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Sample records for noise spectrum suspension

  1. Ultrasonic spectrum for particle concentration measurement in multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaobin; Jiang, Shulan; Yang, Yili; Liang, Jian; Shi, Tielin; Li, Xiwen

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of applying the ultrasonic spectrum technique to the measurement of particle concentrations in multicomponent suspensions. A combination of the kernel partial least squares (KPLS) model and the interval selection methods is implemented to build the relationship between the ultrasonic spectra of the first reflected pulses and the particle concentrations. First of all, the interval selection methods are used to select optimal spectral interval(s) from full spectra. Then, the KPLS models with optimal spectral interval(s) are tuned, built and evaluated to obtain the optimal model. Finally, the optimal KPLS model is employed to measure the particle concentrations in the mixing process and its online prediction ability is evaluated. In comparison with the linear partial least squares (PLS) models, the optimal KPLS model shows the best performance. The results demonstrate that particle concentrations in multicomponent suspensions can be measured online by the ultrasonic spectrum technique, and the KPLS model with optimal spectral interval(s) shows the superiority in model calibration.

  2. Discrimination of rippled-spectrum noise from flat-spectrum noise by chinchillas: evidence for a spectral dominance region.

    PubMed

    Shofner, W P; Yost, W A

    1997-08-01

    Iterated rippled noise having infinite iterations is generated when a flat-spectrum wideband noise is delayed T ms and the delayed version is added to the undelayed noise through positive feedback. The resulting signal has a rippled spectrum, and the perceived pitch of this iterated rippled noise by human listeners corresponds to a frequency of 1/T. We have previously demonstrated that chinchillas can discriminate the rippled-spectrum noise from the flat-spectrum noise. In the present study, chinchillas discriminated a bandpass filtered rippled-spectrum noise from a bandpass flat-spectrum noise in a psychophysical task. The passbands were set to be one octave wide. Psychometric functions were obtained for 5 chinchillas and performance was measured as d'. The best behavioral performance was obtained when the center frequency of the bandpass filter generally corresponded to the 3rd 5th harmonic peak of the rippled noise (i.e., at 3/T to 5/T), but the precise location of the dominant region varied with the delay of the rippled noise such that the dominance region tended to shift to lower harmonics as 1/T increased. These results indicate that not all spectral regions are weighted equally in the discrimination task. The spectral dominance region found in chinchillas is similar to that described for human pitch perception.

  3. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hati, A; Nelson, C W; Howe, D A

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem. PMID:27036804

  4. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  5. Optical spectrum analyzer with quantum-limited noise floor.

    PubMed

    Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Martin, M J; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-30

    Interactions between atoms and lasers provide the potential for unprecedented control of quantum states. Fulfilling this potential requires detailed knowledge of frequency noise in optical oscillators with state-of-the-art stability. We demonstrate a technique that precisely measures the noise spectrum of an ultrastable laser using optical lattice-trapped 87Sr atoms as a quantum projection noise-limited reference. We determine the laser noise spectrum from near dc to 100 Hz via the measured fluctuations in atomic excitation, guided by a simple and robust theory model. The noise spectrum yields a 26(4) mHz linewidth at a central frequency of 429 THz, corresponding to an optical quality factor of 1.6×10(16). This approach improves upon optical heterodyne beats between two similar laser systems by providing information unique to a single laser and complements the traditionally used Allan deviation which evaluates laser performance at relatively long time scales. We use this technique to verify the reduction of resonant noise in our ultrastable laser via feedback from an optical heterodyne beat. Finally, we show that knowledge of our laser's spectrum allows us to accurately predict the laser-limited stability for optical atomic clocks. PMID:24033036

  6. Spectrum of anomalous random telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. )

    1993-12-15

    The alternate capture and emission of electrons at an individual defect site generates discrete switching in resistance, referred to as a random telegraph signal (RTS). Recent experiments indicate that some defects might have two mutually exclusive emission modes with distinct emission rates, which result in the anomalous RTS: a rapid-switching RTS modulated in time by a slow-switching RTS of the same amplitude. The spectrum is calculated of the anomalous RTS by assuming that the emission mode for a captured electron is determined at the moment of capture of the electron, and the probability for a given mode is a constant [ital p] in each event of capturing. It is shown that a distribution in [ital p] might lead to a 1/[ital f] spectrum.

  7. Effects of the Noises' Statistics and Spectrum on Noise-Induced Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deza, Roberto R.; Fuentes, Miguel A.; Wio, Horacio S.

    2007-07-01

    The study of the effect of the noises' statistics and spectrum on second-order, purely noise-induced phase transition (NIPT) is of wide interest: It is simplified if the noises are dynamically generated by means of stochastic differential equations driven by white noises, a well known case being that of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noises with a self-correlation time τ whose effect on the NIPT phase diagram has been studied some time ago. Another case is when the stationary pdf is a (colored) q-Gaussian which, being a fat-tail distribution for q > 1 and a compact-support one for q < 1, allows for a controlled study of the effects of the departure from Gaussian statistics. As done with stochastic resonance and other phenomena, we exploit this tool to study—within a simple mean-field approximation—the combined effect on NIPT of the noises' statistics and spectrum. Even for relatively small τ, it is shown that whereas for fat-tail noise distributions counteract the effect of self-correlation, compact-support ones enhance it.

  8. Normalized Noise Power Spectrum of Full Field Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Norriza Mohd; Wan Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan

    2010-01-05

    A method to measure noise power spectrum of a full field digital mammography system is presented. The effect of X-ray radiation dose, size and configuration of region of interest on normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) was investigated. Flat field images were acquired using RQA-M2 beam quality technique (Mo/Mo anode-filter, 28 kV, 2 mm Al) with different clinical radiation doses. The images were cropped at about 4 cm from the edge of the breast wall and then divided into different size of non-overlapping or overlapping segments. NNPS was determined through detrending, 2-D fast Fourier transformation and normalization. Our measurement shows that high radiation dose gave lower NNPS at a specific beam quality.

  9. Noise-Induced Phase Transitions: Effects of the Noises' Statistics and Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deza, Roberto R.; Wio, Horacio S.; Fuentes, Miguel A.

    2007-05-01

    The local, uncorrelated multiplicative noises driving a second-order, purely noise-induced, ordering phase transition (NIPT) were assumed to be Gaussian and white in the model of [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 3395 (1994)]. The potential scientific and technological interest of this phenomenon calls for a study of the effects of the noises' statistics and spectrum. This task is facilitated if these noises are dynamically generated by means of stochastic differential equations (SDE) driven by white noises. One such case is that of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noises which are stationary, with Gaussian pdf and a variance reduced by the self-correlation time τ, and whose effect on the NIPT phase diagram has been studied some time ago. Another such case is when the stationary pdf is a (colored) Tsallis' q-Gaussian which, being a fat-tail distribution for q > 1 and a compact-support one for q < 1, allows for a controlled exploration of the effects of the departure from Gaussian statistics. As done before with stochastic resonance and other phenomena, we now exploit this tool to study—within a simple mean-field approximation and with an emphasis on the order parameter and the "susceptibility"—the combined effect on NIPT of the noises' statistics and spectrum. Even for relatively small τ, it is shown that whereas fat-tail noise distributions (q > 1) counteract the effect of self-correlation, compact-support ones (q < 1) enhance it. Also, an interesting effect on the susceptibility is seen in the last case.

  10. Viscosity of bacterial suspensions : hydrodynamic interactions and self-induced noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, S. D.; Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-05-01

    The viscosity of a suspension of swimming bacteria is investigated analytically and numerically. We propose a simple model that allows for efficient computation for a large number of bacteria. Our calculations show that long-range hydrodynamic interactions, intrinsic to self-locomoting objects in a viscous fluid, result in a dramatic reduction of the effective viscosity. In agreement with experiments on suspensions of Bacillus subtilis, we show that the viscosity reduction is related to the onset of large-scale collective motion due to interactions between the swimmers. The simulations reveal that the viscosity reduction occurs only for relatively low concentrations of swimmers: Further increases of the concentration yield an increase of the viscosity. We derive an explicit asymptotic formula for the effective viscosity in terms of known physical parameters and show that hydrodynamic interactions are manifested as self-induced noise in the absence of any explicit stochasticity in the system.

  11. Measuring and interpreting the mechanical thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2005-07-01

    The meta-stability of the pull-in displacement of an electrostatically operated parallel plate micromechanical structure is used for the capacitive measurement of the mechanical-thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS. Pull-in time depends on force and is not affected by the input-referred noise of the readout circuit. Repeatedly bringing the microstructure to pull-in while measuring the pull-in time followed by FFT enables the measurement of the mechanical noise spectrum with a non-mechanical noise level set primarily by the resolution of the time measurement. The white noise level is found to be in agreement with the theory on damping. The 1/f noise spectrum is found to be independent of ambient gas pressure with a 1/f noise-white noise cross-over frequency at 0.007 Hz for a 1 bar gas pressure and is reproducible for devices fabricated in the same process and the same run.

  12. Eliminating Noise at the Box-fitting Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufleur, Rodrigo Carlos; Emilio, Marcelo; Pacheco, Eduardo Janot; de La Reza, Jorge Ramiro; da Rocha, José Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Non gaussian sources of erros need to be taken into consideration when searching for planetary transits. Such phenomena are mostly caused by the impact of high energetic particles on the detector (Pinheiro da Silva et al. 2008). The detection efficiency of transits, therefor, depend significantly on the data quality and the algorithms utilized to deal with these errors sources. In this work we show that a modified detrend algorithm CDA (CoRoT Detrend Algorithm; Mislis et al. 2010) using a robust statistics and an empirical fit, instead of a polynomial one, can eliminate more efficiently gaps in the data and other long-term trends from the light-curve. Using this algorithm enables us to obtain a reconstructed light-curve with better signal-to-noise ratio that allows to improve the detection of exoplanet transits, although long term signals are destroyed. The results show that these modifications lead to an improved BLS (Box-fitting Least Squares; Kovács, Zucker & Mazeh 2002) algorithm spectrum. At the end we have compared our planetary search results with CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) satellite chromatic light-curves available in the literature.

  13. A full-spectrum analysis of high-speed train interior noise under multi-physical-field coupling excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu; Hao, Zhiyong; Wang, Xu; Mao, Jie

    2016-06-01

    High-speed-railway-train interior noise at low, medium, and high frequencies could be simulated by finite element analysis (FEA) or boundary element analysis (BEA), hybrid finite element analysis-statistical energy analysis (FEA-SEA) and statistical energy analysis (SEA), respectively. First, a new method named statistical acoustic energy flow (SAEF) is proposed, which can be applied to the full-spectrum HST interior noise simulation (including low, medium, and high frequencies) with only one model. In an SAEF model, the corresponding multi-physical-field coupling excitations are firstly fully considered and coupled to excite the interior noise. The interior noise attenuated by sound insulation panels of carriage is simulated through modeling the inflow acoustic energy from the exterior excitations into the interior acoustic cavities. Rigid multi-body dynamics, fast multi-pole BEA, and large-eddy simulation with indirect boundary element analysis are first employed to extract the multi-physical-field excitations, which include the wheel-rail interaction forces/secondary suspension forces, the wheel-rail rolling noise, and aerodynamic noise, respectively. All the peak values and their frequency bands of the simulated acoustic excitations are validated with those from the noise source identification test. Besides, the measured equipment noise inside equipment compartment is used as one of the excitation sources which contribute to the interior noise. Second, a full-trimmed FE carriage model is firstly constructed, and the simulated modal shapes and frequencies agree well with the measured ones, which has validated the global FE carriage model as well as the local FE models of the aluminum alloy-trim composite panel. Thus, the sound transmission loss model of any composite panel has indirectly been validated. Finally, the SAEF model of the carriage is constructed based on the accurate FE model and stimulated by the multi-physical-field excitations. The results show

  14. Effects of Background Noise on Cortical Encoding of Speech in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Nicole; Zecker, Steven; Trommer, Barbara; Chen, Julia; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This study provides new evidence of deficient auditory cortical processing of speech in noise in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Speech-evoked responses (approximately 100-300 ms) in quiet and background noise were evaluated in typically-developing (TD) children and children with ASD. ASD responses showed delayed timing (both conditions) and…

  15. Extracting information from the power spectrum of synaptic noise.

    PubMed

    Destexhe, Alain; Rudolph, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In cortical neurons, synaptic "noise" is caused by the nearly random release of thousands of synapses. Few methods are presently available to analyze synaptic noise and deduce properties of the underlying synaptic inputs. We focus here on the power spectral density (PSD) of several models of synaptic noise. We examine different classes of analytically solvable kinetic models for synaptic currents, such as the "delta kinetic models," which use Dirac delta functions to represent the activation of the ion channel. We first show that, for this class of kinetic models, one can obtain an analytic expression for the PSD of the total synaptic conductance and derive equivalent stochastic models with only a few variables. This yields a method for constraining models of synaptic currents by analyzing voltage-clamp recordings of synaptic noise. Second, we show that a similar approach can be followed for the PSD of the the membrane potential (Vm) through an effective-leak approximation. Third, we show that this approach is also valid for inputs distributed in dendrites. In this case, the frequency scaling of the Vm PSD is preserved, suggesting that this approach may be applied to intracellular recordings of real neurons. In conclusion, using simple mathematical tools, we show that Vm recordings can be used to constrain kinetic models of synaptic currents, as well as to estimate equivalent stochastic models. This approach, therefore, provides a direct link between intracellular recordings in vivo and the design of models consistent with the dynamics and spectral structure of synaptic noise. PMID:15483395

  16. Noise power spectrum estimation and fast map making for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amblard, A.; Hamilton, J.-Ch.

    2004-04-01

    We present a method designed to estimate the noise power spectrum in the time domain for CMB experiments. The noise power spectrum is extracted from the time ordered data avoiding the contamination coming from sky signal and accounting the pixellisation of the signal and the projection of the noise when making intermediate sky projections. This method is simple to implement and relies on Monte-Carlo simulations, it runs on a simple desk computer. We also propose a trick for filtering data before making coadded maps in order to avoid ringing due to the presence of signal in the timelines. These algorithms were succesfully tested on Archeops data.

  17. Violin mode amplitude glitch monitor for the presence of excess noise on the monolithic silica suspensions of GEO 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorazu, B.; Strain, K. A.; Heng, I. S.; Kumar, R.

    2010-08-01

    Non-Gaussian features of data from gravitational wave detectors are of interest as unpredictable 'glitches' limit the sensitivity of searches for many kinds of signal. We consider events due to non-random excitations of the test masses and their suspension fibres. These events could, for example, be related to acoustic emissions in the fibres due to the presence and propagation of cracks or another type of structural perturbation, and they would generate excess noise above the Gaussian background, which matches the level expected due to thermal noise. We look for excess noise in the fundamental violin modes of the monolithic silica suspension fibres of GEO 600. We describe the algorithm used to monitor the violin mode amplitude for glitches, present our results and consider how these may be applied to advanced detectors. The conclusion of our analysis is that no excess noise above what was considered to be thermal noise was observed for several days of h(t) data analysed at the frequency of the selected violin modes.

  18. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Pengqin; Hu, Menghan; Ying, Yaofeng; Jin, Jinshuang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  19. Intrinsic noise alters the frequency spectrum of mesoscopic oscillatory chemical reaction systems

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2011-01-01

    Mesoscopic oscillatory reaction systems, for example in cell biology, can exhibit stochastic oscillations in the form of cyclic random walks even if the corresponding macroscopic system does not oscillate. We study how the intrinsic noise from molecular discreteness influences the frequency spectrum of mesoscopic oscillators using as a model system a cascade of coupled Brusselators away from the Hopf bifurcation. The results show that the spectrum of an oscillator depends on the level of noise. In particular, the peak frequency of the oscillator is reduced by increasing noise, and the bandwidth increased. Along a cascade of coupled oscillators, the peak frequency is further reduced with every stage and also the bandwidth is reduced. These effects can help understand the role of noise in chemical oscillators and provide fingerprints for more reliable parameter identification and volume measurement from experimental spectra. PMID:22545192

  20. Comparison of Two Methods of Noise Power Spectrum Determinations of Medical Radiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan; Ahmed Darwish, Zeki

    2011-03-30

    Noise in medical images is recognized as an important factor that determines the image quality. Image noise is characterized by noise power spectrum (NPS). We compared two methods of NPS determination namely the methods of Wagner and Dobbins on Lanex Regular TMG screen-film system and Hologic Lorad Selenia full field digital mammography system, with the aim of choosing the better method to use. The methods differ in terms of various parametric choices and algorithm implementations. These parameters include the low pass filtering, low frequency filtering, windowing, smoothing, aperture correction, overlapping of region of interest (ROI), length of fast Fourier transform, ROI size, method of ROI normalization, and slice selection of the NPS. Overall, the two methods agreed to the practical value of noise power spectrum between 10{sup -3}-10{sup -6} mm{sup 2} over spatial frequency range 0-10 mm{sup -1}.

  1. Spectrum pattern resolution after noise exposure in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas: Evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-07-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) and the discrimination of spectrum patterns after fatiguing noise exposure (170 dB re 1 μPa, 10 min duration) was investigated in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas, using the evoked potential technique. Thresholds were measured using rhythmic (1000/s) pip trains of varying levels and recording the rhythmic evoked responses. Discrimination of spectrum patterns was investigated using rippled-spectrum test stimuli of various levels and ripple densities, recording the rhythmic evoked responses to ripple phase reversals. Before noise exposure, the greatest responses to rippled-spectrum probes were evoked by stimuli with a low ripple density with a decrease in the response magnitude occurring with an increasing ripple density. After noise exposure, both a TTS and a reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes appeared and recovered in parallel. The reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes was maximal for high-magnitude responses at low ripple densities and was negligible for low-magnitude responses at high ripple densities. It is hypothesized that the impacts of fatiguing sounds are not limited by increased thresholds and decreased sensitivity results in reduced ability to discriminate fine spectral content with the greatest impact on the discrimination of spectrum content that may carry the most obvious information about stimulus properties.

  2. Spectrum pattern resolution after noise exposure in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas: Evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-07-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) and the discrimination of spectrum patterns after fatiguing noise exposure (170 dB re 1 μPa, 10 min duration) was investigated in a beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas, using the evoked potential technique. Thresholds were measured using rhythmic (1000/s) pip trains of varying levels and recording the rhythmic evoked responses. Discrimination of spectrum patterns was investigated using rippled-spectrum test stimuli of various levels and ripple densities, recording the rhythmic evoked responses to ripple phase reversals. Before noise exposure, the greatest responses to rippled-spectrum probes were evoked by stimuli with a low ripple density with a decrease in the response magnitude occurring with an increasing ripple density. After noise exposure, both a TTS and a reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes appeared and recovered in parallel. The reduction of the responses to rippled-spectrum probes was maximal for high-magnitude responses at low ripple densities and was negligible for low-magnitude responses at high ripple densities. It is hypothesized that the impacts of fatiguing sounds are not limited by increased thresholds and decreased sensitivity results in reduced ability to discriminate fine spectral content with the greatest impact on the discrimination of spectrum content that may carry the most obvious information about stimulus properties. PMID:26233037

  3. Noise-induced synchronization in a system with a 1 / f power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koverda, V. P.; Skokov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    A spatially distributed system with 1/ f fluctuations at coupled nonequilibrium phase transitions have been simulated by two nonlinear stochastic equations. It is shown numerically that at sufficiently high intensity of white noise in the system there arises noise-induced synchronization, which is a nonequilibrium phase transition. To the critical point of the nonequilibrium phase transition corresponds the 1/ f power spectrum and the maximum of informational entropy.

  4. Power spectrum for inflation models with quantum and thermal noises

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Silva, L.A. da E-mail: las.leandro@gmail.com

    2013-03-01

    We determine the power spectrum for inflation models covering all regimes from cold (isentropic) to warm (nonisentropic) inflation. We work in the context of the stochastic inflation approach, which can nicely describe both types of inflationary regimes concomitantly. A throughout analysis is carried out to determine the allowed parameter space for simple single field polynomial chaotic inflation models that is consistent with the most recent cosmological data from the nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and in conjunction with other observational cosmological sources. We present the results for both the amplitude of the power spectrum, the spectral index and for the tensor to scalar curvature perturbation amplitude ratio. We briefly discuss cases when running is present. Despite single field polynomial-type inflaton potential models be strongly disfavored, or even be already ruled out in their simplest versions in the case of cold inflation, this is not the case for nonisentropic inflation models in general (warm inflation in particular), though higher order polynomial potentials (higher than quartic order) tend to become less favorable also in this case, presenting a much smaller region of parameter space compatible with the recent observational cosmological data.

  5. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tom

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of cosmic microwave background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power-spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (l{approx}100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime - i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  6. Diesel engine noise source identification based on EEMD, coherent power spectrum analysis and improved AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Jian; Lin, Jiewei; Bi, Fengrong; Guo, Qian; Chen, Kongwu; Ma, Liang

    2015-09-01

    As the essential foundation of noise reduction, many noise source identification methods have been developed and applied to engineering practice. To identify the noise source in the board-band frequency of different engine parts at various typical speeds, this paper presents an integrated noise source identification method based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), the coherent power spectrum analysis, and the improved analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The measured noise is decomposed into several IMFs with physical meaning, which ensures the coherence analysis of the IMFs and the vibration signals are meaningful. An improved AHP is developed by introducing an objective weighting function to replace the traditional subjective evaluation, which makes the results no longer dependent on the subject performances and provides a better consistency in the meantime. The proposed noise identification model is applied to identifying a diesel engine surface radiated noise. As a result, the frequency-dependent contributions of different engine parts to different test points at different speeds are obtained, and an overall weight order is obtained as oil pan  >  left body  >  valve chamber cover  >  gear chamber casing  >  right body  >  flywheel housing, which provides an effectual guidance for the noise reduction.

  7. Nonlinear modification of the laser noise power spectrum induced by frequency-shifted optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacot, Eric; Houchmandzadeh, Bahram; Girardeau, Vadim; Hugon, Olivier; Jacquin, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study the nonlinear coupling between the stationary (i.e., the beating modulation signal) and transient (i.e., the laser quantum noise) dynamics of a laser subjected to frequency-shifted optical feedback. We show how the noise power spectrum and more specifically the relaxation oscillation frequency of the laser are modified under different optical feedback conditions. Specifically we study the influence of (i) the amount of light returning to the laser cavity and (ii) the initial detuning between the frequency shift and intrinsic relaxation frequency. The present work shows how the relaxation frequency is related to the strength of the beating signal, and the shape of the noise power spectrum gives an image of the transfer modulation function (i.e., of the amplification gain) of the nonlinear-laser dynamics. The theoretical predictions, confirmed by numerical resolutions, are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Scintillation noise power spectrum and its impact on high-redshift 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important source of noise at low radio frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Many low-frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen 21-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR: 12 ≳ z ≳ 7, 100 ≲ ν ≲ 175 MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot uv-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well-known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical (two-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant (dcore ≲ rF ≈ 300 m at 150 MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.

  9. On recording the true absorption spectrum and the scattering spectrum of a turbid sample: application to cell suspensions of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Merzlyak, M N; Naqvi, K R

    2000-11-01

    An integrating sphere is often used for recording the absorption spectrum of a turbid sample. If the sample is placed inside the sphere, scattering losses are eliminated, but the recorded spectrum suffers from other distortions. These distortions can be avoided by positioning the sample outside the sphere; but, since some of the scattered light escapes the detector, the recorded spectrum suffers from residual scattering losses. A method proposed by Latimer and Eubanks more than 30 years ago (Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 98 (1962) 274), is put to a quantitative examination, which has shown that one can obtain, by recording two spectra at different distances from the sphere, not only the true absorption spectrum but also the scattering spectra of the sample. Conditions for the validity of the basic assumption underlying the method are investigated by examining suspensions containing various concentrations of cells of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, and it is shown that the calculated absorbance is proportional to the number density of the cells. The application of the method for quantitative spectrophotometric analysis of pigments in cell suspensions is discussed.

  10. A de-noising algorithm to improve SNR of segmented gamma scanner for spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huailiang; Tuo, Xianguo; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Jinzhao; Henderson, Mark Julian; Courtois, Jérémie; Yan, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    An improved threshold shift-invariant wavelet transform de-noising algorithm for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is proposed to optimize the threshold function of wavelet transforms and reduce signal resulting from pseudo-Gibbs artificial fluctuations. This algorithm was applied to a segmented gamma scanning system with large samples in which high continuum levels caused by Compton scattering are routinely encountered. De-noising data from the gamma ray spectrum measured by segmented gamma scanning system with improved, shift-invariant and traditional wavelet transform algorithms were all evaluated. The improved wavelet transform method generated significantly enhanced performance of the figure of merit, the root mean square error, the peak area, and the sample attenuation correction in the segmented gamma scanning system assays. We also found that the gamma energy spectrum can be viewed as a low frequency signal as well as high frequency noise superposition by the spectrum analysis. Moreover, a smoothed spectrum can be appropriate for straightforward automated quantitative analysis.

