorithms across the three languages were observed. PMID:21568430

  20. Industrial wideband noise reduction for hearing aids using a headset with adaptive-feedback active noise cancellation.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; Li, P C; Tang, S T; Liu, P T; Young, S T

    2005-11-01

    High-intensity noises are a health hazard for industrial workers, and hearing protection is necessary to prevent hearing loss. Passive methods, such as ear muffs, are ineffective against low-frequency noise. Moreover, many hearing-impaired workers must wear hearing aids to enable communication at their workplace, and such aids can amplify ambient noise. To overcome this problem, the present study developed a headset equipped with a digital signal processing system to implement adaptive-feedback active noise cancellation (AFANC) to reduce low-frequency noise. The proposed AFANC headset was effective against wideband industrial noise, with a maximum noise spectrum power reduction of 30 dB. Furthermore, when used with a hearing aid, it improved the speech signal-to-noise ratio by up to 14 dB. These results suggest that a headset with AFANC would be useful for hearing protection in workplaces with high levels of low-frequency industrial noise, especially for hearing-impaired workers. PMID:16594300

  1. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, David A.; Ray, Laura R.; Collier, Robert D.

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. [``Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection,'' Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  2. Older Adults Expend More Listening Effort than Young Adults Recognizing Speech in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Penny Anderson; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Listening in noisy situations is a challenging experience for many older adults. The authors hypothesized that older adults exert more listening effort compared with young adults. Listening effort involves the attention and cognitive resources required to understand speech. The purpose was (a) to quantify the amount of listening effort…

  3. Experimental demonstration of a displacement noise free interferometry scheme for gravitational wave detectors showing displacement noise reduction at low frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Perreca, Antonio; Chelkowski, Simon; Freise, Andreas; Hild, Stefan

    2010-03-15

    This paper reports an experimental demonstration of partial displacement noise free laser interferometry in the gravitational wave detection band. The used detuned Fabry-Perot cavity allows the isolation of the mimicked gravitational wave signal from the displacement noise on the cavities input mirror. By properly combining the reflected and transmitted signals from the cavity a reduction of the displacement noise was achieved. Our results represent the first experimental demonstration of this recently proposed displacement noise free laser interferometry scheme. Overall, we show that the rejection ratio of the displacement noise to the gravitational wave signal was improved in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 10 kHz with a typical factor of {approx}60.

  4. An MDOE Investigation of Chevrons for Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    The impact of chevron design on the noise radiated from heated, overexpanded, supersonic jets is presented. The experiments used faceted bi-conic convergent-divergent nozzles with design Mach numbers equal to 1.51 and 1.65. The purpose of the facets was to simulate divergent seals on a military style nozzle. The nozzle throat diameter was equal to 4.5 inches. Modern Design of Experiment (MDOE) techniques were used to investigate the impact of chevron penetration, length, and width on the resulting acoustic radiation. All chevron configurations used 12 chevrons to match the number of facets in the nozzle. Most chevron designs resulted in increased broadband shock noise relative to the baseline nozzle. In the peak jet noise direction, the optimum chevron design reduced peak sound pressure levels by 4 dB relative to the baseline nozzle. The penetration was the parameter having the greatest impact on radiated noise at all observation angles. While increasing chevron penetration decreased acoustic radiation in the peak jet noise direction, broadband shock noise was adversely impacted. Decreasing chevron length increased noise at most observation angles. The impact of chevron width on radiated noise depended on frequency and observation angle.

  5. The Effects of Noise Reduction on Social Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Vincent J.; Duncan, Phillip K.

    1986-01-01

    The study found no relationship between improved social behavior in a group of juveniles residing at a county shelter care facility and decreased frequency and duration of disruptions above 85 decibels. Subjects did reduce noise levels when stereo listening was made contingent on reduced noise. (Author/DB)

  6. Noise and Fuel Burn Reduction Potential of an Innovative Subsonic Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yueping; Nickol, Craig L.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented for the noise and fuel burn reduction potential of an innovative double deck concept aircraft with two three-shaft direct-drive turbofan engines. The engines are mounted from the fuselage so that the engine inlet is over the main wing. It is shown that such an aircraft can achieve a cumulative Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) about 28 dB below the current aircraft noise regulations of Stage 4. The combination of high bypass ratio engines and advanced wing design with laminar flow control technologies provide fuel burn reduction and low noise levels simultaneously. For example, the fuselage mounted engine position provides more than 4 EPNLdB of noise reduction by shielding the inlet radiated noise. To identify the potential effect of noise reduction technologies on this concept, parametric studies are presented to reveal the system level benefits of various emerging noise reduction concepts, for both engine and airframe noise reduction. These concepts are discussed both individually to show their respective incremental noise reduction potential and collectively to assess their aggregate effects on the total noise. Through these concepts approximately about 8 dB of additional noise reduction is possible, bringing the cumulative noise level of this aircraft to 36 EPNLdB below Stage 4, if the entire suite of noise reduction technologies would mature to practical application. In a final step, an estimate is made for this same aircraft concept but with higher bypass ratio, geared, turbofan engines. With this geared turbofan propulsion system, the noise is estimated to reach as low as 40-42 dB below Stage 4 with a fuel burn reduction of 43-47% below the 2005 best-in-class aircraft baseline. While just short of the NASA N+2 goals of 42 dB and 50% fuel burn reduction, for a 2025 in service timeframe, this assessment shows that this innovative concept warrants refined study. Furthermore, this design appears to be a viable potential future passenger

  7. Brain Regions Recruited for the Effortful Comprehension of Noise-Vocoded Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis G.; Carlyon, Robert P.; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.; Davis, Matthew H.

    2012-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural basis of comprehension and perceptual learning of artificially degraded [noise vocoded (NV)] speech. Fifteen participants were scanned while listening to 6-channel vocoded words, which are difficult for naive listeners to comprehend, but can be readily learned with…

  8. Methods for clinical evaluation of noise reduction techniques in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Ehman, Eric C; Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Hara, Amy K; Shiung, Maria M; Jondal, Dayna; Lake, David S; Paden, Robert G; Blezek, Daniel J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Hough, David M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Most noise reduction methods involve nonlinear processes, and objective evaluation of image quality can be challenging, since image noise cannot be fully characterized on the sole basis of the noise level at computed tomography (CT). Noise spatial correlation (or noise texture) is closely related to the detection and characterization of low-contrast objects and may be quantified by analyzing the noise power spectrum. High-contrast spatial resolution can be measured using the modulation transfer function and section sensitivity profile and is generally unaffected by noise reduction. Detectability of low-contrast lesions can be evaluated subjectively at varying dose levels using phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Clinical applications with inherent high-contrast abnormalities (eg, CT for renal calculi, CT enterography) permit larger dose reductions with denoising techniques. In low-contrast tasks such as detection of metastases in solid organs, dose reduction is substantially more limited by loss of lesion conspicuity due to loss of low-contrast spatial resolution and coarsening of noise texture. Existing noise reduction strategies for dose reduction have a substantial impact on lowering the radiation dose at CT. To preserve the diagnostic benefit of CT examination, thoughtful utilization of these strategies must be based on the inherent lesion-to-background contrast and the anatomy of interest. The authors provide an overview of existing noise reduction strategies for low-dose abdominopelvic CT, including analytic reconstruction, image and projection space denoising, and iterative reconstruction; review qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating these strategies; and discuss the strengths and limitations of individual noise reduction methods. PMID:25019428

  9. Flight-test measurement of the noise reduction of a jet transport delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. D.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    A delayed flap approach procedure was flight tested using the NASA CV-990 airplane to measure and analyze the noise produced beneath the flight path. Three other types of landing approaches were also flight tested to provide a comparison of the noise reduction benefits to the delayed flap approach. The conventional type of approach was used as a baseline to compare the effectiveness of the other approaches. The decelerating approach is a variation of the delayed flap approach. A detailed comparison of the ground perceived noise generated during the approaches is presented. For this comparison, the measured noise data were normalized to compensate for variations in aircraft weight and winds that occurred during the flight tests. The data show that the reduced flap approach offers some noise reduction, while the delayed flap and decelerating approaches offer significant noise reductions over the conventional approach.

  10. Survey of techniques for reduction of wind turbine blade trailing edge noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin

    2011-08-01

    Aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors leads to constraints in both rotor design and turbine siting. The primary source of aerodynamic noise on wind turbine rotors is the interaction of turbulent boundary layers on the blades with the blade trailing edges. This report surveys concepts that have been proposed for trailing edge noise reduction, with emphasis on concepts that have been tested at either sub-scale or full-scale. These concepts include trailing edge serrations, low-noise airfoil designs, trailing edge brushes, and porous trailing edges. The demonstrated noise reductions of these concepts are cited, along with their impacts on aerodynamic performance. An assessment is made of future research opportunities in trailing edge noise reduction for wind turbine rotors.

  11. A simulation study of harmonics regeneration in noise reduction for electric and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi

    2010-05-01

    Recent research results show that combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS) significantly improves speech recognition in noise, and it is generally established that access to the improved F0 representation of target speech, along with the glimpse cues, provide the EAS benefits. Under noisy listening conditions, noise signals degrade these important cues by introducing undesired temporal-frequency components and corrupting harmonics structure. In this study, the potential of combining noise reduction and harmonics regeneration techniques was investigated to further improve speech intelligibility in noise by providing improved beneficial cues for EAS. Three hypotheses were tested: (1) noise reduction methods can improve speech intelligibility in noise for EAS; (2) harmonics regeneration after noise reduction can further improve speech intelligibility in noise for EAS; and (3) harmonics sideband constraints in frequency domain (or equivalently, amplitude modulation in temporal domain), even deterministic ones, can provide additional benefits. Test results demonstrate that combining noise reduction and harmonics regeneration can significantly improve speech recognition in noise for EAS, and it is also beneficial to preserve the harmonics sidebands under adverse listening conditions. This finding warrants further work into the development of algorithms that regenerate harmonics and the related sidebands for EAS processing under noisy conditions.

  12. Two Methods of Mechanical Noise Reduction of Recorded Speech During Phonation in an MRI device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Přibil, J.; Horáček, J.; Horák, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents two methods of noise reduction of speech signal recorded in an MRI device during phonation for the human vocal tract modelling. The applied approach of noise speech signal cleaning is based on cepstral speech analysis and synthesis because the noise is mainly produced by gradient coils, has a mechanical character, and can be processed in spectral domain. Our first noise reduction method is using real cepstrum limitation and clipping the "peaks" corresponding to the harmonic frequencies of mechanical noise. The second method is coming out from substation of the short-time spectra of two signals recorded withal: the first includes speech and noise, and the second consists of noise only. The resulting speech quality was compared by spectrogram and mean periodogram methods.

  13. Column-Parallel Correlated Multiple Sampling Circuits for CMOS Image Sensors and Their Noise Reduction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sungho; Itoh, Shinya; Aoyama, Satoshi; Kawahito, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    For low-noise complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, the reduction of pixel source follower noises is becoming very important. Column-parallel high-gain readout circuits are useful for low-noise CMOS image sensors. This paper presents column-parallel high-gain signal readout circuits, correlated multiple sampling (CMS) circuits and their noise reduction effects. In the CMS, the gain of the noise cancelling is controlled by the number of samplings. It has a similar effect to that of an amplified CDS for the thermal noise but is a little more effective for 1/f and RTS noises. Two types of the CMS with simple integration and folding integration are proposed. In the folding integration, the output signal swing is suppressed by a negative feedback using a comparator and one-bit D-to-A converter. The CMS circuit using the folding integration technique allows to realize a very low-noise level while maintaining a wide dynamic range. The noise reduction effects of their circuits have been investigated with a noise analysis and an implementation of a 1Mpixel pinned photodiode CMOS image sensor. Using 16 samplings, dynamic range of 59.4 dB and noise level of 1.9 e− for the simple integration CMS and 75 dB and 2.2 e− for the folding integration CMS, respectively, are obtained. PMID:22163400

  14. Quantitative appraisal for noise reduction in digital holographic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Silvio; Picart, Pascal

    2016-06-27

    This paper discusses on a quantitative comparison of the performances of different advanced algorithms for phase data de-noising. In order to quantify the performances, several criteria are proposed: the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, the Q index, the standard deviation of the phase error, and the signal to distortion ratio. The proposed methodology to investigate de-noising algorithms is based on the use of a realistic simulation of noise-corrupted phase data. A database including 25 fringe patterns divided into 5 patterns and 5 different signal-to-noise ratios was generated to evaluate the selected de-noising algorithms. A total of 34 algorithms divided into different families were evaluated. Quantitative appraisal leads to ranking within the considered criteria. A fairly good correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio gain and the quality index has been observed. There exists an anti-correlation between the phase error and the quality index which indicates that the phase errors are mainly structural distortions in the fringe pattern. Experimental results are thoroughly discussed in the paper. PMID:27410587

  15. X-/Ka-band dichroic plate noise temperature reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veruttipong, W.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    The X-/Ka-band (8.4 GHz/32.0 GHz) dichroic plate installed as DSS 13 contributes an estimated 3 K to the system noise temperature at 32.0 GHz. Approximately 1 percent of the Ka-band incident field is reflected by the plate into the 300-K environment of the DSS-13 pedestal room. A low-cost, easily implemented method of reducing the noise temperature is presented. Using a curved reflector, the reflected field can be re-focused into an 80-K cold load, reducing the noise temperature contribution of the dichroic plate by about 2 K.

  16. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  17. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  18. Noise Reduction in High-Throughput Gene Perturbation Screens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motivation: Accurate interpretation of perturbation screens is essential for a successful functional investigation. However, the screened phenotypes are often distorted by noise, and their analysis requires specialized statistical analysis tools. The number and scope of statistical methods available...

  19. Noise reduction facilitated by dosage compensation in gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weilin; Song, Ruijie; Acar, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Genetic noise together with genome duplication and volume changes during cell cycle are significant contributors to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. How can cells buffer the effects of these unavoidable epigenetic and genetic variations on phenotypes that are sensitive to such variations? Here we show that a simple network motif that is essential for network-dosage compensation can reduce the effects of extrinsic noise on the network output. Using natural and synthetic gene networks with and without the network motif, we measure gene network activity in single yeast cells and find that the activity of the compensated network is significantly lower in noise compared with the non-compensated network. A mathematical analysis provides intuitive insights into these results and a novel stochastic model tracking cell-volume and cell-cycle predicts the experimental results. Our work implies that noise is a selectable trait tunable by evolution. PMID:27694830

  20. The cost of noise reduction in commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and departure noise annoyance was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt rotor aircraft designs to meet various noise goals at minimum DOC. These vehicles were spaced across the spectrum of possible noise levels from completely unconstrained to the quietest vehicle that could be designed within the study ground rules. A group of optimization parameters were varied to find the minimum DOC while other inputs were held constant and some external constraints were met. This basic variation was then extended to different aircraft sizes and technology time frames. It was concluded that reducing noise annoyance by designing for lower rotor tip speeds is a very promising avenue for future research and development. It appears that the cost of halving the annoyance compared to an unconstrained design is insignificant and the cost of halving the annoyance again is small.

  1. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging. PMID:11755093

  2. Noise reduction of a Libbrecht-Hall style current driver.

    PubMed

    Seck, Christopher M; Martin, Paul J; Cook, Eryn C; Odom, Brian C; Steck, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    The Libbrecht-Hall circuit is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. An important feature of the circuit is a current limit to protect the laser diode. As the current approaches the maximum limit, however, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This paper documents this behavior and explores simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue.

  3. Noise reduction of a Libbrecht-Hall style current driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Christopher M.; Martin, Paul J.; Cook, Eryn C.; Odom, Brian C.; Steck, Daniel A.

    2016-06-01

    The Libbrecht-Hall circuit is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. An important feature of the circuit is a current limit to protect the laser diode. As the current approaches the maximum limit, however, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This paper documents this behavior and explores simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue.

  4. The Structure and Noise Reduction Capacity of Owl Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Justin; Clark, Ian; Alexander, Nathan; Devenport, William; Daly, Conor; Peake, Nigel; Glegg, Stewart

    2014-11-01

    Many species of owl rely on specialized plumage to reduce their self-noise levels and enable hunting in acoustic stealth. In contrast to the leading-edge comb and compliant trailing-edge fringe attributes of owls, the aeroacoustic impact of the fluffy down material on the upper wing surface remains largely speculative as a means to eliminate aerodynamic noise across a broad range of frequencies. Photographic analysis of the owl down reveals a unique forest-like structure, whereby the down fibers rise straight up from the wing surface and then bend into the flow direction to form a porous canopy, with an open area fraction of approximately 70%. Experimental measurements demonstrate that the canopy feature reduces dramatically the turbulent pressure levels on the wing surface by up to 30dB, which affects the roughness noise characteristic of the down in a manner consistent with the theory of flows over and through vegetation. Mathematical models developed for the turbulence noise generation by the down fibers and for the mixing-layer instability above the porous canopy furnish a theoretical basis to understand the influence of the down geometric structure on its self-noise signature and noise suppression characteristics.

  5. Minimizing noise in fiberglass aquaculture tanks: Noise reduction potential of various retrofits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equipment used in intensive aquaculture systems, such as pumps and blowers can produce underwater sound levels and frequencies within the range of fish hearing. The impacts of underwater noise on fish are not well known, but limited research suggests that subjecting fish to noise could result in imp...

  6. An MDOE Assessment of Nozzle Vanes for High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Norum, Thomas; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    The effect of airfoil-shaped vanes placed in the fan stream of a BPR 8 coannular nozzle model system on the resulting jet noise was investigated. The experiments used a Modern Design of Experiments approach to investigate the impact of a range of vane parameters on the noise reduction achieved at representative takeoff conditions. The experimental results showed that the installation of the vanes decreased low frequency noise radiation in the downstream peak-noise direction and increased high frequency noise in the upstream direction. Results also showed that improper selection of the vane configuration resulted in increased low frequency noise radiation in the upstream direction. Large angles of attack are shown to reduce noise near the peak jet noise angle and increase noise in the upstream direction. The MDOE analysis yields an optimum design that minimizes perceived noise levels. Limited data taken with a BPR 5 nozzle system showed that the vanes result in better effective perceived noise reduction for lower bypass ratio nozzles than for the BPR 8 model.

  7. Noise reduction from magnetic resonance images using nonseperable transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhadarya, Ehsan; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Bagher

    2006-03-01

    Multi-scale transforms have got a lot of applications in image processing, in recent years. Wavelet transform is a powerful multiscale transform for denoising noisy signals and images, but the usual two-dimensional separable wavelets are sub-optimal. These separable wavelet transforms can successfully identify zero dimensional singularities in images, but can weakly identify one dimensional singularities such as edges, curves and lines. In this sense, non-separable transforms such as Ridgelet and Curvelet transforms are proposed by Candes and Donoho. The coefficients produced by these non-separable transforms have shown to be sparser than wavelet coefficients. This fact results in better denoising capabilities than wavelet transform. These new non-separable transforms can identify direction in lines and curves, because of special structure of their basis elements. Basically, Magnetic Resonance images are probable to have Rician noise. In some special cases, this kind of noise can be supposed to be white Gaussian noise. In this paper, a new method for denoising MR images is proposed. This method is based on Monoscale Ridgelet transform. It is shown that this two transform can successfully denoise MR images embedded in white Gaussian noise. The results are better in comparison with usual wavelet denoising methods, based on both visual perception and signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Evaluation of a novel method of noise reduction using computer-simulated mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tischenko, Oleg; Hoeschen, Christoph; Dance, David R; Hunt, Roger A; Maidment, Andrew D A; Bakic, Predrag R

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of noise reduction has been tested for mammography using computer-simulated images for which the truth is known exactly. This method is based on comparing two images. The images are compared at different scales, using a cross-correlation function as a measure of similarity to define the image modifications in the wavelet domain. The computer-simulated images were calculated for noise-free primary radiation using a quasi-realistic voxel phantom. Two images corresponding to slightly different geometry were produced. Gaussian noise was added with certain properties to simulate quantum noise. The added noise could be reduced by >70% using the proposed method without any noticeable corruption of the structures. It is possible to save 50% dose in mammography by producing two images (each 25% of the dose for a standard mammogram). Additionally, a reduction of the anatomical noise and, therefore, better detection rates of breast cancer in mammography are possible.

  9. Fan noise reduction achieved by removing tip flow irregularities behind the rotor - forward arc test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The noise source caused by the interaction of the rotor tip flow irregularities (vortices and velocity defects) with the downstream stator vanes was studied. Fan flow was removed behind a 0.508 meter (20 in.) diameter model turbofan through an outer wall slot between the rotor and stator. Noise measurements were made with far-field microphones positioned in an arc about the fan inlet and with a pressure transducer in the duct behind the stator. Little tone noise reduction was observed in the forward arc during flow removal; possibly because the rotor-stator interaction noise did not propagate upstream through the rotor. Noise reductions were maded in the duct behind the stator and the largest decrease occurred with the first increment of flow removal. This result indicates that the rotor tip flow irregularity-stator interaction is as important a noise producing mechanism as the normally considered rotor wake-stator interaction.

  10. Reduction of noise in diffusion tensor images using anisotropic smoothing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaohua; Gore, John C; Anderson, Adam W

    2005-02-01

    To improve the accuracy of tissue structural and architectural characterization with diffusion tensor imaging, a novel smoothing technique is developed for reducing noise in diffusion tensor images. The technique extends the traditional anisotropic diffusion filtering method by allowing isotropic smoothing within homogeneous regions and anisotropic smoothing along structure boundaries. This is particularly useful for smoothing diffusion tensor images in which direction information contained in the tensor needs to be restored following noise corruption and preserved around tissue boundaries. The effectiveness of this technique is quantitatively studied with experiments on simulated and human in vivo diffusion tensor data. Illustrative results demonstrate that the anisotropic smoothing technique developed can significantly reduce the impact of noise on the direction as well as anisotropy measures of the diffusion tensor images.

  11. Noise reduction of a composite cylinder subjected to random acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Beyer, T.

    1989-01-01

    Interior and exterior noise measurements were conducted on a stiffened composite floor-equipped cylinder, with and without an interior trim installed. Noise reduction was obtained for the case of random acoustic excitation in a diffuse field; the frequency range of interest was 100-800-Hz one-third octave bands. The measured data were compared with noise reduction predictions from the Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise (PAIN) program and from a statistical energy analysis. Structural model parameters were not predicted well by the PAIN program for the given input parameters; this resulted in incorrect noise reduction predictions for the lower one-third octave bands where the power flow into the interior of the cylinder was predicted on a mode-per-mode basis.

  12. Experiments to Determine Neighborhood Reactions to Light Airplanes With and Without External Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elwell, Fred S

    1953-01-01

    The work reported was part of a program of experimentation with external noise reduction on light airplanes. This particular study was in effect a byproduct survey conceived to utilize already available equipment and personnel to further the findings of the original research and to determine reactions in populated neighborhoods to light aircraft with and without noise-reduction equipment. The findings indicate that at the 10 sites within and about metropolitan Boston the degree of noise reduction previously found to be aerodynamically and structurally feasible did eliminate substantially all neighborhood objections to noise per se. The evidence clearly suggests that, when the noise nuisance is minimized to the extent found feasible, the number and severity of other objections also diminish -- evidently because the flight operations are noticed less when heard less.

  13. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF EFFORT REDUCTION IN THE REINFORCING EFFICACY OF TIMEOUT FROM AVOIDANCE

    PubMed Central

    Galuska, Chad M.; Mikorski, Jeff; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rats responded on concurrent schedules of shock-postponement or deletion (avoidance) and timeout from avoidance. In Experiment 1, 3 rats' responses on one lever postponed shocks for 20 s and responses on a second lever produced a 1-min timeout according to a variable-interval 45-s schedule. Across conditions, a warning signal (white noise) was presented 19.5 s, 16 s, 12 s, 8 s, or 4 s before an impending shock. Raising the duration of the warning signal increased both avoidance and timeout response rates. Timeout responding, although positively correlated with avoidance responding, was not correlated with the prevailing shock rate. In Experiment 2, 3 rats' responses on one lever deleted scheduled shocks according to a variable-cycle 30-s schedule and responses on a second lever produced a 2-min timeout as described above. After this baseline condition, the avoidance lever was removed and noncontingent shocks were delivered at intervals yoked to the receipt of shocks in the baseline sessions. Timeout responding decreased when the avoidance lever was removed, even though the shock-frequency reduction afforded by the timeout remained constant. These results suggest that a key factor in the reinforcing efficacy of timeout is suspension of the requirement to work to avoid shock, rather than the reduction in shock frequency associated with timeout. PMID:23144504

  14. Reduction of double Rayleigh scattering noise in distributed Raman amplifiers employing higher-order pumping.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Gabriele; Bononi, Alberto

    2009-04-27

    We present a theoretical study of the performance of distributed Raman amplifiers with higher order pumping schemes, focusing in particular on double Rayleigh scattering (DRS) noise. Results show an unexpected significant DRS noise reduction for pumping order higher than third, allowing for an overall performance improvement of carefully designed distributed amplifiers, ensuring a large optical signal-to-noise ratio improvement together with reduced DRS-induced penalties.

  15. The Reduction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise Via a Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, John

    2000-01-01

    Engineering studies for reducing ducted fan engine noise were conducted using the noise prediction code TBIEM3D. To conduct parametric noise reduction calculations, it was necessary to advance certain theoretical and computational aspects of the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) described in and implemented in TBIEM3D. Also, enhancements and upgrades to TBIEM3D were made for facilitating the code's use in this research and by the aeroacoustics engineering community.

  16. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-08-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  17. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  18. Fluorescence microscopy image noise reduction using a stochastically-connected random field model

    PubMed Central

    Haider, S. A.; Cameron, A.; Siva, P.; Lui, D.; Shafiee, M. J.; Boroomand, A.; Haider, N.; Wong, A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an essential part of a biologist’s toolkit, allowing assaying of many parameters like subcellular localization of proteins, changes in cytoskeletal dynamics, protein-protein interactions, and the concentration of specific cellular ions. A fundamental challenge with using fluorescence microscopy is the presence of noise. This study introduces a novel approach to reducing noise in fluorescence microscopy images. The noise reduction problem is posed as a Maximum A Posteriori estimation problem, and solved using a novel random field model called stochastically-connected random field (SRF), which combines random graph and field theory. Experimental results using synthetic and real fluorescence microscopy data show the proposed approach achieving strong noise reduction performance when compared to several other noise reduction algorithms, using quantitative metrics. The proposed SRF approach was able to achieve strong performance in terms of signal-to-noise ratio in the synthetic results, high signal to noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio in the real fluorescence microscopy data results, and was able to maintain cell structure and subtle details while reducing background and intra-cellular noise. PMID:26884148

  19. Reduction of Classroom Noise Levels Using Group Contingencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Brandon M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Eubanks, Sean L.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants…

  20. Phase noise reduction in semiconductor lasers by optical negative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Konosuke; Yokota, Nobuhide

    2016-04-01

    Phase noise of a single mode semiconductor laser is reduced drastically by introducing a newly proposed optical negative feedback scheme. Proof-of-concept experiment confirms that the spectral linewidth of a semiconductor laser can be reduced to 1/1,000 successfully by applying the scheme.

  1. Effective Jet Properties for the Prediction of Turbulent Mixing Noise Reduction by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Lonergan, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional control volume formulation is developed for the determination of jet mixing noise reduction due to water injection. The analysis starts from the conservation of mass, momentum and energy for the control volume, and introduces the concept of effective jet parameters (jet temperature, jet velocity and jet Mach number). It is shown that the water to jet mass flow rate ratio is an important parameter characterizing the jet noise reduction on account of gas-to-droplet momentum and heat transfer. Two independent dimensionless invariant groups are postulated, and provide the necessary relations for the droplet size and droplet Reynolds number. Results are presented illustrating the effect of mass flow rate ratio on the jet mixing noise reduction for a range of jet Mach number and jet Reynolds number. Predictions from the model show satisfactory comparison with available test data on supersonic jets. The results suggest that significant noise reductions can be achieved at increased flow rate ratios.

  2. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  3. AST Critical Propulsion and Noise Reduction Technologies for Future Commercial Subsonic Engines: Separate-Flow Exhaust System Noise Reduction Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Hoff, G. E.; Barter, J. W.; Martens, S.; Gliebe, P. R.; Mengle, V.; Dalton, W. N.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) and Allison Engine Company (AEC) on NASA Contract NAS3-27720 AoI 14.3. The objective of this contract was to generate quality jet noise acoustic data for separate-flow nozzle models and to design and verify new jet-noise-reduction concepts over a range of simulated engine cycles and flight conditions. Five baseline axisymmetric separate-flow nozzle models having bypass ratios of five and eight with internal and external plugs and 11 different mixing-enhancer model nozzles (including chevrons, vortex-generator doublets, and a tongue mixer) were designed and tested in model scale. Using available core and fan nozzle hardware in various combinations, 28 GEAE/AEC separate-flow nozzle/mixing-enhancer configurations were acoustically evaluated in the NASA Glenn Research Center Aeroacoustic and Propulsion Laboratory. This report describes model nozzle features, facility and data acquisition/reduction procedures, the test matrix, and measured acoustic data analyses. A number of tested core and fan mixing enhancer devices and combinations of devices gave significant jet noise reduction relative to separate-flow baseline nozzles. Inward-flip and alternating-flip core chevrons combined with a straight-chevron fan nozzle exceeded the NASA stretch goal of 3 EPNdB jet noise reduction at typical sideline certification conditions.

  4. Evaluation of the sparse coding shrinkage noise reduction algorithm in normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jinqiu; Hu, Hongmei; Zheng, Chengshi; Li, Guoping; Lutman, Mark E; Bleeck, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Although there are numerous single-channel noise reduction strategies to improve speech perception in noise, most of them improve speech quality but do not improve speech intelligibility, in circumstances where the noise and speech have similar frequency spectra. Current exceptions that may improve speech intelligibility are those that require a priori knowledge of the speech or noise statistics, which limits practical application. Hearing impaired (HI) listeners suffer more in speech intelligibility than normal hearing listeners (NH) in the same noisy environment, so developing better single-channel noise reduction algorithms for HI listeners is justified. Our model-based "sparse coding shrinkage" (SCS) algorithm extracts key speech information in noisy speech. We evaluate it by comparison with a state-of-the-art Wiener filtering approach using speech intelligibility tests with NH and HI listeners. The model-based SCS algorithm relies only on statistical signal information without prior information. Results show that the SCS algorithm improves speech intelligibility in stationary noise and is comparable to the Wiener filtering algorithm. Both algorithms improve intelligibility for HI listeners but not for NH listeners. Improvement is less in fluctuating (babble) noise than in stationary noise. Both noise reduction algorithms perform better at higher input signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) where HI listeners can benefit but where NH listeners have already reached ceiling performance. The difference between NH and HI subjects in intelligibility gain depends fundamentally on the input SNR rather than the hearing loss level. We conclude that HI listeners need different signal processing algorithms from NH subjects and that the SCS algorithm offers a promising alternative to Wiener filtering. Performance of all noise reduction algorithms is likely to vary according to extent of hearing loss and algorithms that show little benefit for listeners with moderate hearing loss may

  5. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  6. Long-term effects of noise reduction measures on noise annoyance and sleep disturbance: the Norwegian facade insulation study.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Astrid H; Klæboe, Ronny; Aasvang, Gunn Marit

    2013-06-01

    The Norwegian facade insulation study includes one pre-intervention and two post-intervention surveys. The facade-insulating measures reduced indoor noise levels by 7 dB on average. Before the intervention, 43% of the respondents were highly annoyed by noise. Half a year after the intervention, the proportion of respondents who were highly annoyed by road traffic noise had been significantly reduced to 15%. The second post-intervention study (2 yr after the first post-intervention study) showed that the proportion of highly annoyed respondents had not changed since the first post-intervention study. The reduction in the respondents' self-reported sleep disturbances (due to traffic noise) also remained relatively stable from the first to the second post-intervention study. In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in annoyance between the pre-intervention and the two post-intervention studies. Previous studies of traffic changes have reported that people "overreact" to noise changes. This study indicated that when considering a receiver measure, such as facade insulation, the effect of reducing indoor noise levels could be predicted from exposure-response curves based on previous studies. Thus no evidence of an "overreaction" was found. PMID:23742346

  7. Improving word recognition in noise among hearing-impaired subjects with a single-channel cochlear noise-reduction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fink, Nir; Furst, Miriam; Muchnik, Chava

    2012-09-01

    A common complaint of the hearing impaired is the inability to understand speech in noisy environments even with their hearing assistive devices. Only a few single-channel algorithms have significantly improved speech intelligibility in noise for hearing-impaired listeners. The current study introduces a cochlear noise reduction algorithm. It is based on a cochlear representation of acoustic signals and real-time derivation of a binary speech mask. The contribution of the algorithm for enhancing word recognition in noise was evaluated on a group of 42 normal-hearing subjects, 35 hearing-aid users, 8 cochlear implant recipients, and 14 participants with bimodal devices. Recognition scores of Hebrew monosyllabic words embedded in Gaussian noise at several signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were obtained with processed and unprocessed signals. The algorithm was not effective among the normal-hearing participants. However, it yielded a significant improvement in some of the hearing-impaired subjects under different listening conditions. Its most impressive benefit appeared among cochlear implant recipients. More than 20% improvement in recognition score of noisy words was obtained by 12, 16, and 26 hearing-impaired at SNR of 30, 24, and 18 dB, respectively. The algorithm has a potential to improve speech intelligibility in background noise, yet further research is required to improve its performances.

