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Sample records for non-aqueous solvents

  1. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  2. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes: useful biocatalysts for non-aqueous enzymology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Khare, S K

    2009-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microbes are a newly emerging class that possesses the unique ability to thrive in the presence of organic solvents. Their enzymes adapted to mediate cellular and metabolic processes in a solvent-rich environment and are logically stable in the presence of organic solvents. Enzyme catalysis in non-aqueous/low-water media is finding increasing applications for the synthesis of industrially important products, namely peptides, esters, and other trans-esterification products. Solvent stability, however, remains a prerequisite for employing enzymes in non-aqueous systems. Enzymes, in general, get inactivated or give very low rates of reaction in non-aqueous media. Thus, early efforts, and even some recent ones, have aimed at stabilization of enzymes in organic media by immobilization, surface modifications, mutagenesis, and protein engineering. Enzymes from solvent-tolerant microbes appear to be the choicest source for studying solvent-stable enzymes because of their unique ability to survive in the presence of a range of organic solvents. These bacteria circumvent the solvent's toxic effects by virtue of various adaptations, e.g. at the level of the cytoplasmic membrane, by degradation and transformation of solvents, and by active excretion of solvents. The recent screening of these exotic microbes has generated some naturally solvent-stable proteases, lipases, cholesterol oxidase, cholesterol esterase, cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, and other important enzymes. The unique properties of these novel biocatalysts have great potential for applications in non-aqueous enzymology for a range of industrial processes.

  3. Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis of drugs: properties and application of selected solvents.

    PubMed

    Tjørnelund, J; Hansen, S H

    1999-01-29

    The electrophoretic mobility of selected acidic and basic test solutes have been determined in non-aqueous media prepared by adding various combinations of ammonium acetate, sodium acetate, methane sulphonic acid and acetic acid to acetonitrile, propylene carbonate, methanol, formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide and dimethylsulphoxide, respectively. The apparent pH (pH*) of these non-aqueous media have been measured and it was found that pH* is an important factor for the separations in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. However, in some solvents the concentration of sodium acetate has a strong influence on the mobility despite very small changes in pH*. Due to the fact that a change in one parameter influences a number of other parameters it is very difficult to conduct systematic studies in non-aqueous media and to compare the migration of the species at fixed pH* values from one solvent to another. Thus pH* is only of value for comparison when used with a specific solvent or solvent mixture. The viscosity of the above-mentioned solvents were measured at various temperatures and means to adjust the viscosity of the non-aqueous media used for capillary electrophoresis are discussed and the separation of ibuprofen and its major metabolites in urine is used as an example.

  4. Measuring Nitrous Oxide Mass Transfer into Non-Aqueous CO2BOL CO2 Capture Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zwoster, Andy; Heldebrant, David J.

    2016-03-28

    This paper investigates CO2 absorption behavior in CO2BOL solvents by decoupling the physical and chemical effects using N2O as a non-reactive mimic. Absorption measurements were performed using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed using a “first generation” CO2 binding organic liquid (CO2BOL), comprised of an independent base and alcohol. Measurements were made with N2O at a lean (0.06 mol CO2/mol BOL) and rich (0.26 mol CO2/mol BOL) loading, each at three temperatures (35, 45 and 55 °C). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (kg') were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance – determined from a correlation from literature – from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting kg' values for N2O in CO2BOLs were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous MEA under comparable conditions, which is supported by published measurements of Henry’s coefficients for N2O in various solvents. These results suggest that the physical solubility contribution for CO2 absorption in CO2BOLs is greater than that of aqueous amines, an effect that may pertain to other non-aqueous solvents.

  5. Thermodynamic constrains for life based on non-aqueous polar solvents on free-floating planets.

    PubMed

    Badescu, Viorel

    2011-02-01

    Free-floating planets (FFPs) might originate either around a star or in solitary fashion. These bodies can retain molecular gases atmospheres which, upon cooling, have basal pressures of tens of bars or more. Pressure-induced opacity of these gases prevents such a body from eliminating its internal radioactive heat and its surface temperature can exceed for a long term the melting temperature of a life-supporting solvent. In this paper two non-aqueous but still polar solvents are considered: hydrogen sulfide and ammonia. Thermodynamic requirements to be fulfilled by a hypothetic gas constituent of a life-supporting FFP's atmosphere are studied. The three gases analyzed here (nitrogen, methane and ethane) are candidates. We show that bodies with ammonia oceans are possible in interstellar space. This may happen on FFPs of (significantly) smaller or larger mass than the Earth. Generally, in case of FFP smaller in size than the Earth, the atmosphere exhibits a convective layer near the surface and a radiative layer at higher altitudes while the atmosphere of FFPs larger in size than Earth does not exhibit a convective layer. The atmosphere mass of a life-hosting FFP of Earth size is two or three orders of magnitude larger than the mass of Earth atmosphere. For FFPs larger than the Earth and specific values of surface pressure and temperature, there are conditions for condensation (in the ethane atmosphere). Some arguments induce the conclusion than the associated surface pressures and temperatures should be treated with caution as appropriate life conditions.

  6. Thermodynamic Constrains for Life Based on Non-Aqueous Polar Solvents on Free-Floating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Viorel

    2011-02-01

    Free-floating planets (FFPs) might originate either around a star or in solitary fashion. These bodies can retain molecular gases atmospheres which, upon cooling, have basal pressures of tens of bars or more. Pressure-induced opacity of these gases prevents such a body from eliminating its internal radioactive heat and its surface temperature can exceed for a long term the melting temperature of a life-supporting solvent. In this paper two non-aqueous but still polar solvents are considered: hydrogen sulfide and ammonia. Thermodynamic requirements to be fulfilled by a hypothetic gas constituent of a life-supporting FFP's atmosphere are studied. The three gases analyzed here (nitrogen, methane and ethane) are candidates. We show that bodies with ammonia oceans are possible in interstellar space. This may happen on FFPs of (significantly) smaller or larger mass than the Earth. Generally, in case of FFP smaller in size than the Earth, the atmosphere exhibits a convective layer near the surface and a radiative layer at higher altitudes while the atmosphere of FFPs larger in size than Earth does not exhibit a convective layer. The atmosphere mass of a life-hosting FFP of Earth size is two or three orders of magnitude larger than the mass of Earth atmosphere. For FFPs larger than the Earth and specific values of surface pressure and temperature, there are conditions for condensation (in the ethane atmosphere). Some arguments induce the conclusion than the associated surface pressures and temperatures should be treated with caution as appropriate life conditions.

  7. Insulin-lecithin interaction in non-aqueous solvents and its change after application of a static electric field.

    PubMed

    Galzigna, L; Garbin, L; Rigoni, F; Siliprandi, N

    1980-03-20

    The interaction between dipalmitoyl lecithin and egg lecithin with insulin was studied in a non-aqueous solvent such as dioxane-chloroform (1:1) by dielectric constant measurements and absorption spectra. The electrostatic character of the interaction results from the dielectric measurements and the effect of an external application of a static electric field (F = 30 kV/cm) is apparently related to the strength of such an interaction. The different strength of interaction of insulin with the two types of lecithins results also from experiments with a two-phase system.

  8. Influence of solvents on species crossover and capacity decay in non-aqueous vanadium redox flow batteries: Characterization of acetonitrile and 1, 3 dioxolane solvent mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamgbopa, Musbaudeen O.; Almheiri, Saif

    2017-02-01

    The importance of the choice of solvent in a non-aqueous redox flow battery (NARFB) cannot be overemphasized. Several studies demonstrated the influence of the solvent on electrolyte performance in terms of reaction rates, energy/power densities, and efficiencies. In this work, we investigate capacity decay as a direct consequence of varying reactant crossover rates through membranes in different solvent environments. Specifically, we demonstrate the superiority of an 84/16 vol% acetonitrile/1,3 dioxolane solvent mixture over pure acetonitrile in terms of energy efficiency (up to 89%) and capacity retention for vanadium NARFBs - while incorporating a Nafion 115 membrane. The permeability of Nafion to the vanadium acetylacetonate active species is an order of magnitude lower when pure acetonitrile is replaced by the solvent mixture. A method to estimate relative membrane permeability is formulated from numerical analysis of self-discharge experimental data. Furthermore, tests on a modified Nafion/SiO2 membrane, which generally offered low species permeability, also show that different solvents alter membrane permeability. Elemental and morphological analyses of cycled Nafion and NafionSi membranes in different solvent environments indicate that different crossover rates induced by the choice of solvent during cycling are due to changes in the membrane microstructure, intrinsic permeability, swelling rates, and chemical stability.

  9. Charting the known chemical space for non-aqueous lithium-air battery electrolyte solvents.

    PubMed

    Husch, Tamara; Korth, Martin

    2015-09-21

    Li-air batteries are very promising candidates for powering future mobility, but finding a suitable electrolyte solvent for this technology turned out to be a major problem. We present a systematic computational investigation of the known chemical space for possible Li-air electrolyte solvents. It is shown that the problem of finding better Li-air electrolyte solvents is not only - as previously suggested - about maximizing Li(+) and O2(-) solubilities, but also about finding the optimal balance of these solubilities with the viscosity of the solvent. As our results also show that trial-and-error experiments on known chemicals are unlikely to succeed, full chemical sub-spaces for the most promising compound classes are investigated, and suggestions are made for further experiments. The proposed screening approach is transferable and robust and can readily be applied to optimize electrolytes for other electrochemical devices. It goes beyond the current state-of-the-art both in width (considering the number of compounds screened and the way they are selected), as well as depth (considering the number and complexity of properties included).

  10. Determination of organic bases in non-aqueous solvents by catalytic thermometric titration.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Kiss, T A; Gaál, F F; Zsigrai, I J

    1968-07-01

    Catalytic thermometric titrations have been developed for bases (brucine, diethylaniline, potassium acetate and triethylamine) in acetic acid by continuous and discontinuous addition of the standard solution and automatic temperature recording. The determination of weak bases, e.g., antipyrine, unsuccessful in acetic acid by catalytic thermometric titration, has been achieved by using nitromethane or acetic anhydride as solvent. Catalytic thermometric titrations were also performed by coulometric generation of hydrogen ions for the determination of micro amounts of weak bases in a mixture of acetic anhyride and acetic acid.

  11. Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for solvent-free biomass transformation: physicochemical behavior of non-aqueous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaoyu; Tay, Astrid; Pera-Titus, Marc; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Benhabbari, Samy; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Malcouronne, Guillaume; Bonneviot, Laurent; De Campo, Floryan; Wang, Limin; Clacens, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge in biomass conversion is how to achieve valuable molecules with optimal reactivity in the presence of immiscible reactants. This issue is usually tackled using either organic solvents or surfactants to promote emulsification, making industrial processes expensive and not environmentally friendly. As an alternative, Pickering emulsions using solid particles with tailored designed surface properties can promote phase contact within intrinsically biphasic systems. Here we show that amphiphilic silica nanoparticles bearing a proper combination of alkyl and strong acidic surface groups can generate stable Pickering emulsions of the glycerol/dodecanol system in the temperature range of 35-130°C. We also show that such particles can perform as Pickering Interfacial Catalysts for the acid-catalyzed etherification of glycerol with dodecanol at 150°C. Our findings shed light on some key parameters governing emulsion stability and catalytic activity of Pickering interfacial catalytic systems. This understanding is critical to pave the way toward technological solutions for biomass upgrading able to promote eco-efficient reactions between immiscible organic reagents with neither use of solvents nor surfactants.

  12. Recent advances in tailoring the aggregation of heavier alkaline earth metal halides, alkoxides and aryloxides from non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2006-11-21

    This overview on one of the subjects treated in our group deals with the synthesis and study of low-dimensional polymer and molecular solid state structures formed with alkaline earth metal ions in non-aqueous solvents. We have chosen several synthetic approaches in order to obtain such compounds. The first concept deals with the "cutting out" of structural fragments from a solid state structure of a binary compound, which will be explained with reference to BaI2. Depending on the size and concentration of oxygen donor ligands, used as chemical scissors on BaI2, three-, two-, one- and zero-dimensional derived adducts of BaI2 are obtained, comparable to a structural genealogy tree for BaI2. A second part deals with the supramolecular approach for the synthesis of low dimensional polymeric compounds based on alkaline earth metal iodides, obtained by the combination of metal ion coordination with hydrogen bonding between the cationic complexes and their anions. Certain circumstances allow rules to be established for the prediction of the dimensionality of a given compound, contributing to the fundamental problem of structure prediction in crystal engineering. A third section describes a synthetic approach for generating pure alkaline earth metal cage compounds as well as alkali and alkaline earth mixed metal clusters. A first step deals with different molecular solvated alkaline earth metal iodides which are investigated as a function of the ligand size in non-aqueous solvents. These are then reacted with some alkali metal compound in order to partially or totally eliminate alkali iodide and to form the targeted clusters. These unique structures of ligand stabilized metal halide, hydroxide and/or alkoxide and aryloxide aggregates are of interest as potential precursors for oxide materials and as catalysts. Approaches to two synthetic methods of the latter, sol-gel and (MO)CVD (metal-organic chemical vapour deposition), are investigated with some of our compounds. (D

  13. Solvent and temperature effects on ion association and mobility of 2,6-lutidinium chloride in non-aqueous solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L.; Leitäo, R. E.; Martins, F.

    Molar conductivity values (Λm) of 2,6-lutidinium chloride at ten different concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 0.01 mol dm-3, in several solvents and temperatures are reported for: seven solvents (dimethyl sulphoxide, acetonitrile, propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylacetamide, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol) at five different temperatures (60.00, 65.00, 70.00, 75.00 and 80.00°C) and three additional solvents (nitromethane, 2-methyl-1-propanol and 2-ethoxyethanol) at 60.00°C. Molar conductivities at infinite dilution ( ), association constants (KA) and respective errors are also determined. The temperature dependence of ILM0002 and KA shows positive, negative and negligible trends. ILM0003 versus viscosity plots reveal a breakdown of Walden's rule. KA is markedly dependent on the solvent's features, revealing strong deviations from the predictions of classical dielectric theories. It is reasoned that specific ion-solvent-solvent interactions may play an important role.

  14. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  15. Protein-style dynamical transition in a non-biological polymer and a non-aqueous solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, E.; Sharma, V. K.; Borreguero, J. M.; Tyagi, M.

    2016-03-15

    Using neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation, techniques most often associated with protein dynamical transition studies, we have investigated the microscopic dynamics of one of the most common polymers, polystyrene, which was exposed to toluene vapor, mimicking the process of protein hydration from water vapor. Polystyrene with adsorbed toluene is an example of a solvent-solute system, which, unlike biopolymers, is anhydrous and lacks hydrogen bonding. Nevertheless, it exhibits the essential traits of the dynamical transition in biomolecules, such as a specific dependence of the microscopic dynamics of both solvent and host on the temperature and the amount of solvent adsorbed. Ultimately, we conclude that the protein dynamical transition is a manifestation of a universal solvent-solute dynamical relationship, which is not specific to either biomolecules as solute, or aqueous media as solvent, or even a particular type of interactions between solvent and solute.

  16. Protein-style dynamical transition in a non-biological polymer and a non-aqueous solvent

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, E.; Sharma, V. K.; Borreguero, J. M.; ...

    2016-03-15

    Using neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation, techniques most often associated with protein dynamical transition studies, we have investigated the microscopic dynamics of one of the most common polymers, polystyrene, which was exposed to toluene vapor, mimicking the process of protein hydration from water vapor. Polystyrene with adsorbed toluene is an example of a solvent-solute system, which, unlike biopolymers, is anhydrous and lacks hydrogen bonding. Nevertheless, it exhibits the essential traits of the dynamical transition in biomolecules, such as a specific dependence of the microscopic dynamics of both solvent and host on the temperature and the amount of solvent adsorbed.more » Ultimately, we conclude that the protein dynamical transition is a manifestation of a universal solvent-solute dynamical relationship, which is not specific to either biomolecules as solute, or aqueous media as solvent, or even a particular type of interactions between solvent and solute.« less

  17. Study of complexation process between 4'-nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 and yttrium(III) cation in binary mixed non-aqueous solvents using conductometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, N.; Rounaghi, G. H.; Mohajeri, M.

    2012-12-01

    The complexation reaction of macrocyclic ligand (4'-nitrobenzo-15C5) with Y3+ cation was studied in acetonitrile-methanol (AN-MeOH), acetonitrile-ethanol (AN-EtOH), acetonitrile-dimethylformamide (AN-DMF) and ethylacetate-methanol (EtOAc-MeOH) binary mixtures at different temperatures using conductometry method. The conductivity data show that in all solvent systems, the stoichiometry of the complex formed between 4'-nitrobenzo-15C5 and Y3+ cation is 1: 1 (ML). The stability order of (4'-nitrobenzo-15C5). Y3+ complex in pure non-aqueous solvents at 25°C was found to be: EtOAc > EtOH > AN ≈ DMF > MeOH, and in the case of most compositions of the binary mixed solvents at 25°C it was: AN≈MeOH ≈ AN-EtOH > AN-DMF > EtOAc-MeOH. But the results indicate that the sequence of the stability of the complex in the binary mixed solutions changes with temperature. A non-linear behavior was observed for changes of log K f of (4'-nitrobenzo-15C5 · Y3+) complex versus the composition of the binary mixed solvents, which was explained in terms of solvent-solvent interactions and also the hetero-selective solvation of the species involved in the complexation reaction. The values of thermodynamic parameters (Δ H {c/ℴ} and Δ S {c/ℴ}) for formation of the complex were obtained from temperature dependent of the stability constant using the van't Hoff plots. The results represent that in most cases, the complex is both enthalpy and entropy stabilized and the values and also the sign of thermodynamic parameters are influenced by the nature and composition of the mixed solvents.

  18. Protein-Style Dynamical Transition in a Non-Biological Polymer and a Non-Aqueous Solvent.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, E; Sharma, V K; Borreguero, J M; Tyagi, M

    2016-03-31

    Temperature-dependent onset of apparent anharmonicity in the microscopic dynamics of hydrated proteins and other biomolecules has been known as protein dynamical transition for the last quarter of a century. Using neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation, techniques most often associated with protein dynamical transition studies, we have investigated the microscopic dynamics of one of the most common polymers, polystyrene, which was exposed to toluene vapor, mimicking the process of protein hydration from water vapor. Polystyrene with adsorbed toluene is an example of a solvent-solute system, which, unlike biopolymers, is anhydrous and lacks hydrogen bonding. Nevertheless, it exhibits the essential traits of the dynamical transition in biomolecules, such as a specific dependence of the microscopic dynamics of both solvent and host on the temperature and the amount of solvent adsorbed. We conclude that the protein dynamical transition is a manifestation of a universal solvent-solute dynamical relationship, which is not specific to either biomolecules as solute, or aqueous media as solvent, or even a particular type of interactions between solvent and solute.

  19. The synthesis and the chemical and physical properties of non-aqueous silylamine solvents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Amy L; Switzer, Jackson R; Flack, Kyle M; Hart, Ryan J; Sivaswamy, Swetha; Biddinger, Elizabeth J; Talreja, Manish; Verma, Manjusha; Faltermeier, Sean; Nielsen, Paul T; Pollet, Pamela; Schuette, George F; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L

    2012-11-01

    Silylamine reversible ionic liquids were designed to achieve specific physical properties in order to address effective CO₂ capture. The reversible ionic liquid systems reported herein represent a class of switchable solvents where a relatively non-polar silylamine (molecular liquid) is reversibly transformed to a reversible ionic liquid (RevIL) by reaction with CO₂ (chemisorption). The RevILs can further capture additional CO₂ through physical absorption (physisorption). The effects of changes in structure on (1) the CO₂ capture capacity (chemisorption and physisorption), (2) the viscosity of the solvent systems at partial and total conversion to the ionic liquid state, (3) the energy required for reversing the CO₂ capture process, and (4) the ability to recycle the solvents systems are reported.

  20. Effect of initial voltage ramp on separation efficiency in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis with ethanol as background electrolyte solvent.

    PubMed

    Palonen, Sami; Jussila, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2005-03-11

    Band broadening at high electric field strengths in capillary electrophoresis (CE), especially in wide capillaries, is often attributed to radial temperature gradients in the interior of the capillary caused by Joule heating. In some cases, however, a major cause of the lower separation efficiency could be the abrupt application of high electric field strength. We show that, with ethanol as background electrolyte solvent, initial abrupt voltage application introduces band broadening, which is especially pronounced in wider capillaries at high electric field and ionic strengths. With an appropriate initial voltage ramp this effect can be avoided. The effect of different voltage ramp up times on the separation efficiency of some anionic analytes was investigated with 50, 75 and 100 microm I.D. capillaries at field strengths of 1000-2000 V cm(-1). The results suggest that the band broadening associated with abrupt voltage application is of thermal origin and probably related to thermal volume expansion of the sample and background electrolyte solutions. The plate numbers calculated with a plate height model were in good agreement with the experimental values when a sufficiently long voltage ramp was employed. The dispersion due to axial temperature gradients was found to be very small under the experimental conditions used.

  1. Linking molecular/ion structure, solvent mesostructure, the solvophobic effect and the ability of amphiphiles to self-assemble in non-aqueous liquidst.

    PubMed

    Wijay, Emmy C; Greaves, Tamar L; Drummon, Calum J

    2013-01-01

    Sixteen non-ionic molecular solvents have been found to exhibit the solvophobic effect and to support the formation of amphiphile self-assembly mesophases. The solvents were low molecular weight polar solvents which contained various combinations of amine, hydroxyl or ether moieties with relatively small proportions of hydrocarbon unit constituents. The studied amphiphiles were hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), hexadecylpyridinium bromide (C16PyrBr) and tetraethylene glycol monohexadecyl ether (C16E4). Lyotropic liquid crystal mesophases with lamellar, normal hexagonal and normal bicontinuous cubic, with ordered one-, two- and three-dimensional periodic structure respectively, were identified in CTAB and C16PyrBr systems by using cross-polarised optical microscopy (CPOM). Mesophase diversity and thermal stability ranges correlated to the Gordon parameter (G) value, a proxy for the solvent cohesive energy density. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that all the studied molecular solvents were associative liquids. Solvent mesostructure was studied by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. The small sub-set of neat solvents which were mesostructured, with polar and non-polar domain segregation, displayed the lowest G values, and amongst the lowest mesophase diversity and thermal stability ranges. It has been established that the G value is a good indicator of whether or not a molecular solvent is likely to behave as a co-surfactant, residing within the amphiphile-solvent interfacial region of self-assembled objects, thereby influencing specific mesophase structure formation. Structure-property behaviour has been explored and shows that beneficial solvent features for serving as amphiphile-self assembly media, with the potential for rich mesophase diversity, include the presence of hydroxyl > amine > ether moieties, while methyl moieties have an adverse effect larger than that of methylene moieties.

  2. Thermodynamic study of complex formation between Kryptofix-5 and Sn2+ in several individual and binary non-aqueous solvents using a conductometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnood, Razieh Sanavi; Hatami, Elaheh

    2014-12-01

    The complex formation between 1,13-bis(8-quinolyl)-1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxatridecane (Kryptofix-5) and Sn2+ ions was studied in pure acetonitrile (AN), dimethylformamide (DMF), 1,4-dioxane (DOX), and methanol (MeOH) and in acetonitrile-1,4-dioxane (AN-DOX), acetonitrile-dichloromethane (AN-DCM), acetonitrile-methanol (AN-MeOH), and acetonitrile-dimethylformamide (AN-DMF) binary mixed solvent solutions at different temperatures using conductometric method. 1: 1 [ML] complex is formed between the metal cation and ligand in most solvent systems but in the cases of AN-MeOH (MeOH = 90 mol %) binary mixture and in pure MeOH a 2: 1 [M2L] complex was observed, that is the stoichiometry of complexes may be changed by the nature of the medium. The stability order of the (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex in the studied binary mixed solvent solutions at 25°C was found to be AN-DOX > AN-DCM > AN-MeOH > AN-DMF and in the case of pure solvents at 25°C the sequence was the following: AN > DMF > DOX. A non-linear behavior was observed for changes of log K f of (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex versus the composition of the binary mixed solvents, which was explained in terms of solvent-solvent intractions and also by the preferential solvation of the f species involved in the complexation reaction. The values of standard enthalpy changes (Δ Hc°) for complexation reactions were obtained from the slope of the Van't Hoff plots and the changes in standard entropy (Δ Sc°) were calculated from the relationship Δ Gc,298.15° = Δ Hc° - 298.15Δ Sc°. The results show that in most cases, the (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex is both enthalpy and entropy stabilized.

  3. Application of the Mean Spherical Approximation to Describe the Gibbs Solvation Energies of Monovalent Monoatomic Ions in Non-Aqueous Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-09

    through hydrogen bonding . A plot of AG0Oth against AGO is shown for the Cl- ion data in Figure 4. Agreement tr, htrex between the theoretical estimate and...SOLVENTS by L. Blum* and W.R. Fawcett* Prepared for Publication in the Journal of Physical Chemistry *Department of Physics, POB AT, Faculty of Natural ...the excess ionic properties depend on a single scaling, Debye-like parameter is still retained by this approximation. The equations for the most

  4. Assembly of DNA Architectures in a Non-Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Amethist S.; Anton, Christopher M.; Jacob, Christina M.; Proctor, Thomas J.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the procedures for the creation of self-assembled DNA nanostructures in aqueous and non-aqueous media are described. DNA-Surfactant complex formation renders the DNA soluble in organic solvents offering an exciting way to bridge the transition of DNA origami materials electronics applications. The DNA retains its structural features, and these unique geometries provide an interesting candidate for future electronics and nanofabrication applications with potential for new properties. The DNA architectures were first assembled under aqueous conditions, and then characterized in solution (using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy) and on the surface (using atomic force microscopy (AFM)). Following aqueous assembly, the DNA nanostructures were transitioned to a non-aqueous environment, where butanol was chosen for optical compatibility and thermal properties. The retention of DNA hierarchical structure and thermal stability in non-aqueous conditions were confirmed via CD spectroscopy. The formation and characterization of these higher order DNA-surfactant complexes is described in this paper.

  5. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  6. Simultaneous determination of antidepressants by non-aqueous or quasi-non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Yasuhide; Lim, Lee Wah; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous determinations of 20 antidepressants were carried out by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis using a background electrolyte consisting of an organic solvent. A bubble cell fused silica capillary (112.5 cm x 50 microm i.d., 150 microm i.d. bubble) was used as an electrophoresis tube. The determination was carried out at 215 nm, while the detection wavelength between 190 and 500 nm was selected for qualitative analysis. When an acetonitrile solution alone was used as the background electrolyte, good separation was observed, but it was not sufficient to separate all tested analytes. It was found that better separation was acquired by adding a few other solvents into acetonitrile, such as water and methanol; the best separation was achieved with a mixture of acetonitrile containing 60 mM ammonium acetate and 1 M acetic acid/water/methanol (100:1:0.5, v/v/v). As for the plasma sample, liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were considered; as a result, SPE with Oasis HLB was found to be most suitable. The present method is very useful as regards to plasma samples.

  7. Non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

    2015-11-12

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing anion receptor additives to enhance the power capability of lithium-ion batteries. The anion receptor of the present invention is a Lewis acid that can help to dissolve LiF in the passivation films of lithium-ion batteries. Accordingly, one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising a lithium salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and an anion receptor additive; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  8. A thermodynamic study of interaction of Ag+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ cations with 4-hydroxyphenyl-2,5-bis(2-benzofuranyl)pyridine in some binary mixed non-aqueous solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnood, Razieh Sanavi; Hatami, Elaheh; Arefi, Donya; Maknoni, Fatemeh Zahra

    2016-02-01

    In the present work the complexation process between Ag+ and Mg2+ cations and 4-hydroxyphenyl-2,5-bis(2-benzofuranyl)pyridine (HBFPY) ligand was studied in pure dimethylformamide (DMF), ethanol (EtOH), acetonitrile (AN) and in (DMF-EtOH), (AN-EtOH) and (DMF-AN) binary mixed solvent solutions at different temperatures using the conductometric method. Also in this work the complexation reaction between Ca2+, K+ cations and HBFPY ligand, was studied in pure dimethylformamide (DMF), propanol (PrOH), 1,4-dioxane (DOX), ethanol (EtOH) and in DMF-PrOH, DMF-DOX and DMF-EtOH binary mixed solvent solutions at different temperatures using the conductometric method. The conductance data show that the stoichiometry of the complexes formed between this ligand and the studied cations is 1 : 1 [ML]. In most cases, addition of HBFPY to solutions of these cations, causes a continuous increase in the molar conductivities which indicates that the mobility of complexed cations is more than the uncomplexed ones. The stability constants of the complexes were obtained from fitting of molar conductivity curves using a computer program, GENPLOT. The stability constant of [Mg(HBFPY)]2+ complex in various neat solvents at 15°C decreases in order: EtOH > DMF > AN and the stability constant of [Ag(HBFPY)]+ complex in various neat solvents at 35°C decreases in order: DMF > EtOH. The values of standard enthalpy changes (Δ H° c ) for complexation reactions were obtained from the slope of the Van't Hoff plots and the changes in standard entropy (Δ S° c ) were calculated from the relationship Δ H° c,295.15= Δ H° c -298.15Δ S° c .

  9. Theoretical problems associated with the use of acetic anhydride as a co-solvent for the non-aqueous titration of hydrohalides of organic bases and quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Gergely; Béni, Szabolcs; Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Görög, Sándor

    2010-01-05

    A potentiometric titration study of organic base hydrohalides and quaternary ammonium salts using perchloric acid as the titrant and a mixture of acetic anhydride and acetic acid as the solvent was carried out and the titration mixture was analysed by NMR in order to clarify the chemistry of the reactions involved. It was found that in contrast to the general belief the formation of acetyl halides and titratable free acetate ion does not take place prior to the titration but NMR spectra proved the formation of acetyl halides in the course of the titration. This observation and the fact that the shape of the titration curves depends on the nature of the hydrohaloic acid bound to the base or of the anion in the quaternary ammonium salts led to the conclusion that the titrating agent is acetyl perchlorate formed in situ during the titration. Equations of the reactions involved in the titration process are shown in the paper.

  10. Advances in Non-Aqueous Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, A. K.; Nicholls, D.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion concerning the choice of solvents for a chemical reaction is followed by an examination of the advantages of using liquid ammonia, oxide solvents, and molten salts as alternatives to water as a solvent. (DT)

  11. Non-aqueous polypyrrole colloids: Synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Armes, S.P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1989-01-01

    The preparation of sterically-stabilized polypyrrole colloids via a dispersion polymerization route in non-aqueous media is described for the first time. Pyrrole polymerization was achieved using FeCl/sub 3/ as an oxidant/dopant in organic solvents such as methyl acetate, methyl formate and propyl formate. Macroscopic precipitation was prevented by the use of poly (vinyl acetate) as a polymeric surfactant. Other surfactants, used successfully in aqueous media, were incompatible and consequently resulted in precipitation of polypyrrole. Several techniques were used for characterization of the dispersions including transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), velocity charge analysis and visible absorption spectroscopy. TEM indicated a polydisperse spherical morphology with a particle diameter in the range 100-300 nm. The compressed pellet conductivity of the dried dispersion was 0.1 S/cm. These dispersions are often compared with aqueous bulk polypyrrole and aqueous dispersions. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis in non-aqueous solutions: pH of the background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Porras, Simo P; Kenndler, Ernst

    2004-05-28

    Although the establishment of a pH scale and the determination of the pH in water is not problematic, it is not a straightforward task in non-aqueous solvents. As capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) in organic solvents has gained increasing interest, it seems to be valuable to re-discuss the concept of the pH in such media, especially pointing to those aspects, which make pH measurement uncertain in non-aqueous solvents. In this review, the relevant aspects when dealing with primary standard (PS) and secondary standard (SS) as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), and the usage of the operational pH are discussed with special emphasis to non-aqueous solvents. Here, different liquid junction potentials, incomplete dissociation of the electrolytes (especially in solvents with low or moderate relative permittivity) and the occurrence of homo- and heteroconjugation must be taken into account. Problems arising in capillary zone electrophoresis practice are addressed, e.g. when the background electrolyte (BGE) consists of organic solvents, but the measuring electrode (normally the glass electrode) is calibrated with aqueous buffers, and the liquid junction potentials between the solvents do not cancel each other. The alternative concept of establishing a certain pH is described, using mixtures of reference acids or bases with known pKa in the organic solvent, and their respective salts, at a certain concentration ratio, relying to the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Special discussion is directed to those organic solvents most common in capillary zone electrophoresis, methanol (MeOH) and acetonitrile (ACN), but other solvents are included as well. The potential significance of small amounts of water present in the organic solvent on changes in pKa values, and thus on the pH of the buffering components is pointed out.

  13. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver than water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.

  14. NON-AQUEOUS DISSOLUTION OF MASSIVE PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Walsh, K.A.

    1959-05-12

    A method is presented for obtaining non-aqueous solutions or plutonium from massive forms of the metal. In the present invention massive plutonium is added to a salt melt consisting of 10 to 40 weight per cent of sodium chloride and the balance zinc chloride. The plutonium reacts at about 800 deg C with the zinc chloride to form a salt bath of plutonium trichloride, sodium chloride, and metallic zinc. The zinc is separated from the salt melt by forcing the molten mixture through a Pyrex filter.

  15. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  16. Alkyl-bis(imidazolium) salts: a new amphiphile platform that forms thermotropic and non-aqueous lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, LA; Schenkel, MR; Wiesenauer, BR; Gin, DL

    2013-01-01

    New ionic amphiphiles with a hexyl-bridged bis(imidazolium) headgroup; Br-, BF4-, or Tf2N- anions; and a long n-alkyl tail can form thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystal phases in neat form and/or lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases with several non-aqueous solvents or water.

  17. Non-aqueous electrolyte for lithium-ion battery

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-01-26

    A substantially non-aqueous electrolyte solution includes an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an organophosphorus compound of Formula IA, IB, or IC: ##STR00001## where R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 are each independently hydrogen, halogen, alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, heterocyclyl, heteroaryl, alkoxy, alkenoxy, alkynoxy, cycloalkoxy, aryloxy, heterocyclyloxy, heteroaryloxy, siloxyl, silyl, or organophosphatyl; R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 are each independently alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, heterocyclyl, or heteroaryl; R.sup.7 is ##STR00002## and R.sup.8, R.sup.9 and R.sup.10 are each independently alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, heterocyclyl, or heteroaryl; provided that if the organophosphorus compound is of Formula IB, then at least one of R.sup.5, and R.sup.6 are other than hydrogen, alkyl, or alkenyl; and if the organophosphorus compound is of Formula IC, then the electrolyte solution does not include 4-methylene-1,3-dioxolan-2-one or 4,5-dimethylene-1,3-dioxolan-2-one.

  18. Non-aqueous metathesis as a general approach to prepare nanodispersed materials: Case study of scheelites

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Pavel

    2015-09-15

    A general approach to the preparation of inorganic nanoparticles is proposed, using metathesis of precursor salts in non-aqueous liquids. Nanoparticles of scheelites AMO{sub 4} (A=Ba, Sr, Ca; M=Mo, W), were obtained with a quantitative yield. Precipitations in formamide, N-methylformamide, propylene carbonate, DMSO and polyols often provide narrow particle size distributions. Advantageous morphology was explained by strong ionic association in non-aqueous solvents, leading to slow nucleation and negligible Ostwald ripening. Mean particle size below 10 nm and high specific surface areas were obtained for several Ca(Sr)Mo(W)O{sub 4} materials, making them promising for applications as adsorbents or catalysts. Zeta-potential of scheelites in aqueous suspensions showed negative values in a wide range of pH. Systematic study of optical properties demonstrated variation of optical gap in the sequences W>Mo and Ba>Sr>Ca. The observed trends were reproduced by DFT calculations. No quantum confinement effect was observed for small particles, though the surface states induce low-energy features in the optical spectra. - Graphical abstract: Scheelites AMO{sub 4} (A=Ca, Sr, Ba; M=Mo, W) were prepared in various non-aqueous liquids with high specific surface areas and narrow size distributions. The optical gap of scheelites changes in the series Canon-aqueous liquids. • Narrow size distributions explained by ionic association in non-aqueous media. • Nanoparticles of less than 10 nm size and highest ever specific surface areas were obtained. • Optical gap of scheelites changes in the series Ca

  19. Non-aqueous electrolytes for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Dong, Jian; Amine, Khalil

    2016-06-14

    An electrolyte electrochemical device includes an anodic material and an electrolyte, the electrolyte including an organosilicon solvent, a salt, and a hybrid additiving having a first and a second compound, the hybrid additive configured to form a solid electrolyte interphase film on the anodic material upon application of a potential to the electrochemical device.

  20. Non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium-air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-06-07

    A lithium-air cell includes a negative electrode; an air positive electrode; and a non-aqueous electrolyte which includes an anion receptor that may be represented by one or more of the formulas. ##STR00001##

  1. Particles adsorbed at various non-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Binks, Bernard P; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2017-02-07

    Particles adsorbed at liquid interfaces are commonly used to stabilise water-oil Pickering emulsions and water-air foams. The fundamental understanding of the physics of particles adsorbed at water-air and water-oil interfaces is improving significantly due to novel techniques that enable the measurement of the contact angle of individual particles at a given interface. The case of non-aqueous interfaces and emulsions is less studied in the literature. Non-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces in which water is replaced by other polar solvents have properties similar to those of water-oil interfaces. Nanocomposites of non-aqueous immiscible polymer blends containing inorganic particles at the interface are of great interest industrially and consequently more work has been devoted to them. By contrast, the behaviour of particles adsorbed at oil-oil interfaces in which both oils are immiscible and of low dielectric constant (ε<3) is scarcely studied. Hydrophobic particles are required to stabilise these oil-oil emulsions due to their irreversible adsorption, high interfacial activity and elastic shell behaviour.