  11. Noise spectrum measurements of a midwave, interband cascade infrared photodetector with 33 nm wide electron barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treider, Laura A.; Cowan, Vincent M.; Morath, Christian P.; Tian, Zhaobing; Krishna, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) potentially offer mid-wave infrared detection at very high operating temperatures due to their nearly ideal photovoltaic operation. An ICIP typically makes use of several cascade stages grown in series, each of which consists of an active absorption region with a mid-wave cutoff wavelength, an intra-band relaxation region for electron transport and an inter-band tunneling region to enable electron transport to the next stage. The latter two also effectively act as a hole-barrier (hB) and an electron-barrier (eB), respectively, forming a preferential path for each carrier. Here, an ICIP with a relatively large eB was investigated. One of the key parameters to measure for detector performance is the noise spectrum, particularly to observe the behavior at low frequencies where the noise is often much larger than estimates based on the ideal shot noise expression would predict. This paper presents the results of noise spectrum measurements of differently sized ICIP devices, taken using an external trans-impedance amplifier with a cooled, internal impedance converter and a cooled feedback resistor. Measurements were taken at different operating temperatures and voltage biases in order to determine the noise-dependence on each.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio losses in full spectrum combining of signals with a downconverted subcarrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the results of the signal-to-noise ratio loss in the process of full spectrum combining of signals with a downconverted subcarrier under imperfect conditions. These imperfect conditions not only include the misalignment of the carrier, the subcarrier, and the symbols, but they also include the nonideal filtering in the subcarrier downconversion process, the cutoff of the data bandwidth, and the distortion in signal waveform.

  13. Roundoff noise analysis for digital signal power processors using Welch's power spectrum estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, Chong-Yung; Long, David; Li, Fuk-Kwok

    1987-01-01

    The noise due to finite-word-length effects is analyzed for digital-signal power processors using Welch's power-spectrum estimation technique to measure the power of Gaussian random signals over a frequency band of interest. The input of the digital signal processor contains a finite-length time interval in which the true Gaussian signal is contaminated by Gaussian noise. The roundoff noise-to-signal ratio in the measurement of the signal power is derived, and computer simulations which validate the analytical results are presented. These results can be used in tradeoff studies of hardware design, such as the number of bits required at each processing stage. The results presented in this paper are currently being used in the design of a digital Doppler processor (Chi et al., 1986) for a radar scatterometer.

  14. Reference spectrum extraction and fixed-pattern noise removal in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sucbei; Lee, Sang-Won; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We present a new signal processing method that extracts the reference spectrum information from an acquired optical coherence tomography (OCT) image without a separate calibration step of reference spectrum measurement. The reference spectrum is used to remove the fixed-pattern noise that is a characteristic artifact of Fourier-domain OCT schemes. It was found that the conventional approach based on an averaged spectrum, or mean spectrum, is prone to be influenced by the high-amplitude data points whose statistical distribution is hardly randomized. Thus, the conventional mean-spectrum subtraction method cannot completely eliminate the artifact but may leave residual horizontal lines in the final image. This problem was avoided by utilizing an advanced statistical analysis tool of the median A-line. The reference A-line was obtained by taking a complex median of each horizontal-line data. As an optional method of high-speed calculation, we also propose a minimum-variance mean A-line that can be calculated from an image by a collection of mean A-line values taken from a horizontal segment whose complex variance of the data points is the minimum. By comparing the images processed by those methods, it was found that our new processing schemes of the median-line subtraction and the minimum-variance mean-line subtraction successfully suppressed the fixed-pattern noise. The inverse Fourier transform of the obtained reference A-line well matched the reference spectrum obtained by a physical measurement as well. PMID:21164786

  15. M-Ary Alpha-Stable Noise Modulation in Spread-Spectrum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cek, Mehmet Emre

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a spread-spectrum communication system based on a random carrier is proposed which transmits M-ary information. The random signal is considered as a single realization of a random process taken from prescribed symmetric α-stable (SαS) distribution that carries digital M-ary information to be transmitted. Considering the noise model in the channel as additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), the transmitter sends the information carrying random signal from non-Gaussian density. Alpha-stable distribution is used to encode the M-ary message. Inspired by the chaos shift keying techniques, the proposed method is called M-ary symmetric alpha-stable differential shift keying (M-ary SαS-DSK). The main purpose of preferring non-Gaussian noise instead of conventional pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is to overcome the drawback of self-repeating noise-like sequences which are detectable due to the periodic behavior of the autocorrelation function of PN sequences. Having infinite second order moment in α-stable random carrier offers secrecy of the information due to the non-constant autocorrelation behavior. The bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed method is illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations with respect to various characteristic exponent values and different data length.

  16. Experimental validation of a simple approximation to determine the linewidth of a laser from its frequency noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bucalovic, Nikola; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Schori, Christian; Thomann, Pierre; Di Domenico, Gianni; Schilt, Stéphane

    2012-07-10

    Laser frequency fluctuations can be characterized either comprehensively by the frequency noise spectrum or in a simple but incomplete manner by the laser linewidth. A formal relation exists to calculate the linewidth from the frequency noise spectrum, but it is laborious to apply in practice. We recently proposed a much simpler geometrical approximation applicable to any arbitrary frequency noise spectrum. Here we present an experimental validation of this approximation using laser sources of different spectral characteristics. For each of them, we measured both the frequency noise spectrum to calculate the approximate linewidth and the actual linewidth directly. We observe a very good agreement between the approximate and directly measured linewidths over a broad range of values (from kilohertz to megahertz) and for significantly different laser line shapes. PMID:22781232

  17. Intracavity Multi-Photon-Absorption and the Quantum Noise Spectrum of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Ulrike

    The intensity noise spectrum is investigated quantum-mechanically for incident coherent light passing through a resonator which is filled with a k-photon-absorber. For k 2 the noise of the outgoing light is reduced below the shot noise level the reduction being maximal for frequencies that are small in comparison to the cavity bandwidth. It turns out that the highest possible value of this low-frequency noise reduction is obtained when the resonator losses due to transmission through the outcoupling mirror are 2k - 1 times as large as the k-photon absorption losses. In this case the noise at zero frequency is reduced with respect to the shot noise level by a factor of k/(2k - 1).Translated AbstractQuantenrauschen bei Mehrphotonenabsorption im ResonatorFür kohärent eingestrahltes Licht, das einen mit einem k-Photon-Absorber gefüllten Resonator durchläuft, wird das Intensitäts-Rauschspektrum quantenmechanisch unter-sucht. Für k 2 liegt das Rauschen des austretenden Lichtes unterhalb des Schrotrauschens, wobei die Rauschreduktion für Frequenzen, die klein im Vergleich zur Resonatorbandbreite sind, am größten ist. Es stellt sich heraus, daß diese niederfrequente Rauschunterdrückung ihren höchsten Wert erreicht, wenn die Resonatorverluste, die infolge der Transmission durch den Auskoppelspiegel entstehen, 2k - 1 mal so groß sind wie die k-Photonen-Absorptionsverluste. In diesem Fall reduziert sich das Rauschen bei der Frequenz Null im Vergleich zum Schrotrauschen um den Faktor k/2k - 1.

  18. Magnetic-noise-spectrum measurement by an atom laser in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kálmán, O.; Darázs, Z.; Brennecke, F.; Domokos, P.

    2016-09-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates of ultracold atoms can be used to sense fluctuations of the magnetic field by means of transitions into untrapped hyperfine states. It has been shown recently that counting the outcoupled atoms can yield the power spectrum of the magnetic noise. We calculate the spectral resolution function, which characterizes the condensate as a noise measurement device in this scheme. We use the description of the radio-frequency outcoupling scheme of an atom laser, which takes into account the gravitational acceleration. Employing both an intuitive and the exact three-dimensional and fully quantum mechanical approach, we derive the position-dependent spectral resolution function for condensates of different size and shape.

  19. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  20. Speech Enhancement, Gain, and Noise Spectrum Adaptation Using Approximate Bayesian Estimation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiucang; Attias, Hagai; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approximate Bayesian estimator for enhancing a noisy speech signal. The speech model is assumed to be a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) in the log-spectral domain. This is in contrast to most current models in frequency domain. Exact signal estimation is a computationally intractable problem. We derive three approximations to enhance the efficiency of signal estimation. The Gaussian approximation transforms the log-spectral domain GMM into the frequency domain using minimal Kullback-Leiber (KL)-divergency criterion. The frequency domain Laplace method computes the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator for the spectral amplitude. Correspondingly, the log-spectral domain Laplace method computes the MAP estimator for the log-spectral amplitude. Further, the gain and noise spectrum adaptation are implemented using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm within the GMM under Gaussian approximation. The proposed algorithms are evaluated by applying them to enhance the speeches corrupted by the speech-shaped noise (SSN). The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms offer improved signal-to-noise ratio, lower word recognition error rate, and less spectral distortion. PMID:20428253

  1. Multi-step shot noise spectrum induced by a local large spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Peng-Bin; Shi, Yun-Long; Sun, Zhu; Nie, Yi-Hang

    2015-12-01

    We use non-equilibrium Green’s function method to analyze the shot noise spectrum of artificial single molecular magnets (ASMM) model in the strong spin-orbit coupling limit in sequential tunneling regime, mainly focusing on the effects of local large spin. In the linear response regime, the shot noise shows 2S + 1 peaks and is strongly spin-dependent. In the nonlinear response regime, one can observe 2S + 1 steps in shot noise and Fano factor. In these steps one can see the significant enhancement effect due to the spin-dependent multi-channel process of local large spin, which reduces electron correlations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504210, 11504211, 11504212, 11274207, 11274208, 11174115, and 11325417), the Key Program of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 212018), the Scientific and Technological Project of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015031002-2), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 2013011007-2 and 2013021010-5), and the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi Province, China.

  2. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Dmitry I; Milekhina, Olga N; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels.

  3. [Denoising and assessing method of additive noise in the ultraviolet spectrum of SO2 in flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Sun, Chang-Ku; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yu-Mei

    2009-11-01

    The problem of denoising and assessing method of the spectrum of SO2 in flue gas was studied based on DOAS. The denoising procedure of the additive noise in the spectrum was divided into two parts: reducing the additive noise and enhancing the useful signal. When obtaining the absorption feature of measured gas, a multi-resolution preprocessing method of original spectrum was adopted for denoising by DWT (discrete wavelet transform). The signal energy operators in different scales were used to choose the denoising threshold and separate the useful signal from the noise. On the other hand, because there was no sudden change in the spectra of flue gas in time series, the useful signal component was enhanced according to the signal time dependence. And the standard absorption cross section was used to build the ideal absorption spectrum with the measured gas temperature and pressure. This ideal spectrum was used as the desired signal instead of the original spectrum in the assessing method to modify the SNR (signal-noise ratio). There were two different environments to do the proof test-in the lab and at the scene. In the lab, SO2 was measured several times with the system using this method mentioned above. The average deviation was less than 1.5%, while the repeatability was less than 1%. And the short range experiment data were better than the large range. In the scene of a power plant whose concentration of flue gas had a large variation range, the maximum deviation of this method was 2.31% in the 18 groups of contrast data. The experimental results show that the denoising effect of the scene spectrum was better than that of the lab spectrum. This means that this method can improve the SNR of the spectrum effectively, which is seriously polluted by additive noise. PMID:20101989

  4. Linewidth of a quantum-cascade laser assessed from its frequency noise spectrum and impact of the current driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombez, L.; Schilt, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Führer, T.; Rein, B.; Walther, T.; Di Domenico, G.; Hofstetter, D.; Thomann, P.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the measurement of the frequency noise properties of a 4.6-μm distributed-feedback quantum-cascade laser (QCL) operating in continuous wave near room temperature using a spectroscopic set-up. The flank of the R(14) ro-vibrational absorption line of carbon monoxide at 2196.6 cm-1 is used to convert the frequency fluctuations of the laser into intensity fluctuations that are spectrally analyzed. We evaluate the influence of the laser driver on the observed QCL frequency noise and show how only a low-noise driver with a current noise density below {≈} 1 nA/sqrt{}Hz allows observing the frequency noise of the laser itself, without any degradation induced by the current source. We also show how the laser FWHM linewidth, extracted from the frequency noise spectrum using a simple formula, can be drastically broadened at a rate of {≈} 1.6 MHz/(nA/sqrt{}Hz) for higher current noise densities of the driver. The current noise of commercial QCL drivers can reach several nA/sqrt{}Hz, leading to a broadening of the linewidth of our QCL of up to several megahertz. To remedy this limitation, we present a low-noise QCL driver with only 350 pA/sqrt{}Hz current noise, which is suitable to observe the ≈550 kHz linewidth of our QCL.

  5. Prediction of the spectrum of atmospheric microburst noise in the range 2-20 Hz - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Pope, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    An engineering estimate of the spectrum of atmospheric microburst noise radiation in the range 2-20 Hz is developed. This prediction is obtained via a marriage of standard aeroacoustic theory with a numerical computation of the relevant fluid dynamics. The 'computational aeroacoustics' technique applied here to the interpretation of atmospheric noise measurements is illustrative of a methodology that can now be employed in a wide class of problems.

  6. Intercomparison of methods for image quality characterization. II. Noise power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James T. III; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Chen Ying

    2006-05-15

    Second in a two-part series comparing measurement techniques for the assessment of basic image quality metrics in digital radiography, in this paper we focus on the measurement of the image noise power spectrum (NPS). Three methods were considered: (1) a method published by Dobbins et al. [Med. Phys. 22, 1581-1593 (1995)] (2) a method published by Samei et al. [Med. Phys. 30, 608-622 (2003)], and (3) a new method sanctioned by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1, 2003), developed as part of an international standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency. In addition to an overall comparison of the estimated NPS between the three techniques, the following factors were also evaluated for their effect on the measured NPS: horizontal versus vertical directional dependence, the use of beam-limiting apertures, beam spectrum, and computational methods of NPS analysis, including the region-of-interest (ROI) size and the method of ROI normalization. Of these factors, none was found to demonstrate a substantial impact on the amplitude of the NPS estimates ({<=}3.1% relative difference in NPS averaged over frequency, for each factor considered separately). Overall, the three methods agreed to within 1.6%{+-}0.8% when averaged over frequencies >0.15 mm{sup -1}.

  7. Information-bearing acoustic change outperforms duration in predicting intelligibility of full-spectrum and noise-vocoded sentences.

    PubMed

    Stilp, Christian E

    2014-03-01

    Recent research has demonstrated a strong relationship between information-bearing acoustic changes in the speech signal and speech intelligibility. The availability of information-bearing acoustic changes reliably predicts intelligibility of full-spectrum [Stilp and Kluender (2010). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107(27), 12387-12392] and noise-vocoded sentences amid noise interruption [Stilp et al. (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(2), EL136-EL141]. However, other research reports that proportion of signal duration preserved also predicts intelligibility of noise-interrupted speech. These factors have only ever been investigated independently, obscuring whether one better explains speech perception. The present experiments manipulated both factors to answer this question. A broad range of sentence durations (160-480 ms) containing high or low information-bearing acoustic changes were replaced by speech-shaped noise in noise-vocoded (Experiment 1) and full-spectrum sentences (Experiment 2). Sentence intelligibility worsened with increasing noise replacement, but in both experiments, information-bearing acoustic change was a statistically superior predictor of performance. Perception relied more heavily on information-bearing acoustic changes in poorer listening conditions (in spectrally degraded sentences and amid increasing noise replacement). Highly linear relationships between measures of information and performance suggest that exploiting information-bearing acoustic change is a shared principle underlying perception of acoustically rich and degraded speech. Results demonstrate the explanatory power of information-theoretic approaches for speech perception.

  8. Effects of correlated noise on the full-spectrum combining and complex-symbol combining arraying techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazirani, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of combining telemetry signals received at multiple antennas, commonly referred to as arraying, can be used to improve communication link performance in the Deep Space Network (DSN). By coherently adding telemetry from multiple receiving sites, arraying produces an enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over that achievable with any single antenna in the array. A number of different techniques for arraying have been proposed and their performances analyzed in past literature. These analyses have compared different arraying schemes under the assumption that the signals contain additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and that the noise observed at distinct antennas is independent. In situations where an unwanted background body is visible to multiple antennas in the array, however, the assumption of independent noises is no longer applicable. A planet with significant radiation emissions in the frequency band of interest can be one such source of correlated noise. For example, during much of Galileo's tour of Jupiter, the planet will contribute significantly to the total system noise at various ground stations. This article analyzes the effects of correlated noise on two arraying schemes currently being considered for DSN applications: full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC). A framework is presented for characterizing the correlated noise based on physical parameters, and the impact of the noise correlation on the array performance is assessed for each scheme.

  9. Update on determining the longitudinal temperature in a non-neutral plasma from the plasma noise spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Grant W.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Spencer, Ross L.; Takeshi Nakata, M.

    2003-10-01

    The logitudinal temperature of a non-neutral plasma in a cylindrical Malmberg-Penning trap can be determined by observing the spectrum of the noise signal on an external ring surround the plasma column[1]. One concer in the use of this method of determining the plasma temperature is the effect of plasma shielding on the results. We have revisited this problem from both a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The effects of plasma shielding on the spectrum and on the measured temperature will be discussed. [1]Grant W. Hart, Bryan G. Peterson, M. Takeshi Nakata, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., derline47(126) 2002.

  10. A noise power spectrum study of a new model-based iterative reconstruction system: Veo 3.0.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Liu, Xinming; Dodge, Cristina T; Jensen, Corey T; Rong, X John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance of the third generation of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) system, Veo 3.0, based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis with various clinical presets over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. A CatPhan 600 surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape was scanned 10 times at each of six dose levels on a GE HD 750 scanner. NPS analysis was performed on images reconstructed with various Veo 3.0 preset combinations for comparisons of those images reconstructed using Veo 2.0, filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruc-tion (ASiR). The new Target Thickness setting resulted in higher noise in thicker axial images. The new Texture Enhancement function achieved a more isotropic noise behavior with less image artifacts. Veo 3.0 provides additional reconstruction options designed to allow the user choice of balance between spatial resolution and image noise, relative to Veo 2.0. Veo 3.0 provides more user selectable options and in general improved isotropic noise behavior in comparison to Veo 2.0. The overall noise reduction performance of both versions of MBIR was improved in comparison to FBP and ASiR, especially at low-dose levels. PMID:27685118

  11. Noise Suppression of Incoherent Light Using a Gain-Saturated SOA: Implications for Spectrum-Sliced WDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anoma D.; Horak, Peter; Thomsen, Benn C.; Ibsen, Morten; Richardson, David J.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental and numerical study of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based noise suppression and its relevance to high-channel-density spectrum-sliced wavelength-division-multiplexed systems. We show that the improvement in signal quality is accompanied by spectral distortion, which renders it susceptible to deterioration in the presence of subsequent optical filtering. This phenomenon originates from the loss of intensity correlation between spectral components of the SOA output when the signal spectrum is altered. As a consequence, a design tradeoff is introduced between intensity noise and crosstalk in high-channel-density systems. These adverse effects can be overcome by optimized SOA design, resulting in a significant improvement in signal quality.

  12. PROPOSAL OF PREDICTIVE EQUATIONS FOR THE SOUND PRESSURE SPECTRUM LEVEL OF THE BLAST NOISE IN THE TUNNEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Shigeki; Kakigi, Hiroya; Shinji, Masato

    The noise reduction effect of a sound insulation door installed in a tunnel under construction can be analyzed practically by the numerical analysis using the SEA method. However there was a problem that the prediction analysis is quite difficult at the planning stage because there was not the predictive technique of the sound pressure spectrum level(SPSL) of blast noise to be necessary as input data. In this Study, We analyzed relationship between gunpowder quantity and frequency domain damping characteristic of the sound pressure level in the tunnel based on field measurement results. And based on this analysis, we propose a predictive equation for the SPSL of the blast noise in the tunnel, and discuss its applicability.

  13. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  14. Determination of Jet Noise Radiation Source Locations using a Dual Sideline Cross-Correlation/Spectrum Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. S.; Jaeger, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our efforts is to extrapolate nearfield jet noise measurements to the geometric far field where the jet noise sources appear to radiate from a single point. To accomplish this, information about the location of noise sources in the jet plume, the radiation patterns of the noise sources and the sound pressure level distribution of the radiated field must be obtained. Since source locations and radiation patterns can not be found with simple single microphone measurements, a more complicated method must be used.

  15. NOISE IN THE CROSS-POWER SPECTRUM OF THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Edwards, P. G.; Dougherty, S.; Carlson, B.; Del Rizzo, D.; Hirabayashi, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Murata, Y.; Quick, J. F. H.; Flanagan, C. S.; McCulloch, P. M.

    2012-10-10

    We compare the noise in interferometric measurements of the Vela pulsar from ground- and space-based antennas with theoretical predictions. The noise depends on both the flux density and the interferometric phase of the source. Because the Vela pulsar is bright and scintillating, these comparisons extend into both the low and high signal-to-noise regimes. Furthermore, our diversity of baselines explores the full range of variation in interferometric phase. We find excellent agreement between theoretical expectations and our estimates of noise among samples within the characteristic scintillation scales. Namely, the noise is drawn from an elliptical Gaussian distribution in the complex plane, centered on the signal. The major axis, aligned with the signal phase, varies quadratically with the signal, while the minor axis, at quadrature, varies with the same linear coefficients. For weak signal, the noise approaches a circular Gaussian distribution. Both the variance and covariance of the noise are also affected by artifacts of digitization and correlation. In particular, we show that gating introduces correlations between nearby spectral channels.

  16. Rotating-frame relaxation as a noise spectrum analyser of a superconducting qubit undergoing driven evolution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Gustavsson, Simon; Bylander, Jonas; Jin, Xiaoyue; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Cory, David G; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Orlando, Terry P; Oliver, William D

    2013-01-01

    Gate operations in a quantum information processor are generally realized by tailoring specific periods of free and driven evolution of a quantum system. Unwanted environmental noise, which may in principle be distinct during these two periods, acts to decohere the system and increase the gate error rate. Although there has been significant progress characterizing noise processes during free evolution, the corresponding driven-evolution case is more challenging as the noise being probed is also extant during the characterization protocol. Here we demonstrate the noise spectroscopy (0.1-200 MHz) of a superconducting flux qubit during driven evolution by using a robust spin-locking pulse sequence to measure relaxation (T(1ρ)) in the rotating frame. In the case of flux noise, we resolve spectral features due to coherent fluctuators, and further identify a signature of the 1 MHz defect in a time-domain spin-echo experiment. The driven-evolution noise spectroscopy complements free-evolution methods, enabling the means to characterize and distinguish various noise processes relevant for universal quantum control. PMID:23945930

  17. A Paradoxical Isopotentiality: A Spatially Uniform Noise Spectrum in Neocortical Pyramidal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yaron-Jakoubovitch, Anat; Jacobson, Gilad A.; Koch, Christof; Segev, Idan; Yarom, Yosef

    2008-01-01

    Membrane ion channels and synapses are among the most important computational elements of nerve cells. Both have stochastic components that are reflected in random fluctuations of the membrane potential. We measured the spectral characteristics of membrane voltage noise in vitro at the soma and the apical dendrite of layer 4/5 (L4/5) neocortical neurons of rats near the resting potential. We found a remarkable similarity between the voltage noise power spectra at the soma and the dendrites, despite a marked difference in their respective input impedances. At both sites, the noise levels and the input impedance are voltage dependent; in the soma, the noise level increased from σ = 0.33 ± 0.28 mV at 10 mV hyperpolarization from the resting potential to σ = 0.59 ± 0.3 at a depolarization of 10 mV. At the dendrite, the noise increased from σ = 0.34 ± 0.28 to σ = 0.56 ± 0.30 mV, respectively. TTX reduced both the input impedance and the voltage noise, and eliminated their voltage dependence at both locations. We describe a detailed compartmental model of a L4/5 neuron with simplified electrical properties that successfully reproduces the difference in input impedance between dendrites and soma and demonstrates that spatially uniform conductance-base noise sources leads to an apparent isopotential structure which exhibits a uniform power spectra of voltage noise at all locations. We speculate that a homogeneous distribution of noise sources insures that variability in synaptic amplitude as well as timing of action potentials is location invariant. PMID:18946518

  18. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup −1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  19. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  20. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25430131

  1. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  2. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: the relationship between ambient noise, hearing thresholds and sound spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Yan, H Y; Fine, M L

    2003-04-01

    Two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans live in shallow (5-70 cm) stony streams, and males of both species produce courtship sounds. A previous study demonstrated high noise levels near waterfalls, a quiet window in the noise around 100 Hz at noisy locations, and extremely short-range propagation of noise and goby signals. To investigate the relationship of this acoustic environment to communication, we determined audiograms for both species and measured parameters of courtship sounds produced in the streams. We also deflated the swimbladder in P. martensii to determine its effect on frequency utilization in sound production and hearing. Both species are maximally sensitive at 100 Hz and produce low-frequency sounds with main energy from 70 to 100-150 Hz. Swimbladder deflation does not affect auditory threshold or dominant frequency of courtship sounds and has no or minor effects on sound amplitude. Therefore, both species utilize frequencies for hearing and sound production that fall within the low-frequency quiet region, and the equivalent relationship between auditory sensitivity and maximum ambient noise levels in both species further suggests that ambient noise shapes hearing sensitivity. PMID:12665991

  3. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: the relationship between ambient noise, hearing thresholds and sound spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Yan, H Y; Fine, M L

    2003-04-01

    Two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans live in shallow (5-70 cm) stony streams, and males of both species produce courtship sounds. A previous study demonstrated high noise levels near waterfalls, a quiet window in the noise around 100 Hz at noisy locations, and extremely short-range propagation of noise and goby signals. To investigate the relationship of this acoustic environment to communication, we determined audiograms for both species and measured parameters of courtship sounds produced in the streams. We also deflated the swimbladder in P. martensii to determine its effect on frequency utilization in sound production and hearing. Both species are maximally sensitive at 100 Hz and produce low-frequency sounds with main energy from 70 to 100-150 Hz. Swimbladder deflation does not affect auditory threshold or dominant frequency of courtship sounds and has no or minor effects on sound amplitude. Therefore, both species utilize frequencies for hearing and sound production that fall within the low-frequency quiet region, and the equivalent relationship between auditory sensitivity and maximum ambient noise levels in both species further suggests that ambient noise shapes hearing sensitivity.