  8. Power Mapping and Noise Reduction for Financial Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, P.-J.; Oeberg, A.; Guhr, T.

    2005-09-01

    The spectral properties of financial correlation matrices can show features known from completely random matrices. A major reason is noise originating from the finite lengths of the financial time series used to compute the correlation matrix elements. In recent years, various methods have been proposed to reduce this noise, i.e. to clean the correlation matrices. This is of direct practical relevance for risk management in portfolio optimization. In this contribution, we discuss in detail the power mapping, a new shrinkage method. We show that the relevant parameter is, to a certain extent, self-determined. Due to the ``chirality'' and the normalization of the correlation matrix, the optimal shrinkage parameter is fixed. We apply the power mapping and the well-known filtering method to market data and compare them by optimizing stock portfolios. We address the rôle of constraints by excluding short selling in the optimization.

  9. Development of an acoustic actuator for launch vehicle noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Benjamin K; Lane, Steven A; Gussy, Joel; Griffin, Steve; Farinholt, Kevin M

    2002-01-01

    In many active noise control applications, it is necessary that acoustic actuators be mounted in small enclosures due to volume constraints and in order to remain unobtrusive. However, the air spring of the enclosure is detrimental to the low-frequency performance of the actuator. For launch vehicle noise control applications, mass and volume constraints are very limiting, but the low-frequency performance of the actuator is critical. This work presents a novel approach that uses a nonlinear buckling suspension system and partial evacuation of the air within the enclosure to yield a compact, sealed acoustic driver that exhibits a very low natural frequency. Linear models of the device are presented and numerical simulations are given to illustrate the advantages of this design concept. An experimental prototype was built and measurements indicate that this design can significantly improve the low-frequency response of compact acoustic actuators.

  10. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  11. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  12. Pressure pulse detection apparatus incorporating noise reduction feature

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1980-09-23

    An improved apparatus is disclosed for use in a measuring while drilling apparatus which forms a pressure pulse promulgated from a downhole location upwardly through the drill string and column of mud therein. This apparatus includes a mud line section adapted to flow drilling mud in the mud flow line through an axial passage therein. The apparatus includes an encircling bladder which receives hydraulic oil under pressure to inflate to choke the passage. A pitot tube is focused downstream and thus does not intercept the mud flow from the pump and the noise which is created by pump operation. Mud pressure variations directed upstream from the measuring while drilling apparatus, however, are directed into the pitot tube. These pressure variations are coupled to a pressure signal transducer which forms an output signal of some type which is recorded. Pump noise is nulled to a minimum.

  13. Landing Gear Door Liners for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Van De Ven, Thomas (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A landing gear door for retractable landing gear of aircraft includes an acoustic liner. The acoustic liner includes one or more internal cavities or chambers having one or more openings that inhibit the generation of sound at the surface and/or absorb sound generated during operation of the aircraft. The landing gear door may include a plurality of internal chambers having different geometries to thereby absorb broadband noise.

  14. High-frequency jet nozzle actuators for noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher L.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Butler, George W.

    2003-08-01

    Rules governing airport noise levels are becoming more restrictive and will soon affect the operation of commercial air traffic. Sound produced by jet engine exhaust, particularly during takeoff, is a major contributor to the community noise problem. The noise spectrum is broadband in character and is produced by turbulent mixing of primary, secondary, and ambient streams of the jet engine exhaust. As a potential approach to controlling the noise levels, piezoelectric bimorph actuators have been tailored to enhance the mixing of a single jet with its quiescent environment. The actuators are located at the edge of the nozzle and protrude into the exhaust stream. Several actuator configurations were considered to target two excitation frequencies, 250 Hz and 900 Hz, closely coupled to the naturally unstable frequencies of the mixing process. The piezoelectric actuators were constructed of 10 mil thick d31 poled wafer PZT-5A material bonded to either 10 or 20 mil thick spring steel substrates. Linear analytical beam models and NASTRAN finite element models were used to predict and assess the dynamic performance of the actuators. Experimental mechanical and electrical performance measurements were used to validate the models. A 3 inch diameter nozzle was fitted with actuators and tested in the Boeing Quiet Air Facility with the jet velocity varied from 50 to 1000 ft/s. Performance was evaluated using near-field and far-field acoustic data, flow visualization, and actuator health data. The overall sound pressure level produced from the 3 inch diameter jet illustrates the effect of both static and active actuators.

  15. Algorithm for image registration and clutter and jitter noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, K.L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents an analytical, computational method whereby two-dimensional images of an optical source represented in terms of a set of detector array signals can be registered with respect to a reference set of detector array signals. The detector image is recovered from the detector array signals and represented over a local region by a fourth order, two-dimensional taylor series. This local detector image can then be registered by a general linear transformation with respect to a reference detector image. The detector signal in the reference frame is reconstructed by integrating this detector image over the respective reference pixel. For cases in which the general linear transformation is uncertain by up to plus-or-minus two pixels, the general linear transformation can be determined by least squares fitting the detector image to the reference detector image. This registration process reduces clutter and jitter noise to a level comparable to the electronic noise level of the detector system. Test results with and without electronic noise using an analytical test function are presented.

  16. JT8D-100 turbofan engine, phase 1. [noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The JT8D turbofan engine, widely used in short and medium range transport aircraft, contributes substantially to airport community noise. The jet noise is predominant in the JT8D engine and may be reduced in a modified engine, without loss of thrust, by increasing the airflow to reduce jet velocity. A configuration study evaluated the effects of fan airflow, fan pressure ratio, and bypass ratio on noise, thrust, and fuel comsumption. The cycle selected for the modified engine was based upon an increased diameter, single-stage fan and two additional core engine compressor stages, which replace the existing two-stage fan. Modifications were also made to the low pressure turbine to provide the increased torque required by the larger diameter fan. The resultant JT8D-100 engine models have the following characteristics at take-off thrust, compared to the current JT8D engine: Airflow and bypass ratio are increased, and fan pressure ratio and engine speed are reduced. The resultant engine is also longer, larger in diameter, and heavier than the JT8D base model, but these latter changes are compensated by the increased thrust and decreased fuel comsumption of the modified engine, thus providing the capability for maintaining the performance of the current JT8D-powered aircraft.

  17. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  18. On the role of the radiation directivity in noise reduction for STOL aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruschka, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation characteristics of distributed randomly fluctuating acoustic sources when shielded by finite surfaces are discussed briefly. A number of model tests using loudspeakers as artificial noise sources with a given broadband power density spectrum are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of reducing the radiated noise intensity in certain directions due to shielding. In the lateral direction of the source array noise reductions of 12 dB are observed with relatively small shields. The same shields reduce the backward radiation by approximately 20 dB. With the results obtained in these acoustic model tests the potentials of jet noise reduction of jet flap propulsion systems applicable in future STOL aircraft are discussed. The jet flap configuration as a complex aerodynamic noise source is described briefly.

  19. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. INVITED PAPER: Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-02-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA_ov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation.

  1. Reduction of JT8D powered aircraft noise by engine refanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, L. E.; Medeiros, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    The technical feasibility is described of substantially reducing the noise levels of existing JT8D powered aircraft by retrofitting the existing fleet with quieter refan engines and new acoustically treated nacelles. No major technical problems exist that preclude the development and installation of refanned engines on aircraft currently powered by the JT8D engine. The refan concept is technically feasible and provides calculated noise reductions of from 7 to 8 EPNdb for the B727-200 aircraft and from 10 to 12 EPNdb for the DC-9-32 aircraft at the FAR Part 36 measuring stations. These noise levels are lower than both the FAR Part 36 noise standards and the noise levels of the wide-body DC-10-10. Corresponding reductions in the 90 EPNdb footprint area are estimated to vary from about 70 percent for the DC-9 to about 80 percent for the B727.

  2. Blade-Mounted Flap Control for BVI Noise Reduction Proof-of-Concept Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Seth; Hassan, Ahmed; Straub, Friedrich; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a wind tunnel test of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (MDHS) Active Flap Model Rotor at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The test demonstrated that BVI noise reductions and vibration reductions were possible with the use of an active flap. Aerodynamic results supported the acoustic data trends, showing a reduction in the strength of the tip vortex with the deflection of the flap. Acoustic results showed that the flap deployment, depending on the peak deflection angle and azimuthal shift in its deployment schedule, can produce BVI noise reductions as much as 6 dB on the advancing and retreating sides. The noise reduction was accompanied by an increase in low frequency harmonic noise and high frequency broadband noise. A brief assessment of the effect of the flap on vibration showed that significant reductions were possible. The greatest vibration reductions (as much as 76%) were found in the four per rev pitching moment at the hub. Performance improvement cam results were inconclusive, as the improvements were predicted to be smaller than the resolution of the rotor balance.

  3. In situ calibration of atmospheric-infrasound sensors including the effects of wind-noise-reduction pipe systems.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Thomas B

    2011-09-01

    A worldwide network of more than 40 infrasound monitoring stations has been established as part of the effort to ensure compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Each station has four to eight individual infrasound elements in a kilometer-scale array for detection and bearing determination of acoustic events. The frequency range of interest covers a three-decade range-roughly from 0.01 to 10 Hz. A typical infrasound array element consists of a receiving transducer connected to a multiple-inlet pipe network to average spatially over the short-wavelength turbulence-associated "wind noise." Although the frequency response of the transducer itself may be known, the wind-noise reduction system modifies that response. In order to understand the system's impact on detection and identification of acoustical events, the overall frequency response must be determined. This paper describes a technique for measuring the absolute magnitude and phase of the frequency response of an infrasound element including the wind-noise-reduction piping by comparison calibration using ambient noise and a reference-microphone system. Measured coherence between the reference and the infrasound element and the consistency between the magnitude and the phase provide quality checks on the process. PMID:21895058

  4. In situ calibration of atmospheric-infrasound sensors including the effects of wind-noise-reduction pipe systems.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Thomas B

    2011-09-01

    A worldwide network of more than 40 infrasound monitoring stations has been established as part of the effort to ensure compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Each station has four to eight individual infrasound elements in a kilometer-scale array for detection and bearing determination of acoustic events. The frequency range of interest covers a three-decade range-roughly from 0.01 to 10 Hz. A typical infrasound array element consists of a receiving transducer connected to a multiple-inlet pipe network to average spatially over the short-wavelength turbulence-associated "wind noise." Although the frequency response of the transducer itself may be known, the wind-noise reduction system modifies that response. In order to understand the system's impact on detection and identification of acoustical events, the overall frequency response must be determined. This paper describes a technique for measuring the absolute magnitude and phase of the frequency response of an infrasound element including the wind-noise-reduction piping by comparison calibration using ambient noise and a reference-microphone system. Measured coherence between the reference and the infrasound element and the consistency between the magnitude and the phase provide quality checks on the process.

  5. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    , meant to achieve lag motion amplitudes up to 45 degrees. In order to reduce the required actuation force, the blade hinges were moved to 40% of the blade radius to increase the rotating lag frequency to approximately 1/rev. The blade hinges were redesigned to produce a flap-lag coupling so the large flapwise aerodynamic loads could be exploited to actuate the blades in the lag direction. A wind tunnel test of this rotor concept revealed actuation and blade motion scheduling problems. The project was eventually discontinued due to these problems and high blade stresses. Around the same time, at Boelkow in Germany, a similar lead-lag rotor program was conducted under the leadership of Hans Derschmidt. Here, too, the blade hinges were moved outboard to 34% radius to reduce the actuation loads. The main difference between this and the United Aircraft program was the use of a mechanical actuation scheme with maximum lead-lag motions of 400. This program was also discontinued for unclear reasons. The present study is directed toward conducting a comprehensive analytical examination to evaluate the effectiveness of controlled lead-lag motions in reducing vibratory hub loads and increasing maximum flight speed. Since both previous studies on this subject were purely experimental, only a limited data set and physical understanding of the problem was obtained. With the currently available analytical models and computational resources, the present effort is geared toward developing an in-depth physical understanding of the precise underlying mechanisms by which vibration reduction may be achieved. Additionally, in recognition of the fact that large amplitude lead-lag motions would - (i) be difficult to implement, and (ii) produce very large blade stresses; the present study examines the potential of only moderate-to-small lead-lag motions for reduction of vibratory hub loads. Using such an approach, the emphasis is not on eliminating the periodic variations in tangential velocity

  6. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; May, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    . Demonstrations and/or risk reduction efforts were required to be related to a proposed booster concept directly applicable to fielding an advanced booster. This paper will discuss, for the first time publicly, the contract awards and how NASA intends to use the data from these efforts to prepare for the planned advanced booster DDT&E acquisition as the SLS Program moves forward with competitively procured affordable performance enhancements.

  7. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd; Dumbacher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    /or risk reduction efforts were required to be related to a proposed booster concept directly applicable to fielding an Advanced Booster. This paper will discuss, for the first time publicly, the contract awards and how NASA intends to use the data from these efforts to prepare for the planned Advanced Booster DDT&E acquisition as the SLS Program moves forward with competitively procured affordable performance enhancements.

  8. Studies of blade-vortex interaction noise reduction by rotor blade modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    Blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is one of the most objectionable types of helicopter noise. This impulsive blade-slap noise can be particularly intense during low-speed landing approach and maneuvers. Over the years, a number of flight and model rotor tests have examined blade tip modification and other blade design changes to reduce this noise. Many times these tests have produced conflicting results. In the present paper, a number of these studies are reviewed in light of the current understanding of the BVI noise problem. Results from one study in particular are used to help establish the noise reduction potential and to shed light on the role of blade design. Current blade studies and some new concepts under development are also described.

  9. On-Chip Switched Parasitic Capacitors of Sleep Blocks for Resonant Supply Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinmyoung; Nakura, Toru; Takata, Hidehiro; Ishibashi, Koichiro; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    Switched parasitic capacitors of sleep blocks with a tri-mode power gating structure are implemented to reduce on-chip resonant supply noise in 1.2V, 65nm standard CMOS process. The tri-mode power gating structure makes it possible to store charge into the parasitic capacitance of the power gated blocks. The proposed method achieves 53.1% and 57.9% noise reduction for wake-up noise and 130MHz periodic supply noise, respectively. It also realizes noise cancelling without discharging time before using parasitic capacitors of sleep blocks, and shows 8.4x boost of the effective capacitance value with 2.1% chip area overhead. The proposed method can save the chip area for reducing resonant supply noise more effectively.

  10. Studies of blade-vortex interaction noise reduction by rotor blade modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.

    Blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is one of the most objectionable types of helicopter noise. This impulsive blade-slap noise can be particularly intense during low-speed landing approach and maneuvers. Over the years, a number of flight and model rotor tests have examined blade tip modification and other blade design changes to reduce this noise. Many times these tests have produced conflicting results. In the present paper, a number of these studies are reviewed in light of the current understanding of the BVI noise problem. Results from one study in particular are used to help establish the noise reduction potential and to shed light on the role of blade design. Current blade studies and some new concepts under development are also described.

  11. Prediction and reduction of aircraft noise in outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Bao N.

    This dissertation investigates the noise due to an en-route aircraft cruising at high altitudes. It offers an improved understanding into the combined effects of atmospheric propagation, ground reflection, and source motion on the impact of en-route aircraft noise. A numerical model has been developed to compute pressure time-histories due to a uniformly moving source above a flat ground surface in the presence of a horizontally stratified atmosphere. For a moving source at high elevations, contributions from a direct and specularly reflected wave are sufficient in predicting the sound field close to the ground. In the absence of wind effects, the predicted sound field from a single overhead flight trajectory can be used to interpolate pressure time histories at all other receiver locations via a simplified ray model for the incoherent sound field. This approach provides an efficient method for generating pressure time histories in a three-dimensional space for noise impact studies. A variety of different noise propagation methods are adapted to a uniformly moving source to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of their predictions. The techniques include: analytical methods, the Fast Field Program (FFP), and asymptotic analysis methods (e.g., ray tracing and more advanced formulations). Source motion effects are introduced via either a retarded time analysis or a Lorentz transform approach depending on the complexity of the problem. The noise spectrum from a single emission frequency, moving source has broadband characteristics. This is a consequence of the Doppler shift which continuously modifies the perceived frequency of the source as it moves relative to a stationary observer on the ground. Thus, the instantaneous wavefronts must be considered in both the frequency dependent ground impedance model and the atmospheric absorption model. It can be shown that the Doppler factor is invariant along each ray path. This gives rise to a path dependent atmospheric

  12. Evaluating the Effort Expended to Understand Speech in Noise Using a Dual-Task Paradigm: The Effects of Providing Visual Speech Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Sarah; Gagne, Jean-Pierre; Alepins, Majolaine; Dubois, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using a dual-task paradigm, 2 experiments (Experiments 1 and 2) were conducted to assess differences in the amount of listening effort expended to understand speech in noise in audiovisual (AV) and audio-only (A-only) modalities. Experiment 1 had equivalent noise levels in both modalities, and Experiment 2 equated speech recognition…

  13. Nature-Inspired Airfoils for Environmental Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suyeong; Kyung, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of environmental engineering and aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present work, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings are conducted by utilizing numerical and computational simulation. The e-AIRS [6] (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) gives a balanced service between computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. This paper presents the wing motions and their aerodynamics with a two dimensional approach to reduce environmental noise during the airflight. Also this paper shows an optimal phase angle, where the thrust is maximized at the position of minimized drag, which occurs when noise is minimized. Aside from the two-dimensional approach, stroke angles and phase angles of the airfoils are set as parameters, to determine which motion yields the best aerodynamic characteristics.

  14. Adaptive Autoregressive Model for Reduction of Noise in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Takalo, Reijo; Hytti, Heli; Ihalainen, Heimo; Sohlberg, Antti

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents improved autoregressive modelling (AR) to reduce noise in SPECT images. An AR filter was applied to prefilter projection images and postfilter ordered subset expectation maximisation (OSEM) reconstruction images (AR-OSEM-AR method). The performance of this method was compared with filtered back projection (FBP) preceded by Butterworth filtering (BW-FBP method) and the OSEM reconstruction method followed by Butterworth filtering (OSEM-BW method). A mathematical cylinder phantom was used for the study. It consisted of hot and cold objects. The tests were performed using three simulated SPECT datasets. Image quality was assessed by means of the percentage contrast resolution (CR%) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread functions of the cylinders. The BW-FBP method showed the highest CR% values and the AR-OSEM-AR method gave the lowest CR% values for cold stacks. In the analysis of hot stacks, the BW-FBP method had higher CR% values than the OSEM-BW method. The BW-FBP method exhibited the lowest FWHM values for cold stacks and the AR-OSEM-AR method for hot stacks. In conclusion, the AR-OSEM-AR method is a feasible way to remove noise from SPECT images. It has good spatial resolution for hot objects.

  15. Noise reduction of video imagery through simple averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorder Bruegge, Richard W.

    1999-02-01

    Examiners in the Special Photographic Unit of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory Division conduct examinations of questioned photographic evidence of all types, including surveillance imagery recorded on film and video tape. A primary type of examination includes side-by- side comparisons, in which unknown objects or people depicted in the questioned images are compared with known objects recovered from suspects or with photographs of suspects themselves. Most imagery received in the SPU for such comparisons originate from time-lapse video or film systems. In such circumstances, the delay between sequential images is so great that standard image summing and/or averaging techniques are useless as a means of improving image detail in questioned subjects or objects without also resorting to processing-intensive pattern reconstruction algorithms. Occasionally, however, the receipt of real-time video imagery will include a questioned object at rest. In such cases, it is possible to use relatively simple image averaging techniques as a means of reducing transient noise in the images, without further compromising the already-poor resolution inherent in most video surveillance images. This paper presents an example of one such case in which multiple images were averaged to reduce the transient noise to a sufficient degree to permit the positive identification of a vehicle based upon the presence of scrape marks and dents on the side of the vehicle.

  16. Wavelet-based pavement image compression and noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Peisen S.; Chiang, Fu-Pen

    2005-08-01

    For any automated distress inspection system, typically a huge number of pavement images are collected. Use of an appropriate image compression algorithm can save disk space, reduce the saving time, increase the inspection distance, and increase the processing speed. In this research, a modified EZW (Embedded Zero-tree Wavelet) coding method, which is an improved version of the widely used EZW coding method, is proposed. This method, unlike the two-pass approach used in the original EZW method, uses only one pass to encode both the coordinates and magnitudes of wavelet coefficients. An adaptive arithmetic encoding method is also implemented to encode four symbols assigned by the modified EZW into binary bits. By applying a thresholding technique to terminate the coding process, the modified EZW coding method can compress the image and reduce noise simultaneously. The new method is much simpler and faster. Experimental results also show that the compression ratio was increased one and one-half times compared to the EZW coding method. The compressed and de-noised data can be used to reconstruct wavelet coefficients for off-line pavement image processing such as distress classification and quantification.

  17. Comparison of speech intelligibility in cockpit noise using SPH-4 flight helmet with and without active noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jeffrey W.; Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) is a new technology which can reduce the level of aircraft cockpit noise that reaches the pilot's ear while simultaneously improving the signal to noise ratio for voice communications and other information bearing sound signals in the cockpit. A miniature, ear-cup mounted ANR system was tested to determine whether speech intelligibility is better for helicopter pilots using ANR compared to a control condition of ANR turned off. Two signal to noise ratios (S/N), representative of actual cockpit conditions, were used for the ratio of the speech to cockpit noise sound pressure levels. Speech intelligibility was significantly better with ANR compared to no ANR for both S/N conditions. Variability of speech intelligibility among pilots was also significantly less with ANR. When the stock helmet was used with ANR turned off, the average PB Word speech intelligibility score was below the Normally Acceptable level. In comparison, it was above that level with ANR on in both S/N levels.

  18. Noise reduction evaluation of grids in a supersonic air stream with application to Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Manning, J. C.; Nystrom, P.; Pao, S. P.

    1977-01-01

    Near field acoustic measurements were obtained for a model supersonic air jet perturbed by a screen. Noise reduction potential in the vicinity of the space shuttle vehicle during ground launch when the rocket exhaust flow is perturbed by a grid was determined. Both 10 and 12 mesh screens were utilized for this experiment, and each exhibited a noise reduction only at very low frequencies in the near field forward arc. A power spectrum analysis revealed that a modest reduction of from 3 to 5 decibels exists below a Strouhal number S sub t = 0.11. Above S sub t = 0.11 screen harmonics increased the observed sound pressure level. The favorable noise reductions obtained with screens for S sub t 0.11 may be of substantial interest for the space shuttle at ground launch.

  19. Noise Reduction Techniques and Scaling Effects towards Photon Counting CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Boukhayma, Assim; Peizerat, Arnaud; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the read noise in CMOS image sensors (CISs) based on four-transistors (4T) pixels, column-level amplification and correlated multiple sampling. Starting from the input-referred noise analytical formula, process level optimizations, device choices and circuit techniques at the pixel and column level of the readout chain are derived and discussed. The noise reduction techniques that can be implemented at the column and pixel level are verified by transient noise simulations, measurement and results from recently-published low noise CIS. We show how recently-reported process refinement, leading to the reduction of the sense node capacitance, can be combined with an optimal in-pixel source follower design to reach a sub-0.3erms- read noise at room temperature. This paper also discusses the impact of technology scaling on the CIS read noise. It shows how designers can take advantage of scaling and how the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) transistor gate leakage tunneling current appears as a challenging limitation. For this purpose, both simulation results of the gate leakage current and 1/f noise data reported from different foundries and technology nodes are used.

  20. Noise reduction by the application of an air-bubble curtain in offshore pile driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is a by-product of marine industrial operations. In particular, the noise generated when a foundation pile is driven into the soil with an impact hammer is considered to be harmful for the aquatic species. In an attempt to reduce the ecological footprint, several noise mitigation techniques have been investigated. Among the various solutions proposed, the air-bubble curtain is often applied due to its efficacy in noise reduction. In this paper, a model is proposed for the investigation of the sound reduction during marine piling when an air-bubble curtain is placed around the pile. The model consists of the pile, the surrounding water and soil media, and the air-bubble curtain which is positioned at a certain distance from the pile surface. The solution approach is semi-analytical and is based on the dynamic sub-structuring technique and the modal decomposition method. Two main results of the paper can be distinguished. First, a new model is proposed that can be used for predictions of the noise levels in a computationally efficient manner. Second, an analysis is presented of the principal mechanisms that are responsible for the noise reduction due to the application of the air-bubble curtain in marine piling. The understanding of these mechanisms turns to be crucial for the exploitation of the maximum efficiency of the system. It is shown that the principal mechanism of noise reduction depends strongly on the frequency content of the radiated sound and the characteristics of the bubbly medium. For piles of large diameter which radiate most of the acoustic energy at relatively low frequencies, the noise reduction is mainly attributed to the mismatch of the acoustic impedances between the seawater and the bubbly layer. On the contrary, for smaller piles and when the radiated acoustic energy is concentrated at frequencies close to, or higher than, the resonance frequency of the air bubbles, the sound absorption within the bubbly layer

  1. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  2. Earthquake Seismic Risk Reduction in Ohio: ODNR's Efforts to Address Issues with Natural and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing concerns regarding both natural and induced seismicity in Ohio, ODNR (Ohio Department of Natural Resources) initial efforts on seismic risk reduction paved way to various changes and improvement to tackle several major issues. For natural earthquakes, regional seismicity indicates a NE-SW structure in the northern portion of the area associated with a number of moderate historical earthquakes but no active trace identified. On the other hand, earthquakes of 1986 and 2011 are most probably incidents of induced seismicity that trigger more public uproar against disposal of regulated waste waters through injections. ODNR, in efforts to adapt with increasing need to regulate all operations related to both the Utica and Marcellus shale play within the state, had recently strengthen itself both through additional human resources and improved infrastructure. Tougher regulations and additional field tests were required that took effect immediately when a M4 earthquake was associated with the operations of an injection well. Public meetings were undertaken focused on educating many local inhabitants related to oil and gas operations, hydraulic fracturing, injection wells, and seismicity. Trainings for new and existing staff were regularly done especially for field inspection, data management and technology advancements. Considering the existing seismic stations that are few and distant related to sites of the injection wells, additional seismic stations were installed to gather baseline data and monitor for earthquakes within the injection area(s). Furthermore, to assess if the sites of the injection wells are safe from active structures, initial geomorphic and structural analyses indicated possible active faults in the northern portion of state oriented NE-SW. With the above-mentioned recent changes, ODNR had made a significant leap not only in the improvement of its principal regulatory role in the state for oil and gas operations but also in its

  3. Burst noise reduction of image by decimation and adaptive weighted median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Fumitaka; Meguro, Mitsuhiko; Hamada, Nozomu

    2000-12-01

    The removal of noise in image is one of the important issues, and useful as a preprocessing for edge detection, motion estimation and so on. Recently, many studies on the nonlinear digital filter for impulsive noise reduction have been reported. The median filter, the representative of the nonlinear filters, is very effective for removing impulsive noise and preserving sharp edge. In some cases, burst (i.e., successive) impulsive noise is added to image, and this type of noise is difficult to remove by using the median filter. In this paper, we propose an Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter with Decimation (AWM-D filter) for burst noise reduction. This method can also be applied to recover large destructive regions, such as blotch and scratch. The proposed filter is an extension of the Decimated Median (DM) filter, which is useful for reducing successive impulsive noise. The DM filter can split long impulsive noise sequences into short ones, and remove burst noise in spite of the short filter window. Nevertheless, the DM filter also has two disadvantages. One is that the signals without added noise is unnecessary filtered. The other is that the position information in the window is not considered in the weight determinative process, as common in the median type filter. To improve detail-preserving property of the DM filter, we use the noise detection procedure and the AWM-D filter, which can be tuned by Least Mean Absolute (LMA) algorithm. The AWM-D filter preserves details more precisely than the median-type filter, because the AWM-D filter has the weights that can control the filter output. Through some simulations, the higher performance of the proposed filter is shown compared with the simple median, the WM filter, and the DM filter.

  4. Assessment of Soft Vane and Metal Foam Engine Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hughes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative fan-noise reduction concepts developed by NASA are presented - soft vanes and over-the-rotor metal foam liners. Design methodologies are described for each concept. Soft vanes are outlet guide vanes with internal, resonant chambers that communicate with the exterior aeroacoustic environment via a porous surface. They provide acoustic absorption via viscous losses generated by interaction of unsteady flows with the internal solid structure. Over-the-rotor metal foam liners installed at or near the fan rotor axial plane provide rotor noise absorption. Both concepts also provide pressure-release surfaces that potentially inhibit noise generation. Several configurations for both concepts are evaluated with a normal incidence tube, and the results are used to guide designs for implementation in two NASA fan rigs. For soft vanes, approximately 1 to 2 dB of broadband inlet and aft-radiated fan noise reduction is achieved. For over-the-rotor metal foam liners, up to 3 dB of fan noise reduction is measured in the low-speed fan rig, but minimal reduction is measured in the high-speed fan rig. These metal foam liner results are compared with a static engine test, in which inlet sound power level reductions up to 5 dB were measured. Brief plans for further development are also provided.

  5. High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction and Installation Effects Including Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Czech, Michael J.; Doty, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects of a separate flow jet nozzle with a Hybrid Wing Body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. Prior understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness was extended to a bypass ratio ten application as a function of nozzle configuration, chevron type, axial spacing, and installation effects from additional airframe components. Chevron types included fan chevrons that are uniform circumferentially around the fan nozzle and T-fan type chevrons that are asymmetrical circumferentially. In isolated testing without a pylon, uniform chevrons compared to T-fan chevrons showed slightly more low frequency reduction offset by more high frequency increase. Phased array localization shows that at this bypass ratio chevrons still move peak jet noise source locations upstream but not to nearly the extent, as a function of frequency, as for lower bypass ratio jets. For baseline nozzles without chevrons, the basic pylon effect has been greatly reduced compared to that seen for lower bypass ratio jets. Compared to Tfan chevrons without a pylon, the combination with a standard pylon results in more high frequency noise increase and an overall higher noise level. Shielded by an airframe surface 2.17 fan diameters from nozzle to airframe trailing edge, the T-fan chevron nozzle can produce reductions in jet noise of as much as 8 dB at high frequencies and upstream angles. Noise reduction from shielding decreases with decreasing frequency and with increasing angle from the jet inlet. Beyond an angle of 130 degrees there is almost no noise reduction from shielding. Increasing chevron immersion more than what is already an aggressive design is not advantageous for noise reduction. The addition of airframe control surfaces, including vertical stabilizers and elevon deflection, showed only a small overall impact. Based on the test results, the best

  6. Implementation of activity-based costing (ABC) to drive cost reduction efforts in a semiconductor manufacturing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Hussein; Bol, Igor I.; Lora, J.; Chowdhry, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a case study on the implementation of ABC to calculate the cost per wafer and to drive cost reduction efforts for a new IC product line. The cost reduction activities were conducted through the efforts of 11 cross-functional teams which included members of the finance, purchasing, technology development, process engineering, equipment engineering, production control, and facility groups. The activities of these cross functional teams were coordinated by a cost council. It will be shown that these activities have resulted in a 57% reduction in the wafer manufacturing cost of the new product line. Factors contributed to successful implementation of an ABC management system are discussed.