  2. A study of vehicles for dosing rodent whole embryo culture with non aqueous soluble compounds.

    PubMed

    Augustine-Rauch, Karen A; Zhang, Qin; Kleinman, Mark; Lawton, Richard; Welsh, Michael J

    2004-05-01

    In rodent whole embryo culture (WEC), finding vehicles for non-aqueous-soluble compounds has been problematic due to developmental toxicity associated with many solvents. The purpose of this study was to identify alternative vehicles for insoluble compounds. In WEC, we evaluated carrier solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glycerol as well as the solvents, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol, for relative teratogenicity and delivery of the insoluble teratogen, all-trans retinoic acid (RA). At a concentration of solvents/solutions may have utility as vehicles dependent upon the chemical properties of the compound to be solubilized.

  3. Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2009-07-07

    The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

  4. Modelling of ceramide interactions with porous graphite carbon in non-aqueous liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    West, C; Cilpa, G; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Lesellier, E

    2005-09-16

    Interactions of solutes on porous graphitic carbon (PGC) with non-aqueous mobile phases are studied by the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). Studies have been carried out with eight binary mixtures composed of a weak solvent (acetonitrile or methanol) and a strong solvent (tetrahydrofuran, n-butanol, CH2Cl2, 1,1,2-trichloro-2,2,1-trifluoroethane). The systematic analysis of a set of test compounds was performed for each solvent mixture in isocratic mode (50:50). The results were compared to those obtained on PGC with hydro-organic liquids and supercritical fluids. They were then correlated with the observed retention behaviour of lipid compounds, more particularly ceramides.

  5. A Non-Aqueous Reduction Process for Purifying 153Gd Produced in Natural Europium Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2013-08-01

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu2O3 targets, 153Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  6. Non-aqueous chemistry of uranyl complexes with tripodal ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Duval, Paul B.; Scott, Brian L.

    2000-07-01

    The trans dioxo uranyl(VI) ion (UO22+) is remarkably stable with respect to the U=O bond, which dominates the stereochemistry of its coordination compounds in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The linear O=U=O unit directs all other ligands to coordinate in an equatorial plane perpendicular to the O=U=O axis. In aqueous solution, uranyl coordination chemistry has been developed with a wide array of weak-field ligands that coordinate in the equatorial plane. In contrast, non-aqueous uranyl chemistry incorporating stronger donor ligands at equatorial sites has been less well developed. In this paper, the use of tripodal ligands with strong amide and alkoxide donors is employed, with an aim towards probing the electronic and steric effects of these cis-directing ligands on the structure and bonding of the trans dioxo unit.

  7. Non-aqueous metathesis as a general approach to prepare nanodispersed materials: Case study of scheelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Pavel

    2015-09-01

    A general approach to the preparation of inorganic nanoparticles is proposed, using metathesis of precursor salts in non-aqueous liquids. Nanoparticles of scheelites AMO4 (A=Ba, Sr, Ca; M=Mo, W), were obtained with a quantitative yield. Precipitations in formamide, N-methylformamide, propylene carbonate, DMSO and polyols often provide narrow particle size distributions. Advantageous morphology was explained by strong ionic association in non-aqueous solvents, leading to slow nucleation and negligible Ostwald ripening. Mean particle size below 10 nm and high specific surface areas were obtained for several Ca(Sr)Mo(W)O4 materials, making them promising for applications as adsorbents or catalysts. Zeta-potential of scheelites in aqueous suspensions showed negative values in a wide range of pH. Systematic study of optical properties demonstrated variation of optical gap in the sequences W>Mo and Ba>Sr>Ca. The observed trends were reproduced by DFT calculations. No quantum confinement effect was observed for small particles, though the surface states induce low-energy features in the optical spectra.

  8. Anion receptor compounds for non-aqueous electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    2000-09-19

    A new family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  9. Phenyl boron-based compounds as anion receptors for non-aqueous battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James; Sun, Xuehui

    2002-01-01

    Novel fluorinated boronate-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boronate-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boronate-based anion receptors include different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

  10. Test plan for Geo-Cleanse{reg_sign} demonstration (in situ destruction of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL))

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Accorsi, F.; Dingens, M.; Wilson, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only proven cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on destruction of DNAPL either in situ or ex situ have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. The proposed demonstration, as described in this report will evaluate the applicability to DNAPL plumes of a technology proven for in situ destruction of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as oils.

  11. A non-aqueous reduction process for purifying ¹⁵³Gd produced in natural europium targets.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Amanda M; Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2013-12-01

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu₂O₃ targets, ¹⁵³Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  12. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Rockward, Tommy Q. T.

    2011-07-19

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  13. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Rockward, Tommy Q. T.

    2013-03-12

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  14. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV

  15. Non-aqueous dispersion coatings based on crystalline oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, F.N.

    1993-12-31

    Amorphous oligomers and polymers are generally used in coatings; crystalline ones are avoided because of the difficulty of achieving homogeneous, defect-free films. However, dispersions of crystalline oligomers offer potential advantages of stability, useful application rheology, and excellent film properties. The authors describe non-aqueous dispersions of mixtures of crystalline and amorphous oligomers. An example is a dispersion of mixtures of crystalline (at ambient temperature) hydroxyl-functional oligomer of terephthalic acid and 1,6-hexanediol mixed with an amorphous hydroxyl-functional oligomer of terephthalic acid and glycidyl neodecanote. Microscopy, WAXD and DSC indicate that the dispersion particles are crystalline and have a diameter of 5 to 20 {mu}m. The dispersions are stable and are thixotropic. Coatings formulated with melamine and polyisocyanate resin crosslinkers form glossy, transparent film with excellent mechanical properties.

  16. Room temperature magnesium electrorefining by using non-aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesik; Jung, Yeojin; Kusumah, Priyandi; Dilasari, Bonita; Ku, Heesuk; Kim, Hansu; Kwon, Kyungjung; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    The increasing usage of magnesium inevitably leads to a fast increase in magnesium scrap, and magnesium recycling appears extremely beneficial for cost reduction, preservation of natural resources and protection of the environment. Magnesium refining for the recovery of high purity magnesium from metal scrap alloy (AZ31B composed of magnesium, aluminum, zinc, manganese and copper) at room temperature is investigated with a non-aqueous electrolyte (tetrahydrofuran with ethyl magnesium bromide). A high purity (99.999%) of electrorefined magneisum with a smooth and dense surface is obtained after potentiostatic electrolysis with an applied voltage of 2 V. The selective dissolution of magnesium from magnesium alloy is possible by applying an adequate potential considering the tolerable impurity level in electrorefined magnesium and processing time. The purity estimation method suggested in this study can be useful in evaluating the maximum content of impurity elements.

  17. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Xuran; ...

    2014-12-02

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility ofmore » the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.« less

  18. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Xuran; Li, Chao; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Sadok, Rachel G.; Qu, Deyu; Yu, Xiqian; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2014-12-02

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility of the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.

  19. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vaporextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2000-06-27

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air-water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE.

  20. Non-aqueous-phase fluids in heterogeneous aquifers -- experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, T.H.; Yates, D.N.; Armbruster, E.J. III.

    1995-08-01

    Understanding of flow and entrapment of non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in aquifers contaminated with organic chemicals is important in the effective design of recovery and remediation schemes. Soil heterogeneities play a significant role in the physical behavior of these chemicals. An experimental facility consisting of a large soil tank (lysimeter) and a dual-gamma spectroscopy system for fluid saturation measurements was developed to simulate and monitor plume migration in water-table aquifers after chemical spills. Experimental techniques and results form a preliminary set of experiments conducted in unsaturated and saturated soils under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions are presented. the effects of the layered homogeneities were pronounced in modifying the migration pattern and velocity of the plume. Pockets of coarse sand placed across the path of the plume resulted in the soil acting as a light NAPL trap. A fine-sand pocket acted as a barrier. Qualitative and quantitative data generated in the type of experiments presented in this paper can be used to validate multiphase flow models.

  1. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vapor extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air – water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE. PMID:14734243

  2. Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies Prepared by Interstate Technology and...Regulatory Cooperation Work Group DNAPLs /Chemical Oxidation Work Team June 2000 Technology Overview Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies 5a. CONTRACT

  3. Characterization of the Interface Energetics for N-Type Cadmium Selenide/Non-Aqueous Electrolyte Junctions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-27

    nocesOMY and Idnnti by block number) 3 Photoelectrochemistry, interfaces, photoanodes, cadmium selenide , Ii non-aqueous electrolyte junctions 82 09 1 6 00 5...REPORT NO. 35 "CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERFACE ENERGETICS FOR N-TYPE CADMIUM SELENIDE /NON-AQUEOUS ELECTROLYTE JUNCTIONS" by A. Aruchamy, James A

  4. Design and optimization of disintegrating pellets of MCC by non-aqueous extrusion process using statistical tools.

    PubMed

    Gurram, Rajesh Kumar; Gandra, Suchithra; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-03-10

    The objective of the study was to design and optimize a disintegrating pellet formulation of microcrystalline cellulose by non-aqueous extrusion process for a water sensitive drug using various statistical tools. Aspirin was used as a model drug. Disintegrating matrix pellets of aspirin using propylene glycol as a non-aqueous granulation liquid and croscarmellose as a disintegrant was developed. Plackett-Burman design was initially conducted to screen and identify the significant factors. Final optimization of formula was performed by response surface methodology using a central composite design. The critical attributes of the pellet dosage forms (dependent variables); disintegration time, sphericity and yield were predicted with adequate accuracy based on the regression model. Pareto charts and contour charts were studied to understand the influence of factors and predict the responses. A design space was constructed to meet the desirable targets of the responses in terms of disintegration time <5min, maximum yield, sphericity >0.95 and friability <1.7%. The optimized matrix pellets were enteric coated using Eudragit L 100. The drug release from the enteric coated pellets after 30min in the basic media was ~93% when compared to ~77% from the marketed pellets. The delayed release pellets stored at 25°C/60% RH were stable for a period of 10mo. In conclusion, it can be stated that the developed process for disintegrating pellets using non-aqueous granulating agents can be used as an alternative technique for various water sensitive drugs, circumventing the application of volatile organic solvents in conventional drug layering on inert cores. The scope of this study can be further extended to hydrophobic drugs, which may benefit from the rapid disintegration property and the use of various hydrophilic excipients used in the optimized pellet formulation to enhance dissolution and in turn improve bioavailability.

  5. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, Serguei V.; Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Hui, Xia; Aldoshin, Serguei M.; Lunin, Valery V.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  6. Determination of the phenolic-group capacities of humic substances by non-aqueous titration technique.

    PubMed

    Kirishima, Akira; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sato, Nobuaki; Tochiyama, Osamu

    2009-07-15

    The phenolic-group capacities of five humic substances, such as, the Aldrich humic acid, the humic and fulvic acids extracted from a soil, the humic and fulvic acids extracted from a peat have been precisely determined by the non-aqueous potentiometric titration technique. The titration by KOH in the mixed solvent of DMSO:2-propanol:water=80:19.3:0.7 at [K(+)]=0.02 M enabled to measure the potential change in a wide range of pOH (=-log[OH(-)]), and thus to determine the capacities of phenolic groups which could not be precisely determined in the aqueous titration. The results of the titration revealed that the mean protonation constants of the phenolic groups were nearly the same for all humic substances and close to that of phenol in the same medium, indicating that each phenolic-group in the humic substances is rather isolated and is not electronically affected by other affecting groups in the humic macromolecule.

  7. Biodegradation of multiple aromatic solutes from non-aqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, P.; Ramaswami A.; Basile, F.

    1995-12-31

    Multi-component dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) act as long-term sources of subsurface contamination, slowly releasing organic pollutants into soil and groundwater. This study evaluates the potential for biological stabilization of the pollution source region containing a separate organic phase liquid (NAPL). Biostabilization refers to the process by which aqueous contaminant concentrations may be controlled without complete microbial destruction of the NAPL mass. Very little is known about the concurrent dissolution and degradation of multiple organic substrates from complex NAPLs, such as coal tar, creosote, PCB congeners and mixtures of waste solvents. In this study, biodegradation experiments are being conducted with a model multi-component NAPL to evaluate the rate of depletion of three target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds from the NAPL source. Dissolved aqueous-phase PAH concentrations, as well as the time-scale for depletion of the target PAH constituents from the NAPL due to microbial activity, are being monitored. These experiments will offer insights on the potential for minimizing aqueous plume development and generating a stable post-degradation NAPL residue through biostabilization.

  8. Aggregation of zinc oxide nanoparticles: from non-aqueous dispersions to composites used as photoactive layers in hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, R; Horie, M; Chen, H; Wang, Z; Turner, M L; Saunders, B R

    2010-04-15

    Hybrid solar cells are third-generation solar cells that are colloidal in nature. The composites used as photoactive layers within hybrid solar cells comprise conjugated polymers and inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles (e.g., nanocrystals and nanorods). The composites are usually prepared by spin casting non-aqueous dispersions consisting of polymer, nanoparticles and a co-solvent blend. The factors governing colloidal stability of the dispersions used for composite preparation have not been reported in detail. Here, the factors governing the stability of non-aqueous ZnO nanocrystal and nanorod dispersions as well as the relationship between dispersion stability and the extents of nanoparticle aggregation within model composites are studied. The polymers used are poly[[(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)imino]-9,9-di-(2'-ethylhexyl)-fluorene-2,7-diyl] (PTAA) and poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethyhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta [2,1-b;3,4-b']-dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzo thiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT). FTIR in conjunction with thermogravimetric analysis data showed that up to 30% of the surfaces for the as-prepared ZnO nanocrystals and nanorods were occupied by acetate ligands. 1-Propylamine was found to form covalent coordinate bonds with ZnO and this contributes the ability of this co-solvent to promote enhanced ZnO dispersion stability. The morphologies of the composites were investigated using optical microscopy, AFM and TEM. A strong link was found between colloidal stability of the parent ZnO dispersions, extent of nanoparticle aggregation within the composites and pK(a) for the conjugate acid of the co-solvent. Electrostatic interactions did not control ZnO dispersion stability or composite morphology. Extensive nanometer-scale nanoparticle aggregation was evident within the composites. This was attributed to incompatibility between the polymer and (ligand covered) ZnO nanoparticles. Strategies for reducing uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation are suggested.

  9. Palladium in Non-Aqueous Solvents. Formation, Stability, and Film Forming Properties.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-14

    vessel and Pd (0.5g) and acetone (189g) were codeposited over a 1.0 hr period. The matrix was a dark brown color at the end of the deposition. The matrix...8217 * * - -20- References 1. On leave from Departamento de Quimica , Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 3-C, Concepcion, Chile. 2. Department of Physics. 3

  10. Pyrene-Capped CdSe@ZnS Nanoparticles as Sensitive Flexible Oxygen Sensors in Non-Aqueous Media**

    PubMed Central

    González-Carrero, Soranyel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Galian, Raquel E; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2014-01-01

    A flexible, highly sensitive sensor of oxygen in non-aqueous solvents is described. It consists of CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles decorated with a considerable number of pyrene units, thus making the formation of the pyrene excimer possible. The emission of the pyrene excimer and that of the nanoparticle are suitably separated from each other and also from the excitation wavelength. This sensor can be applied as a ratiometric oxygen sensor by using the linear response of the pyrene excimer lifetime combined with the linear response of the nanoparticle excited state lifetime. This nanohybrid has been assayed in seven media with different dielectric constants and viscosities over the whole oxygen concentration range. In addition, the sensor versatility provides an easy way for monitoring oxygen diffusion through systems. PMID:25478315

  11. [Research on the stability of vitamin C in non-aqueous carrier].

    PubMed

    You, Chao; Fang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    Glycerin containing carrageenan as a non-aqueous carrier for vitamin C (Vc) was prepared in this study. The stabilities of Vc at room temperature and after high temperature accelerating treatment were investigated. The effects of Vc as well as carrageenan on rheological properties were analyzed. The results showed that, with the increases of Vc, the viscosity of the non-aqueous system decreased and the shear-thinning phenomenon disappeared. Furthermore, the stability of Vc was kept well in this non-aqueous system, and the retention rate maintained at a high level-over 99% a month later in room temperature, and over 97% after high temperature accelerating treatment for 20 days. The retention rate of Vc was improved with the increasing of carrageenan. It was proved that this non-aqueous system was an ideal drug delivery system for Vc.

  12. Investigations of oxygen reduction reactions in non-aqueous electrolytes and the lithium-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Laoire, Cormac Micheal

    Unlocking the true energy capabilities of the lithium metal negative electrode in a lithium battery has until now been limited by the low capacity intercalation and conversion reactions at the positive electrodes. This is overcome by removing these electrodes and allowing lithium to react directly with oxygen in the atmosphere forming the Li-air battery. Chapter 2 discusses the intimate role of electrolyte, in particular the role of ion conducting salts on the mechanism and kinetics of oxygen reduction in non-aqueous electrolytes designed for such applications and in determining the reversibility of the electrode reactions. Such fundamental understanding of this high energy density battery is crucial to harnessing its full energy potential. The kinetics and mechanisms of O2 reduction in solutions of hexafluorophosphate salts of the general formula X+ PF6-, where, X = tetra butyl ammonium (TBA), K, Na and Li, in acetonitrile have been studied on glassy carbon electrodes using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. Our results show that cation choice strongly influences the reduction mechanism of O2. Electrochemical data supports the view that alkali metal oxides formed via electrochemical and chemical reactions passivate the electrode surface inhibiting the kinetics and reversibility of the processes. The O2 reduction mechanisms in the presence of the different cations have been supplemented by kinetic parameters determined from detailed analyses of the CV and RDE data. The organic solvent present in the Li+-conducting electrolyte has a major role on the reversibility of each of the O2 reduction products as found from the work discussed in the next chapter. A fundamental study of the influence of solvents on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in a variety of non-aqueous electrolytes was conducted in chapter 4. In this work special attention was paid to elucidate the mechanism of the oxygen electrode processes in the rechargeable Li

  13. Potential of Non-aqueous Microemulsions to Improve the Delivery of Lipophilic Drugs to the Skin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Vanessa F; de Lemos, Debora P; Vieira, Camila S; Migotto, Amanda; Lopes, Luciana B

    2016-10-18

    In this study, non-aqueous microemulsions were developed because of the challenges associated with finding pharmaceutically acceptable solvents for topical delivery of drugs sparingly soluble in water. The formulation irritation potential and ability to modulate the penetration of lipophilic compounds (progesterone, α-tocopherol, and lycopene) of interest for topical treatment/prevention of skin disorders were evaluated and compared to solutions and aqueous microemulsions of similar composition. The microemulsions (ME) were developed with BRIJ, vitamin E-TPGS, and ethanol as surfactant-co-surfactant blend and tributyrin, isopropyl myristate, and oleic acid as oil phase. As polar phase, propylene glycol (MEPG) or water (MEW) was used (26% w/w). The microemulsions were isotropic and based on viscosity and conductivity assessment, bicontinuous. Compared to drug solutions in lipophilic vehicles, MEPG improved drug delivery into viable skin layers by 2.5-38-fold; the magnitude of penetration enhancement mediated by MEPG into viable skin increased with drug lipophilicity, even though the absolute amount of drug delivered decreased. Delivery of progesterone and tocopherol, but not lycopene (the most lipophilic compound), increased up to 2.5-fold with MEW, and higher amounts of these two drugs were released from MEW (2-2.5-fold). Both microemulsions were considered safe for topical application, but MEPG-mediated decrease in the viability of reconstructed epidermis was more pronounced, suggesting its higher potential for irritation. We conclude that MEPG is a safe and suitable nanocarrier to deliver a variety of lipophilic drugs into viable skin layers, but the use of MEW might be more advantageous for drugs in the lower range of lipophilicity.

  14. Rare-earth metal oxide doped transparent mesoporous silica plates under non-aqueous condition as a potential UV sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Transparent mesoporous silica plates doped with rare-earth metal oxide were prepared using solvent-evaporation method based on the self-organization between structure-directing agent and silicate in a non-aqueous solvent. A triblock copolymer, Pluronic (F127 or P123), was used as the structure-directing agent, while tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) was used as a silica source. The pore diameter and the surface area of the mesoporous silica plate prepared with the optimized conditions were ca 40 A and 600 m2 g(-1), respectively, for both structure-directing agent. Rare-earth metal oxides (Eu, Tb, Tm oxide) in mesochannel were formed via one-step synthetic route based on the preparation method of a silica plate. Optical properties of rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates were investigated by UV irradiation and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Under the exitation wavelength of 254 nm, the doped mesoporous silica plates emitted red, green and blue for Eu, Tb and Tm oxides, respectively. Rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates showed enhanced PL intensity compared to that of the bulk rare-earth metal oxide.

  15. Preliminary studies of non-aqueous volatiles in lint cotton moisture tests by thermal methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The standard test methods for moisture in lint cotton are based on oven drying at 105 - 110oC. All of the loss in weight is attributable to moisture. The U.S. cotton industry questions the reliability of the oven-drying method due to the non-aqueous volatiles released during drying may be of an am...

  16. Characterization of a riboflavin non-aqueous nanosuspension prepared by bead milling for cutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takanobu; Tanaka, Kensuke; Matsuki, Kota; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the non-aqueous nanosuspension of a hydrophilic drug prepared by bead milling for cutaneous application. Riboflavin was used as the model hydrophilic drug. The non-aqueous nanosuspensions were prepared by grinding riboflavin with zirconia beads using eight non-aqueous bases. The mean particle size of riboflavin in the suspensions ranged from 206 to 469 nm, as determined by the dynamic light scattering method. Among the well-dispersed samples, riboflavin nanosuspension prepared in oleic acid was selected for evaluation of the drug permeability through rat skin. The cumulative amount and permeation rate of riboflavin from the nanosuspension were approximately three times higher than those for unprocessed riboflavin in oleic acid. Fluorescence imaging of the riboflavin nanosuspension suggested improved penetration of riboflavin into the stratum corneum. Furthermore, the addition of polysorbate 65 or polyglyceryl-6 polyricinoleate to the nanosuspension prepared in oleic acid markedly improved the riboflavin dispersibility. These results show that the preparation of a nanosuspension in a non-aqueous base by bead milling is one of the simple methods to improve the skin permeability of hydrophilic drugs.

  17. Cr(VI) adsorption on functionalized amorphous and mesoporous silica from aqueous and non-aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian . E-mail: isabel.sierra@urjc.es

    2007-08-07

    A mesoporous silica (SBA-15) and amorphous silica (SG) have been chemically modified with 2-mercaptopyridine using the homogeneous route. This synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyridine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane prior to immobilization on the support. The resulting material has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen gas sorption, FT-IR and MAS NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The solid was employed as a Cr(VI) adsorbent from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, metal concentration and solvent polarity) has been studied using the batch technique. The results indicate that under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption value for Cr(VI) was 1.83 {+-} 0.03 mmol/g for MP-SBA-15, whereas the adsorption capacity of the MP-SG was 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mmol/g. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically SBA-15 and SG with 2-mercaptopyridine and to use the resulting modified silicas as effective adsorbents for Cr(VI)

  18. Electrochemically synthesized CuInSe2 thin films from non-aqueous electrolyte for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londhe, Priyanka U.; Rohom, Ashwini B.; Lakhe, Manorama G.; Bhand, Ganesh R.; Chaure, Nandu B.

    2016-12-01

    Highly polycrystalline CuInSe2 (CIS) thin films have been electrodeposited from non-aqueous ethylene glycol (EG) solvent on fluorine-doped tin-oxide-coated glass substrates at 130 °C. The co-deposition potential for Cu, In and Se was optimized by using cyclic voltammetry. CIS layers have been electrodeposited from -1.1 V to -1.5 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The effect of selenization on structural, morphological, optical and compositional properties has been studied extensively. Highly crystalline CIS thin films are electrodeposited for all reported growth potentials without post-annealing treatment. The Raman spectra of stoichiometric CIS thin films showed a dominant A1 mode with features receptive to the crystalline quality of the layers. Noticeable changes in the surface morphology and composition of films deposited at different deposition potential were observed. All CIS layers were void free, compact, uniform, and well adherent to the substrates with particle size ˜1-3 μm. Both as-deposited and selenized samples were Cu-rich, however, the composition of selenium remained closer to the ideal value, 50%. A typical solar cell prepared at -1.3 V measured V OC = 0.316 V, J SC = 26 mA, FF = 49, and η = 4.2, under illuminated conditions at 100 mW cm-2.

  19. Analysis of yohimbine alkaloid from Pausinystalia yohimbe by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinhua; Li, Peng; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Kaijun; Liu, Jia; Li, Qiang

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Pausinystalia yohimbe-type alkaloids in the barks of Rubiaceae species is presented using different analytical approaches. Extracts of P. yohimbe were first examined by GC-MS and the major alkaloids were identified. The quantitation of yohimbine was then accomplished by non-aqueous CE (NACE) with diode array detection. This approach was selected in order to use a running buffer fully compatible with samples in organic solvent. In particular, a mixture of methanol containing ammonium acetate (20 mM) and glacial acetic acid was used as a BGE. The same analytical sample was subjected to GC-MS and NACE analysis; the different selectivity displayed by these techniques allowed different separation profiles that can be useful in phytochemical characterization of the extracts. The linear calibration ranges were all 10-1000 microg/mL for yohimbine by GC-MS and NACE analysis. The recovery of yohimbine was 91.2-94.0% with RSD 1.4-4.3%. The LOD for yohimbine were 0.6 microg/mL by GC-MS and 1.0 microg/mL by NACE, respectively. The GC-MS and NACE methods were successfully validated and applied to the quantitation of yohimbine.

  20. Performance and cost characteristics of multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange non-aqueous redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laramie, Sydney M.; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Breault, Tanya M.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Thompson, Levi T.

    2016-09-01

    Non-aqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) have recently received considerable attention as promising high energy density, low cost grid-level energy storage technologies. Despite these attractive features, NAqRFBs are still at an early stage of development and innovative design techniques are necessary to improve performance and decrease costs. In this work, we investigate multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange NAqRFBs. Common ion systems decrease the supporting electrolyte requirement, which subsequently improves active material solubility and decreases electrolyte cost. Voltammetric and electrolytic techniques are used to study the electrochemical performance and chemical compatibility of model redox active materials, iron (II) tris(2,2‧-bipyridine) tetrafluoroborate (Fe(bpy)3(BF4)2) and ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (Fc1N112-BF4). These results help disentangle complex cycling behavior observed in flow cell experiments. Further, a simple techno-economic model demonstrates the cost benefits of employing common ion exchange NAqRFBs, afforded by decreasing the salt and solvent contributions to total chemical cost. This study highlights two new concepts, common ion exchange and multi-electron transfer, for NAqRFBs through a demonstration flow cell employing model active species. In addition, the compatibility analysis developed for asymmetric chemistries can apply to other promising species, including organics, metal coordination complexes (MCCs) and mixed MCC/organic systems, enabling the design of low cost NAqRFBs.

  1. Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

  2. Non-Aqueous Microwave-Assisted Syntheses of Deca- and Hexa-Molybdovanadates.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Samuel; Sharma, Rupali; Zavras, Athanasios; Mulder, Roger; Ohlin, C André; Goerigk, Lars; O'Hair, Richard A J; Ritchie, Chris

    2017-01-16

    We report a new approach for the synthesis of heterohexa- and heterodecametalates via the use of non-aqueous, microwave-assisted reaction conditions. The two novel molybdovanadates have been isolated and characterized in the solid and solution states using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, UV/Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, and ESI-MS. The relative stabilities of the possible structural isomers were probed using dispersion-corrected DFT calculations for both polyoxometalate systems.

  3. A non-aqueous procedure to synthesize amino group bearing nanostructured organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Göring, M; Seifert, A; Schreiter, K; Müller, P; Spange, S

    2014-09-04

    Amino-functionalized organic-inorganic hybrid materials with a narrow distributed nanostructure of 2-4 nm in size were obtained by means of a template-free and non-aqueous procedure. Simultaneous twin polymerization of novel amino group containing twin monomers with 2,2'-spirobi[4H-1,3,2-benzodioxasiline] has been applied for this purpose. The amino groups of the organic-inorganic hybrid material are useful for post derivatization.

  4. The non-aqueous titrimetric assay of the selected anti-inflammatory agents using tetra-n-butylammonium hydroxide as titrant.

    PubMed

    Cakirer, O; Kiliç, E; Atakol, O; Kenar, A

    1999-06-01

    A potentiometric titration method in non-aqueous media is proposed for the determination of some commonly used anti-inflammatory agents. The direct potentiometric titration of three anti-inflammatory agents, namely mefenamic acid, fenbufen and ibuprofen; and the indirect potentiometric titration of diclofenac sodium was carried out in acetonitrile solvent using tetra-n-butylammonium hydroxide as titrant, at 25 degrees C and under a nitrogen atmosphere. The method was found to be highly accurate and precise, having a relative standard deviation of <1.0% for all anti-inflammatory agents studied. Also, it was shown that the method could be successfully applied to the assay of commercial pharmaceuticals containing the above-mentioned anti-inflammatory agents. The validity of the method was tested by the recovery studies of standard addition to pharmaceuticals and the results were found to be satisfactory. The proposed method is simple, rapid and sufficiently precise for quality control purposes.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix 5 to Subpart A of... - Determination of Crude Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 5... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 1... oil contamination, in non-aqueous drilling fluids (NAFs) by comparing the gas...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix 5 to Subpart A of... - Determination of Crude Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 5... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 1... oil contamination, in non-aqueous drilling fluids (NAFs) by comparing the gas...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix 5 to Subpart A of... - Determination of Crude Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 5... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) (EPA Method 1655) 1... oil contamination, in non-aqueous drilling fluids (NAFs) by comparing the gas...

  8. SURFACTANT/CO-SOLVENT FLUSHING TECHNOLOGIES: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of surfactant and co-solvent solutions to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from soils has seen significant research and development activity over the last decade. These soil flushing technologies are now entering the full-scale implementation stage of their develo...

  9. Improving the treatment of non-aqueous phase TCE in low permeability zones with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Comfort, Steve; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Dvorak, Bruce

    2014-03-15

    Treating dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) embedded in low permeability zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate (MnO4(-)) into LPZs to treat high concentrations of TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into a LPZ that was spiked with non-aqueous phase (14)C-TCE. The treatments we evaluated included permanganate paired with: (i) a shear-thinning polymer (xanthan); (ii) stabilization aids that minimized MnO2 rind formation and (iii) a phase-transfer catalyst. In addition, we quantified the ability of these flooding solutions to improve TCE destruction under batch conditions by developing miniature LPZ cylinders that were spiked with (14)C-TCE. Transport experiments showed that MnO4(-) alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with non-aqueous phase TCE, due to a distinct and large MnO2 rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. By including xanthan with MnO4(-), the sweeping efficiency increased (90%) but rind formation was still evident. By including the stabilization aid, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. Batch experiments using LPZ cylinders allowed longer contact times between the flooding solutions and the DNAPL and results showed that SHMP+MnO4(-) improved TCE destruction by ∼16% over MnO4(-) alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%). These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in low permeable zones.

  10. Effect of hydration on the structure of non aqueous ethyl cellulose/propylene glycol dicaprylate gels.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Lilia; Kasapis, Stefan; Heng, Paul W S

    2012-03-01

    Changes in the structural properties of ethyl cellulose/propylene glycol dicaprylate systems (EC/PGD), intended for topical drug delivery, upon addition of water were investigated. Although designed to be a non-aqueous vehicle for moisture sensitive drugs, these systems are expected to experience an aqueous environment during production, storage and application on the skin. Hence, the interaction of water molecules with the non aqueous gel system and their distribution within the gel network is of interest and critical to its application. Experimental techniques of this study were small-deformation dynamic oscillation in shear, modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), (2)H NMR spectroscopy, ATR-infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction patterns and light microscopy. Rheological profiles of the gels containing moisture from 0.1 to 40.0% (w/w) deviated considerably from that of the non aqueous system at levels of water above 10.0% in preparations. Gradual replacement of the EC/PGD dipole interactions with stronger hydrogen bonding between ethyl cellulose chains, as the level of hydration increased, contributed to these observations. Formation of clusters of ethyl cellulose, observed under a light microscope, was thus ensued. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the rearrangement of the polymer chains led to the loss of liquid crystal structures found in the anhydrous gel. MDSC and (2)H NMR were used to further shed light on the thermodynamic state of added water molecules in the gels. Plots of enthalpy obtained calorimetrically and a good correlation between MDSC and (2)H NMR data indicate that gels with less than two percent hydration contain water in a non-freezable bound state, whereas freezable moieties are obtained at levels of hydration above five percent in composite (EC/PGD/water) gels.

  11. High voltage rechargeable magnesium batteries having a non-aqueous electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Lane, George Hamilton; Jilek, Robert E.; Hwang, Jaehee

    2016-03-22

    A rechargable magnesium battery having an non-aqueous electrolyte is provided. The properties of the electrolyte include high conductivity, high Coulombic efficiency, and an electrochemical window that can exceed 3.5 V vs. Mg/Mg.sup.+2. The use of the electrolyte promotes the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of Mg without the use of any Grignard reagents, other organometallic materials, tetraphenyl borate, or tetrachloroaluminate derived anions. Other Mg-containing electrolyte systems that are expected to be suitable for use in secondary batteries are also described.

  12. Quantification of cholesterol in foods using non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ren-Kuan; Chen, Juan; Chen, Ping; Ling, Xiang-Yang; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2002-03-05

    A simple method for the rapid quantification of cholesterol in egg yolk and milk by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) is described in this paper. The samples were treated with saponification and then quantified by NACE, in which 100 mM sodium acetate-acetic acid in methanol was employed as the running buffer. The correlation coefficient between the cholesterol concentration and the corresponding peak area was 0.999. The detection limit of cholesterol was 5 microg/ml (twice the signal-to-noise ratio). This method can be used as a routine method for the rapid and sensitive determination of cholesterol in foods.

  13. Challenges and Prospect of Non-aqueous Non-alkali (NANA) Metal-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Danny; Shvartsev, Boris; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2016-12-01

    Non-aqueous non-alkali (NANA) metal-air battery technologies promise to provide electrochemical energy storage with the highest specific energy density. Metal-air battery technology is particularly advantageous being implemented in long-range electric vehicles. Up to now, almost all the efforts in the field are focused on Li-air cells, but other NANA metal-air battery technologies emerge. The major concern, which the research community should be dealing with, is the limited and rather poor rechargeability of these systems. The challenges we are covering in this review are related to the initial limited discharge capacities and cell performances. By comprehensively reviewing the studies conducted so far, we show that the implementation of advanced materials is a promising approach to increase metal-air performance and, particularly, metal surface activation as a prime achievement leading to respectful discharge currents. In this review, we address the most critical areas that need careful research attention in order to achieve progress in the understanding of the physical and electrochemical processes in non-aqueous electrolytes applied in beyond lithium and zinc air generation of metal-air battery systems.

  14. Organic solvents for pharmaceutical parenterals and embolic liquids: a review of toxicity data.

    PubMed

    Mottu, F; Laurent, A; Rufenacht, D A; Doelker, E

    2000-01-01

    Non-aqueous solvents have long been used in subcutaneous or intramuscular pharmaceutical formulations to dissolve water-insoluble drugs. In recent years, the need for these vehicles was increased since the drug discovery process has yielded many poorly water-soluble drugs. Besides, preparations containing embolic materials dissolved in undiluted non-aqueous water-miscible solvents have been proposed for the intravascular treatment of aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, or tumors. These organic solvents, regarded as chemically and biologically inert, may show pharmacological and toxicological effects. Therefore, knowledge of tolerance and activity of non-aqueous solvents is essential before they can be administered, especially when given undiluted. This paper focuses on thirteen organic solvents reported as possible vehicles for injectable products and details toxicological data when they have been administered intravascularly. These solvents can be subdivided into three groups according to their description in the literature either for intravenous pharmaceutical parenterals or for intravascular embolic liquids: well-documented organic solvents (propylene glycol, polyethylene glycols, ethanol), solvents described in specific applications (dimethyl sulfoxide, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, glycofurol, Solketal, glycerol formal, acetone), and solvents not reported in intravascular applications but potentially useful (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, diglyme, dimethyl isosorbide, ethyl lactate). This review of the literature shows that toxicity data on intravascular organic solvents are insufficient because they concern solvents diluted with water and because of the lack of comparative evaluation using the same methodologies.