  4. Dynamic frequency-noise spectrum measurement for a frequency-swept DFB laser with short-delayed self-heterodyne method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Qin, Jie; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Tong, Yitian; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-11-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a short-delayed self-heterodyne method with 15.5m delay to get a large-frequency-range laser frequency-noise spectrum over 10Hz to 50 MHz, and an averaging approach to extract the intrinsic frequency noise of a frequency-swept laser. With these two techniques, dynamic frequency-noise spectrum of a frequency-swept DFB laser when free running and servo-controlled are both measured. This measurement method permits accurate and insightful investigation of laser stability.

  5. A full-spectrum 3D noise-based infrared imaging sensor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richwine, Robert; Sood, Ashok; Puri, Yash; Heckathorn, Harry; Wilson, Larry; Goldspiel, Jules

    2006-08-01

    This model was developed in matlab with I/O links to excel spreadsheets to add realistic and accurate sensor effects to scene generator or actual sensor/camera images. The model imports scene generator or sensor images, converts these radiance images into electron maps and digital count maps, and modifies these images in accordance with user-defined sensor characteristics such as the response map, the detector dark current map, defective pixel maps, and 3-D noise (temporal and spatial noise). The model provides realistic line-of-sight motion and accurate and dynamic PSF blurring of the images. The sensor model allows for the import of raw nonuniformities in dark current and photoresponse, performs a user-defined two-point nonuniformity correction to calculate gain and offset terms and applies these terms to subsequent scene images. Some of the model's capabilities include the ability to fluctuate or ramp FPA and optics temperatures, or modify the PSF on a frame-by-frame basis. The model also functions as an FPA/sensor performance predictor and an FPA data analysis tool as FPA data frames can be input into the 3-D noise evaluation section of the model. The model was developed to produce realistic infrared images for IR sensors.

  6. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  7. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    SciTech Connect

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  8. Elimination of directional wave spectrum contamination from noise in elevation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Hancock, D. W., III; Hines, D. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Surface Contour Radar (SCR) is a 36-GHz computer-controlled airborne radar which generates a false-color-coded elevation map of the sea surface below the aircraft in real time, and can routinely produce ocean directional wave spectra with post-flight data processing which have much higher angular resolution than pitch-and-roll buoys. The SCR range measurements are not error-free and the resulting errors in the elevations corrupt the directional wave spectrum. This paper presents a technique for eliminating that contamination.

  9. Robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter noise reduction of ultrasonic signals using multiple sub-spectrum phase coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gongzhang, R.; Xiao, B.; Lardner, T.; Gachagan, A.; Li, M.

    2014-02-18

    This paper presents a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter reduction in ultrasonic A-scan waveforms. The performance of conventional spectral-temporal techniques like Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) is highly dependent on the parameter selection, especially when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. Although spatial beamforming offers noise reduction with less sensitivity to parameter variation, phased array techniques are not always available. The proposed algorithm first selects an ascending series of frequency bands. A signal is reconstructed for each selected band in which a defect is present when all frequency components are in uniform sign. Combining all reconstructed signals through averaging gives a probability profile of potential defect position. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, Full Matrix Capture is applied on the austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples with 5MHz transducer arrays. When processing A-scan signals with unrefined parameters, the proposed algorithm enhances SNR by 20dB for both samples and consequently, defects are more visible in B-scan images created from the large amount of A-scan traces. Importantly, the proposed algorithm is considered robust, while SSP is shown to fail on the austenitic steel data and achieves less SNR enhancement on the HNA data.

  10. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p < 0.001 in all cases. The value of β was also found to be associated with patient age and

  11. SU-C-304-05: Use of Local Noise Power Spectrum and Wavelets in Comprehensive EPID Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Gopal, A; Yan, G; Bassett, P; Park, C; Samant, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As EPIDs are increasingly used for IMRT QA and real-time treatment verification, comprehensive quality assurance (QA) of EPIDs becomes critical. Current QA with phantoms such as the Las Vegas and PIPSpro™ can fail in the early detection of EPID artifacts. Beyond image quality assessment, we propose a quantitative methodology using local noise power spectrum (NPS) to characterize image noise and wavelet transform to identify bad pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts. Methods: A total of 93 image sets including bar-pattern images and open exposure images were collected from four iViewGT a-Si EPID systems over three years. Quantitative metrics such as modulation transform function (MTF), NPS and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were computed for each image set. Local 2D NPS was calculated for each subpanel. A 1D NPS was obtained by radial averaging the 2D NPS and fitted to a power-law function. R-square and slope of the linear regression analysis were used for panel performance assessment. Haar wavelet transformation was employed to identify pixel defects and non-uniform gain correction across subpanels. Results: Overall image quality was assessed with DQE based on empirically derived area under curve (AUC) thresholds. Using linear regression analysis of 1D NPS, panels with acceptable flat fielding were indicated by r-square between 0.8 and 1, and slopes of −0.4 to −0.7. However, for panels requiring flat fielding recalibration, r-square values less than 0.8 and slopes from +0.2 to −0.4 were observed. The wavelet transform successfully identified pixel defects and inter-subpanel flat fielding artifacts. Standard QA with the Las Vegas and PIPSpro phantoms failed to detect these artifacts. Conclusion: The proposed QA methodology is promising for the early detection of imaging and dosimetric artifacts of EPIDs. Local NPS can accurately characterize the noise level within each subpanel, while the wavelet transforms can detect bad pixels and

  12. Numerical analysis of a broadband spectrum generated in a standard fiber by noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Pottiez, O.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper covers a numerical analysis of supercontinuum spectrum generation in a piece of standard fiber by using as the pump noise-like pulses produced by a passively mode-locked fiber laser. An experimental study was also carried out, yielding results that support the numerical results. In the numerical study we estimated that the spectral extension of the generated supercontinuum reaches ~ 1000 nm, and that it presents a high flatness over a region of ~ 220 nm (1630 nm-1850 nm) when we use as the pump noise-like pulses with a wide optical bandwidth (~ 50 nm) and a peak power of ~ 2 kW. Experimentally, the output signal spectrum extends from ~ 1530 nm to at least 1750 nm and presents a high flatness over a region of 1640 nm to 1750 nm for the same value of numerical input power, 1750 nm being the upper limit of the optical spectrum analyzer. The numerical analysis presented here is thus an essential part to overcome the severe limitation in measuring capabilities and to understand the phenomena of supercontinuum generation, which is mainly related to Raman self-frequency shift. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked fiber laser for broadband spectrum generation.

  13. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz.

  14. [Tyndall's hypochromism in suspensions].

    PubMed

    Vekshin, N L; Frolova, M S; Kovalev, V I; Begunova, E A

    2015-01-01

    Since the passage of light through each individual particle in a suspension includes the competition of processes of absorption and scattering, it leads to hypochromism--a decrease in the extinction coefficient. Such "scattering" hypochromism increases with the particle size and its refractive index. Since the Tyndall's light scattering in suspensions, where the size of each particle is substantially larger with respect to wavelengths of light, is not strongly dependent on the wavelength, the absorption spectrum (and excitation spectrum) attenuated almost uniformly at different wavelengths. A simple method to find true extinction coefficients from the absorption (or excitation) spectra of diluted suspensions (not having multiple light scattering) is suggested. The experimental data on spectra of hemoglobin in erythrocytes, actinomycin in DNA and flavins in mitochondria are given.

  15. SU-F-18C-02: Evaluations of the Noise Power Spectrum of a CT Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dolly, S; Chen, H; Anastasio, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the new, commercially released CT iterative reconstruction technique, iDose{sup 4} from Philips, to compare it with filtered back-projection techniques (FBP), and to provide clinical practice suggestions for radiation therapy. Methods: A uniform phantom was CT imaged with 120kVp tube potential over a range of mAs (250-3333). The image sets were reconstructed using two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iDose{sup 4} with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6) and three reconstruction filters (standard B, smooth A, and sharp C), after which NPS variations were analyzed and compared on region of interest (ROI) sizes (16×16 to 128×128 pixels), ROI radii (0–65 mm), reconstruction algorithms, reconstruction filters, and mAs. Results: The NPS magnitude and shape depended considerably on ROI size and location for both reconstruction algorithms. Regional noise variance became more stationary as ROI size decreased, minimizing NPS artifacts. The optimal 32×32-pixel ROI size balanced the trade-off between stationary noise and adequate sampling. NPS artifacts were greatest at the center of reconstruction space and decreased with increasing ROI distance from the center. The optimal ROI position was located near the phantom's radial midpoint (∼40mm). For sharper filters, the NPS magnitude and the maximum magnitude frequency increased. Higher dose scans yielded lower NPS magnitudes for both reconstruction algorithms and all filters. Compared to FBP, the iDose{sup 4} algorithm reduced the NPS magnitude while preferentially reducing noise at mid-range spatial frequencies, altering noise texture. This reduction was more significant with increasing iDose{sup 4} noise reduction level. Conclusion: Compared to pixel standard deviation, NPS has greater clinical potential for task-based image quality assessment, describing both the magnitude and spatial frequency characteristics of image noise. While iDose{sup 4

  16. Reconstruction of Rayleigh-Lamb dispersion spectrum based on noise obtained from an air-jet forcing.

    PubMed

    Larose, Eric; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2007-12-01

    The time-domain cross correlation of incoherent and random noise recorded by a series of passive sensors contains the impulse response of the medium between these sensors. By using noise generated by a can of compressed air sprayed on the surface of a plexiglass plate, we are able to reconstruct not only the time of flight but the whole wave forms between the sensors. From the reconstruction of the direct A(0) and S(0) waves, we derive the dispersion curves of the flexural waves, thus estimating the mechanical properties of the material without a conventional electromechanical source. The dense array of receivers employed here allow a precise frequency-wavenumber study of flexural waves, along with a thorough evaluation of the rate of convergence of the correlation with respect to the record length, the frequency, and the distance between the receivers. The reconstruction of the actual amplitude and attenuation of the impulse response is also addressed in this paper.

  17. Rethinking Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Frank H.; Collins, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    The overrepresentation of the Black and Hispanic subgroups in suspension data is a national problem and a troubling issue for schools and school systems across the United States. In Maryland, an analysis of student suspensions by school districts for the 2006-2007 school year revealed disproportionality issues. In 23 of the 24 jurisdictions,…

  18. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  19. Measuring noise equivalent irradiance of a digital short-wave infrared imaging system using a broadband source to simulate the night spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John R.; Robinson, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in developing helmet-mounted digital imaging systems (HMDIS) for integration into military aircraft cockpits. This interest stems from the multiple advantages of digital vs. analog imaging such as image fusion from multiple sensors, data processing to enhance the image contrast, superposition of non-imaging data over the image, and sending images to remote location for analysis. There are several properties an HMDIS must have in order to aid the pilot during night operations. In addition to the resolution, image refresh rate, dynamic range, and sensor uniformity over the entire Focal Plane Array (FPA); the imaging system must have the sensitivity to detect the limited night light available filtered through cockpit transparencies. Digital sensor sensitivity is generally measured monochromatically using a laser with a wavelength near the peak detector quantum efficiency, and is generally reported as either the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) or Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI). This paper proposes a test system that measures NEI of Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) digital imaging systems using a broadband source that simulates the night spectrum. This method has a few advantages over a monochromatic method. Namely, the test conditions provide spectrum closer to what is experienced by the end-user, and the resulting NEI may be compared directly to modeled night glow irradiance calculation. This comparison may be used to assess the Technology Readiness Level of the imaging system for the application. The test system is being developed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  20. Compressive power spectrum sensing for vibration-based output-only system identification of structural systems in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tau Siesakul, Bamrung; Gkoktsi, Kyriaki; Giaralis, Agathoklis

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the need to reduce monetary and energy consumption costs of wireless sensor networks in undertaking output-only/operational modal analysis of engineering structures, this paper considers a multi-coset analog-toinformation converter for structural system identification from acceleration response signals of white noise excited linear damped structures sampled at sub-Nyquist rates. The underlying natural frequencies, peak gains in the frequency domain, and critical damping ratios of the vibrating structures are estimated directly from the sub-Nyquist measurements and, therefore, the computationally demanding signal reconstruction step is by-passed. This is accomplished by first employing a power spectrum blind sampling (PSBS) technique for multi-band wide sense stationary stochastic processes in conjunction with deterministic non-uniform multi-coset sampling patterns derived from solving a weighted least square optimization problem. Next, modal properties are derived by the standard frequency domain peak picking algorithm. Special attention is focused on assessing the potential of the adopted PSBS technique, which poses no sparsity requirements to the sensed signals, to derive accurate estimates of modal structural system properties from noisy sub- Nyquist measurements. To this aim, sub-Nyquist sampled acceleration response signals corrupted by various levels of additive white noise pertaining to a benchmark space truss structure with closely spaced natural frequencies are obtained within an efficient Monte Carlo simulation-based framework. Accurate estimates of natural frequencies and reasonable estimates of local peak spectral ordinates and critical damping ratios are derived from measurements sampled at about 70% below the Nyquist rate and for SNR as low as 0db demonstrating that the adopted approach enjoys noise immunity.

  1. Techniques to improve the accuracy of noise power spectrum measurements in digital x-ray imaging based on background trends removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Zhongxing; Gao Feng; Zhao Huijuan; Zhang Lixin

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Noise characterization through estimation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) is a central component of the evaluation of digital x-ray systems. Extensive works have been conducted to achieve accurate and precise measurement of NPS. One approach to improve the accuracy of the NPS measurement is to reduce the statistical variance of the NPS results by involving more data samples. However, this method is based on the assumption that the noise in a radiographic image is arising from stochastic processes. In the practical data, the artifactuals always superimpose on the stochastic noise as low-frequency background trends and prevent us from achieving accurate NPS. The purpose of this study was to investigate an appropriate background detrending technique to improve the accuracy of NPS estimation for digital x-ray systems. Methods: In order to achieve the optimal background detrending technique for NPS estimate, four methods for artifactuals removal were quantitatively studied and compared: (1) Subtraction of a low-pass-filtered version of the image, (2) subtraction of a 2-D first-order fit to the image, (3) subtraction of a 2-D second-order polynomial fit to the image, and (4) subtracting two uniform exposure images. In addition, background trend removal was separately applied within original region of interest or its partitioned sub-blocks for all four methods. The performance of background detrending techniques was compared according to the statistical variance of the NPS results and low-frequency systematic rise suppression. Results: Among four methods, subtraction of a 2-D second-order polynomial fit to the image was most effective in low-frequency systematic rise suppression and variances reduction for NPS estimate according to the authors' digital x-ray system. Subtraction of a low-pass-filtered version of the image led to NPS variance increment above low-frequency components because of the side lobe effects of frequency response of the boxcar filtering

  2. Metals in the z ˜ 3 intergalactic medium: results from an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES quasar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; Pomante, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Viel, M.; Barai, P.; Becker, G. D.; Calura, F.; Cupani, G.; Fontanot, F.; Haehnelt, M. G.; Kim, T.-S.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Rorai, A.; Tescari, E.; Vanzella, E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the abundance and distribution of metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at ≃ 2.8 through the analysis of an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES spectrum of the quasar HE0940-1050. In the C IV forest, our deep spectrum is sensitive at 3 σ to lines with column density down to log NCIV ≃ 11.4 and in 60 percent of the considered redshift range down to ≃ 11.1. In our sample, all H I lines with log NHI ≥ 14.8 show an associated C IV absorption. In the range 14.0 ≤ log NHI < 14.8, 43 percent of H I lines has an associated C IV absorption. At log NHI < 14.0, the detection rates drop to <10 percent, possibly due to our sensitivity limits and not to an actual variation of the gas abundance properties. In the range log NHI ≥ 14, we observe a fraction of H I lines with detected C IV a factor of 2 larger than the fraction of H I lines lying in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of relatively bright Lyman-break galaxies hosted by dark matter halos with ˜ 1012 M⊙ (Rudie et al. 2012). The comparison of our results with the output of a grid of photoionization models and of two cosmological simulations implies that the volume filling factor of the IGM gas enriched to a metallicity log Z/Z⊙ ≳ - 3 should be of the order of ˜10 - 13 percent. In conclusion, our results favour a scenario in which metals are found also outside the CGM of bright star-forming galaxies, possibly due to pollution by lower mass objects and/or to an early enrichment by the first sources.

  3. Suspension trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Caroline; Porter, Keith M

    2007-01-01

    Suspension trauma (also known as “harness‐induced pathology” or “orthostatic shock while suspended”) is the development of presyncopal symptoms and loss of consciousness if the human body is held motionless in a vertical position for a period of time. It has been described in experiments of personal fall protection, and has been implicated in causes of death in mountaineering accidents, but it seems neither to be widely known about nor to have been presented to the medical profession. This article highlights the potential existence of suspension trauma and suggests that more robust medical research using modern harnesses and healthy volunteers would be beneficial to assess whether this is purely a theoretical risk. PMID:17384373

  4. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise. [noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  5. NON-Shock-Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``1''/f -``Noise'' Power-Spectrum Power-Law UNIVERSALITY is Merely F=ma Time-Series Integral-Transform, aka ``Bak'' -``SOC'' REdiscovery'' PRE(1687)-``Bak''(1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward; Nabarro, Frank; Brailsford, Alan; Tatro, Clement

    2011-06-01

    NON-shock-plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71);PSS:(a)5,601/607(71);Xl.-Latt. Defects 5,277(74);Scripta Met.:6,785(72); 8,587/617(74);3rd Tokyo AE Symp.(76);Acta Met. 25,383(77);JMMM 7,312(78)] ``1''/ ω-``noise'' power-spectrum ``pink''-Zipf-(NOT ``red''-Pareto) power-law UNIVERSALITY is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!!(aka ``Bak''(1988)-``SOC'':1687 < < < 1988: 1988-1687=301-years!!! PHYSICS:(1687) cross-multiplied F=ma rewritten as 1/m=a/F=OUTPUT/IN-PUT=EFFECT/CAUSE=inverse-mass mechanical-susceptibility=X(`` ω'') X(`` ω '') ~(F.-D. thm.) ~P(`` ω'') ``noise'' power-spectrum; (``Max & Al show''): E ~ ω , & E ~(or any/all media with upper-limiting-speeds) ~m. Thus: ω ~ E ~m inverting: 1/ ω ~ 1/E ~1/m ~a/F= X(`` ω'') ~ P(`` ω'') thus: F=ma integral-transform(I-T) is ```SOC'''s'' P(ω) ~ 1/ ω !!!; ``PURE''-MATHS: F=ma DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) s(t)=[v0t+(1/2)at2] I-T formally defines power-spectrum:

  6. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  7. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  8. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  9. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  10. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  12. The Suspension School: An Alternative to Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Robert L.; And Others

    A suspension school for secondary students, established in the 1977-78 school year in an Arkansas school district has developed specific program goals and procedures. Following a discussion of the school's origins, this paper describes operating procedures, philosophy, support system, and student reaction. Suspensions declined considerably through…

  13. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  14. The Binaural Masking-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Detection and the Binaural Intelligibility-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Recognition in the Presence of Speech-Spectrum Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Yu; Li, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Yuan-Chuan; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-01-01

    Binaural hearing involves using information relating to the differences between the signals that arrive at the two ears, and it can make it easier to detect and recognize signals in a noisy environment. This phenomenon of binaural hearing is quantified in laboratory studies as the binaural masking-level difference (BMLD). Mandarin is one of the most commonly used languages, but there are no publication values of BMLD or BILD based on Mandarin tones. Therefore, this study investigated the BMLD and BILD of Mandarin tones. The BMLDs of Mandarin tone detection were measured based on the detection threshold differences for the four tones of the voiced vowels /i/ (i.e., /i1/, /i2/, /i3/, and /i4/) and /u/ (i.e., /u1/, /u2/, /u3/, and /u4/) in the presence of speech-spectrum noise when presented interaurally in phase (S0N0) and interaurally in antiphase (SπN0). The BILDs of Mandarin tone recognition in speech-spectrum noise were determined as the differences in the target-to-masker ratio (TMR) required for 50% correct tone recognitions between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The detection thresholds for the four tones of /i/ and /u/ differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The average detection thresholds of Mandarin tones were all lower in the SπN0 condition than in the S0N0 condition, and the BMLDs ranged from 7.3 to 11.5 dB. The TMR for 50% correct Mandarin tone recognitions differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions, at –13.4 and –18.0 dB, respectively, with a mean BILD of 4.6 dB. The study showed that the thresholds of Mandarin tone detection and recognition in the presence of speech-spectrum noise are improved when phase inversion is applied to the target speech. The average BILDs of Mandarin tones are smaller than the average BMLDs of Mandarin tones. PMID:25835987

  15. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  16. Doubling the spectrum of time-domain induced polarization by harmonic de-noising, drift correction, spike removal, tapered gating and data uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Dahlin, Torleif; Auken, Esben

    2016-11-01

    The extraction of spectral information in the inversion process of time-domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) data is changing the use of the TDIP method. Data interpretation is evolving from a qualitative description of the subsurface, able only to discriminate the presence of contrasts in chargeability parameters, towards a quantitative analysis of the investigated media, which allows for detailed soil- and rock-type characterization. Two major limitations restrict the extraction of the spectral information of TDIP data in the field: (i) the difficulty of acquiring reliable early-time measurements in the millisecond range and (ii) the self-potential background drift in the measured potentials distorting the shape of the late-time IP responses, in the second range. Recent developments in TDIP acquisition equipment have given access to full-waveform recordings of measured potentials and transmitted current, opening for a breakthrough in data processing. For measuring at early times, we developed a new method for removing the significant noise from power lines contained in the data through a model-based approach, localizing the fundamental frequency of the power-line signal in the full-waveform IP recordings. By this, we cancel both the fundamental signal and its harmonics. Furthermore, an efficient processing scheme for identifying and removing spikes in TDIP data was developed. The noise cancellation and the de-spiking allow the use of earlier and narrower gates, down to a few milliseconds after the current turn-off. In addition, tapered windows are used in the final gating of IP data, allowing the use of wider and overlapping gates for higher noise suppression with minimal distortion of the signal. For measuring at late times, we have developed an algorithm for removal of the self-potential drift. Usually constant or linear drift-removal algorithms are used, but these algorithms often fail in removing the background potentials present when the electrodes used for

  17. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  18. Data processing and algorithm development for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph: reduction of noise free simulated images, analysis and spectrum extraction with reference star differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ygouf, Marie; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; van der Marel, Roeland; Macintosh, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Direct detection and characterization of mature giant or sub-Neptunes exoplanets in the visible require space-based instruments optimized for high-contrast imaging with contrasts of 10-9. In this context, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope - Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) will reach raw contrasts of about 8×10-9 to 10-9 using state-of-the-art starlight suppression and wavefront control techniques. A ten-fold contrast improvement is therefore expected using post-processing techniques to reduce the speckle noise level to a factor of at least 10 lower in order to distinguish 10-9 planets from speckles. Point spread function (PSF) subtractions have been successfully applied to ground-based and space-based data with contrasts up to 10-6 but performance has yet to be demonstrated at higher contrast levels. We use both a classical PSF subtraction and the Karunhen-Loéve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm to reduce noise free WFIRST-AFTA-like simulated images in the context of reference star differential imaging (RDI). The two WFIRST-AFTA baseline coronagraphs are considered for this study: the hybrid lyot coronagraph (HLC) for the imaging channel and the shaped-pupil coronagraph (SPC) for the integral field spectrograph channel (IFS). The two reduction methods are compared with respect to the amount and stability of the aberrations for detection in the imaging channel and preliminary spectra extractions are performed for characterization in the IFS channel.