  7. Cascaded systems analysis of noise reduction algorithms in dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2008-02-15

    An important aspect of dual-energy (DE) x-ray image decomposition is the incorporation of noise reduction techniques to mitigate the amplification of quantum noise. This article extends cascaded systems analysis of imaging performance to DE imaging systems incorporating linear noise reduction algorithms. A general analytical formulation of linear DE decomposition is derived, with weighted log subtraction and several previously reported noise reduction algorithms emerging as special cases. The DE image noise-power spectrum (NPS) and modulation transfer function (MTF) demonstrate that noise reduction algorithms impart significant, nontrivial effects on the spatial-frequency-dependent transfer characteristics which do not cancel out of the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Theoretical predictions were validated in comparison to the measured NPS and MTF. The resulting NEQ was integrated with spatial-frequency-dependent task functions to yield the detectability index, d{sup '}, for evaluation of DE imaging performance using different decomposition algorithms. For a 3 mm lung nodule detection task, the detectability index varied from d{sup '}<1 (i.e., nodule barely visible) in the absence of noise reduction to d{sup '}>2.5 (i.e., nodule clearly visible) for ''anti-correlated noise reduction'' (ACNR) or ''simple-smoothing of the high-energy image'' (SSH) algorithms applied to soft-tissue or bone-only decompositions, respectively. Optimal dose allocation (A{sup *}, the fraction of total dose delivered in the low-energy projection) was also found to depend on the choice of noise reduction technique. At fixed total dose, multi-function optimization suggested a significant increase in optimal dose allocation from A{sup *}=0.32 for conventional log subtraction to A{sup *}=0.79 for ACNR and SSH in soft-tissue and bone-only decompositions, respectively. Cascaded systems analysis extended to the general formulation of DE image decomposition provided an objective means of

  8. An adaptive way for improving noise reduction using local geometric projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontitsis, Alexandros; Bountis, Tassos; Pagge, Jenny

    2004-03-01

    We propose an adaptive way to improve noise reduction by local geometric projection. From the neighborhood of each candidate point in phase space, we identify the best subspace that the point will be orthogonally projected to. The signal subspace is formed by the most significant eigendirections of the neighborhood, while the less significant ones define the noise subspace. We provide a simple criterion to separate the most significant eigendirections from the less significant ones. This criterion is based on the maximum logarithmic difference between the neighborhood eigendirection lengths, and the assumption that there is at least one eigendirection that corresponds to the noise subspace. In this way, we take into account the special characteristics of each neighborhood and introduce a more successful noise reduction technique. Results are presented for a chaotic time series of the Hénon map and Ikeda map, as well as on the Nasdaq Composite index.

  9. Reduction of phase noise in nanowire spin orbit torque oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Schneider, Tobias; Smith, Andrew; Duan, Zheng; Youngblood, Brian; Lenz, Kilian; Lindner, Jürgen; Slavin, Andrei N.; Krivorotov, Ilya N.

    2015-01-01

    Spin torque oscillators (STOs) are compact, tunable sources of microwave radiation that serve as a test bed for studies of nonlinear magnetization dynamics at the nanometer length scale. The spin torque in an STO can be created by spin-orbit interaction, but low spectral purity of the microwave signals generated by spin orbit torque oscillators hinders practical applications of these magnetic nanodevices. Here we demonstrate a method for decreasing the phase noise of spin orbit torque oscillators based on Pt/Ni80Fe20 nanowires. We experimentally demonstrate that tapering of the nanowire, which serves as the STO active region, significantly decreases the spectral linewidth of the generated signal. We explain the observed linewidth narrowing in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau auto-oscillator model. The model reveals that spatial non-uniformity of the spin current density in the tapered nanowire geometry hinders the excitation of higher order spin-wave modes, thus stabilizing the single-mode generation regime. This non-uniformity also generates a restoring force acting on the excited self-oscillatory mode, which reduces thermal fluctuations of the mode spatial position along the wire. Both these effects improve the STO spectral purity. PMID:26592432

  10. ERA's Open Rotor Studies Including Shielding for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale; Thomas, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The Open Rotor is a modern version of the UnDucted Fan (UDF) that was flight tested in the late 1980's through a partnership between NASA and General Electric (GE). Tests were conducted in the 9' x 15' Low Speed Wind Tunnel and the 8' x 6' Supersonic Wind Tunnel starting in late 2009 and completed in early 2012. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained for takeoff, approach and cruise simulations. GE was the primary partner, but other organizations were involved such as Boeing and Airbus who provided additional hardware for fuselage simulations. This test campaign provided the acoustic and performance characteristics for modern open rotor blades designs." NASA and GE conducted joint systems analysis to evaluate how well new blade designs would perform on a B737 class aircraft, and compared the results to an advanced higher bypass ratio turbofan." Acoustic shielding experiments were performed at NASA GRC and Boeing LSAF facilities to provide data for noise estimates of unconventional aircraft configurations with Open Rotor propulsion systems." The work was sponsored by NASA's aeronautics programs, including the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) projects."

  11. New Fan Engine Noise-Reduction Concept Using Trailing Edge Blowing of Fan Blades Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2002-01-01

    A major source of noise in commercial turbofan engines is the interaction of the fan blade wakes with the fan exit vanes (stators). These wakes can be greatly reduced by filling them with air blown out of the blade trailing edge. Extensive testing of this concept has demonstrated significant noise reductions. These tests were conducted on a low-speed, 4- ft-diameter fan using hollow blades at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL).

  12. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  13. Cognitive performance and perceived effort in speech processing tasks: effects of different noise backgrounds in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects.

    PubMed

    Larsby, Birgitta; Hällgren, Mathias; Lyxell, Björn; Arlinger, Stig

    2005-03-01

    Cognitive tests of speech understanding were administered (presented as text, or in auditory or audiovisual modality) and perceived effort was rated. This was done in four background conditions: in silence, and in three types of noise (S/N=+10 dB) varying in temporal structure and meaningfulness. Four groups of 12 subjects each (young/elderly with normal hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment) participated. The presence of noise had a negative effect on accuracy and speed of performance in the speech processing tasks, and resulted in higher scores of perceived effort, even when the stimuli were presented as text. Differences in performance between noise conditions existed. In the subjective scores, the noise with temporal variations, but without meaningful content, was the most disruptive of the three noise conditions. In the objective scores the hearing-impaired subjects showed poorer results in noise with temporal variations. The elderly subjects were more distracted by noise with temporal variations, and especially by noise with meaningful content. In noise, all subjects, particularly those with impaired hearing, were more dependent upon visual cues than in the quiet condition.

  14. Noise and speckle reduction in synthetic aperture radar imagery by nonparametric Wiener filtering.

    PubMed

    Caprari, R S; Goh, A S; Moffatt, E K

    2000-12-10

    We present a Wiener filter that is especially suitable for speckle and noise reduction in multilook synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The proposed filter is nonparametric, not being based on parametrized analytical models of signal statistics. Instead, the Wiener-Hopf equation is expressed entirely in terms of observed signal statistics, with no reference to the possibly unobservable pure signal and noise. This Wiener filter is simple in concept and implementation, exactly minimum mean-square error, and directly applicable to signal-dependent and multiplicative noise. We demonstrate the filtering of a genuine two-look SAR image and show how a nonnegatively constrained version of the filter substantially reduces ringing.

  15. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (<100 Hz) performance by up to 15 dB over either control component acting individually. For the earplug, a filtered-X implementation of the LyLMS accommodates its nonconstant cancellation path gain. A fast time-domain identification method provides a high-fidelity, computationally efficient, infinite impulse response cancellation path model, which is used for both the filtered-X implementation and communication feedthrough. Insertion loss measurements made with a manikin show overall C-weighted total noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR. PMID:17069300

  16. Use of a plane jet for flow-induced noise reduction of tandem rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Zhao; Xi-xiang, Yang; Patrick, N. Okolo; Wei-hua, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady wake from upstream components of landing gear impinging on downstream components could be a strong noise source. The use of a plane jet is proposed to reduce this flow-induced noise. Tandem rods with different gap widths were utilized as the test body. Both acoustic and aerodynamic tests were conducted in order to validate this technique. Acoustic test results proved that overall noise emission from tandem rods could be lowered and tonal noise could be removed with use of the plane jet. However, when the plane jet was turned on, in some frequency range it could be the subsequent main contributor instead of tandem rods to total noise emission whilst in some frequency range rods could still be the main contributor. Moreover, aerodynamic tests fundamentally studied explanations for the noise reduction. Specifically, not only impinging speed to rods but speed and turbulence level to the top edge of the rear rod could be diminished by the upstream plane jet. Consequently, the vortex shedding induced by the rear rod was reduced, which was confirmed by the speed, Reynolds stress as well as the velocity fluctuation spectral measured in its wake. This study confirmed the potential use of a plane jet towards landing gear noise reduction. Project partially supported by the European Union FP7 CleanSky Joint Technology Initiative “ALLEGRA” (Grant No. 308225).

  17. Mixing noise reduction for rectangular supersonic jets by nozzle shaping and induced screech mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Raman, Ganesh

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of mixing noise modification were studied for supersonic jets flowing from rectangular nozzles with an aspect ratio of about five and a small dimension of about 1.4 cm. The first involves nozzle geometry variation using either single (unsymmetrical) or double bevelled (symmetrical) thirty degree cutbacks of the nozzle exit. Both converging (C) and converging-diverging (C-D) versions were tested. The double bevelled C-D nozzle produced a jet mixing noise reduction of about 4 dB compared to a standard rectangular C-D nozzle. In addition all bevelled nozzles produced an upstream shift in peak mixing noise which is conducive to improved attenuation when the nozzle is used in an acoustically treated duct. A large increase in high frequency noise also occurred near the plane of the nozzle exit. Because of near normal incidence, this noise can be easily attenuated with wall treatment. The second approach uses paddles inserted on the edge of the two sides of the jet to induce screech and greatly enhance the jet mixing. Although screech and mixing noise levels are increased, the enhanced mixing moves the source locations upstream and may make an enclosed system more amenable to noise reduction using wall acoustic treatment.

  18. Reduction of electronic noise from radiofrequency generator during radiofrequency ablation in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Thomas; Sinha, Usha; Lu, David; Sinha, Shantanu

    2002-01-01

    MRI has been used increasingly in the recent past for the guidance and monitoring of minimally invasive interventional procedures, using typically radiofrequency (RF) and laser energy, cryoablation, and percutaneous ethanol. RF energy has been used over the last 30 years for the ablation of tissues. Its use in conjunction with MRI for monitoring is limited, however, because of the electronic noise produced by the RF generators, which can significantly deteriorate image quality. The objective of this work was to devise methods by which this noise can be reduced to an acceptable level to allow simultaneous acquisition of MR images for monitoring purposes with the application of RF energy. Three different methods of noise reduction were investigated in a 0.2 T MR scanner: filtration using external hardware circuitry, MR scanner software-controlled filtration, and keyholing. The last two methods were unable by themselves to suppress the noise to an acceptable degree. Hardware filtration, however, provides excellent suppression of RF noise and is able to withstand up to 12 W of RF energy. When all the three approaches are combined, significant reduction of RF noise is achieved. The feasibility of creating an RF lesion of about 1.2 cm diameter in vivo in a porcine model simultaneously with temperature-sensitive MRI with adequate noise suppression is demonstrated. PMID:11884792

  19. Noise reduction of a tilt-rotor aircraft including effects on weight and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibs, J.; Stepniewski, W. Z.; Spencer, R.; Kohler, G.

    1973-01-01

    Various methods for far-field noise reduction of a tilt-rotor acoustic signature and the performance and weight tradeoffs which result from modification of the noise sources are considered in this report. In order to provide a realistic approach for the investigation, the Boeing tilt-rotor flight research aircraft (Model 222), was selected as the baseline. This aircraft has undergone considerable engineering development. Its rotor has been manufactured and tested in the Ames full-scale wind tunnel. The study reflects the current state-of-the-art of aircraft design for far-field acoustic signature reduction and is not based solely on an engineering feasibility aircraft. This report supplements a previous study investigating reduction of noise signature through the management of the terminal flight trajectory.

  20. Static and wind tunnel model tests for the development of externally blown flap noise reduction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennock, A. P.; Swift, G.; Marbert, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Externally blown flap models were tested for noise and performance at one-fifth scale in a static facility and at one-tenth scale in a large acoustically-treated wind tunnel. The static tests covered two flap designs, conical and ejector nozzles, third-flap noise-reduction treatments, internal blowing, and flap/nozzle geometry variations. The wind tunnel variables were triple-slotted or single-slotted flaps, sweep angle, and solid or perforated third flap. The static test program showed the following noise reductions at takeoff: 1.5 PNdB due to treating the third flap; 0.5 PNdB due to blowing from the third flap; 6 PNdB at flyover and 4.5 PNdB in the critical sideline plane (30 deg elevation) due to installation of the ejector nozzle. The wind tunnel program showed a reduction of 2 PNdB in the sideline plane due to a forward speed of 43.8 m/s (85 kn). The best combination of noise reduction concepts reduced the sideline noise of the reference aircraft at constant field length by 4 PNdB.

  1. Optimization of the poro-serrated trailing edges for airfoil broadband noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze Pei; Dubois, Elisa

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an aeroacoustic investigation of a NACA0012 airfoil with a number of poro-serrated trailing edge devices that contain porous materials of various air flow resistances at the gaps between adjacent members of the serrated-sawtooth trailing edge. The main objective of this work is to determine whether multiple-mechanisms on the broadband noise reduction can co-exist on a poro-serrated trailing edge. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of low-flow resistivity, the vortex shedding tone at low-frequency could not be completely suppressed at high-velocity, but a reasonably good broadband noise reduction can be achieved at high-frequency. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of very high-flow resistivity, no vortex shedding tone is present, but the serration effect on the broadband noise reduction becomes less effective. An optimal choice of the flow resistivity for a poro-serrated configuration has been identified, where it can surpass the conventional serrated trailing edge of the same geometry by achieving a further 1.5 dB reduction in the broadband noise while completely suppressing the vortex shedding tone. A weakened turbulent boundary layer noise scattering at the poro-serrated trailing edge is reflected by the lower-turbulence intensity at the near wake centreline across the whole spanwise wavelength of the sawtooth.

  2. Optimization of the poro-serrated trailing edges for airfoil broadband noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze Pei; Dubois, Elisa

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an aeroacoustic investigation of a NACA0012 airfoil with a number of poro-serrated trailing edge devices that contain porous materials of various air flow resistances at the gaps between adjacent members of the serrated-sawtooth trailing edge. The main objective of this work is to determine whether multiple-mechanisms on the broadband noise reduction can co-exist on a poro-serrated trailing edge. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of low-flow resistivity, the vortex shedding tone at low-frequency could not be completely suppressed at high-velocity, but a reasonably good broadband noise reduction can be achieved at high-frequency. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of very high-flow resistivity, no vortex shedding tone is present, but the serration effect on the broadband noise reduction becomes less effective. An optimal choice of the flow resistivity for a poro-serrated configuration has been identified, where it can surpass the conventional serrated trailing edge of the same geometry by achieving a further 1.5 dB reduction in the broadband noise while completely suppressing the vortex shedding tone. A weakened turbulent boundary layer noise scattering at the poro-serrated trailing edge is reflected by the lower-turbulence intensity at the near wake centreline across the whole spanwise wavelength of the sawtooth. PMID:27586762

  3. Local surface plasmon mediated extraordinary optical transmission of multi-spatial-mode quantum noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, Benjamin J; Evans, Philip G; Pooser, Raphael C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the coherent transduction of quantum noise reduction, or squeezed light, by Ag localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Squeezed light, generated through four-wave-mixing in Rb vapor, is coupled to a Ag nanohole array designed to exhibit LSP mediated extraordinary-optical transmission (EOT) spectrally coincident with the squeezed light source at 795 nm. We demonstrate that quantum noise reduction as a function of transmission is found to match closely with linear attenuation models, thus demonstrating that the photon-LSP-photon transduction process is coherent near the LSP resonance.

  4. Noise Reduction with Lobed Mixers: Nozzle-Length and Free-Jet Speed Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James C.; Boyd, Kathy C.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic test results are presented for 1/4th-scaled nozzles with internal lobed mixers used for reduction of subsonic jet noise of turbofan engines with bypass ratio above 5 and jet speeds up to 830 ft/s. One coaxial and three forced lobe mixers were tested with variations in lobe penetration, cut-outs in lobe-sidewall, lobe number and nozzle-length. Measured exit flow profiles and thrusts are used to assist the inferences from acoustic data. It is observed that lobed mixers reduce the low-frequency noise due to more uniformly mixed exit flow; but they may also increase the high-frequency noise at peak perceived noise (PNL) angle and angles upstream of it due to enhanced mixing inside the nozzle. Cut-outs and low lobe penetration reduce the annoying portion of the spectrum but lead to less uniform exit flow. Due to the dominance of internal duct noise in unscalloped, high-penetration mixers their noise is not reduced as much with increase in free-jet speed as that of coaxial or cut-out lobed mixers. The latter two mixers also show no change in PNL over the wide range of nozzle-lengths tested because most of their noise sources are outside the nozzle; whereas, the former show an increase in noise with decrease in nozzle-length.

  5. Optimum Noise Reduction Methods for the Interior of Vehicles and Aircraft Cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavossi, Ph. D., Hasson M.

    The most effective methods of noise reduction in vehicles and Aircraft cabins are investigated. The first goal is to determine the optimal means of noise mitigation without change in external shape of the vehicle, or aircraft cabin exterior such as jet engine or fuselage design, with no significant added weight. The second goal is to arrive at interior designs that can be retrofitted to the existing interiors, to reduce overall noise level for the passengers. The physical phenomena considered are; relaxation oscillations, forced vibrations with non-linear damping and sub-harmonic resonances. The negative and positive damping coefficients and active noise cancelations methods are discussed. From noise power-spectrum for a prototype experimental setup, the most energetic vibration modes are determined, that require the highest damping. The proposed technique will utilize the arrangement of uniformly distributed open Helmholtz resonators, with sound absorbing surface. They are tuned to the frequencies that correspond to the most energetic noise levels. The resonators dissipate noise energy inside the vehicle, or aircraft cabin, at the peak frequencies of the noise spectrum, determined for different vehicle or aircraft cabin, interior design models.

  6. Interior Noise Reduction by Adaptive Feedback Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the possible use of adaptive digital filtering techniques in simultaneous, multiple-mode identification of the modal parameters of a vibrating structure in real-time. It is intended that the results obtained from this project will be used for state estimation needed in adaptive structural acoustics control. The work done in this project is basically an extension of the work on real-time single mode identification, which was performed successfully using a digital signal processor (DSP) at NASA, Langley. Initially, in this investigation the single mode identification work was duplicated on a different processor, namely the Texas Instruments TMS32OC40 DSP. The system identification results for the single mode case were very good. Then an algorithm for simultaneous two mode identification was developed and tested using analytical simulation. When it successfully performed the expected tasks, it was implemented in real-time on the DSP system to identify the first two modes of vibration of a cantilever aluminum beam. The results of the simultaneous two mode case were good but some problems were identified related to frequency warping and spurious mode identification. The frequency warping problem was found to be due to the bilinear transformation used in the algorithm to convert the system transfer function from the continuous-time domain to the discrete-time domain. An alternative approach was developed to rectify the problem. The spurious mode identification problem was found to be associated with high sampling rates. Noise in the signal is suspected to be the cause of this problem but further investigation will be needed to clarify the cause. For simultaneous identification of more than two modes, it was found that theoretically an adaptive digital filter can be designed to identify the required number of modes, but the algebra became very complex which made it impossible to implement in the DSP system used in this study

  7. Optimization and Modeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamimonjezi, Sara

    This project relates to the development of next-generation high-speed aircraft that are efficient and environmentally compliant. The emphasis of the research is on reducing noise from high-performance engines that will power these aircraft. A strong component of engine noise is jet mixing noise that comes from the turbulent mixing process between the high-speed exhaust flow of the engine and the atmosphere. The fan flow deflection method (FFD) suppresses jet noise by deflecting the fan stream downward, by a few degrees, with respect to the core stream. This reduces the convective Mach number of the primary shear layer and turbulent kinetic energy in the downward direction and therefore reduces the noise emitted towards the ground. The redistribution of the fan stream is achieved with inserting airfoil-shaped vanes inside the fan duct. Aerodynamic optimization of FFD has been done by Dr. Juntao Xiong using a computational fluid dynamics code to maximize reduction of noise perceived by the community while minimizing aerodynamic losses. The optimal vane airfoils are used in a parametric experimental study of 50 4-vane deflector configurations. The vane chord length, angle of attack, and azimuthal location are the parameters studied in acoustic optimization. The best vane configuration yields a reduction in cumulative (downward + sideline) effective perceived noise level (EPNL) of 5.3 dB. The optimization study underscores the sensitivity of FFD to deflector parameters and the need for careful design in the practical implementation of this noise reduction approach. An analytical model based on Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and acoustic analogy is developed to predict the spectral changes from a known baseline in the direction of peak emission. A generalized form for space-time correlation is introduced that allows shapes beyond the traditional exponential forms. Azimuthal directivity based on the wavepacket model of jet noise is integrated with the acoustic

  8. Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang

    2012-09-15

    Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain

  9. Wind-tunnel fan noise reduction including effects of turning vanes on noise propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Hoglund, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Fan silencers with low-pressure drop have been designed and installed in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel No. 1. The silencers are composed of an absorbent lining flush with the wind-tunnel walls upstream of the fan and an absorbent splitter in the duct downstream of the fan. An acoustical insertion loss of 4 to 12 dB was measured between 100 and 1000 Hz. High-frequency performance of the silencers was reduced by test-section noise and by corner vanes which turned the sound waves so they followed the duct axis. Sound below 1.2 kHz diffracted around the 305-mm-long vanes and impinged on acoustically absorbent corner walls. Wind-tunnel flow losses are discussed.

  10. A theoretical investigation of noise reduction through the cylindrical fuselage of a twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, R. B.; Mixson, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Interior noise in the fuselage of a twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft with two propellers rotating in opposite directions is studied analytically. The fuselage was modeled as a stiffened cylindrical shell with simply supported ends, and the effects of stringers and frames were averaged over the shell surface. An approximate mathematical model of the propeller noise excitation was formulated which includes some of the propeller noise characteristics such as sweeping pressure waves around the sidewalls due to propeller rotation and the localized nature of the excitation with the highest levels near the propeller plane. Results are presented in the form of noise reduction, which is the difference between the levels of external and interior noise. The influence of propeller noise characteristics on the noise reduction was studied. The results indicate that the sweep velocity of the excitation around the fuselage sidewalls is critical to noise reduction.

  11. Reduction of fan noise in an anechoic chamber by reducing chamber wall induced inlet flow disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Mackinnon, M. J.; Woodward, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The difference between the flight and ground static noise of turbofan engines presents a significant problem in engine noise testing. The additional noise for static testing has been attributed to inlet flow disturbances or turbulence interacting with the fan rotor. In an attempt to determine a possible source of inflow disturbances entering fans tested in the Lewis Research Center anechoic chamber, the inflow field was studied using potential flow analysis. These potential flow calculations indicated that there was substantial flow over the wall directly behind the fan inlet that could produce significant inflow disturbances. Fan noise tests were run with various extensions added to the fan inlet to move the inlet away from this backwall and thereby reduce the inlet flow disturbances. Significant noise reductions were observed with increased inlet length. Over 5 db reduction of the blade passage tone sound power level was observed between the shortest and longest inlets at 90% fan speed and the first overtone was reduced 9 db. High frequency broadband noise was also reduced.

  12. Noise reduction in long‐period seismograms by way of array summing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Wilson, David; Storm, Tyler; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Hutt, Charles R.; Holland, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Long‐period (>100  s period) seismic data can often be dominated by instrumental noise as well as local site noise. When multiple collocated sensors are installed at a single site, it is possible to improve the overall station noise levels by applying stacking methods to their traces. We look at the noise reduction in long‐period seismic data by applying the time–frequency phase‐weighted stacking method of Schimmel and Gallart (2007) as well as the phase‐weighted stacking (PWS) method of Schimmel and Paulssen (1997) to four collocated broadband sensors installed in the quiet Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory underground vault. We show that such stacking methods can improve vertical noise levels by as much as 10 dB over the mean background noise levels at 400 s period, suggesting that greater improvements could be achieved with an array involving multiple sensors. We also apply this method to reduce local incoherent noise on horizontal seismic records of the 2 March 2016 Mw 7.8 Sumatra earthquake, where the incoherent noise levels at very long periods are similar in amplitude to the earthquake signal. To maximize the coherency, we apply the PWS method to horizontal data where relative azimuths between collocated sensors are estimated and compared with a simpler linear stack with no azimuthal rotation. Such methods could help reduce noise levels at various seismic stations where multiple high‐quality sensors have been deployed. Such small arrays may also provide a solution to improving long‐period noise levels at Global Seismographic Network stations.

  13. Full-scale Investigation of Several Jet-engine Noise-reduction Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D; Callaghan, Edmund E

    1957-01-01

    A number of nozzles which use the mixing interference of adjacent jets for noise suppression were investigated. Reductions in sound power of nearly 70 percent (5 db) with thrust losses of 1 percent were achieved. A method of calculating the limiting frequency affected by this type of suppression nozzle, that is , multiple-slot nozzles, is presented. Data are shown which indicate that further large reductions in sound power are not likely with mixing-interference nozzles.

  14. Large Engine Technology (LET) Task XXXVII Low-Bypass Ratio Mixed Turbofan Engine Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction Program Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Joseph R.; Zysman, Steven H.; Barber, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center supported a three year effort to develop the technology for reducing jet noise from low-bypass ratio engines. This effort concentrated on both analytical and experimental approaches using various mixer designs. CFD and MGB predictions are compared with LDV and noise data, respectively. While former predictions matched well with data, experiment shows a need for improving the latter predictions. Data also show that mixing noise can be sensitive to engine hardware upstream of the mixing exit plane.

  15. Reduction of 1/f noise in graphene after electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid Hossain, Md.; Rumyantsev, Sergey; Shur, Michael S.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated experimentally the effect of the electron-beam irradiation on the level of the low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices. It was found that 1/f noise in graphene reduces with increasing concentration of defects induced by irradiation. The increased amount of structural disorder in graphene under irradiation was verified with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The bombardment of graphene devices with 20-keV electrons reduced the noise spectral density, SI/I2 (I is the source-drain current) by an order-of magnitude at the radiation dose of 104 μC/cm2. We analyzed the observed noise reduction in the limiting cases of the mobility and carrier number fluctuation mechanisms. The obtained results are important for the proposed graphene applications in analog, mixed-signal, and radio-frequency systems, integrated circuits and sensors.

  16. Applications of Savitzky-Golay Filter for Seismic Random Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Dang, Bo; Li, Yue; Lin, Hongbo; Ma, Haitao

    2016-02-01

    This article utilizes Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter to eliminate seismic random noise. This is a novel method for seismic random noise reduction in which SG filter adopts piecewise weighted polynomial via least-squares estimation. Therefore, effective smoothing is achieved in extracting the original signal from noise environment while retaining the shape of the signal as close as possible to the original one. Although there are lots of classical methods such as Wiener filtering and wavelet denoising applied to eliminate seismic random noise, the SG filter outperforms them in approximating the true signal. SG filter will obtain a good tradeoff in waveform smoothing and valid signal preservation under suitable conditions. These are the appropriate window size and the polynomial degree. Through examples from synthetic seismic signals and field seismic data, we demonstrate the good performance of SG filter by comparing it with the Wiener filtering and wavelet denoising methods.

  17. Noise Reduction Potential of Large, Over-the-Wing Mounted, Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Indeed, the noise goal for NASA's Aeronautics Enterprise calls for technologies that will help to provide a 20 EPNdB reduction relative to today's levels by the year 2022. Further, the large fan diameters of modem, increasingly higher bypass ratio engines pose a significant packaging and aircraft installation challenge. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large, ultra high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this over-the-wing design is believed to offer noise shielding benefits to observers on the ground. This paper describes the analytical certification noise predictions of a notional, long haul, commercial quadjet transport with advanced, high bypass engines mounted above the wing.

  18. Experimental study on noise reduction effect of a muffler inserted in liquid transporting pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, T.; Xu, W. W.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    In order to reduce the noise of liquid transporting pipelines caused by the motion of the power unit, a kind of compact hydrodynamic muffler used in pipes with small diameters is proposed which achieves good vibration damping as well as hydrodynamic noise reduction. Based on the rubber damper tube, according to the structure characteristics, the muffler is composed of two main parts, the rubber damper tube and the inner noise reducing structure. Experiment on insertion loss of the muffler in stationary state is conducted. It is found that the rubber damper tube itself has a good performance at noise reducing at the frequency band considered here, total insertion loss values can reach 10 dB and the inner structures improve the performance of the muffler at low frequency band.

  19. An experimental study of USB flap noise reduction through mean flow modification. [Upper Surface Blown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, M. C.; Yu, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of mean flow modification on the noise production of upper surface blown flaps has been studied experimentally. Mean velocity profile at the nozzle exit was modified from the usual 'top-hat' shape to 'Gamma' and 'L'-shaped profiles. The 'L'-modification caused noise reduction around and above the peak frequency of the 'top-hat' spectrum when compared on an equal thrust per exit area basis. Modification to 'Gamma'-shaped profile resulted in a shift of the spectrum to lower frequencies and a lower overall noise reduction. These modifications alter the development of the large scale disturbances in the upper shear layer and trailing edge wake of the wall jet geometry.

  20. Gabor-based anisotropic diffusion for speckle noise reduction in medical ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Han, Hong; Ji, Chunhong; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenping

    2014-06-01

    In ultrasound (US), optical coherence tomography, synthetic aperture radar, and other coherent imaging systems, images are corrupted by multiplicative speckle noise that obscures image interpretation. An anisotropic diffusion (AD) method based on the Gabor transform, named Gabor-based anisotropic diffusion (GAD), is presented to suppress speckle in medical ultrasonography. First, an edge detector using the Gabor transform is proposed to capture directionality of tissue edges and discriminate edges from noise. Then the edge detector is embedded into the partial differential equation of AD to guide the diffusion process and iteratively denoise images. To enhance GAD's adaptability, parameters controlling diffusion are determined from a fully formed speckle region that is automatically detected. We evaluate the GAD on synthetic US images simulated with three models and clinical images acquired in vivo. Compared with seven existing speckle reduction methods, the GAD is superior to other methods in terms of noise reduction and detail preservation.

  1. Evaluation of a Transient Noise Reduction Algorithm in Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Hehrmann, Phillipp; Hamacher, Volkmar; Nogueira, Waldo; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Dealing with environmental noises presents a major issue for cochlear implant (CI) users. Hence, digital noise reduction (DNR) schemes have become important features of CI systems. Many noises like for example clinking glasses or slamming doors, have impulsive onsets and decay quickly. Common DNR algorithms cannot handle this type of noise in an appropriate way. In this study, we investigated the effect of an algorithm specially designed for such noises with 12 CI users (age range: 45 to 75 years). Speech scores in noise and quiet as well as subjective ratings of speech clarity, comfort and overall preference were measured. The main finding was a significant improvement of up to 1.7 dB of the speech reception threshold in noise as well as increased speech clarity. Speech in quiet was not negatively affected by the algorithm. The study revealed that the tested algorithm has the potential to improve CI listening. However, further research is needed regarding the effectiveness and suitability of the algorithm in daily use. PMID:26779325

  2. Reduction of the recorded speckle noise in holographic 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Utsugi, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2013-01-14

    A holographic 3D printer produces a high-quality 3D image reproduced by a full-color, full-parallax holographic stereogram with high-density light-ray recording. In order to produce a high-resolution holographic stereogram, we have to solve the problem of speckle noise in this system. For equalizing an intensity distribution inside the elementary hologram, the object beam is modulated by a diffuser. However the diffuser typically generates speckles, which is recorded in the holographic stereogram. It is localized behind the reconstructed image as a granularity noise. First we show the problems of some conventional ways for suppressing the granularity noise using a band-limited diffuser, and then we analyze an approach using a moving diffuser for the reduction of this noise. In the result, it is found that recording with a moving diffuser is effective for reducing the granularity noise at infinity of reconstructed image, although an alternative noise occurs. Moreover we propose a new method introducing multiple exposures to suppress the noise effectively.

  3. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques from 2 MHz to 200 MHz -- Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K., III; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the second part of a two-paper series. The first paper discussed cable types and shield connections. In this second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. <50 KHz) or high frequencies (>100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz.