  15. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers reference to related application

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,; Yu Seung, Lee; Kwan-Soo, Rockward; T, Tommy Q

    2012-08-07

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  16. Sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds on natural sorbents and organoclays from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Francis; Tandlich, Roman; Wilhelmi, Brendan S; Balaz, Stefan

    2014-05-09

    Renewed focus on the sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) onto mineral surfaces and soil components is required due to the increased and wider range of organic pollutants being released into the environment. This mini-review examines the possibility of the contribution and mechanism of HOC sorption onto clay mineral sorbents such as kaolinite, and soil organic matter and the possible role of both in the prevention of environmental contamination by HOCs. Literature data indicates that certain siloxane surfaces can be hydrophobic. Therefore soils can retain HOCs even at low soil organic levels and the extent will depend on the structure of the pollutant and the type and concentration of clay minerals in the sorbent. Clay minerals are wettable by nonpolar solvents and so sorption of HOCs onto them from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions is possible. This is important for two reasons: firstly, the movement and remediation of soil environments will be a function of the concentration and type of clay minerals in the soil. Secondly, low-cost sorbents such as kaolinite and expandable clays can be added to soils or contaminated environments as temporary retention barriers for HOCs. Inorganic cations sorbed onto the kaolinite have a strong influence on the rate and extent of sorption of hydrophobic organic pollutants onto kaolinite. Structural sorbate classes that can be retained by the kaolinite matrix are limited by hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of the octahedral alumosilicate sheet and the tetrahedral sheet with silicon. Soil organic carbon plays a key role in the sorption of HOCs onto soils, but the extent will be strongly affected by the structure of the organic soil matter and the presence of soot. Structural characterisation of soil organic matter in a particular soil should be conducted during a particular contamination event. Contamination by mining extractants and antibiotics will require renewed focus on the use of the QSAR approaches in the

  17. Ceramic planar waveguide laser of non-aqueous tape casting fabricated YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Li, Wenxue; Yang, Chao; Bai, Dongbi; Li, Jiang; Ge, Lin; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG planar waveguide lasers were realized on continuous-wave and mode-locked operations. The straight waveguide, fabricated by non-aqueous tape casting and solid state reactive sintering, enabled highly efficient diode-pumped waveguide continuous-wave laser with the slope efficiency of 66% and average output power of more than 3 W. The influence of the waveguide structure on the wavelength tunability was also experimentally investiccgated with a dispersive prism. Passively mode-locked operation of the ceramic waveguide laser was achieved by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), output 2.95 ps pulses with maximum power of 385 mW at the central wavelength of 1030 nm. PMID:27535577

  18. Growth and development in inert non-aqueous liquids. [of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A preview is presented of the survival and growth capabilities of higher plants in non-aqueous, inert liquids. The two media which were used are mineral (white) oil and fluorochemical inert liquid FC-75. Both liquids dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide readily, but are insoluble in water. Consequently, plants submerged in these liquids are capable of gas exchange with the atmosphere, but possess a water impermeable coating the dimensions of which are determined by the size of the liquid holding container. In a sense, growing plants in a tank of mineral oil imparts on them a cuticle. Plants plus prescribed volumes of water were innoculated into mineral oil. Organisms with minimal water supplied could then be observed. Also, submersed plants covered with an oil slick were shown to be capable of growth in dessicating atmospheres.

  19. Screen printed cathode for non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. Y.; Zhao, T. S.; An, L.; Zeng, L.; Wei, Z. H.

    2015-11-01

    An issue with conventional non-aqueous Li-O2 battery cathodes that are formed by spraying/brushing/casting/coating carbon black slurries is a lack of sufficiently large pores, vulnerable to clogging by solid discharge products, and hence resulting in a low capacity. In this work, we report a novel cathode structure formed by screen-printing method. This deposition method allows the creation of evenly distributed large pores (∼10 μm). As compared with the cathode formed by slurry-coating method, the cathode formed by the present method increases the battery's capacity by two times. The cyclability is also seen a significant improvement. The improved performance may be attributed to large pores that give more appropriate distributions of discharge products and hence facilitate the transportation of oxygen during cycling.

  20. Synthesis of cobalt aluminate nanopigments by a non-aqueous sol-gel route.

    PubMed

    Karmaoui, Mohamed; Silva, Nuno J O; Amaral, Vitor S; Ibarra, Alfonso; Millán, Ángel; Palacio, Fernando

    2013-05-21

    Here we report the chemical synthesis of cobalt aluminum oxide (CoAl2O4) nanoparticles by a non-aqueous sol-gel route. The one-pot procedure is carried out at mild temperatures (in the 150 to 300 °C range), and consists of the reaction between cobalt acetate and aluminium isopropoxide in benzyl alcohol. The resulting CoAl2O4 nanoparticles show an unusually low average size, between 2.5 and 6.2 nm, which can be controlled by the synthesis temperature. The colorimetric properties of the nanoparticles are also determined by the synthesis temperature and the characteristic blue color of CoAl2O4 pigments is achieved in samples prepared at T ≥ 200 °C. The nanoparticles are antiferromagnetically ordered below ∼27 K with an uncompensated configuration. The uncompensated moment shows the typical features of strongly interacting superparamagnetic nanoparticles and spin-glass systems.

  1. Modulation of photophysics due to orientational selectivity of 4- N, N-dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Subhasis; Ranjan Bangal, Prakriti; Chakravorti, Sankar

    2000-10-01

    This paper delineates some results on the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) dynamics of 4- N, N-dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde (DMACA) encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents at room temperature. 4- N, N-Dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde is found to form a 1:1 inclusion complex with β-CD in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents with a binding constant higher in aqueous solvent. The most important feature of the inclusion complexes of 4- N, N-dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde, as revealed from photophysics of normal and twisted intramolecular charge transfer bands, is that there is a preferential orientation of 4- N, N-dimethylamino cinnamaldehyde inside β-CD cavity in aqueous solvent with dimethyl group sticking outside and in non-aqueous solvents it is just the opposite.

  2. Structure and dynamics of 1,2-dimethoxyethane and 1,2-dimethoxypropane in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Samira; Samanta, Susruta; Milano, Giuseppe; Roccatano, Danilo

    2011-10-01

    Herein, we report a comparative modelling study of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) and 1,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) at 298 K and 318 K in the liquid state, water mixtures, and at infinite dilution condition in water, methanol, carbon tetrachloride, and n-heptane. Both DME and DMP are united-atom models compatible with GROMOS/OPLS force fields. Calculated thermodynamic and structural properties of the pure DME and DMP liquids resulted in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In aqueous solutions, densities, diffusion coefficients, and concentration dependent conformers of DME, were in agreement with experimental data. The calculated free energy of solvation (ΔGhyd) at 298 K is equal to -22.1 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1 in good agreement with the experimental value of 20.2 kJ mol-1. In addition, the free energy of solvation of DME in non-aqueous solvents follows the trend methanol ≈ water < carbon tetrachloride < n-heptane, consistently with the dielectric constant of the solvents. On contrary, the presence of an extra methyl group on chiral carbon makes DMP less soluble than DME in water (ΔGhyd = -16.0 ± 1.1 kJ mol-1) but more soluble in non-polar solvents as n-heptane. Finally, for the DMP the chiral discrimination of the two enantiomers was calculated as solvation free energy difference of one DMP isomer in the solution of the other. The obtained value of ΔΔGRS = -3.7 ± 1.4 kJ mol-1 indicates a net chiral discrimination of the two enantiomers.

  3. Subcellular analysis of starch metabolism in developing barley seeds using a non-aqueous fractionation method

    PubMed Central

    Tiessen, Axel; Nerlich, Annika; Faix, Benjamin; Hümmer, Christine; Fox, Simon; Trafford, Kay; Weber, Hans; Weschke, Winfriede; Geigenberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Compartmentation of metabolism in developing seeds is poorly understood due to the lack of data on metabolite distributions at the subcellular level. In this report, a non-aqueous fractionation method is described that allows subcellular concentrations of metabolites in developing barley endosperm to be calculated. (i) Analysis of subcellular volumes in developing endosperm using micrographs shows that plastids and cytosol occupy 50.5% and 49.9% of the total cell volume, respectively, while vacuoles and mitochondria can be neglected. (ii) By using non-aqueous fractionation, subcellular distribution between the cytosol and plastid of the levels of metabolites involved in sucrose degradation, starch synthesis, and respiration were determined. With the exception of ADP and AMP which were mainly located in the plastid, most other metabolites of carbon and energy metabolism were mainly located outside the plastid in the cytosolic compartment. (iii) In developing barley endosperm, the ultimate precursor of starch, ADPglucose (ADPGlc), was mainly located in the cytosol (80–90%), which was opposite to the situation in growing potato tubers where ADPGlc was almost exclusively located in the plastid (98%). This reflects the different subcellular distribution of ADPGlc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) in these tissues. (iv) Cytosolic concentrations of ADPGlc were found to be close to the published Km values of AGPase and the ADPGlc/ADP transporter at the plastid envelope. Also the concentrations of the reaction partners glucose-1-phosphate, ATP, and inorganic pyrophosphate were close to the respective Km values of AGPase. (v) Knock-out of cytosolic AGPase in Riso16 mutants led to a strong decrease in ADPGlc level, in both the cytosol and plastid, whereas knock-down of the ADPGlc/ADP transporter led to a large shift in the intracellular distribution of ADPGlc. (v) The thermodynamic structure of the pathway of sucrose to starch was determined by calculating the mass–action ratios

  4. Containment and recovery of a light non-aqueous phase liquid plume at a woodtreating facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, D.; Powell, G.; Hawthorn, S.; Weinstock, S.

    1997-12-31

    A woodtreating site in Montana used a formulation (product) of 5 percent pentachlorophenol and 95 percent diesel fuel as a carrier liquid to pressure treat lumber. Through years of operations approximately 378,500 liters of this light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) product spilled onto the ground and soaked into the groundwater. A plume of this LNAPL product flowed in a northerly direction toward a stream located approximately 410 meters from the pressure treatment building. A 271-meter long high density polyethylene (HDPE) containment cutoff barrier wall was installed 15 meters from the stream to capture, contain, and prevent the product from migrating off site. This barrier was extended to a depth of 3.7 meters below ground surface and allowed the groundwater to flow beneath it. Ten product recovery wells, each with a dual-phase pumping system, were installed within the plume, and a groundwater model was completed to indicate how the plume would be contained by generating a cone of influence at each recovery well. The model indicated that the recovery wells and cutoff barrier wall would contain the plume and prevent further migration. To date, nearly 3{1/2} year`s later, approximately 106,000 liters of product have been recovered.

  5. Non-aqueous Electrode Processing and Construction of Lithium-ion Coin Cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Malcolm; Chen, Chien-Fan; Robles, Daniel J; Rhodes, Christopher; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2016-02-01

    Research into new and improved materials to be utilized in lithium-ion batteries (LIB) necessitates an experimental counterpart to any computational analysis. Testing of lithium-ion batteries in an academic setting has taken on several forms, but at the most basic level lies the coin cell construction. In traditional LIB electrode preparation, a multi-phase slurry composed of active material, binder, and conductive additive is cast out onto a substrate. An electrode disc can then be punched from the dried sheet and used in the construction of a coin cell for electrochemical evaluation. Utilization of the potential of the active material in a battery is critically dependent on the microstructure of the electrode, as an appropriate distribution of the primary components are crucial to ensuring optimal electrical conductivity, porosity, and tortuosity, such that electrochemical and transport interaction is optimized. Processing steps ranging from the combination of dry powder, wet mixing, and drying can all critically affect multi-phase interactions that influence the microstructure formation. Electrochemical probing necessitates the construction of electrodes and coin cells with the utmost care and precision. This paper aims at providing a step-by-step guide of non-aqueous electrode processing and coin cell construction for lithium-ion batteries within an academic setting and with emphasis on deciphering the influence of drying and calendaring.

  6. TiO 2 (B)/activated carbon non-aqueous hybrid system for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brousse, Thierry; Marchand, René; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice

    TiO 2 (B) has been investigated as a possible candidate to replace Li 4Ti 5O 12 as a negative electrode for Li-ion battery. The starting compound was synthesized by a simple solid state reaction followed by hydrolysis. Long term stability of the TiO 2 (B) electrode can be obtained by limiting lithium intercalation between 0.25 and 0.35 Li + per unit formula. High cycling rates (up to 24 C) have been used without noticeable degradation of the electrode. A non-aqueous hybrid energy storage device using TiO 2 (B) as the negative electrode and activated carbon as the positive was assembled. The maximum hybrid cell voltage can be set between 2.75 V and 3.5 V. The cells exhibit energy densities between 45 W kg -1 and 80 W kg -1 with power densities in the range 240-420 W kg -1 which is compatible with a fast charging/discharging storage device, intermediate between electrochemical double layer capacitor and Li-ion batteries.

  7. Expanded separation technique for chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2011-08-26

    An improved separation method for chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf was developed. While Oriental leaf still gives the green color even after the curing process, little attention has been paid to the detailed composition of the remaining green pigments. This study aimed to identify the green pigments using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography (NARPC). To this end, liquid chromatograph (LC) equipped with a photo diode array detector (DAD) and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer (APCI/MSD) was selected, because it is useful for detecting low polar non-volatile compounds giving green color such as pheophytin a. Identification was based on the wavelength spectrum, mass spectrum and retention time, comparing the analytes in Oriental leaf with the commercially available and synthesized components. Consequently, several chlorophyll metabolites such as hydroxypheophytin a, solanesyl pheophorbide a and solanesyl hydroxypheophorbide a were newly identified, in addition to typical green pigments such as chlorophyll a and pheophytin a. Chlorophyll metabolites bound to solanesol were considered the tobacco specific components. NARPC expanded the number of detectable low polar chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf.

  8. Interaction of non-aqueous dispersions of silver nanoparticles with cellular membrane models.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Gustavo Bonomi; da Silva Oliveira, Roselaine; Camilo, Fernanda Ferraz; Caseli, Luciano

    2017-02-13

    In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) dispersed in non-aqueous media and stabilized with polyether block polymers amide (PEBA) were incorporated in Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which served as a cell membrane model. The AgNPs presented surface activity, disturbing the viscoelastic properties of the floating film. They expanded the monolayers decreasing their surface elasticity as observed with surface pressure-area isotherms. Polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy showed that the permanence of AgNPs at the air-water interface is favored by PEBA, affecting both the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic groups of the phospholipid. Brewster angle microscopy showed that the AgNPs lead to the formation of aggregates at the air-water interface, establishing domains that shear with each other due to the low lateral viscosity of irregular and non-monomolecular domains. These data can be correlated to the possible toxicity and microbicide effect of AgNPs in lipidic surfaces such as in mammalian and microbial membranes.

  9. Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

    2012-10-01

    The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

  10. High cycling stability of zinc-anode/conducting polymer rechargeable battery with non-aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, A.; Trottier, J.; Boyano, I.; De Meatza, I.; Blazquez, J. A.; Brewer, S.; Ryder, K. S.; Vijh, A.; Zaghib, K.

    2014-02-01

    A non-aqueous zinc-polyaniline secondary battery was fabricated with polyaniline Emeraldine base as cathode and zinc metal as anode in an electrolyte consisting of 0.3 M zinc-bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)imide Zn(TFSI)2 dissolved in propylene carbonate. We observed that the formation of the battery required a prerequisite condition to stabilize the interfaces in order to maintain a stable capacity. The battery suffered from Zn dissolution which induces a competition between concurrent Zn dissolution and plating when the battery is in charge mode, and thus inefficient cycles are obtained. The capacity and coulombic efficiency of the battery depends on the charge-discharge rates. We propose cycling protocols at different rates to determine the steady-state rates of competing reactions. When the cell is cycled at ≥1 C rate, the coulombic efficiency improves. The maximum capacity and energy densities of the battery are 148 mAhg-1 and 127 mWhg-1, respectively for discharge at C/2. The battery was successively charged/discharged at constant current densities (1C rate), and high cycling stability was obtained for more than 1700 cycles at 99.8% efficiency. Zinc dissolution and self discharge of the battery were investigated after 24 h of standby. The investigation showed that the battery experiences a severe self-discharge of 48% per day.

  11. Analysis of the Compartmentalized Metabolome – A Validation of the Non-Aqueous Fractionation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Klie, Sebastian; Krueger, Stephan; Krall, Leonard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Willmitzer, Lothar; Steinhauser, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput metabolic technologies, a plethora of primary and secondary compounds have been detected in the plant cell. However, there are still major gaps in our understanding of the plant metabolome. This is especially true with regards to the compartmental localization of these identified metabolites. Non-aqueous fractionation (NAF) is a powerful technique for the determination of subcellular metabolite distributions in eukaryotic cells, and it has become the method of choice to analyze the distribution of a large number of metabolites concurrently. However, the NAF technique produces a continuous gradient of metabolite distributions, not discrete assignments. Resolution of these distributions requires computational analyses based on marker molecules to resolve compartmental localizations. In this article we focus on expanding the computational analysis of data derived from NAF. Along with an experimental workflow, we describe the critical steps in NAF experiments and how computational approaches can aid in assessing the quality and robustness of the derived data. For this, we have developed and provide a new version (v1.2) of the BestFit command line tool for calculation and evaluation of subcellular metabolite distributions. Furthermore, using both simulated and experimental data we show the influence on estimated subcellular distributions by modulating important parameters, such as the number of fractions taken or which marker molecule is selected. Finally, we discuss caveats and benefits of NAF analysis in the context of the compartmentalized metabolome. PMID:22645541

  12. Laboratory study of non-aqueous phase liquid and water co-boiling during thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Mumford, K G; Kueper, B H

    2014-08-01

    In situ thermal treatment technologies, such as electrical resistance heating and thermal conductive heating, use subsurface temperature measurements in addition to the analysis of soil and groundwater samples to monitor remediation performance. One potential indication of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) removal is an increase in temperature following observations of a co-boiling plateau, during which subsurface temperatures remain constant as NAPL and water co-boil. However, observed co-boiling temperatures can be affected by the composition of the NAPL and the proximity of the NAPL to the temperature measurement location. Results of laboratory heating experiments using single-component and multi-component NAPLs showed that local-scale temperature measurements can be mistakenly interpreted as an indication of the end of NAPL-water co-boiling, and that significant NAPL saturations (1% to 9%) remain despite observed increases in temperature. Furthermore, co-boiling of multi-component NAPL results in gradually increasing temperature, rather than a co-boiling plateau. Measurements of gas production can serve as a complementary metric for assessing NAPL removal by providing a larger-scale measurement integrated over multiple smaller-scale NAPL locations. Measurements of the composition of the NAPL condensate can provide ISTT operators with information regarding the progress of NAPL removal for multi-component sources.

  13. Solubilization of Mixed Non-aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) by Tween-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by organic pollutants is a widespread problem. Due to the low water solubility of many organic pollutants, conventional pump-and-treat technology has had little success in the remediation of contaminated groundwater. Thus, surfactant- enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is under investigation to enhance the performance of conventional pump-and-treat technologies. Surfactants have the ability to increase apparent aqueous solubility of many insoluble organic compounds. To date, most SEAR works have been focused on the examination of the pure non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-contaminated sites. However, a discharge into groundwater is usually not composed of a single component, but rather a mixture of several NAPLs. In this study, ternary mixtures of organic compounds with a range of hydrophobicity were investigated to assess the micellar solubilization behavior of each component in mixed NAPLs using Tween-80, a non-ionic surfactant. The experimental results reveal that the micellar solubilization behavior in the mixed NAPLS differs significantly from that in the corresponding single component systems. Compared with the pure NAPLs, less hydrophobic constituents in the mixed NAPLs show the decreased solubilization, while more hydrophobic components exhibit the elevated solubilization. Acknowledgement: This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "The GAIA Project No. 173-092-011."

  14. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO₂

    DOE PAGES

    Middleton, Richard S.; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert P.; ...

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO₂ as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO₂ including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reductionmore » of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO₂. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO₂ proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.« less

  15. Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO₂

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Richard S.; Carey, James William; Currier, Robert P.; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Kang, Qinjun; Karra, Satish; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Porter, Mark L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations in the United States has led to a domestic energy boom. Currently, water is the only fracturing fluid regularly used in commercial shale oil and gas production. Industry and researchers are interested in non-aqueous working fluids due to their potential to increase production, reduce water requirements, and to minimize environmental impacts. Using a combination of new experimental and modeling data at multiple scales, we analyze the benefits and drawbacks of using CO₂ as a working fluid for shale gas production. We theorize and outline potential advantages of CO₂ including enhanced fracturing and fracture propagation, reduction of flow-blocking mechanisms, increased desorption of methane adsorbed in organic-rich parts of the shale, and a reduction or elimination of the deep re-injection of flow-back water that has been linked to induced seismicity and other environmental concerns. We also examine likely disadvantages including costs and safety issues associated with handling large volumes of supercritical CO₂. The advantages could have a significant impact over time leading to substantially increased gas production. In addition, if CO₂ proves to be an effective fracturing fluid, then shale gas formations could become a major utilization option for carbon sequestration.

  16. Infiltration characteristics of non-aqueous phase liquids in undisturbed loessal soil cores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an

    2009-01-01

    The widespread contamination of soils and aquifers by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), such as crude oil, poses serious environmental and health hazards globally. Understanding the infiltration characteristics of NAPL in soil is crucial in mitigating or remediating soil contamination. The infiltration characteristics of crude and diesel oils into undisturbed loessal soil cores, collected in polymethyl methacrylate cylindrical columns, were investigated under a constant fluid head (3 cm) of either crude oil or diesel oil. The infiltration rate of both crude and diesel oils decreased exponentially as wetting depth increased with time. Soil core size and bulk density both had significant effects on NAPL infiltration through the undisturbed soil cores; a smaller core size or a greater bulk density could reduce oil penetration to depth. Compacting soil in areas susceptible to oil spills may be an effective stratage to reduce contamination. The infiltration of NAPL into soil cores was spatially anisotropic and heterogeneous, thus recording the data at four points on the soil core is a good stratage to improve the accuracy of experimental results. Our results revealed that crude and diesel oils, rather than their components, have a practical value for remediation of contaminated loessal soils.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix 6 to Subpart A of... - Reverse Phase Extraction (RPE) Method for Detection of Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Detection of Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids (NAF) 6 Appendix 6 to Subpart A of... Appendix 6 to Subpart A of Part 435—Reverse Phase Extraction (RPE) Method for Detection of Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids (NAF) 1.0Scope and Application 1.1This method is used...

  18. Processes controlling the migration and biodegradation of Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) within fractured rocks in the vadose zone FY97 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, J.T.; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Conrad, M.

    1998-02-01

    Subsurface contamination from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been found at many Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DoD) and industrial sites due to the widespread use of organic solvents and hydrocarbon fuels. At ambient pressures and temperatures in the shallow subsurface, these substances are liquids that are immiscible with water; hence they are commonly designated as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). At some DOE sites, NAPLs are the presumed source of groundwater contamination in fractured rocks, such as basalts (at Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)), shales (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), and welded tuffs (Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)). The flow, transport and biodegradation processes controlling NAPL behavior in the vadose zone must be understood in order to establish the possible extent of contamination, the risk to groundwater supplies, and appropriate remediation action. This is particularly important in and sites with deep water tables (such as at Hanford, INEEL and LANL). In fractured rock aquifers, NAPL migration is likely to be dominated by the highly permeable pathways provided by rock fractures and joints. Two- and three-phase fluid phases may be present in vadose zone fractures, including NAPL-gas, NAPL-water (in regions of perched water) and NAPL-water-gas.

  19. Separation of Rebaudiana A from Steviol glycoside using a polymeric adsorbent with multi-hydrogen bonding in a non-aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Ba, Jing; Zhang, Na; Yao, Lijuan; Ma, Ning; Wang, Chunhong

    2014-11-15

    Rebaudioside A (RA) and stevioside (SS) are the primary effective glycoside components in Stevia Rebaudiana. The RA glycoside is sweeter, and it tastes similarly to sucrose. Because extracts with a high RA content can be used as natural sweeteners for food additives approved by the FAO and FDA, RA should generate high market demand. In this study, an efficient method for separating RA was established based on the synergistic multi-hydrogen bonding interaction between a polymeric adsorbent and the RA glycoside. To overcome the destruction of the hydrophobic affinity required for the selective adsorption of RA, an innovative non-aqueous environment was established for adsorption and separation. To this end, an initial polymeric adsorbent composed of a glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (GMA-co-TMPTMA) copolymer matrix was synthesized, and polyethylene polyamine was employed as a functional reagent designed to react with the epoxy group on GME-co-TMPTMA to form a highly selective macroporous adsorbent. The effects of the different functional reagents and the solvent polarity on the adsorption selectivity for RA and SS, respectively, were investigated. Matching the structure of the polyethylene polyamine and sugar ligand on the glycoside molecule was essential in ensuring that the maximum synergistic interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate would be achieved. Moreover, the hydrogen-bonding force was observed to increase when the polarity of the adsorption solvent decreased. Therefore, among the synthesized macroporous polymeric adsorbents, the GTN4 adsorbent-bonding tetraethylenepentamine functional group provided the best separation in an n-butyl alcohol solution. Under the optimized gradient elution conditions, RA and SS can be effectively separated, and the contents of RA and SS increased from 33.5% and 51.5% in the initial crude extract to 95.4% and 78.2% after separation, respectively. Compared to conventional methods, the adsorption

  20. DETERMINATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID MIXTURES IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, G

    2006-09-22

    It is important to recognize the presence of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in soils at a waste site in order to design and construct a successful remediation system. NAPLs often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media, such as vadose zone soil, where the mixture will partition and equilibrate with soil particles, pore vapor, and pore water. Complex organic mixtures can greatly complicate the determination and quantification of NAPL in soil due to inter-media transfer. NAPL thresholds can also change because of mixture physical properties and can disguise the presence of NAPL. A unique analytical method and copyrighted software have been developed at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site that facilitates solution of this problem. The analytical method uses a classic chemistry approach and applies the principals of solubility limit theory, Raoult's Law, and equilibrium chemistry to derive an accurate estimation of NAPL presence and quantity. The method is unique because it calculates an exact result that is mass balanced for each physical state, chemical mixture component, and mixture characteristics. The method is also unique because the solution can be calculated on both a wet weight and dry weight basis--a factor which is often overlooked. The software includes physical parameters for 300 chemicals in a database that self-loads into the model to save time. The method accommodates up to 20 different chemicals in a multi-component mixture analysis. A robust data display is generated including important parameters of the components and mixture including: NAPL thresholds for individual chemical components within the mixture, mass distribution in soil for each physical state, molar fractions, density, vapor pressure, solubility, mass balance, media concentrations, residual saturation, and modest graphing capabilities. This method and software are power tools to simplify otherwise tedious

  1. Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds on Natural Sorbents and Organoclays from Aqueous and Non-Aqueous Solutions: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Francis; Tandlich, Roman; Wilhelmi, Brendan S.; Balaz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Renewed focus on the sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) onto mineral surfaces and soil components is required due to the increased and wider range of organic pollutants being released into the environment. This mini-review examines the possibility of the contribution and mechanism of HOC sorption onto clay mineral sorbents such as kaolinite, and soil organic matter and the possible role of both in the prevention of environmental contamination by HOCs. Literature data indicates that certain siloxane surfaces can be hydrophobic. Therefore soils can retain HOCs even at low soil organic levels and the extent will depend on the structure of the pollutant and the type and concentration of clay minerals in the sorbent. Clay minerals are wettable by nonpolar solvents and so sorption of HOCs onto them from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions is possible. This is important for two reasons: firstly, the movement and remediation of soil environments will be a function of the concentration and type of clay minerals in the soil. Secondly, low-cost sorbents such as kaolinite and expandable clays can be added to soils or contaminated environments as temporary retention barriers for HOCs. Inorganic cations sorbed onto the kaolinite have a strong influence on the rate and extent of sorption of hydrophobic organic pollutants onto kaolinite. Structural sorbate classes that can be retained by the kaolinite matrix are limited by hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of the octahedral alumosilicate sheet and the tetrahedral sheet with silicon. Soil organic carbon plays a key role in the sorption of HOCs onto soils, but the extent will be strongly affected by the structure of the organic soil matter and the presence of soot. Structural characterisation of soil organic matter in a particular soil should be conducted during a particular contamination event. Contamination by mining extractants and antibiotics will require renewed focus on the use of the QSAR approaches in the

  2. Mesoporous amorphous binary Ru-Ti oxides as bifunctional catalysts for non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisu; Jo, HeeGoo; Wu, Mihye; Yoon, Dae-Ho; Kang, Yongku; Jung, Ha-Kyun

    2017-04-07

    Mesoporous amorphous binary Ru-Ti oxides were prepared as bifunctional catalysts for non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries, and their electrochemical performance was investigated for the first time. A Li-O2 battery with mesoporous amorphous binary Ru-Ti oxides exhibited a remarkably high capacity of 27100 mAh g(-1) as well as a reduced overpotential. A GITT analysis suggested that the introduction of amorphous TiO2 to amorphous RuO2 was responsible for the enhanced kinetics toward both the oxygen reduction reaction and oxygen evolution reaction. Excellent cyclic stability up to 230 cycles was achieved, confirming the applicability of the new bifunctional catalyst in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries.

  3. Mesoporous amorphous binary Ru–Ti oxides as bifunctional catalysts for non-aqueous Li–O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jisu; Jo, HeeGoo; Wu, Mihye; Yoon, Dae-Ho; Kang, Yongku; Jung, Ha-Kyun

    2017-04-01

    Mesoporous amorphous binary Ru–Ti oxides were prepared as bifunctional catalysts for non-aqueous Li–O2 batteries, and their electrochemical performance was investigated for the first time. A Li–O2 battery with mesoporous amorphous binary Ru–Ti oxides exhibited a remarkably high capacity of 27100 mAh g‑1 as well as a reduced overpotential. A GITT analysis suggested that the introduction of amorphous TiO2 to amorphous RuO2 was responsible for the enhanced kinetics toward both the oxygen reduction reaction and oxygen evolution reaction. Excellent cyclic stability up to 230 cycles was achieved, confirming the applicability of the new bifunctional catalyst in non-aqueous Li–O2 batteries.

  4. Lipase-catalyzed syntheses of sugar esters in non-aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    The lipase-catalyzed reaction is useful to obtain sugar esters with chemically defined structures and will contribute to the synthesis of sugar-based compounds by a chemo-enzymatic pathway. The synthesis of sugar esters in nonaqueous media has been attempted for a quarter century. To facilitate the reactions, they have been performed either in an organic solvent with/without a polar adjuvant or in an ionic liquid, or by using a hydrophobic sugar derivative. In this review, the following points are discussed: (1) various synthetic methods of sugar esters; (2) role of the solvents or adjuvants; and (3) improvement in the productivity.

  5. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube-ruthenium dioxide core-shell cathode for non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. Y.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, L.; Tan, P.

    2016-11-01

    Exploitation of hierarchical porous carbons is increasingly attractive for high-capacity lithium (Li)-oxygen (O2) battery cathodes. However, their practical applications in non-aqueous electrolytes are limited by poor rechargeability, primarily due to the decomposition of carbon electrode and electrolyte. In this work, we report a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT)-ruthenium dioxide (RuO2) core-shell (VACNT@RuO2) cathode for non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The cathode is fabricated with VACNT as the core material and hydrous RuO2 as the shell material, which eliminates the direct contact between the carbon and nucleophilic reactive intermediate species in the electrolyte. In comparison with the VACNT cathode, the VACNT@RuO2 cathode presents a superior rate capability (3.3-fold less reduction in capacity) and cycling stability (sustainable for 100 cycles), with a maximum capacity as large as 13.2 mAh cm-2 (6600 mAh gelectrode-1) at 1.0 mA cm-2. The proposed cathode exhibiting a binder-free and hierarchical core-shell structure is a promising candidate for rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries.

  6. Development and validation of non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis methods to analyze boronic esters and acids.

    PubMed

    Forst, Mindy B; Warner, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    Boronic esters and acids are potential intermediates in the manufacture of many active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). Accurate quantitation of the intermediate is necessary to assure the stoichiometry of the reaction. The analysis of these compounds is challenging due to their labile nature. For example, the boronic ester can hydrolyze to the acid during storage, when exposed to moisture in the air, during sample preparation and analysis, and thus give erroneous ester results. Traditional analytical techniques like gas chromatography (GC), normal phase chromatography (NPLC), hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) have been utilized but with noted limitations such as poor peak shape, variation in retention times, and evidence of hydrolysis. All of these limitations impact accurate quantitation needed for selected situations. For the proprietary boronic ester evaluated here, these traditional techniques were insufficient for the accurate determination of assay and residual boronic acid. Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) is an accurate quantitative technique that can be used to analyze boronic esters and their corresponding acids without the limitations noted for traditional analytical techniques. The present study describes the development of methodology for the determination of the potency of a proprietary boronic ester as well as methodology for the determination of residual boronic acid in the ester. In addition, nine model boronic ester and acid pairs with a range in polarity, based on the electronic properties of the attached side group, were tested to evaluate and demonstrate the general applicability of these conditions. Under the conditions used for potency, all ten pairs had a resolution between the boronic ester and acid of greater than 1.5, acceptable peak shape for the boronic ester (tailing factor of less than 2.0), and a run time of less than 3 min. In addition, this work describes

  7. To Keep or Not to Keep? The Question of Crystallographic Waters for Enzyme Simulations in Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Dahanayake, Jayangika N.; Gautam, Devaki N.; Verma, Rajni; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R.

    2016-01-01

    The use of enzymes in non-aqueous solvents expands the use of biocatalysts to hydrophobic substrates, with the ability to tune selectivity of reactions through solvent selection. Non-aqueous enzymology also allows for fundamental studies on the role of water and other solvents in enzyme structure, dynamics, and function. Molecular dynamics simulations serve as a powerful tool in this area, providing detailed atomic information about the effect of solvents on enzyme properties. However, a common protocol for non-aqueous enzyme simulations does not exist. If you want to simulate enzymes in non-aqueous solutions, how many and which crystallographic waters do you keep? In the present work, this question is addressed by determining which crystallographic water molecules lead most quickly to an equilibrated protein structure. Five different methods of selecting and keeping crystallographic waters are used in order to discover which crystallographic waters lead the protein structure to reach an equilibrated structure more rapidly in organic solutions. It is found that buried waters contribute most to rapid equilibration in organic solvent, with slow-diffusing waters giving similar results. PMID:27403032

  8. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  9. Boron esters as tunable anion carriers for non-aqueous batteries electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Shanmukaraj, Devaraj; Grugeon, Sylvie; Gachot, Grégory; Laruelle, Stéphane; Mathiron, David; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Armand, Michel

    2010-03-10

    Compounds like LiF, Li(2)O, and Li(2)O(2) have considerable importance in batteries; the first two are ubiquitous in the protective SEI at the negative electrode, or the result of conversion reactions with fluorides and oxides. The latter, Li(2)O(2,) forms from oxygen reduction in the much vaunted Li/air batteries. Mastering their solubility in Li-based electrolytes is viewed as essential for further progress in battery safety, lifetime, or capacity. Aprotic solvents cannot provide the H-bonds necessary to their dissolution, and simple practical solutions have yet to materialize. Here we disclose a novel and large family of boron esters of general formula Y-C((CH(2)O)(Z(1)O)(Z(2)O))B whose Lewis acidity stems from geometrical constraint and can be tuned via electron affinity either by Y = CH(3) --> Y = NO(2) or Z(1,2) = CH(2) --> Z(1,2) = CO so as to partially or fully dissolve the above compounds both in battery solvent EC/DMC and in DMF. The extreme simplicity of synthesis and variability of these boron-based anion carriers, where the exchange rate is fast, are not only a valuable addition to coordination science but also a step forward to improve present battery systems.

  10. The IUPAC aqueous and non-aqueous experimental pKa data repositories of organic acids and bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Anthony Michael

    2014-10-01

    Accurate and well-curated experimental pKa data of organic acids and bases in both aqueous and non-aqueous media are invaluable in many areas of chemical research, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, specialty chemical and property prediction research. In pharmaceutical research, pKa data are relevant in ligand design, protein binding, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination as well as solubility and dissolution rate. The pKa data compilations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, originally in book form, have been carefully converted into computer-readable form, with value being added in the process, in the form of ionisation assignments and tautomer enumeration. These compilations offer a broad range of chemistry in both aqueous and non-aqueous media and the experimental conditions and original reference for all pKa determinations are supplied. The statistics for these compilations are presented and the utility of the computer-readable form of these compilations is examined in comparison to other pKa compilations. Finally, information is provided about how to access these databases.

  11. Macromolecular Design Strategies for Preventing Active-Material Crossover in Non-Aqueous All-Organic Redox-Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Doris, Sean E; Ward, Ashleigh L; Baskin, Artem; Frischmann, Peter D; Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Chénard, Etienne; Sevov, Christo S; Prendergast, David; Moore, Jeffrey S; Helms, Brett A

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent energy sources, including solar and wind, require scalable, low-cost, multi-hour energy storage solutions in order to be effectively incorporated into the grid. All-Organic non-aqueous redox-flow batteries offer a solution, but suffer from rapid capacity fade and low Coulombic efficiency due to the high permeability of redox-active species across the battery's membrane. Here we show that active-species crossover is arrested by scaling the membrane's pore size to molecular dimensions and in turn increasing the size of the active material above the membrane's pore-size exclusion limit. When oligomeric redox-active organics (RAOs) were paired with microporous polymer membranes, the rate of active-material crossover was reduced more than 9000-fold compared to traditional separators at minimal cost to ionic conductivity. This corresponds to an absolute rate of RAO crossover of less than 3 μmol cm(-2)  day(-1) (for a 1.0 m concentration gradient), which exceeds performance targets recently set forth by the battery industry. This strategy was generalizable to both high and low-potential RAOs in a variety of non-aqueous electrolytes, highlighting the versatility of macromolecular design in implementing next-generation redox-flow batteries.