  19. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Energy-Dispersive X-Ray (STEM-EDX) Spectrum Images Using Single-Atomic-Column Cross-Correlation Averaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2016-06-01

    Acquiring an atomic-resolution compositional map of crystalline specimens has become routine practice, thus opening possibilities for extracting subatomic information from such maps. A key challenge for achieving subatomic precision is the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of compositional maps. Here, we report a simple and reliable solution for achieving high-SNR energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy spectrum images for individual atomic columns. The method is based on standard cross-correlation aided by averaging of single-column EDX maps with modifications in the reference image. It produces EDX maps with minimal specimen drift, beam drift, and scan distortions. Step-by-step procedures to determine a self-consistent reference map with a discussion on the reliability, stability, and limitations of the method are presented here.

  20. Enhanced detection sensitivity of "fluorescence reduction" by shifting the analyte absorbance spectrum and use of a fluorescent paper with higher signal/noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Yarmola, E; Chen, N; Yi, D; Chrambach, A

    1998-02-01

    Nonfluorescing protein bands can be detected by the fluorescence optics of the commercial gel electrophoresis apparatus with automated scanning of the migration path (HPGE-1000, LabIntelligence, Belmont CA), taking advantage of the decrease of emission from a fluorescent paper placed below the gel by the absorbance of proteins ("fluorescence reduction"). That decrease of fluorescence gives rise to an inverted protein peak. Nonfluorescent colorless proteins appear to reduce the intensity of light emitted from the fluorescent paper due to absorbance of incident and emitted light. When the absorbance spectrum only slightly overlaps with the excitation and emission spectra of the fluorescent paper, that reduction is weak, and detection sensitivity in that application is consequently only 1/30 of that of fluorescent proteins. By contrast, when the protein is colored so that its absorbance spectrum overlaps widely with the excitation and emission spectra of the fluorescent paper, the sensitivity of "fluorescence reduction" equals 1/4 to 1/5 of that obtained for fluorescent proteins. Bands detected by "fluorescence reduction" provide a quantitative measure of protein load and mobility. The area of the inverted bands is proportional to protein loads up to 16 microg/lane of the gel tray. A theory of "fluorescence reduction" is presented which accounts for the existence of a linear relationship between band area and load.

  1. NON-Shock-Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``1''/f -``Noise'' Power-Spectrum(PS) Power-Law UNIVERSALITY is Merely F =ma Time-Series Integral-Transform, aka ``Bak'' -``SOC'' REdiscovery'' PRE(1687)-``Bak'' (1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward

    2015-06-01

    NON-shock plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71); PSS:(a)5,601/607(71); Xl.-Latt.Defects 5,277(74); Scripta Met.:6,785(72); 8,587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo AE Symp.(76); Acta Met. 5,383(77); JMMM 7,312(78)] ``1''/ ω-``noise'' power-spectrum ``pink''-Zipf(NOT ``red'' =Pareto) power-law UNIVERSALITY is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton 3rd Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!! (aka ``Bak''(1988)-``SOC'':1687 <<<1988: 1988-1687 =301-years!!! PHYSICS:F =ma cross-multiplied as 1/m =a/F =OUTPUT/INPUT = EFFECT/CAUSE =inverse-mass mechanical-susceptibility = χ (`` ω'') χ(`` ω'') ~(F.-D.thm.) ~P(`` ω'') ``noise'' power-spectrum; (``Max & Al show''): E ~ ω & E ~ (upper-limiting-speeds media) ~m. Thus: ω ~ E ~m Inverting: 1/ ω ~ 1/E ~1/m ~a/F = χ (`` ω'') ~P(`` ω'') Thus: F =ma integral-transform(I-T) is ````SOC'''s'' P(ω) ~ 1/ ω!!! ; ''PURE''-MATHS: F =ma DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) s(t) =[v0t +(1/2)at2] I-T formally de?nes power-spectrum(PS): P(ω) ≡ ∫ s(t)e-iωtdt = ∫ [vot +(1/2)at2]e-iωtdt = vo ∫ a(t)e-iωtdt +(1/2)[a ≠a(t)] ∫t2e-iωtdt =vo(∂ / ∂ω) δ(ω) + (1/2)[a ≠a(t)](∂2/ ∂ω2) δ(ω) = vo/ω0 + (1/2)[a ≠a(t)]/ω 1 . 000 ...; uniform-velocity a =0 PS P(ω) = 1/ωo WHITE vs. uniform:-a>0a<0) PS P(ω) = 1/ω 1 . 000 ... pink/flicker/HYPERBOLICITY.

  2. Noise in miniature microphones.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed. PMID:11863188

  3. Noise in miniature microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen C.; Lopresti, Janice L.; Ring, Eugene M.; Nepomuceno, Henry G.; Beard, John J.; Ballad, William J.; Carlson, Elmer V.

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  4. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  5. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  6. Modelling a Suspension Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The quadratic function can be modeled in real life by a suspension bridge that supports a uniform weight. This activity uses concrete models and computer generated graphs to discover the mathematical model of the shape of the main cable of a suspension bridge. (MDH)

  7. Research on School Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Schools across the nation report increases in the use of punitive disciplinary methods (e.g., suspension). The need for these disciplinary practices to address serious student misconduct is undisputed. What research has questioned is why some students seem to be suspended more often than others, what effects suspension has on students, and whether…

  8. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  9. Ultrasonic separation of a suspension for in situ spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Qi, Wei; Mori, Keita; Ogawa, Satoshi; Inohara, Daichi; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic techniques to suspensions is difficult because optical scattering caused by solid particles reduces the accuracy. At the extreme, dense suspensions like blood cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. In the present study, an ultrasonic standing wave was used to agglomerate fluorescent particles in an aqueous ethanol suspension at the nodes of the standing wave. Relatively clear liquid regions, which contained few particles that could cause optical scattering, appeared around the anti-nodes and were used for spectroscopic imaging. This produced a spectrum that was similar to that of clear aqueous ethanol without any fluorescent particles.

  10. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  11. Rotor noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-08-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  12. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  13. Wind noise under a pine tree canopy.

    PubMed

    Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that infrasonic wind noise levels are lower for arrays placed in forests and under vegetation than for those in open areas. In this research, the wind noise levels, turbulence spectra, and wind velocity profiles are measured in a pine forest. A prediction of the wind noise spectra from the measured meteorological parameters is developed based on recent research on wind noise above a flat plane. The resulting wind noise spectrum is the sum of the low frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-shear interaction near and above the tops of the trees and higher frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction near the ground within the tree layer. The convection velocity of the low frequency wind noise corresponds to the wind speed above the trees while the measurements showed that the wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction is near stationary and is generated by the slow moving turbulence adjacent to the ground. Comparison of the predicted wind noise spectrum with the measured wind noise spectrum shows good agreement for four measurement sets. The prediction can be applied to meteorological estimates to predict the wind noise under other pine forests.

  14. Diffusion of passive particles in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafai, Salima; John, Thomas; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-11-01

    We study how an active suspension consisting of a definite volume fraction of the microswimmer Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii modifies the Brownian movement of small to medium size microspheres. We present measurements and simulations of trajectories of microspheres with a diameter of 20 μm in suspensions of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a so called ``puller,'' and show that the mean squared displacement of such trajectories consist of parabolic and a linear part. The linear part is due to the hydrodynamic noise of the microswimmers while the parabolic part is a consequence of directed motion events that occur randomly, when a microsphere is transported by a microswimmer on a timescale that is in higher order of magnitude than the Brownian like hydrodynamic interaction. In addition, we theoretically describe this effect with a dimensional analysis that takes the force dipole model used to describe ``puller'' like Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii into account.

  15. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  16. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  17. Application of time-frequency analysis to the evaluation of the condition of car suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, G. M.; Josko, M.; Tomaszewski, F.; Filipiak, R.

    2015-06-01

    The article presents possibilities of use of vibration signal parameters for the evaluation of elements' clearance in the car suspension system. The time-spectrum analysis has been proposed to determine the frequency band connected with car body free vibration generated by impacts of suspension elements in case of clearance in suspension elements fixing to the car body. Diagnostic models allowing evaluation of shock absorber fastening to the car body are described in this work.

  18. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  19. Multipath noise reduction spread spectrum signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The concepts of early-prompt delay tracking, multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, and carrier phase multipath correction are addressed. In early-prompt delay tracking, since multipath is always delayed with respect to the direct signals, the system derives phase and pseudorange observables from earlier correlation lags. In multipath correction of early-prompt delay tracking from correlation shape, the system looks for relative variations of amplitude across the code correlation function that do not match the predicted multipath-free code cross-correlation shape. The system then uses deviations from the multipath-free shape to infer the magnitude of multipath, and to generate corrections pseudorange observables. In carrier phase multipath correction, the system looks for variations of phase among plural early and prompt lags. The system uses the measured phase variations, along with the general principle that the multipath errors are larger for later lags, to infer the presence of multipath, and to generate corrections for carrier-phase observables.

  20. Noise spectroscopy of polymer transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsh, Rishav; Narayan, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Noise studies constitute an important approach to study polymer based field effect transistors (FETs) from the perspective of disorder physics as well as device application. The current fluctuations in an all organic solution-processable FET in different regimes of operation (I-V) are measured and analyzed. The intrinsic transport noise is sizable and readily observed in the current time series measurements. The ensuing current spectrum (SI(f)) exhibits a typical 1/f characteristics. It is observed that this noise amplitude scales with respect to current bias and indicative of mobility as well as number fluctuations at dielectric-semiconductor interface. FETs with leakage (lossy) dielectric layer indicate characteristic noise spectrum features which can serve as a diagnostic tool to monitor device stability.

  1. Telegraph frequency noise in electromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F.; Zou, J.; Maizelis, Z. A.; Chan, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the possibility of revealing fluctuations in the eigenfrequency of a resonator when the frequency noise is of the telegraph type. Using a resonantly driven micromechanical resonator, we show that the time-averaged vibration amplitude spectrum exhibits two peaks. They merge with an increasing rate of frequency switching and the spectrum displays an analog of motional narrowing. We also show that the moments of the complex amplitude depend strongly on the frequency noise characteristics. This dependence remains valid even when strong thermal noise or detector noise is present.

  2. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  3. Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening Truss; Upper & Lower Decks; Assembled System - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  5. Squeezed light spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for determining physical properties of an unperturbed spin system from its power noise spectrum both in atomic and solid state physics. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, we detect spontaneous spin fluctuations of a dense Rb vapor via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, resulting in the excess of spectral noise at the Larmor frequency over a white photon shot-noise background. We report quantum enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio via polarization squeezing of the probe beam up to 3dB over the full density range up to n = 1013 atoms cm-3, covering practical conditions used in optimized SNS experiments. Furthermore, we show that squeezing improves the trade-off between statistical sensitivity and systematic errors due to line broadening, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  6. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  7. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  8. Stability of Metronidazole Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ronald F; Ying, James

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antiprotozoal agent used in the treatment of bacterial and protozoal anaerobic infections. The objectives of this study were to develop concentrated metronidazole suspensions that are inexpensive and easy to prepare and determine the stability of these suspensions after storage in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles at room temperature (23°C) and under refrigeration (5°C). Metronidazole suspensions (50 mg/mL) were prepared from powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup as the vehicles. Samples were collected in triplicate from each container on days 0, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 93. Samples were assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method that had been validated as stability indicating. Color, change in physical appearance, and pH were also monitored at each time interval. There was no apparent change in color or physical appearance. The pH values changed by less than 0.20 units over the 93 days. The stability of metronidazole suspensions compounded from United States Pharmacopeia powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup and packaged in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles was determined to be 93 days when stored at either room temperature or under refrigeration. PMID:26714365

  9. Alternatives to Student Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, David

    2012-01-01

    Seven years ago, James A. Garfield High School in East Los Angeles set a school record with 613 student suspensions, out of a total enrollment of 5,000 students. The school, made famous by the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver", was no stranger to the high rates of student discipline all too common within the Los Angeles Unified School District.…

  10. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  11. Flywheel Magnetic Suspension Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Sifford, Curtiss; Thomas, Erwin; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Provenza, Andrew; Kascak, Albert; Montague, Gerald; Lei, Shuliang; Kim, Yeonkyu; Sun, Guangyoung; Chon, ChonHee; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Li, Ming; Minihan, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of many areas of the flywheel magnetic suspension (MS) R&D being performed at the Texas A&M Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab (TAMU-VCEL). This includes system response prediction, actuator optimization and redundancy, controller realizations and stages, sensor enhancements and backup bearing reliability.

  12. Crewbot Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Nathan A.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Surface Robot Work Crews (RWC) represent a new class of construction robots for future deployment in planetary exploration. Rovers currently being used for the RWC platform lack the load carrying capabilities required in regular work. Two new rovers, dubbed CrewBots, being designed in JPL's Planetary Robotics Lab specifically for RWC applications greatly increase the load carrying capabilities of the platform. A major component of the rover design was the design of the rocker type suspension, which increases rover mobility. The design of the suspension for the Crewbots departed from the design of recent rovers. While many previous rovers have used internal bevel gear differentials, the increased load requirements of the Crewbots calls for a more robust system. The solution presented is the use of an external modified three-bar, slider-linkage, rocker-style suspension that increases the moment arm of the differential. The final product is a suspension system capable of supporting the extreme loading cases the RWC platform presents, without consuming a large portion of the Crewbots' internal space.

  13. Cryonic Suspension and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, George P.; Hall, Clare

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes three central problems which adversely affect use, development, and perfection of cryonic suspension of individuals: the extent to which a physician may be guilty of malpractice in assisting with a suspension; the need for a recognition of suspension; and the present effect of the law's anachronistic treatment of estate devolution upon a…

  14. Low endogenous neural noise in autism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Greg; Plaisted-Grant, Kate

    2015-04-01

    'Heuristic' theories of autism postulate that a single mechanism or process underpins the diverse psychological features of autism spectrum disorder. Although no such theory can offer a comprehensive account, the parsimonious descriptions they provide are powerful catalysts to autism research. One recent proposal holds that 'noisy' neuronal signalling explains not only some deficits in autism spectrum disorder, but also some superior abilities, due to 'stochastic resonance'. Here, we discuss three distinct actions of noise in neural networks, arguing in each case that autism spectrum disorder symptoms reflect too little, rather than too much, neural noise. Such reduced noise, perhaps a function of atypical brainstem activation, would enhance detection and discrimination in autism spectrum disorder but at significant cost, foregoing the widespread benefits of noise in neural networks.

  15. Landslide noise.

    PubMed

    Cadman, J D; Goodman, R E

    1967-12-01

    Acoustical monitoring of real landslides has revealed the existence of subaudible noise activity prior to failure and has enabled prediction of the depth of the seat of sliding when conducted in boreholes beneath the surface. Recordings of noise generated in small slopes of moist sand, tilted to failure in laboratory tests, have been analyzed to determine the foci of discrete subaudible noise events. The noises emitted shortly before failure were plotted close to the true sliding surface observed after failure. The foci of earlier events lay either within the central portion of the sliding mass or in a region behind the failure surface. The head and toe zones were devoid of strong seismic activity. PMID:17734306

  16. Semiconductor Laser Low Frequency Noise Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Logan, Ronald T.

    1996-01-01

    This work summarizes the efforts in identifying the fundamental noise limit in semiconductor optical sources (lasers) to determine the source of 1/F noise and it's associated behavior. In addition, the study also addresses the effects of this 1/F noise on RF phased arrays. The study showed that the 1/F noise in semiconductor lasers has an ultimate physical limit based upon similar factors to fundamental noise generated in other semiconductor and solid state devices. The study also showed that both additive and multiplicative noise can be a significant detriment to the performance of RF phased arrays especially in regard to very low sidelobe performance and ultimate beam steering accuracy. The final result is that a noise power related term must be included in a complete analysis of the noise spectrum of any semiconductor device including semiconductor lasers.

  17. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions.

  18. Zellweger Spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Zellweger spectrum result from defects in the assembly of a cellular structure called the peroxisome, and ... Zellweger spectrum are caused by defects in the assembly of the peroxisome. There are at least 12 ...

  19. Suspension for automotive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.C.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a vehicle suspension system for mounting ground-engaging wheels to a vehicle frame. The suspension system comprises at least two substantially rigid arms secured to opposite sides of the frame through substantially aligned pivot mounts; at least one wheel-carrying axle between the arms; and a bracket means securing the at least one axle to each of the arms. The improvements described here is in each of the bracket means comprising: an axle plate means rigidly secured to the axle and having an elongated planar complementary surface at least partially wrapping around the axle; two spaced connecting plates secured transversely to the axle plate means and to one of the arms; and a bracing means comprising at least one curved gusset plate rigidly and angularly secured to and between the axle plate means and one of the connecting plates.

  20. Articulated Suspension Without Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Wheels negotiate bumps and holes with minimal tilting of vehicle body. In new suspension, wheel climbs obstacle as high as 1 1/2 times its diameter without excessive tilting of chassis. Provides highly stable ride over rough ground for such vehicles as wheelchairs, military scout cars, and police and fire robots. System of levers distributes weight to wheels. Sized to distribute equal or other desired portions of load among wheels.

  1. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  2. The Tail Suspension Test

    PubMed Central

    Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Bhat, Shambhu; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The tail-suspension test is a mouse behavioral test useful in the screening of potential antidepressant drugs, and assessing of other manipulations that are expected to affect depression related behaviors. Mice are suspended by their tails with tape, in such a position that it cannot escape or hold on to nearby surfaces. During this test, typically six minutes in duration, the resulting escape oriented behaviors are quantified. The tail-suspension test is a valuable tool in drug discovery for high-throughput screening of prospective antidepressant compounds. Here, we describe the details required for implementation of this test with additional emphasis on potential problems that may occur and how to avoid them. We also offer a solution to the tail climbing behavior, a common problem that renders this test useless in some mouse strains, such as the widely used C57BL/6. Specifically, we prevent tail climbing behaviors by passing mouse tails through a small plastic cylinder prior to suspension. Finally, we detail how to manually score the behaviors that are manifested in this test. PMID:22315011

  3. Emergence of collective motion in suspensions of swimming cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffin, Maria Chiara; Denissenko, Petr; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    Collective motion is one of the most fascinating manifestations of self-organization in non-equilibrium systems. The phenomena emerges with the increase in concentration of motile individuals ranging from molecular motors to large animals like fish and humans. We have studied the suspension of swimming sperm cells in a microfluidic device which gradually concentrates motile cells in the region of interest. The onset of collective motion is identified by investigating correlations of fluid velocity and image brightness associated with the cell orientation. Cell concentration and the noise parameter are varied to switch on/off the collective interaction. The level of noise is controlled by adjusting the cell motility which depends on the temperature in the microfluidic chip. Fluid velocity is measured by tracing passive fluorescent beads in the suspension.

  4. Novel oral suspensions: a review.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Phadke, Chetan

    2014-01-01

    An oral pharmaceutical suspension has been one of the most favorable dosage forms for pediatric and geriatric patients or patients unable to tolerate solid dosage forms. The liquid form is preferred because of the ease of swallowing and flexibility in the administration of doses. This emerging area of suspensions as applied to the pharmaceutical field are discussed in the current article enlightening the vision of the readers towards pharmaceutical formulations including nanosuspensions, non-aqueous suspensions and modified release suspensions. The emphasis in the article focuses on the essential principles involved in the process of formation of different types of suspensions and their applications, since novel oral suspensions have potential to provide various strategy systems.

  5. Silica suspension and coating developments for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, G.; Armandula, H.; Cantley, C. A.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cumming, A.; Elliffe, E.; Fejer, M. M.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Harry, G. M.; Heptonstall, A.; Hough, J.; Jones, R.; Mackowski, J.-M.; Martin, I.; Murray, P.; Penn, S. D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Reid, S.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Robertson, N. A. A.; Sneddon, P. H.; Strain, K. A.

    2006-03-01

    The proposed upgrade to the LIGO detectors to form the Advanced LIGO detector system is intended to incorporate a low thermal noise monolithic fused silica final stage test mass suspension based on developments of the GEO 600 suspension design. This will include fused silica suspension elements jointed to fused silica test mass substrates, to which dielectric mirror coatings are applied. The silica fibres used for GEO 600 were pulled using a Hydrogen-Oxygen flame system. This successful system has some limitations, however, that needed to be overcome for the more demanding suspensions required for Advanced LIGO. To this end a fibre pulling machine based on a CO2 laser as the heating element is being developed in Glasgow with funding from EGO and PPARC. At the moment a significant limitation for proposed detectors like Advanced LIGO is expected to come from the thermal noise of the mirror coatings. An investigation on mechanical losses of silica/tantala coatings was carried out by several labs involved with Advanced LIGO R&D. Doping the tantala coating layer with titania was found to reduce the coating mechanical dissipation. A review of the results is given here.

  6. Six degrees of freedom vibration isolation using electromagnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang-Il; Debra, Daniel B.; Michelson, Peter F.; Taber, Robert C.; Price, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for modeling an electromagnet. Control laws are considered with and without flux feedback and with position and orientation information of the suspended body. Base motion and sensor noise are the principal disturbances. Proper selection of the geometrical operating point minimizes the passive coupling above the bandwidth of the control and filtering can attenuate the high frequency content of sensor noise. Six electromagnets are arranged in a configuration which optimizes the load support and provides control over all six degrees of freedom of the suspended body. The design is based on experimental data generated with a specially designed test facility. Application for suspension of a gravity wave antenna is discussed.

  7. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  8. 20 CFR 416.1320 - Suspensions; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspensions; general. 416.1320 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Suspensions and Terminations § 416.1320 Suspensions; general. (a) When suspension is proper. Suspension of benefit payments is required when a recipient is alive but no longer meets...

  9. 20 CFR 416.1320 - Suspensions; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspensions; general. 416.1320 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Suspensions and Terminations § 416.1320 Suspensions; general. (a) When suspension is proper. Suspension of benefit payments is required when a recipient is alive but no longer meets...

  10. Electrofiltration of Aqueous Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang; Tan; Neoh; Tien

    2000-08-15

    Electrofiltration of hydrosols in fixed-bed filters was studied experimentally. The experimental variables examined included media type, electric field strength, and suspension pH values. The extent of particle removal was found to improve with the application of the electric field, and lower pH values favor particle collection. The filtrate quality displayed the transient behavior of increasing particle concentration with time. A simple model which assumes that the filter coefficient decreases linearly with the extent of deposition was developed and found capable of predicting the observed behavior. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M R; Sa, N; Davenport, M; Healy, K; Vlassiouk, I; Letant, S E; Baker, L A; Siwy, Z S

    2011-02-18

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared for the first time: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit non-equilibrium 1/f noise, thus the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics, and formation of vortices and non-linear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields inducing secondary effects in the pore such as enhanced water dissociation.

  12. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  13. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  14. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  15. Analysis of handling noises on wound strings.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, J; Penttinen, H; Bank, B

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzes the handling noises that occur when a finger is slid along a wound string. The resulting noise has a harmonic structure due to the periodic texture of the wound string. The frequency of the harmonics and the root-mean-square amplitude of the noise were found to be linearly proportional to the sliding speed. In addition, the sliding excites the longitudinal modes of the string, thus resulting in a set of static harmonics in the noise spectrum. The sliding excites different longitudinal modes depending on the sliding location. PMID:18247641

  16. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  17. Consolidation of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Wei-Heng; Kim, Seong Il; Shih, Wan Y.; Aksay, I.A. ); Schilling, C.H. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA )

    1990-08-01

    A key step in the processing of ceramics is the consolidation of powders into engineered shapes. Colloidal processing uses solvents (usually water) and dispersants to break up powder agglomerates in suspension and thereby reduce the pore size in a consolidated compact. However, agglomeration and particle rearrangement leading to pore enlargement can still occur during drying. Therefore, it is beneficial to consolidate the compact as densely as possible during the suspension stage. The consolidation techniques of pressure filtration and centrifugation were studied and the results are reported in this paper. In particular, the steady-state pressure- density relationship was studied, and information was obtained regarding the consolidation process, the microstructure, and the average density profile of consolidated cakes. Recently, we performed Monte Carlo simulations on a cluster-cluster aggregation model with restructuring, and found the exponential relationship between pressure and density is indeed the result of the breaking up of the fractal structural units. Furthermore, we calculated density profiles from the bottom to the top of the consolidated cakes by solving the local static force balance equation in the continuum particulate network. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Active control of an innovative seat suspension system with acceleration measurement based friction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Donghong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Hongyi; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an innovative active seat suspension system for vehicles is presented. This seat suspension prototype is built with two low cost actuators each of which has one rotary motor and one gear reducer. A H∞ controller with friction compensation is designed for the seat suspension control system where the friction is estimated and compensated based on the measurement of seat acceleration. This principal aim of this research was to control the low frequency vibration transferred or amplified by the vehicle (chassis) suspension, and to maintain the passivity of the seat suspension at high frequency (isolation vibration) while taking into consideration the trade-off between the active seat suspension cost and its high frequency performance. Sinusoidal excitations of 1-4.5 Hz were applied to test the active seat suspension both when controlled and when uncontrolled and this is compared with a well-tuned passive heavy duty vehicle seat suspension. The results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm within the tested frequencies. Further tests were conducted using the excitations generated from a quarter-car model under bump and random road profiles. The bump road tests indicate the controlled active seat suspension has good transient response performance. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) method and ISO 2631-1 standards were applied to analyse the seat suspension's acceleration under random road conditions. Although some low magnitude and high frequency noise will inevitably be introduced by the active system, the weighted-frequency Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration shows that this may not have a large effect on ride comfort. In fact, the ride comfort is improved from being an 'a little uncomfortable' to a 'not uncomfortable' level when compared with the well-tuned passive seat suspension. This low cost active seat suspension design and the proposed controller with the easily measured feedback signals are very practical for real

  19. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  20. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  1. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  2. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension....