  4. Children's Performance in Complex Listening Conditions: Effects of Hearing Loss and Digital Noise Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hearing loss (HL) on children's performance for an auditory task under demanding listening conditions and to determine the effect of digital noise reduction (DNR) on that performance. Method: Fifty children with normal hearing (NH) and 30 children with HL (8-12 years of age) categorized words in the presence of…

  5. Assessing the Role of Effort Reduction in the Reinforcing Efficacy of Timeout from Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Mikorski, Jeff; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rats responded on concurrent schedules of shock-postponement or deletion (avoidance) and timeout from avoidance. In Experiment 1, 3 rats' responses on one lever postponed shocks for 20 s and responses on a second lever produced a 1-min timeout according to a variable-interval 45-s schedule. Across conditions, a warning signal (white noise) was…

  6. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low

  7. Detection threshold for sound distortion resulting from noise reduction in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Brons, Inge; Dreschler, Wouter A; Houben, Rolph

    2014-09-01

    Hearing-aid noise reduction should reduce background noise, but not disturb the target speech. This objective is difficult because noise reduction suffers from a trade-off between the amount of noise removed and signal distortion. It is unknown if this important trade-off differs between normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. This study separated the negative effect of noise reduction (distortion) from the positive effect (reduction of noise) to allow the measurement of the detection threshold for noise-reduction (NR) distortion. Twelve NH subjects and 12 subjects with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. The detection thresholds for distortion were determined using an adaptive procedure with a three-interval, two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. Different levels of distortion were obtained by changing the maximum amount of noise reduction. Participants were also asked to indicate their preferred NR strength. The detection threshold for overall distortion was higher for HI subjects than for NH subjects, suggesting that stronger noise reduction can be applied for HI listeners without affecting the perceived sound quality. However, the preferred NR strength of HI listeners was closer to their individual detection threshold for distortion than in NH listeners. This implies that HI listeners tolerate fewer audible distortions than NH listeners.

  8. LES-based evaluation of a microjet noise reduction concept in static and flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Mikhail L.; Spalart, Philippe R.; Strelets, Mikhail Kh.

    2011-08-01

    The Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) numerical system established since 2002 for jet-noise computation is first evaluated in terms of recent gains in accuracy with increased computer resources, and is then used to explore the relatively new "microjet" noise-reduction concept (injection of high-pressure microjets in the vicinity of the main jet nozzle exit), which currently attracts attention in the aeroacoustic community. The simulations, which are carried out with an emulation of the microjets by specially designed distributed sources of mass, momentum, and energy in the governing equations, are found to capture the essential features of the flow/turbulence and the far-field noise alteration by the microjets observed in experiments, and to reveal the subtle flow features responsible for the effect of injection on noise. They also confirm the experimental observation that in static conditions microjets provide a noise reduction comparable with that from chevrons in the low-frequency range, and probably have a less pronounced high-frequency penalty. This positive evaluation of the microjets concept is, however, mitigated by the far less favorable results of simulations in flight conditions, which were never studied experimentally. The latter results, which are awaiting an experimental verification, make a practical use of the concept in its current form rather unlikely.

  9. Direct-to-digital holography reduction of reference hologram noise and fourier space smearing

    DOEpatents

    Voelkl, Edgar

    2006-06-27

    Systems and methods are described for reduction of reference hologram noise and reduction of Fourier space smearing, especially in the context of direct-to-digital holography (off-axis interferometry). A method of reducing reference hologram noise includes: recording a plurality of reference holograms; processing the plurality of reference holograms into a corresponding plurality of reference image waves; and transforming the corresponding plurality of reference image waves into a reduced noise reference image wave. A method of reducing smearing in Fourier space includes: recording a plurality of reference holograms; processing the plurality of reference holograms into a corresponding plurality of reference complex image waves; transforming the corresponding plurality of reference image waves into a reduced noise reference complex image wave; recording a hologram of an object; processing the hologram of the object into an object complex image wave; and dividing the complex image wave of the object by the reduced noise reference complex image wave to obtain a reduced smearing object complex image wave.

  10. Experimental investigation of the noise reduction of supersonic exhaust jets with fluidic inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Russell William Walter

    The noise produced by the supersonic, high temperature jets that exhaust from military aircraft is becoming a hazard to naval personnel and a disturbance to communities near military bases. Methods to reduce the noise produced from these jets in a practical full-scale environment are difficult. The development and analysis of distributed nozzle blowing for the reduction of radiated noise from supersonic jets is described. Model scale experiments of jets that simulate the exhaust jets from typical low-bypass ratio military jet aircraft engines during takeoff are performed. Fluidic inserts are created that use distributed blowing in the divergent section of the nozzle to simulate mechanical, hardwall corrugations, while having the advantage of being an active control method. This research focuses on model scale experiments to better understand the fluidic insert noise reduction method. Distributed blowing within the divergent section of the military-style convergent divergent nozzle alters the shock structure of the jet in addition to creating streamwise vorticity for the reduction of mixing noise. Enhancements to the fluidic insert design have been performed along with experiments over a large number of injection parameters and core jet conditions. Primarily military-style round nozzles have been used, with preliminary measurements of hardwall corrugations and fluidic inserts in rectangular nozzle geometries also performed. It has been shown that the noise reduction of the fluidic inserts is most heavily dependent upon the momentum flux ratio between the injector and core jet. Maximum reductions of approximately 5.5 dB OASPL have been observed with practical mass flow rates and injection pressures. The first measurements with fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream have been performed. Optimal noise reduction occurs at similar injector parameters in the presence of forward flight. Fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream were

  11. Development of a SMA-Based, Slat-Gap Filler for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Long, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Noise produced by unsteady flow around aircraft structures, termed airframe noise, is an important source of aircraft noise during the approach and landing phases of flight. Conventional leading-edge-slat devices for high lift on typical transport aircraft are a prominent source of airframe noise. Many concepts for slat noise reduction have been investigated. Slat-cove fillers have emerged as an attractive solution, but they maintain the gap flow, leaving some noise production mechanisms unabated, and thus represent a nonoptimal solution. Drooped-leading-edge (DLE) concepts have been proposed as "optimal" because the gap flow is eliminated. The deployed leading edge device is not distinct and separate from the main wing in DLE concepts and the high-lift performance suffers at high angles of attack (alpha) as a consequence. Elusive high-alpha performance and excessive weight penalty have stymied DLE development. The fact that high-lift performance of DLE systems is only affected at high alpha suggests another concept that simultaneously achieves the high-lift of the baseline airfoil and the noise reduction of DLE concepts. The concept involves utilizing a conventional leading-edge slat device and a deformable structure that is deployed from the leading edge of the main wing and closes the gap between the slat and main wing, termed a slat-gap filler (SGF). The deployable structure consists of a portion of the skin of the main wing and it is driven in conjunction with the slat during deployment and retraction. Benchtop models have been developed to assess the feasibility and to study important parameters. Computational models have assisted in the bench-top model design and provided valuable insight in the parameter space as well as the feasibility.

  12. Evaluation of Airframe Noise Reduction Concepts via Simulations Using a Lattice Boltzmann Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Ehab; Casalino, Damiano; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady computations are presented for a high-fidelity, 18% scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model in landing configuration, i.e. flap deflected at 39 degree and main landing gear deployed. The simulations employ the lattice Boltzmann solver PowerFLOW® to simultaneously capture the flow physics and acoustics in the near field. Sound propagation to the far field is obtained using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. In addition to the baseline geometry, which was presented previously, various noise reduction concepts for the flap and main landing gear are simulated. In particular, care is taken to fully resolve the complex geometrical details associated with these concepts in order to capture the resulting intricate local flow field thus enabling accurate prediction of their acoustic behavior. To determine aeroacoustic performance, the farfield noise predicted with the concepts applied is compared to high-fidelity simulations of the untreated baseline configurations. To assess the accuracy of the computed results, the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic impact of the noise reduction concepts is evaluated numerically and compared to experimental results for the same model. The trends and effectiveness of the simulated noise reduction concepts compare well with measured values and demonstrate that the computational approach is capable of capturing the primary effects of the acoustic treatment on a full aircraft model.

  13. Method for inserting noise in digital mammography to simulate reduction in radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2015-03-01

    The quality of clinical x-ray images is closely related to the radiation dose used in the imaging study. The general principle for selecting the radiation is ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"). The practical optimization, however, remains challenging. It is well known that reducing the radiation dose increases the quantum noise, which could compromise the image quality. In order to conduct studies about dose reduction in mammography, it would be necessary to acquire repeated clinical images, from the same patient, with different dose levels. However, such practice would be unethical due to radiation related risks. One solution is to simulate the effects of dose reduction in clinical images. This work proposes a new method, based on the Anscombe transformation, which simulates dose reduction in digital mammography by inserting quantum noise into clinical mammograms acquired with the standard radiation dose. Thus, it is possible to simulate different levels of radiation doses without exposing the patient to new levels of radiation. Results showed that the achieved quality of simulated images generated with our method is the same as when using other methods found in the literature, with the novelty of using the Anscombe transformation for converting signal-independent Gaussian noise into signal-dependent quantum noise.

  14. Measured noise reductions resulting from modified approach procedures for business jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.; Parish, O. O.

    1975-01-01

    Five business jet airplanes were flown to determine the noise reductions that result from the use of modified approach procedures. The airplanes tested were a Gulfstream 2, JetStar, Hawker Siddeley 125-400, Sabreliner-60 and LearJet-24. Noise measurements were made 3, 5, and 7 nautical miles from the touchdown point. In addition to a standard 3 deg glide slope approach, a 4 deg glide slope approach, a 3 deg glide slope approach in a low-drag configuration, and a two-segment approach were flown. It was found that the 4 deg approach was about 4 EPNdB quieter than the standard 3 deg approach. Noise reductions for the low-drag 3 deg approach varied widely among the airplanes tested, with an average of 8.5 EPNdB on a fleet-weighted basis. The two-segment approach resulted in noise reductions of 7 to 8 EPNdB at 3 and 5 nautical miles from touchdown, but only 3 EPNdB at 7 nautical miles from touchdown when the airplanes were still in level flight prior to glide slope intercept. Pilot ratings showed progressively increasing workload for the 4 deg, low-drag 3 deg, and two-segment approaches.

  15. Engine isolation for structural-borne interior noise reduction in a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, J. F.; Scheidt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Engine vibration isolation for structural-borne interior noise reduction is investigated. A laboratory based test procedure to simulate engine induced structure-borne noise transmission, the testing of a range of candidate isolators for relative performance data, and the development of an analytical model of the transmission phenomena for isolator design evaluation are addressed. The isolator relative performance test data show that the elastomeric isolators do not appear to operate as single degree of freedom systems with respect to noise isolation. Noise isolation beyond 150 Hz levels off and begins to decrease somewhat above 600 Hz. Coupled analytical and empirical models were used to study the structure-borne noise transmission phenomena. Correlation of predicted results with measured data show that (1) the modeling procedures are reasonably accurate for isolator design evaluation, (2) the frequency dependent properties of the isolators must be included in the model if reasonably accurate noise prediction beyond 150 Hz is desired. The experimental and analytical studies were carried out in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 1000 Hz.

  16. Improvements to local projective noise reduction through higher order and multiscale refinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jack Murdoch; Small, Michael; Karrech, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The broad spectrum characteristic of signals from nonlinear systems obstructs noise reduction techniques developed for linear systems. Local projection was developed to reduce noise while preserving nonlinear deterministic structures, and a second order refinement to local projection which was proposed ten years ago does so particularly effectively. It involves adjusting the origin of the projection subspace to better accommodate the geometry of the attractor. This paper describes an analytic motivation for the enhancement from which follows further higher order and multiple scale refinements. However, the established enhancement is frequently as or more effective than the new filters arising from solely geometric considerations. Investigation of the way that measurement errors reinforce or cancel throughout the refined local projection procedure explains the special efficacy of the existing enhancement, and leads to a new second order refinement offering widespread gains. Different local projective filters are found to be best suited to different noise levels. At low noise levels, the optimal order increases as noise increases. At intermediate levels second order tends to be optimal, while at high noise levels prototypical local projection is most effective. The new higher order filters perform better relative to established filters for longer signals or signals corresponding to higher dimensional attractors.

  17. Noise-Reduction Benefits Analyzed for Over-the-Wing-Mounted Advanced Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    As we look to the future, increasingly stringent civilian aviation noise regulations will require the design and manufacture of extremely quiet commercial aircraft. Also, the large fan diameters of modern engines with increasingly higher bypass ratios pose significant packaging and aircraft installation challenges. One design approach that addresses both of these challenges is to mount the engines above the wing. In addition to allowing the performance trend towards large diameters and high bypass ratio cycles to continue, this approach allows the wing to shield much of the engine noise from people on the ground. The Propulsion Systems Analysis Office at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field conducted independent analytical research to estimate the noise reduction potential of mounting advanced turbofan engines above the wing. Certification noise predictions were made for a notional long-haul commercial quadjet transport. A large quad was chosen because, even under current regulations, such aircraft sometimes experience difficulty in complying with certification noise requirements with a substantial margin. Also, because of its long wing chords, a large airplane would receive the greatest advantage of any noise-shielding benefit.

  18. Reduction of Return Current Noise Using Double-Series Resonant Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Satoshi; Itoh, Daisuke; Sugahara, Kengo

    A novel double-series resonant filter is implemented in order to reduce the high-frequency return current noise generated by AC-powered electric cars with AC/DC PWM converters and inverters. The double-series resonant filter is placed between a main transformer and a converter. The resonant filter is tuned so that the noise signal due to the return current is attenuated at the exact noise frequency; for example, the 105-kHz component of an ATS (Automatic Train Stop) signal is attenuated by this filter. The filter has two LCR resonant circuits, one of which is in parallel with a resistance. This filter design helps achieve good attenuation at the noise frequency and helps limit unnecessary amplification at other frequencies. First, a test filter is realized, and the inductance and capacitance of this filter are in good agreement with the corresponding values in the filter design. Then, the filter is included in a full-scale test system with a main transformer and a converter. Then it is confirmed that a 5-dB reduction in the return current noise is achieved by using the proposed filter. Finally, the return current noise in the test system is confirmed to be well below the desired regulation level. This is expected to help realize simple methods for dealing with the effects of impedance at high frequencies in the main transformer.

  19. Acoustic noise reduction. January 1970-November 1988 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning methods, devices, and materials for acoustic-noise reduction. Included are noise-reduction techniques for engines, turbines, machinery, motor vehicles, pumps, aircraft cabins, and compressors. (Contains 189 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  20. Tiltrotor noise reduction through flight trajectory management and aircraft configuration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Marc

    approaches that take into account the first-order effects of deceleration on the acoustics were systematically designed and compared to a baseline approach profile. The low-noise approaches yielded substantial noise reduction benefits on a hemisphere surrounding the aircraft and on a ground plane below the aircraft's trajectory.

  1. Bulk Current Injection Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques, 50 kHz to 400 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.; Singh, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated using bulk current injection (BCI) techniques with radiated fields from 50 kHz - 400 MHz. It is a follow up to the two-part paper series presented at the Asia Pacific EMC Conference that focused on TEM cell signal injection. This paper discusses the effects of cable types, shield connections, and chassis connections on cable noise. For each topic, well established theories are compared with data from a real-world physical system.

  2. Reduction of residual excess noise in class-A lasers using two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Audo, Kévin; Amili, Abdelkrim El; Baili, Ghaya; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate experimentally a significant reduction of the remaining excess intensity noise in a class-A semi-conductor laser. This is obtained by inserting into the laser cavity a buffer reservoir mechanism based on two-photon absorption in GaAs. The excess noise peaks at the laser-free spectral range, induced by the beating between the lasing mode and the amplified spontaneous emission in the adjacent non-oscillating modes, is reduced by 20 dB, while preserving the class-A dynamical behavior of the laser cavity.

  3. NASA refan program status. [for noise reduction of JT8D turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, K. L.; Yuska, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the refan program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of substantially reducing the noise levels of existing JT8D powered aircraft. The program consists of the design, manufacturing and testing of the refan engines and modified nacelles and airplanes. Experimental testing was completed for the refan engine both at sea level and at altitude conditions. Ground testing for the B727 side- and center-engine installations and flight testing of the DC-9 with refan engines and acoustic nacelles were performed. Preliminary results presented show that substantial noise reductions were achieved.

  4. Status report on NASA two-segment approach program. [for aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, D. G.; Bourquin, K. R.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Shigemoto, F. H.; White, K. C.

    1975-01-01

    NASA, in cooperation with the FAA, is evaluating the two-segment approach as a routine procedure for reducing aircraft noise. The program calls for separate flight evaluations using a 727 and a DC-8, and an extrapolation of these results to determine the adaptability of the technique to the rest of the fleet. After a review of the total program, this paper presents (1) the profile and procedures developed and the noise reduction achievable, (2) the vortex characteristics behind an aircraft on a two-segment path, and (3) cost estimates for retrofitting aircraft with two-segment avionics.

  5. Reduction of residual excess noise in class-A lasers using two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Audo, Kévin; Amili, Abdelkrim El; Baili, Ghaya; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate experimentally a significant reduction of the remaining excess intensity noise in a class-A semi-conductor laser. This is obtained by inserting into the laser cavity a buffer reservoir mechanism based on two-photon absorption in GaAs. The excess noise peaks at the laser-free spectral range, induced by the beating between the lasing mode and the amplified spontaneous emission in the adjacent non-oscillating modes, is reduced by 20 dB, while preserving the class-A dynamical behavior of the laser cavity. PMID:27628366

  6. Assessment of an ICA-based noise reduction method for multi-channel auditory evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirahmadizoghi, Siavash; Bell, Steven; Simpson, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work a new independent component analysis (ICA) based method for noise reduction in evoked potentials is evaluated on for auditory late responses (ALR) captured with a 63-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) from 10 normal-hearing subjects. The performance of the new method is compared with a single channel alternative in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR), the number of channels with an SNR above an empirically derived statistical critical value and an estimate of hearing threshold. The results show that the multichannel signal processing method can significantly enhance the quality of the signal and also detected hearing thresholds significantly lower than with the single channel alternative.

  7. Finite element analysis using NASTRAN applied to helicopter transmission vibration/noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howells, R. W.; Sciarra, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element NASTRAN model of the complete forward rotor transmission housing for the Boeing Vertol CH-47 helicopter was developed and applied to reduce transmission vibration/noise at its source. In addition to a description of the model, a technique for vibration/noise prediction and reduction is outlined. Also included are the dynamic response as predicted by NASTRAN, test data, the use of strain energy methods to optimize the housing for minimum vibration/noise, and determination of design modifications which will be manufactured and tested. The techniques presented are not restricted to helicopters but are applicable to any power transmission system. The transmission housing model developed can be used further to evaluate static and dynamic stresses, thermal distortions, deflections and load paths, fail-safety/vulnerability, and composite materials.

  8. Multifunctional Low Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and NOx Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Acosta, Waldo

    2013-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of the induced synthetic jet is key, and is still TBD. center dot Available LPT vane volume is sufficient for tens of resonators per span-wise hole spacing, so physically feasible. center dot Determination of acoustic attenuation requires accurate model of vane, resonator locations, flow field and incident waves. (TBD) center dot Determination of NOx reduction is also TBD.

  9. Dual-microphone and binaural noise reduction techniques for improved speech intelligibility by hearing aid users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian Jazi, Nima

    Spatial filtering and directional discrimination has been shown to be an effective pre-processing approach for noise reduction in microphone array systems. In dual-microphone hearing aids, fixed and adaptive beamforming techniques are the most common solutions for enhancing the desired speech and rejecting unwanted signals captured by the microphones. In fact, beamformers are widely utilized in systems where spatial properties of target source (usually in front of the listener) is assumed to be known. In this dissertation, some dual-microphone coherence-based speech enhancement techniques applicable to hearing aids are proposed. All proposed algorithms operate in the frequency domain and (like traditional beamforming techniques) are purely based on the spatial properties of the desired speech source and does not require any knowledge of noise statistics for calculating the noise reduction filter. This benefit gives our algorithms the ability to address adverse noise conditions, such as situations where interfering talker(s) speaks simultaneously with the target speaker. In such cases, the (adaptive) beamformers lose their effectiveness in suppressing interference, since the noise channel (reference) cannot be built and updated accordingly. This difference is the main advantage of the proposed techniques in the dissertation over traditional adaptive beamformers. Furthermore, since the suggested algorithms are independent of noise estimation, they offer significant improvement in scenarios that the power level of interfering sources are much more than that of target speech. The dissertation also shows the premise behind the proposed algorithms can be extended and employed to binaural hearing aids. The main purpose of the investigated techniques is to enhance the intelligibility level of speech, measured through subjective listening tests with normal hearing and cochlear implant listeners. However, the improvement in quality of the output speech achieved by the

  10. A complex noise reduction method for improving visualization of SD-OCT skin biomedical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myakinin, Oleg O.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Kornilin, Dmitry V.; Khramov, Alexander G.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we consider the original method of solving noise reduction problem for visualization's quality improvement of SD-OCT skin and tumors biomedical images. The principal advantages of OCT are high resolution and possibility of in vivo analysis. We propose a two-stage algorithm: 1) process of raw one-dimensional A-scans of SD-OCT and 2) remove a noise from the resulting B(C)-scans. The general mathematical methods of SD-OCT are unstable: if the noise of the CCD is 1.6% of the dynamic range then result distortions are already 25-40% of the dynamic range. We use at the first stage a resampling of A-scans and simple linear filters to reduce the amount of data and remove the noise of the CCD camera. The efficiency, improving productivity and conservation of the axial resolution when using this approach are showed. At the second stage we use an effective algorithms based on Hilbert-Huang Transform for more accurately noise peaks removal. The effectiveness of the proposed approach for visualization of malignant and benign skin tumors (melanoma, BCC etc.) and a significant improvement of SNR level for different methods of noise reduction are showed. Also in this study we consider a modification of this method depending of a specific hardware and software features of used OCT setup. The basic version does not require any hardware modifications of existing equipment. The effectiveness of proposed method for 3D visualization of tissues can simplify medical diagnosis in oncology.

  11. Aeroacoustic Analysis of Fan Noise Reduction With Increased Bypass Nozzle Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan was tested in the NASA Glenn 9-by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects of increased bypass nozzle area. This fan stage test was part of the NASA Glenn Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test, second entry (SDT2) which acquired aeroacoustic results over a range of test conditions. The baseline nozzle was sized to produce maximum stage performance at cruise condition. However, the wind tunnel testing is conducted near sea level condition. Therefore, in order to simulate and obtain performance at other operating conditions, two additional nozzles were designed and tested one with +5 percent increase in weight flow (+5.4 percent increase in nozzle area compared with the baseline nozzle), sized to simulate the performance at the stage design point (takeoff) condition, and the other with a +7.5 percent increase in weight flow (+10.9 percent increase in nozzle area) sized for maximum weight flow with a fixed nozzle at sea level condition. Measured acoustic benefits with increased nozzle area were very encouraging, showing overall sound power level (OAPWL) reductions of 2 or more dB while the stage thrust actually increased by 2 to 3 percent except for the most open nozzle at takeoff rotor speed where stage performance decreased. Effective perceived noise levels for a 1500 ft engine flyover and 3.35 scale factor showed a similar noise reduction of 2 or more EPNdB. Noise reductions, principally in the level of broadband noise, were observed everywhere in the far field. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements taken downstream of the rotor showed that the total turbulent velocity decreased with increasing nozzle flow, which may explain the reduced rotor broadband noise levels.

  12. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  13. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  14. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  15. Reduction of JT8D powered aircraft noise by engine refanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, L. E.; Medeiros, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the Refan Program is to establish the technical feasibility of substantially reducing the noise levels of existing JT8D powered aircraft. This would be accomplished by retrofitting the existing fleet with quieter refan engines and new acoustically treated nacelles. No major technical problems exist that preclude the development and installation of refanned engines on aircraft currently powered by the JT8D engine. The refan concept is technically feasible and provides calculated noise reductions of from 7 to 8 EPNdB for the B727-200 aircraft and from 10 to 12 EPNdB for the DC-9-32 aircraft at the FAR Part 36 measuring stations. Corresponding reductions in the 90 EPNdB footprint area are estimated to vary from about 70 percent for the DC-9 to about 80 percent for the B727.

  16. Optimal filter design for shielded and unshielded ambient noise reduction in fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Comani, S; Mantini, D; Alleva, G; Di Luzio, S; Romani, G L

    2005-12-01

    The greatest impediment to extracting high-quality fetal signals from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is environmental magnetic noise, which may have peak-to-peak intensity comparable to fetal QRS amplitude. Being an unstructured Gaussian signal with large disturbances at specific frequencies, ambient field noise can be reduced with hardware-based approaches and/or with software algorithms that digitally filter magnetocardiographic recordings. At present, no systematic evaluation of filters' performances on shielded and unshielded fMCG is available. We designed high-pass and low-pass Chebychev II-type filters with zero-phase and stable impulse response; the most commonly used band-pass filters were implemented combining high-pass and low-pass filters. The achieved ambient noise reduction in shielded and unshielded recordings was quantified, and the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) of the retrieved fetal signals was evaluated. The study regarded 66 fMCG datasets at different gestational ages (22-37 weeks). Since the spectral structures of shielded and unshielded magnetic noise were very similar, we concluded that the same filter setting might be applied to both conditions. Band-pass filters (1.0-100 Hz) and (2.0-100 Hz) provided the best combinations of fetal signal detection rates, SNR and SDR; however, the former should be preferred in the case of arrhythmic fetuses, which might present spectral components below 2 Hz. PMID:16306648

  17. Enhanced ground bounce noise reduction in a low-leakage CMOS multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Bipin Kumar; Akashe, Shyam; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, various parameters are used to reduce leakage power, leakage current and noise margin of circuits to enhance their performance. A multiplier is proposed with low-leakage current and low ground bounce noise for the microprocessor, digital signal processors (DSP) and graphics engines. The ground bounce noise problem appears when a conventional power-gating circuit transits from sleep-to-active mode. This paper discusses a reduction in leakage current in the stacking power-gating technique by three modes - sleep, active and sleep-to-active. The simulation results are performed on a 4 × 4 carry-save multiplier for leakage current, active power, leakage power and ground bounce noise, and comparison made for different nanoscales. Ground bounce noise is limited to 90%. The leakage current of the circuit is decimated up to 80% and the active power is reduced to 31%. We performed simulations using cadence virtuoso 180 and 45 nm at room temperature at various supply voltages.

  18. Numerical Studies on a Rotor with Distributed Suction for Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Thorsten; Arnold, Benjamin; Wolf, Alexander; Krämer, Ewald

    2014-06-01

    Minimizing the flow-induced noise is an important issue in the design of modern onshore wind turbines. There is a number of proven passive means to reduce the aeroacoustic noise, such as the implementation of serrations, porous trailing edges or the aeroacoustic airfoil design. The noise emission can be further reduced by active flow control techniques. In the present study the impact of distributed boundary layer suction on the noise emission of an airfoil and a complete rotor is investigated. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic wind tunnel tests were performed for the NACA 64-418 airfoil and supplemented by numerical calculations. The aeroacoustic analyses have been conducted by means of the institute's Rnoise prediction scheme. The 2D studies have shown that noise reductions of 5 dB can be achieved by suction at moderate mass flow rates. To study the impact of three-dimensional effects numerical investigations have been conducted on the example of the generic NREL 5MW rotor with suction applied in the outer part of the blade. The predictions for the complete rotor provided smaller benefits compared to those for the isolated airfoil, mainly because the examined suction configurations were not optimized with respect to the extent of the suction patch and suction distribution.

  19. Optimal filter design for shielded and unshielded ambient noise reduction in fetal magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comani, S.; Mantini, D.; Alleva, G.; Di Luzio, S.; Romani, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    The greatest impediment to extracting high-quality fetal signals from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is environmental magnetic noise, which may have peak-to-peak intensity comparable to fetal QRS amplitude. Being an unstructured Gaussian signal with large disturbances at specific frequencies, ambient field noise can be reduced with hardware-based approaches and/or with software algorithms that digitally filter magnetocardiographic recordings. At present, no systematic evaluation of filters' performances on shielded and unshielded fMCG is available. We designed high-pass and low-pass Chebychev II-type filters with zero-phase and stable impulse response; the most commonly used band-pass filters were implemented combining high-pass and low-pass filters. The achieved ambient noise reduction in shielded and unshielded recordings was quantified, and the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) of the retrieved fetal signals was evaluated. The study regarded 66 fMCG datasets at different gestational ages (22-37 weeks). Since the spectral structures of shielded and unshielded magnetic noise were very similar, we concluded that the same filter setting might be applied to both conditions. Band-pass filters (1.0-100 Hz) and (2.0-100 Hz) provided the best combinations of fetal signal detection rates, SNR and SDR; however, the former should be preferred in the case of arrhythmic fetuses, which might present spectral components below 2 Hz.

  20. The Reduction of Ducted Fan Engine Noise Via A Boundary Integral Equation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Dunn, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a Boundary Integral Equation Method (BIEM) for the prediction of ducted fan engine noise is discussed. The method is motivated by the need for an efficient and versatile computational tool to assist in parametric noise reduction studies. In this research, the work in reference 1 was extended to include passive noise control treatment on the duct interior. The BEM considers the scattering of incident sound generated by spinning point thrust dipoles in a uniform flow field by a thin cylindrical duct. The acoustic field is written as a superposition of spinning modes. Modal coefficients of acoustic pressure are calculated term by term. The BEM theoretical framework is based on Helmholtz potential theory. A boundary value problem is converted to a boundary integral equation formulation with unknown single and double layer densities on the duct wall. After solving for the unknown densities, the acoustic field is easily calculated. The main feature of the BIEM is the ability to compute any portion of the sound field without the need to compute the entire field. Other noise prediction methods such as CFD and Finite Element methods lack this property. Additional BIEM attributes include versatility, ease of use, rapid noise predictions, coupling of propagation and radiation both forward and aft, implementable on midrange personal computers, and valid over a wide range of frequencies.

  1. Helicopter internal noise reduction research and development application to the SA 360 and SA 365 Dauphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marze, H. J.; Dambra, F.

    1978-01-01

    Noise sources inside helicopter cabins are considered with emphasis on the mechanisms of vibration generation inside the main gear box and mechanisms of transmission between source and cabin. The dynamic behavior of the main gear box components is examined in relation to the transfer of vibration energy to the structure. It is indicated that although improvements can be made in noise reduction at the source, a soundproofing treatment isolating the passenger from the noise source is necessary. Soundproofing treatments installed and optimized include: (1) an acoustic screen using the weight effect to isolate the passenger from the noise source; (2) a damping treatment to limit the conversion of the vibratory energy into acoustic energy; and (3) an absorbing treatment achieved either through HELMHOLTZ resonators or through a glass wool blanket to limit the propagation of acoustic waves and the wave reflection effects in the cabin. The application of treatments at the source and the optimization of the sound barriers improved the noise level by about 30 db.

  2. All-electrical frequency noise reduction and linewidth narrowing in quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Sergachev, Ilia; Maulini, Richard; Bismuto, Alfredo; Blaser, Stéphane; Gresch, Tobias; Bidaux, Yves; Müller, Antoine; Schilt, Stéphane; Südmeyer, Thomas

    2014-11-15

    A novel all-electrical method of frequency noise reduction in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is proposed. Electrical current through the laser was continuously adjusted to compensate for fluctuations of the laser internal resistance, which led to an active stabilization of the optical emission frequency. A reduction of the linewidth from 1.7 MHz in the standard constant current mode of operation down to 480 kHz is demonstrated at 10-ms observation time when applying this method to a QCL emitting at 7.9 μm.

  3. Evaluation of Variable-Depth Liner Configurations for Increased Broadband Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Howerton, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of variable-depth geometry on the amount of noise reduction that can be achieved with acoustic liners. Results for two variable-depth liners tested in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube demonstrate significant broadband noise reduction. An impedance prediction model is combined with two propagation codes to predict corresponding sound pressure level profiles over the length of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The comparison of measured and predicted sound pressure level profiles is sufficiently favorable to support use of these tools for investigation of a number of proposed variable-depth liner configurations. Predicted sound pressure level profiles for these proposed configurations reveal a number of interesting features. Liner orientation clearly affects the sound pressure level profile over the length of the liner, but the effect on the total attenuation is less pronounced. The axial extent of attenuation at an individual frequency continues well beyond the location where the liner depth is optimally tuned to the quarter-wavelength of that frequency. The sound pressure level profile is significantly affected by the way in which variable-depth segments are distributed over the length of the liner. Given the broadband noise reduction capability for these liner configurations, further development of impedance prediction models and propagation codes specifically tuned for this application is warranted.

  4. A mass reduction effort of the electric and hybrid vehicle. [composite door panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, R. B.; Jahnle, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    Weight reduction, cost competitiveness, and elimination of the intrusion beam resulted from the redesign and fabrication using composite materials of the door outer panel and intrusion beam from a Chevrolet Impala. The basis of the redesign involved replacing these two steel parts with a single compression molding using the unique approach of simultaneously curing a sheet molding compound outside panel with a continuous glass fiber intrusion strap. A weight reduction of nearly 11 pounds per door was achieved. Additional weight savings are possible by taking advantage of the elimination of the intrusion beam to design thinner door structures. The parts consolidation approach allows the composite structure to be cost competitive with the original steel design for both the lower production car models and for the near to midterm production vehicles using current state of the art composite production techniques. The design, prototype fabrication, costing, material, properties and compression molding production requirements are discussed.

