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Sample records for non-contact stiffness measurement

  1. Non-Contact Stiffness Measurement of a Suspended Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yun; Su, Chanmin; Getty, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    A new nanoscale electric field sensor was developed for studying triboelectric charging in terrestrial and Martian dust devils. This sensor is capable to measure the large electric fields for large dust devils without saturation. However, to quantify the electric charges and the field strength it is critical to calibrate the mechanical stiffness of the sensor devices. We performed a technical feasibility study of the Nano E-field Sensor stiffness by a non-contact stiffness measurement method. The measurement is based on laser Doppler vibrometer measurement of the thermal noise due to energy flunctuations in the devices. The experiment method provides a novel approach to acquire data that is essential in analyzing the quantitative performance of the E-field Nano Sensor. To carry out the non-contact stiffness measurement, we fabricated a new Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) E-field sensor with different SWCNTs suspension conditions. The power spectra of the thermal induced displacement in the nano E-field sensor were measured at the accuracy of picometer. The power spectra were then used to derive the mechanical stiffness of the sensors. Effect of suspension conditions on stiffness and sensor sensitivty was discussed. After combined deformation and resistivity measurement, we can compare with our laboratory testing and field testing results. This new non-contact measurement technology can also help to explore to other nano and MEMS devices in the future.

  2. Non-contact measurement of carotid arterial stiffness by two-point heart-pulse laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Favalli, V.; Mariano, A.; Rebrova, N.; Consoli, A.; Ayadi, J.; Gilardi, L.; Perna, M.; Minzioni, P.; Arbustini, E.; Giuliani, G.

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) is a recognized predictor of cardiovascular risk and mortality, and a potential marker for monitoring the beneficial effects of medical treatments for arterial diseases. AS is typically evaluated indirectly, by assessing the so called pulse wave velocity (PWV), i.e. the speed at which the pressure wave created by the heart contraction travels along the aorta and other arteries. PWV is generally measured using piezoelectric transducers, or via a complex ultrasound technique, but in both cases it requires a direct contact with the patient, which could also modify the measured parameters. In the EU project "NISTAS" (Non-invasive screening of the status of the vascular system) [1], we develop a contactless system allowing to measure the PWV thanks to a technology derived from laser triangulation devices. The measurement principle consists in the detection of the small (around 100μm) displacement of the neck skin, induced by the transit of the pressure wave in the carotid. By simultaneously measuring the displacement caused by the pulse wave in two distinct points along the carotid, the time required by the pressure wave to travel a certain distance can be measured, and the PWV can then be easily calculated. The chosen technique for the skin displacement measurement is laser triangulation in its 2D variant (i.e. "laser profilometry"), which is robust to slight movements of the target, it does not suffer from speckle-pattern signal fading, and it can be conveniently implemented using low-cost optical components. Two light lines, emitted by two blue LEDs are projected on the target (the patient's neck skin), and the skin displacement versus time is measured using a high-frame-rate CMOS camera. In this manuscript we present the results obtained by measuring the PWV of 10 volunteers. It is foreseen that this technique can become a simple and widespread point-of-care method for large-scale cardiovascular system screening over large populations.

  3. Non-contact temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. R.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    Three methods for noncontact temperature measurement are presented. Ideal gas thermometry is realized by using laser-induced fluorescence to measure the concentration of mercury atoms in a Hg-Ar mixture in the vicinity of hot specimens. Emission polarimetry is investigated by measuring the spatially resolved intensities of polarized light from a hot tungsten sphere. Laser polarimetry is used to measure the optical properties, emissivity, and, in combination with optical pyrometry, the temperature of electromagnetically levitated liquid aluminum. The precision of temperature measurements based on the ideal gas law is + or - 2.6 percent at 1500-2000 K. The polarized emission technique is found to have the capability to determine optical properties and/or spectral emissivities of specimens over a wide range of wavelengths with quite simple instruments.

  4. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements for electronic materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for non-contact temperature measurement capabilities for electronic materials processing in space are assessed. Non-contact methods are probably incapable of sufficient accuracy for the actual absolute measurement of temperatures in most such applications but would be useful for imaging in some applications.

  5. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  6. Electronic Non-Contacting Linear Position Measuring System

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A non-contacting linear position location system employs a special transmission line to encode and transmit magnetic signals to a receiver on the object whose position is to be measured. The invention is useful as a non-contact linear locator of moving objects, e.g., to determine the location of a magnetic-levitation train for the operation of the linear-synchronous motor drive system.

  7. Non-contact measurement of contact wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Ye, Xuemei; Li, Zhongke; Yue, Kaiduan

    2008-12-01

    The overhead contact system is the power supply unit of the electric locomotive. This article is to introduce our newly developed method to measure the height and pull out value of the contact wire. A carema dolly which can move on railway is applied to bear the weight of the measure equipment; two linear CCD cameras are installed on the dolly symmetrically about the midline of two rails. While the dolly move along the railway, two CCD cameras grasp the image synchronously, and a computer real-time process the images, the height and pull out value can be calculate out from the images.

  8. Non-contact thickness measurement using UTG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Hoa T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A measurement structure for determining the thickness of a specimen without mechanical contact but instead employing ultrasonic waves including an ultrasonic transducer and an ultrasonic delay line connected to the transducer by a retainer or collar. The specimen, whose thickness is to be measured, is positioned below the delay line. On the upper surface of the specimen a medium such as a drop of water is disposed which functions to couple the ultrasonic waves from the delay line to the specimen. A receiver device, which may be an ultrasonic thickness gauge, receives reflected ultrasonic waves reflected from the upper and lower surface of the specimen and determines the thickness of the specimen based on the time spacing of the reflected waves.

  9. Non-Contact Conductivity Measurement for Automated Sample Processing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kirby, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A new method has been developed for monitoring and control of automated sample processing and preparation especially focusing on desalting of samples before analytical analysis (described in more detail in Automated Desalting Apparatus, (NPO-45428), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 8 (August 2010), page 44). The use of non-contact conductivity probes, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the solid phase sample preparation media, allows monitoring of the process, and acts as a trigger for the start of the next step in the sequence (see figure). At each step of the muti-step process, the system is flushed with low-conductivity water, which sets the system back to an overall low-conductivity state. This measurement then triggers the next stage of sample processing protocols, and greatly minimizes use of consumables. In the case of amino acid sample preparation for desalting, the conductivity measurement will define three key conditions for the sample preparation process. First, when the system is neutralized (low conductivity, by washing with excess de-ionized water); second, when the system is acidified, by washing with a strong acid (high conductivity); and third, when the system is at a basic condition of high pH (high conductivity). Taken together, this non-contact conductivity measurement for monitoring sample preparation will not only facilitate automation of the sample preparation and processing, but will also act as a way to optimize the operational time and use of consumables