  12. Non-aqueous silicone elastomer gels as a vaginal microbicide delivery system for the HIV-1 entry inhibitor maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Claire J.; Lowry, Deborah; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Shattock, Robin J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Mitchnick, Mark; Goldman, Laurie; Doyle, Lara A.; Muldoon, Brendan C.O.; Woolfson, A. David; Moore, John P.; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous semi-solid polymeric gels, such as those based on hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and polyacrylic acid (e.g. Carbopol®), have a long history of use in vaginal drug delivery. However, despite their ubiquity, they often provide sub-optimal clinical performance, due to poor mucosal retention and limited solubility for poorly water-soluble actives. These issues are particularly pertinent for vaginal HIV microbicides, since many lead candidates are poorly water-soluble and where a major goal is the development of a coitally independent, once daily gel product. In this study, we report the use of a non-aqueous silicone elastomer gel for vaginal delivery of the HIV-1 entry inhibitor maraviroc. In vitro rheological, syringeability and retention studies demonstrated enhanced performance for silicone gels compared with a conventional aqueous HEC gel, while testing of the gels in the slug model confirmed a lack of mucosal irritancy. Pharmacokinetic studies following single dose vaginal administration of a maraviroc silicone gel in rhesus macaques showed higher and sustained MVC levels in vaginal fluid, vaginal tissue and plasma compared with a HEC gel containing the same maraviroc loading. The results demonstrate that non-aqueous silicone gels have potential as a formulation platform for coitally independent vaginal HIV microbicides. PMID:21864598

  13. The IUPAC aqueous and non-aqueous experimental pKa data repositories of organic acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Slater, Anthony Michael

    2014-10-01

    Accurate and well-curated experimental pKa data of organic acids and bases in both aqueous and non-aqueous media are invaluable in many areas of chemical research, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, specialty chemical and property prediction research. In pharmaceutical research, pKa data are relevant in ligand design, protein binding, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination as well as solubility and dissolution rate. The pKa data compilations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, originally in book form, have been carefully converted into computer-readable form, with value being added in the process, in the form of ionisation assignments and tautomer enumeration. These compilations offer a broad range of chemistry in both aqueous and non-aqueous media and the experimental conditions and original reference for all pKa determinations are supplied. The statistics for these compilations are presented and the utility of the computer-readable form of these compilations is examined in comparison to other pKa compilations. Finally, information is provided about how to access these databases.

  14. Solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Holt, Jerrid S.

    2010-08-03

    A solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings, the solvent having a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide as constituents. In some embodiments the solvent consists only of miscible constituents. In some embodiments the carbaldehyde is benzaldehyde and in some embodiments the cyclic amide is N-methylpyrrolidone (M-pyrole). An extender may be added to the solvent. In some embodiments the extender is miscible with the other ingredients, and in some embodiments the extender is non-aqueous. For example, the extender may include isopropanol, ethanol, tetrahydro furfuryl alcohol, benzyl alcohol, Gamma-butyrolactone or a caprolactone. In some embodiments a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide are heated and used to separate a urethane bonded to a component.

  15. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  16. Non-aqueous electrolytes for isotachophoresis of weak bases and its application to the comprehensive preconcentration of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in column-coupling ITP/CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) has long been used alone but also as a preconcentration technique for capillary electrophoresis (CE). Unfortunately, up to now, its application is restricted to relatively strong acids and bases as either the degree of (de)protonation is too low or the water dissociation is too high, evoking zone electrophoresis. With the comprehensive ITP analysis of all 20 proteinogenic amino acids as model analytes, we, here, show that non-aqueous ITP using dimethylsulfoxide as a solvent solves this ITP shortcoming. Dimethylsulfoxide changes the pH regime of analytes and electrolytes but, more importantly, strongly reduces the proton mobility by prohibiting hydrogen bonds and thus, the so-called Zundel-Eigen-Zundel electrical conduction mechanism of flipping hydrogen bonds. The effects are demonstrated in an electrolyte system with taurine or H(+) as terminator, and imidazole as leader together with strong acids such as oxalic and even trifluoroacetic acid as counterions, both impossible to use in aqueous solution. Mass spectrometric as well as capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) are used to follow the ITP processes. To demonstrate the preconcentration capabilities of ITP in a two-dimensional set-up, we, here, also demonstrate that our non-aqueous ITP method can be combined with capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry in a column-coupling system using a hybrid approach of capillaries coupled to a microfluidic interface. For this, C(4)D was optimized for on-chip detection with the electrodes aligned on top of a thin glass lid of the microfluidic chip.

  17. Ion transport properties of magnesium bromide/dimethyl sulfoxide non-aqueous liquid electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Sheha, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nonaqueous liquid electrolyte system based dimethyl sulfoxide DMSO and magnesium bromide (MgBr2) is synthesized via ‘Solvent-in-Salt’ method for the application in magnesium battery. Optimized composition of MgBr2/DMSO electrolyte exhibits high ionic conductivity of 10−2 S/cm at ambient temperature. This study discusses different concentrations from 0 to 5.4 M of magnesium salt, representing low, intermediate and high concentrations of magnesium salt which are examined in frequency dependence conductivity studies. The temperature dependent conductivity measurements have also been carried out to compute activation energy (Ea) by least square linear fitting of Arrhenius plot: ‘log σ − 1/T. The transport number of Mg2+ ion determined by means of a combination of d.c. and a.c. techniques is ∼0.7. A prototype cell was constructed using nonaqueous liquid electrolyte with Mg anode and graphite cathode. The Mg/graphite cell shows promising cycling. PMID:26843967

  18. Origin of electrochemical, structural and transport properties in non-aqueous zinc electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Sang -Don; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; ...

    2016-01-14

    Through coupled experimental analysis and computational techniques, we uncover the origin of anodic stability for a range of nonaqueous zinc electrolytes. By examination of electrochemical, structural, and transport properties of nonaqueous zinc electrolytes with varying concentrations, it is demonstrated that the acetonitrile Zn(TFSI)2, acetonitrile Zn(CF3SO3)2, and propylene carbonate Zn(TFSI)2 electrolytes can not only support highly reversible Zn deposition behavior on a Zn metal anode (≥99% of Coulombic efficiency), but also provide high anodic stability (up to ~3.8 V). The predicted anodic stability from DFT calculations is well in accordance with experimental results, and elucidates that the solvents play an importantmore » role in anodic stability of most electrolytes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to understand the solvation structure (e.g., ion solvation and ionic association) and its effect on dynamics and transport properties (e.g., diffusion coefficient and ionic conductivity) of the electrolytes. Lastly, the combination of these techniques provides unprecedented insight into the origin of the electrochemical, structural, and transport properties in nonaqueous zinc electrolytes« less

  19. Origin of electrochemical, structural and transport properties in non-aqueous zinc electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang -Don; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; Pan, Baofei; He, Meinan; Ferrandon, Magali S.; Liao, Chen; Persson, Kristin A.; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2016-01-14

    Through coupled experimental analysis and computational techniques, we uncover the origin of anodic stability for a range of nonaqueous zinc electrolytes. By examination of electrochemical, structural, and transport properties of nonaqueous zinc electrolytes with varying concentrations, it is demonstrated that the acetonitrile Zn(TFSI)2, acetonitrile Zn(CF3SO3)2, and propylene carbonate Zn(TFSI)2 electrolytes can not only support highly reversible Zn deposition behavior on a Zn metal anode (≥99% of Coulombic efficiency), but also provide high anodic stability (up to ~3.8 V). The predicted anodic stability from DFT calculations is well in accordance with experimental results, and elucidates that the solvents play an important role in anodic stability of most electrolytes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to understand the solvation structure (e.g., ion solvation and ionic association) and its effect on dynamics and transport properties (e.g., diffusion coefficient and ionic conductivity) of the electrolytes. Lastly, the combination of these techniques provides unprecedented insight into the origin of the electrochemical, structural, and transport properties in nonaqueous zinc electrolytes

  20. Evaluation of non-aqueous capillary zone electrophoresis for the determination of histamine H2 receptor antagonists in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Peñalvo, G Castañeda; Dorado, R M Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    A new non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis method is proposed for the separation and simultaneous determination of cimetidine, ranitidine, roxatidine, nizatidine and famotidine by using a 30-cm long × 75 µm i.d. fused silica capillary and UV detection at 214 nm. Using a temperature of 25°C, an applied voltage of 15 kV, and a background electrolyte consisting of methanol containing 10 mM ammonium acetate and 0.2% acetic acid allowed the analytes to be separated in less than 4 min. The limits of detection obtained ranged from 7 and 17 µg L(-1). The proposed method was successfully used to determine the analytes in pharmaceutical preparations and its results were checked against an HPLC method.

  1. Iron phthalocyanine in non-aqueous medium forming layer-by-layer films: growth mechanism, molecular architecture and applications.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Priscila; Rodríguez-Méndez, Maria Luz; De Saja Saez, Jose Antonio; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo

    2010-04-28

    The application of organic thin films as transducer elements in electronic devices has been widely exploited, with the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) technique being one of the most powerful tools to produce such films. The conventional LbL method, however, is restricted in many cases to water soluble compounds. Here, an alternative way to produce LbL films containing iron phthalocyanine (FePc) in non-aqueous media (chloroform) is presented. This film fabrication was made possible by exploiting the specific interactions between Fe and NH(2) groups from PAH, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) used as the supporting layer, leading to the formation of bilayers structured as (PAH/FePc)(n). We have also incorporated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in LbL films with (PAH/FePc/AgNP)(n) trilayers, making it possible to achieve the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon. The molecular architecture of the LbL films was determined through different techniques. The growth was monitored with UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, their morphology characterized by optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopes, and their molecular organization determined using FTIR. The electrochemical properties of the LbL films were successfully applied in detecting dopamine in KCl aqueous solutions at different concentrations using cyclic voltammetry. The results confirmed that the LbL films from FePc in non-aqueous media keep their electroactivity, while showing an interesting electrocatalytic effect. The SERS phenomenon suggested that FePc aggregates might be directly involved in the maintenance of the electroactivity of the LbL films.

  2. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2001-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  3. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2002-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  4. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Perry L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2003-06-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents is of great interest both for natural attenuation and for engineered remediation of these hazardous contaminants in groundwater. Compounds to be studied are carbon tetrachloride (CT) and the chlorinated ethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). The chlorinated solvents often are present as dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), which are difficult to remove. Biodegradation of DNAPLs was previously thought not possible because of toxicity, but recent evidence indicates that under the right conditions, biodegradation is possible. Anaerobic biodegradation of DNAPLs is the major subject of this research. The specific objectives of this multi-investigator effort are: (1) Evaluate the potential for chlorinated solvent biodegradation near DNAPLs, (2) Provide a molecular understanding of the biological mechanisms involved, (3) Determine cellular components involved in carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain KC without chloroform formation.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix 5 to Subpart A of... - Determination of Crude Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) 5 Appendix 5 to... Drilling Fluids by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) 1.0Scope and Application 1.1This method... fluids (NAFs) by comparing the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) fingerprint scan...

  6. Highly-dispersed Ta-oxide catalysts prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous plating bath for polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Cha, Dongkyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2012-09-18

    The Ta-oxide cathode catalysts were prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous solution. These catalysts showed excellent catalytic activity and have an onset potential of 0.92 V(RHE) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The highly-dispersed Ta species at the nanometer scale on the carbon black was an important contributor to the high activity.

  7. Solvating additives drive solution-mediated electrochemistry and enhance toroid growth in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aetukuri, Nagaphani B.; McCloskey, Bryan D.; García, Jeannette M.; Krupp, Leslie E.; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Luntz, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Given their high theoretical specific energy, lithium-oxygen batteries have received enormous attention as possible alternatives to current state-of-the-art rechargeable Li-ion batteries. However, the maximum discharge capacity in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries is limited to a small fraction of its theoretical value due to the build-up of insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), the battery’s primary discharge product. The discharge capacity can be increased if Li2O2 forms as large toroidal particles rather than as a thin conformal layer. Here, we show that trace amounts of electrolyte additives, such as H2O, enhance the formation of Li2O2 toroids and result in significant improvements in capacity. Our experimental observations and a growth model show that the solvating properties of the additives prompt a solution-based mechanism that is responsible for the growth of Li2O2 toroids. We present a general formalism describing an additive’s tendency to trigger the solution process, providing a rational design route for electrolytes that afford larger lithium-oxygen battery capacities.

  8. Non-aqueous carbon black suspensions for lithium-based redox flow batteries: rheology and simultaneous rheo-electrical behavior.

    PubMed

    Youssry, Mohamed; Madec, Lénaïc; Soudan, Patrick; Cerbelaud, Manuella; Guyomard, Dominique; Lestriez, Bernard

    2013-09-14

    We report on the rheological and electrical properties of non-aqueous carbon black (CB) suspensions at equilibrium and under steady shear flow. The smaller the primary particle size of carbon black is, the higher the magnitude of rheological parameters and the conductivity are. The electrical percolation threshold ranges seem to coincide with the strong gel rather than the weak gel rheological threshold ones. The simultaneous measurements of electrical properties under shear flow reveal the well-known breaking-and-reforming mechanism that characterises such complex fluids. The small shear rate breaks up the network into smaller agglomerates, which in turn transform into anisometric eroded ones at very high shear rates, recovering the network conductivity. The type of carbon black, its concentration range and the flow rate range are now precisely identified for optimizing the performance of a redox flow battery. A preliminary electrochemical study for a composite anolyte (CB/Li4Ti5O12) at different charge-discharge rates and thicknesses is shown.

  9. Key scientific challenges in current rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Mahesh Datt; Geaney, Hugh; Nolan, Michael; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-06-28

    Rechargeable Li-air (henceforth referred to as Li-O2) batteries provide theoretical capacities that are ten times higher than that of current Li-ion batteries, which could enable the driving range of an electric vehicle to be comparable to that of gasoline vehicles. These high energy densities in Li-O2 batteries result from the atypical battery architecture which consists of an air (O2) cathode and a pure lithium metal anode. However, hurdles to their widespread use abound with issues at the cathode (relating to electrocatalysis and cathode decomposition), lithium metal anode (high reactivity towards moisture) and due to electrolyte decomposition. This review focuses on the key scientific challenges in the development of rechargeable non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries from both experimental and theoretical findings. This dual approach allows insight into future research directions to be provided and highlights the importance of combining theoretical and experimental approaches in the optimization of Li-O2 battery systems.

  10. Novel Flower-like Nickel Sulfide as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Non-aqueous Lithium-Air Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong; Yuan, Xianxia; Zhang, Zhenlin; Mei, Delong; Li, Lin; Ma, Zi-Feng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, metal sulfide materials have been explored for the first time as a new choice of bifunctional cathode electrocatalyst materials for non-aqueous lithium-air batteries (LABs). Nickel sulfides with two different morphologies of flower-like (f-NiS) and rod-like (r-NiS) are successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal method with and without the assistance of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide. As LAB cathode catalysts, both f-NiS and r-NiS demonstrate excellent catalytic activities towards the formation and decomposition of Li2O2, resulting in improved specific capacity, reduced overpotentials and enhanced cycling performance when compared to those of pure Super P based electrode. Moreover, the morphology of NiS materials can greatly affect LAB performance. Particularly, the f-NiS is more favorable than r-NiS in terms of their application in LABs. When compared to both r-NiS and pure super P materials as LAB cathode materials, this f-NiS catalyst material can give the highest capacity of 6733 mA h g−1 and the lowest charge voltage of 4.24 V at the current density of 75 mA g−1 and also exhibit an quite stable cycling performance. PMID:26658833

  11. Carbon coated nano-LiTi2(PO4)3 electrodes for non-aqueous hybrid supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, V; Chuiling, W; Reddy, M V; Rao, G V Subba; Chowdari, B V R; Madhavi, S

    2012-04-28

    The Pechini type polymerizable complex decomposition method is employed to prepare LiTi(2)(PO(4))(3) at 1000 °C in air. High energy ball milling followed by carbon coating by the glucose-method yielded C-coated nano-LiTi(2)(PO(4))(3) (LTP) with a crystallite size of 80(±5) nm. The phase is characterized by X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, thermogravimetry, SEM, HR-TEM and Raman spectra. Lithium cycling properties of LTP show that 1.75 moles of Li (~121 mA h g(-1) at 15 mA g(-1) current) per formula unit can be reversibly cycled between 2 and 3.4 V vs. Li with 83% capacity retention after 70 cycles. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) reveal the two-phase reaction mechanism during Li insertion/extraction. A hybrid electrochemical supercapacitor (HEC) with LTP as negative electrode and activated carbon (AC) as positive electrode in non-aqueous electrolyte is studied by CV at various scan rates and by galvanostatic cycling at various current rates up to 1000 cycles in the range 0-3 V. Results show that the HEC delivers a maximum energy density of 14 W h kg(-1) and a power density of 180 W kg(-1).

  12. Tracer test for the measurement of gas diffusion and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation in soil.

    PubMed

    Van De Steene, Joke; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    During soil bioremediation, the diffusion of oxygen into the soil is an important prerequisite for aerobic biodegradation, and the decrease of petroleum products is the ultimate goal. Both processes need to be monitored. The aim of this work was to develop a gas tracer test that yields information on both, gas diffusion and residual saturation with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unsaturated soil heaps. One conservative tracer (methane) and 4 partitioning gas tracers (diethylether, methyl tert-butyl ether, chloroform and n-heptane) were injected as vapors into laboratory columns filled with unsaturated sand with increasing NAPL saturation. Breakthrough curves of gaseous compounds were measured at two points and compared to analytical solutions of an analytical diffusive-reactive transport equation. By fitting of methane data, robust results for effective diffusivity (tortuosity) were obtained. NAPL saturation was most accurately measured by the moderately water soluble tracers (ethers and chloroform). The hydrophobic tracer n-heptane did not partition into water-immersed NAPL. An easy and accurate way to assess air-NAPL partitioning constants from gas chromatography retention times is furthermore reported. It is concluded that gas tracer tests have the potential for measuring two important properties in soil bioremediation systems easily and quickly.

  13. Effect of water content in perchloric acid on the non-aqueous potentiometric titration of nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Qi, X S; Miller, R B; Namiki, Y; Zhang, J; Jacobus, R

    1997-11-01

    In the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), 0.1 N perchloric acid in acetic acid volumetric solution (hereafter HClO4 VS) used for non-aqueous titration has specified a water content between 0.02 and 0.05%. Preparing this titrant with such a narrow range of water content is very time consuming, precludes the use of commercially available titrants, and, consequently, prompted an investigation to try and expand the range up to 0.5%. In this study, the titrimetric results obtained using HClO4 VS containing more water were very close to those obtained using the USP specified titrants. A maximum assay difference of 0.7% in the titrations of three selected nitrogen-containing compounds, clonidine hydrochloride, dipyridamole, and adenosine were observed. The titrimetric results obtained using these titrants were also precise with RSDs of not more than 0.4%. Therefore, a wider range of water content in HClO4 VS between 0.02 and 0.5% is suggested for the USP potentiometric titration of nitrogen-containing compounds.

  14. Solvents and supporting electrolytes for vanadium acetylacetonate flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkle, Aaron A.; Pomaville, Timothy J.; Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Thompson, Levi T.; Monroe, Charles W.

    2014-02-01

    Properties of supporting electrolytes and solvents were examined for use with vanadium acetylacetonate - a member of the class of metal(β-diketonate) active species - in non-aqueous redox flow batteries. Twenty supporting-electrolyte/solvent combinations were screened for ionic conductivity and supporting-electrolyte solubility. Hexane, tetrahydrofuran, and dimethylcarbonate solvents did not meet minimal conductivity and solubility criteria for any of the electrolytes used, which included tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, and (1-butyl, 3-methyl)imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. Ionic conductivities and solubilities for solutions of these electrolytes passed screening criteria in acetonitrile and dimethylformamide solvents, in which maximum supporting-electrolyte and active-species solubilities were determined. Active-species electrochemistry was found to be reversible in several solvent/support systems; for some systems the voltammetric signatures of unwanted side reactions were suppressed. Correlations between supporting-solution properties and performance metrics suggest that an optimal solvent for a vanadium acetylacetonate RFB should have a low solvent molar volume for active-species solubility, and a high Hansen polarity for conductivity.

  15. Refinement of the Kansas City Plant site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Hall, S.C.; Baker, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents a refinement of the site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP). This refinement was prompted by a review of the literature and the results of a limited study that was conducted to evaluate whether pools of DNAPL were present in contaminated locations at the KCP. The field study relied on the micropurge method of sample collection. This method has been demonstrated as a successful approach for obtaining discrete samples within a limited aquifer zone. Samples were collected at five locations across 5-ft well screens located at the base of the alluvial aquifer at the KCP. The hypothesis was that if pools of DNAPL were present, the dissolved concentration would increase with depth. Four wells with highly contaminated groundwater were selected for the test. Three of the wells were located in areas where DNAPL was suspected, and one where no DNAPL was believed to be present. The results demonstrated no discernible pattern with depth for the four wells tested. A review of the data in light of the available technical literature suggests that the fine-grained nature of the aquifer materials precludes the formation of pools. Instead, DNAPL is trapped as discontinuous ganglia that are probably widespread throughout the aquifer. The discontinuous nature of the DNAPL distribution prevents the collection of groundwater samples with concentrations approaching saturation. Furthermore, the results indicate that attempts to remediate the aquifer with conventional approaches will not result in restoration to pristine conditions because the tortuous groundwater flow paths will inhibit the efficiency of fluid-flow-based treatments.

  16. Effect of Humic Acid on Migration, Distribution and Remediation of Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: A laboratory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z.; Wu, J.; Xu, H.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decades, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) contamination in the subsurface increases with the rapid development of oil industry and becomes the focus of many studies. The migration, distribution and remediation efficiency of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment are greatly affected by the solution chemistry besides the physical heterogeneities of aquifers. Humic acid (HA), which is ubiquitous in natural environments, is a surface active substance exhibiting solubility enhancement behavior for hydrophobic organic compounds such as DNAPLs. Here we reported a laboratory investigation to study the effects of HA on the infiltration, immobilization and subsequent recovery of DNAPL in porous media. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was selected as the representative DNAPL in this study. Two-dimensional (2-D) sandbox experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different HA concentrations on the transport, distribution of PCE and the remediation of PCE using surfactant (Tween 80) flushing in a saturated porous media system. The surfactant flushing of PCE was performed after the PCE transport and distribution had reached equilibrium. A light transmission visualization method with charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was adopted to visualize PCE distribution and quantify its saturation. In addition, the experiments were also designed to gather data for the validation of multiphase flow models. Effluent samples were collected to determine dissolved PCE concentrations. PCE solubilization and PCE-water interfacial tension were experimentally determined in aqueous solutions of varying HA concentrations. The experimental results showed that the presence of HA can have a dramatic impact on PCE flow and entrapment, and significantly improved the recovery of PCE during surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). The findings are of use for better understanding of the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs and developing of SEAR technology.

  17. Partitioning of non-ionic surfactants between water and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) of chlorinated organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KANG, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the hydrophobic nature, chlorinated organic compounds penetrate soil and groundwater to form non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). At the sites contaminated with such NAPLs, thus, surfactants are applied to increase the aqueous solubility of chlorinated organics via micellar solubilization. However, a portion of surfactants can be partitioned into NAPL phases by forming reverse micelles within them. Consequently, lesser amounts of surfactants are available for the micellar solubilization of chlorinated organics in the aqueous phase. In this study, we investigated the partitioning behavior of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 80, and Triton X-100) between water and a NAPL phase consisting of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), or chloroform (CF). According to the experimental results, the partitioning of surfactants in the water-NAPL systems was found to follow linear or Langmuir-type isotherms. Regardless of type of surfactants, the partitioning loss of surfactants into NAPLs became greater with the more hydrophilic (i.e., the lower water-NAPL interfacial tension) chlorinated organics: PCE < TCE < CF. Notably, the partitioning of all Tween surfactants into the NAPLs consisting of the least hydrophilic PCE was minimal. The partitioning behavior among different surfactants was somewhat complicated. The partitioning extent into CF-NAPLs increased in the order of Tween 20 < Tween 40 < Tween 80 << Triton X-100, suggesting that the greater partitioning occurred with the more hydrophobic (i.e., the lower hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, HLB) surfactant. Consistent with this postulation, the surfactant partitioning into PCE-NAPLs showed the similar trend. In case of TCE-NAPLs, however, the more hydrophobic Tween 40 was partitioned to a less extent than Tween 20. Therefore, the specific interaction of a NAPL-surfactant pair as well as their individual properties should be considered when selecting an effective surfactant for the remediation

  18. Ultrasound assisted Bradsher reaction in aqueous and non-aqueous media: First use of ultrasounds in electrophilic aromatic cyclisation leading to polyacenes.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Emilia; Bałczewski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The present work describes the first use of ultrasounds in the Bradsher cyclisation of activated and non-activated ortho-formyl diarylmethanes. This reaction is also the first example of electrophilic, aromatic cyclisation assisted by ultrasounds which leads to pure polycyclic, fused aromatic hydrocarbons containing 3 and 4 fused rings in excellent yields. The reaction proceeds not only in aqueous but also in non-aqueous media at milder conditions (room temperature) and in much shorter reaction times than in conventional protocols.

  19. Anion exchange membrane prepared from simultaneous polymerization and quaternization of 4-vinyl pyridine for non-aqueous vanadium redox flow battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Sandip; Shin, Sung-Hee; Sung, Ki-Won; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2014-06-01

    A simple, single step and environmentally friendly process is developed for the synthesis of anion exchange membrane (AEM) by simultaneous polymerization and quaternization, unlike the conventional membrane synthesis which consists of separate polymerization and quaternization step. The membrane synthesis is carried out by dissolving polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in cyclohexanone along with 4-vinyl pyridine (4VP) and 1,4-dibromobutane (DBB) in the presence of thermal initiator benzoyl peroxide, followed by film casting to get thin and flexible AEMs. The membrane properties such as ion exchange capacity, ionic conductivity and swelling behaviour are tuned by varying the degree of crosslinking. These AEMs exhibit low vanadium permeability, while retaining good dimensional and chemical stability in an electrolyte solution, making them appropriate candidates for non-aqueous vanadium acetylacetonate redox flow battery (VRFB) applications. The optimized membrane displays ion exchange capacity and ionic conductivity of 2.0 mequiv g-1 and 0.105 mS cm-1, respectively, whereas the efficiency of 91.7%, 95.7% and 87.7% for coulombic, voltage and energy parameter in non-aqueous VRFB, respectively. This study reveals that the non-aqueous VRFB performance is greatly influenced by membrane properties; therefore the optimal control over the membrane properties is advantageous for the improved performance.

  20. Mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Deligiannis, Fotios (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention comprises an improved electrolyte for secondary lithium-based cells as well as batteries fabricated using this electrolyte. The electrolyte is a lithium containing salt dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent, which is made from a mixture of ethylene carbonate, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, 2-methylfuran, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. This improved, mixed solvent electrolyte is more conductive than prior electrolytes and much less corrosive to lithium anodes. Batteries constructed with this improved electrolyte utilize lithium or lithium alloy anodes and cathodes made of metal chalcogenides or oxides, such as TiS.sub.2, NbSe.sub.3, V.sub.6 O.sub.13, V.sub.2 O.sub.5, MoS.sub.2, MoS.sub.3, CoO.sub.2, or CrO.sub.2, dissolved in a supporting polymer matrix, like EPDM. The preferred non-aqueous solvent mixture comprises approximately 5 to 30 volume percent ethylene carbonate, approximately 0.01 to 0.1 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and approximately 0.2 to 2 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The most preferred solvent comprises approximately 10 to 20 volume percent ethylene carbonate, about 0.05 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and about 1.0 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The concentration of lithium arsenic hexafluoride can range from about 1.0 to 1.8 M; a concentration 1.5 M is most preferred. Secondary batteries made with the improved electrolyte of this invention have lower internal impedance, longer cycle life, higher energy density, low self-discharge, and longer shelf life.

  1. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  2. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  3. Photoluminescent properties of Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphors prepared via urea precipitation in non-aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yu; Qi, Jason L.; Lee, M.; Lee, Burtrand I.; Samuels, William D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2004-08-01

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide phosphors were prepared by firing precursors obtained by urea solvothermal method. The nature of solvents plays an important role in determining the structure and chemical composition of the precursor compounds. Amorphous hydroxides/carbonates mixture, amorphous carbonates and crystalline carbonates were obtained by urea solvothermal reactions from ethylenediamine, ethanol and aqueous media, respectively. The morphology and particle size distribution of the phosphor particles were studied by SEM and dynamic laser scattering method. The photoluminescence of the phosphor prepared by urea solvothermal method is improved as compared with that of the phosphor obtained by conventional urea homogeneous precipitation method. Urea solvothermal method provides a possible way to tailor the properties of a variety of carbonates and oxides by exploiting the nature of different solvents.

  4. Synthesis and studies of boron based anion receptors and their use in non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Yang, X.Q.; Lee, H.S.; McBreen, J.; Choi, L.S.

    1998-12-31

    A new family of anion receptors based on boron compounds has been synthesized. These compounds can be used as anion receptors in lithium battery electrolytes and can greatly increase solubility and ionic conductivities of various lithium salts, such as LiF, LiCl, CF{sub 3}COOLi and C{sub 2}F{sub 5}COOLi, in DME solutions. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies show that Cl{sup {minus}} anions of LiCl are complexed with these compounds in DME solutions. The electrochemical stability of lithium salts and one of the boron compounds in deferent solvents was studied. For the first time, LiF has been successfully used as conducting salt in a novel electrolyte with this boron compound as an additive in DME. A rechargeable Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell using this electrolyte was successfully cycled 51 times. However, the capacity fades with cycling due to decomposition of the solvent. The cycling performance of the battery was greatly improved by replacing DME with PC-EC-DMC as the solvent.

  5. Stoddard solvent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    These products contain Stoddard solvent: Dry cleaning fluids Paints Paint thinner Stoddard solvent ( mineral spirits ) Toners used in copy machines This list may not include all products containing Stoddard solvent.

  6. Towards a generalized iso-density continuum model for molecular solvents in plane-wave DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunceler, Deniz; Arias, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Implicit electron-density solvation models offer a computationally efficient solution to the problem of calculating thermodynamic quantities of solvated systems from first-principles quantum mechanics. However, despite much recent interest in such models, to date the applicability of such models in the plane-wave context to non-aqueous solvents has been limited because the determination of the model parameters requires fitting to a large database of experimental solvation energies for each new solvent considered. This work presents a simple approach to quickly find approximations to the non-electrostatic contributions to the solvation energy, allowing for development of new iso-density models for a large class of protic and aprotic solvents from only simple, single-molecule ab initio calculations and readily available bulk thermodynamic data. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of the resulting theory, we also calculate the surface solvation energies of crystalline LiF in various different non-aqueous solvents, and discuss the observed trends and their relevance to lithium battery technology.

  7. Formation of residual non-aqueous phase liquid in a water-wet system: Investigation by bulk electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, L. M.; Das, N.

    2011-12-01

    Managing contaminated sites can be expensive, but multi-phase models can be an effective tool to predict the subsurface behavior of contaminants and help reduce associated costs. One of the major deficiencies of such models is the prediction of the amount of residual non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). In order to accurately predict the behavior of residual NAPL, it is important to understand the formation of residual NAPL. The presence of residual NAPL in the vadose zone has been demonstrated by many researchers, but the conditions under which residual NAPL is formed are poorly understood. Traditionally permeability-saturation pressure (k-s-p) relations have been used to demonstrate the formation of residual NAPL. We used electrical conductivity to investigate the process of formation of residual NAPL. Experiments were conducted in a teflon jar (diameter=106.9mm and height= 64.8mm) packed as uniformly as possible with a washed, oven-dried soil sample. The soil was washed with distilled, deionized water to reduce any dissolved salt, so that the soil salinity was consistent. A Wenner array was adapted to a round cell with four neighboring stainless steel electrodes were installed into the cell wall with equal spacing. The cell has two porous cups connected; one is saturated with water and another with Oleic acid. Soil resistance measurements were made with a model 1625 Fluke Earth/Ground Tester. The system was initially water wet, drained to the irreducible water content and then NAPL was introduced to the system using peristaltic pump until the desired NAPL saturation was reached. Once equilibrium was reached, NAPL was drained 5-10 ml at a time and the pressure head was measured. Once the NAPL reached irreducible level, i.e. no NAPL would come out of the system when drainage was unrestricted; water was again imbibed into the system. For each step of fluid imbibition and drainage resistivity values were recorded. During the first few increments of oil imbibition

  8. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  9. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  10. Novel composite membrane coated with a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/urushi semi-interpenetrating polymer network for non-aqueous redox flow battery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunhae; Won, Jongok

    2016-12-01

    Novel composite membranes of a semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) coated on the surfaces of a porous Celgard 2400 support are prepared and investigate for application in a non-aqueous redox flow battery (RFB). A natural polymer, urushi, is used for the matrix because of its high mechanical robustness, and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) provides anionic exchange sites. The PDDA/urushi (P/U) semi-IPN film is prepared by the photo polymerization of urushiol in the presence of PDDA. The thin layer composed of the P/U semi-IPN on the porous support provides selectivity while maintaining the ion conductivity. The coulombic and energy efficiencies increase with increasing amounts of PDDA in the P/U semi-IPN layer, and the values reach 69.5% and 42.5%, respectively, for the one containing 40 wt% of PDDA. These values are substantially higher than those of the Neosepta AHA membrane and the Celgard membrane, indicating that the selective layer reduces the crossover of the redox active species through the membrane. This result implies that the formation of composite membranes using semi-IPN selective layers on the dimensionally stable porous membrane enable the successful use of a non-aqueous RFB for future energy storage systems.

  11. Ag nanoparticles-anchored reduced graphene oxide catalyst for oxygen electrode reaction in aqueous electrolytes and also a non-aqueous electrolyte for Li-O2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surender; Selvaraj, C; Scanlon, L G; Munichandraiah, N

    2014-11-07

    Silver nanoparticles-anchored reduced graphene oxide (Ag-RGO) is prepared by simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide and Ag(+) ions in an aqueous medium by ethylene glycol as the reducing agent. Ag particles of average size of 4.7 nm were uniformly distributed on the RGO sheets. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is studied on Ag-RGO catalyst in both aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes by using cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode techniques. As the interest in non-aqueous electrolyte is to study the catalytic performance of Ag-RGO for rechargeable Li-O2 cells, these cells are assembled and characterized. Li-O2 cells with Ag-RGO as the oxygen electrode catalyst are subjected to charge-discharge cycling at several current densities. A discharge capacity of 11 950 mA h g(-1) (11.29 mA h cm(-2)) is obtained initially at low current density. Although there is a decrease in the capacity on repeated discharge-charge cycling initially, a stable capacity is observed for about 30 cycles. The results indicate that Ag-RGO is a suitable catalyst for rechargeable Li-O2 cells.

  12. A comparative study on the solubility and stability of p-phenylenediamine-based organic redox couples for non-aqueous flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-seung; Lee, Keon-Joon; Han, Young-Kyu; Ryu, Ji Heon; Oh, Seung M.

    2017-04-01

    A methyl-substituted p-phenylenediamine (PD), N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), is examined as a positive redox couple with high energy density for non-aqueous Li-flow batteries. Methyl substitution affects the solubility of the redox couple, as the solubility is increased by a factor of ten, to a maximum solubility of 5.0 M in 1.0 M lithium tetrafluoroborate-propylene carbonate supporting electrolyte due to elimination of the hydrogen bonding between the solute molecules. The methyl substitution also enhances the chemical stability of the cation radical and di-cation being generated from PD, as the redox center is shielded by the methyl groups. Furthermore, this organic redox couple demonstrate two-electron redox reactions at 3.2 and 3.8 V (vs. Li/Li+); therefore, the volumetric capacity is twice higher compared to conventional one-electron involved redox couples. In a non-flowing Li/TMPD coin-cell, this organic redox couple demonstrates very stable cycleability as a positive redox couple for non-aqueous flow batteries.

  13. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; ...

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore » 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  14. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  15. Fractionation of cell-wall preparations from grass leaves by centrifuging in non-aqueous density gradients.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A H; Bacon, J S

    1981-03-01

    1. Dried preparations of cell walls from perennial-ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and Italian-ryegrass (L. multiflorum) leaves were suspended in mixtures of carbon tetrachloride with light-petroleum (b.p. 45--50 degrees C) or alcohols and layered on density gradients formed from the same solvents. 2. On centrifugation, the cell walls become distributed throughout a suitably chosen gradient. Fractions corresponding to various regions of the gradient were separated, examined under the microscope and analysed. 3. Cell-wall preparations made from leaf material ground in liquid N2, or in a triple roll mill, showed considerable heterogeneity in particle size, and their behaviour in the density gradient was variable, although there was a general indication that walls derived from vascular bundles were less dense than those from sclerenchyma. 4 Treatment in a vibratory ball mill decreased the size of the particles and produced a more uniform material, but made it impossible to distinguish the origins of the particles. This material behaved more reproducibly in the density gradient. 5. Some fractionations were also made by successive centrifugation in media of increasing relative density. 6. Analyses of the fractions obtained by each method indicated that the less dense had a greater proportion of xylose in the polysaccharide components, and higher contents of acetyl groups and lignin, confirming the close relationship between these components in plant cell walls. 7. The results show that there are differences in polysaccharide composition between the cell-wall types in the grass leaf, the vascular tissue being richer in hemicellulose relative to cellulose than the sclerenchyma.

  16. Solvents in novolak synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobodacha, Chet J.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Durham, Dana L.; Paradis, Valerie R.