  3. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension....

  4. 48 CFR 3409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 3409.407... COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 3409.407 Suspension....

  5. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  6. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-04-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  7. Diesel Technology: Steering and Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roger; Scarberry, Terry; Tesch, Carl; Kellum, Mary

    Competency-based teacher and student materials on steering and suspension are provided for a diesel technology curriculum. Eleven units of instruction cover the following topics: chassis, tires, and wheels; steering; and suspension. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, then developing…

  8. TECHNICAL NOTE: Electroconductive magnetorheological suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2006-12-01

    A magnetorheological suspension (MRS) is obtained by thermal decomposition of Fe2(CO)9 in mineral oil with stearic acid. For well-chosen values of the intensity of the magnetic field, the suspension becomes electroconductive. By addition of styrene acrylate copolymer iron oxide, MRSs are obtained with prescribed domains of electrical conductivity. The experimental results obtained are presented and discussed.

  9. Flow properties of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, K.; Izumi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The viscosity and flow behavior of a concentrated suspension, with special emphasis on fresh concrete containing a superplasticizer, is analyzed according to Newton's law of viscosity. The authors interpreted Newton's law in a new way, and explain non-Newton flow from Newton's law. The outline of this new theory is given. Viscosity of suspensions, and the effect of dispersants are analyzed.

  10. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  11. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  12. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  13. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  14. Information Content in Uniformly Discretized Gaussian Noise:. Optimal Compression Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, August; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Barriga, Jose; Elizalde, Emilio

    We approach the theoretical problem of compressing a signal dominated by Gaussian noise. We present expressions for the compression ratio which can be reached, under the light of Shannon's noiseless coding theorem, for a linearly quantized stochastic Gaussian signal (noise). The compression ratio decreases logarithmically with the amplitude of the frequency spectrum P(f) of the noise. Entropy values and compression rates are shown to depend on the shape of this power spectrum, given different normalizations. The cases of white noise (w.n.), fnp power-law noise (including 1/f noise), (w.n.+1/f) noise, and piecewise (w.n.+1/f | w.n.+1/f2) noise are discussed, while quantitative behaviors and useful approximations are provided.

  15. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  16. Nonlinear Single Spin Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-03-01

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments, through the use of decoherence spectroscopy. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis. Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 110503 (2013). Synopsis at http://physics.aps.org/synopsis-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.110503 Current position: NIST, Boulder, CO.

  17. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise.

    PubMed

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect-that is, the plasmonic effect-on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors.

  18. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise.

    PubMed

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect-that is, the plasmonic effect-on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors. PMID:26266548

  19. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect—that is, the plasmonic effect—on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors.

  20. Electrorheology of nanofiber suspensions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluid, which can be transformed rapidly from a fluid-like state to a solid-like state under an external electric field, is considered to be one of the most important smart fluids. However, conventional ER fluids based on microparticles are subjected to challenges in practical applications due to the lack of versatile performances. Recent researches of using nanoparticles as the dispersal phase have led to new interest in the development of non-conventional ER fluids with improved performances. In this review, we especially focus on the recent researches on electrorheology of various nanofiber-based suspensions, including inorganic, organic, and inorganic/organic composite nanofibers. Our goal is to highlight the advantages of using anisotropic nanostructured materials as dispersal phases to improve ER performances. PMID:21711790

  1. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  2. Noise Abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  3. Suspension culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Birch, J R; Arathoon, R

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian cell suspension culture systems are being used increasingly in the biotechnology industry. This is due to their many advantages including simplicity and homogeneity of culture. Suspension systems are very adaptable (e.g., for microcarrier, microencapsulation, or other methods of culture). Their engineering is thoroughly understood and standardized at large scale, and automation and cleaning procedures are well established. Suspension systems offer the possibility of quick implementation of production protocols due to their ability to be scaled easily once the basic culture parameters are understood. The only main disadvantage of the suspension culture systems to date is their inapplicability for the production of human vaccines from either primary cell lines or from normal human diploid cell lines (Hayflick et al., 1987 and references therein). One of the great advantages of suspension culture is the opportunity it provides to study interactions of metabolic and production phenomena in chemostat or turbidostat steady-state systems. Furthermore, in suspension culture systems from which cell number and cell mass measurements are easy to obtain, rigorous and quantitative estimations of the effects of growth conditions or perturbations of metabolic homeostasis can be made. Such studies can speed up the development of optimal processes. With our increasing understanding of factors influencing expression in mammalian cells (Cohen and Levinson, 1988; Santoro et al., 1988) and the direct application of new methods in suspension culture (Rhodes and Birch, 1988), its usefulness and importance is likely to increase in the future. In this chapter, we have described some of the potential uses of the various suspension culture systems and have covered most of the established technology and literature. Due to the rapid developments and needs in the biotechnology industry and the versatility of suspension culture systems, it is probable that many more variations on this

  4. Nonlinear Single-Spin Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-03-01

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis.

  5. Spin noise in the anisotropic central spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Johannes; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-01-01

    Spin-noise measurements can serve as a direct probe for the microscopic decoherence mechanism of an electronic spin in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We have calculated the spin-noise spectrum in the anisotropic central spin model using a Chebyshev expansion technique which exactly accounts for the dynamics up to an arbitrary long but fixed time in a finite-size system. In the isotropic case, describing QD charge with a single electron, the short-time dynamics is in good agreement with quasistatic approximations for the thermodynamic limit. The spin-noise spectrum, however, shows strong deviations at low frequencies with a power-law behavior of ω-3/4 corresponding to a t-1/4 decay at intermediate and long times. In the Ising limit, applicable to QDs with heavy-hole spins, the spin-noise spectrum exhibits a threshold behavior of (ω-ωL)-1/2 above the Larmor frequency ωL=gμBB. In the generic anisotropic central spin model we have found a crossover from a Gaussian type of spin-noise spectrum to a more Ising-type spectrum with increasing anisotropy in a finite magnetic field. In order to make contact with experiments, we present ensemble averaged spin-noise spectra for QD ensembles charged with single electrons or holes. The Gaussian-type noise spectrum evolves to a more Lorentzian shape spectrum with increasing spread of characteristic time scales and g factors of the individual QDs.

  6. A simple hindlimb suspension apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, E.; Schultz, E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a simple, inexpensive apparatus for application of the hindlimb suspension model to studies of the effects of unloading on mammalian physiology. Construction of a cage and suspension assembly is described using materials that can be obtained from most hardware stores. The design is kept simple for easy assembly and disassembly to facilitate cleaning and storage. The suspension assembly allows the animals full access to all portions of the floor area and provides an effective environment to study the effects of unloading.

  7. Jet Aeroacoustics: Noise Generation Mechanism and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the third year research effort of the project. The research work focussed on the fine scale mixing noise of both subsonic and supersonic jets and the effects of nozzle geometry and tabs on subsonic jet noise. In publication 1, a new semi-empirical theory of jet mixing noise from fine scale turbulence is developed. By an analogy to gas kinetic theory, it is shown that the source of noise is related to the time fluctuations of the turbulence kinetic theory. On starting with the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, a formula for the radiated noise is derived. An empirical model of the space-time correlation function of the turbulence kinetic energy is adopted. The form of the model is in good agreement with the space-time two-point velocity correlation function measured by Davies and coworkers. The parameters of the correlation are related to the parameters of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Thus the theory is self-contained. Extensive comparisons between the computed noise spectrum of the theory and experimental measured have been carried out. The parameters include jet Mach number from 0.3 to 2.0 and temperature ratio from 1.0 to 4.8. Excellent agreements are found in the spectrum shape, noise intensity and directivity. It is envisaged that the theory would supercede all semi-empirical and totally empirical jet noise prediction methods in current use.

  8. Adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension for shock mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    An adaptive magnetorheological seat suspension (AMSS) was analyzed for optimal protection of occupants from shock loads caused by the impact of a helicopter with the ground. The AMSS system consists of an adaptive linear stroke magnetorheological shock absorber (MRSA) integrated into the seat structure of a helicopter. The MRSA provides a large controllability yield force to accommodate a wide spectrum for shock mitigation. A multiple degrees-of-freedom nonlinear biodynamic model for a 50th percentile male occupant was integrated with the dynamics of MRSA and the governing equations of motion were investigated theoretically. The load-stroke profile of MRSA was optimized with the goal of minimizing the potential for injuries. The MRSA yield force and the shock absorber stroke limitations were the most crucial parameters for improved biodynamic response mitigation. An assessment of injuries based on established injury criteria for different body parts was carried out.

  9. Cancellation of simulated environmental noise as a tool for measuring vocal performance during noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Ternström, Sten; Södersten, Maria; Bohman, Mikael

    2002-06-01

    It can be difficult for the voice clinician to observe or measure how a patient uses his voice in a noisy environment. We consider here a novel method for obtaining this information in the laboratory. Worksite noise and filtered white noise were reproduced over high-fidelity loudspeakers. In this noise, 11 subjects read an instructional text of 1.5 to 2 minutes duration, as if addressing a group of people. Using channel estimation techniques, the site noise was suppressed from the recording, and the voice signal alone was recovered. The attainable noise rejection is limited only by the precision of the experimental setup, which includes the need for the subject to remain still so as not to perturb the estimated acoustic channel. This feasibility study, with 7 female and 4 male subjects, showed that small displacements of the speaker's body, even breathing, impose a practical limit on the attainable noise rejection. The noise rejection was typically 30 dB and maximally 40 dB down over the entire voice spectrum. Recordings thus processed were clean enough to permit voice analysis with the long-time average spectrum and the computerized phonetogram. The effects of site noise on voice sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, long-term average spectrum centroid, phonetogram area, and phonation time were much as expected, but with some interesting differences between females and males.

  10. 39 CFR 957.27 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 957.27 Section 957.27 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.27 Suspension. (a) Any firm or individual suspended under chapter 3, section 7 of the Postal Service Purchasing Manual who believes that the suspension has not been...

  11. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1206.1-4 Section 1206.1-4 Public... GRANTS AND CONTRACTS-SUSPENSION AND TERMINATION AND DENIAL OF APPLICATION FOR REFUNDING Suspension and Termination of Assistance § 1206.1-4 Suspension. (a) General. The responsible Corporation official may...

  12. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 630.670 Section 630.670 Public Welfare... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an...

  13. 14 CFR 221.81 - Suspension supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension supplement. 221.81 Section 221...) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Suspension of Tariff Provisions by Department § 221.81 Suspension supplement. (a) Suspension supplement. Upon receipt of an order of the Department suspending any...

  14. 50 CFR 13.27 - Permit suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit suspension. 13.27 Section 13.27... GENERAL PERMIT PROCEDURES Permit Administration § 13.27 Permit suspension. (a) Criteria for suspension... Government. Such suspension shall remain in effect until the issuing officer determines that the...

  15. 34 CFR 682.705 - Suspension proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension proceedings. 682.705 Section 682.705... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Limitation, Suspension, or....705 Suspension proceedings. (a) Scope. (1) A suspension by the Secretary removes a...

  16. 48 CFR 2909.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 2909.407... CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2909.407 Suspension. (a) The Senior... authorized to make an exception, regarding suspension by another agency suspending official under...

  17. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited suspension. 10.82 Section... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a... suspension. A suspension under this section will commence on the date that written notice of the...

  18. 33 CFR 156.112 - Suspension order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension order. 156.112 Section... § 156.112 Suspension order. The COTP or OCMI may issue a suspension order to suspend transfer operations... OCMI is unable to verify compliance with the regulations through an inspection. A suspension order:...

  19. 31 CFR 19.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transactions and transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 19.1015 Section 19.1015... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  20. 41 CFR 105-68.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending completion of an agency investigation and any... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 105-68.1015...-GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 105-68.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  1. 24 CFR 1710.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspensions. 1710.45 Section 1710... Suspensions. (a) Suspension notice—prior to effective date. (1) If it appears to the Secretary that a... Secretary shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable time after...

  2. 34 CFR 682.705 - Suspension proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension proceedings. 682.705 Section 682.705..., Suspension, or Termination of Lender or Third-party Servicer Eligibility and Disqualification of Lenders and Schools § 682.705 Suspension proceedings. (a) Scope. (1) A suspension by the Secretary removes a...

  3. 24 CFR 21.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 21.670 Section 21.670... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.670 Suspension. Suspension means...

  4. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 570.61 Section 570.61... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut... bushings shall not be cracked, extruded out from or missing from suspension joints. Radius rods shall...

  5. 24 CFR 21.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 21.670 Section 21.670... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.670 Suspension. Suspension means...

  6. 41 CFR 105-68.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending completion of an agency investigation and any... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 105-68.1015...-GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 105-68.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  7. 29 CFR 1472.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 1472.670 Section 1472.670 Labor Regulations... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.670 Suspension. Suspension means...

  8. 50 CFR 13.27 - Permit suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permit suspension. 13.27 Section 13.27... GENERAL PERMIT PROCEDURES Permit Administration § 13.27 Permit suspension. (a) Criteria for suspension... Government. Such suspension shall remain in effect until the issuing officer determines that the...

  9. 49 CFR 570.8 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension systems. 570.8 Section 570.8... Pounds or Less § 570.8 Suspension systems. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or... out from or missing from suspension joints. Radius rods shall not be missing or damaged....

  10. 36 CFR 223.141 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 223.141 Section... Suspension and Debarment of Timber Purchasers § 223.141 Suspension. (a) The suspending official may, in the..., using the procedures in § 223.143. However, the existence of a cause for suspension does not...

  11. 5 CFR 919.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending completion of an agency investigation and any... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 919.1015 Section 919.1015...) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  12. 29 CFR 1472.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1472.670 Section 1472.670 Labor Regulations... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.670 Suspension. Suspension means...

  13. 45 CFR 1641.11 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1641.11 Section 1641.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND REMOVAL OF RECIPIENT AUDITORS Suspension § 1641.11 Suspension. (a) IPAs suspended from providing...

  14. 48 CFR 2909.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 2909.407... CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2909.407 Suspension. (a) The Senior... authorized to make an exception, regarding suspension by another agency suspending official under...

  15. 40 CFR 36.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 36.670 Section 36.670... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.670 Suspension. Suspension...

  16. 49 CFR 570.8 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension systems. 570.8 Section 570.8... Pounds or Less § 570.8 Suspension systems. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut or... out from or missing from suspension joints. Radius rods shall not be missing or damaged....

  17. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 630.670 Section 630.670 Public Welfare... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an...

  18. 45 CFR 1641.11 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1641.11 Section 1641.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND REMOVAL OF RECIPIENT AUDITORS Suspension § 1641.11 Suspension. (a) IPAs suspended from providing...

  19. 5 CFR 919.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending completion of an agency investigation and any... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 919.1015 Section 919.1015...) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  20. 29 CFR 1471.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transactions and transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1471.1015 Section 1471.1015 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  1. 39 CFR 957.27 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 957.27 Section 957.27 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.27 Suspension. (a) Any firm or individual suspended under chapter 3, section 7 of the Postal Service Purchasing Manual who believes that the suspension has not been...

  2. 31 CFR 19.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transactions and transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 19.1015 Section 19.1015... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  3. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1206.1-4 Section 1206.1-4 Public... GRANTS AND CONTRACTS-SUSPENSION AND TERMINATION AND DENIAL OF APPLICATION FOR REFUNDING Suspension and Termination of Assistance § 1206.1-4 Suspension. (a) General. The responsible Corporation official may...

  4. 29 CFR 1471.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transactions and transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 1471.1015 Section 1471.1015 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.1015 Suspension. Suspension is an action taken by a...

  5. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expedited suspension. 10.82 Section... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. Link to... suspension. A suspension under this section will commence on the date that written notice of the...

  6. 49 CFR 570.61 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension system. 570.61 Section 570.61... 10,000 Pounds § 570.61 Suspension system. (a) Suspension condition. Ball joint seals shall not be cut... bushings shall not be cracked, extruded out from or missing from suspension joints. Radius rods shall...

  7. 2 CFR 180.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending completion of an agency investigation and any... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 180.1015 Section 180.1015 Grants... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 180.1015 Suspension. Suspension is...

  8. 24 CFR 1710.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspensions. 1710.45 Section 1710... Suspensions. (a) Suspension notice—prior to effective date. (1) If it appears to the Secretary that a... Secretary shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable time after...

  9. Paradoxical ratcheting in cornstarch suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Siu, Theo; Rutala, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Cornstarch suspensions are well known to exhibit strong shear thickening, and we show as a result that they must - and do - climb vertically vibrating rods and plates. This occurs because when the rod moves upward, it shears the suspension against gravity, and so the fluid stiffens, but when the rod moves downward, the suspension moves with gravity, and so the fluid is more compliant. This causes the fluid to be dragged up by the upstroke more than it is dragged down by the downstroke, effectively ratcheting the fluid up the rod every cycle. We show experimentally and computationally that this effect is paradoxically caused by gravity - and so goes away when gravity is removed - and we show that the suspension can be made to balance on the uphill side of an inclined rod in an analog of the inverted ``Kapitza pendulum,'' closely related to the recent report by Ramachandran & Nosonovsky, Soft Matter 10, 4633 (2014).

  10. NASA CSI suspension methods overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Cooley, Victor M.

    1989-01-01

    New suspension techniques will be necesary for ground testing the flexible spacecraft anticipated in NASA's future space activity. The most complex spacecraft involve nonlinear maneuvering (i.e., large angle slewing) with articulating substructures such as remote manipulating systems. The NASA control-structure interaction (CSI) ground test method team has begun researching and developing methodology to suspend the future class of spacecraft. This overview describes the work completed thus far. The research objective and technical approach will be presented first. Second, will be a suspension device overview followed by an assessment of existing hardware. Two different mechanical zero-spring-rate mechanisms will be compared for optimal performance. Next, will be a description of how existing hardware can be evolved to meet more general suspension requirements. A comparison of suspending articulating structures overhead vs underneath will follow. After a few experimental results from the zero-spring-rate mechanism/air suspension cart will be concluding remarks and future work.

  11. Stability of an electrodynamic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Alexei V.; Maslen, Eric H.; Gillies, George T.

    2002-09-01

    Previously, the authors have described a method of dynamically stabilized noncontact electromagnetic suspension of rotating bodies. The method makes use of the dynamic interaction between stationary and rotating sets of conductors and permanent magnets. The validity of this method has been demonstrated by building and testing a prototype in which noncontact suspension of a 3.2 kg rotor was achieved when it rotates at speeds above 18 Hz. A stability condition for that method of suspension was obtained with certain simplifying assumptions. One of these assumptions was that the inductive component of the stationary conductors is negligible. Here, we present modified stability conditions which take the inductance of the stationary conductors into consideration. One of the predicted effects is that nonzero inductance may cause significant reduction of the minimum stable levitation speed. Consequently, careful choice of the electrical properties of the stationary coils may significantly enhance the performance of the suspension.

  12. Debarment and suspension. [of contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The changing Government attitude toward contractor debarment and suspension is examined, with emphasis on the fact that the Government is more alert to fraud, waste, and abuse. Consideration is given to causes of debarment or suspension, procedures and due process hearings, settlement agreements, compliance programs, and recent related legislation. It is concluded that the change in the Government contracting environment in recent years should be sufficient incentive for contractors to monitor their operations more closely.

  13. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  14. Noise exposure in oil mills

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. V. Prasanna; Dewangan, K. N.; Sarkar, Amaresh

    2008-01-01

    , USA, equivalent SPL and noise spectrum at each reading was obtained. Noise survey map of equivalent SPL was drawn for each oil mill by drawing contour lines on the sketch of the oil mill between the points of equal SPL. The floor area in the oil mill where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map of each oil mill to determine the causes of high level of noise. Subjective assessment was done during the rest period of workers and it was assessed with personal interview with each worker separately. Demographic information, nature of work, working hours, rest period, experience of working in the mill, degree of noise annoyance, activity interference, and psychological and physiological effects of machine noise on the worker were asked during the interview. These details were noted in a structured form. Statistical Analysis Used: Nil. Results: The noise survey conducted in three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India revealed that about 26% of the total workers were exposed to noise level of more than 85 dBA. Further, 10% to 30% floor areas of workrooms, where oil expellers are provided have the SPL of more than 85 dBA. The noise in the oil mills was dominated by low frequency noise. The predominant noise sources in the oil mills were seed cleaner and power transmission system to oil expellers. Poor maintenance of machines and use of bamboo stick to prevent the fall of belt from misaligned pulleys were the main reason of high noise. Noise emitted by the electric motor, table ghani and oil expellers in all the oil mills was well within 85 dBA. Subjective response indicated that about 63% of the total workers felt that noise interfered with their conversation. About 16% each were of the opinion that noise interfered in their work and harmed their hearing. About 5% of workers stated that the workroom noise gave them headaches. Conclusions: The workers engaged in the workrooms of the oil mills are exposed to high noise, which will have

  15. Spectrum-Sharing Scheme For Two BPSK Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, Benito O.

    1996-01-01

    Scheme proposed to enable two binary-phase-shift-keyed (BPSK) radio-communication systems to operate simultaneously in same frequency band. Estimate of interference spectrum generated in one of interference cancelers and subtracted from total spectrum of received signal + noise to obtain interference-free spectrum.

  16. Noise from implantable Cooper cable.

    PubMed

    Carrington, V; Zhou, L; Donaldson, N

    2005-09-01

    Cooper cable is made for implanted devices, usually for connection to stimulating electrodes. An experiment has been performed to see whether these cables would be satisfactory for recording electroneurogram (ENG) signals from cuffs. Four cables were subjected to continuous flexion at 2 Hz while submerged in saline. The cables were connected to a low-noise amplifier, and the noise was measured using a spectrum analyser. These cables had not fractured after 184 million flexions, and the noise in the neural band (500-5000 Hz) had not increased owing to age. Noise in the ENG band increased by less than 3 dB owing to the motion. A fifth, worn cable did fail during the experiment, the conductors becoming exposed to the saline, but this was only apparent by extra noise when the cable was in motion. After 184 million flexions, the four cables were given a more severe test: instead of being connected to the amplifier reference node, two of the four cores of each cable were connected to 18V batteries. Two of the cables were then noisier, but only when in motion, presumably because of leakage between cores. Cooper cables are excellent for transmitting neural signals alone; transmission in one cable of neural signals and power supplies should be avoided if possible. PMID:16411634

  17. Spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-04-23

    In this article, we discuss fundamentals of the spectrum analysis in beam diagnostics, where several important particle motions in a circular accelerator are considered. The properties of the Fourier transform are presented. Then the coasting and the bunched beam motion in both longitudinal and transverse are studied. The discussions are separated for the signal particle, multiple particle, and the Schottky noise cases. To demonstrate the interesting properties of the beam motion spectrum, time domain functions are generated, and then the associated spectra are calculated and plotted. In order to show the whole picture in a single plot, some data have been scaled, therefore they may not be realistic in an accelerator.

  18. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  19. Controllable damping of high-Q violin modes in fused silica suspension fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Mescheriakov, S. D.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Mitrofanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Fused silica fiber suspension of the test masses will be used in the interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the next generation. This allows a significant reduction of losses in the suspension and thermal noise associated with the suspension. Unfortunately, unwanted violin modes may be accidentally excited in the suspension fibers. The Q-factor of the violin modes also exceeds 108. They have a ring-down time that is too long and may complicate the stable control of the interferometer. Results of the investigation of a violin mode active damping system are described. An original sensor and actuator were especially developed to realize the effective coupling of a thin, optically transparent, non-conducting fused silica fiber with an electric circuit. The damping system allowed the changing of the violin mode's damping rate over a wide range.