  5. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  6. Noise reduction for curve-linear structures in real time fluoroscopy applications using directional binary masks

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Martin; Yang, Pengfei; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent efforts in the reconstruction of interventional devices from two distinct views require the segmentation of the object in both fluoroscopic images. Noise might decrease the quality of the segmentation and cause artifacts in the reconstruction. The noise level depends on the x-ray dose the patient is exposed to. The proposed algorithm reduces the noise and enhances the separability of curvilinear devices in background subtracted fluoroscopic images to allow a more accurate segmentation. Methods: The algorithm uses a set of binary masks to estimate a line conformity measure that determines the best direction for a directional filter kernel. If the calculated value exceeds a certain threshold, the directional kernel is used to obtain the filtered value. Otherwise, an isotropic filter kernel is used. Results: The evaluation was performed on a set of 36 fluoroscopic images using a vascular head phantom with three different guidewires and nine different x-ray dosages from 6 nGy/pulse to 45 nGy/pulse as well as a clinical data set containing ten images. Compared with wavelet shrinkage and the bilateral filter, the proposed algorithm increased the average contrast to noise ratio by at least 17.8% for the phantom and 68.9% for the clinical images. The accuracy of the device segmentation was improved on average by at least 17.3% and 14.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm was able to significantly reduce the amount of noise in the images and therefore increase the quality of the device segmentations compared to both the bilateral filter and the wavelet thresholding approach for all acquired noise levels using rotating directional filter kernels near line structures and isotropic kernels for the background. The application of the proposed algorithm for the 3D reconstruction of curvilinear devices from two views would allow a more accurate reconstruction of the device. PMID:26233192

  7. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  8. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  9. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  10. Aerodynamic performance investigation of advanced mechanical suppressor and ejector nozzle concepts for jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenknecht, C. D.; Bediako, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced Supersonic Transport jet noise may be reduced to Federal Air Regulation limits if recommended refinements to a recently developed ejector shroud exhaust system are successfully carried out. A two-part program consisting of a design study and a subscale model wind tunnel test effort conducted to define an acoustically treated ejector shroud exhaust system for supersonic transport application is described. Coannular, 20-chute, and ejector shroud exhaust systems were evaluated. Program results were used in a mission analysis study to determine aircraft takeoff gross weight to perform a nominal design mission, under Federal Aviation Regulation (1969), Part 36, Stage 3 noise constraints. Mission trade study results confirmed that the ejector shroud was the best of the three exhaust systems studied with a significant takeoff gross weight advantage over the 20-chute suppressor nozzle which was the second best.

  11. Electrical noise reduction techniques contributing to improved data quality at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcphee, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    In initial use, the high-speed digital data acquisition systems at Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility produced data containing unacceptably high noise levels. Described is a process whereby the contributing noise sources were identified and eliminated. The effects of 60 Hz power, system grounding, EMI/RFI, and other problems are discussed and the corrective action taken is outlined. The overall effort resulted in an improvement of greater than 5:1 in system performance. Although the report describes a system specifically used for wind tunnel data acquisition, the corrective techniques employed are generally applicable to large scale high-speed data systems where signal resolution in the low microvolts range is important.

  12. Potential of combining iterative reconstruction with noise efficient detector design: aggressive dose reduction in head CT

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B; Schabel, C; Fenchel, M; Ernemann, U; Korn, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With further increase of CT numbers and their dominant contribution to medical exposure, there is a recent quest for more effective dose control. While reintroduction of iterative reconstruction (IR) has proved its potential in many applications, a novel focus is placed on more noise efficient detectors. Our purpose was to assess the potential of IR in combination with an integrated circuit detector (ICD) for aggressive dose reduction in head CT. Methods: Non-contrast low-dose head CT [190 mAs; weighted volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), 33.2 mGy] was performed in 50 consecutive patients, using a new noise efficient detector and IR. Images were assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality and compared with standard dose acquisitions (320 mAs; CTDIvol, 59.7 mGy) using a conventional detector and filtered back projection. Results: By combining ICD and IR in low-dose examinations, the signal to noise was improved by about 13% above the baseline level in the standard-dose control group. Both, contrast-to-noise ratio (2.02 ± 0.6 vs 1.88 ± 0.4; p = 0.18) and objective measurements of image sharpness (695 ± 84 vs 705 ± 151 change in Hounsfield units per pixel; p = 0.79) were fully preserved in the low-dose group. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the grading of several subjective image quality parameters when both noise-reducing strategies were used in low-dose examinations. Conclusion: Combination of noise efficient detector with IR allows for meaningful dose reduction in head CT without compromise of standard image quality. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of almost 50% dose reduction in head CT dose (1.1 mSv per scan) through combination of novel dose-reducing strategies. PMID:25827204

  13. Rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction and vibration using higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The use of higher harmonic control (HHC) of blade pitch to reduce blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is examined by means of a rotor acoustic test. A dynamically scaled, four-bladed, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium. Acoustic and vibration measurements were made for a large range of matched flight conditions where prescribed (open loop) HHC pitch schedules were superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. A novel sound power measurement technique was developed to take advantage of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel. Quantitative sound power results are presented for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch HHC. By comparing the results using 4P HHC to corresponding baseline (no HHC) conditions, significant midfrequency noise reductions of 5-6 dB are found for low-speed descent conditions where BVI is most intense. For other flight conditions, noise is found to increase with the use of HHC. LF loading noise, as well as fixed and rotating frame vibration levels, show increased levels.

  14. Active noise reduction systems: Their interaction with very low frequency acoustical energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, R. Brian

    1994-08-01

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is used for reducing noise at the ears of an observer through the action of interfering sound waves. Noise sensed by a microphone built into the observer's headset or helmet is processed and reintroduced into the ear cup cavity out of phase with the original sound, thus cancelling the noise at the ear. Recent field experience has shown that system exposure to very high amplitude low-frequency sound, such as during the operation of helicopters, can lead to saturation or overload of the ANR electronics. Experiments using acoustical maniquins were conducted to assess the low-frequency behavior of ANR equipment. Results of measurement of the threshold of overload indicated large differences in the saturation thresholds among systems tested. Performance strongly depended on the integrity of the ear seal. Those systems offering active attenuation into the infrasound region tended to saturate most easily, but did create the best listening condition for the user when operated below the saturation threshold.

  15. A PIV Study of Slotted Air Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are presented for single and dual-stream jets with fluidic injection on the core stream. The fluidic injection nozzles delivered air to the jet through slots on the interior of the nozzle at the nozzle trailing edge. The investigations include subsonic and supersonic jet conditions. Reductions in broadband shock noise and low frequency mixing noise were obtained with the introduction of fluidic injection on single stream jets. Fluidic injection was found to eliminate shock cells, increase jet mixing, and reduce turbulent kinetic energy levels near the end of the potential core. For dual-stream subsonic jets, the introduction of fluidic injection reduced low frequency noise in the peak jet noise direction and enhanced jet mixing. For dual-stream jets with supersonic fan streams and subsonic core streams, the introduction of fluidic injection in the core stream impacted the jet shock cell structure but had little effect on mixing between the core and fan streams.

  16. Multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies for coordinated stimulation in bilateral cochlear implant devices.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C

    2010-05-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BI-CI) recipients achieve high word recognition scores in quiet listening conditions. Still, there is a substantial drop in speech recognition performance when there is reverberation and more than one interferers. BI-CI users utilize information from just two directional microphones placed on opposite sides of the head in a so-called independent stimulation mode. To enhance the ability of BI-CI users to communicate in noise, the use of two computationally inexpensive multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies exploiting information simultaneously collected by the microphones associated with two behind-the-ear (BTE) processors (one per ear) is proposed. To this end, as many as four microphones are employed (two omni-directional and two directional) in each of the two BTE processors (one per ear). In the proposed two-microphone binaural strategies, all four microphones (two behind each ear) are being used in a coordinated stimulation mode. The hypothesis is that such strategies combine spatial information from all microphones to form a better representation of the target than that made available with only a single input. Speech intelligibility is assessed in BI-CI listeners using IEEE sentences corrupted by up to three steady speech-shaped noise sources. Results indicate that multi-microphone strategies improve speech understanding in single- and multi-noise source scenarios.

  17. Investigating Differences in Preferred Noise Reduction Strength Among Hearing Aid Users.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tobias; Wagener, Kirsten C

    2016-01-01

    Even though hearing aid (HA) users can respond very differently to noise reduction (NR) processing, knowledge about possible drivers of this variability (and thus ways of addressing it in HA fittings) is sparse. The current study investigated differences in preferred NR strength among HA users. Participants were groups of experienced users with clear preferences ("NR lovers"; N = 14) or dislikes ("NR haters"; N = 13) for strong NR processing, as determined in two earlier studies. Maximally acceptable background noise levels, detection thresholds for speech distortions caused by NR processing, and self-reported "sound personality" traits were considered as candidate measures for explaining group membership. Participants also adjusted the strength of the (binaural coherence-based) NR algorithm to their preferred level. Consistent with previous findings, NR lovers favored stronger processing than NR haters, although there also was some overlap. While maximally acceptable noise levels and detection thresholds for speech distortions tended to be higher for NR lovers than for NR haters, group differences were only marginally significant. No clear group differences were observed in the self-report data. Taken together, these results indicate that preferred NR strength is an individual trait that is fairly stable across time and that is not easily captured by psychoacoustic, audiological, or self-report measures aimed at indexing susceptibility to background noise and processing artifacts. To achieve more personalized NR processing, an effective approach may be to let HA users determine the optimal setting themselves during the fitting process. PMID:27604781

  18. Improved Kalman filter method for measurement noise reduction in multi sensor RFID systems.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ki Hwan; Lee, Seung Joon; Kyung, Yeo Sun; Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Min Chul; Jung, Kyung Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the range of available radio frequency identification (RFID) tags has been widened to include smart RFID tags which can monitor their varying surroundings. One of the most important factors for better performance of smart RFID system is accurate measurement from various sensors. In the multi-sensing environment, some noisy signals are obtained because of the changing surroundings. We propose in this paper an improved Kalman filter method to reduce noise and obtain correct data. Performance of Kalman filter is determined by a measurement and system noise covariance which are usually called the R and Q variables in the Kalman filter algorithm. Choosing a correct R and Q variable is one of the most important design factors for better performance of the Kalman filter. For this reason, we proposed an improved Kalman filter to advance an ability of noise reduction of the Kalman filter. The measurement noise covariance was only considered because the system architecture is simple and can be adjusted by the neural network. With this method, more accurate data can be obtained with smart RFID tags. In a simulation the proposed improved Kalman filter has 40.1%, 60.4% and 87.5% less mean squared error (MSE) than the conventional Kalman filter method for a temperature sensor, humidity sensor and oxygen sensor, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was also verified with some experiments.

  19. Real-Time Noise Reduction for Mossbauer Spectroscopy through Online Implementation of a Modified Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    2015-02-01

    Spectrum-processing software that incorporates a gaussian smoothing kernel within the statistics of first-order Kalman filtration has been developed to provide cross-channel spectral noise reduction for increased real-time signal-to-noise ratios for Mossbauer spectroscopy. The filter was optimized for the breadth of the gaussian using the Mossbauer spectrum of natural iron foil, and comparisons between the peak broadening, signal-to-noise ratios, and shifts in the calculated hyperfine parameters are presented. The results of optimization give a maximum improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of 51.1% over the unfiltered spectrum at a gaussian breadth of 27 channels, or 2.5% of the total spectrum width. The full-width half-maximum of the spectrum peaks showed an increase of 19.6% at this optimum point, indicating a relatively weak increase in the peak broadening relative to the signal enhancement, leading to an overall increase in the observable signal. Calculations of the hyperfine parameters showed no statistically significant deviations were introduced from the application of the filter, confirming the utility of this filter for spectroscopy applications.

  20. Flaperon Modification Effect on Jet-Flap Interaction Noise Reduction for Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Mengle, Vinod G.; Stoker, Robert W.; Brusniak, Leon; Elkoby, Ronen

    2007-01-01

    Jet-flap interaction (JFI) noise can become an important component of far field noise when a flap is immersed in the engine propulsive stream or is in its entrained region, as in approach conditions for under-the-wing engine configurations. We experimentally study the effect of modifying the flaperon, which is a high speed aileron between the inboard and outboard flaps, at both approach and take-off conditions using scaled models in a free jet. The flaperon modifications were of two types: sawtooth trailing edge and mini vortex generators (vg s). Parametric variations of these two concepts were tested with a round coaxial nozzle and an advanced chevron nozzle, with azimuthally varying fan chevrons, using both far field microphone arrays and phased microphone arrays for source diagnostics purposes. In general, the phased array results corroborated the far field results in the upstream quadrant pointing to JFI near the flaperon trailing edge as the origin of the far field noise changes. Specific sawtooth trailing edges in conjunction with the round nozzle gave marginal reduction in JFI noise at approach, and parallel co-rotating mini-vg s were somewhat more beneficial over a wider range of angles, but both concepts were noisier at take-off conditions. These two concepts had generally an adverse JFI effect when used in conjunction with the advanced chevron nozzle at both approach and take-off conditions.

  1. Noise reduction in computed tomography using a multiplicative continuous-time image reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    In clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT), filtered back-projection as a transform method and iterative reconstruction such as the maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) method are known methods to reconstruct tomographic images. As the other reconstruction method, we have presented a continuous-time image reconstruction (CIR) system described by a nonlinear dynamical system, based on the idea of continuous methods for solving tomographic inverse problems. Recently, we have also proposed a multiplicative CIR system described by differential equations based on the minimization of a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence. We prove theoretically that the divergence measure decreases along the solution to the CIR system, for consistent inverse problems. In consideration of the noisy nature of projections in clinical CT, the inverse problem belongs to the category of ill-posed problems. The performance of a noise-reduction scheme for a new (previously developed) CIR system was investigated by means of numerical experiments using a circular phantom image. Compared to the conventional CIR and the ML-EM methods, the proposed CIR method has an advantage on noisy projection with lower signal-to-noise ratios in terms of the divergence measure on the actual image under the same common measure observed via the projection data. The results lead to the conclusion that the multiplicative CIR method is more effective and robust for noise reduction in CT compared to the ML-EM as well as conventional CIR methods.

  2. Arousal from sleep - The physiological and subjective effects of a 15 dB/A/ reduction in aircraft flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levere, T. E.; Davis, N.

    1977-01-01

    The present research was concerned with whether or not a 15 dB(A) reduction in overall noise level would lessen the sleep disturbing properties of jet aircraft flyover noise and, if less disturbing, whether this would be subjectively appreciated by the sleeping individual. The results indicate that a reduction of 15 dB (A) does result in less sleep disruption but only during sleep characterized by fast-wave electroencephalographic activity. During sleep characterized by slow-wave electroencephalographic activity, such a reduction in the sleep-disturbing properties of jet aircraft noise has little effect. Moreover, even when effective during fast-wave sleep, the decreased arousal produced by the lower noise levels is not subjectively appreciated by the individual in terms of his estimate of the quality of his night's sleep. Thus, reducing the overall noise level of jet aircraft flyovers by some 15 dB(A), is, at best, minimally beneficial to sleep.

  3. On the railway track dynamics with rail vibration absorber for noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. X.

    2008-01-01

    A promising means to increase the decay rate of vibration along the rail is using a rail absorber for noise reduction. Compound track models with the tuned rail absorber are developed for investigation of the performance of the absorber on vibration reduction. Through analysis of the track dynamics with the rail absorber some guidelines are given on selection of the types and parameters for the rail absorber. It is found that a large active mass used in the absorber is beneficial to increase the decay rate of rail vibration. The effectiveness of the piecewise continuous absorber is moderate compared with the discrete absorber installed in the middle of sleeper span or at a sleeper. The most effective installation position for the discrete absorber is in the middle of sleeper span. Over high or over low loss factor of the damping material used in the absorber may degrade the performance on vibration reduction.

  4. ARV robotic technologies (ART): a risk reduction effort for future unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Jeffrey F.

    2006-05-01

    The Army's ARV (Armed Robotic Vehicle) Robotic Technologies (ART) program is working on the development of various technological thrusts for use in the robotic forces of the future. The ART program will develop, integrate and demonstrate the technology required to advance the maneuver technologies (i.e., perception, mobility, tactical behaviors) and increase the survivability of unmanned platforms for the future force while focusing on reducing the soldiers' burden by providing an increase in vehicle autonomy coinciding with a decrease in the total number user interventions required to control the unmanned assets. This program will advance the state of the art in perception technologies to provide the unmanned platform an increasingly accurate view of the terrain that surrounds it; while developing tactical/mission behavior technologies to provide the Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) the capability to maneuver tactically, in conjunction with the manned systems in an autonomous mode. The ART testbed will be integrated with the advanced technology software and associated hardware developed under this effort, and incorporate appropriate mission modules (e.g. RSTA sensors, MILES, etc.) to support Warfighter experiments and evaluations (virtual and field) in a military significant environment (open/rolling and complex/urban terrain). The outcome of these experiments as well as other lessons learned through out the program life cycle will be used to reduce the current risks that are identified for the future UGV systems that will be developed under the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, including the early integration of an FCS-like autonomous navigation system onto a tracked skid steer platform.

  5. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  6. A New Technique for Reduction the Phase Induced Intensity Noise in SAC-OCDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd, Thanaa Hussein; Aljunid, Syed Alwee; Fadhil, Hilal Adnan

    2011-12-01

    A new code for reduction the phase induced intensity noise has been presented. The new code is proposed for Spectral Amplitude-Coding Optical Code Division Multiple Accesses (SAC-OCDMA). This new code family we call it Dynamic Cyclic Shift (DCS) code. The DCS code reduced the effect of Multi Access Interference (MAI) due to it is the property of variable cross correlation. We find that the performance of the DCS code is a batter than other SAC-OCDMA codes such as; Random Diagonal (RD) code, Modified Quadratic Congruence (MQC) code and Modified Frequency Hopping (MFH) code. Through the mathematical calculation and simulation analysis, for the bit-error rate of DCS code is significantly better than other SAC-OCDMA codes, the effect of Phase Induced Intensity Noise is reduced. In addition, proofof-principle simulations of 10 Gb/s for 20 km have been successfully demonstrated and achieved low BER compared to the other codes.

  7. The non-contact precision measurement and noise reduction method for liquid volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jintao; Liu, Ziyong; Tong, Lin; Zhang, Long; Guo, Ligong; Bao, Xuesong

    2011-12-01

    Liquid volume is one important metrology method for commercial transaction in international trade, and vertical tank is used as main metrology tool. One non-contact optical measurement system was raised by using laser scanning method. The coordinates of vertical tank shell were acquired by phase-shift ranging method and angular measurement, and the set of coordinates is named as data cloud. The measurement errors of distance and angle are 2mm and 2" respectively. Wavelet was applied to noise reduction and curve feature extraction for data cloud. Iterative method was used to deduce the radius at each course height. One 1000m3 vertical tank used as test object, comparison experiment was carried out with strap method (international arbitral standard). The experimental results show that the noise due to tank shell surface characteristics and laser scanning devices could be filtered satisfactorily, and the local curve features of tank shell were described correctly.

  8. Autonomous Slat-Cove-Filler Device for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated with Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor); Lockard, David P (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Weber, Douglas Leo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A slat cove filler is utilized to reduce airframe noise resulting from deployment of a leading edge slat of an aircraft wing. The slat cove filler is preferably made of a super elastic shape memory alloy, and the slat cove filler shifts between stowed and deployed shapes as the slat is deployed. The slat cove filler may be configured such that a separate powered actuator is not required to change the shape of the slat cove filler from its deployed shape to its stowed shape and vice-versa. The outer contour of the slat cove filler preferably follows a profile designed to maintain accelerating flow in the gap between the slat cove filler and wing leading edge to provide for noise reduction.

  9. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  10. Measures for the reduction of the noise and vibration level of apartment house elevators. [changes in construction and insulation measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enescu, N.; Munteanu, M.; Stan, A.

    1974-01-01

    The reduction of the level of elevator noise and vibrations in apartment buildings was studied. By improving the mounting and gearing conditions of the winch and soundproofing the winch chamber, as well as by covering the elevator's control panel, the noise and vibration level was appreciably reduced.

  11. Attention-Induced Variance and Noise Correlation Reduction in Macaque V1 Is Mediated by NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Jose L.; Gieselmann, Marc A.; Sanayei, Mehdi; Thiele, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Summary Attention improves perception by affecting different aspects of the neuronal code. It enhances firing rates, it reduces firing rate variability and noise correlations of neurons, and it alters the strength of oscillatory activity. Attention-induced rate enhancement in striate cortex requires cholinergic mechanisms. The neuropharmacological mechanisms responsible for attention-induced variance and noise correlation reduction or those supporting changes in oscillatory activity are unknown. We show that ionotropic glutamatergic receptor activation is required for attention-induced rate variance, noise correlation, and LFP gamma power reduction in macaque V1, but not for attention-induced rate modulations. NMDA receptors mediate attention-induced variance reduction and attention-induced noise correlation reduction. Our results demonstrate that attention improves sensory processing by a variety of mechanisms that are dissociable at the receptor level. PMID:23719166

  12. Noise Reduction in Low-Dose X-Ray Fluoroscopy for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing Zhu Lei; Xing Lei

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images using statistics-based restoration algorithm so that the patient fluoroscopy can be performed with reduced radiation dose. Method and Materials: Noise in the low-dose fluoroscopy was suppressed by temporal and spatial filtering. The temporal correlation among neighboring frames was considered by the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) transform (i.e., principal component analysis). After the KL transform, the selected neighboring frames of fluoroscopy were decomposed to uncorrelated and ordered principal components. For each KL component, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed to restore the ideal image. The penalty was chosen as anisotropic quadratic, and the penalty parameter in each KL component was inversely proportional to its corresponding eigenvalue. Smaller KL eigenvalue is associated with the KL component of lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and a larger penalty parameter should be used for such KL component. The low-dose fluoroscopic images were acquired using a Varian Acuity simulator. A quality assurance phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were used to evaluate the presented algorithm. Results: In the images restored by the proposed KL domain PWLS algorithm, noise is greatly suppressed, whereas fine structures are well preserved. Average improvement rate of SNR is 75% among selected regions of interest. Comparison studies with traditional techniques, such as the mean and median filters, show that the proposed algorithm is advantageous in terms of structure preservation. Conclusions: The proposed noise reduction algorithm can significantly improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic image and allows for dose reduction in X-ray fluoroscopy.

  13. Fan interaction noise reduction using a wake generator: experiments and computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacsek, C.; Desbois-Lavergne, F.

    2003-08-01

    A control grid (wake generator) aimed at reducing rotor-stator interaction modes in fan engines when mounted upstream of the rotor has been studied here. This device complements other active noise control systems currently proposed. The compressor model of the instrumented ONERA CERF-rig is used to simulate suitable conditions. The design of the grid is drafted out using semi-empirical models for wake and potential flow, and experimentally achieved. Cylindrical rods are able to generate a spinning mode of the same order and similar level as the interaction mode. Mounting the rods on a rotating ring allows for adjusting the phase of the control mode so that an 8 dB sound pressure level (SPL) reduction at the blade passing frequency is achieved when the two modes are out of phase. Experimental results are assessed by a numerical approach using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes 2-D solver, developed at ONERA, is used to provide the unsteady force components on blades and vanes required for acoustics. The loading noise source term of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to model the interaction noise between the sources, and an original coupling to a boundary element method (BEM) code is realized to take account of the inlet geometry effects on acoustic in-duct propagation. Calculations using the classical analytical the Green function of an infinite annular duct are also addressed. Simple formulations written in the frequency domain and expanded into modes are addressed and used to compute an in-duct interaction mode and to compare with the noise reduction obtained during the tests. A fairly good agreement between predicted and measured SPL is found when the inlet geometry effects are part of the solution (by coupling with the BEM). Furthermore, computed aerodynamic penalties due to the rods are found to be negligible. These results partly validate the computation chain and highlight the potential of the wake generator

  14. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  15. Experimental and theoretical sound transmission. [reduction of interior noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Durenberger, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    The capabilities of the Kansas University- Flight Research Center for investigating panel sound transmission as a step toward the reduction of interior noise in general aviation aircraft were discussed. Data obtained on panels with holes, on honeycomb panels, and on various panel treatments at normal incidence were documented. The design of equipment for panel transmission loss tests at nonnormal (slanted) sound incidence was described. A comprehensive theory-based prediction method was developed and shows good agreement with experimental observations of the stiffness controlled, the region, the resonance controlled region, and the mass-law region of panel vibration.

  16. Reduction of Aerodynamic Noise Generated by a Bluff-Shaped Pantograph Head Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishige, Hiroaki; Minobe, Takayuki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Masahiro

    With an increase in the maximum speed of Shinkansen trains, it becomes imperative to resolve aerodynamic and aeroacoustic problems related to pantographs. Hence, some methods based on flow control have been studied to improve the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic characteristics. In this study, the authors attempted to control the flow around a pantograph by using synthetic jets. The results of numerical and experimental tests indicate that the synthetic jets can stabilize the flow around the bluff-shaped pantograph head, thus resulting in a reduction in aerodynamic noise.

  17. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques From 2 MHz to 200 MHz - Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K.; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the first part of a two-paper series. This first paper discusses cable types and shield connections. In the second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. <50 KHz) or high frequencies (>100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz. The electronic system (Fig. 1) consisted of two Hammond shielded electrical enclosures, one containing the source resistance, and the other containing the load resistance. The boxes were mounted on a large aluminium plate acting as the chassis. Cables connecting the two boxes measured 81 cm in length and were attached to the boxes using standard D38999 military-style connectors. The test setup is shown in Fig. 2. Electromagnetic fields were created using an HP8657B signal generator, MiniCircuits ZHL-42W-SMA amplifier, and an EMCO 5103 TEM cell. Measurements were

  18. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  19. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  20. Development of an impact noise reduction method by the adding of a small thickness elastomeric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arz, Jean-Pierre

    The starting point of this Ph.D. is the industrial issue submitted to the ETS by the company Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP) of the noise reduction of the tracked drive mechanism of snowmobiles. The overall goal of is to develop a method to predict the impact noise reduction obtained by the adding of an elastomeric layer specimen of small thickness between the impacting body and the impacted structure which is a complex structure (i.e. a structure whose geometry is complex and whose composition involves several materials). To reach this overall goal, three specific goals have been fixed: (1) characterize the behavior under impact of different small thickness elastomeric layers; (2) predict the impact force generated when an elastomeric layer is added on a complex vibrating structure; and (3) validate experimentally the whole method by applying it to the impact noise reduction of a bar of the snowmobile track. To reach the first specific goal (characterize the behavior under impact of different small thickness elastomeric layers), a specific experimental characterization method has been developed. Firstly, an experimental device has been realized to submit the elastomeric layer specimens to the reproducible impact conditions of an impact hammer. The measurement of the penetration depth of the hammer into the elastomeric layer is achieved by recording its motion with a high-speed camera and by detecting its position by further analysis on the individual images. Secondly, the experimental curves obtained are analyzed to point out their main characteristics and choose an appropriate impact model. Thirdly, the contact force parameters are estimated from the experimental results and from the impact model. Using this method, eight impacted elastomeric specimens have been characterized. The results show that a more precise characterization than hardness is obtained. To reach the second specific goal (predict the impact force generated when an elastomeric layer is

  1. Blade-mounted trailing edge flap control for BVI noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, A. A.; Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Sankar, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical procedures based on the 2-D and 3-D full potential equations and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations were developed to study the effects of leading and trailing edge flap motions on the aerodynamics of parallel airfoil-vortex interactions and on the aerodynamics and acoustics of the more general self-generated rotor blade vortex interactions (BVI). For subcritical interactions, the 2-D results indicate that the trailing edge flap can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, the results show the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented. For the OLS model rotor, contours of a BVI noise metric were used to quantify the effects of the trailing edge flap on the size and directivity of the high/low intensity noise region(s). Average reductions in the BVI noise levels on the order of 5 dB with moderate power penalties on the order of 18 pct. for a four bladed rotor and 58 pct. for a two bladed rotor were obtained.

  2. Computational analysis of noise reduction devices in axial fans with stabilized finite element formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.; Rispoli, F.; Sheard, A. G.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The paper illustrates how a computational fluid mechanic technique, based on stabilized finite element formulations, can be used in analysis of noise reduction devices in axial fans. Among the noise control alternatives, the study focuses on the use of end-plates fitted at the blade tips to control the leakage flow and the related aeroacoustic sources. The end-plate shape is configured to govern the momentum transfer to the swirling flow at the blade tip. This flow control mechanism has been found to have a positive link to the fan aeroacoustics. The complex physics of the swirling flow at the tip, developing under the influence of the end-plate, is governed by the rolling up of the jet-like leakage flow. The RANS modelling used in the computations is based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and pressure-stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin methods, supplemented with the DRDJ stabilization. Judicious determination of the stabilization parameters involved is also a part of our computational technique and is described for each component of the stabilized formulation. We describe the flow physics underlying the design of the noise control device and illustrate the aerodynamic performance. Then we investigate the numerical performance of the formulation by analysing the inner workings of the stabilization operators and of their interaction with the turbulence model.

  3. Blade-mounted trailing edge flap control for BVI noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. A.; Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Sankar, L. N.

    1992-02-01

    Numerical procedures based on the 2-D and 3-D full potential equations and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations were developed to study the effects of leading and trailing edge flap motions on the aerodynamics of parallel airfoil-vortex interactions and on the aerodynamics and acoustics of the more general self-generated rotor blade vortex interactions (BVI). For subcritical interactions, the 2-D results indicate that the trailing edge flap can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, the results show the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented. For the OLS model rotor, contours of a BVI noise metric were used to quantify the effects of the trailing edge flap on the size and directivity of the high/low intensity noise region(s). Average reductions in the BVI noise levels on the order of 5 dB with moderate power penalties on the order of 18 pct. for a four bladed rotor and 58 pct. for a two bladed rotor were obtained.

  4. Noise reduction in functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals by independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, Hendrik; Jiyoun Hong, Melissa; Kim, Sung-Phil; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2013-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is used to detect concentration changes of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain. The main difficulty entailed in the analysis of fNIRS signals is the fact that the hemodynamic response to a specific neuronal activation is contaminated by physiological and instrument noises, motion artifacts, and other interferences. This paper proposes independent component analysis (ICA) as a means of identifying the original hemodynamic response in the presence of noises. The original hemodynamic response was reconstructed using the primary independent component (IC) and other, less-weighting-coefficient ICs. In order to generate experimental brain stimuli, arithmetic tasks were administered to eight volunteer subjects. The t-value of the reconstructed hemodynamic response was improved by using the ICs found in the measured data. The best t-value out of 16 low-pass-filtered signals was 37, and that of the reconstructed one was 51. Also, the average t-value of the eight subjects' reconstructed signals was 40, whereas that of all of their low-pass-filtered signals was only 20. Overall, the results showed the applicability of the ICA-based method to noise-contamination reduction in brain mapping.

  5. Noise reduction of coincidence detector output by the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2006-05-31

    A recurring theme in theoretical work is that integration over populations of similarly tuned neurons can reduce neural noise. However, there are relatively few demonstrations of an explicit noise reduction mechanism in a neural network. Here we demonstrate that the brainstem of the barn owl includes a stage of processing apparently devoted to increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in the encoding of the interaural time difference (ITD), one of two primary binaural cues used to compute the position of a sound source in space. In the barn owl, the ITD is processed in a dedicated neural pathway that terminates at the core of the inferior colliculus (ICcc). The actual locus of the computation of the ITD is before ICcc in the nucleus laminaris (NL), and ICcc receives no inputs carrying information that did not originate in NL. Unlike in NL, the rate-ITD functions of ICcc neurons require as little as a single stimulus presentation per ITD to show coherent ITD tuning. ICcc neurons also displayed a greater dynamic range with a maximal difference in ITD response rates approximately double that seen in NL. These results indicate that ICcc neurons perform a computation functionally analogous to averaging across a population of similarly tuned NL neurons. PMID:16738236

  6. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  7. Improvement in DMSA imaging using adaptive noise reduction: an ROC analysis.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Lisa; Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F; McKiddie, Fergus I; Staff, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid imaging is the 'gold standard' for the detection of cortical defects and diagnosis of scarring of the kidneys. The Siemens planar processing package, which implements adaptive noise reduction using the Pixon algorithm, is designed to allow a reduction in image noise, enabling improved image quality and reduced acquisition time/injected activity. This study aimed to establish the level of improvement in image quality achievable using this algorithm. Images were acquired of a phantom simulating a single kidney with a range of defects of varying sizes, positions and contrasts. These images were processed using the Pixon processing software and shown to 12 observers (six experienced and six novices) who were asked to rate the images on a six-point scale depending on their confidence that a defect was present. The data were analysed using a receiver operating characteristic approach. Results showed that processed images significantly improved the performance of the experienced observers in terms of their sensitivity and specificity. Although novice observers showed significant increase in sensitivity when using the software, a significant decrease in specificity was also seen. This study concludes that the Pixon software can be used to improve the assessment of cortical defects in dimercaptosuccinic acid imaging by suitably trained observers.