  10. Non-Contact EDDY Current Hole Eccentricity and Diameter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Precision holes are among the most critical features of a mechanical component. Deviations from permissible tolerances can impede operation and result in unexpected failure. We have developed an automated non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measuring system. The operating principle is based on the eddy current lift-off effect, which is the coil impedance as a function of the distance between the coil and the test object. An absolute eddy current probe rotates in the hole. The impedance of each angular position is acquired and input to the computer for integration and analysis. The eccentricity of the hole is the profile of the impedance as a function of angular position as compared to a straight line, an ideal hole. The diameter of the hole is the sum of the diameter of the probe and twice the distance-calibrated impedance. An eddy current image is generated by integrating angular scans for a plurality of depths between the top and bottom to display the eccentricity profile. This system can also detect and image defects in the hole. The method for non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measurement has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  11. Advances in Non-Contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Canepari, Stacy; White, Erica Bischoff; Cretegny, Laurent; Rogers, jan

    2009-01-01

    As the required service temperatures for superalloys increases, so do the demands on testing for development of these alloys. Non-contact measurement of creep of refractory metals using electrostatic levitation has been demonstrated at temperatures up to 2300 C using samples of only 20-40 mg. These measurements load the spherical specimen by inertial forces due to rapid rotation. However, the first measurements relied on photon pressure to accelerate the samples to the high rotational rates of thousands of rotations per second, limiting the applicability to low stresses and high temperatures. Recent advances in this area extend this measurement to higher stresses and lower-temperatures through the use of an induction motor to drive the sample to such high rotational speeds. Preliminary results on new measurements on new materials will be presented.

  12. Anthropometry of external auditory canal by non-contactable measurement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Wang, Ren-Hung; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Fan, Chun-Chieh; Peng, Ying-Chin; Tu, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Ching-I; Lin, Kuei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Human ear canals cannot be measured directly with existing general measurement tools. Furthermore, general non-contact optical methods can only conduct simple peripheral measurements of the auricle and cannot obtain the internal ear canal shape-related measurement data. Therefore, this study uses the computed tomography (CT) technology to measure the geometric shape of the ear canal and the shape of the ear canal using a non-invasive method, and to complete the anthropometry of external auditory canal. The results of the study show that the average height and width of ear canal openings, and the average depth of the first bend for men are generally longer, wider and deeper than those for women. In addition, the difference between the height and width of the ear canal opening is about 40% (p < 0.05). Hence, the circular cross-section shape of the earplugs should be replaced with an elliptical cross-section shape during manufacturing for better fitting.

  13. Non-contact Laser-based Human Respiration Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.

    2011-08-01

    At present the majority of the instrumentation, used in clinical environments, to measure human respiration rate are based on invasive and contact devices. The gold standard instrument is considered the spirometer which is largely used; it needs a direct contact and requires a collaboration by the patient. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) is an optical, non-contact measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. LDVi has already been used for the measurement of the cardiac activity and for the measurement of the chest-wall displacements. The aims of this work are to select the best measurement point on the thoracic surface for LDVi monitoring of the respiration rate (RR) and to compare measured data with the RR valued provided by the spirometer. The measurement system is composed by a LDV system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC. Tests were made on 10 different point of the thorax for each patient. Patients population was composed by 33 subjects (17 male and 16 female). The optimal measurement point was chosen considering the maximum peak-to-peak value of the displacement measured by LDV. Before extracting RR we have used a special wavelet decomposition for better selection of the expiration peaks. A standard spirometer was used for the validation of the data. From tests it results that the optimal measurement point, namely is located on the inferior part of the thoracic region (left, front side). From our tests we have obtained a close correlation between the RR values measured by the spirometer and those measured by the proposed method: a difference of 14±211 ms on the RR value is reported for the entire population of 33 subjects. Our method allows a no-contact measurement of lungs activity (respiration period), reducing the electric and biological risks. Moreover it allows to measure in critical environment like in RMN or in burned skin where is difficult or impossible to apply electrodes.

  14. Investigation of a non-contact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; Damiano, B.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new non-contact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components, however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  15. Non-Contact Measurements of Creep Properties of Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    State-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature (>2000 C) materials. At such high temperatures, creep rises as one of the most important design factors to be considered. Since conventional measurement techniques for creep resistance are limited to about 17OO0C, a new technique is in demand for higher temperatures. This paper presents a non-contact method using electrostatic levitation (ESL) which is applicable to both metallic and non-metallic materials. The samples were rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deformation of the samples was captured with a high speed camera and then the images were analyzed to estimate creep resistance. Finite element analyses were performed and compared to the experiments to verify the new method. Results are presented for niobium and tungsten, representative refractory materials at 2300 C and 2700 C respectively.

  16. Non-Contact Circuit for Real-Time Electric and Magnetic Field Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ARL-TR-7507 ● OCT 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Non- Contact Circuit for Real-Time Electric and Magnetic Field Measurements...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7507 ● OCT 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Non- Contact Circuit for Real...DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 3/2015–8/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non- Contact Circuit for

  17. Non-contact temperature measurements for biotechnology discipline working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In the biotechnology research areas, there is interest in measuring temperature changes over very small dimensions, such as the surface of a 10-micrometer diameter biological cell immersed in cell culture fluid. Non-interference measurements of other properties, such as chemical constituents and their concentrations, are also needed. Contacting probes for pH have recently been developed to penetrate a cell but questions have been raised about their accuracy and net value.

  18. Non-contact temperature measurement of a falling drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The 105 meter drop tube at NASA-Marshall has been used in a number of experiments to determine the effects of containerless, microgravity processing on the undercooling and solidification behavior of metals and alloys. These experiments have been limited, however, because direct temperature measurement of the falling drops has not been available. Undercooling and nucleation temperatures are calculated from thermophysical properties based on droplet cooling models. In most cases these properties are not well known, particularly in the undercooled state. This results in a large amount of uncertainty in the determination of nucleation temperatures. If temperature measurement can be accomplished then the thermal history of the drops could be well documented. This would lead to a better understanding of the thermophysical and thermal radiative properties of undercooled melts. An effort to measure the temperature of a falling drop is under way. The technique uses two color pyrometry and high speed data acquisition. The approach is presented along with some preliminary data from drop tube experiments. The results from droplet cooling models is compared with noncontact temperature measurements.

  19. Non-contact infrared temperature measurements in dry permafrost boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Ralf; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Kaul, Norbert

    2008-04-01

    While planning the COAST Expedition to the Siberian Laptev Sea in 2005, the question of how to make a short equilibrium temperature measurement in a dry borehole arose. As a result, an infrared borehole tool was developed and used in three dry boreholes (up to 60.2 m deep) in the coastal transition zone from terrestrial to sub-sea permafrost near Mamontovy Klyk in the western Laptev Sea. A depth versus temperature profile was acquired with equilibration times of 50 × 10-3 s at each depth interval. Comparison with a common resistor string revealed an offset due to limitations of accuracy of the infrared technique and the influence of the probe's massive steel housing. Therefore it was necessary to calibrate the infrared sensor with a high precision temperature logger in each borehole. The results of the temperature measurements show a highly dynamic transition zone with temperature gradients up to -0.092°C/m and heat flow of -218 mW/m. A period of submergence of only 600 years the drilled sub-sea permafrost is approaching the overlying seawater temperature at -1.61°C with a temperature gradient of 0.021°C/m and heat flow of 49 mW/m. Further offshore, 11 km from the coastline, a temperature gradient of 0.006°C/m and heat flow of 14 mW/m occur. Thus the sub-sea permafrost in the Mamontovy Klyk region has reached a critical temperature for the presence of interstitial ice. The aim of this article is to give a brief feasibility study of infrared downhole temperature measurements and to present experiences and results of its successful application.