  20. Suspension biomechanics of swimming microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organisms play a vital role in many biological, medical and engineering phenomena. Some recent research efforts have demonstrated the importance of biomechanics in understanding certain aspects of micro-organism behaviours such as locomotion and collective motions of cells. In particular, spatio-temporal coherent structures found in a bacterial suspension have been the focus of many research studies over the last few years. Recent studies have shown that macroscopic properties of a suspension, such as rheology and diffusion, are strongly affected by meso-scale flow structures generated by swimming microbes. Since the meso-scale flow structures are strongly affected by the interactions between microbes, a bottom-up strategy, i.e. from a cellular level to a continuum suspension level, represents the natural approach to the study of a suspension of swimming microbes. In this paper, we first provide a summary of existing biomechanical research on interactions between a pair of swimming micro-organisms, as a two-body interaction is the simplest many-body interaction. We show that interactions between two nearby swimming micro-organisms are described well by existing mathematical models. Then, collective motions formed by a group of swimming micro-organisms are discussed. We show that some collective motions of micro-organisms, such as coherent structures of bacterial suspensions, are satisfactorily explained by fluid dynamics. Lastly, we discuss how macroscopic suspension properties are changed by the microscopic characteristics of the cell suspension. The fundamental knowledge we present will be useful in obtaining a better understanding of the behaviour of micro-organisms. PMID:19674997

  1. An overview of health effects on noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.

    1988-12-01

    Although noise can damage the inner ear and cause other pathological changes, its most common negative effects are non-somatic, such as a perception of noisiness and disturbance of daily activities. According to the definition of health by WHO, this should be considered as a health hazard. These health effects of noise can be classified into the following three categories: (I) hearing loss, perception of noisiness and masking are produced along the auditory pathway and are thus direct and specific effects of noise; (II) interference with performance, rest and sleep, a feeling of discomfort and some physiological effects are produced as indirect and non-specific effects via reticular formation of the midbrain; (III) annoyance is not merely a feeling of unpleasantness but the feeling of being bothered or troubled, and includes the development of a particular attitude toward the noise source. Individual or group behavioral responses will be evoked when annoyance develops. Annoyance and behavioral response are integrated and composite effects. The health effects of noise are modified by many factors related to both the noise and the individual. Noise level, frequency spectrum, duration and impulsiveness modify the effects. Sex, age, health status and mental character also have an influence on the effects. Direct effects of noise are most dependent on the physical nature of the noise and least dependent on human factors. Indirect effects are more dependent, and integrated effects most dependent, on human factors.

  2. Sub-band adaptive noise cancelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James G.; Goubran, Rafik A.

    The technique of using sub-band adaptive filters for acoustic noise suppression is examined. Simulation results are presented for experimental systems trained with white noise and colored noise for both decimated and non-decimated sub-band signals. To illustrate the usefulness of the sub-band approach for a real application, the full band and sub-band noise cancellers were applied to car data. Estimates of the input and output power spectra for the different cases are presented. It is shown that the full-band noise canceller is unable to attenuate the noise in the higher frequencies due to the low input signal power in this region. The sub-band decomposition of the input signal can significantly increase the rate as compared to a full-band implementation under certain conditions. This increase in convergence speed is manifested as an increased noise attenuation in those regions of the input spectrum with relatively low amounts of power. In addition, the sub-band processing is seen to eliminate the noise enhancement phenomenon found in acoustic noise cancellers for mobile telephony.

  3. 33 CFR 158.178 - Actions during a suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General Suspension... after the suspension becomes effective. (b) After the suspension is in effect, the COTP may—...

  4. Noise and blast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. C.; Garinther, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Noise and blast environments are described, providing a definition of units and techniques of noise measurement and giving representative booster-launch and spacecraft noise data. The effects of noise on hearing sensitivity and performance are reviewed, and community response to noise exposure is discussed. Physiological, or nonauditory, effects of noise exposure are also treated, as are design criteria and methods for minimizing the noise effects of hearing sensitivity and communications. The low level sound detection and speech reception are included, along with subjective and behavioral responses to noise.

  5. Automated removal of quasiperiodic noise using frequency domain statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Frédéric; Grédiac, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Digital images may be impaired by periodic or quasiperiodic noise, which manifests itself by spurious long-range repetitive patterns. Most of the time, quasiperiodic noise is well localized in the Fourier domain; thus it can be attenuated by smoothing out the image spectrum with a well-designed notch filter. While existing algorithms require hand-tuned filter design or parameter setting, this paper presents an automated approach based on the expected power spectrum of a natural image. The resulting algorithm enables not only the elimination of simple periodic noise whose influence on the image spectrum is limited to a few Fourier coefficients, but also of quasiperiodic structured noise with a much more complex contribution to the spectrum. Various examples illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm. A comparison with morphological component analysis, a blind source separation algorithm, is also provided. A MATLAB implementation is available.

  6. Interstellar communication: The case for spread spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2012-12-01

    Spread spectrum, widely employed in modern digital wireless terrestrial radio systems, chooses a signal with a noise-like character and much higher bandwidth than necessary. This paper advocates spread spectrum modulation for interstellar communication, motivated by robust immunity to radio-frequency interference (RFI) of technological origin in the vicinity of the receiver while preserving full detection sensitivity in the presence of natural sources of noise. Receiver design for noise immunity alone provides no basis for choosing a signal with any specific character, therefore failing to reduce ambiguity. By adding RFI to noise immunity as a design objective, the conjunction of choice of signal (by the transmitter) together with optimum detection for noise immunity (in the receiver) leads through simple probabilistic argument to the conclusion that the signal should possess the statistical properties of a burst of white noise, and also have a large time-bandwidth product. Thus spread spectrum also provides an implicit coordination between transmitter and receiver by reducing the ambiguity as to the signal character. This strategy requires the receiver to guess the specific noise-like signal, and it is contended that this is feasible if an appropriate pseudorandom signal is generated algorithmically. For example, conceptually simple algorithms like the binary expansion of common irrational numbers like π are shown to be suitable. Due to its deliberately wider bandwidth, spread spectrum is more susceptible to dispersion and distortion in propagation through the interstellar medium, desirably reducing ambiguity in parameters like bandwidth and carrier frequency. This suggests a promising new direction in interstellar communication using spread spectrum modulation techniques.

  7. Improved All-Terrain Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Redesigned suspension system for all-terrain vehicle exhibits enhanced ability to negotiate sand and rocks. Improved six-wheel suspension system includes only two links on each side. Bogie tends to pull rear wheels with it as it climbs. Designed for rover vehicle for exploration of Mars, also has potential application in off-road vehicles, military scout vehicles, robotic emergency vehicles, and toys. Predecessors of suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354), "Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System" (NPO-17407), and "High-Clearance Six-Wheel Suspension" (NPO-17821).

  8. SHOCKS Impulse-Jerk(I-J) Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) NON:``1''/ ω -``Noise'' Power-Law; Universality Power-Spectrum is I-J Time-Series Fourier-Transform: 1687 < < < 1988: VERY-LONG PRE-``Bak''!!!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavira, Aldo; Gregson, Victor, Jr.; Green, Sidney; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    SHOCKS impulse-jerk(I-J) [apply strain/impulse to get stress/jerk ],{VS. NON-shocks[apply stress to get strain]}, plasticity/fracture BAE[E. S.: MSE 8.,310(71); PSS: (a) 5, 601/607(71); Xl..-Latt. Defects 5, 277(74); Scripta Met.: 6, 785(72); 8, 587/617(74); 3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp. (76);Acta Met.25,383(77); JMMM 7, 312(78)] NON: ``1''/ ω -``Noise'' Zipf(NON-Pareto); power-law ; universality power-spectrum is manifestly-demonstrated in ONLY ``PURE''-MATHS way to be nothing but d[F(t)=m(t)a(t)=Newton's (3rd) Law of Motion=(I-J)]/dt I-Jderivative d(I-J)/dt=dF(t)/dt=[m(t)da(t)/dt+a(t)dm(t)/dt] REdiscovery!!! A/Siegel NON-shock PHYSICS derivation fails!!!; ''PURE''-MATHS: dF(t)/dt=d2p(t)/dt2=[m(t)da(t)/dt+a(t)dm(t)/dt] TRIPLE-integral [VS. NON -shocks F = ma time-series DOUBLE-integral] Dichotomy: s(t) = [v0+(1/2)a(t)t2+EXTRA-TERM(S)], {VS. s(t) = [v0t+(1/2) at2]}, integral-transform formally defines power-spectrum Dichotomy:

  9. Noise characteristic of AlGaN-based solar-blind UV avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Xu, J. T.; Li, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    A particular system for excess noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) measurement was build. Then the signal-noise ratio at different reverse voltage and the noise spectrum are measured and analyzed on different devices. First, the noise measurement system was constructed to fulfill the requirement that a high DC voltage can be applied on, and the measurement system was carefully shielded to protect from disturbance of electromagnetic radiations. Than we measured the noise spectrums of separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) type solar-blind APDs. The noise spectrums of SAM APDs which have different dark current levels were also measured. The results show that the low-frequency noise is dominant across a wide frequency range. And as the dark current goes higher, shot noise and low-frequency noise go higher at the same time. And the low-frequency noise will also takes more proportion in the spectrum when dark current goes higher. On the other hand, noise measurements at different reverse voltage and in either UV illumination or dark show that the excess noise factor increase faster as the gain increase. This leads to a decrease of signal-noise ratio at very high gain. In order to get a higher signal-noise ratio, a proper high gain should be adopted, rather than a gain "higher and better".

  10. Ultrahigh [ital Q] pendulum suspensions for gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.G.; Ju, L.; Notcutt, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Pendulum suspensions for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors need to have an extremely high [ital Q] factor to minimize Brownian motion noise. In this paper we analyze the limits to the [ital Q] factor of the compound pendulum. We show that the observed acoustic loss of niobium can allow pendulum [ital Q] factors of 10[sup 10] to be achieved. This should enable a 3 km terrestrial laser interferometer detector to achieve strain sensitivity of 10[sup [minus]22]/[radical]Hz at frequencies as low as 10 Hz. At cryogenic temperatures [ital Q] factors up to 10[sup 12] should be achievable.

  11. Electrostatic Suspension Using Variable Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takaaki; Tsukada, Shinya; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi

    A new control system for electrostatic actuators was applied to electrostatic suspension. This control system was designed to use a variable capacitor connected with an electrostatic actuator in series. A high voltage was applied to this connection. The voltage applied to the actuator was controlled by varying the capacitance of the variable capacitor. An experimental apparatus was fabricated in order to study the controllability of electrostatic force using this control system. The experimental results show that electrostatic force can be controlled both statically and dynamically. Another experimental apparatus was fabricated for demonstrating the feasibility of electrostatic suspension. This apparatus was able to control the 3-DOF vertical motions of the suspended object. Non-contact suspension was achieved with the developed control system using variable capacitors.

  12. Gravitational Instability in Suspension Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpen, Ileana C.; Brady, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The gravity-driven flow of non-neutrally buoyant suspensions is shown to be unstable to spanwise perturbations when the shearing motion generates a density profile that increases with height. The instability is simply due to having heavier material over light. The wavelength of the perturbation is found to be on the order of the thickness of the suspension layer. The parameters important to the problem are the angle of inclination of the layer relative to gravity, the relative density difference between the particles and fluid, the ratio of the particle size to the suspension layer, and the bulk volume fraction of particles. An example showing the growth rate as a function of wave number is shown.

  13. The Rheology of Concentrated Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Acrivos

    2004-09-07

    Research program on the rheological properties of flowing suspensions. The primary purpose of the research supported by this grant was to study the flow characteristics of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal solid particles and thereby construct a comprehensive and robust theoretical framework for modeling such systems quantitatively. At first glance, this seemed like a modest goal, not difficult to achieve, given that such suspensions were viewed simply as Newtonian fluids with an effective viscosity equal to the product of the viscosity of the suspending fluid times a function of the particle volume fraction. But thanks to the research findings of the Principal Investigator and of his Associates, made possible by the steady and continuous support which the PI received from the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the subject is now seen to be more complicated and therefore much more interesting in that concentrated suspensions have been shown to exhibit fascinating and unique rheological properties of their own that have no counterpart in flowing Newtonian or even non-Newtonian (polymeric) fluids. In fact, it is generally acknowledged that, as the result of these investigations for which the PI received the 2001 National Medal of Science, our understanding of how suspensions behave under flow is far more detailed and comprehensive than was the case even as recently as a decade ago. Thus, given that the flow of suspensions plays a crucial role in many diverse physical processes, our work has had a major and lasting impact in a subject having both fundamental as well as practical importance.

  14. Narrowband spread spectrum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annecke, K. H.; Ottka, M.

    1984-10-01

    The available military radio frequency bands are covered very densely by the already existing conventional systems and therefore the application of bandwidth widening procedures as antijam measures will be allowed only with small spreading factors within these RF-bands. The problems arising from the random code selection for spread spectrum systems with small spreading factors are discussed. The calculations show the dependence between certain statistical properties of classes of codewords and the number of codewords available in these classes. The bit error probabilities in case of jamming by white Gaussian noise, narrowband and CW-jammers are calculated in comparison with the error probability of the class of codewords with ideal correlation properties.

  15. Precision magnetic suspension linear bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Queen, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown the design and analyzed the electromechanics of a linear motor suitable for independently controlling two suspension degrees of freedom. This motor, at least on paper, meets the requirements for driving an X-Y stage of 10 Kg mass with about 4 m/sq sec acceleration, with travel of several hundred millimeters in X and Y, and with reasonable power dissipation. A conceptual design for such a stage is presented. The theoretical feasibility of linear and planar bearings using single or multiple magnetic suspension linear motors is demonstrated.

  16. Airfoil flutter model suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel suspension system for testing flutter models under various loads and at various angles of attack is described. The invention comprises a mounting bracket assembly affixing the suspension system to the wind tunnel, a drag-link assembly and a compound spring arrangement comprises a plunge spring working in opposition to a compressive spring so as to provide a high stiffness to trim out steady state loads and simultaneously a low stiffness to dynamic loads. By this arrangement an airfoil may be tested for oscillatory response in both plunge and pitch modes while being held under high lifting loads in a wind tunnel.

  17. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids.

    PubMed

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-10

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  18. Frequency Domain Analysis of Errors in Cross-Correlations of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    We analyze random errors (variances) in cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise in the frequency domain, which differ from previous time domain methods. Extending previous theoretical results on ensemble averaged cross-spectrum, we estimate confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum of finite amount of data at each frequency using non-overlapping windows with fixed length. The extended theory also connects amplitude and phase variances with the variance of each complex spectrum value. Analysis of synthetic stationary ambient noise is used to estimate the confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum obtained with different length of noise data corresponding to different number of evenly spaced windows of the same duration. This method allows estimating Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR) of noise cross-correlation in the frequency domain, without specifying filter bandwidth or signal/noise windows that are needed for time domain SNR estimations. Based on synthetic ambient noise data, we also compare the probability distributions, causal part amplitude and SNR of stacked cross-spectrum function using one-bit normalization or pre-whitening with those obtained without these preprocessing steps. Natural continuous noise records contain both ambient noise and small earthquakes that are inseparable from the noise with the existing preprocessing steps. Using probability distributions of random cross-spectrum values based on the theoretical results provides an effective way to exclude such small earthquakes, and additional data segments (outliers) contaminated by signals of different statistics (e.g. rain, cultural noise), from continuous noise waveforms. This technique is applied to constrain values and uncertainties of amplitude and phase velocity of stacked noise cross-spectrum at different frequencies, using data from southern California at both regional scale (˜ 35 km) and dense linear array (˜ 20 m) across the plate-boundary faults. A block bootstrap resampling method

  19. On the Two Components of Turbulent Mixing Noise from Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Golebiowski, Michel; Seiner, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    It is argued that because of the lack of intrinsic length and time scales in the core part of the jet flow, the radiated noise spectrum of a high-speed jet should exhibit similarity. A careful analysis of all the axisymmetric supersonic jet noise spectra in the data-bank of the Jet Noise Laboratory of the NASA Langley Research Center has been carried out. Two similarity spectra, one for the noise from the large turbulence structures/instability waves of the jet flow, the other for the noise from the fine-scale turbulence, are identified. The two similarity spectra appear to be universal spectra for axisymmetric jets. They fit all the measured data including those from subsonic jets. Experimental evidence are presented showing that regardless of whether a jet is supersonic or subsonic the noise characteristics and generation mechanisms are the same. There is large turbulence structures/instability waves noise from subsonic jets. This noise component can be seen prominently inside the cone of silence of the fine-scale turbulence noise near the jet axis. For imperfectly expanded supersonic jets, a shock cell structure is formed inside the jet plume. Measured spectra are provided to demonstrate that the presence of a shock cell structure has little effect on the radiated turbulent mixing noise. The shape of the noise spectrum as well as the noise intensity remain practically the same as those of a fully expanded jet. However, for jets undergoing strong screeching, there is broadband noise amplification for both turbulent mixing noise components. It is discovered through a pilot study of the noise spectrum of rectangular and elliptic supersonic jets that the turbulent mixing noise of these jets is also made up of the same two noise components found in axisymmetric jets. The spectrum of each individual noise component also fits the corresponding similarity spectrum of axisymmetric jets.

  20. Nonlinear Single Spin Spectrum Analayzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-05-01

    Qubits are excellent probes of their environment. When operating in the linear regime, they can be used as linear spectrum analyzers of the noise processes surrounding them. These methods fail for strong non-Gaussian noise where the qubit response is no longer linear. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for strongly coupled environments. Our non-perturbative analytic model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We developed a noise characterization scheme adapted to this non-linearity. We then applied it using a single trapped 88Sr+ ion as the a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. With this method, we attained a ten fold improvement over the standard Fourier limit. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs. Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis. Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 110503 (2013), Synopsis at http://physics.aps.org/synopsis-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.110503 Current position: National Institute of Standards and Tehcnology, Boulder, CO.

  1. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  2. Research In Helicopter Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Schmitz, Frederic H.; Morse, Andrew H.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in aeroacoustical theory and experiments reviewed. Report summarizes continuing U.S. Army programs of research into causes of noise generated by helicopters. Topics of study include high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex-interaction noise, and low-frequency harmonic noise.

  3. Characterizing Fullerene Nanoparticles in Aqueous Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have indicated that fullerenes can form stable colloidal suspensions in water when introduced to the aqueous phase through solvent exchange, sonication, or extended mixing. The colloidal suspensions created using these techniques have effective aqueous phase concentratio...

  4. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  5. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  6. Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Four-wheel suspension system uses simple system of levers with no compliant components to provide three-point suspension of chassis of vehicle while maintaining four-point contact with uneven terrain. Provides stability against tipping of four-point rectangular base, without rocking contact to which rigid four-wheel frame susceptible. Similar to six-wheel suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354).

  7. A Colorful Mixing Experiment in a Stirred Tank Using Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujilo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecillia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballesca´-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Marion Moise´s

    2014-01-01

    A simple experiment designed to study mixing of a material of complex rheology in a stirred tank is described. Non-Newtonian suspensions of blue maize flour that naturally contain anthocyanins have been chosen as a model fluid. These anthocyanins act as a native, wide spectrum pH indicator exhibiting greenish colors in alkaline environments, blue…

  8. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  9. Suspense at the Ballot Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kell, Nat; Kretchmar, Matt

    2013-01-01

    In the popular television show "Survivor", the winner of a million-dollar prize is determined in a final election, where the votes are read aloud as the winner is announced. We hypothesize that the show's producers purposely alter the order of the ballots in order to build audience suspense. We test our hypothesis using the Poisson binomial…

  10. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  11. Cryogenic container compound suspension strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A support strap for use in a cryogenic storage vessel for supporting the inner shell from the outer shell with a minimum heat leak is presented. The compound suspension strap is made from a unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite material with an ultimate tensile strength and fatigue strength which are approximately doubled when the material is cooled to a cryogenic temperature.

  12. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  13. Microgravity combustion of dust suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John H. S.; Peraldi, Olivier; Knystautas, Rom

    1993-01-01

    Unlike the combustion of homogeneous gas mixtures, there are practically no reliable fundamental data (i.e., laminar burning velocity, flammability limits, quenching distance, minimum ignition energy) for the combustion of heterogeneous dust suspensions. Even the equilibrium thermodynamic data such as the constant pressure volume combustion pressure and the constant pressure adiabatic flame temperature are not accurately known for dust mixtures. This is mainly due to the problem of gravity sedimentation. In normal gravity, turbulence, convective flow, electric and acoustic fields are required to maintain a dust in suspension. These external influences have a dominating effect on the combustion processes. Microgravity offers a unique environment where a quiescent dust cloud can in principle be maintained for a sufficiently long duration for almost all combustion experiments (dust suspensions are inherently unstable due to Brownian motion and particle aggregation). Thus, the microgravity duration provided by drop towers, parabolic flights, and the space shuttle, can all be exploited for different kinds of dust combustion experiments. The present paper describes some recent studies on microgravity combustion of dust suspension carried out on the KC-135 and the Caravelle aircraft. The results reported are obtained from three parabolic flight campaigns.

  14. Mathematics in Use: Suspension Bridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginther, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the mathematics utilized in the design and construction of suspension bridges, in general, then illustrates these mathematical concepts by examining data associated with the Mackinac Bridge, which connects the two peninsulas of Michigan. Emphasizes the strong interest factor these gigantic structures have for students by attaching a sense…

  15. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  16. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning-a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates-is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates. PMID:27636496

  17. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  18. 21 CFR 520.1630 - Oxfendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxfendazole suspension. 520.1630 Section 520.1630... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1630 Oxfendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains: (1) 90.6 milligrams (mg) oxfendazole...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1630 - Oxfendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxfendazole suspension. 520.1630 Section 520.1630... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1630 Oxfendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains: (1) 90.6 milligrams (mg) oxfendazole...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1630 - Oxfendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxfendazole suspension. 520.1630 Section 520.1630... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1630 Oxfendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains: (1) 90.6 milligrams (mg) oxfendazole...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1630 - Oxfendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxfendazole suspension. 520.1630 Section 520.1630... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1630 Oxfendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains: (1) 90.6 milligrams (mg) oxfendazole...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1630 - Oxfendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxfendazole suspension. 520.1630 Section 520.1630... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1630 Oxfendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains: (1) 90.6 milligrams (mg) oxfendazole...

  3. 48 CFR 1309.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1309.407 Section 1309.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 1309.407 Suspension....

  4. 48 CFR 909.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 909.407 Section 909.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 909.407 Suspension....

  5. 48 CFR 609.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 609.407 Section 609.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 609.407 Suspension....

  6. 15 CFR 29.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 29.670 Section 29.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  7. 45 CFR 1155.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1155.670 Section 1155.670 Public... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  8. 22 CFR 210.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 210.670 Section 210.670 Foreign... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal...

  9. 21 CFR 1405.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 1405.670 Section 1405.670 Food and... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a...

  10. 36 CFR 25.3 - Supervision; suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supervision; suspensions. 25... NATIONAL MILITARY PARKS; LICENSED GUIDE SERVICE REGULATIONS § 25.3 Supervision; suspensions. (a) The guide... the interests of the Government. A full report of the facts attending each suspension will be made...

  11. 48 CFR 409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 409.407 Section 409.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 409.407 Suspension....

  12. 48 CFR 309.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 309.407 Section 309.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 309.407 Suspension....

  13. 48 CFR 509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 509.407 Section 509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 509.407 Suspension....

  14. 22 CFR 34.20 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Suspension. The suspension of collection action shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS, 31 CFR 903.1-903.2 ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 34.20 Section 34.20...

  15. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Grant and Subgrant Closeout, Suspension and Termination § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  16. 32 CFR 552.80 - Suspension period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension period. 552.80 Section 552.80 National... Suspension period. All solicitation privileges suspended by installation commanders will be for a specific time. Normally, it will not exceed 2 years. When the suspension period expires, the agent may...

  17. 22 CFR 1509.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1509.670 Section 1509.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1806 - Piperazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine suspension. 520.1806 Section 520.1806... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1806 Piperazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains piperazine monohydrochloride equivalent...

  19. 34 CFR 668.85 - Suspension proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension proceedings. 668.85 Section 668.85 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Fine, Limitation, Suspension and Termination Proceedings § 668.85 Suspension proceedings. (a) Scope and consequences. (1) The Secretary may suspend...

  20. 22 CFR 312.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 312.670 Section 312.670 Foreign... § 312.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits...

  1. 29 CFR 94.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension. 94.670 Section 94.670 Labor Office of the... § 94.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits...

  2. 45 CFR 1623.4 - Suspension procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension procedures. 1623.4 Section 1623.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.4 Suspension procedures. (a) When the Corporation has made a proposed determination,...

  3. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has... assistance, suspend the grant. The notice preceding the suspension shall include the effective date of...

  4. 48 CFR 509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 509.407 Section 509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 509.407 Suspension....

  5. 48 CFR 1409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1409.407 Section 1409.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 1409.407 Suspension....

  6. 34 CFR 668.85 - Suspension proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension proceedings. 668.85 Section 668.85 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Fine, Limitation, Suspension and Termination Proceedings § 668.85 Suspension proceedings. (a) Scope and consequences. (1) The Secretary may suspend...

  7. 34 CFR 84.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 84.670 Section 84.670 Education Office of... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  8. 22 CFR 133.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 133.670 Section 133.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  9. 2 CFR 182.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... suspension (2 CFR part 180, which implements Executive Orders 12549 and 12689). Suspension of a recipient is... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 182.670 Section 182.670...

  10. 32 CFR 776.82 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interim suspension. 776.82 Section 776.82... Complaint Processing Procedures § 776.82 Interim suspension. (a) Where the Rules Counsel determines there is... interim suspension, pending completion of a professional responsibility investigation. The...