  8. The correlation study of parallel feature extractor and noise reduction approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dewi, Deshinta Arrova; Sundararajan, Elankovan; Prabuwono, Anton Satria

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents literature reviews that show variety of techniques to develop parallel feature extractor and finding its correlation with noise reduction approaches for low light intensity images. Low light intensity images are normally displayed as darker images and low contrast. Without proper handling techniques, those images regularly become evidences of misperception of objects and textures, the incapability to section them. The visual illusions regularly clues to disorientation, user fatigue, poor detection and classification performance of humans and computer algorithms. Noise reduction approaches (NR) therefore is an essential step for other image processing steps such as edge detection, image segmentation, image compression, etc. Parallel Feature Extractor (PFE) meant to capture visual contents of images involves partitioning images into segments, detecting image overlaps if any, and controlling distributed and redistributed segments to extract the features. Working on low light intensity images make the PFE face challenges and closely depend on the quality of its pre-processing steps. Some papers have suggested many well established NR as well as PFE strategies however only few resources have suggested or mentioned the correlation between them. This paper reviews best approaches of the NR and the PFE with detailed explanation on the suggested correlation. This finding may suggest relevant strategies of the PFE development. With the help of knowledge based reasoning, computational approaches and algorithms, we present the correlation study between the NR and the PFE that can be useful for the development and enhancement of other existing PFE.

  9. State of the art: Design for noise II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Charts relating to helicopter noise reduction design efforts are given. Information regarding priorities, design guidelines, design margins, risks, noise prediction, derivative trends, design impact, and cost impact is given.

  10. Investigating Differences in Preferred Noise Reduction Strength Among Hearing Aid Users

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Kirsten C.

    2016-01-01

    Even though hearing aid (HA) users can respond very differently to noise reduction (NR) processing, knowledge about possible drivers of this variability (and thus ways of addressing it in HA fittings) is sparse. The current study investigated differences in preferred NR strength among HA users. Participants were groups of experienced users with clear preferences (“NR lovers”; N = 14) or dislikes (“NR haters”; N = 13) for strong NR processing, as determined in two earlier studies. Maximally acceptable background noise levels, detection thresholds for speech distortions caused by NR processing, and self-reported “sound personality” traits were considered as candidate measures for explaining group membership. Participants also adjusted the strength of the (binaural coherence-based) NR algorithm to their preferred level. Consistent with previous findings, NR lovers favored stronger processing than NR haters, although there also was some overlap. While maximally acceptable noise levels and detection thresholds for speech distortions tended to be higher for NR lovers than for NR haters, group differences were only marginally significant. No clear group differences were observed in the self-report data. Taken together, these results indicate that preferred NR strength is an individual trait that is fairly stable across time and that is not easily captured by psychoacoustic, audiological, or self-report measures aimed at indexing susceptibility to background noise and processing artifacts. To achieve more personalized NR processing, an effective approach may be to let HA users determine the optimal setting themselves during the fitting process. PMID:27604781

  11. Advanced noise reduction in placental ultrasound imaging using CPU and GPU: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombori, G.; Ryan, J.; McAuliffe, F.; Rainford, L.; Moran, M.; Brennan, P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of different implementations of 3D anisotropic diffusion speckle noise reduction technique on ultrasound images. In this project we are developing a novel volumetric calcification assessment metric for the placenta, and providing a software tool for this purpose. The tool can also automatically segment and visualize (in 3D) ultrasound data. One of the first steps when developing such a tool is to find a fast and efficient way to eliminate speckle noise. Previous works on this topic by Duan, Q. [1] and Sun, Q. [2] have proven that the 3D noise reducing anisotropic diffusion (3D SRAD) method shows exceptional performance in enhancing ultrasound images for object segmentation. Therefore we have implemented this method in our software application and performed a comparative study on the different variants in terms of performance and computation time. To increase processing speed it was necessary to utilize the full potential of current state of the art Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Our 3D datasets are represented in a spherical volume format. With the aim of 2D slice visualization and segmentation, a "scan conversion" or "slice-reconstruction" step is needed, which includes coordinate transformation from spherical to Cartesian, re-sampling of the volume and interpolation. Combining the noise filtering and slice reconstruction in one process on the GPU, we can achieve close to real-time operation on high quality data sets without the need for down-sampling or reducing image quality. For the GPU programming OpenCL language was used. Therefore the presented solution is fully portable.

  12. Effects of noise reduction on AM perception for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Miermont, Franck; Coez, Arnaud; Bizaguet, Eric; Lorenzi, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Noise reduction (NR) systems are commonplace in modern digital hearing aids. Though not improving speech intelligibility, NR helps the hearing-aid user in terms of lowering noise annoyance, reducing cognitive load and improving ease of listening. Previous psychophysical work has shown that NR does in fact improve the ability of normal-hearing (NH) listeners to discriminate the slow amplitude-modulation (AM) cues representative of those found in speech. The goal of this study was to assess whether this improvement of AM discrimination with NR can also be observed for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. AM discrimination was measured at two audio frequencies of 500 Hz and 2 kHz in a background noise with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12 dB. Discrimination was measured for ten HI and ten NH listeners with and without NR processing. The HI listeners had a moderate sensorineural hearing loss of about 50 dB HL at 2 kHz and normal hearing (≤ 20 dB HL) at 500 Hz. The results showed that most of the HI listeners tended to benefit from NR at 500 Hz but not at 2 kHz. However, statistical analyses showed that HI listeners did not benefit significantly from NR at any frequency region. In comparison, the NH listeners showed a significant benefit from NR at both frequencies. For each condition, the fidelity of AM transmission was quantified by a computational model of early auditory processing. The parameters of the model were adjusted separately for the two groups (NH and HI) of listeners. The AM discrimination performance of the HI group (with and without NR) was best captured by a model simulating the loss of the fast-acting amplitude compression applied by the normal cochlea. This suggests that the lack of benefit from NR for HI listeners results from loudness recruitment.

  13. Effects of noise reduction on AM perception for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Miermont, Franck; Coez, Arnaud; Bizaguet, Eric; Lorenzi, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Noise reduction (NR) systems are commonplace in modern digital hearing aids. Though not improving speech intelligibility, NR helps the hearing-aid user in terms of lowering noise annoyance, reducing cognitive load and improving ease of listening. Previous psychophysical work has shown that NR does in fact improve the ability of normal-hearing (NH) listeners to discriminate the slow amplitude-modulation (AM) cues representative of those found in speech. The goal of this study was to assess whether this improvement of AM discrimination with NR can also be observed for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. AM discrimination was measured at two audio frequencies of 500 Hz and 2 kHz in a background noise with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12 dB. Discrimination was measured for ten HI and ten NH listeners with and without NR processing. The HI listeners had a moderate sensorineural hearing loss of about 50 dB HL at 2 kHz and normal hearing (≤ 20 dB HL) at 500 Hz. The results showed that most of the HI listeners tended to benefit from NR at 500 Hz but not at 2 kHz. However, statistical analyses showed that HI listeners did not benefit significantly from NR at any frequency region. In comparison, the NH listeners showed a significant benefit from NR at both frequencies. For each condition, the fidelity of AM transmission was quantified by a computational model of early auditory processing. The parameters of the model were adjusted separately for the two groups (NH and HI) of listeners. The AM discrimination performance of the HI group (with and without NR) was best captured by a model simulating the loss of the fast-acting amplitude compression applied by the normal cochlea. This suggests that the lack of benefit from NR for HI listeners results from loudness recruitment. PMID:24899379

  14. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  15. Speech quality evaluation of a sparse coding shrinkage noise reduction algorithm with normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jinqiu; Hu, Hongmei; Zheng, Chengshi; Li, Guoping; Lutman, Mark E; Bleeck, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous papers describing single-channel noise reduction strategies to improve speech perception in a noisy environment, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effects of noise reduction algorithms on speech quality for hearing impaired (HI). A model-based sparse coding shrinkage (SCS) algorithm has been developed, and has shown previously (Sang et al., 2014) that it is as competitive as a state-of-the-art Wiener filter approach in speech intelligibility. Here, the analysis is extended to include subjective quality ratings and a method called Interpolated Paired Comparison Rating (IPCR) is adopted to quantitatively link the benefit of speech intelligibility and speech quality. The subjective quality tests are performed through IPCR to efficiently quantify noise reduction effects on speech quality. Objective measures including frequency-weighted segmental signal-to-noise ratio (fwsegSNR), perceptual evaluation of speech quality (PESQ) and hearing aid speech quality index (HASQI) are adopted to predict the noise reduction effects. Results show little difference in speech quality between the SCS and the Wiener filter algorithm but a difference in quality rating between the HI and NH listeners. HI listeners generally gave better quality ratings of noise reduction algorithms than NH listeners. However, SCS reduced the noise more efficiently at the cost of higher distortions that were detected by NH but not by the HI. SCS is a promising candidate for noise reduction algorithms for HI. In general, care needs to be taken when adopting algorithms that were originally developed for NH participants into hearing aid applications. An algorithm that is evaluated negatively with NH might still bring benefits for HI participants.

  16. Speech quality evaluation of a sparse coding shrinkage noise reduction algorithm with normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jinqiu; Hu, Hongmei; Zheng, Chengshi; Li, Guoping; Lutman, Mark E; Bleeck, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous papers describing single-channel noise reduction strategies to improve speech perception in a noisy environment, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effects of noise reduction algorithms on speech quality for hearing impaired (HI). A model-based sparse coding shrinkage (SCS) algorithm has been developed, and has shown previously (Sang et al., 2014) that it is as competitive as a state-of-the-art Wiener filter approach in speech intelligibility. Here, the analysis is extended to include subjective quality ratings and a method called Interpolated Paired Comparison Rating (IPCR) is adopted to quantitatively link the benefit of speech intelligibility and speech quality. The subjective quality tests are performed through IPCR to efficiently quantify noise reduction effects on speech quality. Objective measures including frequency-weighted segmental signal-to-noise ratio (fwsegSNR), perceptual evaluation of speech quality (PESQ) and hearing aid speech quality index (HASQI) are adopted to predict the noise reduction effects. Results show little difference in speech quality between the SCS and the Wiener filter algorithm but a difference in quality rating between the HI and NH listeners. HI listeners generally gave better quality ratings of noise reduction algorithms than NH listeners. However, SCS reduced the noise more efficiently at the cost of higher distortions that were detected by NH but not by the HI. SCS is a promising candidate for noise reduction algorithms for HI. In general, care needs to be taken when adopting algorithms that were originally developed for NH participants into hearing aid applications. An algorithm that is evaluated negatively with NH might still bring benefits for HI participants. PMID:26232529

  17. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  18. The Development And Implementation Of A Concept To Permanent Reduction Of Noise Pollution In Production Taking Into Account The Legal And Economic Framework Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaušková, Lucia; Czán, Andrej; Babík, Ondrej; Piešová, Marianna

    2015-12-01

    Article deals with the issue of reducing noise impact in real conditions of industrial production. The solution includes measurements and calculations of noise level the person is exposed to and developing proposals for effective reduction of noise levels at the specific workplace. When assessing noise levels and design to reduce it to an acceptable level we will consider the legal, safety and economic conditions.

  19. Nonlinear complex diffusion approaches based on a novel noise estimation for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear diffusion processes have been widely used for image denoising. In the traditional nonlinear anisotropic diffusion denoising techniques, behavior of the diffusion depends highly on the gradient of image. However, it is difficult to get a good effect if we use these methods to reduce noise in optical coherence tomography images. Because background has the gradient that is very similar to regions of interest, so background noise will be mistaken for edge information and cannot be reduced. Therefore, nonlinear complex diffusion approaches using texture feature(NCDTF) for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography is proposed here, which uses texture feature in OCT images and structural OCT images to remove noise in phase-resolved OCT. Taking into account the fact that texture between background and signal region is different, which can be linked with diffusion coefficient of nonlinear complex diffusion model, we use NCDTF method to reduce noises of structure and phase images first. Then, we utilize OCT structure images to filter phase image in OCT. Finally, to validate our method, parameters such as image SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL), and edge preservation were compared between our approach and median filter, Gaussian filter, wavelet filter, nonlinear complex diffusion filter (NCDF). Preliminary results demonstrate that NCDTF method is more effective than others in keeping edges and denoising for phase-resolved OCT.

  20. A novel coupling of noise reduction algorithms for particle flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimoń, M. J.; Reese, J. M.; Emerson, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and its extension based on time-windows have been shown to greatly improve the effectiveness of recovering smooth ensemble solutions from noisy particle data. However, to successfully de-noise any molecular system, a large number of measurements still need to be provided. In order to achieve a better efficiency in processing time-dependent fields, we have combined POD with a well-established signal processing technique, wavelet-based thresholding. In this novel hybrid procedure, the wavelet filtering is applied within the POD domain and referred to as WAVinPOD. The algorithm exhibits promising results when applied to both synthetically generated signals and particle data. In this work, the simulations compare the performance of our new approach with standard POD or wavelet analysis in extracting smooth profiles from noisy velocity and density fields. Numerical examples include molecular dynamics and dissipative particle dynamics simulations of unsteady force- and shear-driven liquid flows, as well as phase separation phenomenon. Simulation results confirm that WAVinPOD preserves the dimensionality reduction obtained using POD, while improving its filtering properties through the sparse representation of data in wavelet basis. This paper shows that WAVinPOD outperforms the other estimators for both synthetically generated signals and particle-based measurements, achieving a higher signal-to-noise ratio from a smaller number of samples. The new filtering methodology offers significant computational savings, particularly for multi-scale applications seeking to couple continuum informations with atomistic models. It is the first time that a rigorous analysis has compared de-noising techniques for particle-based fluid simulations.

  1. The ART of representation: Memory reduction and noise tolerance in a neural network vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Christopher S.

    The Feature Cerebellar Model Arithmetic Computer (FCMAC) is a multiple-input-single-output neural network that can provide three-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) pose estimation for a robotic vision system. The FCMAC provides sufficient accuracy to enable a manipulator to grasp an object from an arbitrary pose within its workspace. The network learns an appearance-based representation of an object by storing coarsely quantized feature patterns. As all unique patterns are encoded, the network size grows uncontrollably. A new architecture is introduced herein, which combines the FCMAC with an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) network. The ART module categorizes patterns observed during training into a set of prototypes that are used to build the FCMAC. As a result, the network no longer grows without bound, but constrains itself to a user-specified size. Pose estimates remain accurate since the ART layer tends to discard the least relevant information first. The smaller network performs recall faster, and in some cases is better for generalization, resulting in a reduction of error at recall time. The ART-Under-Constraint (ART-C) algorithm is extended to include initial filling with randomly selected patterns (referred to as ART-F). In experiments using a real-world data set, the new network performed equally well using less than one tenth the number of coarse patterns as a regular FCMAC. The FCMAC is also extended to include real-valued input activations. As a result, the network can be tuned to reject a variety of types of noise in the image feature detection. A quantitative analysis of noise tolerance was performed using four synthetic noise algorithms, and a qualitative investigation was made using noisy real-world image data. In validation experiments, the FCMAC system outperformed Radial Basis Function (RBF) networks for the 3-DOF problem, and had accuracy comparable to that of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and superior to that of Shape Context Matching (SCM), both

  2. Experimental Investigation of Shock-Cell Noise Reduction for Single Stream Nozzles in Simulated Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Brausch, J. F.; Balsa, T. F.; Janardan, B. A.; Knott, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Seven single stream model nozzles were tested in the Anechoic Free-Jet Acoustic Test Facility to evaluate the effectiveness of convergent divergent (C-D) flowpaths in the reduction of shock-cell noise under both static and mulated flight conditions. The test nozzles included a baseline convergent circular nozzle, a C-D circular nozzle, a convergent annular plug nozzle, a C-D annular plug nozzle, a convergent multi-element suppressor plug nozzle, and a C-D multi-element suppressor plug nozzle. Diagnostic flow visualization with a shadowgraph and aerodynamic plume measurements with a laser velocimeter were performed with the test nozzles. A theory of shock-cell noise for annular plug nozzles with shock-cells in the vicinity of the plug was developed. The benefit of these C-D nozzles was observed over a broad range of pressure ratiosin the vicinity of their design conditions. At the C-D design condition, the C-D annual nozzle was found to be free of shock-cells on the plug.

  3. Optimal design of minimum mean-square error noise reduction algorithms using the simulated annealing technique.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hur, Kur-Nan

    2009-02-01

    The performance of the minimum mean-square error noise reduction (MMSE-NR) algorithm in conjunction with time-recursive averaging (TRA) for noise estimation is found to be very sensitive to the choice of two recursion parameters. To address this problem in a more systematic manner, this paper proposes an optimization method to efficiently search the optimal parameters of the MMSE-TRA-NR algorithms. The objective function is based on a regression model, whereas the optimization process is carried out with the simulated annealing algorithm that is well suited for problems with many local optima. Another NR algorithm proposed in the paper employs linear prediction coding as a preprocessor for extracting the correlated portion of human speech. Objective and subjective tests were undertaken to compare the optimized MMSE-TRA-NR algorithm with several conventional NR algorithms. The results of subjective tests were processed by using analysis of variance to justify the statistic significance. A post hoc test, Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference, was conducted to further assess the pairwise difference between the NR algorithms.

  4. Portal imaging: Performance improvement in noise reduction by means of wavelet processing.

    PubMed

    González-López, Antonio; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Bastida-Jumilla, María-Consuelo; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the suitability, in terms of noise reduction, of various methods which can be applied to an image type often used in radiation therapy: the portal image. Among these methods, the analysis focuses on those operating in the wavelet domain. Wavelet-based methods tested on natural images--such as the thresholding of the wavelet coefficients, the minimization of the Stein unbiased risk estimator on a linear expansion of thresholds (SURE-LET), and the Bayes least-squares method using as a prior a Gaussian scale mixture (BLS-GSM method)--are compared with other methods that operate on the image domain--an adaptive Wiener filter and a nonlocal mean filter (NLM). For the assessment of the performance, the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), the structural similarity index (SSIM), the Pearson correlation coefficient, and the Spearman rank correlation (ρ) coefficient are used. The performance of the wavelet filters and the NLM method are similar, but wavelet filters outperform the Wiener filter in terms of portal image denoising. It is shown how BLS-GSM and NLM filters produce the smoothest image, while keeping soft-tissue and bone contrast. As for the computational cost, filters using a decimated wavelet transform (decimated thresholding and SURE-LET) turn out to be the most efficient, with calculation times around 1 s. PMID:26602966

  5. Improved Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Noise Reduction in Particle Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Reese, Jason; Emerson, David

    2014-11-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), widely utilised for turbulent flows, has recently been explored for processing particle data. An extension of the method based on time-windows offers a useful approach for noise reduction in particle simulations. However, to successfully remove statistical noise from the system, large amounts of data need to be provided. Moreover, POD can fail to improve the quality of an ensemble mean (statistical average) when applied to steady-state simulations. In order to achieve a better efficiency of POD in processing non-stationary fields, we have combined the method with wavelet-based filtering. In this new procedure, the wavelet thresholding is performed within POD's domain. In case of stationary problems, we will show how effectively POD can be applied to a matrix constructed from the mean, following the application of singular spectral analysis (SSA). The combination of POD and SSA is shown to successfully smooth time-dependent observables. Simulations were undertaken to illustrate the performance of the new tools applied to noisy velocity and density fields. Numerical examples include molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics simulations of force-driven fluid flows and phase separation phenomena. The research has received funding from the UK's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) under Grant EP/I011927/1. Results were obtained using the ARCHIE-WeSt High Performance Computer, under EPSRC Grant EP/K000586/1.

  6. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale; Suder, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are: a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney; an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney and FAA; and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  7. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney, an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney FAA and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  8. Chemical noise reduction via mass spectrometry and ion/ion charge inversion: amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kerry M; LeBlanc, Yves C; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Charge inversion ion/ion reactions can provide a significant reduction in chemical noise associated with mass spectra derived from complex mixtures for species composed of both acidic and basic sites, provided the ions derived from the matrix largely undergo neutralization. Amino acids constitute an important class of amphoteric compounds that undergo relatively efficient charge inversion. Precipitated plasma constitutes a relatively complex biological matrix that yields detectable signals at essentially every mass-to-charge value over a wide range. This chemical noise can be dramatically reduced using multiply charged reagent ions that can invert the charge of species amenable to the transfer of multiple charges upon a single interaction and by detecting product ions of opposite polarity. The principle is illustrated here with amino acids present in precipitated plasma subjected to ionization in the positive mode, reaction with anions derived from negative nanoelectrospray ionization of poly (amido amine) dendrimer generation 3.5, and mass analysis in the negative ion mode. PMID:21456599

  9. Noise reduction in a launch vehicle fairing using actively tuned loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Jonathan D; Clark, Robert L

    2003-04-01

    Loudspeakers tuned as optimal acoustic absorbers can significantly reduce damaging, low frequency, reverberant noise in a full-scale launch vehicle fairing. Irregular geometry, changing payloads, and the compliant nature of the fairing hinder effective implementation of a passively tuned loudspeaker. A method of tuning the loudspeaker dynamics in real time is required to meet the application requirements. Through system identification, the dynamics of the enclosure can be identified and used to tune the dynamics of the loudspeaker for reduction of targeted, high intensity, low-frequency modes that dominate the acoustic response in the fairing. A loudspeaker model with desired dynamics serves as the reference model in a control law designed to tune the dynamics of a non-ideal loudspeaker to act as an optimal tuned absorber. Experimental results indicate that a tuned loudspeaker placed in the nose cone of the fairing significantly reduces acoustic energy and verifies results calculated from the simulation.

  10. Method for the reduction of signal-induced noise in photomultiplier tubes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, C K; De Young, R J

    2000-04-20

    A new method to reduce photomultiplier tube detector signal-induced noise (SIN) in a lidar system is successfully demonstrated. A metal ring electrode placed external to the photomultiplier tube photocathode is pulsed during the intense near-field lidar return with a potential between 15 and 500 V, resulting in a significant reduction in SIN. The effect of the metal ring voltage on the decay time constant and the magnitude of a simulated lidar signal is presented. Optimal experimental conditions for the use of this device in lidar receivers, such that the lidar decay time constant is not affected, are determined. Mechanisms for this SIN suppression system are discussed in detail, and data were recorded to show that the voltage on the metal ring functions by altering the photomultiplier electron optics.

  11. Motion detection, noise reduction, texture suppression, and contour enhancement by spatiotemporal Gabor filters with surround inhibition.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Nicolai; Subramanian, Easwar

    2007-12-01

    We study the orientation and speed tuning properties of spatiotemporal three-dimensional (3D) Gabor and motion energy filters as models of time-dependent receptive fields of simple and complex cells in the primary visual cortex (V1). We augment the motion energy operator with surround suppression to model the inhibitory effect of stimuli outside the classical receptive field. We show that spatiotemporal integration and surround suppression lead to substantial noise reduction. We propose an effective and straightforward motion detection computation that uses the population code of a set of motion energy filters tuned to different velocities. We also show that surround inhibition leads to suppression of texture and thus improves the visibility of object contours and facilitates figure/ground segregation and the detection and recognition of objects.

  12. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W Y

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  13. Age-Related Benefits of Digital Noise Reduction for Short-Term Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of word learning for children with hearing loss (HL) in quiet and in noise compared to normal-hearing (NH) peers. The effects of digital noise reduction (DNR) were examined for children with HL. Method: Forty-one children with NH and 26 children with HL were grouped by age (8-9 years and 11-12 years). The children…

  14. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Yamamoto, K.; Majjigi, R. K.; Brausch, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Six scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic facility to evauate the effectiveness of convergent-divergent (C-D) terminations in reducing shock-cell noise of unsuppressed and mechanically suppressed coannular plug nozzles. One hundred fifty-three acoustic test points with inverted velocity profiles were conducted under static and simulated flight conditions. Diagnostic flow visualization with a shadowgraph and velocity measurements with a laser velocimeter were performed on selected plumes. Shock-cells were identified on the plug and downstream of the plug of the unsuppressed convergent coannular nozzle with truncated plug. Broadband peak frequencies predicted with the two shock-cell structures were correlated with the observed spectra using the measured shock-cell spacings. Relative to a convergent circular nozzle, the perceived noise level (PNL) data at an observer angle of 60 deg relative to inlet, indicated a reduction of (1) 6.5 dB and 9.2 dB with unsuppressed C-D coannular nozzle with truncated plug and (2) 7.7 dB and 8.3 dB with suppressed C-D coannular nozzle under static and simulated flight conditions, espectively. The unsuppressed C-D coannular nozzle with truncated plug, operating at the C-D design condition, had shock-cells downstream of the plug with no shock-cells on the plug. The downstream shock-cells were eliminated by replacing the truncated plug with a smooth extension to obtain an additional 2.4 dB and 3 dB front quadrant PNL reduction, under static and simulated flight conditions, respectively. Other results are discussed.

  15. BVI impulsive noise reduction by higher harmonic pitch control - Results of a scaled model rotor experiment in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Schultz, KLAUS-J.; Kube, Roland; Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Niesl, Georg; Streby, Olivier

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a model rotor acoustics test performed to examine the benefit of higher harmonic control (HHC) of blade pitch to reduce blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise. A dynamically scaled, four-bladed, rigid rotor model, a 40-percent replica of the B0-105 main rotor, was tested in the German Dutch Wind Tunnel. Noise characteristics and noise directivity patterns as well as vibratory loads were measured and used to demonstrate the changes when different HHC schedules were applied. Dramatic changes of the acoustic signatures and the noise radiation directivity with the HHC phase variations are found. Compared to the baseline conditions (without HHC), significant mid-frequency noise reductions of locally 6 dB are obtained for low-speed descent conditions where GVI is most intense. For other rotor operating conditions with less intense BVI there is less or no benefit from the use of HHC. LF noise and vibratory loads, especially at optimum noise reduction control settings, are found to increase.

  16. Gain-induced speech distortions and the absence of intelligibility benefit with existing noise-reduction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibak; Loizou, Philipos C

    2011-09-01

    Most noise-reduction algorithms used in hearing aids apply a gain to the noisy envelopes to reduce noise interference. The present study assesses the impact of two types of speech distortion introduced by noise-suppressive gain functions: amplification distortion occurring when the amplitude of the target signal is over-estimated, and attenuation distortion occurring when the target amplitude is under-estimated. Sentences corrupted by steady noise and competing talker were processed through a noise-reduction algorithm and synthesized to contain either amplification distortion, attenuation distortion or both. The attenuation distortion was found to have a minimal effect on speech intelligibility. In fact, substantial improvements (>80 percentage points) in intelligibility, relative to noise-corrupted speech, were obtained when the processed sentences contained only attenuation distortion. When the amplification distortion was limited to be smaller than 6 dB, performance was nearly unaffected in the steady-noise conditions, but was severely degraded in the competing-talker conditions. Overall, the present data suggest that one reason that existing algorithms do not improve speech intelligibility is because they allow amplification distortions in excess of 6 dB. These distortions are shown in this study to be always associated with masker-dominated envelopes and should thus be eliminated.

  17. Statistical-noise reduction in correlation analysis of high-energy nuclear collisions with event-mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. L.; Bhattarai, P.

    2016-06-01

    The error propagation and statistical-noise reduction method of Reid and Trainor for two-point correlation applications in high-energy collisions is extended to include particle-pair references constructed by mixing two particles from all event-pair combinations within event subsets of arbitrary size. The Reid-Trainor method is also applied to other particle-pair mixing algorithms commonly used in correlation analysis of particle production from high-energy nuclear collisions. The statistical-noise reduction, inherent in the Reid-Trainor event-mixing procedure, is shown to occur for these other event-mixing algorithms as well. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented which verify the predicted degree of noise reduction. In each case the final errors are determined by the bin-wise particle-pair number, rather than by the bin-wise single-particle count.

  18. Demonstration of short-haul aircraft aft noise reduction techniques on a twenty inch (50.8 cm) diameter fan, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Mcfalls, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Tests of a 20 inch diameter, low tip speed, low pressure ratio fan which investigated aft fan noise reduction techniques are reported. These techniques included source noise reduction features of selection of vane-blade ratio to reduce second harmonic noise, spacing effects, and lowering the Mach number through a vane row. Aft suppression features investigated included porosity effects, variable depth treatment, and treatment regenerated flow noise. Initial results and selected comparisons are presented.

  19. Reduction of Background Noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, Stephen M.; Allen, Christopher S.; Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Background noise in both open-jet and closed wind tunnels adversely affects the signal-to-noise ratio of acoustic measurements. To measure the noise of increasingly quieter aircraft models, the background noise will have to be reduced by physical means or through signal processing. In a closed wind tunnel, such as the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel, the principle background noise sources can be classified as: (1) fan drive noise; (2) microphone self-noise; (3) aerodynamically induced noise from test-dependent hardware such as model struts and junctions; and (4) noise from the test section walls and vane set. This paper describes the steps taken to minimize the influence of each of these background noise sources in the 40 x 80.

  20. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold

  1. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools—Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Konstanze; Scharf, Thomas; Baumann, Uwe; Groneberg, David A.; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. Methods: This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax) as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam) were investigated. Results: The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of “metal grid” (90.71 dB) or of a woven willow “basket” (91.61 dB), whereas a case of “aluminium” (103.34 dB) generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs “metal grid” and “basket”. The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (−13.88 dB) and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. Conclusion: The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven “basket” with an insert of PU-foam. PMID:27384575

  2. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  3. The effect of oblique angle of sound incidence, realistic edge conditions, curvature and in-plane panel stresses on the noise reduction characteristics of general aviation type panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, F.; Lameris, J.; Dunn, D.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments and a theoretical analysis were conducted to predict the noise reduction of inclined and curved panels. These predictions are compared to the experimental results with reasonable agreement between theory and experiment for panels under an oblique angle of sound incidence. Theoretical as well as experimental results indicate a big increase in noise reduction when a flat test panel is curved. Further curving the panel slightly decreases the noise reduction. Riveted flat panels are shown to give a higher noise reduction in the stiffness-controlled frequency region, while bonded panels are superior in this region when the test panel is curved. Experimentally measured noise reduction characteristics of flat aluminum panels with uniaxial in-plane stresses are presented and discussed. These test results indicate an important improvement in the noise reduction of these panels in the frequency range below the fundamental panel/cavity frequency.

  4. A Comparison of IIR and Wavelet Filtering for Noise Reduction of the ECG

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, JS; Johannesen, L; Grove, USL; Lundhus, K; Couderc, J-P; Graff, C

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the ability to preserve information and reduce noise contaminants on the ECG for five wavelet filters and three IIR filters. Two 3-lead Holter ECGs were used. White Gaussian Noise was added to the first ECG in increments of 10% coverage. The second ECG contained alternating muscle transients and noise-free segments. Computation times and SNR improvements for different noise coverages were calculated and compared. RMS errors were calculated from noise-free segments on the ECG with transient muscle noise. Wavelet filters improved SNR more than IIR filters when the signal coverage was more than 50% noise. In contrast, the computation times were shorter for IIR filters (6 s) than for wavelet filters (88 s). On the ECG with transient muscle noise there was a trade-off in performance between wavelet and IIR filtering. In a clinical setting where the amount of noise is unknown, using IIR filters appears to be preferred for consistent performance. PMID:22068831

  5. Effect of Community Engagement Interventions on Patient Safety and Risk Reduction Efforts in Primary Health Facilities: Evidence from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Ogink, Alice; van Ostenberg, Paul; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient safety and quality care remain major challenges to Ghana’s healthcare system. Like many health systems in Africa, this is largely because demand for healthcare is outstripping available human and material resource capacity of healthcare facilities and new investment is insufficient. In the light of these demand and supply constraints, systematic community engagement (SCE) in healthcare quality assessment can be a feasible and cost effective option to augment existing quality improvement interventions. SCE entails structured use of existing community groups to assess healthcare quality in health facilities. Identified quality gaps are discussed with healthcare providers, improvements identified and rewards provided if the quality gaps are closed. Purpose This paper evaluates whether or not SCE, through the assessment of health service quality, improves patient safety and risk reduction efforts by staff in healthcare facilities. Methods A randomized control trail was conducted in 64 primary healthcare facilities in the Greater Accra and Western regions of Ghana. Patient risk assessments were conducted in 32 randomly assigned intervention and control facilities. Multivariate multiple regression test was used to determine effect of the SCE interventions on staff efforts towards reducing patient risk. Spearman correlation test was used to ascertain associations between types of community groups engaged and risk assessment scores of healthcare facilities. Findings Clinic staff efforts towards increasing patient safety and reducing risk improved significantly in intervention facilities especially in the areas of leadership/accountability (Coef. = 10.4, p<0.05) and staff competencies (Coef. = 7.1, p<0.05). Improvement in service utilization and health resources could not be attributed to the interventions because these were outside the control of the study and might have been influenced by institutional or national level developments between the

  6. Noise reduction techniques in the design of a pneumatic-driven hand held power tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Christian M.