    1993-09-01

    Novolac resins may be prepared with or without a solvent present. We have found that solvent power greatly affects the properties of the finished resin and thus gives the resist chemist another variable with which to `fine-tune' resist properties. Using designed experiments, we investigated the effect of solvent power, as measured by Hansen's Solubility Parameters, of a number of solvents and solvent mixtures on the final properties of the novolac resin. We found that the relative molecular weight (RMW) and dissolution rate of a novolac resin can be varied by selection of a solvent or solvent mixture with the appropriate polarity and hydrogen- bonding characteristics. The solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics may affect the stability of the cresol/formaldehyde transition state, thus causing the observed changes in RMW and dissolution rate.

  17. Laboratory characterization of non-aqueous phase liquid/tracer interaction in support of a vadose zone partitioning interwell tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Neil E.; McKinney, Daene C.; Pope, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant characterization is important for successful remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the unsaturated zone. A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) can provide a good estimate of average subsurface NAPL saturations. Screening experiments were completed in the laboratory to evaluate several gas tracers for a PITT study to be completed in the vadose zone at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, NM. Four perfluorocarbon tracers were found to be suitable for this PITT. Further laboratory column studies were completed using contaminated field soil to measure the partition coefficients between the tracers and the NAPL. The results from the column studies showed that the air/NAPL tracer partition coefficients ranged from 8.8±0.6 to 71±3. This range of partition coefficients is suitable for detection of NAPL saturations in the field of 0.002 to 0.14.

  18. Evaluating transformational solvent systems for post-combustion CO2 separations

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Mathias, Paul M.; Cantu Cantu, David; Rousseau, Roger J.; Malhotra, Deepika; Bhakta, Mukund; Bearden, Mark D.; Freeman, Charles J.; Zheng, Feng

    2014-01-06

    Broad research is underway on developing transformational solvents that can capture of CO2 from flue gas with lower energy compared to aqueous amines. Water-lean, or non-aqueous, solvents are being considered as a class of transformational solvents due to the prospect of lower energy duties by not having to heat and condense water. To date, little is known about the real world performance of water-lean solvent systems compared to commercial aqueous amine technologies, and whether or not they can utilize existing or at least similar processing infrastructure. This paper provides the key results from a comprehensive three-year study of the water-lean CO2-Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOL) solvent platform coupled with Polarity-Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). We present here thermodynamic, kinetic, and bench-scale data, followed by Aspen Plus projections of full-scale process performance for three CO2BOL/PSAR cases. This paper also provides discussions on materials performance and identifies viscosity as a critical property that most greatly limits the viability of water-lean solvent platforms. We provide results from a new effort spanning molecular modeling and synthesis and experimental testing to decipher the critical material properties needed to address this challenge. We conclude with implications for development of other water-lean solvent systems

  19. Enhanced production and organic solvent stability of a protease fromBrevibacillus laterosporus strain PAP04

    PubMed Central

    Anbu, P.

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain (PAP04) isolated from cattle farm soil was shown to produce an extracellular, solvent-stable protease. Sequence analysis using 16S rRNA showed that this strain was highly homologous (99%) to Brevibacillus laterosporus. Growth conditions that optimize protease production in this strain were determined as maltose (carbon source), skim milk (nitrogen source), pH 7.0, 40°C temperature, and 48 h incubation. Overall, conditions were optimized to yield a 5.91-fold higher production of protease compared to standard conditions. Furthermore, the stability of the enzyme in organic solvents was assessed by incubation for 2 weeks in solutions containing 50% concentration of various organic solvents. The enzyme retained activity in all tested solvents except ethanol; however, the protease activity was stimulated in benzene (74%) followed by acetone (63%) and chloroform (54.8%). In addition, the plate assay and zymography results also confirmed the stability of the PAP04 protease in various organic solvents. The organic solvent stability of this protease at high (50%) concentrations of solvents makes it an alternative catalyst for peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:27007657

  20. Enhanced production and organic solvent stability of a protease from Brevibacillus laterosporus strain PAP04.

    PubMed

    Anbu, P

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain (PAP04) isolated from cattle farm soil was shown to produce an extracellular, solvent-stable protease. Sequence analysis using 16S rRNA showed that this strain was highly homologous (99%) to Brevibacillus laterosporus. Growth conditions that optimize protease production in this strain were determined as maltose (carbon source), skim milk (nitrogen source), pH 7.0, 40°C temperature, and 48 h incubation. Overall, conditions were optimized to yield a 5.91-fold higher production of protease compared to standard conditions. Furthermore, the stability of the enzyme in organic solvents was assessed by incubation for 2 weeks in solutions containing 50% concentration of various organic solvents. The enzyme retained activity in all tested solvents except ethanol; however, the protease activity was stimulated in benzene (74%) followed by acetone (63%) and chloroform (54.8%). In addition, the plate assay and zymography results also confirmed the stability of the PAP04 protease in various organic solvents. The organic solvent stability of this protease at high (50%) concentrations of solvents makes it an alternative catalyst for peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  1. Solvent Recycling for Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    alternatives to solvent cleaning. Typical equipment types that can be effectively cleaned with recycled solvents include spray guns paint hoses pumps...in place of solvent-based coatings; or equipment changes, such as the use of airless or HVLP systems to reduce paint consumption and overspray...Using mechanical cleaning methods instead of solvent cleaning Change from conventional painting to solventless processes such as thermal spray or powder

  2. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  3. Comparative evaluation of the chiral recognition potential of single-isomer sulfated beta-cyclodextrin synthesis intermediates in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fejős, Ida; Varga, Erzsébet; Benkovics, Gábor; Darcsi, András; Malanga, Milo; Fenyvesi, Éva; Sohajda, Tamás; Szente, Lajos; Béni, Szabolcs

    2016-10-07

    The enantioselectivity of neutral single-isomer synthetic precursors of sulfated-β-cyclodextrins was studied. Four neutral single-isomer cyclodextrins substituted on the secondary side with acetyl and/or methyl functional groups, heptakis(2-O-methyl-3,6-dihydroxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HM-β-CD), heptakis(2,3-di-O-acetyl-6-hydroxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HDA-β-CD), heptakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-hydroxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HDM-β-CD), heptakis(2-O-methyl-3-O-acetyl-6-hydroxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HMA-β-CD), and their sulfated analogs the negatively charged heptakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-sulfato)-β-cyclodextrin (HDMS-β-CD) and heptakis(2,3-di-O-acetyl-6-sulfato)-β-cyclodextrin (HDAS-β-CD) were investigated by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis in the view of enantiodiscrimination for various drugs and related pharmaceutical compounds. The focus of the present work was on the chiral selectivity studies of the neutral derivatives, which are the synthesis intermediates of the sulfated products. The chiral recognition experiments proved that among the neutral compounds the HMA-β-CD shows remarkable enantioselectivity towards chiral guests in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis, while HM-β-CD, HDA-β-CD and HDM-β-CD failed to resolve any of the 25 studied racemates under the applied experimental conditions. In order to get deeper insight into the molecular interactions between the studied single-isomer cyclodextrin and chiral fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin, gatifloxacin and lomefloxacin) and β-blockers (propranolol), (1)H and ROESY NMR experiments were performed. The 2-O-methylation in combination with the 3-O-acetylation of the host was evidenced to exclusively carry the essential spatial arrangement for chiral recognition.

  4. A new method for producing highly concentrated non-aqueous dispersions of silver nanoparticles and the evaluation of their bactericidal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da S. Oliveira, Roselaine; Bizeto, Marcos A.; Liberatore, Ana M. A.; Koh, Ivan H. J.; Camilo, Fernanda F.

    2014-11-01

    Different preparation methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are well described in the literature, most of them in aqueous medium. Aqueous dispersions of AgNP normally have a limited capacity to tolerate high nanosilver concentrations. However, AgNP production in non-aqueous medium is still scarce although its exploitation for example, as coating for hydrophobic surfaces, would be of a huge importance in many technological applications. In this work, we report the chemical preparation of highly concentrated non-aqueous AgNP dispersions obtained by reduction of silver cation, from two distinct salt sources (AgNO3 and AgBF4), by 1-butanol in the presence of a biocompatible poly(ether-block-amide) copolymer, named PEBA. The highest concentration reached was around 5 mM, when it used AgBF4 as silver source and 4 % (w/w) of a PEBA solution in 1-butanol. This AgNP concentration is notably higher than the values reported in aqueous medium. The AgNP formation was attested by UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis, which showed the characteristic strong plasmon band at 420 nm. The X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of a crystalline fcc silver metallic phase with particle diameters ranging from 5 to 10 nm accordingly to transmission electron microscopy examination. It was also observed that the AgNP dimensions are dependent on the PEBA and silver salt concentrations. The AgNP dispersions presented a very high antimicrobial activity against E. coli and S. aureus microorganisms, even in low concentration, attested by the Kirby-Bauer method.

  5. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  6. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  7. Activity and conformation of lysozyme in molecular solvents, protic ionic liquids (PILs) and salt-water systems.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Emmy C; Separovic, Frances; Drummond, Calum J; Greaves, Tamar L

    2016-09-21

    Improving protein stabilisation is important for the further development of many applications in the pharmaceutical, specialty chemical, consumer product and agricultural sectors. However, protein stabilization is highly dependent on the solvent environment and, hence, it is very complex to tailor protein-solvent combinations for stable protein maintenance. Understanding solvent features that govern protein stabilization will enable selection or design of suitable media with favourable solution environments to retain protein native conformation. In this work the structural conformation and activity of lysozyme in 29 solvent systems were investigated to determine the role of various solvent features on the stability of the enzyme. The solvent systems consisted of 19 low molecular weight polar solvents and 4 protic ionic liquids (PILs), both at different water content levels, and 6 aqueous salt solutions. Small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the tertiary and secondary structure of lysozyme along with the corresponding activity in various solvation systems. At low non-aqueous solvent concentrations (high water content), the presence of solvents and salts generally maintained lysozyme in its native structure and enhanced its activity. Due to the presence of a net surface charge on lysozyme, electrostatic interactions in PIL-water systems and salt solutions enhanced lysozyme activity more than the specific hydrogen-bond interactions present in non-ionic molecular solvents. At higher solvent concentrations (lower water content), solvents with a propensity to exhibit the solvophobic effect, analogous to the hydrophobic effect in water, retained lysozyme native conformation and activity. This solvophobic effect was observed particularly for solvents which contained hydroxyl moieties. Preferential solvophobic effects along with bulky chemical structures were postulated to result in less

  8. Determination of beef tallow in lard through a multidimensional off-line non-aqueous reversed phase-argentation LC method coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Paola; Kumm, Tiina; Fazio, Alessia; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2006-03-01

    The presence of tallow in lard is not easy to determine, due to the similarity of the composition of these two animal fats, which differ mainly in the distribution of fatty acids (FA) in the three positions of the glycerol molecule. The determination of the composition of the triacylglycerol (TAG) fraction of lard, tallow, and their mixtures was investigated by HPLC in combination with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The presence of tallow in lard was determined through the study of the sn-POP/sn-PPO ratio by multidimensional HPLC. The off-line bidimensional system was attained through the coupling of non-aqueous reversed phase (NARP)-HPLC and silver ion (Ag)-HPLC. The primary column eluate was fractionated and the fraction containing POP/PPO isomers was injected onto the secondary column, allowing the separation of positional isomers, unresolved in the first dimension. Peak assignment was carried out by combining retention data with APCI-MS spectral information. The fatty acid distribution along the glycerol backbone, determined by Ag-HPLC, was confirmed through diglyceride ion ratios derived from APCI-MS analysis. Method validation was carried out in preliminary applications on standard TAGs. The analytical results obtained show that even a 5% addition of tallow to lard modifies the distribution of positional isomers.

  9. A method for simultaneous analysis of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detector.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2014-05-02

    While numerous analytical methods for phytosterols have been reported, the similar polarity and large molecules of phytosterol esters have made the methods lengthy and complicated. For this reason, an analytical method that could completely separate phytosterol esters including the higher fatty acids such as palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid in addition to phytosterols without preliminary separation was developed. The separation was accomplished by non-aqueous reversed phase chromatography technique using only acetone and acetonitrile. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry detector configured at selected ion monitoring mode was hyphenated with the separation system to detect phytosterols and phytosterol esters. Twenty-four types of these were consequently separated and then identified with their authentic components. The calibration curve was drawn in the range of about 5 to 25,000 ng/mL with a regression coefficient over 0.999. The limit of detection and limit of quantification, respectively, ranged from 0.9 to 3.0 ng/mL and from 3.0 to 11.0 ng/mL. Recovery rates ranged from 80 to 120%. The quantification results were subjected to statistical analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis, and were used to determine the differences in the amounts of phytosterols and phytosterol esters across tobacco leaves. The newly developed method succeeded in clarifying the whole composition of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves and in explaining compositional differences across the variety of tobacco leaves.

  10. A Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell Consisting of a Cadmium Sulfide Photoanode and a Ruthenium-2,2'-Bipyridine Redox Shuttle in a Non-aqueous Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kageshima, Yosuke; Kumagai, Hiromu; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-06-26

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell consisting of an n-type CdS single-crystal electrode and a Pt counter electrode with the ruthenium-2,2'-bipyridine complex [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+) as the redox shuttle in a non-aqueous electrolyte was studied to obtain a higher open-circuit voltage (V(OC)) than the onset voltage for water splitting. A V(OC) of 1.48 V and a short-circuit current (I(SC)) of 3.88 mA cm(-2) were obtained under irradiation by a 300 W Xe lamp with 420-800 nm visible light. This relatively high voltage was presumably due to the difference between the Fermi level of photo-irradiated n-type CdS and the redox potential of the Ru complex at the Pt electrode. The smooth redox reaction of the Ru complex with one-electron transfer was thought to have contributed to the high V(OC) and I(SC). The obtained V(OC) was more than the onset voltage of water electrolysis for hydrogen and oxygen generation, suggesting prospects for application in water electrolysis.

  11. Motile Geobacter dechlorinators migrate into a model source zone of trichloroethene dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Experimental evaluation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Jo; Miroshnikov, Alexey; Haest, Pieter Jan; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2014-12-01

    Microbial migration towards a trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) could facilitate the bioaugmentation of TCE DNAPL source zones. This study characterized the motility of the Geobacter dechlorinators in a TCE to cis-dichloroethene dechlorinating KB-1™ subculture. No chemotaxis towards or away from TCE was found using an agarose in-plug bridge method. A second experiment placed an inoculated aqueous layer on top of a sterile sand layer and showed that Geobacter migrated several centimeters in the sand layer in just 7 days. A random motility coefficient for Geobacter in water of 0.24 ± 0.02 cm2·day- 1 was fitted. A third experiment used a diffusion-cell setup with a 5.5 cm central sand layer separating a DNAPL from an aqueous top layer as a model source zone to examine the effect of random motility on TCE DNAPL dissolution. With top layer inoculation, Geobacter quickly colonized the sand layer, thereby enhancing the initial TCE DNAPL dissolution flux. After 19 days, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement was only 24% lower than with an homogenous inoculation of the sand layer. A diffusion-motility model was developed to describe dechlorination and migration in the diffusion-cells. This model suggested that the fast colonization of the sand layer by Geobacter was due to the combination of random motility and growth on TCE.

  12. Motile Geobacter dechlorinators migrate into a model source zone of trichloroethene dense non-aqueous phase liquid: experimental evaluation and modeling.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jo; Miroshnikov, Alexey; Haest, Pieter Jan; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2014-12-01

    Microbial migration towards a trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) could facilitate the bioaugmentation of TCE DNAPL source zones. This study characterized the motility of the Geobacter dechlorinators in a TCE to cis-dichloroethene dechlorinating KB-1(™) subculture. No chemotaxis towards or away from TCE was found using an agarose in-plug bridge method. A second experiment placed an inoculated aqueous layer on top of a sterile sand layer and showed that Geobacter migrated several centimeters in the sand layer in just 7days. A random motility coefficient for Geobacter in water of 0.24±0.02cm(2)·day(-1) was fitted. A third experiment used a diffusion-cell setup with a 5.5cm central sand layer separating a DNAPL from an aqueous top layer as a model source zone to examine the effect of random motility on TCE DNAPL dissolution. With top layer inoculation, Geobacter quickly colonized the sand layer, thereby enhancing the initial TCE DNAPL dissolution flux. After 19days, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement was only 24% lower than with an homogenous inoculation of the sand layer. A diffusion-motility model was developed to describe dechlorination and migration in the diffusion-cells. This model suggested that the fast colonization of the sand layer by Geobacter was due to the combination of random motility and growth on TCE.

  13. A rotating disk apparatus for assessing the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons transferring from a non-aqueous phase liquid to solutions of surfactant Brij 35.

    PubMed

    Bernardez, Letícia A

    2009-04-01

    A rotating disk apparatus was used to investigate the biodegradation of PAHs from non-aqueous phase liquids to solutions of Brij 35. The mass transfer of PAHs in absence of surfactant solution was not large enough to replenish the degraded PAHs. The addition of surfactant resulted in an overall enhancement of biodegradation rates compared to that observed in pure aqueous solution. This is because surfactant partition significant amount of PAHs into the bulk phase, where uptake occurs but the supply of PAHs to the aqueous phase through micellar solubilization at latter period limited biodegradation rates. It was demonstrated the relationship between biodegradation rate and surfactant dose and the mechanisms controlling the mass transfer of PAH from NAPLs. The satisfactory comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of a model, which parameters were determined from independent solubilization and dissolution experiments and based on the main assumption that the solutes must be present in the true aqueous phase to be degraded, allows us to conclude the absence of direct uptake of PAHs by bacteria.

  14. Simultaneous separation and confirmation of amphetamine and related drugs in equine plasma by non-aqueous capillary-electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, X Q; Uboh, C E; Soma, L R; Guan, F Y; You, Y W; Kahler, M C; Judy, J A; Liu, Y; Chen, J W

    2010-02-01

    A non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (NACE-MS) method was developed for simultaneous separation and identification of 12 amphetamine and related compounds in equine plasma. Analytes were recovered from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A bare fused-silica capillary was used for separation of the analytes. Addition of sheath liquid to the capillary effluent allowed the detection of the analytes by positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using full scan data acquisition. The limit of detection (LOD) for the target analytes was 10-200 ng/mL and that of confirmation (LOC) was 50-1000 ng/mL in equine plasma. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS) parameters were optimized for full CE separation and MS detection of the analytes. Separation buffer comprised 25 mM ammonium formate in acetonitrile/methanol (20: 80, v/v) plus 1 M formic acid. Sheath liquid was isopropanol-water-formic acid (50:50:0.5, v/v/v). Samples were hydrodynamically injected and separated at 25 kV. Analytes were electrokinetically separated and mass spectrometrically identified and confirmed. This simple, fast, inexpensive and reproducible method was successfully applied to post race equine plasma and research samples in screening for amphetamine and related drugs.

  15. Highly enhanced electrochemical activity of Ni foam electrodes decorated with nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for non-aqueous redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungkuk; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) are directly grown on the surface of a three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate by floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD). The electrochemical properties of the 3D NCNT-Ni foam are thoroughly examined as a potential electrode for non-aqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs). During synthesis, nitrogen atoms can be successfully doped onto the carbon nanotube (CNT) lattices by forming an abundance of nitrogen-based functional groups. The 3D NCNT-Ni foam electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical activities toward the redox reactions of [Fe (bpy)3]2+/3+ (in anolyte) and [Co(bpy)3]+/2+ (in catholyte), which are mainly attributed to the hierarchical 3D structure of the NCNT-Ni foam electrode and the catalytic effect of nitrogen atoms doped onto the CNTs; this leads to faster mass transfer and charge transfer during operation. As a result, the RFB cell assembled with 3D NCNT-Ni foam electrodes exhibits a high energy efficiency of 80.4% in the first cycle; this performance is maintained up to the 50th cycle without efficiency loss.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix 6 to Subpart A of... - Reverse Phase Extraction (RPE) Method for Detection of Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... may yield artifacts that affect results. Specific selection of reagents and purification of solvents....1Sample collection bottles/jars—New, pre-cleaned bottles/jars, lot-certified to be free of...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix 6 to Subpart A of... - Reverse Phase Extraction (RPE) Method for Detection of Oil Contamination in Non-Aqueous Drilling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... may yield artifacts that affect results. Specific selection of reagents and purification of solvents....1Sample collection bottles/jars—New, pre-cleaned bottles/jars, lot-certified to be free of...

  18. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  19. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  20. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  1. The synthesis and determination of the octacoordinated structure of Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes with β-diketones and diols in non aqueous solutions: evidence of some participation of π-electron density of diols with Pr(III) and Nd(III) in complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sudhindra N.; Devi, M. Indira

    1997-10-01

    The synthesized complexes are of the general structure Ln(β-diketonate) 3 diol (where β-diketonate = benzoyl acetonate (bzac), dibenzoyl methanoate (dbm) and thionyl trifluoroacetonate (ttfa) and (diols) (= butane-1,4- and cis-butene-1,4-diols). The absorption intensity data in non aqueous solvents has been analysed in terms of Judd Ofelt intensity Tλ(λ = 2, 4, 6) parameters for electric dipole 4f-4f transitions. β-diketones are bidentate and function as monofunctional ligands coordinating through oxygen donor atoms forming substantially stable chelate rings, while diols behave as neutral biodentate ligands coordinating through oxygen. β-diketone ligands differ only in the substituents R 1 and R 2 (Fig. 1) while diols differ in the nature of the bond formed between second and third carbon atoms of the molecules. These small chemical and structural differences have been shown to produce significant variation of oscillator strength of certain absorption bands. Again, their relative perturbations of 4f-4f transition intensities are quite evident in Tλ-parameters estimated for different complexes. Attempts have been made to correlate between the intensity parameter Tλ and oscillator strengths determined from observed spectra of these complexes. The intensity analysis of absorption spectral bands have given sufficient evidence of some sort of interaction between Pr(III) and Nd(III) with π-electron density of the double bond found in butene-1,4-diol.

  2. Non-Aqueous Electrode Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Thionyl Chloride and 1.8 M Lithium Tetrachloroaluminate in Thionyl Chloride . 18 SEM Photomicrographs for Lithium Aged in 16...EDAX Trace of 44 "mudcracked" Region for a Lithium Sample Soaked in Electrolyte 90 Minutes and Receiving No Thionyl Chloride Wash. 24 AES Spectrum of...One-Half 53 Percent in Electrolyte at One mA/cm2 , Room Temperature, No Thionyl Chloride Wash. 29 AES Spectrum of Lithium Discharged One-Half

  3. Non-Aqueous Electrode Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    LITHIUM 4. LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE EXPOSURE STUDIESUSING AES 42 Profile Experiments 475. BLACK SPOT FORMATION 47 5 XPS STUDIES OF LITHIUM 53...Auger Spectra of a Typical Scraped Lithium 46 Surface (GTE) Exposed to Thionyl Chloride Liquid: a) Five Hour Exposure in Unbaked Vials and Unbaked Sample...and Baked Sample Chamber. 28 Auger Profile of an "As Received" GTE Lithium 49 Surface Exposed to Liquid Thionyl Chloride Eleven Days. 29

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  5. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  6. Bioenhanced dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase of trichloroethylene as affected by iron reducing conditions: model systems and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Paul, Laiby; Smolders, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic biotransformation of trichloroethylene (TCE) can be affected by competing electron acceptors such as Fe (III). This study assessed the role of Fe (III) reduction on the bioenhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Columns were set up as 1-D diffusion cells consisting of a lower DNAPL layer, a layer with an aquifer substratum and an upper water layer that is regularly refreshed. The substrata used were either inert sand or sand coated with 2-line ferrihydrite (HFO) or two environmental Fe (III) containing samples. The columns were inoculated with KB-1 and were repeatedly fed with formate. In none of the diffusion cells, vinyl chloride or ethene was detected while dissolved and extractable Fe (II) increased strongly during 60 d of incubation. The cis-DCE concentration peaked at 4.0 cm from the DNAPL (inert sand) while it was at 3.4 cm (sand+HFO), 1.7 cm and 2.5 cm (environmental samples). The TCE concentration gradients near the DNAPL indicate that the DNAPL dissolution rate was larger than that in an abiotic cell by factors 1.3 (inert sand), 1.0 (sand+HFO) and 2.2 (both environmental samples). This results show that high bioavailable Fe (III) in HFO reduces the TCE degradation by competitive Fe (III) reduction, yielding lower bioenhanced dissolution. However, Fe (III) reduction in environmental samples was not reducing TCE degradation and the dissolution factor was even larger than that of inert sand. It is speculated that physical factors, e.g. micro-niches in the environmental samples protect microorganisms from toxic concentrations of TCE.

  7. Cell response and bioactivity of titania-zirconia-zirconium titanate nanotubes with different nanoscale topographies fabricated in a non-aqueous electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie

    2015-04-01

    The morphology and the physical and chemical characteristics of four groups of TiO2-ZrO2-ZrTiO4 nanotubes that were fabricated via anodization in a non-aqueous electrolyte were investigated in order to examine their influence on the bioactivity of, and cell adhesion on, Ti50Zr alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3D profilometry were used for the characterization. The in vitro cell responses to nanotubular surfaces with different inner diameters (Di) between 25 and 49 nm were assessed using osteoblast cells (SaOS2). The results of the MTS assay indicated that the percentage of cell adhesion on the nanotubes was influenced by the nanoscale topographical parameters including the tube inner diameter (Di), the tube wall thickness (Wt), the amplitude roughness (Sa) and the spacing roughness (Sm) of the nanotubular surface. Cell adhesion was promoted to 84.9% on nanotubes with an inner diameter of 25 nm, or 80.3% on nanotubes with a large wall thickness of 34 nm due to the accelerated integrin clustering and focal contacts of formation. A nanotubular surface with a low spacing roughness of 33 nm(3) nm(-2) led to a cell adhesion of 61.0%. Similarly, a nanotubular surface with a high amplitude roughness of 1.03 μm revealed a cell adhesion of 61.5% in instances where the inner diameters (29 nm) and wall thicknesses (24 nm) were within the critical dimensional parameters for cells to survive and thrive.

  8. Laboratory Studies to Assess the Potential for Detection of Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid in Contaminated Soils with Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryar, T. R.; Knight, R. J.; Nielsen, T. P.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the conditions necessary for the detection of LNAPL (Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid) in contaminated soils using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements. The study used toluene as the LNAPL and well characterized kaolinite and sand samples as the porous media; proton NMR measurements were made on partially saturated sand, clay and sand-clay mixtures. Proton NMR has the advantage over other surface geophysical techniques that it only responds to H atoms. However, since water is ubiquitous in the near surface, one of our main concerns was whether the signal from water would interfere with the detection of organic contaminants. We established that water and toluene were not resolved for sand or sand-clay mixtures with paramagnetic iron impurities less than or equal to 1.5 mg/g. However, for a sand-clay mixture for which the iron concentration was 1.9 mg/g, the two fluids were clearly resolved by laboratory NMR. These levels of paramagnetic materials are common in soils, especially those with some clay content. Provided that the soil has sufficient paramagnetic content for contaminant signal to be distinguishable from that of water, we found that the detection limit improves with signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the NMR data. For detection of LNAPL in the presence of water, NMR was capable of detecting as little as 20 mg toluene/g water, under ideal conditions in the laboratory. When we reduced signal quality to S/N = 80, the detection limit was only 140 mg toluene/g water. We also showed with synthetic data that the currently available surface loop NMR instrument (capable of S/N ~5) would be incapable of distinguishing organic contaminant at any concentration from water. The instrument would have to be improved to S/N = 20 to reliably detect even 1g LNAPL/g water.

  9. Comparison of a non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis method with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of herbicides and metabolites in water samples.

    PubMed

    Carabias-Martínez, R; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, E; Miranda-Cruz, E; Domínguez-Alvarez, J; Hernández-Méndez, J

    2006-07-28

    A method of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for the determination of triazine herbicides and some of their main metabolites in water samples has been developed. The proposed CE method includes an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure with LiChrolut EN sorbent coupled to a non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) separation with UV detection. The target compounds were the chloro-s-triazines simazine, atrazine, propazine; the methyltio-s-triazines ametryn and prometryn and three main derivatives from the atrazine degradation products; namely, deethylatrazine, deethylhydroxyatrazine and deisopropylhydroxyatrazine. The analytical characteristics of the CE method are reported. The repeatability of the method was studied considering the different steps of the method separately in order to determine the contributions of each step to the total variability of the method. The NACE-UV results are compared with those obtained with a high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV) method. The same off-line SPE procedure was applied to both techniques. The results obtained show that both methods afford the same results in the analysis of surface and drinking water samples, with a level of significance regarding the F- and t-tests greater than 0.05 in all the cases. The detection limits in surface water samples were in the 0.04-0.32 microg l(-1) and 0.11-1.2 microg l(-1) ranges for the NACE-UV and HPLC-UV methods, respectively. The recoveries (spiked/found) were significantly 100% in all cases.

  10. A comparative study of solid and liquid non-aqueous phases for the biodegradation of hexane in two-phase partitioning bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hernández, María; Quijano, Guillermo; Thalasso, Frédéric; Daugulis, Andrew J; Villaverde, Santiago; Muñoz, Raúl

    2010-08-01

    A comparative study of the performance of solid and liquid non-aqueous phases (NAPs) to enhance the mass transfer and biodegradation of hexane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) was undertaken. A preliminary NAP screening was thus carried out among the most common solid and liquid NAPs used in pollutant biodegradation. The polymer Kraton G1657 (solid) and the liquid silicone oils SO20 and SO200 were selected from this screening based on their biocompatibility, resistance to microbial attack, non-volatility and high affinity for hexane (low partition coefficient: K = C(g)/C(NAP), where C(g) and C(NAP) represent the pollutant concentration in the gas phase and NAP, respectively). Despite the three NAPs exhibited a similar affinity for hexane (K approximately 0.0058), SO200 and SO20 showed a superior performance to Kraton G1657 in terms of hexane mass transfer and biodegradation enhancement. The enhanced performance of SO200 and SO20 could be explained by both the low interfacial area of this solid polymer (as a result of the large size of commercial beads) and by the interference of water on hexane transfer (observed in this work). When Kraton G1657 (20%) was tested in a TPPB inoculated with P. aeruginosa, steady state elimination capacities (ECs) of 5.6 +/- 0.6 g m(-3) h(-1) were achieved. These values were similar to those obtained in the absence of a NAP but lower compared to the ECs recorded in the presence of 20% of SO200 (10.6 +/- 0.9 g m(-3) h(-1)). Finally, this study showed that the enhancement in the transfer of hexane supported by SO200 was attenuated by limitations in microbial activity, as shown by the fact that the ECs in biotic systems were far lower than the maximum hexane transfer capacity recorded under abiotic conditions.

  11. Fast non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography separation of triacylglycerol regioisomers with isocratic mobile phase. Application to different oils and fats.

    PubMed

    Tamba Sompila, Arnaud W G; Héron, Sylvie; Hmida, Dorra; Tchapla, Alain

    2017-01-15

    The distribution of fatty acid species at the sn-1/3 position or the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in natural fats and oils affects their physical and nutritional properties. In fats and oils, determining the presence of one or two regioisomers and the identification of structure, where they do have one, as well as their separation, became a problem of fundamental importance to solve. A variety of instrumental technics has been proposed, such as MS, chromatography-MS or pure chromatography. A number of studies deal with the optimization of the separation, but very often, they are expensive in time. In the present study, in order to decrease the analysis time while maintaining good chromatographic separation, we tested different monomeric and polymeric stationary phases and different chromatographic conditions (mobile phase composition and analysis temperature) using Non-Aqueous Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography (NARP-LC). It was demonstrated that mixed polymeric stationary bonded silica with accessible terminal hydroxyl groups leads to very good separation for the pairs of TAGs regioisomers constituted by two saturated and one unsaturated fatty acid (with double bond number: from 1 to 6). A Nucleodur C18 ISIS percolated by isocratic mobile phase (acetonitrile/2-propanol) at 18°C leads to their separations in less than 15min. The difference of retention times between two regioisomers XYX and XXY are large enough to confirm, as application, the presence of POP, SOP, SOS and PLP and no PPO, SPO, SSO and PPL in Theobroma cacao butter. In the same way, this study respectively shows the presence of SOS, SOP and no SSO, PSO in Butyrospermum parkii butter, POP, SOP, SOS and no PPO, PSO and SSO in Carapa oil and finally POP and no PPO in Pistacia Lentiscus oil.

  12. Non-Aqueous Glycerol Monolaurate Gel Exhibits Antibacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Elizabeth A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin and surgical infections due to Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are causes of patient morbidity and increased healthcare costs. These organisms grow planktonically and as biofilms, and many strains exhibit antibiotic resistance. This study examines the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML), as solubilized in a non-aqueous vehicle (5% GML Gel), as a novel, broadly-active topical antimicrobial. The FDA has designated GML as generally recognized as safe for human use, and the compound is commonly used in the cosmetic and food industries. Methods In vitro, bacterial strains in broths and biofilms were exposed to GML Gel, and effects on bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs) were assessed. In vivo,subcutaneous incisions were made in New Zealand white rabbits; the incisions were closed with four sutures. Bacterial strains were painted onto the incision sites, and then GML Gel or placebo was liberally applied to cover the sites completely. Rabbits were allowed to awaken and were examined for CFUs as a function of exposure time. Results In vitro, GML Gel was bactericidal for all broth culture and biofilm organisms in <1 hour and <4 hour, respectively; no CFUs were detected after the entire 24 h test period. In vivo, GML Gel inhibited bacterial growth in the surgical incision sites, compared to no growth inhibition in controls. GML Gel significantly reduced inflammation, as viewed by lack of redness in and below the incision sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 5% GML Gel is useful as a potent topical antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent for prevention of infections. PMID:25799455

  13. Effects of non-aqueous fluids-associated drill cuttings discharge on shelf break macrobenthic communities in the Campos Basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria Fernanda L; Silva, Janete; Fachel, Jandyra M G; Pulgati, Fernando H

    2010-08-01

    This paper assesses the effects of non-aqueous fluids (NAF)-associated drill cuttings discharge on shelf break macrobenthic communities in the Campos Basin, off the southeast Brazilian coast, Rio de Janeiro State. Samples were taken with a 0.25-m2 box corer from surrounding two oil and gas wells on three monitoring cruises: before drilling, three months after drilling, and 22 months after drilling. Statistical methodologies used Bayesian geostatistical and analysis of variance models to evaluate the effects of the NAF-associated drill cuttings discharge and to define the impact area. The results indicated that marked variations were not observed in the number of families between cruises, though there were changes in the fauna composition. The changes seen in biological descriptors in both control and background situation areas were not considered significant, showing a temporal homogeneity in means. The impact area presented changes in biological descriptors of communities and trophic structure during the three cruises and such changes were correlated to chemical and physical variables related to the drilling activities, as a result of the mix of drill cuttings and sediment and the anoxic conditions established in the substrate. In that area, three months after drilling, a decrease in diversity and an increase in density, motile deposit-feeders and Pol/Crp ratio, and dominance of opportunistic organisms, such as the capitellid Capitella sp., were observed and, 22 months after drilling, an increase of diversity, reduction of dominance of capitellid polychaete, changes in the fauna composition, and a dominance of opportunistic burrowing and tube-building organisms were observed, indicating an ecological succession process.

  14. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  15. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  17. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  18. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  19. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  20. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  1. Supercapacitor Electrolyte Solvents with Liquid Range Below -80 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik; Smart, Marshall; West, William

    2010-01-01

    A previous NASA Tech Brief ["Low-Temperature Supercapacitors" (NPO-44386) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No 7 (July 2008), page 32] detailed ongoing efforts to develop non-aqueous supercapacitor electrolytes capable of supporting operation at temperatures below commercially available cells (which are typically limited to charging and discharging at > or equal to -40 C). These electrolyte systems may enable energy storage and power delivery for systems operating in extreme environments, such as those encountered in the Polar regions on Earth or in the exploration of space. Supercapacitors using these electrolytes may also offer improved power delivery performance at moderately low temperatures (e.g. -40 to 0 C) relative to currently available cells, offering improved cold-cranking and cold-weather acceleration capabilities for electrical or hybrid vehicles. Supercapacitors store charge at the electrochemical double-layer, formed at the interface between a high surface area electrode material and a liquid electrolyte. The current approach to extending the low-temperature limit of the electrolyte focuses on using binary solvent systems comprising a high-dielectric-constant component (such as acetonitrile) in conjunction with a low-melting-point co-solvent (such as organic formates, esters, and ethers) to depress the freezing point of the system, while maintaining sufficient solubility of the salt. Recent efforts in this area have led to the identification of an electrolyte solvent formulation with a freezing point of -85.7 C, which is achieved by using a 1:1 by volume ratio of acetonitrile to 1,3-dioxolane

  2. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of docetaxel liposome mediated by a novel galactosylated cholesterol derivatives synthesized by lipase-catalyzed esterification in non-aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Hua; Zheng, Pin-Jing; Nie, Hua; Chen, Yu-Chao; Tong, Dan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Yi

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize a novel galactosylated cholesterol derivative, cholesterol-diethenyl decanedioate-lactitol (CHS-DD-LA) through lipase-catalyzed esterification in non-aqueous and to evaluate the preparation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel (DOC) liposomes modified with CHS-DD-LA (G-DOC-L), which may actively gather at the liver compared with the conventional DOC liposomes (DOC-L) and commercial dosage form of DOC injection (DOC-i). A rapid and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay was developed for the determination of the DOC concentration in plasma and tissues with Taxol as the internal standard (IS). To measure the liver-targeting effect of the G-DOC-L, relative uptake rate (Re), peak concentration ratio (Ce), targeting efficiency (Te) and relative targeting efficiency (RTe) were reduced as the evaluation parameters. The results showed that the entrapment efficiency, particle size and Zeta potential of G-DOC-L was 76.8 ± 3.5%, 95.6 nm and 27.19 mV, respectively. After i.v. administration at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg in rats, a decrease in the AUC, MRT and an increase in CL (p < 0.05) were observed in the G-DOC-L group compared with DOC-L. All these results suggested that galactose-anchored liposomes could rapidly be removed from the circulation in vivo. The tissue distribution of G-DOC-L was widely different from that of DOC-L. The Re of G-DOC-L, DOC-L on liver was 4.011, 0.102; Ce was 3.391, 0.111; Te was 55.01, 3.08, respectively, demonstrating that G-DOC-L had an excellent effect on liver-targeting, which may help to improve the therapeutic effect of hepatic diseases.