  11. 14 CFR 1267.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 1267.670 Section 1267.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  12. 45 CFR 1623.4 - Suspension procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension procedures. 1623.4 Section 1623.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.4 Suspension procedures. (a) When the Corporation has made a proposed determination,...

  13. 22 CFR 34.20 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Suspension. The suspension of collection action shall be made in accordance with the standards set forth in the FCCS, 31 CFR 903.1-903.2 ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 34.20 Section 34.20...

  14. 31 CFR 20.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 20.670 Section 20.670...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action...

  15. 21 CFR 26.16 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 26.16 Section 26.16 Food and Drugs... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.16 Suspension. (a) Each party has the right... after such notification, the contested authority will be suspended. (d) Upon the suspension of...

  16. 34 CFR 84.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 84.670 Section 84.670 Education Office of... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  17. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  18. 15 CFR 29.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 29.670 Section 29.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  19. 48 CFR 2009.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 2009.407 Section 2009.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2009.407 Suspension....

  20. 29 CFR 94.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 94.670 Section 94.670 Labor Office of the... § 94.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits...

  1. 36 CFR 223.141 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 223.141 Section... DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Suspension and Debarment of Timber Purchasers § 223.141 Suspension. (a) The suspending official may, in the public interest, suspend a purchaser on the basis...

  2. 25 CFR 558.5 - License suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false License suspension. 558.5 Section 558.5 Indians NATIONAL... MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.5 License suspension. (a) If, after the issuance of a gaming license, the... tribe shall suspend such license and shall notify in writing the licensee of the suspension and...

  3. 29 CFR 4281.41 - Benefit suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benefit suspensions. 4281.41 Section 4281.41 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION... WITHDRAWAL Benefit Suspensions § 4281.41 Benefit suspensions. If the plan sponsor determines that the plan...

  4. 22 CFR 312.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Suspension. 312.670 Section 312.670 Foreign... § 312.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits...

  5. 28 CFR 83.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 83.670 Section 83.670... WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1640 - Oxibendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxibendazole suspension. 520.1640 Section 520.1640... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1640 Oxibendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. The suspension contains 10 percent oxibendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000069 in §...

  7. 48 CFR 1409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1409.407 Section 1409.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 1409.407 Suspension....

  8. 31 CFR 20.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 20.670 Section 20.670...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action...

  9. 49 CFR 32.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 32.670 Section 32.670 Transportation... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  10. 20 CFR 439.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 439.670 Section 439.670 Employees... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  11. 14 CFR 1267.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Suspension. 1267.670 Section 1267.670... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  12. 22 CFR 1008.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suspension. 1008.670 Section 1008.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  13. 22 CFR 127.8 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interim suspension. 127.8 Section 127.8 Foreign... Interim suspension. (a) The Managing Director of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls or the Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance is authorized to order the interim suspension...

  14. 48 CFR 1309.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1309.407 Section 1309.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 1309.407 Suspension....

  15. 48 CFR 609.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 609.407 Section 609.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 609.407 Suspension....

  16. 48 CFR 909.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 909.407 Section 909.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 909.407 Suspension....

  17. 25 CFR 558.5 - License suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false License suspension. 558.5 Section 558.5 Indians NATIONAL... MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.5 License suspension. (a) If, after the issuance of a gaming license, the... tribe shall suspend such license and shall notify in writing the licensee of the suspension and...

  18. 32 CFR 776.82 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim suspension. 776.82 Section 776.82... Complaint Processing Procedures § 776.82 Interim suspension. (a) Where the Rules Counsel determines there is... interim suspension, pending completion of a professional responsibility investigation. The...

  19. 22 CFR 127.8 - Interim suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim suspension. 127.8 Section 127.8 Foreign... Interim suspension. (a) The Managing Director of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls or the Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance is authorized to order the interim suspension...

  20. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1210.3-3 Section 1210.3-3 Public... § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  1. 13 CFR 147.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 147.670 Section 147...-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  2. 32 CFR 552.79 - Suspension action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension action. 552.79 Section 552.79 National... Suspension action. (a) When suspended for cause, immediately notify the company and the agent, in writing, of the reason. When the installation commander determines that suspension should be extended...

  3. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  4. 45 CFR 1155.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1155.670 Section 1155.670 Public... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  5. 48 CFR 1509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 1509.407 Section 1509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 1509.407 Suspension....

  6. 22 CFR 1008.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Suspension. 1008.670 Section 1008.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  7. 7 CFR 3021.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 3021.670 Section 3021.670 Agriculture... Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient...

  8. 13 CFR 147.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 147.670 Section 147...-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by...

  9. 48 CFR 809.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 809.407 Section 809.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 809.407 Suspension....

  10. 32 CFR 552.79 - Suspension action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Suspension action. 552.79 Section 552.79 National... Suspension action. (a) When suspended for cause, immediately notify the company and the agent, in writing, of the reason. When the installation commander determines that suspension should be extended...

  11. 21 CFR 1405.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 1405.670 Section 1405.670 Food and... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a...

  12. 45 CFR 1173.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1173.670 Section 1173.670 Public... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1173.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a...

  13. 49 CFR 32.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 32.670 Section 32.670 Transportation... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1806 - Piperazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine suspension. 520.1806 Section 520.1806... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1806 Piperazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of suspension contains piperazine monohydrochloride equivalent...

  15. 21 CFR 26.16 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 26.16 Section 26.16 Food and Drugs... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.16 Suspension. (a) Each party has the right... after such notification, the contested authority will be suspended. (d) Upon the suspension of...

  16. 7 CFR 3021.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 3021.670 Section 3021.670 Agriculture... Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency that immediately prohibits a recipient...

  17. 48 CFR 2009.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 2009.407 Section 2009.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2009.407 Suspension....

  18. 21 CFR 520.1640 - Oxibendazole suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxibendazole suspension. 520.1640 Section 520.1640... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1640 Oxibendazole suspension. (a) Specifications. The suspension contains 10 percent oxibendazole. (b) Sponsor. See 000069 in §...

  19. 48 CFR 1509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 1509.407 Section 1509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 1509.407 Suspension....

  20. 48 CFR 2509.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Suspension. 2509.407 Section 2509.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 2509.407 Suspension....

  1. 48 CFR 809.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 809.407 Section 809.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 809.407 Suspension....

  2. 48 CFR 409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 409.407 Section 409.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility 409.407 Suspension....

  3. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Grant and Subgrant Closeout, Suspension and Termination § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  4. 32 CFR 552.80 - Suspension period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Suspension period. 552.80 Section 552.80 National... Suspension period. All solicitation privileges suspended by installation commanders will be for a specific time. Normally, it will not exceed 2 years. When the suspension period expires, the agent may...

  5. 22 CFR 210.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 210.670 Section 210.670 Foreign... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal...

  6. 22 CFR 1509.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Suspension. 1509.670 Section 1509.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  7. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has... assistance, suspend the grant. The notice preceding the suspension shall include the effective date of...

  8. 22 CFR 133.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 133.670 Section 133.670 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal agency...

  9. 48 CFR 9.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 9.407 Section 9.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 9.407 Suspension....

  10. 48 CFR 309.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 309.407 Section 309.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 309.407 Suspension....

  11. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 1210.3-3 Section 1210.3-3 Public... § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  12. 12 CFR 367.7 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspensions. 367.7 Section 367.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY SUSPENSION AND EXCLUSION OF CONTRACTOR AND TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS § 367.7 Suspensions. (a) The Ethics Counselor...

  13. 28 CFR 83.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 83.670 Section 83.670... WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action taken by a Federal...

  14. Alternatives to Suspensions: Rationale and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Jenna K.; Dowdy, Erin; Jimerson, Shane R.; Rime, W. Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Suspensions are often used as an individual disciplinary consequence in attempts to reduce problem behaviors in the future. However, suspensions have shown to be less effective for students with specific behavioral challenges and problems. When examining suspensions in the context of behaviorist and social-ecological learning theories, suspending…

  15. 48 CFR 9.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 9.407 Section 9.407 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 9.407 Suspension....

  16. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  17. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  18. 45 CFR 630.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.670 Suspension. Suspension means an action... CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and the common rule, Government-wide Debarment and Suspension...

  19. Flow properties of suspensions rich in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. P.; Gay, E. C.; Nelson, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Mathematical evaluation of flow properties of fluids carrying high concentrations of solids in suspension relates suspension viscosity to physical properties of the solids and liquids, and provides a means for predicting flow behavior. A technique for calculating a suspensions flow rates is applicable to the design of pipelines.

  20. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure regulator valve shall not allow air into the suspension system until at least 55 psi is in the... greater than 3 psi in a 5-minute time period when the vehicle's air pressure gauge shows normal operating pressure. (g) Air suspension exhaust controls. The air suspension exhaust controls must not have...

  1. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure regulator valve shall not allow air into the suspension system until at least 55 psi is in the... greater than 3 psi in a 5-minute time period when the vehicle's air pressure gauge shows normal operating pressure. (g) Air suspension exhaust controls. The air suspension exhaust controls must not have...

  2. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pressure regulator valve shall not allow air into the suspension system until at least 55 psi is in the... greater than 3 psi in a 5-minute time period when the vehicle's air pressure gauge shows normal operating pressure. (g) Air suspension exhaust controls. The air suspension exhaust controls must not have...

  3. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pressure regulator valve shall not allow air into the suspension system until at least 55 psi is in the... greater than 3 psi in a 5-minute time period when the vehicle's air pressure gauge shows normal operating pressure. (g) Air suspension exhaust controls. The air suspension exhaust controls must not have...

  4. 49 CFR 393.207 - Suspension systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pressure regulator valve shall not allow air into the suspension system until at least 55 psi is in the... greater than 3 psi in a 5-minute time period when the vehicle's air pressure gauge shows normal operating pressure. (g) Air suspension exhaust controls. The air suspension exhaust controls must not have...

  5. Part A: Hydrocarbon Suspension in Slush Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindt, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of preparing suspensions of a hydrocarbon in slush hydrogen for nuclear fuel element corrosion inhibition in rocket engines were investigated. Suspensions were prepared using approximately 5000 ppm by mass of methane, ethane, or cyclopropane in slush hydrogen. The suspensions were stable in the slush, but the hydrocarbons settled out of the liquid melt.

  6. Nonstationary noise propagation with sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Benjamin, J. S.; Cohen, L.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss a number of topics relevant to noise propagation in dispersive media. We formulate the problem of pulse propagation with a source term in phase space and show that a four dimensional Wigner distribution is required. The four dimensional Wigner distribution is that of space and time and also wavenumber and frequency. The four dimensional Wigner spectrum is equivalent to the space-time autocorrelation function. We also apply the quantum path method to improve the phase space approximation previously obtained. In addition we discuss motion in a Snell's law medium.

  7. Engineering of Novel Biocolloid Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Rodges, S.; Hiddessen, A.; Weitz, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions are materials with a variety of uses from cleaners and lubricants to food, cosmetics, and coatings. In addition, they can be used as a tool for testing the fundamental tenets of statistical physics. Colloidal suspensions can be synthesized from a wide variety of materials, and in the form of monodisperse particles, which can self-assemble into highly ordered colloidal crystal structures. As such they can also be used as templates for the construction of highly ordered materials. Materials design of colloids has, to date, relied on entropic self-assembly, where crystals form as result of lower free energy due to a transition to order. Here, our goal is to develop a completely new method for materials fabrication using colloidal precursors, in which the self-assembly of the ordered colloidal structures is driven by a highly controllable, attractive interaction. This will greatly increase the range of potential structures that can be fabricated with colloidal particles. In this work, we demonstrate that colloidal suspensions can be crosslinked through highly specific biological crosslinking reactions. In particular, the molecules we use are protein-carbohydrate interactions derived from the immune system. This different driving force for self-assembly will yield different and novel suspensions structures. Because the biological interactions are heterotypic (A binding to B), this chemical system can be used to make binary alloys in which the two colloid subpopulations vary in some property - size, density, volume fraction, magnetic susceptibility, etc. An additional feature of these molecules which is unique - even within the realm of biological recognition - is that the molecules bind reversibly on reasonable time-scales, which will enable the suspension to sample different configurations, and allow us to manipulate and measure the size of the suspension dynamically. Because of the wide variety of structures that can be made from these novel

  8. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  9. Investigation of 1/f Noise and Superimposed RTS Noise in Ti-Au/n-Type GaAs Schottky Barrier Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuev, Alexey V.; Yakimov, Arkady V.

    2015-10-01

    Low frequency noise characteristics of Schottky diodes are investigated. Two noise components were found in experimental noise records: random telegraph signal (RTS), caused by burst noise, and 1/f Gaussian noise. The noise is sampled and recorded on a PC. Then, in addition to the spectrum, the probability density function (pdf) of the total noise is analyzed. In the case of the mixture of the burst noise and Gaussian (1/f) noise, the pdf has two maxima separated by a local minimum. Extraction of burst noise component from Gaussian noise background was performed using the pdf, standard signal detection theory, and advanced signal-processing techniques. It is concluded that the RTS noise and 1/f noise have different physical origins in Schottky diodes. The raw noise is split into two components. One appeared to be burst noise with a Lorentzian-like spectral shape. The other component is 1/f noise. Having extracted 1/f noise, we have studied the dependence of noise spectral values on the current across the diode.

  10. Characteristics of Students Who Reenroll after Serving a Disciplinary Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimpson, Matthew T.; Janosik, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if students who reenroll following a disciplinary suspension had significant common characteristics. Gender, GPA at time of suspension, class status at time of suspension, type of violation(s) that resulted in suspension, number of disciplinary incidents prior to suspension, and length of suspension were…

  11. Procedure for Separating Noise Sources in Measurements of Turbofan Engine Core Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    The study of core noise from turbofan engines has become more important as noise from other sources like the fan and jet have been reduced. A multiple microphone and acoustic source modeling method to separate correlated and uncorrelated sources has been developed. The auto and cross spectrum in the frequency range below 1000 Hz is fitted with a noise propagation model based on a source couplet consisting of a single incoherent source with a single coherent source or a source triplet consisting of a single incoherent source with two coherent point sources. Examples are presented using data from a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 turbofan engine. The method works well.

  12. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EMISSION: NOISE INVENTORY FOR THE SCINTILLATING PULSAR B0834+06

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Smirnova, T. V.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu

    2011-05-20

    We compare signal and noise for observations of the scintillating pulsar B0834+06, using very long baseline interferometry and a single-dish spectrometer. Comparisons between instruments and with models suggest that amplitude variations of the pulsar strongly affect the amount and distribution of self-noise. We show that noise follows a quadratic polynomial with flux density, in spectral observations. Constant coefficients, indicative of background noise, agree well with expectation; whereas second-order coefficients, indicative of self-noise, are {approx}3 times values expected for a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density. We show that variations in flux density during the 10 s integration accounts for the discrepancy. In the secondary spectrum, {approx}97% of spectral power lies within the pulsar's typical scintillation bandwidth and timescale; an extended scintillation arc contains {approx}3%. For a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density, noise in the dynamic spectrum will appear as a uniformly distributed background in the secondary spectrum. We find that this uniform noise background contains 95% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for interferometric observations; but only 35% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for single-dish observations. Receiver and sky dominate noise for our interferometric observations, whereas self-noise dominates for single-dish. We suggest that intermittent emission by the pulsar, on timescales <300 {mu}s, concentrates self-noise near the origin in the secondary spectrum, by correlating noise over the dynamic spectrum. We suggest that intermittency sets fundamental limits on pulsar astrometry or timing. Accounting of noise may provide means for detection of intermittent sources, when effects of propagation are unknown or impractical to invert.

  13. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  14. Influence of tire damping on mixed H2/H∞ synthesis of half-car active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akçay, Hüseyin; Türkay, Semiha

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, multi-objective control of a half-car suspension system using linear matrix inequalities is studied. It is observed that when tire damping is precisely known, road-holding quality of the suspension system can be improved to some extent by the design procedure while ride comfort and compactness of suspension rattling space are only slightly affected as tire damping coefficients are increased. In the absence of tire damping information, a robust controller is designed for a suspension system with polytopic tire damping uncertainties. In contrast to multi-objective control of quarter-car models with polytopic tire damping uncertainties, this robust design does not offer any advantage over an active suspension system designed by neglecting tire damping. The results, based on the assumption that the front and the rear road velocity inputs are uncorrelated white-noise processes, demonstrate that the body pitch significantly impacts the closed-loop performance of the active suspension system. This implies that decomposition of a half-car model into two independent quarter-car models by a linear transformation is not realistic for a study of the performance limitations and the trade-offs.

  15. Determination of Optical Constants of Latex in Concentrated Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaĭrullina, A. Ya.; Oleĭnik, T. V.; Buĭ, L. M.

    2000-11-01

    The possibility of taking into account concentration effects in the determination of optical constants of latex in the visible and near IR regions of the spectrum is demonstrated, and the limits of applicability of the methods proposed for this purpose are determined. The limiting concentration of particles in suspensions for which these effects should be taken into account depend on the particle size. Using latex as an example, ways of increasing the accuracy of reconstruction of optical constants of weakly absorbing particles of micron and submicron size are shown. Similar concentration effects can take place in the study of blood substituents, proteins, and other weakly absorbing particles in weakly absorbing media.

  16. Role of colored noise in active dynamical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex

    2015-03-01

    The noise driving many dynamical systems is temporally correlated, or colored. Biological motor proteins, for example, generate processive stresses in biopolymer networks, and it would be incorrect to model this forcing as uncorrelated white noise. To gain insight into the role of the noise spectrum, we study a phi⌃4 theory in the presence of active colored noise with renormalization group techniques. Using a frequency shell integration scheme, we perform an epsilon expansion around d =8 for power law noise of the form 1/f⌃2 and find frequency and wavevector dependent corrections to the transport coefficients. The power law noise assumption is, of course, an approximation: all physical processes possess a small frequency cutoff. We study the effect of this cutoff and find a change in scaling behavior as the system transitions from a power law divergent regime to one dominated by white noise.

  17. A Comparison of Combustor-Noise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    The present status of combustor-noise prediction in the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP)1 for current-generation (N) turbofan engines is summarized. Several semi-empirical models for turbofan combustor noise are discussed, including best methods for near-term updates to ANOPP. An alternate turbine-transmission factor2 will appear as a user selectable option in the combustor-noise module GECOR in the next release. The three-spectrum model proposed by Stone et al.3 for GE turbofan-engine combustor noise is discussed and compared with ANOPP predictions for several relevant cases. Based on the results presented herein and in their report,3 it is recommended that the application of this fully empirical combustor-noise prediction method be limited to situations involving only General-Electric turbofan engines. Long-term needs and challenges for the N+1 through N+3 time frame are discussed. Because the impact of other propulsion-noise sources continues to be reduced due to turbofan design trends, advances in noise-mitigation techniques, and expected aircraft configuration changes, the relative importance of core noise is expected to greatly increase in the future. The noise-source structure in the combustor, including the indirect one, and the effects of the propagation path through the engine and exhaust nozzle need to be better understood. In particular, the acoustic consequences of the expected trends toward smaller, highly efficient gas-generator cores and low-emission fuel-flexible combustors need to be fully investigated since future designs are quite likely to fall outside of the parameter space of existing (semi-empirical) prediction tools.

  18. ROTATIONAL- SHOCK(S) Impulse-Jerk(I-J) [VS. T=I α] Plasticity/Fracture Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) NON: ``1''/[f= ω]-``Noise'' Power-Law Power-Spectrum is T=I α DERIVATIVE I-J Time-Series Integral-Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Thomas; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    ROTATIONAL-[``spin-up''/``spin-down'']-SHOCK(S)-plasticity/fracture BAE[E.S.:MSE 8,310(71); PSS:(a)5,601 /607(71); Xl..-Latt. Defects 5,277(74);Scripta Met.:6,785(72);8,587/617(74);3rd Tokyo A.-E. Symp.(76);Acta Met. 25,383(77);JMMM 7,312(78)] NON: ``1''/ ω noise'' Zipf-(Pareto); power-law universality power-spectrum; is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but ROTATIONAL(in 2 OR 3-dimensions)ANGULAR-momentum Newton's 3rd Law of Motion T=I α=dJ/dt REdiscovery!!! A/Siegel PHYSICS derivation FAILS!!! ''PURE''-MATHS: dT(t)/dt=(dJ(t)/dt)2=[I(t)d α(t)/dt+ α(t)(t)dI(t)/dt TRIPLE-integral VS. T=I α DOUBLE-integral time-series(T-S) Dichotomy: θ(t)=[ϖ0 t + α(t) t 2 / 2 + EXTRA-TERM(S)] VS. θ(t)=[ϖ0 t + α(t) t 2 / 2 ] integral-transform formally defines power-spectrum Dichotomy: P(ω) =? θ(t)e-iωtdt=?[ϖ0 t + αt2 / 2 ]e-iωtdt=φ0?te-iωtdt+?{[ α ≠ α (t)]/2}t2eiωtdt= φ0 (ω) /d ω+{[a ≠a(t)]/2}d2 δ (ω) /dω2 =φ0 /ω0+{[ α ≠ α (t)]/2}/ω 1 . 000 ...: if α=0, then P(ω) 1/ω0, VS. if α ≠ α (t) ≠0, then P(ω) 1/ ω 1/ω 1 . 000 ...

  19. Spectroscopy of surface-induced noise using shallow spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Romach, Y; Müller, C; Unden, T; Rogers, L J; Isoda, T; Itoh, K M; Markham, M; Stacey, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Naydenov, B; McGuinness, L P; Bar-Gill, N; Jelezko, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the noise spectrum experienced by few nanometer deep nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond as a function of depth, surface coating, magnetic field and temperature. Analysis reveals a double-Lorentzian noise spectrum consistent with a surface electronic spin bath in the low frequency regime, along with a faster noise source attributed to surface-modified phononic coupling. These results shed new light on the mechanisms responsible for surface noise affecting shallow spins at semiconductor interfaces, and suggests possible directions for further studies. We demonstrate dynamical decoupling from the surface noise, paving the way to applications ranging from nanoscale NMR to quantum networks. PMID:25615501

  20. Parasite transmission through suspension feeding.

    PubMed

    Ben-Horin, Tal; Bidegain, Gorka; Huey, Lauren; Narvaez, Diego A; Bushek, David

    2015-10-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalve molluscs are confronted with a wide range of materials in the benthic marine environment. These materials include various sized plankton and the organic material derived from it, macroalgae, detritus and a diversity of microbial parasites that have adapted life stages to survive in the water column. For bivalve parasites to infect hosts though, they must first survive and remain infectious in the water column to make initial contact with hosts, and once in contact, enter and overcome elaborate pathways for particle sorting and selection. Even past these defenses, bivalve parasites are challenged with efficient systems of mechanical and chemical digestion and highly evolved systems of innate immunity. Here we review how bivalve parasites evade these hurdles to complete their life cycles and establish within bivalve hosts. We broadly cover significant viral, bacterial, and protozoan parasites of marine bivalve molluscs, and illustrate the emergent properties of these host-parasite systems where parasite transmission occurs through suspension feeding. PMID:26210495

  1. Chain Dynamics in Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, A. P.; Furst, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) suspensions are composed of colloidal particles which acquire dipole moments when subjected to an external magnetic field. At sufficient field strengths and concentrations, the dipolar particles rapidly aggregate to form long chains. Subsequent lateral cross-linking of the dipolar chains is responsible for a rapid liquid-to-solid-like rheological transition. The unique, magnetically-activated rheological properties of MR suspensions make them ideal for interfacing mechanical systems to electronic controls. Additionally, the ability to experimentally probe colloidal suspensions interacting through tunable anisotropic potentials is of fundamental interest. Our current experimental work has focused on understanding the fluctuations of dipolar chains. It has been proposed by Halsey and Toor (HT) that the strong Landau-Peierls thermal fluctuations of dipolar chains could be responsible for long-range attractions between chains. Such interactions will govern the long-time relaxation of MR suspensions. We have synthesized monodisperse neutrally buoyant MR suspensions by density matching stabilized ferrofluid emulsion droplets with D2O. This allows us to probe the dynamics of the dipolar chains using light scattering without gravitational, interfacial, and polydispersity effects to resolve the short-wavelength dynamics of the dipolar chains. We used diffusing wave spectroscopy to measure these dynamics. The particle displacements at short times that show an independence to the field strength, but at long times exhibit a constrained, sub-diffusive motion that slows as the dipole strength is increased. The experiments are in good qualitative agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations of dipolar chains. Although there have been several important and detailed studies of the structure and interactions in MR suspensions, there has not been conclusive evidence that supports or contradicts the HT model prediction that long-range interactions exist between

  2. Enhancing the cosmic shear power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Jimenez, Raul; Joachimi, Benjamin; Verde, Licia

    2016-02-01

    Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However, substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the Ωm - σ8 plane by more than a factor of 3.

  3. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  4. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  5. The effects of ear protectors and hearing losses on sentence intelligibility in aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, G. R.