  20. Advances in Non-contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Canepari, Stacy; Rogers, Jan. R.

    2009-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and heated with a laser. The laser is aligned off-center so that the absorbed photons transfer their momentum to the sample, causing it to rotate at up to 250,000+ RPM. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the noncontact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method is being employed on Ultra-High-Temperature ZrB2- SiC composites, which may see application in rocket nozzles and sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles.

  1. A method for non-contact drop charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. C.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for detecting point type of charge has been developed. This system is based on the principle of reciprocal motion of a grounded conductor near a point charge. The current induced through such a process can then be used to determine the static field strength of the point charge, hence the quantity of the charge. Experiments were done to understand the characteristics of this new device. Test case indicates that the results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. This device shows extremely good linearity with respect to the strength of the input static field. The resolution of the system is better than 10 V/m, which is about two orders of magnitude in sensitivity higher than other types of field measuring apparatus. The high sensitivity of this system makes it possible to conduct charged drop experiments under microgravity conditions.

  2. Proposal on Calculation of Ventilation Threshold Using Non-contact Respiration Measurement with Pattern Light Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Ichimura, Shiro; Fujiwara, Toyoki; Kiyooka, Satoru; Koshiji, Kohji; Tsuzuki, Keishi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Fujimoto, Hideo

    We proposed a calculation method of the ventilation threshold using the non-contact respiration measurement with dot-matrix pattern light projection under pedaling exercise. The validity and effectiveness of our proposed method is examined by simultaneous measurement with the expiration gas analyzer. The experimental result showed that the correlation existed between the quasi ventilation thresholds calculated by our proposed method and the ventilation thresholds calculated by the expiration gas analyzer. This result indicates the possibility of the non-contact measurement of the ventilation threshold by the proposed method.

  3. The Practical Implementation of Non-Contacting Laser Strain Measurements Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam; Quinn, roger D.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of stress and strain in rotating turbomachinery is critical to many industries. The search for a non-contacting, non-interfering, non-degrading measurement system is on going and extensive. While several methods seem promising in theory, implementation has proven troublesome. This work uncovers and quantifies these implementation issues in the context of a laser measurement system. Both a Laser Doppler Velocimeter system and a displacement laser system are utilized. It is found that the key issues are signal to noise ratio, rigid body compensation, measurement location, and conversion of intermittent measurements to a continuous signal. Accounting for these factors leads to successful measurements. These results should lead to better ideas and more practical solutions to the non-contacting, non-degrading, non-interfering strain measurement system problem.

  4. Non-Contact Measurement of the Electrical Impedance of Biological Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT OF THE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE C.H. Riedel and O.Dössel Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Universität...currents. Keywords—contact-free measurement, electrical im- pedance, coil systems I. Introduction The non-invasive method of measuring the impe- dance...can give information of the electrical characte- ristics of tissue. In some cases the conductivity gra- dient can be an important value. The

  5. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  6. Investigation of human body potential measured by a non-contact measuring system.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Norimitsu

    2016-12-07

    A human body is occasionally electrified in a room. This charged object will be a source of electrostatic accidents, including the malfunction of electronic equipment. Hence, prevention of these accidents is required. Accidents occasionally occur, even though antistatic clothes and shoes are used. One of the causes for these accidents is that there is a lack of the preventive measures. This situation occurs when using, for example, unconductive wax. In this study, human body potential (voltage) is measured using a non-contact measuring system. An investigation of the human body's voltage when using this system is conducted. The result demonstrates that the voltage of a human body wearing antistatic clothes and shoes or light clothes and slippers exceeds a malfunctioning voltage of a microelectronics device when the body walks on floors. Thus, accidents may occur even if a human body wearing the antistatic clothes walks on flooring. These results will be useful in estimating determination whether electrostatic accidents occur or not.

  7. Measuring stream discharge by non-contact methods: A proof-of-concept experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Spicer, K.R.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Thurman, E.M.; Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experiment to make a completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurement. A van-mounted, pulsed doppler (10GHz) radar collected surface-velocity data across the 183-m wide Skagit River, Washington at a USGS streamgaging station using Bragg scattering from short waves produced by turbulent boils on the surface of the river. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities for 25 sub-sections by assuming a normal open-channel velocity profile (surface velocity times 0.85). Channel cross-sectional area was measured using a 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar antenna suspended from a cableway car over the river. Seven acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements and a conventional current-meter discharge measurement were also made. Three non-contact discharge measurements completed in about a 1-hour period were within 1 % of the gaging station rating curve discharge values. With further refinements, it is thought that open-channel flow can be measured reliably by non-contact methods.

  8. Contact and non-contact ultrasonic measurement in the food industry: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufiq Mohd Khairi, Mohd; Ibrahim, Sallehuddin; Yunus, Mohd Amri Md; Faramarzi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of the food manufacturing process is vital since it determines the safety and quality level of foods which directly affect the consumers’ health. Companies which produce high quality products will gain trust from consumers. This factor helps the companies to make profits. The use of efficient and appropriate sensors for the monitoring process can also reduce cost. The food assessing process based on an ultrasonic sensor has attracted the attention of the food industry due to its excellent capabilities in several applications. The utilization of low or high frequencies for the ultrasonic transducer has provided an enormous benefit for analysing, modifying and guaranteeing the quality of food. The contact and non-contact ultrasonic modes for measurement also contributed significantly to the food processing. This paper presents a review of the application of the contact and non-contact mode of ultrasonic measurement focusing on safety and quality control areas. The results from previous researches are shown and elaborated.

  9. A model undergraduate research institute for study of emerging non-contact measurement technologies and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvonch, Curt; Smith, Christopher; Bourne, Stefanie; Blandino, Joseph R.; Miles, Jonathan J.

    2006-04-01

    The Infrared Development and Thermal Structures Laboratory (IDTSL) is an undergraduate research laboratory in the College of Integrated Science and Technology (CISAT) at James Madison University (JMU) in Harrisonburg, Virginia. During the 1997-98 academic year, Dr. Jonathan Miles established the IDTSL at JMU with the support of a collaborative research grant from the NASA Langley Research Center and with additional support from the College of Integrated Science and Technology at JMU. The IDTSL supports research and development efforts that feature non-contact thermal and mechanical measurements and advance the state of the art. These efforts all entail undergraduate participation intended to significantly enrich their technical education. The IDTSL is funded by major government organizations and the private sector and provides a unique opportunity to undergraduates who wish to participate in projects that push the boundaries of non-contact measurement technologies, and provides a model for effective hands-on, project oriented, student-centered learning that reinforces concepts and skills introduced within the Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) curriculum. The lab also provides access to advanced topics and emerging measurement technologies; fosters development of teaming and communication skills in an interdisciplinary environment; and avails undergraduates of professional activities including writing papers, presentation at conferences, and participation in summer internships. This paper provides an overview of the Infrared Development and Thermal Structures Laboratory, its functionality, its record of achievements, and the important contribution it has made to the field of non-contact measurement and undergraduate education.