  3. Electromagnetic induction of nanoscale zerovalent iron particles accelerates the degradation of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Kumloet, Itsaraphong

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a novel electromagnetically enhanced treatment concept is proposed for in situ remediation of a source zone of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that is slowly dissolved, causing contaminated groundwater for centuries. Here, we used polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles (ferromagnetic) in combination with a low frequency (LF) (150 kHz) AC electromagnetic field (EMF) to accelerate the degradation of the DNAPLs via enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were used in a bench-scaled evaluation. The PSS-modified NZVI successfully targeted the DNAPL/water interface, as evidenced by the Pickering emulsion formation. Dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL was measured by quantifying the by-product formation (acetylene, ethene, and ethane). Without magnetic induction heating (MIH) by LF EMF, PSS-modified NZVI transformed TCE- and PCE-DNAPL to ethene and ethane at the rate constants of 12.19 × 10(-3) and 1.00 × 10(-3) μmol/h/m(2), respectively, following pseudo zero-order reactions. However, four MIH cycles of PSS-NZVI increased the temperature up to 87 °C and increased the rate constants of TCE-DNAPL and PCE-DNAPL up to 14.58 and 58.01 times, respectively, in comparison to the dechlorination rate without MIH. Theoretical analysis suggested that the MIH of the PSS-modified NZVI enhanced the dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL via the combination of the enhanced thermal dissolution of DNAPL, the effect of increasing the temperature on the rate constant (the Arrhenius equation), and the accelerated NZVI corrosion. Nevertheless, the effect of the Arrhenius equation was dominant. For the first time, this proof-of-concept study reveals the potential for using polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI coupled with LF EMF as a combined remediation technique for increasing the rate and completeness of in situ chlorinated DNAPL source remediation.

  4. Characterisation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids of coal tar using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchotte-Lindsay, Caroline; McGregor, Laura; Richards, Phil; Kerr, Stephanie; Glenn, Aliyssa; Thomas, Russell; Kalin, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is a recently developed analytical technique in which two capillary columns with different stationary phases are placed in series enabling planar resolution of the analytes. The resolution power of GCxGC is one order of magnitude higher than that of one dimension gas chromatography. Because of its high resolution capacity, the use of GCxGC for complex environmental samples such as crude oils, petroleum derivatives and polychlorinated biphenyls mixtures has rapidly grown in recent years. We developed a one-step method for the forensic analysis of coal tar dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites. Coal tar is the by-product of the gasification of coal for heating and lighting and it is composed of thousands of organic and inorganic compounds. Before the boom of natural gases and oils, most towns and cities had one or several manufactured gas plants that have, in many cases, left a devastating environmental print due to coal tar contamination. The fate of coal tar DNAPLs, which can persist in the environment for more than a hundred years, is therefore of crucial interest. The presented analytical method consists of a unique clean-up/ extraction stage by pressurized liquid extraction and a single analysis of its organic chemical composition using GCxGC coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The chemical fingerprinting is further improved by derivatisation by N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) of the tar compounds containing -OH functions such as alcohols and carboxylic acids. We present here how, using the logical order of elution in GCxGC-TOFMS system, 1) the identification of never before observed -OH containing compounds is possible and 2) the isomeric selectivity of an oxidation reaction on a DNAPL sample can be revealed. Using samples collected at various FMGP sites, we demonstrate how this GCxGC method enables the simultaneous

  5. An environmental screening model to assess the consequences to soil and groundwater from railroad-tank-car spills of light non-aqueous phase liquids.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J; Barkan, Christopher P L; Schaeffer, David J; Anand, Pooja

    2009-06-15

    North American railroads transport a wide variety of chemicals, chemical mixtures and solutions in railroad tank cars. In the event of an accident, these materials may be spilled and impact the environment. Among the chemicals commonly transported are a number of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). If these are spilled they can contaminate soil and groundwater and result in costly cleanups. Railroads need a means of objectively assessing the relative risk to the environment due to spills of these different materials. Environmental models are often used to determine the extent of contamination, and the associated environmental risks. For LNAPL spills, these models must account for NAPL infiltration and redistribution, NAPL dissolution and volatilization, and remediation systems such as pump and treat. This study presents the development and application of an environmental screening model to assess NAPL infiltration and redistribution in soils and groundwater, and to assess groundwater cleanup time using a pumping system. Model simulations use parameters and conditions representing LNAPL releases from railroad tank cars. To take into account unique features of railroad-tank-car spill sites, the hydrocarbon spill screening model (HSSM), which assumes a circular surface spill area and a circular NAPL lens, was modified to account for a rectangular spill area and corresponding lens shape at the groundwater table, as well as the effects of excavation and NAPL evaporation to the atmosphere. The modified HSSM was first used to simulate NAPL infiltration and redistribution. A NAPL dissolution and groundwater transport module, and a pumping system module were then implemented and used to simulate the effects of chemical properties, excavation, and free NAPL removal on NAPL redistribution and cleanup time. The amount of NAPL that reached the groundwater table was greater in coarse sand with high permeability than in fine sand or silt with lower permeabilities

  6. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  7. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  8. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  9. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  10. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  11. Catalysis and stability of an alkaline protease from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium under non-aqueous conditions as a function of pH, salt and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sandeep; Rakholiya, Kalpna D; Raval, Vikram H; Singh, Satya P

    2012-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from Coastal Gujarat (India) was identified as Oceanobacillus sp. (GQ162111) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. The organism grew and secreted extra cellular protease in presence of various organic solvents. At 30% (v/v) concentration of hexane, heptane, isooctane, dodecane and decane, significant growth and protease production was evident. The alkaline protease was purified in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6 FF with 28% yield. The molecular mass as judged by SDS-PAGE was 30 kDa. The temperature optimum of protease was 50°C and the enzyme retained 70% activity in 10% (v/v) isooctane. Effect of salt and pH was investigated in combination to assess the effect of isooctane. In organic solvents, the enzyme was considerably active at pH 8-11, with optimum activity at pH 10. Salt at 2 M was optimum for activity and enzyme maintained significant stability up to 18 h even at 3 M salt concentration. Patters of growth, protease production, catalysis and stability of the enzyme are presented. The study resumes significance as limited information is available on the interaction of haloalkaliphilic bacteria and their enzymes with organic solvents.

  12. On the characterization of NaDEHP/n-heptane nonaqueous reverse micelles: the effect of the polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Silvina S; Dario Falcone, R; Silber, Juana J; Moyano, Fernando; Mariano Correa, N

    2015-03-14

    The behavior of two polar solvents, ethylene glycol (EG) and dimethylformamide (DMF), entrapped in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP)/n-heptane reverse micelles (RMs) was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), molecular probe absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy. DLS results reveal the formation of RMs containing EG and DMF as a polar component. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report where both polar solvents are entrapped by the NaDEHP surfactant to effectively create RMs. We use the solvatochromism behavior of the molecular probe, 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinum betaine (QB), and FT-IR spectroscopy to investigate the physicochemical properties of the non-aqueous RMs. Our results demonstrate that the NaDEHP surfactant interacts through hydrogen bonds with EG at the EG/NaDEHP interface and this interaction is responsible for destroying the bulk structure of pure solvent EG when entrapped in NaDEHP RMs. On the other hand, when DMF is incorporated inside the RMs the bulk structure of DMF is destroyed upon encapsulation by the Na-DMF interaction at the DMF/NaDEHP interface. Our results are completely different than the one observed for DMF/n-heptane/AOT. Our results show how the physicochemical properties, such as micropolarity, microviscosity and hydrogen bond interaction, of nonaqueous NaDEHP/n-heptane RMs interfaces can be dramatically changed by simply using different non-aqueous polar solvents. Thus, these results can be very useful to employ these novel RMs as nanoreactors since the dimensions of the RMs are around 10 to 20 nm.

  13. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  14. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  15. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  16. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  17. Simplified continuum solvent model with a smooth cavity based on volumetric data

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Alexander; Walter, Michael

    2014-11-07

    We present a continuum solvent model (CSM) with a smooth cavity for the application in grid-based electronic structure methods. The cavity is identified with the inherently smooth distribution function of a binary mixture at infinite dilution. We obtain a cavity model based on atomic van der Waals radii and one free parameter controlling the overall size. This single parameter is sufficient to adequately reproduce experimental partial molar volumes. The CSM based on this cavity is of similar accuracy in the prediction of aqueous solvation Gibbs energies of small neutral molecules and ions as other CSMs with a smooth cavity. We apply the model to systems in non-aqueous solution, i.e., spiropyran/merocyanin energetics, a proton transfer reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, and the electrostatic screening of charged gold clusters in an ionic liquid.

  18. Comparison and SEM-characterization of novel solvents of DNA/carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Vahdati, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been many applications proposed for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In spite of these applications they are not being used vastly for a few fundamental difficulties in utilizing them including not being soluble in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. One method for dispersing and solubilizing them in aqueous solutions is attaching single stranded DNA to the outer wall of single walled carbon nanotubes. The effective parameter in the solubility (efficiency in gel filtration) is the strength of hydrogen bonds between CNTs and DNA in three solvents possessing strong hydrogen bonds: H2O, methanol (MeOH) and N,N'-dimethyl formamide (DMF). Electronic absorption spectra, Superdex TM 200 10/300 gel-filtration and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) also support van der Waals wrapping of DNA on CNTs. It was found that DMF exhibit higher solubility than MeOH and H2O.

  19. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  20. Effects of organic solvents and substrate binding on trypsin in acetonitrile and hexane media.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yanyan; Yuan, Yuan; Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Yanzhi; Li, Menglong; Wang, Zhimeng; Pu, Xuemei; Jiang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we used molecular dynamic (MD) simulation to study trypsin with and without a six-amino-acid peptide bound in three different solvents (water, acetonitrile and hexane) in order to provide molecular information for well understanding the structure and function of enzymes in non-aqueous media. The results show that the enzyme is more compact and less native-like in hexane than in the other two polar solvents. The substrate could stabilize the native protein structure in the two polar media, but not in the non-polar hexane. There are no significant differences in the conformation of the S1 pocket upon the substrate binding in water and acetonitrile media while a reverse behavior is observed in hexane media, implying a possible induced fit binding mechanism in the non-polar media. The substrate binding enhances the stability of catalytic H-bond network since it could expel the solvent molecules from the active site. The enzyme and the substrate appear to be more appropriate to the reactive conformation in the organic solvents compared with aqueous solution. There is much greater substrate binding strength in hexane media than the water and acetonitrile ones since the polar solvent significantly weakens electrostatic interactions, which are observed to be the main driving force to the binding. In addition, some residues of the S1 pocket could remain favorable contribution to the binding despite the solvent change, but with differences in the contribution extent, the number and the type of residues between the three media.

  1. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  2. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  3. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  4. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  5. Transport, Targeting and Applications of Metallic Functional Nanoparticles for Degradation of DNAPL Chlorinated Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Gregory V.; Majetich, Sara; Sholl, David; Tilton, Robert D.; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Liu, Yueqiang; Sarbu, Traian; Almusallam, Abdulwahab; Redden, George D.; Meakin, Paul; Rollins, Harry W.

    2004-03-31

    Recently, laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that zero-valent iron nanoparticles (colloids) can rapidly transform dissolved chlorinated organic solvents into non-toxic compounds. This technology also has the potential to address Dense Non- Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) contamination, one of DOE's primary contamination problems. This project develops and tests polymer-modified reactive nanoscale Fe0 particles for in situ delivery to chlorinated solvents that are present as DNAPLs in the subsurface. The surfaces of reactive Fe0-based nanoparticles are modified with amphiphilic block copolymers to maintain a stable suspension of the particles in water for transport in a porous matrix and to create an affinity for the water-DNAPL interface. Ultimately this will provide an improved technology to locate and eliminate DNAPL, a recalcitrant and persistent source for groundwater contamination by chlorinated solvents. Candidate polymers have been synthesized and attached to 20 nm SiO2 particles using Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP). The physical properties (hydrodynamic radius, stability, TCE-water partitioning behavior, mobility in a porous matrix) of these nanostructures have been determined. The particles (dp {approx}102 nm) are water soluble and partition to the TCE-water interface. The physical and chemical properties (e.g. oxide phase and thickness) of Fe0 nanoparticles synthesized using different techniques and the effects of these properties on particle reactivity and efficiency have been evaluated. Numerical models (Brownian Dynamics) have been developed to predict the aqueous diffusivities of these particle-polymer nanostructures.

  6. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  7. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  8. Influence of membrane structure on the operating current densities of non-aqueous redox flow batteries: Organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Hee; Kim, Yekyung; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Maurya, Sandip; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2015-11-01

    We develop three types of organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN) to explore the effects of membrane structure on the possible operating current densities of a non-aqueous redox flow battery (RFB) system. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF) is selected as a supporting polymer matrix for improving the chemical and thermal stability of the organic-inorganic composite membranes. We also introduce silica nanoparticles (5 wt% of PVdF) into the membranes to ensure the low crossover of active species. The fabrication of SIPN through the addition of glycidyl methacrylate, 4-vinylpyridine, or N-vinylcarbazole enables control of the membrane structure. Depending on monomer type, the membrane structure is determined to be either aliphatic or aromatic in terms of chemical properties and either dense or porous in terms of physical properties. These chemical and physical structures affect the electrochemical properties that correspond to charge/discharge performance and to the range of possible operating current densities. An important requirement is to examine charge/discharge performance at the possible range of operating current densities by using various membrane structures. This requirement is discussed in relation to a proposed design strategy for non-aqueous RFB membranes.

  9. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  10. Effects of solvent composition and ionic strength on the interaction of quinoline antimalarials with ferriprotoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Egan, Timothy J; Ncokazi, Kanyile K

    2004-01-01

    Enthalpy-entropy compensation in the interaction of quinoline antimalarials with ferriprotoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) in 40% aqueous dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been compared with that in pure aqueous solution. The data indicate that the degree of desolvation and loss of conformational freedom is virtually identical in both systems. Taken together with previous findings showing that the molar free energies of association of these drugs with Fe(III)PPIX in both solvent systems are very similar, this suggests that the recognition site on the metalloporphyrin is comparable in both cases. This is despite the fact that Fe(III)PPIX exists as a dimer in aqueous solution, but is monomeric in 40% DMSO. Free energies of association of chloroquine, quinine and quinidine with Fe(III)PPIX are largely insensitive to the concentration of sodium perchlorate in 40% DMSO. This demonstrates that electrostatic interactions play only a minor role in the overall stability of these complexes under these conditions. Increasing DMSO concentration greatly weakens the interactions of chloroquine, amodiaquine, quinine, quinidine and 9-epiquinine with Fe(III)PPIX. This suggests that hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the stability of these complexes. Further investigation of chloroquine has revealed that the free energy of association with Fe(III)PPIX also weakens as a function of decreasing solvent polarity in pure organic solvents. However, the free energies of association are weaker in the mixed aqueous solvent than in pure organic solvents. This indicates that dispersion and electrostatic interactions are relatively strong in the non-aqueous environment. The results demonstrate that any successful model of antimalarial drug-Fe(III)PPIX interactions will need to take both solvation and electrostatic factors into account.

  11. Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis with diode array and electrospray mass spectrometric detection for the analysis of selected steroidal alkaloids in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui, S; Bekkouche, K; Christen, P; Veuthey, J L

    2001-07-13

    Nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis coupled to UV detection is described for the separation and determination of steroidal alkaloids. After optimization of electrophoretic parameters, including the electrolyte nature and the organic solvent composition, a reliable separation of solasodine and solanidine was achieved in a methanol-acetonitrile (20:80, v/v) mixture containing 25 mM ammonium acetate and 1 M acetic acid. For quantitative purposes, a fused-silica capillary with a bubble cell was used and detection was performed at low wavelength (195 nm). Method performances, including migration time and peak area reproducibility, linearity, sensitivity and accuracy, were also evaluated. The method was applied to determine solasodine in Solanum elaeagnifolium berries and Solanum sodomaeum leaves and seeds. To further improve sensitivity in the analysis of solasodine-related compounds, solanidine, demissidine and tomatidine, the developed method was interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the case of solasodine, the detection limit was estimated at 3 microg/ml for NACE-UV and at 0.05 microg/ml for NACE-MS, in the selected ion-monitoring mode.

  12. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  13. Cracking of Clay Due to Contact with Waste Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Ayral, D.; Shipan, J.; Goltz, M. N.; Huang, J.; Demond, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Clays are known to crack upon desiccation. Desiccation cracks of up to 3 cm wide have been reported in natural soils. This raises the question if a similar behavior is seen when a dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) waste is in contact with clay. The contact with organic liquids causes the clay structure to shrink, leading to the formation of cracks. Moreover, DNAPL waste not only contains the organic liquid solvent but also includes surface-active solutes or surfactants. Such solutes can enhance the interaction of the organic solvents with the clay. This research will assess whether or not contact with chlorinated organic waste causes cracking. In order to evaluate the possibility of cracking in the clay, microcosms have been constructed that mimic aquifer systems, consisting of a saturated layer of sand, a saturated layer of bentonite clay and a 2.5 cm layer of either pure chlorinated solvents or DNAPL waste. The onset of cracking for the microcosm with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) waste as the DNAPL layer occurred after ten days of contact. Similarly, at eight days, cracks were observed in a microcosm containing trichloroethylene (TCE) waste . Forty-four days later, the length and number of cracks have grown considerably; with a total crack length of 50 cm on a surface of 80 cm2 in the microcosm containing PCE waste. On the other hand it took approximately 161 days for the clay layer in the microcosm containing pure PCE to crack. To quantity the degree of cracking, crack maps were developed using the image software, Image J. Characteristics like crack length, crack aperture, and the percentage of total length for a range of apertures were calculated using this software. For example, for the PCE waste microcosm, it was calculated that 3.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 100-300 microns, 15.1% of the crack length had an aperture of 300-500 microns, 29.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 500-700 microns, 40.1% of the crack length had an aperture of

  14. Femtosecond transient dichroism/birefringence studies of solute- solvent friction and solvent dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.J.; Castner, E.W. Jr.; Konitsky, W.; Waldeck, D.H.

    1994-02-01

    Ultrafast, heterodyne, polarization spectroscopies are used to measure solute-solvent frictional coupling and characterize the neat solvent`s relaxation dynamics on femtosecond and picosecond timescales.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  16. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  17. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Non-aqueous semi-solid flow battery based on Na-ion chemistry. P2-type Na(x)Ni(0.22)Co(0.11)Mn(0.66)O(2)-NaTi2(PO4)3.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, Edgar; Buchholz, Daniel; Klink, Stefan; Flox, Cristina; Chagas, Luciana Gomes; Vaalma, Christoph; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Passerini, Stefano; Morante, Joan Ramon

    2015-04-30

    We report the first proof of concept for a non-aqueous semi-solid flow battery (SSFB) based on Na-ion chemistry using P2-type NaxNi0.22Co0.11Mn0.66O2 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as positive and negative electrodes, respectively. This concept opens the door for developing a new low-cost type of non-aqueous semi-solid flow batteries based on the rich chemistry of Na-ion intercalating compounds.

  19. Combined remediation technologies: results from field trials at chlorinated solvent impacted sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Chowdhury, A. I.; Lomheim, L.; Boparai, H. K.; Weber, K.; Austrins, L. M.; Edwards, E.; Sleep, B.; de Boer, C. V.; Garcia, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are one class of waste liquids often generated from waste mixtures in industrial processes containing surfactants, chlorinated hydrocarbons and other compounds. Chlorinated solvents, a particularly persistent NAPL contaminant, frequently contaminate water sources for decades and are one of the more common contaminants at brownfield and industrialized sites. Although considerable advances in our understanding of the phenomena governing NAPL remediation have been made, and a number of innovative remediation technologies have been developed, existing technologies are rarely able to achieve clean up goals in contaminated aquifers at the completion of remedial activities. The development and pilot scale testing of new and innovative remediation technologies is, therefore, crucial to achieve clean up goals at contaminated sites. Our research group is currently investigating a number of innovative remediation technologies, either individually or as combined remedies. This includes the applicability of nanometals and ISCO (e.g., persulfate) for contaminated site remediation. These technologies can be combined with technologies to enhance amendment delivery (e.g., electrokinetics) or create conditions favorable for enhanced biotic contaminant degradation. This presentation will discuss outcomes from a number of field trials conducted at chlorinated solvent impacted sites by our group with a particular focus on combined remediation technologies.

  20. Switchable Polarity Solvents: Are They Green?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaumann, Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Solvents play an incredibly important role in large scale chemical reactions. Switchable polarity solvents may prove to be a class of solvent that offers energy and material efficiencies greater than existing solvents. This paper examines such solvents and their potential in a variety of chemical reactions.

  1. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  2. Solvent extraction of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes improvement in a process for solvent refining a hydrocarbon based lubricating oil stock containing aromatics and non-aromatics components with an extraction solvent wherein the lubricating oil stock is contacted with the extraction solvent in a first extraction zone at a first extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and a solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol % forming an aromatics-rich primary extract and an aromatics-lean primary raffinate of high viscosity index of at least 85. The improvement comprises: withdrawing and cooling the primary extract to a temperature 10{degrees} F to 120{degrees} F below the extraction temperature and admixing with 0.0 vol % to 10 vol % anti-solvent thereby forming a secondary extract and a secondary raffinate, passing the secondary raffinate to a second extraction zone wherein the secondary raffinate is contacted with the extraction solvent at a second extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol %, to form an aromatics-lean tertiary raffinate phase of viscosity index 65 or greater.

  3. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  4. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  5. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  6. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  7. Applied biotransformations in green solvents.

    PubMed

    Hernáiz, María J; Alcántara, Andrés R; García, José I; Sinisterra, José V

    2010-08-16

    The definite interest in implementing sustainable industrial technologies has impelled the use of biocatalysts (enzymes or cells), leading to high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivities under mild conditions. As usual substrates are not soluble in water, the employ of organic solvents is mandatory. We will focus on different attempts to combine the valuable properties of green solvents with the advantages of using biocatalysts for developing cleaner synthetic processes.

  8. Mastering analytical challenges for the characterization of pentacyclic triterpene mono- and diesters of Calendula officinalis flowers by non-aqueous C30 HPLC and hyphenation with APCI-QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Nicolaus, Christoph; Sievers-Engler, Adrian; Murillo, Renato; D'Ambrosio, Michele; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Merfort, Irmgard

    2016-01-25

    Pentacyclic triterpene mono- and diesters have been isolated from Calendula officinalis flowers. GC-MS, APCI-Exactive Orbitrap HR-MS and NMR allowed to identify the triterpene skeleton in various samples (different triterpene mixtures from Calendula n-hexane extract). NMR provided evidence that triterpene diesters are present in the samples as well. However, the corresponding quasi-molecular ions could not be detected by APCI-Exactive Orbitrap HR-MS. Instability of triterpene diesters and loss of a fatty acid residue, respectively, in the ion-source made their MS detection challenging. Thus, a set of new APCI-QTOF-MS methods (using the TripleTOF 5600+ mass spectrometer) were developed which made it eventually possible to solve this problem and confirm the diester structures by MS via quasi-molecular ion [M+H](+) detection. Direct infusion APCI-QTOF MS experiments in MS/MS high sensitivity scan mode with low collision energy and multi-channel averaging acquisition (MCA) allowed the detection of quasi-molecular ions of triterpene diesters for the first time and unequivocally confirmed the presence of faradiol 3,16-dimyristate and -dipalmitate, as well as the corresponding mixed diesters faradiol 3-myristate,16-palmitate and faradiol 3-palmitate,16-myristate. Preferential loss of the fatty acid in 16-position made it possible to distinguish the mixed diesters by MS/MS spectra. Their chromatographic separations turned out to be challenging due to their bulkiness and extended molecular dimensions. However, separation could be achieved by an uncommon non-aqueous RPLC mode with an in-house synthesized C30 phase. Finally, two (U)HPLC-APCI-QTOF-MS methods with C18- and C30-based non-aqueous RPLC provided suitable, sensitive assays to monitor the presence of monoesters and diesters of various triterpenes (faradiol, maniladiol, arnidiol, arnitriol A and lupane-3β,16β,20-triol esters) in the n-hexane extract of C. officinalis with high mass resolution and good mass accuracy.

  9. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  11. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  12. Thermal Stability of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) Nanocrystalline Cellulose: Effects of post-treatment of oven drying and solvent exchange techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indarti, E.; Marwan; Wanrosli, W. D.

    2015-06-01

    Nanocrystallinecellulose (NCC) from biomass is a promising material with huge potentials in various applications. A big challenge in its utilization is the agglomeration of the NCC's during processing due to hydrogen bonding among the cellulose chains when in close proximity to each other. Obtaining NCC's in a non-agglomerated and non-aqueous condition is challenging. In the present work NCC's was isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) using TEMPO-oxidation reaction method. To obtain non-agglomerated and non-aqueous products, the NCC's underwent post-treatment using oven drying (OD) and solvent exchanged (SE) techniques. The thermal stability of all samples was determined from TGA and DTG profiles whilst FTIR was used to analyzethe chemical modifications that occurred under these conditions. NCC-SE has better thermal stability than the NCC-OD and its on-set degradation temperature and residue are also higher. FTIR analysis shows that NCC-SE has a slightly different chemical composition whereby the absorption band at 1300 cm-1 (due to C-O symmetric stretching) is absent as compared to NCC-OD indicating that in NCC-SE the carboxylate group is in acid form which contribute to its thermal stability

  13. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  14. Comparison of various types of stationary phases in non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of glycerolipids in blackcurrant oil and its enzymatic hydrolysis mixture.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Sovová, Helena

    2009-11-20

    The selection of column packing during the development of high-performance liquid chromatography method is a crucial step to achieve sufficient chromatographic resolution of analyzed species in complex mixtures. Various stationary phases are tested in this paper for the analysis of complex mixture of triacylglycerols (TGs) in blackcurrant oil using non-aqueous reversed-phase (NARP) system with acetonitrile-2-propanol mobile phase. Conventional C(18) column in the total length of 45 cm is used for the separation of TGs according to their equivalent carbon number, the number and positions of double bonds and acyl chain lengths. The separation of TGs and their more polar hydrolysis products after the partial enzymatic hydrolysis of blackcurrant oil in one chromatographic run is achieved using conventional C(18) column. Retention times of TGs are reduced almost 10 times without the loss of the chromatographic resolution using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography with 1.7 microm C(18) particles. The separation in NARP system on C(30) column shows an unusual phenomenon, because the retention order of TGs changes depending on the column temperature, which is reported for the first time. The commercial monolithic column modified with C(18) is used for the fast analysis of TGs to increase the sample throughput but at cost of low resolution.

  15. Characterization of fatty acid and triacylglycerol composition in animal fats using silver-ion and non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Netušilová, Kateřina; Franěk, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Hana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Holčapek, Michal

    2011-10-21

    Fatty acid (FA) and triacylglycerol (TG) composition of natural oils and fats intake in the diet has a strong influence on the human health and chronic diseases. In this work, non-aqueous reversed-phase (NARP) and silver-ion high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection and gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC/FID) and mass spectrometry detection are used for the characterization of FA and TG composition in complex samples of animal fats from fallow deer, red deer, sheep, moufflon, wild boar, cock, duck and rabbit. The FA composition of samples is determined based on the GC/FID analysis of FA methyl esters. In total, 81 FAs of different acyl chain length, double bond (DB) number, branched/linear, cis-/trans- and DB positional isomers are identified. TGs in animal fats contain mainly monounsaturated and saturated FAs. High amounts of branched and trans-FAs are observed in the samples of ruminants. In NARP mode, individual TG species are separated including the separation of trans- and branched TGs. Silver-ion mode provides the separation of TG regioisomers, which enables the determination of their ratios. Great differences in the preference of unsaturated and saturated FAs in the sn-2 position on the glycerol skeleton are observed among individual animal fats. Unsaturated FAs are preferentially occupied in the sn-2 position in all animal samples except for wild boar with the strong preference of saturated FAs in the sn-2 position.

  16. Method of treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, W.; Mallek, H.; Plum, W.

    1981-07-07

    A method of and apparatus for treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste are claimed. The solvent waste is supplied to material such as peat, vermiculite, diaton, etc. This material effects the distribution or dispersion of the solvent and absorbs the foreign substances found in the solvent waste. Air or an inert gas flows through the material in order to pick up the solvent portions which are volatile as a consequence of their vapor pressure. The thus formed gas mixture, which includes air or inert gas and solvent portions, is purified in a known manner by thermal, electrical, or catalytic combustion of the solvent portions.

  17. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  18. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  19. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  20. Helpful hints for physical solvent absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.

    1982-11-01

    Review of experience with natural gas treatment using physical solvents points to design and operating suggestions. Experiences with three plants using either Selexol or Sepasolv MPE solvent shows that both solvents perform well. The solvents offer economical and problem-free purification of natural gas. The Sepasolv MPE and Selexol solvents are very similar in chemical structure and physical properties. Thus, their application range is almost similar. An exchange is possible in most plants without equipment modification and/or process data.

  1. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  3. Non-aqueous electrolytes for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Dong, Jian; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2016-07-12

    A electrolyte for a lithium battery includes a silane/siloxane compound represented by SiR.sub.4-x-yR'.sub.xR''.sub.y, by Formula II, or Formula III: ##STR00001## where each R is individually an alkenyl, alkynyl, alk(poly)enyl, alk(poly)ynyl, aryl; each R' is represented by; ##STR00002## each R'' is represented by Formula I-B; ##STR00003## R.sup.1 is an organic spacer; R.sup.2 is a bond or an organic spacer; R.sup.3 is alkyl or aryl; k is 1-15; m is 1-15; n is 1 or 2; p is 1-3; x' is 1-2; and y' is 0-2.

  4. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes.

  5. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area.

  6. The non-aqueous synthesis of shape controllable Cu2-xS plasmonic nanostructures in a continuous-flow millifluidic chip for the generation of photo-induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Tai-Lok; Hong, Liying; Rao, Nanxi; Yang, Chengbin; Wang, Libo; Lai, Wenn Jing; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new method for synthesizing non-aqueous copper sulfide nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes using a homemade continuous-flow millifluidic chip is presented. Conventionally, the shape control of nanocrystals was accomplished using a surfactant-controlled approach, where directional growth is facilitated by selective passivation of a particular facet of the nanocrystals using surfactants. We demonstrate a ``surfactant-free'' approach where different sizes and shapes (i.e. spherical, triangular prism and rod) of plasmonic copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals can be fabricated by adjusting the flow rate and precursor concentrations. As continuous-flow synthesis enables uniform heating and easy variation of precursors' stoichiometries, it serves as an excellent incubation platform for nanoparticles due to its simplicity and high reproducibility. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fast Fourier transform (FFT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterize the as-synthesized nanocrystals and revealed structures ranging from copper-deficient covellite (CuS), spionkopite (Cu1.39S), roxbyite (Cu1.75S), to copper-rich djurleite (Cu1.94S). The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of the nanocrystals can be tuned from 1115 to 1644 nm by simply varying the copper to sulfur molar ratio and flow rate. Furthermore, photothermal effects of Cu2-xS nanocrystals were also demonstrated to annihilate the RAW264.7 cells upon near infra-red laser irradiation.In this paper, a new method for synthesizing non-aqueous copper sulfide nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes using a homemade continuous-flow millifluidic chip is presented. Conventionally, the shape control of nanocrystals was accomplished using a surfactant-controlled approach, where directional growth is facilitated by selective passivation of a particular facet of the nanocrystals using surfactants. We demonstrate a ``surfactant-free'' approach where different sizes

  7. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  8. Development and validation of an analytical method for the separation and determination of major bioactive curcuminoids in Curcuma longa rhizomes and herbal products using non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Anubala, S; Sekar, R; Nagaiah, K

    2014-06-01

    A simple, fast and efficient non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis method (NACE) was developed for the simultaneous determination of three major bioactive curcuminoids (CMNs) in Curcuma longa rhizomes and its herbal products. Good separation, resolution and reproducibility were achieved with the background electrolyte (BGE) consisting a mixture of 15.0 mM sodium tetraborate and 7.4 mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in 2:10:15 (v/v/v) of water, 1-propanol, and methanol. The influences of background electrolyte, sodium hydroxide, water, sodium dodecyl sulfate and hydroxylpropyl-β-cyclodextrin on separations were investigated. The separation was carried out in a fused-silica capillary tube with reverse polarity. Hydrodynamic injection of 25mbar for 12s was used for injecting samples and a voltage of 28 kV was applied for separation. The ultrasonication method was used for the extraction of CMNs from the turmeric herbal products and the extract was filtered and directly injected without any further treatments. The limits of detection and quantification were less than 5.0 and 14.6 µg/ml respectively for all CMNs. The percentage recoveries for CMNs were >97.2% (%RSD, <2.62). The results obtained by the method were compared with existing spectrophotometric and HPLC methods. The related compounds in the extract did not interfere in the determination of CMNs. The proposed NACE method is better than existing chromatographic and electrophoretic methods in terms of simple electrophoretic medium, fast analysis and good resolution.

  9. Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes Using In-Situ Air Sparging—A 2-D Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Krishna R.; Tekola, Lue

    2011-01-01

    In-situ air sparging has evolved as an innovative technique for soil and groundwater remediation impacted with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including chlorinated solvents. These may exist as non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) or dissolved in groundwater. This study assessed: (1) how air injection rate affects the mass removal of dissolved phase contamination, (2) the effect of induced groundwater flow on mass removal and air distribution during air injection, and (3) the effect of initial contaminant concentration on mass removal. Dissolved-phase chlorinated solvents can be effectively removed through the use of air sparging; however, rapid initial rates of contaminant removal are followed by a protracted period of lower removal rates, or a tailing effect. As the air flow rate increases, the rate of contaminant removal also increases, especially during the initial stages of air injection. Increased air injection rates will increase the density of air channel formation, resulting in a larger interfacial mass transfer area through which the dissolved contaminant can partition into the vapor phase. In cases of groundwater flow, increased rates of air injection lessened observed downward contaminant migration effect. The air channel network and increased air saturation reduced relative hydraulic conductivity, resulting in reduced groundwater flow and subsequent downgradient contaminant migration. Finally, when a higher initial TCE concentration was present, a slightly higher mass removal rate was observed due to higher volatilization-induced concentration gradients and subsequent diffusive flux. Once concentrations are reduced, a similar tailing effect occurs. PMID:21776228

  10. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Federica; Ercole, Claudia; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Perchloroethene, trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form dense non-aqueous phase liquids that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy, there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo ("Val Vibrata"), characterized by a significant chlorinated solvents contamination. Data from the various monitoring campaigns that have taken place over time were collected, and new samplings were carried out, resulting in a complete database. The data matrix was processed with a multivariate statistic analysis (in particular principal component analysis, PCA) and was then imported into geographic information system (GIS), to obtain a model of the contamination. A microcosm anaerobic study was utilized to assess the potential for in situ natural or enhanced bioremediation. Most of the microcosms were positive for dechlorination, particularly those inoculated with a mineral medium. This indicate the presence of an active native dechlorinating population in the subsurface, probably inhibited by co-contaminants in the groundwater, or more likely by the absence or lack of nutritional factors. Among the tested electron donors (i.e., yeast extract, lactate, and butyrate) lactate and butyrate enhanced dechlorination of chlorinated compounds. PCA and GIS studies allowed delimiting the contamination; the microcosm study helped to identify the conditions to promote the bioremediation of the area.