    1981-06-01

    Flight line personnel with hearing defects often complain that face-to-face speech communication in noise is considerably reduced when ear protectors are worn. Whether this could be confirmed or not was determined. An effective noise protecting flight helmet changes the flat aircraft cabin noise spectrum into a spectrum with predominance of lower frequencies. Whether the additional wearing of earplugs under the ear cups might improve speech perception was investigated.

  6. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  7. Membrane filtration of food suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, A N; Peterkin, P I; Dudas, I

    1979-01-01

    Factors affecting the membrane filtration of food suspensions were studied for 58 foods and 13 membrane filters. Lot number within a brand, pore size (0.45 or 0.8 micrometer), and time elapsed before filtration had little effect on filterability. Brand of membrane filter, flow direction, pressure differential, age (microbiological quality) of the food, duration of the blending process, temperature, and concentration of food in the suspension had significant and often predictable effects. Preparation of suspensions by Stomacher (relative to rotary blender) addition of surfactant (particularly at elevated temperature) and prior incubation with proteases sometimes had dramatic effects of filterability. In contrast to popular opinion, foods can be membrane filtered in quantities pertinent to the maximums used in conventional plating procedures. Removal of growth inhibitors and food debris is possible by using membrane filters. Lowering of the limits of detection of microorganisms by concentration on membrane filters can be considered feasible for many foods. The data are particularly relevant to the use of hydrophobic grid-membrane filters (which are capable of enumerating up to 9 X 10(4) organisms per filter) in instrumented methods of food microbiological analysis. Images PMID:760637

  8. Electrorheology for smart automotive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Z.; Winkler, C. B.; Ervin, R. D.; Filisko, F. E.; Venhovens, P. J.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the work reported was to demonstrate the suitability of electrorheological (ER) technology for adaptive control of suspension forces on tracked and wheeled vehicles. The mechanical shear strength properties of ER fluids change in response to the application of an electric field. The change is very rapid and fully reversible. This property was used to create an automotive suspension damper whose resistive force is readily controlled by an external electrical signal. The device was applied in a semiactive suspension system for the Army's high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV). The work reported covers a range of development tasks including definition of the semiactive control algorithm, ER fluid formulation, design and fabrication of an ER damper, design of an electrical control circuit, creation of a quarter-HMMWV test stand for the simulation of ride vibrations, laboratory measurement of the ER-damped performance characteristics over a range of physically simulated operating conditions, and computer simulation of the quarter-HMMWV system. The research demonstrated that an ER damper and appropriate control circuits could out-perform the conventional hydraulic shock absorber, but that various complexities tend to impede broad application of electrorheology in automotive devices.

  9. Accelerated Stokesian Dynamics: Brownian Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchio, Adolfo J.; Brady, John F.

    2001-11-01

    A new Stokesian Dynamics (SD) algorithm for Brownian suspensions is presented. This implementation is based on the recently developed Accelerated Stokesian Dynamics (ASD) simulation method(Sierou, A and Brady, J. F.; J. Fluid Mech., accepted for publication.) for non-Brownian particles. As in ASD, the many-body long-range hydrodynamic interactions are computed using Fast Fourier Transforms and the resistance matrix is inverted iteratively, in order to keep the computational cost of O(N log N). A fast method for computing the Brownian forces acting on the particles is applied by splitting them into near-field and far-field contributions. For the near-field part the forces can be represented as a sum of pairwise contributions with a cost of O(N); and for the far-field part using a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the inverse of the square root of the mobility matrix results in an order O(N^1.25 log N) computational cost. The overall scaling of the method is roughly of O(N^1.25 log N) and makes possible the simulation of larger systems, necessary for studying dynamical properties and/or polydispersity effects in colloidal suspensions. Also a faster approximate method is presented in which the far-field hydrodynamic contribution to the Brownian forces are treated in a mean-field-like fashion. The accuracy of the approximation is discussed, and results for the dynamics and rheology of Brownian suspensions are presented.

  10. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  11. Noise Reduction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  12. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  13. Characteristics of USB noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Searle, N.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive series of noise measurements, for a variety of geometric and operational parameters, was made on models of upper surface blowing (USB) powered lift systems. The data obtained were analyzed and the effects and trends of parametric variation defined. The behavior and nature of USB noise and the design of USB systems with low noise characteristics is examined.

  14. Acoustic Probe for Solid-Gas-Liquid Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2003-09-14

    /monitoring two-phase flows in relatively ideal, well-characterized suspensions. Two major factors which we judge has prevented its wide-spread use in the processing industry, particularly for dilute suspensions, is careful selection of the frequency range for interrogation and quantification and removal of the noise introduced by bubbles from the acoustic signal obtained from the suspension. Our research during the first funding period to develop an acoustic probe for solid-gas liquid suspensions has resulted in a theory, supported by our experiments, to describe small amplitude dilute suspensions (Norato, 1999, Spelt et al., 1999, Spelt et al., 2001). The theory agrees well with experimental data of sound attenuation up to 45 {approx}01% suspensions of 0.11 and 77 micron radius polystyrene particles in water and 0.4 to 40 vol %, suspensions of 32 micron soda-lime glass particles in water. Also, analyses of our attenuation experiments for solid-gas liquid experiments suggest the theory can be applied to correct for signal interference due to the presence of bubbles over a selected frequency range to permit determination of the solid-liquid volume fraction. Further, we show experimentally that a reliable linear dependency of weight percent solids with attenuation is obtained for low weight fractions at high frequencies of interrogation where bubble interference is minimal. There was a collaborative effort during the first funding period with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories in that Dr. Margaret Greenwood was a co-investigator on the project. Dr. Greenwood provided a high level of experimental knowledge and techniques on ultrasound propagation, measurement and data processing. During the second funding period the slurry test loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratories under the direction of Mr. Tom Hylton will be employed to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of the prototype acoustic monitor.

  15. Thermal Noise in Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Raffaele

    Thermal noise is one of the major limitations to the sensitivity of present and future laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection. According to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem any mechanical oscillator is affected by a motion of thermal origin directly related to its thermodynamic temperature. The mirrors and their suspensions that are used in gravitational wave detectors such as Virgo or LIGO are examples of such mechanical oscillators. As a consequence their position is affected by this thermal vibration and the sensitivity of the gravitational wave detector is thermal noise limited over a wide range of frequencies. After recalling briefly the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and its origins, this chapter describes the main types of thermal noise affecting gravitational wave detectors. In the last part of the chapter a special emphasis is given to the thermal noise due to dissipation in the mirrors optical coatings.

  16. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  17. Defects and noise in Type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Wörl, Andreas; Daumer, Volker; Rehm, Robert; Kirste, Lutz; Rutz, Frank; Schmitz, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    To examine defects in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices we investigated GaSb substrates and epitaxial InAs/GaSb layers by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography to characterize the distribution of threading dislocations. Those measurements are compared with wet chemical etch pit density measurements on GaSb substrates and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices epitaxial layer structures. The technique uses a wet chemical etch process to decorate threading dislocations and an automated optical analyzing system for mapping the defect distribution. Dark current and noise measurements on processed InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice single element photo diodes reveal a generation-recombination limited dark current behavior without contributions by surface leakage currents for midwavelength infrared detectors. In the white noise part of the noise spectrum, the extracted diode noise closely matches the theoretically expected shot noise behavior. For diodes with an increased dark current in comparison to the dark current of generation-recombination limited material, the standard shot-noise model fails to describe the noise experimentally observed in the white part of the spectrum. Instead, we find that McIntyre's noise model for avalanche multiplication processes fits the data quite well. We suggest that within high electric field domains localized around crystallographic defects, electrons initiate avalanche multiplication processes leading to increased dark current and excess noise.

  18. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  19. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  20. Interpreting Transistor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospieszalski, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    The simple noise models of field effect and bipolar transistors reviewed in this article are quite useful in engineering practice, as illustrated by measured and modeled results. The exact and approximate expressions for the noise parameters of FETs and bipolar transistors reveal certain common noise properties and some general noise properties of both devices. The usefulness of these expressions in interpreting the dependence of measured noise parameters on frequency, bias, and temperature and, consequently, in checking of consistency of measured data has been demonstrated.

  1. Spread-spectrum communications using sequences generated by phase filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, M.

    The principal characteristics of spread-spectrum communications is to extend the signal spectrum in order to combat jammers and other interferences. The 'noise-like' emitted signal must have a power spectral density as flat as possible. It is shown that the impulse response of an ARMA phase filter can be considered an infinite sequence with this good spectrum property. Such sequences are studied as alternatives for spread-spectrum communications signal design. Characteristics of these signals, such as their autocorrelation, spectrum, and intercorrelation are investigated. Some comparisons with other pseudorandom sequences are given.

  2. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  3. Toward meaningful noise research.

    PubMed

    Holding, D H; Baker, M A

    1987-10-01

    The present review considers a series of studies of noise conducted in collaboration with Dr. Michel Loeb. This review attempts to provide a theoretical perspective as well as to summarize the most important findings of those studies. The work reviewed shows that noise effects interact with other variables, such that a noise effect on one sex is reversed for the other, and is also reversed at different times of the day. A second experiment confirmed this finding with a different arithmetic task. Further work indicated parallels between noise and fatigue, with aftereffects depending upon both work and noise. The final experiment repeated some of these findings with a different task battery of information processing tasks while showing that noise effects further depend on the meaningfulness of the noise background.

  4. Attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, David B.; Fontana, Richard R.

    1992-05-01

    Magnetic suspension systems can be used in a wide variety of applications. The decision of whether to use an attractive or repulsive suspension system for a particular application is a fundamental one which must be made during the design process. As an aid to the designer, we compare and contrast attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems and indicate whether and under what conditions one or the other system is preferred.

  5. Attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, David B.; Fontana, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic suspension systems can be used in a wide variety of applications. The decision of whether to use an attractive or repulsive suspension system for a particular application is a fundamental one which must be made during the design process. As an aid to the designer, we compare and contrast attractive and repulsive magnetic suspension systems and indicate whether and under what conditions one or the other system is preferred.

  6. Large angle magnetic suspension text fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1995-01-01

    In lieu of a final report for this project for the period 1 April 1995 through 31 October 1995, a compilation of three reports are included herein. The three reports are: (1) 'Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Magnetic Suspension and Vernier Pointing System', (2) 'Influence of Eddy Currents on the Dynamic Characteristics of Magnetic Suspensions and Magnetic Bearings', and (3) 'Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Magnetic Suspension and Vernier Pointing System'.

  7. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  8. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  9. Ultrasonic characterization of solid liquid suspensions

    DOEpatents

    Panetta, Paul D.

    2010-06-22

    Using an ultrasonic field, properties of a solid liquid suspension such as through-transmission attenuation, backscattering, and diffuse field are measured. These properties are converted to quantities indicating the strength of different loss mechanisms (such as absorption, single scattering and multiple scattering) among particles in the suspension. Such separation of the loss mechanisms can allow for direct comparison of the attenuating effects of the mechanisms. These comparisons can also indicate a model most likely to accurately characterize the suspension and can aid in determination of properties such as particle size, concentration, and density of the suspension.

  10. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far.

  11. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  12. Noise properties of graphene like systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, Avinash; Stanton, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    The unusual electronic properties of graphene and its potential for applications in nanoscale devices motivated us to study the noise properties of materials that have a graphene-like electronic dispersion. For high values of electric field, we find interesting behavior in the noise properties which appear due to hot electron effects. We study the low-frequency noise based on the Boltzmann-Green function method within the relaxation time approximation considering an inelastic scattering term coming from phonon scattering and an elastic scattering term coming from impurity scattering. The steady-state distribution function is evaluated to calculate the average behavior of physical observables like current and energy. We find that as the field strength is increased, the noise decreases from the thermal noise value. We have also studied these properties for electronic dispersion with a gap parameter introduced in the Dirac spectrum. The inclusion of gap in the electronic dispersion causes initial heating of the electrons resulting in an increase in noise for intermediate values of field before it decreases at high fields. Supported by NSF through grants OISE-0968405.

  13. Magnetic suspension options for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Design criteria for spacecraft inertia-wheel suspensions are listed. The advantages of magnetic suspensions over other suspension types for spacecraft inertia-wheel applications are cited along with the functions performed by magnetic suspension. The common designs for magnetic suspensions are enumerated. Materials selection of permanent magnets and core materials is considered.

  14. Experiment pointing with magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A need has been identified for a payload auxilliary pointing system onboard the Space Shuttle which provides sub-arcsecond stability in the Shuttle disturbance environment. This paper describes such a pointing system, presently being developed by Sperry Flight Systems for the NASA Langley Research Center. At the core of the design is a non-contacting magnetic suspension which provides a high degree of isolation between payload and carrier. Design concepts and control laws will be discussed. Also, test results from full-scale protoflight hardware and planned system refinements will be presented.

  15. An analysis of FM jamming and noise quality measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Timothy N.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis provides a description of FM-by-noise jamming, both at RF and at the output of the radar receiver, in terms of spectra, time-domain waveforms, and univariate probability density of amplitude. Particular emphasis is given to the case where the peak frequency deviation of the FM modulator is sufficiently small that Woodward's Theorem does not provide a good approximation of the RF spectrum. Additionally, noise quality measures which have been used to measure noise quality of radar jammers are considered theoretically and experimentally, and it is concluded that a noise measure which incorporates both a spectral measure and a probability density measure should be adopted. One such measure is proposed here. Lastly, a technique for measuring the noise quality of an operational jammer is demonstrated and the programs necessary to measure noise quality of an operational jammer are included here.

  16. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page Condensed from Autism Spectrum ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Autistic disorder (sometimes called autism or ...

  17. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  18. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous “natural” noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc2(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. AJNRSDS1084-752910.1364/JOSAA.14.000529 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence

  19. [Laser Raman spectrum analysis of carbendazim pesticide].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-bin; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Zhang, Lu-ling; Lin, Lei; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2014-06-01

    Raman signal of solid and liquid carbendazim pesticide was collected by laser Raman spectrometer. The acquired Raman spectrum signal of solid carbendazim was preprocessed by wavelet analysis method, and the optimal combination of wavelet denoising parameter was selected through mixed orthogonal test. The results showed that the best effect was got with signal to noise ratio (SNR) being 62.483 when db2 wavelet function was used, decomposition level was 2, the threshold option scheme was 'rigisure' and reset mode was 'sln'. According to the vibration mode of different functional groups, the de-noised Raman bands could be divided into 3 areas: 1 400-2 000, 700-1 400 and 200-700 cm(-1). And the de-noised Raman bands were assigned with and analyzed. The characteristic vibrational modes were gained in different ranges of wavenumbers. Strong Raman signals were observed in the Raman spectrum at 619, 725, 964, 1 022, 1 265, 1 274 and 1 478 cm(-1), respectively. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of solid carbendazim pesticide. Find characteristic Raman peaks at 629, 727, 1 001, 1 219, 1 258 and 1 365 cm(-1) in Raman spectrum signal of liquid carbendazim. These characteristic peaks were basically tallies with the solid carbendazim. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in food and agricultural products based on Raman spectrum.

  20. Airfoil noise in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, P.

    An experimental analysis was made of the noise radiated by a NACA 0012 airfoil in a uniform flow in the CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel. The investigations concerned the estimate of the radiated noise from existing theories developed in particular by Chandiramani, Chase and Howe. They required experimental characterization of the pressure field induced by the turbulent boundary layer in the trailing edge region of the airfoil. This work is original in that it allows the noise to be predicted from wave number spectrum measurements made using a sensor array. The prediction is not limited to low frequencies as is the case for computations using the measured integral scales of Corcos. This approach was also applied to airfoils at an incidence.

  1. Photomixing of chlamydomonas rheinhardtii suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Abou, Bérengère; Brunet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas rheinhardtii is a fast swimming unicellular alga able to bias its swimming direction in gradients of light intensity, an ability know as phototaxis. We have investigated experimentally both the swimming behavior of individual cells and the macroscopic response of shallow suspensions of these micro-organisms in response to a localized light source. At low light intensity, algae exhibit positive phototaxis and accumulate beneath the excitation light. In weakly concentrated thin layers, the balance between phototaxis and cell motility results in steady symmetrical patterns compatible with a purely diffusive model using effective diffusion coefficients extracted from the analysis of individual cell trajectories. However, at higher cell density and layer depth, collective effects induce convective flows around the light source. These flows disturb the cell concentration patterns which spread and may then becomes unstable. Using large passive tracer particles, we have characterized the velocity fields associated with this forced bioconvection and their dependence on the cell density and layer depth. By tuning the light distribution, this mechanism of photo-bioconvection allows a fine control over the local fluid flows, and thus the mixing efficiency, in algal suspensions.

  2. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  3. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  4. Uniform apparent contrast noise: A picture of the noise of the visual contrast detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Watson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A picture which is a sample of random contrast noise is generated. The noise amplitude spectrum in each region of the picture is inversely proportional to spatial frequency contrast sensitivity for that region, assuming the observer fixates the center of the picture and is the appropriate distance from it. In this case, the picture appears to have approximately the same contrast everywhere. To the extent that contrast detection thresholds are determined by visual system noise, this picture can be regarded as a picture of the noise of that system. There is evidence that, at different eccentricities, contrast sensitivity functions differ only by a magnification factor. The picture was generated by filtering a sample of white noise with a filter whose frequency response is inversely proportional to foveal contrast sensitivity. It was then stretched by a space-varying magnification function. The picture summmarizes a noise linear model of detection and discrimination of contrast signals by referring the model noise to the input picture domain.

  5. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  6. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)). PMID:20058998

  7. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)).

  8. Measurements of Man-Made Spectrum Noise Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Do, Juyong; Simoneau, Joel B.; Pearson, L. Wilson; Seetharam, Venkatesh; Oria, A. J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This report consolidates research carried out at Clemson University and Stanford University where a series of measurements were undertaken to identify the man-made radiation present in four bands used by rather different services, namely, L1 Band (1563.42 1587.42 MHz), the Unified S-Band (2025 2110 MHz), the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) Band (2400 2482.50 MHz), and the 23.6-24.0 GHz Passive Sensing Band. Results show that there were distinctive differences in the measurement data in the frequency bands, which should be expected based on the function/regulation associated with each. The GPS L1 Band had little to none terrestrial man-made sources, but the ISM 2.4 GHz Band had a large number of man-made sources regardless of the site and the time. The Unified S Band showed mixed results depending on the sites. The Passive Sensing Band does not contain appreciable man-made radiation.

  9. 36 CFR 296.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 296.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  10. 32 CFR 229.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 229.10 Suspension and... section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation...

  11. 32 CFR 229.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 229.10 Suspension and... section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation...

  12. 18 CFR 1312.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  13. 43 CFR 7.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESOURCES Uniform Regulations § 7.10 Suspension and revocation of permits. (a) Suspension or revocation for... failed after notice under this section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit....

  14. 18 CFR 1312.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  15. 18 CFR 1312.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  16. 18 CFR 1312.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  17. 43 CFR 7.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESOURCES Uniform Regulations § 7.10 Suspension and revocation of permits. (a) Suspension or revocation for... failed after notice under this section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit....

  18. 18 CFR 1312.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AUTHORITY PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 1312.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  19. 43 CFR 7.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESOURCES Uniform Regulations § 7.10 Suspension and revocation of permits. (a) Suspension or revocation for... failed after notice under this section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit....

  20. 43 CFR 7.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESOURCES Uniform Regulations § 7.10 Suspension and revocation of permits. (a) Suspension or revocation for... failed after notice under this section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit....

  1. 32 CFR 229.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 229.10 Suspension and... section to correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation...

  2. 36 CFR 296.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 296.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for...

  3. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  4. Noise in biological circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Allen, Michael S.; Cox, Chris D.; Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; McCollum, James M.; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

  5. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  6. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF... § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  7. 7 CFR 3015.123 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Suspension. 3015.123 Section 3015.123 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF... § 3015.123 Suspension. (a) When a recipient has materially failed to comply with the...

  8. 24 CFR 1710.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Secretary shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable time after the... the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which to request a... effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Secretary has reasonable grounds...

  9. 24 CFR 1710.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Secretary shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable time after the... the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which to request a... effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Secretary has reasonable grounds...

  10. 12 CFR 1010.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... respect, the Director shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable... deficiencies cited in the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which... proceedings to suspend an effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Director...

  11. 12 CFR 1010.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... respect, the Director shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable... deficiencies cited in the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which... proceedings to suspend an effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Director...

  12. 24 CFR 1710.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Secretary shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable time after the... the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which to request a... effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Secretary has reasonable grounds...

  13. 12 CFR 1010.45 - Suspensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... respect, the Director shall so advise the developer, by issuing a suspension notice, within a reasonable... deficiencies cited in the notice. (3) Upon receipt of a suspension notice, the developer has 15 days in which... proceedings to suspend an effective Statement of Record may be issued to a developer if the Director...

  14. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  15. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  16. 45 CFR 1210.3-3 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-3 Suspension. (a) The ACTION State Director may suspend a Volunteer for up to 30 days in order... Volunteer. Suspension is not warranted if the State Director determines that sufficient grounds...

  17. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adequately correct the deficiency which led to the initiation of the suspension proceeding. (9) The... section as well as any showing that the recipient has adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the... adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the suspension and that repetition is not...

  18. 45 CFR 1206.1-4 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequately correct the deficiency which led to the initiation of the suspension proceeding. (9) The... section as well as any showing that the recipient has adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the... adequately corrected the deficiency which led to the suspension and that repetition is not...

  19. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has materially failed to comply and remains out of compliance with the terms and conditions of the grant,...

  20. 25 CFR 23.52 - Grant suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grant suspension. 23.52 Section 23.52 Indians BUREAU OF... Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements § 23.52 Grant suspension. (a) When a grantee has materially failed to comply and remains out of compliance with the terms and conditions of the grant,...

  1. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  2. 22 CFR 1006.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Suspension. 1006.1015 Section 1006.1015 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT)...

  3. 32 CFR 552.77 - Suspension approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Suspension approval. 552.77 Section 552.77 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND....77 Suspension approval. The installation commander will personally approve all cases in...

  4. 2 CFR 182.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and agency regulations implementing the OMB guidance on nonprocurement debarment and suspension (2 CFR part 180, which implements Executive Orders... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 182.670 Section 182.670...

  5. 39 CFR 955.28 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 955.28 Section 955.28 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE BEFORE THE POSTAL SERVICE BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.28 Suspension. (a) Whenever at any time it appears that the parties are in agreement as...

  6. 49 CFR 238.227 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension system. 238.227 Section 238.227 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.227 Suspension system. On or after November 8, 1999— (a) All passenger equipment...

  7. 49 CFR 238.227 - Suspension system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension system. 238.227 Section 238.227 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.227 Suspension system. On or after November 8, 1999— (a) All passenger equipment...

  8. 22 CFR 1508.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Suspension. 1508.1015 Section 1508.1015 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  9. 22 CFR 208.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 208.1015 Section 208.1015 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  10. 39 CFR 955.28 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 955.28 Section 955.28 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE BEFORE THE POSTAL SERVICE BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.28 Suspension. (a) Whenever at any time it appears that the parties are in agreement as...

  11. 32 CFR 1609.5 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspension. 1609.5 Section 1609.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM UNCOMPENSATED PERSONNEL § 1609.5 Suspension. The Director of Selective Service may suspend from duty any uncompensated...

  12. 2 CFR 180.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period, pending... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension. 180.1015 Section 180.1015 Grants... Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT)...

  13. 43 CFR 43.670 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suspended, in accordance with the Federal Acquisition Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and 2 CFR part 180. Suspension of a recipient is a distinct and separate action from... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 43.670 Section 43.670...

  14. 75 FR 24494 - Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... CFR, 1986 Comp., 189 51 FR 6370), to establish a governmentwide debarment and suspension system... Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001)) because it is not a...; ] ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION 2 CFR Chapter 58 Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension AGENCY:...

  15. 32 CFR 552.77 - Suspension approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension approval. 552.77 Section 552.77 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND....77 Suspension approval. The installation commander will personally approve all cases in...

  16. 76 FR 25656 - Responsibility; Suspension and Debarment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 1809 RIN 2700-AD54 Responsibility; Suspension and Debarment AGENCY... suspension and debarment. Although the procedures do not impact the public and will not be codified in...

  17. 2 CFR 1401.270 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation for procurement contracts (48 CFR part 9, subpart 9.4) and 2 CFR part 180. Suspension of a... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension. 1401.270 Section 1401.270 Grants... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) (Eff. 1-21-2011) Definitions § 1401.270...

  18. 21 CFR 1404.1015 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transactions covered under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (48 CFR chapter 1) for a temporary period... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension. 1404.1015 Section 1404.1015 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION...

  19. 25 CFR 242.7 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension. 242.7 Section 242.7 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMERCIAL FISHING ON RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION § 242.7 Suspension. All commercial fishing operations may be suspended by order of the Secretary at...

  20. 32 CFR 1609.5 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 1609.5 Section 1609.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM UNCOMPENSATED PERSONNEL § 1609.5 Suspension. The Director of Selective Service may suspend from duty any uncompensated...