    2005-09-01

    Pneumatic-driven hand-held power tools generate noise in the workplace. Current legislation in Europe and the USA aims at protecting workers against noise exposure. In the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that employers create a hearing conservation program if the noise exposure exceeds 85 dB(A). In the European Community under the Directive 2003/10/EC, employers are required to provide hearing protection if the noise exposure within the working environment exceeds 80 dB(A) and must require hearing protection to be worn if the noise exposure exceeds 85 dB(A). This paper examines the sources of noise which contribute to the overall noise from a hand-held power tool. A test plan was developed to identify these individual sources of noise and to determine if structure-borne noise or airborne noise is the dominant source relative to the overall noise level. The measurements were performed per International Standards Organization (ISO) 15744. This paper will describe the methodology used to identify the noise sources and reduce the overall noise of a hand-held power tool.

  7. Reduction of Striping Noise in Overlapping LIDAR Intensity Data by Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Shaker, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    To serve seamless mapping, airborne LiDAR data are usually collected with multiple parallel strips with one or two cross strip(s). Nevertheless, the overlapping regions of LiDAR data strips are usually found with unbalanced intensity values, resulting in the appearance of stripping noise. Despite that physical intensity correction methods are recently proposed, some of the system and environmental parameters are assumed as constant or not disclosed, leading to such an intensity discrepancy. This paper presents a new normalization technique to adjust the radiometric misalignment found in the overlapping LiDAR data strips. The normalization technique is built upon a second-order polynomial function fitted on the joint histogram plot, which is generated with a set of pairwise closest data points identified within the overlapping region. The method was tested on Teledyne Optech's Gemini dataset (at 1064 nm wavelength), where the LiDAR intensity data were first radiometrically corrected based on the radar (range) equation. Five land cover features were selected to evaluate the coefficient of variation (cv) of the intensity values before and after implementing the proposed method. Reduction of cv was found by 19% to 59% in the Gemini dataset, where the striping noise was significantly reduced in the radiometrically corrected and normalized intensity data. The Gemini dataset was also used to conduct land cover classification, and the overall accuracy yielded a notable improvement of 9% to 18%. As a result, LiDAR intensity data should be pre-processed with radiometric correction and normalization prior to any data manipulation.

  8. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temeperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Struts shaping of the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  9. Integrated solid-state nanopore platform for nanopore fabrication via dielectric breakdown, DNA-speed deceleration and noise reduction

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yusuke; Yanagi, Itaru; Matsui, Kazuma; Yokoi, Takahide; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The practical use of solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing requires easy fabrication of the nanopores, reduction of the DNA movement speed and reduction of the ionic current noise. Here, we report an integrated nanopore platform with a nanobead structure that decelerates DNA movement and an insulating polyimide layer that reduces noise. To enable rapid nanopore fabrication, we introduced a controlled dielectric breakdown (CDB) process into our system. DNA translocation experiments revealed that single nanopores were created by the CDB process without sacrificing performance in reducing DNA movement speed by up to 10 μs/base or reducing noise up to 600 pArms at 1 MHz. Our platform provides the essential components for proceeding to the next step in the process of DNA sequencing. PMID:27499264

  10. Integrated solid-state nanopore platform for nanopore fabrication via dielectric breakdown, DNA-speed deceleration and noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yusuke; Yanagi, Itaru; Matsui, Kazuma; Yokoi, Takahide; Takeda, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    The practical use of solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing requires easy fabrication of the nanopores, reduction of the DNA movement speed and reduction of the ionic current noise. Here, we report an integrated nanopore platform with a nanobead structure that decelerates DNA movement and an insulating polyimide layer that reduces noise. To enable rapid nanopore fabrication, we introduced a controlled dielectric breakdown (CDB) process into our system. DNA translocation experiments revealed that single nanopores were created by the CDB process without sacrificing performance in reducing DNA movement speed by up to 10 μs/base or reducing noise up to 600 pArms at 1 MHz. Our platform provides the essential components for proceeding to the next step in the process of DNA sequencing.

  11. Poisson-Gaussian Noise Reduction Using the Hidden Markov Model in Contourlet Domain for Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sejung; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    In certain image acquisitions processes, like in fluorescence microscopy or astronomy, only a limited number of photons can be collected due to various physical constraints. The resulting images suffer from signal dependent noise, which can be modeled as a Poisson distribution, and a low signal-to-noise ratio. However, the majority of research on noise reduction algorithms focuses on signal independent Gaussian noise. In this paper, we model noise as a combination of Poisson and Gaussian probability distributions to construct a more accurate model and adopt the contourlet transform which provides a sparse representation of the directional components in images. We also apply hidden Markov models with a framework that neatly describes the spatial and interscale dependencies which are the properties of transformation coefficients of natural images. In this paper, an effective denoising algorithm for Poisson-Gaussian noise is proposed using the contourlet transform, hidden Markov models and noise estimation in the transform domain. We supplement the algorithm by cycle spinning and Wiener filtering for further improvements. We finally show experimental results with simulations and fluorescence microscopy images which demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26352138

  12. Poisson-Gaussian Noise Reduction Using the Hidden Markov Model in Contourlet Domain for Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sejung; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    In certain image acquisitions processes, like in fluorescence microscopy or astronomy, only a limited number of photons can be collected due to various physical constraints. The resulting images suffer from signal dependent noise, which can be modeled as a Poisson distribution, and a low signal-to-noise ratio. However, the majority of research on noise reduction algorithms focuses on signal independent Gaussian noise. In this paper, we model noise as a combination of Poisson and Gaussian probability distributions to construct a more accurate model and adopt the contourlet transform which provides a sparse representation of the directional components in images. We also apply hidden Markov models with a framework that neatly describes the spatial and interscale dependencies which are the properties of transformation coefficients of natural images. In this paper, an effective denoising algorithm for Poisson-Gaussian noise is proposed using the contourlet transform, hidden Markov models and noise estimation in the transform domain. We supplement the algorithm by cycle spinning and Wiener filtering for further improvements. We finally show experimental results with simulations and fluorescence microscopy images which demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26352138

  13. Experimental study of the effect of viscoelastic damping materials on noise and vibration reduction within railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rongping; Meng, Guang; Yang, Jun; He, Caichun

    2009-01-01

    Interior noise and vibration reduction has become one important concern of railway operating environments due to the influence of increased speeds and reduced vehicle weights for energy efficiency. Three types of viscoelastic damping materials, bitumen-based damping material, water-based damping coating and butyl rubber damping material, were developed to reduce the vibration and noise within railway vehicles. Two sleeper carriages were furnished with the new materials in different patterns of constrained-layer and free-layer damping treatment. The measurements of vibration and noise were carried out in three running carriages. It is found that the reduction effect of damping treatments depends on the running speed. The unweighted root-mean-square acceleration is reduced by 0.08-0.79 and 0.06-0.49 m/s 2 for the carriage treated by bitumen-based as well as water-based damping materials and water-based damping material, respectively. The first two materials reduce vibration in a wider frequency range of 63-1000 Hz than the last. It turns out that the damping treatments of the first two reduce the interior noise level by 5-8 dBA within the carriage, and the last damping material by 1-6 dBA. However, the specific loudness analysis of noises shows that the noise components between 125 and 250 Hz are dominant for the overall loudness, although the low-frequency noise is noticeably decreased by the damping materials. The measure of loudness is shown to be more accurate to assess reduction effect of the damping material on the acoustic comfort.

  14. Reduction of diesel engine exhaust noise in the petroleum mining industry. [by resonator type diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinov, T.

    1974-01-01

    An important noise source in a drilling plant is Diesel engine exhaust. In order to reduce this noise, a reactive silencer of the derivative resonator type was proposed, calculated from the acoustic and design point of view and applied. As a result of applying such a silencer on the exhaust conduit of a Diesel engine the noise level dropped down to 18 db.

  15. Efficient reduction of complex noise in passive millimeter-wavelength video utilizing Bayesian surprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Baron, Josh; Matic, Roy M.

    2011-06-01

    Passive millimeter wavelength (PMMW) video holds great promise given its ability to see targets and obstacles through fog, smoke and rain. However, current imagers produce undesirable complex noise. This can come as a mixture of fast shot (snow like) noise and a slower forming circular fixed pattern. Shot noise can be removed by a simple gain style filter. However, this can produce blurring of objects in the scene. To alleviate this, we measure the amount of Bayesian surprise in videos. Bayesian surprise is feature change in time which is abrupt, but cannot be accounted for as shot noise. Surprise is used to attenuate the shot noise filter in locations of high surprise. Since high Bayesian surprise in videos is very salient to observers, this reduces blurring particularly in places where people visually attend. Fixed pattern noise is removed after the shot noise using a combination of Non-uniformity correction (NUC) and Eigen Image Wavelet Transformation. The combination allows for online removal of time varying fixed pattern noise even when background motion may be absent. It also allows for online adaptation to differing intensities of fixed pattern noise. The fixed pattern and shot noise filters are all efficient allowing for real time video processing of PMMW video. We show several examples of PMMW video with complex noise that is much cleaner as a result of the noise removal. Processed video clearly shows cars, houses, trees and utility poles at 20 frames per second.

  16. Meta-Analysis of Free-Response Studies, 1992-2008: Assessing the Noise Reduction Model in Parapsychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Lance; Tressoldi, Patrizio E.; Di Risio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of meta-analyses on 3 types of free-response study: (a) ganzfeld (a technique that enhances a communication anomaly referred to as "psi"); (b) nonganzfeld noise reduction using alleged psi-enhancing techniques such as dream psi, meditation, relaxation, or hypnosis; and (c) standard free response (nonganzfeld, no noise…

  17. Meta-analysis of free-response studies, 1992-2008: assessing the noise reduction model in parapsychology.

    PubMed

    Storm, Lance; Tressoldi, Patrizio E; Di Risio, Lorenzo

    2010-07-01

    We report the results of meta-analyses on 3 types of free-response study: (a) ganzfeld (a technique that enhances a communication anomaly referred to as "psi"); (b) nonganzfeld noise reduction using alleged psi-enhancing techniques such as dream psi, meditation, relaxation, or hypnosis; and (c) standard free response (nonganzfeld, no noise reduction). For the period 1997-2008, a homogeneous data set of 29 ganzfeld studies yielded a mean effect size of 0.142 (Stouffer Z = 5.48, p = 2.13 x 10(-8)). A homogeneous nonganzfeld noise reduction data set of 16 studies yielded a mean effect size of 0.110 (Stouffer Z = 3.35, p = 2.08 x 10(-4)), and a homogeneous data set of 14 standard free-response studies produced a weak negative mean effect size of -0.029 (Stouffer Z = -2.29, p = .989). The mean effect size value of the ganzfeld database was significantly higher than the mean effect size of the standard free-response database but was not higher than the effect size of the nonganzfeld noise reduction database [corrected].We also found that selected participants (believers in the paranormal, meditators, etc.) had a performance advantage over unselected participants, but only if they were in the ganzfeld condition.

  18. Comparison of options for reduction of noise in the test section of the NASA Langley 4x7m wind tunnel, including reduction of nozzle area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustically significant features of the NASA 4X7m wind tunnel and the Dutch-German DNW low speed tunnel are compared to illustrate the reasons for large differences in background noise in the open jet test sections of the two tunnels. Also introduced is the concept of reducing test section noise levels through fan and turning vane source reductions which can be brought about by reducing the nozzle cross sectional area, and thus the circuit mass flow for a particular exit velocity. The costs and benefits of treating sources, paths, and changing nozzle geometry are reviewed.

  19. A reliable ground bounce noise reduction technique for nanoscale CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha

    2015-11-01

    Power gating is the most effective method to reduce the standby leakage power by adding header/footer high-VTH sleep transistors between actual and virtual power/ground rails. When a power gating circuit transitions from sleep mode to active mode, a large instantaneous charge current flows through the sleep transistors. Ground bounce noise (GBN) is the high voltage fluctuation on real ground rail during sleep mode to active mode transitions of power gating circuits. GBN disturbs the logic states of internal nodes of circuits. A novel and reliable power gating structure is proposed in this article to reduce the problem of GBN. The proposed structure contains low-VTH transistors in place of high-VTH footer. The proposed power gating structure not only reduces the GBN but also improves other performance metrics. A large mitigation of leakage power in both modes eliminates the need of high-VTH transistors. A comprehensive and comparative evaluation of proposed technique is presented in this article for a chain of 5-CMOS inverters. The simulation results are compared to other well-known GBN reduction circuit techniques at 22 nm predictive technology model (PTM) bulk CMOS model using HSPICE tool. Robustness against process, voltage and temperature (PVT) variations is estimated through Monte-Carlo simulations.

  20. A coherent model for predicting noise reduction in long enclosures with impedance discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, P. M.; Li, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed for the prediction of sound propagation in a rectangular long enclosure with impedance discontinuities. Based on the image-source method, the boundaries are assumed to be geometrically reflective. An infinite number of image sources are generated by multiple reflections. The sound pressure of each image is obtained by an approximate analytical solution, known as the Weyl-van der Pol formula. The total sound field is then calculated by summation of the contribution from all images. The phase information of each image and the phase change upon reflection are included in the model. A single change of impedance in a two-dimensional duct is focused on as the fundamental problem of the current study. The diffraction effect at the impedance discontinuity is proved to be insignificant, and it is ignored in the formulation. On the assumption that the diffraction effect is not important, the investigation is moved on to a rectangular long enclosure. Measurements are conducted in two model tunnels to validate the proposed prediction model. The predictions are found to give good approximations of the experimental results. The theoretical model serves as the first attempt to optimize the position and pattern of sound absorption materials in a long enclosure, such as an underground railway station or a building corridor, for the reduction of noise and improvement of sound quality.

  1. Global threat reduction initiative efforts to address transportation challenges associated with the recovery of disused radioactive sealed sources - 10460

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julie; Abeyta, Cristy L; Griffin, Justin M; Matzke, James L; Pearson, Michael W; Cuthbertson, Abigail; Rawl, Richard; Singley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Proper disposition of disused radioactive sources is essential for their safe and secure management and necessary to preclude their use in malicious activities. Without affordable, timely transportation options, disused sealed sources remain in storage at hundreds of sites throughout the country and around the world. While secure storage is a temporary measure, the longer sources remain disused or unwanted the chances increase that they will become unsecured or abandoned. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Off-Site Source Recovery Project (GTRIlOSRP), recovers thousands of disused and unwanted sealed sources annually as part of GTRl's larger mission to reduce and protect high risk nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Faced with decreasing availability of certified transportation containers to support movement of disused and unwanted neutron- and beta/gamma-emitting radioactive sealed sources, GTRIlOSRP has initiated actions to ensure the continued success of the project in timely recovery and management of sealed radioactive sources. Efforts described in this paper to enhance transportation capabilities include: {sm_bullet} Addition of authorized content to existing and planned Type B containers to support the movement of non-special form and other Type B-quantity sealed sources; {sm_bullet} Procurement of vendor services for the design, development, testing and certification of a new Type B container to support transportation of irradiators, teletherapy heads or sources removed from these devices using remote handling capabilities such as the IAEA portable hot cell facility; {sm_bullet} Expansion of shielded Type A container inventory for transportation of gamma-emitting sources in activity ranges requiring use of shielding for conformity with transportation requirements; {sm_bullet} Approval of the S300 Type A fissile container for transport of Pu-239 sealed sources internationally; {sm_bullet} Technology transfer of field

  2. Effect of advanced aircraft noise reduction technology on the 1990 projected noise environment around Patrick Henry Airport. [development of noise exposure forecast contours for projected traffic volume and aircraft types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthorn, J. M.; Brown, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been conducted of the future noise environment of Patric Henry Airport and its neighboring communities projected for the year 1990. An assessment was made of the impact of advanced noise reduction technologies which are currently being considered. These advanced technologies include a two-segment landing approach procedure and aircraft hardware modifications or retrofits which would add sound absorbent material in the nacelles of the engines or which would replace the present two- and three-stage fans with a single-stage fan of larger diameter. Noise Exposure Forecast (NEF) contours were computed for the baseline (nonretrofitted) aircraft for the projected traffic volume and fleet mix for the year 1990. These NEF contours are presented along with contours for a variety of retrofit options. Comparisons of the baseline with the noise reduction options are given in terms of total land area exposed to 30 and 40 NEF levels. Results are also presented of the effects on noise exposure area of the total number of daily operations.

  3. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Separate-Flow High-Bypass Ratio Nozzle Noise Reduction Program Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, John K. C.; Schweiger, Paul S.; Premo, John W.; Barber, Thomas J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA s model-scale nozzle noise tests show that it is possible to achieve a 3 EPNdB jet noise reduction with inwardfacing chevrons and flipper-tabs installed on the primary nozzle and fan nozzle chevrons. These chevrons and tabs are simple devices and are easy to be incorporated into existing short duct separate-flow nonmixed nozzle exhaust systems. However, these devices are expected to cause some small amount of thrust loss relative to the axisymmetric baseline nozzle system. Thus, it is important to have these devices further tested in a calibrated nozzle performance test facility to quantify the thrust performances of these devices. The choice of chevrons or tabs for jet noise suppression would most likely be based on the results of thrust loss performance tests to be conducted by Aero System Engineering (ASE) Inc. It is anticipated that the most promising concepts identified from this program will be validated in full scale engine tests at both Pratt & Whitney and Allied-Signal, under funding from NASA s Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts (EVNRC) programs. This will bring the technology readiness level to the point where the jet noise suppression concepts could be incorporated with high confidence into either new or existing turbofan engines having short-duct, separate-flow nacelles.

  4. In-flight evaluation of noise levels and assessment of active noise reduction systems in the Seahawk S-70B-2 helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Foran, D. A.

    Cabin and at-ear sound spectra in the S-70B-2 at various crew positions and flight conditions were measured in order to determine the noise attenuation properties of the ALPHA helmet and the effectiveness of active noise reduction (ANR) systems developed by the Defence Research Agency-Aerospace Division (formerly the Royal Aerospace Establishment) and the BOSE Corporation. Results show that if newly proposed hearing conservation guidelines are adopted, aircrew wearing the ALPHA helmet would require additional attenuation devices. It is recommended that an ANR system be incorporated into the S-70B-2 as such a system would allow realistic flight duration to be maintained, improve voice communication, and reduce aircrew fatigue.

  5. Reduction of frequency noise and frequency shift by phase shifting elements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-03-15

    We recently reported the analysis of the frequency noise in the frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) both in high-Q and low-Q environments [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043708 (2009)]. We showed in the paper that the oscillator noise, the frequency fluctuation of the oscillator, becomes prominent in the modulation frequency lower than f{sub 0}/2Q, where f{sub 0} and Q are the resonance frequency and Q-factor. The magnitude of the oscillator noise is determined by the slope of the phase versus frequency curve of the cantilever at f{sub 0}. However, in actual FM-AFM in liquids, the phase versus frequency curve may not be always ideal because of the existence of various phase shifting elements (PSEs). For example, the spurious resonance peaks caused by the acoustic excitation and a band-pass filter in the self-oscillation loop increase the slope of the phase versus frequency curve. Due to those PSEs, the effective Q-factor is often increased from the intrinsic Q-factor of the cantilever. In this article, the frequency noise in the FM-AFM system with the PSEs in the self-oscillation loop is analyzed to show that the oscillator noise is reduced by the increase of the effective Q-factor. It is also shown that the oscillation frequency deviates from the resonance frequency due to the increase of the effective Q-factor, thereby causing the reduction in the frequency shift signal with the same factor. Therefore the increase of the effective Q-factor does not affect the signal-to-noise ratio in the frequency shift measurement, but it does affect the quantitativeness of the measured force in the FM-AFM. Furthermore, the reduction of the frequency noise and frequency shift by the increase of the effective Q-factor were confirmed by the experiments.

  6. A computational study of the effect of windscreen shape and flow resistivity on turbulent wind noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Zheng, Z C; Wilson, D K

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, numerical simulations are used to study the turbulent wind noise reduction effect of microphone windscreens with varying shapes and flow resistivities. Typical windscreen shapes consisting of circular, elliptical, and rectangular cylinders are investigated. A turbulent environment is generated by placing a solid circular cylinder upstream of the microphone. An immersed-boundary method with a fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme is implemented to enhance the simulation accuracy for high-Reynolds number flow around the solid cylinder as well as at the interface between the open air and the porous material comprising the windscreen. The Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are solved in the open air. For the flow inside the porous material, a modified form of the Zwikker-Kosten equation is solved. The results show that, on average, the circular and horizontal ellipse windscreens have similar overall wind noise reduction performance, while the horizontal ellipse windscreen with medium flow resistivity provides the most effective wind noise reduction among all the considered cases. The vertical ellipse windscreen with high flow resistivity, in particular, increases the wind noise because of increased self-generation of turbulence.

  7. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic composite nacelle. [for achieving reductions in community noise and operating expense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodall, R. G.; Painter, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual nacelle designs for wide-bodied and for advanced-technology transports were studied with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise with minimum penalties in airplane weight, cost, and in operating expense by the application of advanced composite materials to nacelle structure and sound suppression elements. Nacelle concepts using advanced liners, annular splitters, radial splitters, translating centerbody inlets, and mixed-flow nozzles were evaluated and a preferred concept selected. A preliminary design study of the selected concept, a mixed flow nacelle with extended inlet and no splitters, was conducted and the effects on noise, direct operating cost, and return on investment determined.

  8. Pratt & Whitney/Boeing Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts Final Report for NASA Contract NAS3-97144, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Larry A.; Hauser, Joseph E.; Mathews, Douglas C.; Topol, David A.; Bielak, Gerald W.; Lan, Justin H.; Premo, John W.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results of the work completed in Phase 2 of the Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts (EVNRC) contract. The purpose of the program is to validate, through engine testing, advanced noise reduction concepts aimed at reducing engine noise up to 6 EPNdB and improving nacelle suppression by 50 percent relative to 1992 technology. Phase 1 of the program is completed and is summarized in NASA/CR-2014-218088.

  9. Noise-induced cochlear hypoxia is intensity dependent, correlates with hearing loss and precedes reduction of cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Lamm, K; Arnold, W

    1996-01-01

    Anesthetized and artificially ventilated guinea pigs were exposed to broad-band noise of 95, 101, 106 or 115 dB SPL for 30 min and studied for 180 min after cessation of noise. The partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the perilymph, the cochlear blood flow (CoBF) and auditory-evoked potentials were continuously recorded. Arterial blood pressure, electrocardiogram, inspiratory and expiratory gas levels, arterial blood gas levels and acid-base status were kept stable to exclude influences of these parameters on cochlear parameters. Exposure to 95 dB SPL did not affect perilymphatic pO2 or CoBF. Cochlear microphonics (CMs) were reduced, but compound action potentials of the auditory nerve (CAPs) and auditory brainstem potentials (ABRs) increased after exposure to this low-level noise. Perilymphatic pO2 decreased during exposure to 101 dB SPL and then further decreased during the subsequent 60 min after cessation of the noise. CoBF did not change significantly during and 30 min after noise but then paralleled the decline of perilymphatic pO2. However, both parameters showed a clear indication of recovery in the second and third hours after noise. At 101 dB SPL, CMs were again reduced immediately, CAPs were unaltered and ABRs again increased. Exposure to 106 and to 115 dB SPL resulted in a decrease in both perilymphatic pO2 and CoBF; this decrease began during the exposure but became progressively worse after the noise. Hearing loss was observed immediately with exposure and showed no signs of further deterioration after cessation. The observed time courses of changes are important. They reveal that hearing loss and cochlear hypoxia precede reduction in CoBF due to noise exposure. The potential mechanisms underlying these effects are discussed.

  10. Investigation of Flow Conditioners for Compact Jet Engine Simulator Rig Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    The design requirements for two new Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units for upcoming wind tunnel testing lead to the distinct possibility of rig noise contamination. The acoustic and aerodynamic properties of several flow conditioner devices are investigated over a range of operating conditions relevant to the CJES units to mitigate the risk of rig noise. An impinging jet broadband noise source is placed in the upstream plenum of the test facility permitting measurements of not only flow conditioner self-noise, but also noise attenuation characteristics. Several perforated plate and honeycomb samples of high porosity show minimal self-noise but also minimal attenuation capability. Conversely, low porosity perforated plate and sintered wire mesh conditioners exhibit noticeable attenuation but also unacceptable self-noise. One fine wire mesh sample (DP450661) shows minimal selfnoise and reasonable attenuation, particularly when combined in series with a 15.6 percent open area (POA) perforated plate upstream. This configuration is the preferred flow conditioner system for the CJES, providing up to 20 dB of broadband attenuation capability with minimal self-noise.

  11. An adaptive integrated algorithm for noninvasive fetal ECG separation and noise reduction based on ICA-EEMD-WS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangchen; Luan, Yihui

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) plays an important role in assisting physicians to detect fetal changes in the womb and to make clinical decisions. However, in real situations, clear FECG is difficult to extract because it is usually overwhelmed by the dominant maternal ECG and other contaminated noise such as baseline wander, high-frequency noise. In this paper, we proposed a novel integrated adaptive algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA), ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), and wavelet shrinkage (WS) denoising, denoted as ICA-EEMD-WS, for FECG separation and noise reduction. First, ICA algorithm was used to separate the mixed abdominal ECG signal and to obtain the noisy FECG. Second, the noise in FECG was reduced by a three-step integrated algorithm comprised of EEMD, useful subcomponents statistical inference and WS processing, and partial reconstruction for baseline wander reduction. Finally, we evaluate the proposed algorithm using simulated data sets. The results indicated that the proposed ICA-EEMD-WS outperformed the conventional algorithms in signal denoising. PMID:26429348

  12. Active hearing protectors: Prospects for improving speech intelligibility while maintaining noise reduction and audibility of warning alarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, Anthony J.; Peterson, Donald R.; Cherniack, Martin G.; Gullapalli, Subhash

    2005-04-01

    Users of hearing protection devices (HPDs), including the communication headsets and helmets commonly worn by aircraft air and ground crews, emergency responders, military personnel, and persons in industry working in hostile environments, have long complained that HPDs interfere with their ability to communicate and to hear warning alarms. There thus appears to be a need for additional specialized HPDs designed specifically for these situations. The technology of active noise control together with signal processing applied to the communication channel of the HPD may provide a potential solution. The combination could improve noise reduction at low frequencies and enhance the intelligibility of speech reproduced by the communication channel, while maintaining the overall noise reduction within occupational exposure requirements, and assisting the perception of external warning alarms. A strategy for achieving these goals using an active circumaural earmuff equipped with sub-band processing will be described, in which parallel controllers optimize the speech signal-to-noise ratio in bands that contribute most to intelligibility. The perception of a tonal alarm is assisted by binaural feed through to the earphones, within the constraints imposed by occupational exposure limits, and by sub-band processing to reduce the upward spread of masking.

  13. Elastomeric Structural Attachment Concepts for Aircraft Flap Noise Reduction - Challenges and Approaches to Hyperelastic Structural Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Su, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise of transport aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Airframe noise reduction is currently emphasized under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) and Fixed Wing (FW) Project goals of NASA. A promising concept for trailing-edge-flap noise reduction is a flexible structural element or link that connects the side edges of the deployable flap to the adjacent main-wing structure. The proposed solution is distinguished by minimization of the span-wise extent of the structural link, thereby minimizing the aerodynamic load on the link structure at the expense of increased deformation requirement. Development of such a flexible structural link necessitated application of hyperelastic materials, atypical structural configurations and novel interface hardware. The resulting highly-deformable structural concept was termed the FLEXible Side Edge Link (FLEXSEL) concept. Prediction of atypical elastomeric deformation responses from detailed structural analysis was essential for evaluating feasible concepts that met the design constraints. The focus of this paper is to describe the many challenges encountered with hyperelastic finite element modeling and the nonlinear structural analysis of evolving FLEXSEL concepts. Detailed herein is the nonlinear analysis of FLEXSEL concepts that emerged during the project which include solid-section, foamcore, hollow, extended-span and pre-stressed concepts. Coupon-level analysis performed on elastomeric interface joints, which form a part of the FLEXSEL topology development, are also presented.

  14. Noise Reduction Using Wavelet Thresholding of Multitaper Estimators and Geometric Approach to Spectral Subtraction for Speech Coding Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kai Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Noise reduction using wavelet thresholding of multitaper estimators (WTME) and geometric approach to spectral subtraction (GASS) can improve speech quality of noisy sound for speech coding strategy. This study used Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ) to assess the performance of the WTME and GASS for speech coding strategy. Methods This study included 25 Mandarin sentences as test materials. Environmental noises including the air-conditioner, cafeteria and multi-talker were artificially added to test materials at signal to noise ratio (SNR) of -5, 0, 5, and 10 dB. HiRes 120 vocoder WTME and GASS noise reduction process were used in this study to generate sound outputs. The sound outputs were measured by the PESQ to evaluate sound quality. Results Two figures and three tables were used to assess the speech quality of the sound output of the WTME and GASS. Conclusion There is no significant difference between the overall performance of sound quality in both methods, but the geometric approach to spectral subtraction method is slightly better than the wavelet thresholding of multitaper estimators. PMID:22701151

  15. Acoustic analysis of aft noise reduction techniques measured on a subsonic tip speed 50.8 cm (twenty inch) diameter fan. [quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Clemons, A.

    1977-01-01

    Sound data which were obtained during tests of a 50.8 cm diameter, subsonic tip speed, low pressure ratio fan were analyzed. The test matrix was divided into two major investigations: (1) source noise reduction techniques; and (2) aft duct noise reduction with acoustic treatment. Source noise reduction techniques were investigated which include minimizing second harmonic noise by varying vane/blade ratio, variation in spacing, and lowering the Mach number through the vane row to lower fan broadband noise. Treatment in the aft duct which includes flow noise effects, faceplate porosity, rotor OGV treatment, slant cell treatment, and splitter simulation with variable depth on the outer wall and constant thickness treatment on the inner wall was investigated. Variable boundary conditions such as variation in treatment panel thickness and orientation, and mixed porosity combined with variable thickness were examined. Significant results are reported.

  16. Noise reduction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transversal data using improved wavelet transform and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Li, Jiangtao; Wang, Yang; Deng, Shaogui

    2015-02-01

    NMR logging and core NMR signals acts as an effective way of pore structure evaluation and fluid discrimination, but it is greatly contaminated by noise for samples with low magnetic resonance intensity. Transversal relaxation time (T2) spectrum obtained by inversion of decay signals intrigued by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence may deviate from the truth if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is imperfect. A method of combing the improved wavelet thresholding with the EWMA is proposed for noise reduction of decay data. The wavelet basis function and decomposition level are optimized in consideration of information entropy and white noise estimation firstly. Then a hybrid threshold function is developed to avoid drawbacks of hard and soft threshold functions. To achieve the best thresholding values of different levels, a nonlinear objective function based on SNR and mean square error (MSE) is constructed, transforming the problem to a task of finding optimal solutions. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to ensure the stability and global convergence. EWMA is carried out to eliminate unwanted peaks and sawtooths of the wavelet denoised signal. With validations of numerical simulations and experiments, it is demonstrated that the proposed approach can reduce the noise of T2 decay data perfectly.

  17. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of two panels with air in between and offers the advantages of low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. The double panel structure is widely used, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel's noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control to the cavity has been discussed in many papers. In this paper, the resonances of the panels and the cavity are considered simultaneously to further reduce the transmitted noise through an existing double panel structure. A structural-acoustic coupled model is developed to investigate and compare various structural control and cavity control methods. Numerical analysis and real-time control results show that structural control should be applied to both panels. Three types of cavity control sources are presented and compared. The results indicate that the largest noise reduction is obtained with cavity control by loudspeakers modified to operate as incident pressure sources.