  11. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Matteucci, Federica; Ercole, Claudia; del Gallo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Perchloroethene, trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form dense non-aqueous phase liquids that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy, there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (“Val Vibrata”), characterized by a significant chlorinated solvents contamination. Data from the various monitoring campaigns that have taken place over time were collected, and new samplings were carried out, resulting in a complete database. The data matrix was processed with a multivariate statistic analysis (in particular principal component analysis, PCA) and was then imported into geographic information system (GIS), to obtain a model of the contamination. A microcosm anaerobic study was utilized to assess the potential for in situ natural or enhanced bioremediation. Most of the microcosms were positive for dechlorination, particularly those inoculated with a mineral medium. This indicate the presence of an active native dechlorinating population in the subsurface, probably inhibited by co-contaminants in the groundwater, or more likely by the absence or lack of nutritional factors. Among the tested electron donors (i.e., yeast extract, lactate, and butyrate) lactate and butyrate enhanced dechlorination of chlorinated compounds. PCA and GIS studies allowed delimiting the contamination; the microcosm study helped to identify the conditions to promote the bioremediation of the area. PMID:26388862

  12. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  14. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  15. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  16. Cardiovascular effects of selected water-miscible solvents for pharmaceutical injections and embolization materials: a comparative hemodynamic study using a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Alexandre; Mottu, Florence; Chapot, René; Zhang, Jong Qi; Jordan, Olivier; Rüfenacht, Daniel A; Doelker, Eric; Merland, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Generally, organic water-miscible solvents are used intravascularly (both intravenously and intra-arterially) for preparing two types of formulations, namely, pharmaceutical injections of poorly soluble drugs and precipitating liquid embolic polymeric materials for the minimally invasive treatment of aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, or tumors, by arterial route. Although several of such solvents have been used in both drug delivery and interventional radiology, their safety profile is a concern. In particular, there is a lack of comparative investigations of their cardiovascular effects when injected intra-arterially. We selected 13 non-aqueous water-miscible solvents based on their capacity to solubilize drugs or embolic polymeric materials, and on their described use, at least diluted with water, in pharmaceutical formulations. Their in vivo hemodynamic toxicity in male adult sheep after infra-renal aorta catheterization has been estimated with respect to the arterial and venous pressures, as well as the heart rate. Saline solution was used as a control. Three different volumes (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mL) were infused rapidly. An increase in arterial pressure and concomitant decrease in venous pressure, which we considered as signs of a cardiovascular toxicity, were observed to a differing extent for all organic solvents. Changes in heart rate were negligible. Based on the intensity of arterial pressure change after a 1-mL infusion, a classification of the toxicity of the solvents following intra-arterial infusion is proposed: Solvents devoid of significant cardiovascular toxicity: dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), Glycofurol 75, polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200), diglyme. Solvents with moderate cardiovascular toxicity: tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA), ethanol, acetone, Solketal, glycerol formal, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Solvents with marked cardiovascular toxicity: propylene glycol, ethyl lactate, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Emphasis is put on the relative

  17. Combining MOSCED with molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations to develop an efficient tool for solvent formulation and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Courtney E.; Phifer, Jeremy R.; Ferreira da Silva, Larissa; Gonçalves Nogueira, Gabriel; Ley, Ryan T.; O'Loughlin, Elizabeth J.; Pereira Barbosa, Ana Karolyne; Rygelski, Brett T.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2017-02-01

    Solubility parameter based methods have long been a valuable tool for solvent formulation and selection. Of these methods, the MOdified Separation of Cohesive Energy Density (MOSCED) has recently been shown to correlate well the equilibrium solubility of multifunctional non-electrolyte solids. However, before it can be applied to a novel solute, a limited amount of reference solubility data is required to regress the necessary MOSCED parameters. Here we demonstrate for the solutes methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, lidocaine and ephedrine how conventional molecular simulation free energy calculations or electronic structure calculations in a continuum solvent, here the SMD or SM8 solvation model, can instead be used to generate the necessary reference data, resulting in a predictive flavor of MOSCED. Adopting the melting point temperature and enthalpy of fusion of these compounds from experiment, we are able to predict equilibrium solubilities. We find the method is able to well correlate the (mole fraction) equilibrium solubility in non-aqueous solvents over four orders of magnitude with good quantitative agreement.

  18. Isolation of β-carotene, α-carotene and lutein from carrots by countercurrent chromatography with the solvent system modifier benzotrifluoride.

    PubMed

    Englert, Michael; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2015-04-03

    A carotenoid purification method with dual-mode countercurrent chromatography (CCC) for β-carotene, α-carotene and lutein from a fresh carrot extract was developed. The fluorinated liquid benzotrifluoride (IUPAC name: (trifluoromethyl)benzene) was used as a novel modifier in the non-aqueous ternary solvent system n-hexane/benzotrifluoride/acetonitrile. The ternary phase diagram of the type I solvent system was used to select two-phase solvent mixtures which enabled an efficient preparative separation of α-carotene, β-carotene and lutein from concomitant pigments in crude carrot extract. By means of the modifier, high separation factors (α ≥ 1.2) were obtained, allowing baseline resolution between α-carotene and β-carotene due to specific chemical interactions such as π-π molecular interactions. After optimizing the injection step with a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, 51 mg of β-carotene, 32 mg of α-carotene and 4 mg of lutein could be isolated from 100.2mg crude carrot extract in a short time and with high purities of 95% and 99% by using dual-mode CCC, respectively. Temperatures > 22°C had a negative impact on the separation of α-carotene and β-carotene.

  19. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F; Venturini, Cristina de G; Machado, Vanderlei G

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy (E(T)) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The E(T) values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  20. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  1. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2013-08-01

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation.

  3. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  5. The role of active-site Phe87 in modulating the organic co-solvent tolerance of cytochrome P450 BM3 monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Jochen; Tee, Kang Lan; Wilmanns, Matthias; Roccatano, Danilo; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Wong, Tuck Seng

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of organic co-solvents on protein structure and function is pivotal to engineering enzymes for biotransformation in non-aqueous solvents. The effects of DMSO on the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 BM3 have previously been investigated and the importance of Phe87 in its organic co-solvent tolerance was identified. To probe the DMSO inactivation mechanism and the functional role of Phe87 in modulating the organic co-solvent tolerance of P450 BM3, the haem domain (Thr1–Leu455) of the F87A variant was cocrystallized in the presence of 14%(v/v) and 28%(v/v) DMSO. At both DMSO concentrations the protein retained the canonical structure of the P450 haem domain without any sign of partial or global unfolding. Interestingly, a DMSO molecule was found in the active site of both structures, with its O atom pointing towards the haem iron. The orientation of the DMSO molecule indicated a dynamic coordination process that was in competition with the active-site water molecule. The ability of the DMSO molecule to coordinate the haem iron is plausibly the main reason why P450 BM3 is inactivated at elevated DMSO concentrations. The data allowed an interesting comparison with the wild-type structures reported previously. A DMSO molecule was found when the wild-type protein was placed in 28%(v/v) DMSO, in which the DMSO molecule coordinated the haem iron directly via its S atom. Intriguingly, no DMSO molecule was observed at 14%(v/v) DMSO for the wild-type structure. These results suggested that the bulky phenyl side chain of Phe87 protects the haem from being accessed by the DMSO molecule and explains the higher tolerance of the wild-type enzyme towards organic co-solvents compared with its F87A variant. PMID:22949185

  6. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  7. Dynamics around solutes and solute-solvent complexes in mixed solvents.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Sungnam; Fayer, M D

    2007-09-04

    Ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo experiments, IR pump-probe experiments, and FT-IR spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of phenol-OD in three solvents, CCl4, mesitylene (1, 3, 5 trimethylbenzene), and the mixed solvent of mesitylene and CCl4 (0.83 mole fraction CCl4), are used to study solute-solvent dynamics via observation of spectral diffusion. Phenol forms a complex with Mesitylene. In the mesitylene solution, there is only complexed phenol; in the CCl4 solution, there is only uncomplexed phenol; and in the mixed solvent, both phenol species are present. Dynamics of the free phenol in CCl4 or the mixed solvent are very similar, and dynamics of the complex in mesitylene and in the mixed solvent are very similar. However, there are differences in the slowest time scale dynamics between the pure solvents and the mixed solvents. The mixed solvent produces slower dynamics that are attributed to first solvent shell solvent composition variations. The composition variations require a longer time to randomize than is required in the pure solvents, where only density variations occur. The experimental results and recent MD simulations indicate that the solvent structure around the solute may be different from the mixed solvent's mole fraction.

  8. Asphaltene aggregation in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeongseok; Ring, Terry A; Deo, Milind D

    2004-03-01

    Asphaltenic solids formed in the Rangely field in the course of a carbon dioxide flood and heptane insolubles in the oil from the same field were used in this study. Four different solvents were used to dissolve the asphaltenes. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the onset of asphaltene precipitation by heptane titration. When the onset values were plotted versus asphaltene concentrations, distinct break points (called critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) in this paper) were observed. CACs for the field asphaltenes dissolved in toluene, trichloroethylene, tetrahydrofuran, and pyridine occurred at concentrations of 3.0, 3.7, 5.0, and 8.2 g/l, respectively. CACs are observed at similar concentrations as critical micelle concentrations (CMC) for the asphaltenes in the solvents employed and can be interpreted to be the points at which rates of asphaltene aggregations change. CMC values of asphaltenes determined from surface tension measurements (in pyridine and TCE) were slightly higher than the CAC values measured by NIR onset measurements. The CAC for heptane-insoluble asphaltenes in toluene was 3.1 g/l. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental compositions of the two asphaltenes showed that the H/C ratio of the heptane-insoluble asphaltenes was higher and molecular weight (measured by vapor pressure osmometry) was lower.

  9. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  10. Organic solvent use in enterprises in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yasuhiro; Ukai, Hirohiko; Okamoto, Satoru; Samoto, Hajime; Itoh, Kenji; Moriguchi, Jiro; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Ohashi, Fumiko; Takada, Shiro; Kawakami, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to elucidate possible changes in types of organic solvents (to be called solvents in short) used in enterprises in Japan through comparison of current solvent types with historical data since 1983. To investigate current situation in solvent use in enterprises, surveys were conducted during one year of 2009 to 2010. In total, workroom air samples in 1,497 unit workplaces with solvent use were analyzed in accordance with regulatory requirements. Typical use pattern of solvents was as mixtures, accounting for >70% of cases. Adhesives spreading (followed by adhesion) was relatively common in small-scale enterprises, whereas printing and painting work was more common in middle-scale ones, and solvent use for testing and research purpose was basically in large-scaled enterprises. Through-out printing, painting, surface coating and adhesive application, toluene was most common (being detected in 49 to 82% of workplaces depending on work types), whereas isopropyl alcohol was most common (49%) in degreasing, cleaning and wiping workplaces. Other commonly used solvents were methyl alcohol, ethyl acetate and acetone (33 to 37%). Comparison with historical data in Japan and literature-retrieved data outside of Japan all agreed with the observation that toluene is the most commonly used solvent. Application of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, once common in 1980s, has ceased to exist in recent years.

  11. Special Issue: "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents".

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jonathan; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    To overcome the well-established drawbacks of conventional organic solvents (toxicity, non-biodegradability, flammability, accumulation in the atmosphere) remarkable research efforts have been recently devoted to the replacement of traditional organic reaction media by the so-called Green Solvents. In this sense, the choice of a safe, non-toxic, biorenewable and cheap reaction media is a crucial goal in organic synthesis. Thus, this Special Issue on "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents" has been aimed to showcase a series of stimulating contributions from international experts within different sub-areas of organic synthesis in Green Solvents (ranging from metal- to organo-catalyzed organic reactions).

  12. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  13. A solvent tolerant isolate of Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Singh, Rajni; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2006-01-01

    A solvent tolerant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Presence of cyclohexane (20%) in culture media prolonged the lag phase and caused reduction in biomass. Transmission electron micrographs showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvent in case of the cells grown in cyclohexane. The Enterobacter isolate was able to grow in the range of organic solvents having log P above 3.2 and also in presence of mercury, thus showing potential for treatment of solvent rich wastes.

  14. Solvent-driven chemical motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumata, Tetsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1998-10-01

    A solvent-driven chemical motor using amphiphilic polymer gel has been fabricated. The driving force of the gel originates from the surface tension of spreading organic fluid which is pumped out by osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in the gel. A tetrahydrofurane-swollen gel equipped with a spouting hole made a controlled translational motion with a velocity of 77 mm/s or rotational motion with a maximum speed of 400 rpm and a torque of 10-9-10-7 Nm on the water surface. A generator to produce an electric power with a maximum electromotive force of 15 mV and electric power of 0.2 μW has also been constructed. The successful fabrication of gel motor may produce a new era of soft machine systems which work without pollution and unnecessary intermediates.

  15. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  16. Organic solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes an organic solvent-stable proteolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Shiotani, Takashi

    1995-12-01

    A bacterial strain which can be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and can secrete a proteolytic enzyme was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain was derived by the following two-step procedures: high proteolytic enzyme producers were first isolated by the usual method, and then the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism was selected from these high-rate proteolytic enzyme producers. The proteolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture was stable in the presence of various organic solvents. The stability of the enzyme in the presence of organic solvents, of which the values of the logarithm of the partition coefficient (log P) were equal to or more than 3.2, was almost the same as that in the absence of organic solvents. It is expected that both the solvent-tolerant microorganism and the solvent-stable enzyme produced by this strain can be used as catalysts for reactions in the presence of organic solvents.

  17. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  18. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  19. The legacy of chlorinated solvents in the Birmingham aquifer, UK: Observations spanning three decades and the challenge of future urban groundwater development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivett, Michael O.; Turner, Ryan J.; Glibbery (née Murcott), Penny; Cuthbert, Mark O.

    2012-10-01

    Licensed abstraction well data collected during 1986-2008 from a total of 77 wells mainly located at industrial sites combined with historic land use data from 1975 has allowed insight into the legacy of chlorinated solvent contamination in the Birmingham aquifer that underlies the UK's second largest city. This legacy, expected to be reasonably symptomatic of those occurring in other urban aquifers, was characterised by: dominance of parent solvents, particularly TCE (trichloroethene) that widely exceeded drinking-water quality criteria; greater TCE occurrence in wells in proximity to increased historic land use by the metal/engineering solvent-user industry (the relationship providing a first-pass indicator of future resource development potential); regional groundwater vulnerability controls; well abstraction changes (over months to decades) influential of observed concentration transients and anticipated plume capture or release; persistence of contamination over decades (with less soluble PCE (perchloroethene) showing increased persistence relative to TCE) that was reasonably ascribed to slow contaminant release from DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) sources and, or low permeability layers; presence of dechlorination products arising from solvent (bio)degradation, although this key attenuation process appeared to have moderate to weak influence regionally on plumes; and, inadvertent, but significant solvent mass removal from the aquifer by industrial abstractions. Key challenges to realising future urban groundwater development were identified based on the observed legacy and well capture zone simulations. Despite the extensive contamination of the aquifer, it should still be possible to develop wells of high (several megalitres per day) capacity for drinking water supply (or other lower grade uses) without the requirement for solvent treatment. In those areas with higher risk of contamination, our dataset, together with application of emergent risk

  20. The legacy of chlorinated solvents in the Birmingham aquifer, UK: observations spanning three decades and the challenge of future urban groundwater development.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Turner, Ryan J; Glibbery Née Murcott, Penny; Cuthbert, Mark O

    2012-10-01

    Licensed abstraction well data collected during 1986-2008 from a total of 77 wells mainly located at industrial sites combined with historic land use data from 1975 has allowed insight into the legacy of chlorinated solvent contamination in the Birmingham aquifer that underlies the UK's second largest city. This legacy, expected to be reasonably symptomatic of those occurring in other urban aquifers, was characterised by: dominance of parent solvents, particularly TCE (trichloroethene) that widely exceeded drinking-water quality criteria; greater TCE occurrence in wells in proximity to increased historic land use by the metal/engineering solvent-user industry (the relationship providing a first-pass indicator of future resource development potential); regional groundwater vulnerability controls; well abstraction changes (over months to decades) influential of observed concentration transients and anticipated plume capture or release; persistence of contamination over decades (with less soluble PCE (perchloroethene) showing increased persistence relative to TCE) that was reasonably ascribed to slow contaminant release from DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) sources and, or low permeability layers; presence of dechlorination products arising from solvent (bio)degradation, although this key attenuation process appeared to have moderate to weak influence regionally on plumes; and, inadvertent, but significant solvent mass removal from the aquifer by industrial abstractions. Key challenges to realising future urban groundwater development were identified based on the observed legacy and well capture zone simulations. Despite the extensive contamination of the aquifer, it should still be possible to develop wells of high (several megalitres per day) capacity for drinking water supply (or other lower grade uses) without the requirement for solvent treatment. In those areas with higher risk of contamination, our dataset, together with application of emergent risk

  1. Mechanisms of solute rejection in solvent resistant nanofiltration: the effect of solvent on solute rejection.

    PubMed

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Degrève, Jan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-10-28

    The separation performance of solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membranes was studied in a systematic way to elucidate the complex mechanisms involved in rejection of solutes. Rejection of three dyes (Sudan II, Sudan Black, Sudan 408) from common organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene and n-hexane) through a polyimide based SRNF membrane, STARMEM™122, was studied. It was found that the rejection of the STARMEM™122 membrane was lower than that indicated by the manufacturer. The experimental observations for Sudan II were not promising for the rejection study as they were lower than expected. Sudan Black and Sudan 408, which are larger solutes than Sudan II, provided more interesting insights. The effects of the solvent on the membrane and solute were studied separately. A higher permeation rate of ketones and alcohols was observed, while permeabilities of non-polar solvents were low which shows that this membrane shows higher affinity toward semi-polar solvents (alcohols, ketones). The effect of the solvent on the solute's rejection, based on the results for Sudan Black and Sudan 408, was studied for solvents in the same chemical groups, since the membrane showed a similar separation performance for solvents with similar functional groups (e.g. alcohols). The effect of solvent on solute molecular size was investigated by using simulation with Molecular Dynamics. It was shown that the effective size of a molecule is dependent on the solvent due to solvation and hydration of the solute by the solvent. The size of the solute in the solvent belonging to a similar family was studied separately. It was clear that the rejection was influenced by molecular size of the solute in the same group of solvents. A surprising negative rejection of solutes was achieved for n-hexane. Although solutes in n-hexane have higher volume compared to those in other solvents, the affinity between the solute and membrane increases the solute

  2. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  3. Coal mining with a liquid solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Study suggests carbonated water can dissolve or suspend coal and carry it to surface. Mixture of carbon dioxide and water may be coal solvent that will make unmanned mining reality. When used with proposed process monitoring coal solubility with conventional strain gage, solvent is basis for rapid cost effective extraction of coal from underground seams.

  4. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Cytotoxic effects of gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S V; Burkard, D H; Spångberg, L S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of commonly used gutta-percha solvents was evaluated. Gutta-percha dissolved by chloroform, halothane, or turpentine was evaluated with the radiochromium release method using L929 mouse fibroblast cells. All solvents were toxic. Turpentine was most toxic followed by halothane and chloroform, which caused similar levels of cell injury.

  6. Evaluation of Gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1990-11-01

    Five solvents (rectified white turpentine, oil of melaleuca, eucalyptol, white pine oil, and pine needle oil) were compared with chloroform for their ability to dissolve gutta-percha. All solvents dissolved at least 50% of the gutta-percha in 15 min at 37 degrees C with chloroform and rectified white turpentine dissolving the gutta-percha completely.

  7. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  8. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  9. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  10. A spreadsheet algorithm for stagewise solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  11. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  12. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  13. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  14. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.

  15. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  16. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  17. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  18. METHOD FOR SOLVENT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, P.B.

    1962-09-18

    This invention provides a method for producing densely compacted bodies having relatively large dimensions. The method comprises the addition of a small quantity of a suitable solvent to a powder which is to be compacted. The solvent- moistened powder is placed inside a flexible bag, and the bag is suspended in an isostatic press. The solvent is squeezed out of the powder by the isostatic pressure, and the resulting compacted body is recovered. The presence of the solvent markedly decreases the proportion of void space in the powder, thereby resulting in a denser, more homogeneous compact. Another effect of the solvent is that it allows the isostatic pressing operation to be conducted at substantially lower pressures than are conventionally employed. (AEC)

  19. Stabilization of Underground Solvent Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, T.R.

    2003-08-15

    The Old Solvent Tanks (OST), located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are comprised of 22 underground storage tanks that were used to store spent radioactive solvent and aqueous wastes generated from the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process. The OSTs were installed at various dates between 1955 and 1968 and used to store the spent solvents until 1974. The spent solvents stored in the OSTs were transferred out from 1976 through 1981 leaving only residual liquids and sludges that could not be pumped out.Final remediation goals include an overlying infiltration control system. If the tanks were to structurally fail, they would collapse causing potential for onsite worker exposure and release of tank contents to the environment. Therefore, as an interim action, methods for stabilizing the tanks were evaluated. This paper will discuss the systems designed to perform and monitor the grouting operation, the grouting process, and the radiological controls and wastes associated with grouting the Old Solvent Tanks.

  20. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  1. Assessment of solvents for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Tsianou, Marina; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-03-01

    A necessary step in the processing of biomass is the pretreatment and dissolution of cellulose. A good solvent for cellulose involves high diffusivity, aggressiveness in decrystallization, and capability of disassociating the cellulose chains. However, it is not clear which of these factors and under what conditions should be improved in order to obtain a more effective solvent. To this end, a newly-developed phenomenological model has been applied to assess the controlling mechanism of cellulose dissolution. Among the findings, the cellulose fibers remain crystalline almost to the end of the dissolution process for decrystallization-controlled kinetics. In such solvents, decreasing the fiber crystallinity, e.g., via pretreatment, would result in a considerable increase in the dissolution rate. Such insights improve the understanding of cellulose dissolution and facilitate the selection of more efficient solvents and processing conditions for biomass. Specific examples of solvents are provided where dissolution is limited due to decrystallization or disentanglement.

  2. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  3. Multiphase transport simulation and venting experiments to identify NAPL source in vadose zone at a site contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, W.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    In many countries, groundwater is threatened by contamination from Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids such as chlorinated solvents (e.g. TCE). Existing as a residual or trapped source in the unsaturated zone, NAPLs remain in a continuous contamination source to groundwater even after groundwater itself was remediated because the residual NAPL source could be dissolved into the groundwater intermittently. In this study, 1-D and 2-D experiments were conducted. For 1-D experiment, a column (1 m) packed with well-sorted sand was used for developing the hydraulic properties in VOC transport. In 2-D experiment, hydraulic and contaminant properties in unsaturated condition were investigated including gas-phase concentration of a volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) originated from residual or trapped NAPLs with different distances between an extraction well and source point, with different extraction rates and with different extraction intervals. While extracting air from the sand-tank (50 x 30 x 5 cm), temperature, humidity and pressure data were compiled with logging sensors. One and two-dimensional STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator were used to simulate the experimental conditions. The experimental and simulation results can be used to estimate distances from extraction wells to source locations of residual NAPLs.

  4. A novel detergent-stable solvent-tolerant serine thiol alkaline protease from Streptomyces koyangensis TN650.

    PubMed

    Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Rekik, Hatem; Bejar, Wacim; Boulkour Touioui, Souraya; Hmidi, Maher; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-08-01

    An alkaline proteinase (STAP) was produced from strain TN650 isolated from a Tunisian off-shore oil field and assigned as Streptomyces koyangensis strain TN650 based on physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 45125.17-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of TQSNPPSWGLDRIDQTTAFTKACSIKY, thus sharing high homology with those of Streptomyces proteases. The results showed that this protease was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), and partially inhibited by 5,5-dithio-bis-(2-nitro benzoic acid) (DTNB), which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine thiol protease family. Using casein as a substrate, the optimum pH and temperature values for protease activity were pH 10 and 70 °C, respectively. The protease was stable at pH 7-10 and 30-60 °C for 24 h. STAP exhibited high catalytic efficiency, significant detergent stability, and elevated organic solvent resistance compared to the SG-XIV proteases from S. griseus and KERAB from Streptomyces sp. AB1. The stap gene encoding STAP was isolated, and its DNA sequence was determined. These properties make STAP a potential candidate for future application in detergent formulations and non-aqueous peptide biocatalysis.

  5. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  6. ACCELERATED SOLVENT EXTRACTION COMBINED WITH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A research project was initiated to address a recurring problem of elevated detection limits above required risk-based concentrations for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds in high moisture content solid samples. This project was initiated, in cooperation with the EPA Region 1 Laboratory, under the Regional Methods Program administered through the ORD Office of Science Policy. The aim of the project was to develop an approach for the rapid removal of water in high moisture content solids (e.g., wetland sediments) in preparation for analysis via Method 8270. Alternative methods for water removal have been investigated to enhance compound solid concentrations and improve extraction efficiency, with the use of pressure filtration providing a high-throughput alternative for removal of the majority of free water in sediments and sludges. In order to eliminate problems with phase separation during extraction of solids using Accelerated Solvent Extraction, a variation of a water-isopropanol extraction method developed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, CO is being employed. The concentrations of target compounds in water-isopropanol extraction fluids are subsequently analyzed using an automated Solid Phase Extraction (SPE)-GC/MS method developed in our laboratory. The coupled approaches for dewatering, extraction, and target compound identification-quantitation provide a useful alternative to enhance sample throughput for Me

  7. Differential response of marine diatoms to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Phillips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V.

    1995-06-01

    Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result of discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, only few data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Phytoplankton species vary in their tolerance to trace metals. Diatoms in particular are able to detoxify trace metals by the excretion of organic compounds. A previous study reported that diatoms collected form different sites in the Gulf of Mexico varied in their physiological characteristics. Algae have been considered to be good indicator s of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to marine diatoms. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on seven diatom species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  9. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  10. Solvent Effect on the Photolysis of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmed, Sofia; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Bano, Raheela; Hafeez, Ambreen

    2015-10-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in water (pH 7.0) and in organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrometric method for the assay of RF and its major photoproducts, formylmethylflavin and lumichrome. The apparent first-order rate constants (k obs) for the reaction range from 3.19 (ethyl acetate) to 4.61 × 10(-3) min(-1) (water). The values of k obs have been found to be a linear function of solvent dielectric constant implying the participation of a dipolar intermediate along the reaction pathway. The degradation of this intermediate is promoted by the polarity of the medium. This indicates a greater stabilization of the excited-triplet states of RF with an increase in solvent polarity to facilitate its reduction. The rate constants for the reaction show a linear relation with the solvent acceptor number indicating the degree of solute-solvent interaction in different solvents. It would depend on the electron-donating capacity of RF molecule in organic solvents. The values of k obs are inversely proportional to the viscosity of the medium as a result of diffusion-controlled processes.

  11. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (δ13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  12. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  13. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  14. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  15. A Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-08-01

    The material balance and equilibrium equations for solvent extraction processes have been combined with computer spreadsheets in a new way so that models for very complex multicomponent multistage operations can be setup and used easily. A part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  16. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  17. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  18. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  19. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  20. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  1. Interaction of organic solvents with protein structures at protein-solvent interface.

    PubMed

    Khabiri, Morteza; Minofar, Babak; Brezovský, Jan; Damborský, Jiří; Ettrich, Rudiger

    2013-11-01

    The effect of non-denaturing concentrations of three different organic solvents, formamide, acetone and isopropanol, on the structure of haloalkane dehalogenases DhaA, LinB, and DbjA at the protein-solvent interface was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of B-factors revealed that the presence of a given organic solvent mainly affects the dynamical behavior of the specificity-determining cap domain, with the exception of DbjA in acetone. Orientation of organic solvent molecules on the protein surface during the simulations was clearly dependent on their interaction with hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface patches, and the simulations suggest that the behavior of studied organic solvents in the vicinity of hyrophobic patches on the surface is similar to the air/water interface. DbjA was the only dimeric enzyme among studied haloalkane dehalogenases and provided an opportunity to explore effects of organic solvents on the quaternary structure. Penetration and trapping of organic solvents in the network of interactions between both monomers depends on the physico-chemical properties of the organic solvents. Consequently, both monomers of this enzyme oscillate differently in different organic solvents. With the exception of LinB in acetone, the structures of studied enzymes were stabilized in water-miscible organic solvents.

  2. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  3. [Shoe factory workers, solvents and health].

    PubMed

    Foà, Vito; Martinotti, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents in footwear manufacturing industry came from the glues used adhering the shoe parts to each other. Benzene was the first solvent used in shoe factories until the evidence of its capacity to cause leukaemia. Then, the demonstration that exposure to n-hexane was related to distal polyneuropathy limited the use of this substance. After that, results of neurotoxicological studies conducted on workers exposed to different mixtures of organic solvents make necessary prevention measure directed to a progressive reduction of air dispersion of these chemicals. Today exposure to solvents in workplaces is regulated by health based exposure limit values that should warranty absence of central nervous system effects. One of the most important rules of occupational medicine is verify that these exposure levels are really health protective also for workers with increased susceptibility.

  4. Deasphalted oil -- A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene, xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various non conventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  5. Deasphalted oil: A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1996-08-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene and xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various nonconventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  6. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  7. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  8. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  9. Used lubricating oil recycling using hydrocarbon solvents.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ahmad; Al-Zubaidy, Essam; Fayed, Muhammad E

    2005-01-01

    A solvent extraction process using new hydrocarbon solvents was employed to treat used lubricant oil. The solvents used were liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) condensate and stabilized condensate. A demulsifier was used to enhance the treatment process. The extraction process using stabilized condensate demonstrated characteristics that make it competitive with existing used oil treatment technologies. The process is able to reduce the asphaltene content of the treated lubricating oil to 0.106% (w/w), the ash content to 0.108%, and the carbon residue to 0.315% with very low levels of contaminant metals. The overall yield of oil is 79%. The treated used oil can be recycled as base lubricating oil. The major disadvantage of this work is the high temperature of solvent recovery. Experimental work and results are presented in detail.

  10. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  11. Wetting of polymers by their solvents.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence; Verneuil, Emilie; Delannoy, Guillaume; Valois, Pauline

    2016-02-01

    We review the studies on the wetting of soluble polymeric substrates by their solvents, both in the literature and conducted in our group in the past decade. When a droplet of solvent spreads on a soluble polymer layer, its wetting angle can strongly vary with the contact line velocity even at capillary numbers smaller than unity, in contrast to non-soluble substrates. The solvent content in the polymer is a key parameter for the spreading dynamics; that content is set by the initial conditions, but also by the transfers occurring from the droplet to the polymer layer during spreading. We focus on hydrophilic amorphous polymers that are glassy at room temperature, and we discuss the consequences on wetting of the very large changes in the polymer physical properties induced by solvent sorption. We finally present new results on polymers of varying molar masses, and show how they open new perspectives for a better understanding of powder dissolution.

  12. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  13. Recovery, Reuse, and Recycle of Solvents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    So. San Francisco, CA 94080 (513) 771-2300 (415) 589-9600 Buflovak Division Safety-Kleen Corp. Blaw - Knox food and Chimical Eq. Co. 655 Big Timber Rd...ing, oil and grease removal for cleanup, protective surface removal, and cleaning of wheel bearings. Both hydrocarbon solvents and halogenated solvents...fluid but it could still be blended and downgraded for use as a metal cleaner, - such as using it to clean wheel bearings. Heptane is also an excellent

  14. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  15. Water as a Solvent for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  16. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate. PMID:27708264

  17. Microencapsulation of advanced solvents for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Ye, Congwang; Oakdale, James S; Baker, Sarah E; Smith, William L; Nguyen, Du T; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Aines, Roger D

    2016-10-20

    Purpose-designed, water-lean solvents have been developed to improve the energy efficiency of CO2 capture from power plants, including CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) and ionic liquids (ILs). Many of these solvents are highly viscous or change phases, posing challenges for conventional process equipment. Such problems can be overcome by encapsulation. Micro-Encapsulated CO2 Sorbents (MECS) consist of a CO2-absorbing solvent or slurry encased in spherical, CO2-permeable polymer shells. The resulting capsules have diameters in the range of 100-600 μm, greatly increasing the surface area and CO2 absorption rate of the encapsulated solvent. Encapsulating these new solvents requires careful selection of shell materials and fabrication techniques. We find several common classes of polymers are not compatible with MECS production, but we develop two custom formulations, a silicone and an acrylate, that show promise for encapsulating water-lean solvents. We make the first demonstration of an encapsulated IL for CO2 capture. The rate of CO2 absorption is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 compared to a liquid film, a value that can be improved by further development of shell materials and fabrication techniques.

  18. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  19. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  20. Effect of Organic Solvents on the Yield of Solvent-Tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    PubMed Central

    Isken, Sonja; Derks, Antoine; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microorganisms are useful in biotransformations with whole cells in two-phase solvent-water systems. The results presented here describe the effects that organic solvents have on the growth of these organisms. The maximal growth rate of Pseudomonas putida S12, 0.8 h−1, was not affected by toluene in batch cultures, but in chemostat cultures the solvent decreased the maximal growth rate by nearly 50%. Toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, xylene, hexane, and cyclohexane reduced the biomass yield, and this effect depended on the concentration of the solvent in the bacterial membrane and not on its chemical structure. The dose response to solvents in terms of yield was linear up to an approximately 200 mM concentration of solvent in the bacterial membrane, both in the wild type and in a mutant lacking an active efflux system for toluene. Above this critical concentration the yield of the wild type remained constant at 0.2 g of protein/g of glucose with increasing concentrations of toluene. The reduction of the yield in the presence of solvents is due to a maintenance higher by a factor of three or four as well as to a decrease of the maximum growth yield by 33%. Therefore, energy-consuming adaptation processes as well as the uncoupling effect of the solvents reduce the yield of the tolerant cells. PMID:10347053

  1. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2012-01-07

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  2. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  3. Scale-up of recovery process for waste solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carey, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Recycling of spent cleaning solvents, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and trichlorotrifluoroethane at KCP was evaluated. Gas chromatography was used to identify stabilization levels in virgin and recycled solvent. Segregation, pretreatment and distillation processes were defined. Existing distillation equipment was modified and a solvent drying process was added. Recycled solvent quality of several production lots is also presented. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Solvent disperser for removing oil from sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Di Foggio, R.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes method for dispersing solvent for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, comprising: (a) receiving solvent dripping downwardly, and (b) conducting the received solvent by means of capillary action to an application zone located and dimensioned for passing such solvent to the sponge in a sponge core barrel.

  5. Organic-solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes organic-solvent-stable lipolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruo )

    1994-10-01

    A bacterial strain which could be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and which could secrete lipolytic enzyme was isolated. The stability of the lipolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture increased significantly in the presence of organic solvents such as toluene, cyclohexane, ethanol, and acetone. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Effect of solvents, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Thipperudrappa, J; Deepa, H R; Raghavendra, U P; Hanagodimath, S M; Melavanki, R M

    2017-02-01

    The effect of solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen bonding ability, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on the photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye, 2,5-di[(E)-1-(4-diethylaminophenyl) methylidine]-1-cyclopentanone (2,5-DEAPMC), is investigated at room temperature. Solvent effect is analyzed using Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function, Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter, and Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches. The spectral properties better follow Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter than the Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function. This indicates that both general and specific solute-solvent interactions are operative. Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches indicate that polarizability/dipolarity solvent influences are greater than hydrogen bond donor and hydrogen bond acceptor solvent influences. The solvatochromic correlations are used to estimate excited state dipole moment using the experimentally determined ground state dipole moment. The excited state dipole moment of the dye is found to be larger than its corresponding ground state dipole moment and ground and excited state dipole moments are not parallel, but subtend an angle of 77°. The absorption and emission spectra are modulated in the presence silver nanoparticles. The fluorescence of 2,5-DEAPMC is quenched by silver nanoparticles. The possible fluorescence quenching mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Changes in psychological performances of solvent-poisoned and solvent-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in psychological performances associated with long-term exposure to organic solvents and solvent mixtures were studied in a group of 56 male workers diagnosed as having an occupational disease caused by solvents. Their mean duration of exposure was 9.1 +/- SD 8.3 years, and they were exposed mainly to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons and to mixtures of paint solvents. The psychological performances of these solvent-exposed patients were compared with those of 98 styrene-exposed workers and a nonexposed group of 43 construction workers. The applied psychological test variables were factor analyzed, before other statistical analysis, in order to clarify what they measured in the present study. The solvent-exposed group was characterized by a decline in visuomotor performance and decreased freedom from distractibility. The poor visuomotor performances were also related to the long duration of solvent exposure in this group of patients. The index applied for the exposure level revealed no significant relationships to psychological performances among the solvent-exposed patients. The psychological performances of the styrene-exposed group differed only very slightly from those of the nonexposed workers.

  8. Towards ultra-fast solvent evaporation, the development of a computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gunnar; Wong, J.; Drapes, C.; Grant, M.; Baruth, A.

    Despite the promise of cheap and fast nanoscale ordering of block polymer thin films via solvent vapor annealing, a standardized, scalable production scheme remains elusive. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a nano-thin film to the vapors of one or more solvents with the goal of forming a swollen and mobile state to direct the self-assembly process by tuning surface energies and mediating unfavorable chain interactions. We have shown that optimized annealing conditions, where kinetic and thermal properties for crystal growth are extremely fast (<1s), exist at solvent concentrations just below the order-disorder transition of the film. However, when investigating the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of a film during drying, the role of solvent evaporation comes under great scrutiny. During this process, the film undergoes a competition between two fronts; phase separation and kinetic trapping. Recent results in both theory and experiment point toward this critical element in controlling the resultant morphologies; however, no current method includes a controllable solvent evaporation rate at ultra-fast time scales. We report on a computer-controlled, pneumatically actuated chamber that provides control over solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance monitors solvent concentration with 10 ms temporal resolution and reveals several possible evaporation trajectories, ranging from linear to exponential to logarithmic. Funded by Dr. Randolph Ferlic Summer Research Scholarship and NASA Nebraska Space Grant.