  10. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Marty-Dessus, D. Ziani, A. C.; Berquez, L.; Petre, A.

    2015-04-15

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  11. Non-contact measurements of ultrasonic waves on paper webs using a photorefractive interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Brodeur, Pierre H.; Lafond, Emmanuel F.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for non-contact measurement of ultrasonic waves on moving paper webs employs a photorefractive interferometer. The photorefractive interferometer employs an optical head in which the incident beam and reflected beam are coaxial, thus enabling detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane waves with a single apparatus. The incident beam and reference beams are focused into a line enabling greater power to be used without damaging the paper.

  12. Non-contact angle measurement based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Lian

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel precise angle measurement scheme based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry (PLFI), which outputs two parallel laser beams and thus their displacement difference reflects the angle variation of the target. Due to its ultrahigh sensitivity to the feedback light, PLFI realizes the direct non-contact measurement of non-cooperative targets. Experimental results show that PLFI has an accuracy of 8″ within a range of 1400″. The yaw of a guide is also measured and the experimental results agree with those of the dual-frequency laser interferometer Agilent 5529A.

  13. Investigation of human body potential measured by a non-contact measuring system

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Norimitsu

    2016-01-01

    A human body is occasionally electrified in a room. This charged object will be a source of electrostatic accidents, including the malfunction of electronic equipment. Hence, prevention of these accidents is required. Accidents occasionally occur, even though antistatic clothes and shoes are used. One of the causes for these accidents is that there is a lack of the preventive measures. This situation occurs when using, for example, unconductive wax. In this study, human body potential (voltage) is measured using a non-contact measuring system. An investigation of the human body’s voltage when using this system is conducted. The result demonstrates that the voltage of a human body wearing antistatic clothes and shoes or light clothes and slippers exceeds a malfunctioning voltage of a microelectronics device when the body walks on floors. Thus, accidents may occur even if a human body wearing the antistatic clothes walks on flooring. These results will be useful in estimating determination whether electrostatic accidents occur or not. PMID:27319403

  14. Non-contact measurements of water jet spreading width with a laser instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funami, Yuki; Hasuya, Ryo; Tanabe, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Jet spreading width is one of the important characteristics of water jets discharging into the air. Many researchers have dealt with measuring this width, and contact measuring methods on the water jet surface were employed in a lot of the cases. In order to avoid undesirable effects caused by the contact on the jet surface, we introduce non-contact measuring methods with a laser instrument to the measurements of jet spreading width. In measurements, a transmitter emits sheet-like laser beam to a receiver. The water jet between the transmitter and the receiver interrupts the laser beam and makes a shadow. The minimum and maximum values of the shadow width are measured. In addition, pictures of the water jet are taken with a scale, and the shadow width is measured from the pictures. The experiments on various needle strokes were performed. Three kinds of width consistent with the jet structure were obtained. In the results, it can be concluded that our non-contact measuring methods are feasible. The data of jet spreading widths and jet taper were obtained and are useful for future applications.

  15. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  16. Long wavelength infrared radiation thermometry for non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, J.; Zipf, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini, M.; Ebert, H.-P.; Tutschke, A.; Hallam, A.; Hanspal, J.; Langley, M.; Hodge, D.; Hartmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the EU project "Sensors Towards Advanced Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Engines (acronym STARGATE)" is the development of a suite of advanced sensors, instrumentation and related systems in order to contribute to the developing of the next generation of green and efficient gas turbine engines. One work package of the project deals with the design and development of a long wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation thermometer for the non-contact measurement of the surface temperature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during the operation of gas turbine engines. For opaque surfaces (e.g. metals or superalloys) radiation thermometers which are sensitive in the near or short wavelength infrared are used as state-of-the-art method for non-contact temperature measurements. But this is not suitable for oxide ceramic based TBCs (e.g. partially yttria stabilized zirconia) as oxide ceramics are semi-transparent in the near and short wavelength infrared spectral region. Fortunately the applied ceramic materials are non-transparent in the long wavelength infrared and additionally exhibit a high emittance in this wavelength region. Therefore, a LWIR pyrometer can be used for non-contact temperature measurements of the surfaces of TBCs as such pyrometers overcome the described limitation of existing techniques. For performing non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines one has to know the infrared-optical properties of the applied TBCs as well as of the hot combustion gas in order to properly analyse the measurement data. For reaching a low uncertainty on the one hand the emittance of the TBC should be high (>0.9) in order to reduce reflections from the hot surrounding and on the other hand the absorbance of the hot combustion gas should be low (<0.1) in order to decrease the influence of the gas on the measured signal. This paper presents the results of the work performed by the authors with focus on the implementation of the LWIR pyrometer and the

  17. Looking to the Future: Non-contact Methods for Measuring Streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Spicer, K.R.; Plant, J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.; Wahl, T.L.; Pugh, C.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Vermeyen, T.B.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate whether it is possible to make completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurements. After an extensive evaluation of potential technologies, we concluded a combination of high-frequency (microwave) radar (for measuring surface velocity) and low-frequency radar (ground-penetrating radar) for measuring channel cross-section, had the best chance for success. The first experiment in 1999 on the Skagit River, Washington, using non-contact methods, produced a discharge value nearly exactly the same as from an ADCP and current meter. Surface-velocity data were converted to mean velocity based on measurements of the velocity profile (multiplied by 0.85), and radar signal speed in impure fresh water was measured to be 0.11-0.12 ft/ns. The weak link was thought to be the requirement to suspend the GPR antenna over the water, which required a bridge or cableway. Two contractors, expert with radar, were unsuccessful in field experiments to measure channel cross-section from the riverbank. Another series of experiments were designed to demonstrate whether both radar systems could be mounted on a helicopter, flown back and forth across a river, and provide data to compute flow. In Sept. 2000 and May 2001, a series of helicopter flights with mounted radar systems successfully measured surface velocity and channel cross-section of the Cowlitz River, Washington.

  18. Non-Contact Measurement of Density and Thickness Variation in Dielectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This non-contact, single-sided terahertz electromagnetic measurement and imaging method characterizes micro structural (e.g., spatially-lateral density) and thickness variation in dielectric (insulating) materials. This method was demonstrated for space shuttle external tank sprayed-on foam insulation and has been designed for use as an inspection method for current and future NASA thermal protection systems and other dielectric material inspection applications where no contact can be made with the sample due to fragility and it is impractical to use ultrasonic methods

  19. Solid state lasers for use in non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The last decade has seen a series of dramatic developments in solid state laser technology. Prominent among these has been the emergence of high power semiconductor laser diode arrays and a deepening understanding of the dynamics of solid state lasers. Taken in tandem these two developments enable the design of laser diode pumped solid state lasers. Pumping solid state lasers with semiconductor diodes relieves the need for cumbersome and inefficient flashlamps and results in an efficient and stable laser with the compactness and reliability. It provides a laser source that can be reliably used in space. These new coherent sources are incorporated into the non-contact measurement of temperature. The primary focus is the development and characterization of new optical materials for use in active remote sensors of the atmosphere. In the course of this effort several new materials and new concepts were studied which can be used for other sensor applications. The general approach to the problem of new non-contact temperature measurements has had two components. The first component centers on passive sensors using optical fibers; an optical fiber temperature sensor for the drop tube was designed and tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Work on this problem has given insight into the use of optical fibers, especially new IR fibers, in thermal metrology. The second component of the effort is to utilize the experience gained in the study of passive sensors to examine new active sensor concepts. By active sensor are defined as a sensing device or mechanism which is interrogated in some way be radiation, usually from a laser. The status of solid state lasers as sources for active non-contact temperature sensors are summarized. Some specific electro-optic techniques are described which are applicable to the sensor problems at hand. Work on some of these ideas is in progress while other concepts are still being worked out.