  18. Noise reduction in a Mach 5 wind tunnel with a rectangular rod-wall sound shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Keyes, J. W.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1980-06-01

    A rod wall sound shield was tested over a range of Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x 10 to the 7th power to 8.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter. The model consisted of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Suitable measurement techniques were used to determine properties of the flow and acoustic disturbance in the shield and transition in the rod boundary layers. Measurements indicated that for a Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power the noise in the shielded region was significantly reduced, but only when the flow is mostly laminar on the rods. Actual nozzle input noise measured on the nozzle centerline before reflection at the shield walls was attenuated only slightly even when the rod boundary layer were laminar. At a lower Reynolds number, nozzle input noise at noise levels in the shield were still too high for application to a quiet tunnel. At Reynolds numbers above 2.0 x 10 the the 7th power per meter, measured noise levels were generally higher than nozzle input levels, probably due to transition in the rod boundary layers. The small attenuation of nozzle input noise at intermediate Reynolds numbers for laminar rod layers at the acoustic origins is apparently due to high frequencies of noise.

  19. Noise reduction in urban LRT networks by combining track based solutions.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Vanhonacker, Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The overall objective of the Quiet-Track project is to provide step-changing track based noise mitigation and maintenance schemes for railway rolling noise in LRT (Light Rail Transit) networks. WP 4 in particular focuses on the combination of existing track based solutions to yield a global performance of at least 6dB(A). The validation was carried out using a track section in the network of Athens Metro Line 1 with an existing outside concrete slab track (RHEDA track) where high airborne rolling noise was observed. The procedure for the selection of mitigation measures is based on numerical simulations, combining WRNOISE and IMMI software tools for noise prediction with experimental determination of the required track and vehicle parameters (e.g., rail and wheel roughness). The availability of a detailed rolling noise calculation procedure allows for detailed designing of measures and of ranking individual measures. It achieves this by including the modelling of the wheel/rail source intensity and of the noise propagation with the ability to evaluate the effect of modifications at source level (e.g., grinding, rail dampers, wheel dampers, change in resiliency of wheels and/or rail fixation) and of modifications in the propagation path (absorption at the track base, noise barriers, screening). A relevant combination of existing solutions was selected in the function of the simulation results. Three distinct existing solutions were designed in detail aiming at a high rolling noise attenuation and not affecting the normal operation of the metro system: Action 1: implementation of sound absorbing precast elements (panel type) on the track bed, Action 2: implementation of an absorbing noise barrier with a height of 1.10-1.20m above rail level, and Action 3: installation of rail dampers. The selected solutions were implemented on site and the global performance was measured step by step for comparison with simulations.

  20. Noise reduction in urban LRT networks by combining track based solutions.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Vanhonacker, Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The overall objective of the Quiet-Track project is to provide step-changing track based noise mitigation and maintenance schemes for railway rolling noise in LRT (Light Rail Transit) networks. WP 4 in particular focuses on the combination of existing track based solutions to yield a global performance of at least 6dB(A). The validation was carried out using a track section in the network of Athens Metro Line 1 with an existing outside concrete slab track (RHEDA track) where high airborne rolling noise was observed. The procedure for the selection of mitigation measures is based on numerical simulations, combining WRNOISE and IMMI software tools for noise prediction with experimental determination of the required track and vehicle parameters (e.g., rail and wheel roughness). The availability of a detailed rolling noise calculation procedure allows for detailed designing of measures and of ranking individual measures. It achieves this by including the modelling of the wheel/rail source intensity and of the noise propagation with the ability to evaluate the effect of modifications at source level (e.g., grinding, rail dampers, wheel dampers, change in resiliency of wheels and/or rail fixation) and of modifications in the propagation path (absorption at the track base, noise barriers, screening). A relevant combination of existing solutions was selected in the function of the simulation results. Three distinct existing solutions were designed in detail aiming at a high rolling noise attenuation and not affecting the normal operation of the metro system: Action 1: implementation of sound absorbing precast elements (panel type) on the track bed, Action 2: implementation of an absorbing noise barrier with a height of 1.10-1.20m above rail level, and Action 3: installation of rail dampers. The selected solutions were implemented on site and the global performance was measured step by step for comparison with simulations. PMID:26028336

  1. The cost of noise reduction for departure and arrival operations of commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, H. B.; Swan, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and noise annoyance due to a departure and an arrival operation was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt rotor aircraft designs to meet various noise goals at minimum DOC. These vehicles ranged across the spectrum of possible noise levels from completely unconstrained to the quietest vehicles that could be designed within the study ground rules. Optimization parameters were varied to find the minimum DOC. This basic variation was then extended to different aircraft sizes and technology time frames.

  2. Reduction of noise in the beta camera for low activity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ljunggren, K.L.; Strand, S.E. . Radiation Physics Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    The Beta-camera'' is a position sensitive light detector based on a photocathode, microchannel plates and a resistive anode adapted with a plastic scintillator (0.3 mm NE102A). The light from the scintillator is collected in a manner similar to conventional scintillation (Anger-type) cameras. The Beta-camera'' used in the past in the authors laboratory for imaging of biomedical samples, has a noise level of about 50 counts per second. It is desirable to reduce this noise, in order to improve the detectability in the biological samples. Accordingly in this paper, the authors report on a coincidence technique that reduces the noise level to almost zero.

  3. High tip speed fan inlet noise reduction using treated inlet splitters and accelerating inlets (quiet engine program fan C scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    A series of inlet suppression tests were run on a supersonic tip speed fan which employed an acoustically treated cowl wall, treated splitters and elevated average throat Mach numbers in various combinations. Results show appreciable fan noise reductions at high fan speeds; 15-18 PNdB. On the basis of inlet total pressure recovery loss per PNdb of noise reduction, an inlet with no splitters produced the most efficient design. However, greater reduction in noise was achieved with one splitter in the inlet. It was also noted that moderate increases in inlet Mach number increased noise in the acoustically treated inlets and that Mach numbers in excess of 0.65 were required before net noise reduction was realized.

  4. Acoustic evaluation of a novel swept-rotor fan. [noise reduction in turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. G.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Inlet noise and aerodynamic performance are presented for a high tip speed fan designed with rotor blade leading edge sweep that gives a subsonic component of inlet Mach number normal to the edge at all radii. The intent of the design was to minimize the generation of rotor leading edge shock waves thereby minimizing multiple pure tone noise. Sound power level and spectral comparisons are made with several high-speed fans of conventional design. Results show multiple pure tone noise at levels below those of some of the other fans and this noise was initiated at a higher tip speed. Aerodynamic performance of the fan did not meet design goals for this first build which applied conventional design procedures to the swept fan geometry.

  5. A Design of Experiments Investigation of Offset Streams for Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the noise characteristics of a dual-stream jet with four airfoils inserted in the fan nozzle was conducted. The intent of the airfoils was to deflect the fan stream relative to the core stream and, therefore, impact the development of the secondary potential core and noise radiated in the peak jet-noise direction. The experiments used a full-factorial Design of Experiments (DoE) approach to identify parameters and parameter interactions impacting noise radiation at two azimuthal microphone array locations, one of which represented a sideline viewing angle. The parameters studied included airfoil angle-of-attack, airfoil azimuthal location within the fan nozzle, and airfoil axial location relative to the fan-nozzle trailing edge. Jet conditions included subsonic and supersonic fan-stream Mach numbers. Heated jets conditions were simulated with a mixture of helium and air to replicate the exhaust velocity and density of the hot jets. The introduction of the airfoils was shown to impact noise radiated at polar angles in peak-jet noise direction and to have no impact on noise radiated at small and broadside polar angles and to have no impact on broadband-shock-associated noise. The DoE analysis showed the main effects impacting noise radiation at sideline-azimuthal-viewing angles included airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils on the lower side of the jet near the sideline array and airfoil trailing edge distance (with airfoils located at the nozzle trailing edge produced the lowest sound pressure levels). For an array located directly beneath the jet (and on the side of the jet from which the fan stream was deflected), the main effects impacting noise radiation included airfoil angle-of-attack and airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils located on the observation side of the jet as well and trailing edge distance. Interaction terms between multiple configuration parameters were shown to have significant impact on the radiated

  6. Active noise reduction in aviation helmets during a military jet trainer test flight.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, R; Kuronen, P; Korteoja, M

    2001-01-01

    Cockpit noise measurements were carried out in a two-seat jet trainer. For the continuous time and frequency analyses a two-channel tape-recording system was constructed of two miniature microphones connected through an amplifier to a digital tape-recorder. The analysed and averaged noise exposure including radio communication was 80-81 dB when the ANC system was on and 84-89 dB when the ANC system was off. For the conventional flight helmet the same noise exposure was 86 dB, and the noise exposure in the cockpit was 104-106 dB. The effect of the ANC system on the averaged noise exposure (L(Aeq8min)) was an improvement of 4-8 dB over the noise attenuation of the same helmets when the ANC system was off. Both ANC systems worked properly during the test flights. No severe ringing or voice circulation was found except during extreme vibration.

  7. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  8. Inlet Noise Reduction by Shielding for the Blended-Wing-Body Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Lorenzo R.; Gerhold, Carl H.

    1999-01-01

    Noise shielding benefits associated with an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended-Wing-Body, were studied using a 4- percent scale, 3-engine nacelle model. The study was conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. A high- frequency, wideband point source was placed inside the nacelles of the center engine and one of the side engines in order to simulate broadband engine noise. The sound field of the model was measured with a rotating microphone array that was moved to various stations along the model axis and with a fixed array of microphones that was erected behind the model. Ten rotating microphones were traversed a total of 22 degrees in 2-degree increments. Seven fixed microphones covered an arc that extended from a point in the exhaust exit plane of the center engine (and directly below its centerline) to a point 30 degrees above the jet centerline. While no attempt was made to simulate the noise emission characteristics of an aircraft engine, the model source was intended to radiate sound in a frequency range encompassing 1, 2, and 3 times the blade passage of a typical full-scale engine. In this study, the Blended-Wing-Body model was found to provide significant shielding of inlet noise. In particular, noise radiated downward into the forward sector was reduced by 20 to 25 dB overall in the full-scale frequencies from 2000 to 4000 Hz, decreasing to 10 dB or less at the lower frequencies. Also, it was observed that noise associated with the exhaust radiates into the sector directly below the model downstream to reduce shielding efficiency.

  9. Biomagnetic measurement system for supine subjects with expanded sensor array and real-time noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Shigenori; Sasano, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yasuhiro Haruta Daisuke; Uehara, Gen; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    A biomagnetic measurement system was developed, suitable for the detection of magnetospinogram (MSG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals from the dorsal surface of supine subjects. It is effective for noninvasively observing the electric activity of the spinal cord and/or heart. These biomagnetic signals are extremely weak, and magnetic flux sensors based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are necessary to detect them. However, highly sensitive magnetic field measurement often suffers from ultra low-band circumstance noise mainly caused by transportation in urban areas. We applied reference sensors for monitoring the circumstance noise, and their outputs multiplied by appropriate weight coefficients were directly input to the feedback coil of a SQUID gradiometer. Synthesized in-phase components reduced the ultra low-band noise by approximately 90%. Both the MSG and MCG signals were successfully detected in a moderately magnetically shielded room. Even though the MCG signal band overlapped the ultra low-band noise, the signal-to-noise ratio was improved.

  10. Impulsive noise reduction in digital phase-sensitive demodulation by nonlinear filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ziqiang; Wang, Huaxiang; Yin, Wuliang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2015-07-01

    Phase-sensitive demodulation is widely used in many systems, e.g. impedance measurement, communication, sonar and radar. In most cases, white noise is assumed in system design and analysis. However, impulsive noise is often encountered in many applications, which imposes challenges for a phase-sensitive demodulator (PSD). This paper presents a nonlinear filter for removing impulsive noise prior to the PSD. Unlike its linear counterparts, it is analysed in the time domain rather than in the frequency domain, making it easier to implement. The performance of the proposed method is compared to a standard PSD with a low-pass filter to suppress the impulsive noise and the theoretical limits of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is analysed. The theoretical prediction has been validated by numerical simulation and experiment. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve SNR improvement of 10.8 dB or greater when impulse rate α = 0.01. Statistical analysis shows that 97.2% of the impulses can be rejected by the median filter of length 3 when impulse rate is less than or equal to 0.1.

  11. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-04

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data.

  12. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data. PMID:26959024

  13. Real-time noise reduction for Mössbauer spectroscopy through online implementation of a modified Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    2015-02-01

    Spectrum-processing software that incorporates a Gaussian smoothing kernel within the statistics of first-order Kalman filtration has been developed to provide cross-channel spectral noise reduction for increased real-time signal-to-noise ratios for Mössbauer spectroscopy. The filter was optimized for the breadth of the Gaussian using the Mössbauer spectrum of natural iron foil, and comparisons among the peak broadening, signal-to-noise ratios, and shifts in the calculated hyperfine parameters are presented. The results of optimization give a maximum improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of 51.1% over the unfiltered spectrum at a Gaussian breadth of 27 channels, or 2.5% of the total spectrum width. The full-width half-maximum of the spectrum peaks showed an increase of 19.6% at this optimum point, indicating a relatively weak increase in the peak broadening relative to the signal enhancement, leading to an overall increase in the observable signal. Calculations of the hyperfine parameters showed that no statistically significant deviations were introduced from the application of the filter, confirming the utility of this filter for spectroscopy applications.

  14. Noise reduction of FBG sensor signal by using a wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yo-Han; Song, Minho

    2011-05-01

    We constructed a FBG (fiber Bragg grating) sensor system based on a fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer. A fiber-optic laser source is used as a strong light source to attain high signal-to-noise ratio. However the unstable output power and coherence noises of the fiber laser made it hard to separate the FBG signals from the interference signals of the fiber coils. To reduce noises and extract FBG sensor signals, we used a Gaussian curve-fitting and a wavelet transform. The wavelet transform is a useful tool for analyzing and denoising output signals. The feasibility of the wavelet transform denoising process is presented with the preliminary experimental results, which showed much better accuracy than the case with only the Gaussian curve-fitting algorithm.

  15. An investigation of possible causes for the reduction of fan noise in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodder, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the impact on fan tone-noise generation of several engine inflow distortions found in conventional static testing has been made. Inflow distortions examined included the ground vortex, atmospheric turbulence, and test-stand structure interference. This work was undertaken to help explain results from noise measurements made on modern turbofan engines which show lower fan tone levels in flight at the blade-passing frequency than are predicted from static measurements. The results indicate that the ground vortex can greatly increase noise at the blade-passing frequency. A special inlet was designed to examine the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Use of this inlet reduced the variability of the sound-pressure level at the blade-passing frequency, and the results were similar to those found in flight.

  16. A New Method for Reduction of Photomultiplier Signal-Induced Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koble, Andrea; DeYoung, Russell

    2000-01-01

    For lidar measurements of ozone, photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector signal-induced noise represents a fundamental problem that complicates the extraction of information from lidar data. A new method is developed to significantly reduce signal-induced noise in lidar receiver PMT detectors. The electron optics of the lidar photomultiplier detector is modified to filter the source of signal-induced noise. A mesh electrode external to the PMT is utilized to control photoemission and disorient electron trajectories from the photocathode to the first dynode. Experiments were taken both with simulated and actual lidar return signals at Langley Research Center. Results show at least 40 percent more accurate ozone number density values with a mesh voltage of 60 V applied than with no voltage applied.

  17. A Practical Laser Projector with New Illumination Optics for Reduction of Speckle Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasazumi, Ken'ichi; Kitaoka, Yasuo; Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa

    2004-08-01

    We have developed illumination optics for image projection systems. It realizes uniform illumination and suppression of speckle and diffraction noises by using a diffuser and integrator optics. By optimizing the diffusing angle of the diffuser, optical power loss was less than 10%. A proto type of a laser projector with a red wide-stripe semiconductor laser and green and blue second-harmonic generation lasers was realized by using the developed illumination optics and twisted nematic liquid-crystal panels. Still images from a personal computer and video images from a digital versatile disk (DVD) player were displayed with the system and a wide colour gamut and smooth images without diffraction noise nor speckle noise were confirmed.

  18. Acoustic plane waves normally incident on a clamped panel in a rectangular duct. [to explain noise reduction curves for reducing interior noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unz, H.; Roskam, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of acoustic plane wave normally incident on a clamped panel in a rectangular duct is developed. The coupling theory between the elastic vibrations of the panel (plate) and the acoustic wave propagation in infinite space and in the rectangular duct is considered. The partial differential equation which governs the vibration of the panel (plate) is modified by adding to its stiffness (spring) forces and damping forces, and the fundamental resonance frequency and the attenuation factor are discussed. The noise reduction expression based on the theory is found to agree well with the corresponding experimental data of a sample aluminum panel in the mass controlled region, the damping controlled region, and the stiffness controlled region. All the frequency positions of the upward and downward resonance spikes in the sample experimental data are identified theoretically as resulting from four cross interacting major resonance phenomena: the cavity resonance, the acoustic resonance, the plate resonance, and the wooden back panel resonance.

  19. The Coanda effect in gas-dynamic noise control. [pressure reduction by silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilescu, G.

    1974-01-01

    The principle types of silencers are discussed for gas dynamic noise of free steam and gas expansions, as well as the results of research in gas dynamics of jets and applied acoustics. Gas dynamic noise attenuation by means of the Coanda effect is due to fluid decompression in a Coanda ejector of the external type, where a structural change takes place in the acoustic frequency spectrum and in its direction, as well as a substantial decrease in the fluid's velocity, temperature and concentration. This process is continued in the second phase with absorption of the acoustic waves by means of an active structure.

  20. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  1. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing antenna. Reduction in the RF near-field level will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Measured antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas.

  2. Reduction of speckle noise from optical coherence tomography images using multi-frame weighted nuclear norm minimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Damber; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a speckle noise reduction method for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images called multi-frame weighted nuclear norm minimization (MWNNM). This method is a direct extension of weighted nuclear norm minimization (WNNM) in the multi-frame framework since an adequately denoised image could not be achieved with single-frame denoising methods. The MWNNM method exploits multiple B-scans collected from a small area of a SD-OCT volumetric image, and then denoises and averages them together to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio B-scan. The results show that the image quality metrics obtained by denoising and averaging only five nearby B-scans with MWNNM method is considerably better than those of the average image obtained by registering and averaging 40 azimuthally repeated B-scans.

  3. An evaluation of noise reduction algorithms for particle-based fluid simulations in multi-scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimoń, M. J.; Prosser, R.; Emerson, D. R.; Borg, M. K.; Bray, D. J.; Grinberg, L.; Reese, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Filtering of particle-based simulation data can lead to reduced computational costs and enable more efficient information transfer in multi-scale modelling. This paper compares the effectiveness of various signal processing methods to reduce numerical noise and capture the structures of nano-flow systems. In addition, a novel combination of these algorithms is introduced, showing the potential of hybrid strategies to improve further the de-noising performance for time-dependent measurements. The methods were tested on velocity and density fields, obtained from simulations performed with molecular dynamics and dissipative particle dynamics. Comparisons between the algorithms are given in terms of performance, quality of the results and sensitivity to the choice of input parameters. The results provide useful insights on strategies for the analysis of particle-based data and the reduction of computational costs in obtaining ensemble solutions.

  4. Feedback Control of a Morphing Chevron for Takeoff and Cruise Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Schiller, Noah H.; Mabe, James H.; Ruggeri, Robert T.; Butler, G. W.

    2004-01-01

    Noise from commercial high-bypass ratio turbofan engines is generated by turbulent mixing of the hot jet exhaust, fan stream, and ambient air. Serrated aerodynamic devices, known as chevrons, along the trailing edges of a jet engine primary and secondary exhaust nozzle have been shown to reduce jet noise at takeoff and shock-cell noise at cruise conditions. Their optimum shape is a finely tuned compromise between noise-benefit and thrust-loss. The design of a full scale Variable Geometry Chevron (VGC) fan-nozzle incorporating Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators is described in a companion paper. This paper describes the development and testing of a proportional-integral control system that regulates the heating of the SMA actuators to control the VGC s tip immersion. The VGC and control system were tested under representative flow conditions in Boeing s Nozzle Test Facility (NTF). Results from the NTF test which demonstrate controllable immersion of the VGC are described. The paper also describes the correlation between strains and temperatures on the chevron with a photogrammetric measurement of the chevron's tip immersion.

  5. Evaluation of a doubly-swept blade tip for rotorcraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, Brian E.; Egolf, T. Alan

    1992-01-01

    A computational study was performed for a doubly-swept rotor blade tip to determine its benefit for high-speed impulsive (HSI) and blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. This design consists of aft and forward sweep. For the HSI-noise computations, unsteady Euler calculations were performed for several variations to a rotor blade geometry. A doubly-swept planform was predicted to increase the delocalizing Mach number to 0.94 (representative of a 200+ kt helicopter). For the BVI-noise problem, it had been hypothesized that the doubly-swept blade tip, by producing a leading-edge vortex, would reduce the tip-vortex effect on BVI noise. A procedure was used in which the tip vortex velocity profile computed by a Navier-Stokes solver was used to compute the inflow associated with BVI. This inflow was used by a Euler solver to compute the unsteady pressures for an acoustic analysis. The results of this study were inconclusive due to the difficulty in accurately predicting the viscous tip vortex downstream of the blade. Also, for the condition studied, no leading-edge vortex formed at the tip.

  6. Optical beat interference noise reduction in OFDMA optical access link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2013-12-01

    A Novel technique for reducing the OBI noise in optical OFDMA-PON uplink is presented. OFDMA is a multipleaccess/ multiplexing scheme that can provide multiplexing operation of user data streams onto the downlink sub-channels and uplink multiple access by means of dividing OFDM subcarriers as sub-channels. The main issue of high-speed, single-wavelength upstream OFDMA-PON arises from optical beating interference noise. Because the sub-channels are allocated dynamically to multiple access users over same nominal wavelength, it generates the optical beating interference among upstream signals. In this paper, we proposed a novel scheme using self-homodyne balanced detection in the optical line terminal (OLT) to reduce OBI noise which is generated in the uplink transmission of OFDMA-PON system. When multiple OFDMA sub-channels over the same nominal wavelength are received at the same time in the proposed architecture, OBI noises can be removed using balanced detection. Using discrete multitone modulation (DMT) to generate real valued OFDM signals, the proposed technique is verified through experimental demonstration.

  7. Vortex Noise Reductions from a Flexible Fiber Model of Owl Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Justin; Peake, Nigel

    2013-11-01

    Many species of owl rely on specialized plumage to reduce their self-noise levels and enable hunting in acoustic stealth. In contrast to the leading-edge comb and compliant trailing-edge fringe attributes of owls, the aeroacoustic impact of the fluffy down material on the upper wing surface remains largely speculative as a means to eliminate aerodynamic noise across a broad range of frequencies. The down is presently idealized as a collection of independent and rigid fibers, which emerge perpendicularly from a rigid plane and are allowed to rotate under elastic restraint. Noise generation from an isolated fiber is effected by its interaction with a point vortex, whose motion is induced by the presence of the rigid half-plane and the elastically-restrained fiber. Numerical evaluations of the vortex path and acoustic signature furnish a comparison with known analytical results for stationary fibers, and results from this primitive model seek to address how aerodynamic noise could be mitigated by flexible fibers.

  8. Evaluation of a doubly-swept blade tip for rotorcraft noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, Brian E.; Egolf, T. Alan

    1992-10-01

    A computational study was performed for a doubly-swept rotor blade tip to determine its benefit for high-speed impulsive (HSI) and blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. This design consists of aft and forward sweep. For the HSI-noise computations, unsteady Euler calculations were performed for several variations to a rotor blade geometry. A doubly-swept planform was predicted to increase the delocalizing Mach number to 0.94 (representative of a 200+ kt helicopter). For the BVI-noise problem, it had been hypothesized that the doubly-swept blade tip, by producing a leading-edge vortex, would reduce the tip-vortex effect on BVI noise. A procedure was used in which the tip vortex velocity profile computed by a Navier-Stokes solver was used to compute the inflow associated with BVI. This inflow was used by a Euler solver to compute the unsteady pressures for an acoustic analysis. The results of this study were inconclusive due to the difficulty in accurately predicting the viscous tip vortex downstream of the blade. Also, for the condition studied, no leading-edge vortex formed at the tip.

  9. TDLAS noise reduction algorithm for the raw spectral data under strong interference conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyao; Lv, Jinwei; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong; Su, Jianzhong

    2014-12-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a high-resolution infrared laser absorption spectroscopy technique with a non-contact measurement, high spatial and temporal resolution, extensive measurement information, which has been a hot research area at present. Compared to traditional techniques, TDLAS technology has many advantages, but in engineering applications under complex environmental conditions, TDLAS technology is still facing many difficulties. Because of the impact of environmental factors, the measured spectral signal would be distorted, and cannot be used to extract useful information. Therefore, to extract useful information from the raw signal, it is essential to improve the signal to noise ratio. To eliminate interference information contained in the spectral signal, the absorption spectra of the laboratory intends to take data preprocessing methods. In the preprocess, the Empirical Mode Desperation (EMD) method is developed in recent years, which is a new self-adaptive local frequency analysis method. Compared to the method of wavelet denoising, EMD method with adaptive filters is able to achieve a multi-scale decomposition of the noise signal. In this paper, EMD method is taken to eliminate noise and interference signal source decomposition. By reconstructing the actual signal and eliminating the noise components, a better SNR can be achieved.

  10. Edge detection, color quantization, segmentation, texture removal, and noise reduction of color image using quaternion iterative filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Zhe; Pei, Soo-Chang

    2014-07-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is a simple, local, adaptive, and efficient method for nonlinear and nonstationary signal analysis. However, for dealing with multidimensional signals, EMD and its variants such as bidimensional EMD (BEMD) and multidimensional EMD (MEMD) are very slow due to the needs of a large amount of envelope interpolations. Recently, a method called iterative filtering has been proposed. This filtering-based method is not as precise as EMD but its processing speed is very fast and can achieve comparable results as EMD does in many image and signal processing applications. We combine quaternion algebra and iterative filtering to achieve the edge detection, color quantization, segmentation, texture removal, and noise reduction task of color images. We can obtain similar results by using quaternion combined with EMD; however, as mentioned before, EMD is slow and cumbersome. Therefore, we propose to use quaternion iterative filtering as an alternative method for quaternion EMD (QEMD). The edge of color images can be detected by using intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and the color quantization results can be obtained from residual image. The noise reduction algorithm of our method can be used to deal with Gaussian, salt-and-pepper, speckle noise, etc. The peak signal-to-noise ratio results are satisfactory and the processing speed is also very fast. Since textures in a color image are high-frequency components, we also can use quaternion iterative filtering to decompose a color image into many high- and low-frequency IMFs and remove textures by eliminating high-frequency IMFs.

  11. Potential Applicability of Persuasive Communication to Light-Glow Reduction Efforts: A Case Study of Marine Turtle Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamrowski, Ruth L.; Sutton, Stephen G.; Tobin, Renae C.; Hamann, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents ( n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R 2 = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model ( R 2 = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to "increased protection of local turtles" ( P < 0.01) and/or "benefits to the local economy" ( P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.

  12. Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation.

    PubMed

    Kamrowski, Ruth L; Sutton, Stephen G; Tobin, Renae C; Hamann, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to "increased protection of local turtles" (P < 0.01) and/or "benefits to the local economy" (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.

  13. Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation.

    PubMed

    Kamrowski, Ruth L; Sutton, Stephen G; Tobin, Renae C; Hamann, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to "increased protection of local turtles" (P < 0.01) and/or "benefits to the local economy" (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting. PMID:24957580

  14. China's air pollution reduction efforts may result in an increase in surface ozone levels in highly polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Anger, Annela; Dessens, Olivier; Xi, Fengming; Barker, Terry; Wu, Rui

    2016-03-01

    China, as a fast growing fossil-fuel-based economy, experiences increasing levels of air pollution. To tackle air pollution, China has taken the first steps by setting emission-reduction targets for nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans. This paper uses two models-the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global level (E3MG) and the global Chemistry Transport Model pTOMCAT-to test the effects of these policies. If the policy targets are met, then the maximum values of 32 % and 45 % reductions below 'business as usual' in the monthly mean NO x and SO2 concentrations, respectively, will be achieved in 2015. However, a decrease in NO x concentrations in some highly polluted areas of East, North-East and South-East China can lead to up to a 10% increase in the monthly mean concentrations in surface ozone in 2015. Our study demonstrates an urgent need for the more detailed analysis of the impacts and designs of air pollution reduction guidelines for China.

  15. When grammars collide: Harm reduction, drug detention and the challenges of international policy reform efforts in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Edington, Claire; Bayer, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the 1990s, a dramatic rise in HIV prevalence rates among drug users in Vietnam attracted the attention of international observers concerned about the prospect of a more generalised epidemic. Vietnam subsequently became the target of extensive funding and advocacy which sought to introduce needle exchange and methadone in a country where drug use was considered a 'social evil', and drug users were subjected to what international observers viewed as draconian incarceration measures. What were the goals of proponents of harm reduction when they came to Vietnam? How did they perceive the state of prevailing approaches to drug users in the context of the Vietnamese HIV epidemic? How did they understand the strategic challenges they faced and the dilemmas they had to confront? Based on in-depth interviews with international harm reduction proponents working in Vietnam, this paper explores the encounter of two grammars of harm reduction, one based on broadly accepted international approaches, the other rooted in Vietnam's own history and politics. From this encounter a set of policies and practices characterised by needle exchange and methadone maintenance emerged, as well as an extensive network of closed centres where tens of thousands of drug users are currently detained.

  16. China's air pollution reduction efforts may result in an increase in surface ozone levels in highly polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Anger, Annela; Dessens, Olivier; Xi, Fengming; Barker, Terry; Wu, Rui

    2016-03-01

    China, as a fast growing fossil-fuel-based economy, experiences increasing levels of air pollution. To tackle air pollution, China has taken the first steps by setting emission-reduction targets for nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans. This paper uses two models-the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global level (E3MG) and the global Chemistry Transport Model pTOMCAT-to test the effects of these policies. If the policy targets are met, then the maximum values of 32 % and 45 % reductions below 'business as usual' in the monthly mean NO x and SO2 concentrations, respectively, will be achieved in 2015. However, a decrease in NO x concentrations in some highly polluted areas of East, North-East and South-East China can lead to up to a 10% increase in the monthly mean concentrations in surface ozone in 2015. Our study demonstrates an urgent need for the more detailed analysis of the impacts and designs of air pollution reduction guidelines for China. PMID:26409886

  17. Reduction of provisioning effort in response to experimental manipulation of chick nutritional status in the Horned Puffin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; van Pelt, Thomas I.; Piatt, J.F.; Kitaysky, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Using a supplemental feeding experiment, we investigated the ability of adult Horned Puffins to decrease provisioning effort in response to reduced nutritional requirements of chicks. We found no difference between experimental and control groups in parental provisioning before supplementary feeding was initiated. After receiving supplemental food for seven days, experimental chicks grew faster, gained more mass and received 87% less food from their parents than did control chicks. These results demonstrate that Horned Puffin parents can decrease food provisioning in response to a decrease in their chick nutritional requirements. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  18. SU-F-18C-15: Model-Based Multiscale Noise Reduction On Low Dose Cone Beam Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging systems, Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence at x-ray source and the detector because of the independent binomial process of photon absorption in medium. On a CBCT projection, the variance of fluence consists of the variance of noiseless imaging structure and that of Poisson noise, which is proportional to the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at the detector. This requires multiscale filters to smoothen noise while keeping the structure information of the imaged object. We used a mathematical model of Poisson process to design multiscale filters and established the balance of noise correction and structure blurring. The algorithm was checked with low dose kilo-voltage CBCT projections acquired from a Varian OBI system. Results: From the investigation of low dose CBCT of a Catphan phantom and patients, it showed that our model-based multiscale technique could efficiently reduce noise and meanwhile keep the fine structure of the imaged object. After the image processing, the number of visible line pairs in Catphan phantom scanned with 4 ms pulse time was similar to that scanned with 32 ms, and soft tissue structure from simulated 4 ms patient head-and-neck images was also comparable with scanned 20 ms ones. Compared with fixed-scale technique, the image quality from multiscale one was improved. Conclusion: Use of projection-specific multiscale filters can reach better balance on noise reduction and structure information loss. The image quality of low dose CBCT can be improved by using multiscale filters.

  19. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  20. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276