  9. Solvent System Selection Strategies in Countercurrent Separation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J. Brent; McAlpine, James B.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of applications in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography, collectively known as countercurrent separation, are dedicated to medicinal plant and natural product research. In countercurrent separation, the selection of the appropriate solvent system is of utmost importance as it is the equivalent to the simultaneous choice of column and eluent in liquid chromatography. However, solvent system selection is often laborious, involving extensive partition and/or analytical trials. Therefore, simplified solvent system selection strategies that predict the partition coefficients and, thus, analyte behavior are in high demand and may advance both the science of countercurrent separation and its applications. The last decade of solvent system selection theory and applications are critically reviewed, and strategies are classified according to their data input requirements. This offers the practitioner an up-to-date overview of rationales and methods for choosing an efficient solvent system, provides a perspective regarding their accuracy, reliability, and practicality, and discusses the possibility of combining multiple methods for enhanced prediction power. PMID:26393937

  10. Solvent extraction of phenols from water

    SciTech Connect

    Greminger, D.C.; Burns, G.P.; Lynn, S.; Hanson, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE) have been evaluated as solvents for extraction of phenols, at high dilution, from water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) have been measured for phenol, dihydroxybenzenes and trihydroxybenzenes in both solvents as a function of pH. Particularly for the multihydric phenols, MIBK gives substantially higher values of K/sub D/ than does DIPE. The effect of pH can be described quantitatively through a simple ionization model, using published values of dissociation constants for the various phenols. Some method for removal of residual dissolved solvent must ordinarily be included in any extraction process for phenols. Possibilities include atmospheric-steam or inert-gas stripping, vacuum-steam stripping, and extraction with a second solvent. Vacuum-steam stripping is a particularly attractive choice for removal of MIBK; this reinforces the utility of MIBK as a solvent. The optimal temperature for vacuum stripping is generally the temperature of the extraction operation, which in turn is related to the effect of temperature on K/sub D/. Values of K/sub D/ for phenol-water-MIBK were determined at 30, 50, and 75/sup 0/C, and were found to decrease with increasing temperature at all concentrations.

  11. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Solvent response of mixed polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kai; Chapman, Walter G.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed classical density functional theory calculations to study the behavior of mixed polymer brushes tethered to a planar surface. We assume no lateral segregation of the polymer at the grafting density studied and consider an implicit solvent. For a binary mixture of short and long athermal polymer chains, the short chain is compressed while the long chain is stretched compared with corresponding pure polymer chains at the same grafting density, which is consistent with simulation. This results from configurational entropy effects. Furthermore, we add a mean-field interaction for each polymer brush to simulate their different response towards a solvent. The long chain is forced to dislike the solvent more than the short chain. Through the interplay between the solvent effects and configurational entropy effects, a switch of the polymer brush surface (or outer) layer is found with increasing chain length of the long chain. The transition chain length (long chain) increases with increasing the solvent selectivity, and decreases with increasing the grafting density of the long chain. These results can provide guidance for the design of smart materials based on mixed polymer brushes.

  13. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation.

  14. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. ); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  18. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  19. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  2. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  3. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  6. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  14. Photochemistry of 5-aminoquinoline in protic and aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Bridhkoti, Jagat P; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Joshi, H C; Pant, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Photophysical properties of 5-aminoquinoline (5AQ) have been investigated in various non-polar and polar (protic and aprotic) solvents using steady state and time resolved fluorescence. In aprotic solvents, the spectral maxima depend on the polarity. However, in protic solvents both the fluorescence intensity as well decay time show decrease depending on the hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. The results suggest that photochemistry 5AQ is quite sensitive towards the polarity as well as protic character of the solvent.

  15. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  16. Relative efficiency of solvents used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M G

    1998-01-01

    A root canal model was used to test the relative efficiency of various commonly used endodontic solvents including eucalyptol, eucalyptus oil, orange oil, chloroform, and xylene to dissolve or soften gutta-percha and several different types of sealers (Proco-Sol, AH26, and Sealapex). There was no significant difference in the ability of the solvents to dissolve gutta-percha and the zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer Proco-Sol. The resin-based sealer, AH26, was only dissolved in chloroform and took considerable time (> 30 min). The calcium hydroxide-based sealer, Sealapex, could not be tested because it was found not to set at all unless in contact with air. All of the solvents for both Proco-Sol and gutta-percha produced clinically acceptable dissolving times.

  17. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  18. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Warren K.; McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  19. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.K.; McCray, S.B.; Friesen, D.T.

    1998-03-10

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  20. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-06

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  1. Dip-angle influence on areal DNAPL recovery by co-solvent flooding with and without pre-flooding.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Glen R; Li, Minghua; Husserl, Johana; Ocampo-Gómez, Ana M

    2006-01-10

    A two-dimensional (2D) laboratory model was used to study effects of gravity on areal recovery of a representative dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant by an alcohol pre-flood and co-solvent flood in dipping aquifers. Recent studies have demonstrated that injection of alcohol and co-solvent solutions can be used to reduce in-situ the density of DNAPL globules and displace the contaminant from the source zone. However, contact with aqueous alcohol reduces interfacial tension and causes DNAPL swelling, thus facilitating risk of uncontrolled downward DNAPL migration. The 2D laboratory model was operated with constant background gradient flow and a DNAPL spill was simulated using tetrachloroethene (PCE). The spill was dispersed to a trapped, immobile PCE saturation by a water flood. Areal PCE recovery was studied using a double-triangle well pattern to simulate a remediation scheme consisting of an alcohol pre-flood using aqueous isobutanol ( approximately 10% vol.) followed by a co-solvent flood using a solution of ethylene glycol (65%) and 1-propanol (35%). Experiments were conducted with the 2D model oriented in the horizontal plane and compared to experiments at the 15 degrees and 30 degrees dip-angle orientations. Injection was applied either in the downward or upward direction of flow. Experimental results were compared to theoretical predictions for flood front stability and used to evaluate effects of gravity on areal PCE recovery. Sensitivity experiments were performed to evaluate effects of the alcohol pre-flood on PCE areal recovery. For experiments conducted with the alcohol pre-flood and the 2D model oriented in the horizontal plane, results indicate that 89-93% of source zone PCE was recovered. With injection oriented downward, results indicate that areal PCE recovery was 70-77% for a 15 degrees dip angle and 57-59% for a 30 degrees dip angle. With injection oriented upward, results indicate that areal PCE recovery was 57-60% at the 30

  2. Solvent and solvent isotope effects on the vibrational cooling dynamics of a DNA base derivative.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Chris T; Cohen, Boiko; Kohler, Bern

    2007-10-25

    Vibrational cooling by 9-methyladenine was studied in a series of solvents by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Signals at UV and near-UV probe wavelengths were assigned to hot ground state population created by ultrafast internal conversion following electronic excitation by a 267 nm pump pulse. A characteristic time for vibrational cooling was determined from bleach recovery signals at 250 nm. This time increases progressively in H2O (2.4 ps), D2O (4.2 ps), methanol (4.5 ps), and acetonitrile (13.1 ps), revealing a pronounced solvent effect on the dissipation of excess vibrational energy. The trend also indicates that the rate of cooling is enhanced in solvents with a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The faster rate of cooling seen in H2O vs D2O is noteworthy in view of the similar hydrogen bonding and macroscopic thermal properties of both liquids. We propose that the solvent isotope effect arises from differences in the rates of solute-solvent vibrational energy transfer. Given the similarities of the vibrational friction spectra of H2O and D2O at low frequencies, the solvent isotope effect may indicate that a considerable portion of the excess energy decays by exciting relatively high frequency (>/=700 cm-1) solvent modes.

  3. Diffusion of aromatic compounds in nonaqueous solvents: a study of solute, solvent, and temperature dependences.

    PubMed

    Chan, T C; Tang, W K

    2013-06-14

    Tracer diffusivities (limiting mutual diffusion coefficients) of nonassociated aromatic compounds in n-hexane and cyclohexane have been measured at 298.2 K by Taylor's dispersion method. These new data, together with other diffusivities of nonassociated pseudoplanar solutes reported in the literature, are used to determine the separate effects of solute and solvent on tracer diffusion. The data show that for a given pseudoplanar solute diffusing in different solvents at 298.2 K, the tracer diffusivity is dependent not only on the fractional viscosity of the solvent but also on a function of the solvent's molar density, molecular mass, and free volume fraction. For different pseudoplanar aromatic solutes diffusing in a particular solvent at a constant temperature, there is a linear relationship between the reciprocal of the tracer diffusivity and the molecular volume of the solutes. The results are discussed in respect to relevant theories and experimental studies in the literature. An idealized relation, developed on the basis of the Einstein equation by incorporating the newly found solute and solvent dependences, is capable of describing a total of 176 diffusivities of nonassociated pseudoplanar solutes in various solvents at different temperatures to within an average error of ±2.8%.

  4. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tara E.; Scherman, Carl; Martin, David; Suggs, Patricia

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  5. DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

    2003-02-27

    Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

  6. Controlling Actinide Hydration in Mixed Solvent Systems: Towards Tunable Solvent Systems to Close the Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue B.

    2016-10-31

    The goal of this project has been to define the extent of hydration the f-elements and other cations in mixed solvent electrolyte systems. Methanol-water and other mixed solvent systems have been studied, where the solvent dielectric constant was varied systematically. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic studies provide details concerning the energetics of complexation and other reactions of these cations. This information has also been used to advance new understanding of the behavior of these cations in a variety of systems, ranging from environmental studies, chromatographic approaches, and ionization processes for mass spectrometry.

  7. Structure and Solvent Properties of Microemulsions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Civia A.; Calzola, Zachary J.; Mbindyo, Jeremiah K. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microscale laboratory experiment to investigate the formation and utility of microemulsions is described. Microemulsions are technologically important fluids that can reduce the use of toxic organic solvents. In the experiment, students prepare a microemulsion and compare the solubility of sudan III dye in the microemulsion and in dodecane. They…

  8. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  9. REPLACING SOLVENT CLEANING WITH AQUEOUS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents actions taken by Robert Bosch Corp., Charleston, SC, in replacing the cleaning solvents 1, 1, 2- trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene (TCE) with aqueous solutions. Bosch has succeeded in eliminating all their CFC-113 use and so f...

  10. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Appell, Herbert R.; Narain, Nand K.; Utz, Bruce R.

    1986-05-06

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  11. SOLVENT FREE CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION USING MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-expedited solvent-free synthetic processes will be described that involve the exposure of neat reactants to microwave (MW) irradiation in the presence of supported reagents or catalysts on mineral oxides. Recent developments will be presented on the synthetic utility o...

  12. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  13. ESES: Software for Eulerian solvent excluded surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Beibei; Wang, Bao; Zhao, Rundong; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2017-03-15

    Solvent excluded surface (SES) is one of the most popular surface definitions in biophysics and molecular biology. In addition to its usage in biomolecular visualization, it has been widely used in implicit solvent models, in which SES is usually immersed in a Cartesian mesh. Therefore, it is important to construct SESs in the Eulerian representation for biophysical modeling and computation. This work describes a software package called Eulerian solvent excluded surface (ESES) for the generation of accurate SESs in Cartesian grids. ESES offers the description of the solvent and solute domains by specifying all the intersection points between the SES and the Cartesian grid lines. Additionally, the interface normal at each intersection point is evaluated. Furthermore, for a given biomolecule, the ESES software not only provides the whole surface area, but also partitions the surface area according to atomic types. Homology theory is utilized to detect topological features, such as loops and cavities, on the complex formed by the SES. The sizes of loops and cavities are measured based on persistent homology with an evolutionary partial differential equation-based filtration. ESES is extensively validated by surface visualization, electrostatic solvation free energy computation, surface area and volume calculations, and loop and cavity detection and their size estimation. We used the Amber PBSA test set in our electrostatic solvation energy, area, and volume validations. Our results are either calibrated by analytical values or compared with those from the MSMS software. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. CO-SOLVENT BASED SOURCE REMEDIATION APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field pilot scale studies have demonstrated that co-solvent-enhanced in situ extraction can remove residual and free-phase nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), but may leave levels of contaminants in the ground water and subsurface formation higher than regulatory requirements for c...

  15. Deep eutectic solvents: syntheses, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Royer, Sébastien; Jérôme, François

    2012-11-07

    Within the framework of green chemistry, solvents occupy a strategic place. To be qualified as a green medium, these solvents have to meet different criteria such as availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability, recyclability, flammability, and low price among others. Up to now, the number of available green solvents are rather limited. Here we wish to discuss a new family of ionic fluids, so-called Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES), that are now rapidly emerging in the current literature. A DES is a fluid generally composed of two or three cheap and safe components that are capable of self-association, often through hydrogen bond interactions, to form a eutectic mixture with a melting point lower than that of each individual component. DESs are generally liquid at temperatures lower than 100 °C. These DESs exhibit similar physico-chemical properties to the traditionally used ionic liquids, while being much cheaper and environmentally friendlier. Owing to these remarkable advantages, DESs are now of growing interest in many fields of research. In this review, we report the major contributions of DESs in catalysis, organic synthesis, dissolution and extraction processes, electrochemistry and material chemistry. All works discussed in this review aim at demonstrating that DESs not only allow the design of eco-efficient processes but also open a straightforward access to new chemicals and materials.

  16. EXXON donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperly, W. R.; Swabb, L. E., Jr.; Tauton, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    A solvent coal liquefaction process to produce low-sulfur liquid products from a wide range of coals is described. An integrated program of laboratory and engineering research and development in conjunction with operation of a 250 T/D pilot plant is discussed.

  17. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  18. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  19. Purification and characterization of a thermostable keratinolytic serine alkaline proteinase from Streptomyces sp. strain AB1 with high stability in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Jaouadi, Bassem; Abdelmalek, Badis; Fodil, Djamila; Ferradji, Fatma Zohra; Rekik, Hatem; Zaraî, Nedia; Bejar, Samir

    2010-11-01

    A keratinolytic alkaline proteinase (KERAB) was isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain AB1. Based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, the purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 29850.17Da. The NH(2)-terminal sequence of the enzyme was determined to be TQANPPSWGLDDIDQTAL. This keratinase was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DIFP), which suggests that it belongs to the serine protease family. Using keratin azure as a substrate, the optimum pH and temperature values for keratinase activity were pH 11.5 and 75 degrees C, respectively. This keratinase was stable between 30 and 60 degrees C and pH 4 and 11 for 4 and 96 h, respectively, and thermoactivity and thermostability were enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Mg(2+). Its catalytic efficiency was higher than those of SAPB-L31I/T33S/N99Y, nattokinase and subtilisin Carlsberg. KERAB exhibited stability to detergents and high resistance against organic solvents and was able to degrade feathers completely. These properties make KERAB a potential candidate for future applications in detergent formulations, dehairing during leather processing, and non-aqueous peptide biocatalysis.

  20. Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in natural products research: mixtures of solids as extraction solvents.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuntao; van Spronsen, Jaap; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-11-22

    Mixtures of solid chemicals may become liquid under certain conditions. These liquids are characterized by the formation of strong ionic (ionic liquids) or hydrogen bonds (deep eutectic solvents). Due to their extremely low vapor pressure, they are now widely used in polymer chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry, yet little attention has been paid to their use as extraction solvents of natural products. This review summarizes the preparation of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents with natural product components and recent progress in their applications to the extraction and analysis of natural products as well as the recovery of extracted compounds from their extracts. Additionally, various factors affecting extraction features of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, as well as potential useful technologies including microwave and ultrasound to increase the extraction efficiency, are discussed.

  1. Solution phase synthesis of aluminum-doped silicon nanoparticles via room-temperature, solvent based chemical reduction of silicon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowbray, Andrew James

    We present a method of wet chemical synthesis of aluminum-doped silicon nanoparticles (Al-doped Si NPs), encompassing the solution-phase co-reduction of silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and aluminum chloride (AlCl 3) by sodium naphthalide (Na[NAP]) in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME). The development of this method was inspired by the work of Baldwin et al. at the University of California, Davis, and was adapted for our research through some noteworthy procedural modifications. Centrifugation and solvent-based extraction techniques were used throughout various stages of the synthesis procedure to achieve efficient and well-controlled separation of the Si NP product from the reaction media. In addition, the development of a non-aqueous, formamide-based wash solution facilitated simultaneous removal of the NaCl byproduct and Si NP surface passivation via attachment of 1-octanol to the particle surface. As synthesized, the Si NPs were typically 3-15 nm in diameter, and were mainly amorphous, as opposed to crystalline, as concluded from SAED and XRD diffraction pattern analysis. Aluminum doping at various concentrations was accomplished via the inclusion of aluminum chloride (AlCl3); which was in small quantities dissolved into the synthesis solution to be reduced alongside the SiCl4 precursor. The introduction of Al into the chemically-reduced Si NP precipitate was not found to adversely affect the formation of the Si NPs, but was found to influence aspects such as particle stability and dispersibility throughout various stages of the procedure. Analytical techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR spectroscopy, and ICP-optical emission spectroscopy were used to comprehensively characterize the product NPs. These methods confirm both the presence of Al and surface-bound 1-octanol in the newly formed Si NPs.

  2. Solvent-based nanocomposite coatings I. Dispersion of organophilic montmorillonite in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Burgentzlé, D; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F; Jupin, A; Fillon, B

    2004-10-01

    This study aims to determine the relevant parameters controlling the organophilic montmorillonite dispersion in various organic solvents which can be used as dispersion media for polymer coatings. These suspensions were studied at three scales: At nanometer scale by looking to interlayer distance: When the solvent surface energy is higher than the organophilic clay surface energy, i.e., gamma solvent > or = gamma montmorillonite, the intercalated organic chains of the quaternary ammonium modifier swell, leading to an increase of the interlayer distance. The balance between hydrophilic and hydrophobic character is the key to dispersion of nanoclays. At micrometer scale by studying the rheological behaviour of clay suspensions: Gels are formed by percolation of microgels, based on swollen 3-4 platelet tactoids. The viscoelastic properties and the flow behavior reveal the gel structuration by measuring the gel stiffness and the flowing stress. At macroscopic scale analyzed from the swelling of the nanoclay into solvents: The compatibility between solvent and organophilic clay governs the macroscopic swelling, i.e., interactions between organic chains borne by the intercalated ions and solvents govern the final suspension morphologies. The same methodology can be adopted for monomers or prepolymers selected for one in situ intercalation/exfoliation processing route.

  3. Effectiveness of three solvents and two associations of solvents on gutta-percha and resilon.

    PubMed

    Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista de; Loiola, Livia Etchebehere de; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Villela; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 3 solvents (Citrol orange oil, Eucalyptol and Tetrachloroethylene) and 2 associations of solvents (Citrol orange oil+Tetrachloroethylene and Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene) on 3 types of gutta-percha (conventional, thermoplastic and EndoREZ) and Resilon. Ten discs (10 mm diameter x 1 mm thick) from each material were prepared using standard metallic molds. Each specimen was weighed to determinate its initial mass. The specimens were immersed in the solvents for 10 min, followed by immersion in distilled water for 20 min, and were then reweighed to obtain the final mass. The mean weight loss determined the solvent capacity. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on conventional gutta-percha (p<0.05). Tetrachloroethylene was also the most effective on thermoplastic gutta-percha, but it was not significantly different (p>0.05) from Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene, Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene, and Citrol. All solvents and associations presented little effectiveness on Resilon. The association Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on EndoREZ, but it did not differ significantly (p>0.05) from Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene. All evaluated substances presented solvent action. Tetrachloroethylene improved the effectiveness of both Citrol and Eucalyptol.

  4. Numerical Treatment of Stokes Solvent Flow and Solute-Solvent Interfacial Dynamics for Nonpolar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhou, Shenggao; Moore, David K; Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo

    2016-05-01

    We design and implement numerical methods for the incompressible Stokes solvent flow and solute-solvent interface motion for nonpolar molecules in aqueous solvent. The balance of viscous force, surface tension, and van der Waals type dispersive force leads to a traction boundary condition on the solute-solvent interface. To allow the change of solute volume, we design special numerical boundary conditions on the boundary of a computational domain through a consistency condition. We use a finite difference ghost fluid scheme to discretize the Stokes equation with such boundary conditions. The method is tested to have a second-order accuracy. We combine this ghost fluid method with the level-set method to simulate the motion of the solute-solvent interface that is governed by the solvent fluid velocity. Numerical examples show that our method can predict accurately the blow up time for a test example of curvature flow and reproduce the polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of some simple model molecular systems.

  5. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Cyclohexane as a Cryoscopic Solvent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffel, Margaret J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that cyclohexane be used as a solvent in experiments usually using benzene, which has been placed on the list of chemicals that are confirmed carcinogens. Reasons for selection of cyclohexane and experimental procedures using this solvent are described. (CS)

  6. The Ideal Solvent for Paper Chromatography of Food Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Uses paper chromatography with food dyes to provide a simple and inexpensive basis for teaching chromatography. Provides experimental methodology and tabled results. Includes a solvent system comparison (Rf) for seven dyes and twenty-two solvents. (MVL)

  7. Organic Solvent Tropical Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-06-21

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines.

  8. TGA and DTA studies of solvent-exchanged gels

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, K.; Durakpasa, H.; Breiter, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    Sols were prepared in the system TMOS:H{sub 2}O:SOLV:HCl with molar ratios of 1:4:3:0.0005 for SOLV = MEOH, ETOH and DMF. The gelation and aging of these sols took place in cuvettes covered by parafilm. The gels were removed from the cuvettes 14 days after gelation. Solvent exchange was carried out in each of the three solvents for a period of 14 days. Starting with fresh solvent, the exchange was repeated three times. TGA and DTA curves were taken with pieces of the original gels and of gels after the 2nd and 3rd solvent exchange. The TGA curves display a considerable weight loss in the temperature range of solvent evaporation. A small step is observed at higher temperatures if MEOH or ETOH represent the exchange solvent. The DTA curves allow a distinction what mixtures of solvents are present. The effectiveness of the solvent exchange can be evaluated.

  9. Final Report of the Study on Spent Solvents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a final report of the study on spent solvents and discusses the wastes associated with the use of the materials as solvents, the toxicity of the wastes, and the management practices for the wastes.

  10. Local solvent density augmentation around a solute in supercritical solvent bath: 1. A mechanism explanation and a new phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2005-04-21

    A recently proposed partitioned density functional (DF) approximation (Phys. Rev. E 2003, 68, 061201) and an adjustable parameter-free version of a Lagrangian theorem-based DF approximation (LTDFA: Phys. Lett. A 2003, 319, 279) are combined to propose a DF approximation for nonuniform Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid. Predictions of the present DF approximation for local LJ solvent density inhomogeneity around a large LJ solute particle or hard core Yukawa particle are in good agreement with existing simulation data. An extensive investigation about the effect of solvent bath temperature, solvent-solute interaction range, solvent-solute interaction magnitude, and solute size on the local solvent density inhomogeneity is carried out with the present DF approximation. It is found that a plateau of solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density is due to a coupling between the solvent-solute interaction and solvent correlation whose mathematical expression is a convolution integral appearing in the density profile equation of the DF theory formalism. The coupling becomes stronger as the increasing of the whole solvent-solute interaction strength, solute size relative to solvent size, and the closeness to the critical density and temperature of the solvent bath. When the attractive solvent-solute interaction becomes large enough and the bulk state moves close enough to the critical temperature of the solvent bath, the maximum solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density appears near the solvent bath critical density; the appearance of this maximum is in contrast with a conclusion drawn by a previous investigation based on an inhomogeneous version of Ornstein-Zernike integral equation carried out only for a smaller parameter space than that in the present paper. Advantage of the DFT approach over the integral equation is discussed.

  11. The Concept of Solid Solvent as Processing Aid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-20

    such concept was examined using acetanilid p as a potential solid solvent for polystyrene (PS) and Kraton 1101, a block copolymer containing PS blocks... Acetanilide demon- strated the essential features required of a solid solvent supporting the concept of solid solvent. It had a high solubility in PS...properties of the polymer. The feasibility of such concept was examined using acetanilide as a potential solid solvent for polystyrene (PS) and Iraton 1101, a

  12. Electrochemical instability of solvent membranes during electrodialytic cation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, V.N.; Kontush, A.S.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental data are reported concerning the uptake of water by solvent membranes during dialysis and electrodialysis when the solvent is nonaqueous and a macrocyclic carrier is present. Aspects of the electrochemical instability of solvent membranes are discussed, and particularly the discontinuous conductivity fluctuations and the three stages of development of electric breakdown. The cationic selectivity of the macrocyclic carrier, the amount of water present in the solvent membrane, and the character of electrochemical instability of the membrane are shown to be interrelated.

  13. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  14. Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M; Fox, Robert V; Petkovic, Lucia M

    2009-04-07

    A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

  15. Gamma Ray Radiolysis of the FPEX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    B. J. Mincher; S. P. Mezyk; D. R. Peterman

    2006-09-01

    Slide presentation. FPEX contains a calixarene for Cs extraction, a crown ether for Sr extraction, Cs7SB modifier, and TOA to aid in stripping, in Isopar L diluent. The radiation stability FPEX must be evaluated prior to process use. Radiolytic degradation of species in solution are due to reaction with the direct radiolysis products of the diluent. In Isopar L, the reactive species produced include e-, •H and alkane radicals, resulting in a reducing environment. However, in nitric acid, oxidizing hydroxyl (•OH) and nitro (•NO2) radicals dominate system chemistry. Thus, the nature of diluent and the presence of radical scavengers affect the results of irradiation. We report the preliminary results of a new program to investigate the radiolysis of FPEX using the 60Co irradiation of FPEX neat solvent, acid pre-equilibrated solvent and mixed aerated phases. The Cs and Sr distribution ratios were used as metrics.

  16. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  17. Development of a solvent processed insensitive propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trask, R.; Costa, E.; Beardell, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of low vulnerability propellants are studied which are distinguished by whether the binder is a rubber, such as polyurethane or CTBN, or a plasticizable polymer such as ethyl cellulose or cellulose acetate. The former propellants are made by a partial cure extrusion process while the latter are made by the conventional solvent process. Emphasis is given to a cellulose binder (plasticizer) RDX composition. The type of binder used, the particle size of the RDX and the presence of small quantities of nitrocellulose in the solvent processed compositions have important influences on the mechanical and combustion characteristics of the propellant. The low temperature combustion is of particular concern because of potential breakup of the grains that can lead to instability.

  18. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qianwen; Pu, Yu; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhen; Hu, Xinzhong

    2017-03-13

    This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs) of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC), 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC), 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC), 5% Na₂CO₃ SRC (SCASRC), NaCl SRC (SCSRC), CaCl₂ SRC (CCSRC), FeCl₃ SRC (FCSRC), sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC), NaOH (pH 10) SRC (SHSRC), Na₂CO₃ (pH 10) SRC (SCABSRC) and SDS (pH 10) SRC (SDSSRC) values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl) to acidic (5% lactic acid) or alkaline (5% Na₂CO₃, CaCl₂, FeCl₃, NaOH and pH 10 Na₂CO₃), and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl₂ and FeCl₃) increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**), CCSRC (0.82**), SCHSRC (0.80**) and FCSRC (0.78*). SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64*) but not related with protein and starch. CaCl₂ could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay.

  20. Design of lattice proteins with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, G.; Mölbert, S.; de Los Rios, P.

    2002-12-01

    Protein design is important to develop new drugs. As such, a knowledge of the correct model to use to design novel proteins is of the utmost importance. Here we show that a simple model where the solvent degrees of freedom are (semi)explicitly taken into account performs better than other existing models when compared to real data. Some consequences on the criteria to be used for protein design are discussed.

  1. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  2. ALKYL PYROPHOSPHATE METAL SOLVENT EXTRACTANTS AND PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the recovery of uranium from aqueous mineral acidic solutions by solvent extraction. The extractant is a synmmetrical dialkyl pyrophosphate in which the alkyl substituents have a chain length of from 4 to 17 carbon atoms. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dioctyl pyrophosphate. The uranium is precipitated irom the organic extractant phase with an agent such as HF, fluoride salts. alcohol, or ammonia.

  3. Coupling of protein dynamics with the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gokhan; Sauzan, Azzam; Mehtani, Disha; Sokolov, Alexei

    2003-03-01

    Glycerol and trehalose are among the many viscous solvents that are widely used for biostabilization and controlling the dynamics of proteins. It is believed that the suppression of the structural relaxations by high viscosity of solvent is responsible for improved stability in proteins. However, results of [1] and [2] demonstrate stronger suppression of biochemical activity and dynamics of proteins by liquid glycerol than by solid trehalose in a wide temperature range. The authors tried to explain the counterintuitive observations by a possible decoupling of the dynamics of the protein from trehalose. In order to test the validity of this assumption and to investigate the influence of the fast dynamics in proteins, the low frequency Raman scattering spectroscopy technique is used. Both relaxational and vibrational dynamics of glycerol, trehalose, and lysozyme in glycerol and in trehalose are studied in a wide temperature range. Dynamics of lysozyme in glycerol follows the strong temperature dependence of relaxational and vibrational dynamics of the bulk glycerol. On the other hand, the weak temperature dependence of dynamics of lysozyme in trehalose follows exactly the behavior of pure trehalose. This proves that there is a strong dynamic coupling between the protein and the solvents used. Interestingly, stronger relaxations in solid trehalose as compared to liquid glycerol are observed in the GHz region at low temperatures. This could be the reason for the enhanced protein activity observed in trehalose, compared to that in glycerol in this temperature range. Suppression of these fast relaxations should be the key for providing long-term stability to proteins. 1. Sastry, G.M. and N. Agmon, Trehalose prevents myoglobin collapse and preserves its internal mobility. BIOCHEMISTRY, 1997, 36(23): p. 7097-108. 2. Caliskan, G., et al., Influence of solvent on dynamics and stability of a protein. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, 2002, 307-310: p. 887-893.

  4. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qianwen; Pu, Yu; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhen; Hu, Xinzhong

    2017-01-01

    This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs) of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC), 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC), 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC), 5% Na2CO3 SRC (SCASRC), NaCl SRC (SCSRC), CaCl2 SRC (CCSRC), FeCl3 SRC (FCSRC), sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC), NaOH (pH 10) SRC (SHSRC), Na2CO3 (pH 10) SRC (SCABSRC) and SDS (pH 10) SRC (SDSSRC) values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl) to acidic (5% lactic acid) or alkaline (5% Na2CO3, CaCl2, FeCl3, NaOH and pH 10 Na2CO3), and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3) increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**), CCSRC (0.82**), SCHSRC (0.80**) and FCSRC (0.78*). SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64*) but not related with protein and starch. CaCl2 could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay. PMID:28335393

  5. Implementation of Precision Verification Solvents on the External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the Implementation of Precision Verification Solvents on the External Tank. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Solvent Usages; 3) TCE (Trichloroethylene) Reduction; 4) Solvent Replacement Studies; 5) Implementation; 6) Problems Occuring During Implementation; and 7) Future Work. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. PROCESS OF SEPARATING URANIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Warf, J.C.

    1958-08-19

    A process is described for separating uranium values from aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions. The process consists in contacting the uramium bearing solution with an organic solvent, tributyl phosphate, preferably diluted with a less viscous organic liquida whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the organic solvent phase. The uranvl nitrate may be recovered from the solvent phase bv back extracting with an aqueous mediuin.

  7. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  8. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  9. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  10. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  11. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  12. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  13. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  14. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  15. Green solvents and technologies for oil extraction from oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S P Jeevan; Prasad, S Rajendra; Banerjee, Rintu; Agarwal, Dinesh K; Kulkarni, Kalyani S; Ramesh, K V

    2017-01-01

    Oilseeds are crucial for the nutritional security of the global population. The conventional technology used for oil extraction from oilseeds is by solvent extraction. In solvent extraction, n-hexane is used as a solvent for its attributes such as simple recovery, non-polar nature, low latent heat of vaporization (330 kJ/kg) and high selectivity to solvents. However, usage of hexane as a solvent has lead to several repercussions such as air pollution, toxicity and harmfulness that prompted to look for alternative options. To circumvent the problem, green solvents could be a promising approach to replace solvent extraction. In this review, green solvents and technology like aqueous assisted enzyme extraction are better solution for oil extraction from oilseeds. Enzyme mediated extraction is eco-friendly, can obtain higher yields, cost-effective and aids in obtaining co-products without any damage. Enzyme technology has great potential for oil extraction in oilseed industry. Similarly, green solvents such as terpenes and ionic liquids have tremendous solvent properties that enable to extract the oil in eco-friendly manner. These green solvents and technologies are considered green owing to the attributes of energy reduction, eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and non-harmfulness. Hence, the review is mainly focussed on the prospects and challenges of green solvents and technology as the best option to replace the conventional methods without compromising the quality of the extracted products.

  16. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  17. Demonstration of the INEL Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes a Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System implemented by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and funded by the United States Department of Energy. This system provides information about hazardous solvents such as Material Safety Data Sheets and provides listings of non-hazardous alternatives to the solvents.

  18. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  3. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  4. Absorbance changes of carotenoids in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Zang, L Y; Sommerburg, O; van Kuijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoids are typically measured in tissues with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantitation is usually done by calibrating with stock solutions in solvents. Four carotenoids including lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were dissolved in hexane and methanol respectively, and their absorbance characteristics were compared. Lutein shows absorbance spectra that are almost independent of solvents at various concentrations. Spectra of zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were found to be more solvent-dependent. The absorbance of zeaxanthin at lambda max is about approximately 2 times larger in methanol than in hexane at the higher concentrations, and increased non-linearly with increasing concentration in hexane. The absorbance of lycopene at lambda max in hexane is approximately 4 fold larger than in methanol, but the absorbance of the methanol sample can be recovered by re-extracting this sample in hexane. The absorbance of beta-carotene in hexane is larger than in methanol, and increased linearly with increasing concentration. But beta-carotene showed a non-linear concentration effect in methanol. There are very small variations in lambda max for all four carotenoids between hexane and methanol, due to differences in molar extinction coefficients. The non-linear concentration effects for these carotenoids are probably due to differences in solubility leading to the formation of microcrystals. Thus, care should be taken with quantitation of tissue carotenoid values, when they depend on measurement of concentrations in stock solutions.

  5. Dynamics of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chremos, Alexandros; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Koch, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The diffusivity and structural relaxation characteristics of oligomer-grafted nanoparticles have been investigated with simulations of a previously proposed coarse-grained model at atmospheric pressure. Solvent-free, polymer-grafted nanoparticles as well as grafted nanoparticles in a melt were compared to a reference system of bare (ungrafted) particles in a melt. Whereas longer chains lead to a larger hydrodynamic radius and lower relative diffusivity for grafted particles in a melt, bulk solvent-free nanoparticles with longer chains have higher relative diffusivities than their short chain counterparts. Solvent-free nanoparticles with short chains undergo a glass transition as indicated by a vanishing diffusivity, diverging structural relaxation time and the formation of body-centered-cubic-like order. Nanoparticles with longer chains exhibit a more gradual increase in the structural relaxation time with decreasing temperature and concomitantly increasing particle volume fraction. The diffusivity of the long chain nanoparticles exhibits a minimum at an intermediate temperature and volume fraction where the polymer brushes of neighboring particles overlap, but must stretch to fill the interparticle space.

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... organic HAP mass fraction must be used for that solvent blend. Otherwise, use the organic HAP...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... organic HAP mass fraction must be used for that solvent blend. Otherwise, use the organic HAP...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... organic HAP mass fraction must be used for that solvent blend. Otherwise, use the organic HAP...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  16. Molar Absorptivity Measurements in Absorbing Solvents: Impact on Solvent Absorptivity Values.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Ariel; Arnold, Mark A

    2016-10-18

    Molar absorptivity is a fundamental molecular property that quantifies absorption strength as a function of wavelength. Absolute measurements of molar absorptivity demand accounting for all mechanisms of light attenuation, including reflective losses at interfaces associated with the sample. Ideally, such measurements are performed in nonabsorbing solvents and reflective losses can be determined in a straightforward manner from Fresnel equations or effectively accounted for by path length difference methods. At near-infrared wavelengths, however, many solvents, including water, are absorbing which complicates the quantification of reflective losses. Here, generalized equations are developed for calculating absolute molar absorptivities of neat liquids wherein the dependency of reflective loss on absorption properties of the liquid are considered explicitly. The resulting equations are used to characterize sensitivity of absolute molar absorptivity measurements for solvents to the absorption strength of the solvent as well as the path length of the measurement. Methods are derived from these equations to properly account for reflective losses in general and the effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated for absolute molar absorptivity measurements for water over the combination region (5000-4000 cm(-1)) of the near-infrared spectrum. Results indicate that ignoring solvent absorption effects can incorporate wide ranging systematic errors depending upon experimental conditions. As an example, systematic errors range from 0 to 10% for common conditions used in the measurement of absolute molar absorptivity of water over the combination region of the near-infrared spectrum.

  17. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    P.T. Cummings; J.P. O'Connell

    1995-01-31

    The goals of the research program evolved into six areas: Molecular simulation of phase equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions. Molecular simulation of solvation and structure in supercritical aqueous systems. Extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes. Analysis of the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions and mixed electrolyte solutions using fluctuation solution theory. Development of analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solved integral equation approximations. Fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories.

  18. Evaluating non-chlorinated solvents for welding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.

    1993-08-11

    There is interest in eliminating the use of chlorinated solvents such as methyl chloroform at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for environmental reasons. Solvent 140 has been offered as an acceptable replacement. Methyl chloroform has frequently been used for the final cleaning of materials just prior to welding. Electron beam welds were made in an aluminum alloy to compare the potential contamination effect of Solvent 140 to that of methyl chloroform. Tests indicated that the Solvent 140 did not have an adverse effect on pumpdown time of electron beam welding equipment during normal handling. Solvent 140 resulted in significantly less weld porosity than; methyl chloroform in this test.

  19. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  20. Interaction of organic solvents with the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Solvents are often a component of bioassay systems when water-insoluble toxicants are being tested. These solvents must also be considered as xenobiotics and therefore, as potential toxicants in the bioassay. However, the effects of solvents on the organisms being tested and their possible interaction with the test compound are often overlooked by researchers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards growth of the common green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and to examine the occurrence of solvent-pesticide interactions with this organism.