  20. Solid state lasers for use in non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-06-01

    The last decade has seen a series of dramatic developments in solid state laser technology. Prominent among these has been the emergence of high power semiconductor laser diode arrays and a deepening understanding of the dynamics of solid state lasers. Taken in tandem these two developments enable the design of laser diode pumped solid state lasers. Pumping solid state lasers with semiconductor diodes relieves the need for cumbersome and inefficient flashlamps and results in an efficient and stable laser with the compactness and reliability. It provides a laser source that can be reliably used in space. These new coherent sources are incorporated into the non-contact measurement of temperature. The primary focus is the development and characterization of new optical materials for use in active remote sensors of the atmosphere. In the course of this effort several new materials and new concepts were studied which can be used for other sensor applications. The general approach to the problem of new non-contact temperature measurements has had two components. The first component centers on passive sensors using optical fibers; an optical fiber temperature sensor for the drop tube was designed and tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Work on this problem has given insight into the use of optical fibers, especially new IR fibers, in thermal metrology. The second component of the effort is to utilize the experience gained in the study of passive sensors to examine new active sensor concepts. By active sensor are defined as a sensing device or mechanism which is interrogated in some way be radiation, usually from a laser. The status of solid state lasers as sources for active non-contact temperature sensors are summarized. Some specific electro-optic techniques are described which are applicable to the sensor problems at hand. Work on some of these ideas is in progress while other concepts are still being worked out.

  1. A non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Yun; Chang, Rong-Seng; Jwo, Ko-Wen; Hsu, Chung-Chi; Tsao, Chu-Pang

    2015-04-27

    This study is to construct a non-contact pulse automatic positioning measurement system for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) using optical triangulation measurements. The system consists of a linear laser, a CMOS image sensor and image analysis software. The linear laser is projected on the pulse beat location on the wrists; the CMOS image sensor records the process and the software analyzes the images. The program mainly uses the optical centroid and fast Fourier transform (FFT) principles to calculate centroid changes (pulse amplitude changes) from the images taken by the CMOS image sensor. It returns the positions of cun, guan and chi pulses automatically in terms of the amplitudes and the signals are then transformed from the time domain (time-amplitude) into the frequency domain (frequency-amplitude) via FFT to obtain the waveforms and frequencies of the cun, guan and chi pulses. It successfully extracts the data from the TCM pulse reading and can be a medical aid system for TCM. Combining the advantages of optical measurement and computer automation, this system provides a non-contact, easy to operate, fast in detection and low-cost equipment design.

  2. A non-contacting vertical alignment system for mass properties measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Suazo, J.E.; Varga, R.C.

    1993-11-01

    A non-contact system for alignment of objects on mass properties measuring instruments is described. Test parts can be aligned to within the capabilities of the user and the fixture to make the adjustments. The current implementation can align objects to less than .001 inches at two points with final requested adjustments of a few ten-thousands of an inch. The non-contact capability allows the alignment of objects which are too compliant or fragile for traditional contacting measurement methods. Also, this system allows the definition of a reference axis on objects which are not perfectly symmetric. The reference axis is defined at the top of the object by an appropriate marker and defined at the bottom by a best fit circle through the surface at a specified height. A general description of the hardware, procedures, and results are presented for the non-user. Appendices which contain a complete description of the software, usage, and mathematical implementation are provided for the reader who is interested in using or further developing the system.

  3. A non-contact technique for measuring eccrine sweat gland activity using passive thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Krzywicki, Alan T; Berntson, Gary G; O'Kane, Barbara L

    2014-10-01

    An approach for monitoring eccrine sweat gland activity using high resolution Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) imaging (3-5 μm wave band) is described. This technique is non-contact, passive, and provides high temporal and spatial resolution. Pore activity was monitored on the face and on the volar surfaces of the distal and medial phalanges of the index and middle fingers while participants performed a series of six deep inhalation and exhalation exercises. Two metrics called the Pore Activation Index (PAI) and Pore Count (PC) were defined as size-weighted and unweighted measures of active sweat gland counts respectively. PAI transient responses on the finger tips were found to be positively correlated to Skin Conductance Responses (SCRs). PAI responses were also observed on the face, although the finger sites appeared to be more responsive. Results indicate that thermal imaging of the pore response may provide a useful, non-contact, correlate measure for electrodermal responses recorded from related sites.

  4. Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity using RGB cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using red, green, and blue (RGB) digital color images is proposed. Generally, PWV is used as the index of arteriosclerosis. In our method, changes in blood volume are calculated based on changes in the color information, and is estimated by combining multiple regression analysis (MRA) with a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) model of the transit of light in human skin. After two pulse waves of human skins were measured using RGB cameras, and the PWV was calculated from the difference of the pulse transit time and the distance between two measurement points. The measured forehead-finger PWV (ffPWV) was on the order of m/s and became faster as the values of vital signs raised. These results demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  5. Non-contact direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect in thin samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cugini, F. Porcari, G.; Solzi, M.

    2014-07-15

    An experimental setup, based on a non-contact temperature sensor, is proposed to directly measure the magnetocaloric effect of samples few micrometers thick. The measurement of the adiabatic temperature change of foils and ribbons is fundamental to design innovative devices based on magnetocaloric thin materials or micro-structuring bulk samples. The reliability of the proposed setup is demonstrated by comparing the measurements performed on a bulk gadolinium sample with the results obtained by an experimental setup based on a Cernox bare chip thermoresistance and by in-field differential scanning calorimetry. We show that this technique can measure the adiabatic temperature variation on gadolinium sheets as thin as 27 μm. Heat transfer simulations are added to describe the capability of the presented technique.

  6. Non-contact Measurement of Damaged External Tapered Thread Based on Linear Array CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F. J.; Zhang, R. J.; Du, Z. J.; Cui, X. M.

    2006-10-01

    The non-contact measurement of external tapered thread based on linear array CCD is presented to decrease the measuring error caused by local damage area contrast to the measurement with mechanical gauges. The thread is scanned by linear array CCD and the signal is processed by first order difference to obtain thread contour. For the thread with damage on tooth flank and deformation on generating line, the Hough transform and weighted least squares are adopted to reduce the local defects and to set up fitted thread contour equations that can reflect the real dimension. Then the dimensions can be calculated based on these equations according to the definition. The paper also presents the method to evaluate the local damage. Experiment shows that the method is suitable for the measurement of damaged thread.

  7. A novel nano-scale non-contact temperature measurement technique for crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaowei; Hull, Robert

    2012-11-23

    A new high spatial resolution non-contact temperature measurement technique (thermal scanning electron microscopy, ThSEM) is demonstrated. It employs temperature dependent thermal diffuse scattering in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Unlike conventional scanning thermal microscopy, which uses contact probes, ThSEM is a non-contact method. In contrast to optical temperature mapping techniques, ThSEM does not have the spatial resolution limitation that arises from the optical wavelength and theoretically can reach a resolution of <10 nm. The hardware setup is very similar to the EBSD system in an SEM, which can make the integration of temperature mapping into an SEM relatively straightforward. Moreover, multiple signals or contrast mechanisms, such as temperature distributions, grain orientation maps, topographic images and elemental maps can be obtained from the same sample area depending on the specific SEM capability. This technique thus adds a new channel-the temperature signal-to the collection of existing SEM signals.

  8. Enhancement to Non-Contacting Stress Measurement of Blade Vibration Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael; Jagodnik, John

    2011-01-01

    A system for turbo machinery blade vibration has been developed that combines time-of-arrival sensors for blade vibration amplitude measurement and radar sensors for vibration frequency and mode identification. The enabling technology for this continuous blade monitoring system is the radar sensor, which provides a continuous time series of blade displacement over a portion of a revolution. This allows the data reduction algorithms to directly calculate the blade vibration frequency and to correctly identify the active modes of vibration. The work in this project represents a significant enhancement in the mode identification and stress calculation accuracy in non-contacting stress measurement system (NSMS) technology when compared to time-of-arrival measurements alone.

  9. Non-contact measurements of creep properties of niobium at 1985 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Wall, J. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Hyers, R. W.

    2015-01-01

    The stress exponent in the power-law creep of niobium at 1985 °C was measured by a non-contact technique using an electrostatic levitation facility at NASA MSFC. This method employs a distribution of stress to allow the stress exponent to be determined from each test, rather than from the curve fit through measurements from multiple samples that is required by conventional methods. The sample is deformed by the centripetal acceleration from the rapid rotation, and the deformed shapes are analyzed to determine the strain. Based on a mathematical proof, which revealed that the stress exponent was determined uniquely by the ratio of the polar to equatorial strains, a series of finite-element analyses with the models of different stress exponents were also performed to determine the stress exponent corresponding to the measured strain ratio. The stress exponent from the ESL experiment showed a good agreement with those from the literature and the conventional creep test.

  10. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants. PMID:26527099

  11. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-18

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focuses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  12. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  13. Research of non-contact measurement method for outline dimensions of some special workpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qiaoling; Guo, Yongcai

    2016-11-01

    In industrial production, machine vision is widely used in a variety of automated testing industry, because of its non-contact, high precision, fast detection time, etc. This paper introduces a nondestructive detection system for the outline dimensions of a kind of special workpiece. For the purpose of controlling the quality of image, an ultra-high-resolution monochrome CCD image sensor is adopted to capture source image. Then it's image preprocessing, including image clipping processing, grey scale processing, image denoising, etc. Then it was the progress of edge extraction, using gradient operator to get its contour edge, then a piecewise fitting method to get the dimensions. This method achieves once measuring multiple outline dimensions without moving the workpiece. It has been used in industrial production. The result sees its practical value for meeting the production needs, with the advantages of high accuracy, fast speed high stability of the measurement system through experiments.

  14. Non-contact passive temperature measuring system and method of operation using micro-mechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Oden, Patrick I.; Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2000-01-01

    A non-contact infrared thermometer measures target temperatures remotely without requiring the ratio of the target size to the target distance to the thermometer. A collection means collects and focusses target IR radiation on an IR detector. The detector measures thermal energy of the target over a spectrum using micromechanical sensors. A processor means calculates the collected thermal energy in at least two different spectral regions using a first algorithm in program form and further calculates the ratio of the thermal energy in the at least two different spectral regions to obtain the target temperature independent of the target size, distance to the target and emissivity using a second algorithm in program form.

  15. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; ...

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying withmore » transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.« less

  16. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  17. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  18. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  19. Sleep/wake measurement using a non-contact biomotion sensor.

    PubMed

    De Chazal, Philip; Fox, Niall; O'Hare, Emer; Heneghan, Conor; Zaffaroni, Alberto; Boyle, Patricia; Smith, Stephanie; O'Connell, Caroline; McNicholas, Walter T

    2011-06-01

    We studied a novel non-contact biomotion sensor, which has been developed for identifying sleep/wake patterns in adult humans. The biomotion sensor uses ultra low-power reflected radiofrequency waves to determine the movement of a subject during sleep. An automated classification algorithm has been developed to recognize sleep/wake states on a 30-s epoch basis based on the measured movement signal. The sensor and software were evaluated against gold-standard polysomnography on a database of 113 subjects [94 male, 19 female, age 53±13years, apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) 22±24] being assessed for sleep-disordered breathing at a hospital-based sleep laboratory. The overall per-subject accuracy was 78%, with a Cohen's kappa of 0.38. Lower accuracy was seen in a high AHI group (AHI >15, 63 subjects) than in a low AHI group (74.8% versus 81.3%); however, most of the change in accuracy can be explained by the lower sleep efficiency of the high AHI group. Averaged across subjects, the overall sleep sensitivity was 87.3% and the wake sensitivity was 50.1%. The automated algorithm slightly overestimated sleep efficiency (bias of +4.8%) and total sleep time (TST; bias of +19min on an average TST of 288min). We conclude that the non-contact biomotion sensor can provide a valid means of measuring sleep-wake patterns in this patient population, and also allows direct visualization of respiratory movement signals.

  20. Operational modal analysis of a rectangular plate using non-contact excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Zhu, W. D.

    2013-09-01

    Operational modal analysis (OMA), or output-only modal analysis, has been extensively developed in the past decades and widely used especially when the input is unknown and difficult to measure. This paper presents a non-contact experimental technique for measuring modal parameters of a rectangular aluminum plate with free boundaries using only the output data, with the intention to apply the technique to turbine blades. OMA is used to analyze both the out-of-plane and in-plane vibrations of the plate in the frequency range of up to 15,000 Hz, which can be an operation frequency range of a turbine blade, under white noise acoustic excitation in a direction of interest. It is shown that OMA can be performed when the types of measurement at the measurement and reference points are different, since the associated cross-correlation functions contain modal characteristics of the test structure. A single-point laser vibrometer and a free-field microphone are used to simultaneously measure the responses of the plate in a non-contact manner, with the microphone measurement serving as the reference. The pressure measured by the microphone near the reference point is shown to be proportional to the normal surface acceleration at the reference point, and the cross power spectral densities obtained by the current test method can be used for modal parameter estimation. A method for measuring the in-plane modes of the plate by shining the laser beam on the plate surface with an incident angle is developed. Experimental modal analysis (EMA) is also performed on the plate using an impact hammer and the laser vibrometer. The measured natural frequencies and mode shapes of the out-of-plane and in-plane modes of the plate using OMA and EMA are compared with those calculated using commercial finite element software. The maximum error between the measured and calculated natural frequencies of the plate is 1.53 percent for the first 18 elastic modes, including 16 out-of-plane and two in

  1. Non-Contact Thermal Properties Measurement with Low-Power Laser and IR Camera System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Troy L.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    As shown by the Phoenix Mars Lander's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP), contact measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity (using a modified flux-plate or line-source heat-pulse method) are constrained by a number of factors. Robotic resources must be used to place the probe, making them unavailable for other operations for the duration of the measurement. The range of placement is also limited by mobility, particularly in the case of a lander. Placement is also subject to irregularities in contact quality, resulting in non-repeatable heat transfer to the material under test. Most important from a scientific perspective, the varieties of materials which can be measured are limited to unconsolidated or weakly-cohesive regolith materials, rocks, and ices being too hard for nominal insertion strengths. Accurately measuring thermal properties in the laboratory requires significant experimental finesse, involving sample preparation, controlled and repeatable procedures, and, practically, instrumentation much more voluminous than the sample being tested (heater plates, insulation, temperature sensors). Remote measurements (infrared images from orbiting spacecraft) can reveal composite properties like thermal inertia, but suffer both from a large footprint (low spatial resolution) and convolution of the thermal properties of a potentially layered medium. In situ measurement techniques (the Phoenix TECP is the only robotic measurement of thermal properties to date) suffer from problems of placement range, placement quality, occupation of robotic resources, and the ability to only measure materials of low mechanical strength. A spacecraft needs the ability to perform a non-contact thermal properties measurement in situ. Essential components include low power consumption, leveraging of existing or highly-developed flight technologies, and mechanical simplicity. This new in situ method, by virtue of its being non-contact, bypasses all of these

  2. A Non-Contact Measurement System for the Range of Motion of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Trieu; Pathirana, Pubudu N.; Trinh, Hieu; Fay, Pearse

    2015-01-01

    An accurate and standardised tool to measure the active range of motion (ROM) of the hand is essential to any progressive assessment scenario in hand therapy practice. Goniometers are widely used in clinical settings for measuring the ROM of the hand. However, such measurements have limitations with regard to inter-rater and intra-rater reliability and involve direct physical contact with the hand, possibly increasing the risk of transmitting infections. The system proposed in this paper is the first non-contact measurement system utilising Intel Perceptual Technology and a Senz3D Camera for measuring phalangeal joint angles. To enhance the accuracy of the system, we developed a new approach to achieve the total active movement without measuring three joint angles individually. An equation between the actual spacial position and measurement value of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint was established through the measurement values of the total active movement, so that its actual position can be inferred. Verified by computer simulations, experimental results demonstrated a significant improvement in the calculation of the total active movement and successfully recovered the actual position of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint angles. A trial that was conducted to examine the clinical applicability of the system involving 40 healthy subjects confirmed the practicability and consistency in the proposed system. The time efficiency conveyed a stronger argument for this system to replace the current practice of using goniometers. PMID:26225976

  3. Non-contacting Measurement of Oil Film Thickness Between Loaded Metallic Gear Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Daniel B.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical power transmission efficiency of gears is depends on the lubrication condition between gear teeth. While the lubrication levels can be generally predicted, an effective in-situ non-contacting measurement of oil film thicknesses between loaded metallic gear teeth has proved elusive. This study explores a novel oil film thickness measurement technique based on optical fluence, the light energy transmitted between loaded gear teeth. A gear testing apparatus that allowed independent control of gear rotation rate, load torque, and oil flow was designed and built. Film thickness measurements made with 5-inch-pitch-diameter 60-tooth spur gears ranged from 0.3 to 10.2 mil. These results are compared with film thickness measurements made in an earlier investigation (MacConochie and Cameron, 1960), as well as with predictions from two film thickness models: a simple two-dimensional squeezed oil film and the industry-accepted model as described by the American Gear Manufacturers Association (AGMA 925, 2003). In each case, the measured film thicknesses were larger than the predicted thicknesses, though these discrepancies might be attributed to the specifics the experiments and to challenges associated with calibrating the fluence measurements. [Sponsored by General Electric].

  4. Optical non-contact pH measurement in cell culture with sterilizable, modular parts.

    PubMed

    Kattipparambil Rajan, Dhanesh; Patrikoski, Mimmi; Verho, Jarmo; Sivula, Jyrki; Ihalainen, Heimo; Miettinen, Susanna; Lekkala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    A non-contact real time pH measurement using fully modular optical parts is described for phenol-red medium cell cultures. The modular parts can be sterilized, and once the measurement is started at the beginning of culture, no recalibration or maintenance is needed till the end of the culture. Measurements can be carried out without any special manual attention. The modular assembly of LED and sensor cassettes is unique, robust, reusable and reproducible. pH is measured in an intact closed flow system, without wasting any culture medium. A special pump encapsulation enables the system to be effortlessly functional in extremely humid incubator environments. This avoids lengthy sample tubings in and out of the incubator, associated large temperature changes and CO2 buffering issues. A new correction model to compensate errors caused e.g. by biolayers in spectrometric pH measurement is put-forward, which improves the accuracy of pH estimation significantly. The method provides resolution down to 0.1 pH unit in physiological pH range with mean absolute error 0.02.

  5. Non-Contact Surface Roughness Measurement by Implementation of a Spatial Light Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Aulbach, Laura; Salazar Bloise, Félix; Lu, Min; Koch, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    The surface structure, especially the roughness, has a significant influence on numerous parameters, such as friction and wear, and therefore estimates the quality of technical systems. In the last decades, a broad variety of surface roughness measurement methods were developed. A destructive measurement procedure or the lack of feasibility of online monitoring are the crucial drawbacks of most of these methods. This article proposes a new non-contact method for measuring the surface roughness that is straightforward to implement and easy to extend to online monitoring processes. The key element is a liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulator, integrated in an interferometric setup. By varying the imprinted phase of the modulator, a correlation between the imprinted phase and the fringe visibility of an interferogram is measured, and the surface roughness can be derived. This paper presents the theoretical approach of the method and first simulation and experimental results for a set of surface roughnesses. The experimental results are compared with values obtained by an atomic force microscope and a stylus profiler. PMID:28294990

  6. Non-contact sound speed measurement by optical probing of beam deflection due to sound wave.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Soo; Kim, Yong Tae; Pu, Yu Cheon; Kim, Min Gon; Kim, Ho Chul

    2006-01-01

    We report a non-contact and non-invasive method of sound speed measurement by optical probing of deflected laser beam due to normally incident degenerated shock wave. In this study the shock wave from an exploding wire was degenerated to an ordinary sound wave at the distance exceeding 0.23 m. Temporal resolution of the deflected beam signal was improved by passing through an adequate electronic high-pass filter, as a result we obtained a better temporal resolution than that of the acoustic pressure detection by PZT transducer in terms of rising time. The spatial resolution was improved by passing the refracted beam signal into the edge of focusing lens to make a larger deflection angle. Sound speed was calculated by monitoring the time of flight of transient deflected signal at the predetermined position. Sound speed has been measured in air, distilled water and acryl, agreed well with the published values. The sound speed measured in the solution of glycerin, magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), and dimethylformamide with various mole fractions also agrees within 3% of relative error with those measured in the present work by ultrasonic pulse echo method. The results suggest that the method proposed is to be reliable and reproducible.

  7. Non-Contact Surface Roughness Measurement by Implementation of a Spatial Light Modulator.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, Laura; Salazar Bloise, Félix; Lu, Min; Koch, Alexander W

    2017-03-15

    The surface structure, especially the roughness, has a significant influence on numerous parameters, such as friction and wear, and therefore estimates the quality of technical systems. In the last decades, a broad variety of surface roughness measurement methods were developed. A destructive measurement procedure or the lack of feasibility of online monitoring are the crucial drawbacks of most of these methods. This article proposes a new non-contact method for measuring the surface roughness that is straightforward to implement and easy to extend to online monitoring processes. The key element is a liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulator, integrated in an interferometric setup. By varying the imprinted phase of the modulator, a correlation between the imprinted phase and the fringe visibility of an interferogram is measured, and the surface roughness can be derived. This paper presents the theoretical approach of the method and first simulation and experimental results for a set of surface roughnesses. The experimental results are compared with values obtained by an atomic force microscope and a stylus profiler.

  8. Measurements of anterior segment parameters using three different non-contact optical devices in keratoconus patients

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Ahmet Taylan; Pekel, Gökhan; Bozkurt, Ercüment; Yıldırım, Yusuf; Pekel, Evre; Demirok, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the measurements of anterior segment parameters using three different non-contact optical devices in keratoconus patients. METHODS A hundred and one eyes of 55 keratoconus patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 26.2±8.9 years. The inclusion criteria were keratoconus stage I to III according to the Amsler-Krumeich keratoconus classification. All the measurements were done by the same operator, under the mesopic light condition and repeated with three different optical methods; Visante, Orbscan and Pentacam. The evaluated anterior segment parameters were anterior chamber depth (ACD), central and thinnest corneal thickness (CCT and TCT) and pupil diameter (PD). RESULTS The mean CCT measured by Visante, Orbscan and Pentacam were as follows: 462.0±48.1µm, 463.9±60.9µm, 476.5±45.3µm, respectively (P=0.873). The mean ACD values were 3.34±0.33mm, 3.26±0.33mm, 3.49±0.40mm, respectively (P=0.118). The mean PD measurements were 5.11±1.14mm, 4.80±0.85mm, 3.80±1.38mm, respectively (P<0.001). The mean TCT measurements of Visante, Orbscan and Pentacam were 437.9±48.2µm, 447.6±60.6µm and 459.9±44.0µm, respectively (P=0.214). The Visante and Orbscan measured CCT similarly, while Pentacam measured CCT thicker than the other two. The Visante measured TCT thinner than the other two devices. In ACD measurements, Orbscan was the one giving the lowest values. PD was measured differently by the devices. CONCLUSION Although TCT, CCT and ACD measurements acquired by Visante, Orbscan and Pentacam in keratoconus patients are similar, PD measurements show large differences among the devices. PMID:23991390

  9. Measuring pulse rate variability using long-range, non-contact imaging photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Ethan B; Piasecki, Alyssa M; Estepp, Justin R

    2016-08-01

    Camera-based measurement of the blood volume pulse via non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography is a very popular approach for measuring pulse rate using a remote imaging sensor. Comparatively less attention has been paid to the usefulness of the method for measuring features of pulse rate variability, and even less focus has been put on the accuracy of any cardiac activity feature that can be achieved at long imager-to-subject distances. In this study, video was recorded from 19 participants, while at rest, at a distance of 25 meters from the imaging sensor. A digital camera was used to record video while cardiovascular measures of both electrical and optical physiological ground truth were recorded. Pulse rate data obtained from the imager using a common blind source separation and periodogram approach were compared to physiological ground truth signals. The quality of the recovered blood volume pulse morphology was sufficient to calculate time-domain measures of pulse rate using inter-pulse interval (IPI) time series. Following this, several features of pulse rate variability were calculated from the IPI time series and compared to those calculated from the corresponding physiological ground truth signals. Use of the time-domain data as compared to the periodogram approach to measure pulse rate reduced the error in the estimate from 1.6 to 0.2 beats per minute. Correlation analysis (r2) between the camera-based measures of pulse rate variability and ECG-derived heart rate variability ranged from 0.779 to 0.973; these results are of comparable outcome to those obtained at imager-to-subject distances of no more than 3 meters. This study demonstrates that pulse rates of less than one beat-per-minute error can be obtained when the recovered blood volume pulse morphology is of adequate quality to resolve systolic onsets for individual cardiac cycles. Further, this approach can yield data of very promising quality for estimating measures of pulse rate variability.

  10. Contact Versus Non-Contact Measurement of a Helicopter Main Rotor Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Luczak, Marcin; Dziedziech, Kajetan; Peeters, Bart; Van der Auweraer, Herman; Vivolo, Marianna; Desmet, Wim

    2010-05-28

    The dynamic characterization of lightweight structures is particularly complex as the impact of the weight of sensors and instrumentation (cables, mounting of exciters...) can distort the results. Varying mass loading or constraint effects between partial measurements may determine several errors on the final conclusions. Frequency shifts can lead to erroneous interpretations of the dynamics parameters. Typically these errors remain limited to a few percent. Inconsistent data sets however can result in major processing errors, with all related consequences towards applications based on the consistency assumption, such as global modal parameter identification, model-based damage detection and FRF-based matrix inversion in substructuring, load identification and transfer path analysis [1]. This paper addresses the subject of accuracy in the context of the measurement of the dynamic properties of a particular lightweight structure. It presents a comprehensive comparative study between the use of accelerometer, laser vibrometer (scanning LDV) and PU-probe (acoustic particle velocity and pressure) measurements to measure the structural responses, with as final aim the comparison of modal model quality assessment. The object of the investigation is a composite material blade from the main rotor of a helicopter. The presented results are part of an extensive test campaign performed with application of SIMO, MIMO, random and harmonic excitation, and the use of the mentioned contact and non-contact measurement techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of the applied instrumentation are discussed. Presented are real-life measurement problems related to the different set up conditions. Finally an analysis of estimated models is made in view of assessing the applicability of the various measurement approaches for successful fault detection based on modal parameters observation as well as in uncertain non-deterministic numerical model updating.

  11. Non-contact Real-time heart rate measurements based on high speed circuit technology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Shi, Cong; Liu, Ming; Hui, Mei; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, which threaten human health greatly, increased year by year. Heart rate is an important index of these diseases. To address this status, the paper puts forward a kind of simple structure, easy operation, suitable for large populations of daily monitoring non-contact heart rate measurement. In the method we use imaging equipment video sensitive areas. The changes of light intensity reflected through the image grayscale average. The light change is caused by changes in blood volume. We video the people face which include the sensitive areas (ROI), and use high-speed processing circuit to save the video as AVI format into memory. After processing the whole video of a period of time, we draw curve of each color channel with frame number as horizontal axis. Then get heart rate from the curve. We use independent component analysis (ICA) to restrain noise of sports interference, realized the accurate extraction of heart rate signal under the motion state. We design an algorithm, based on high-speed processing circuit, for face recognition and tracking to automatically get face region. We do grayscale average processing to the recognized image, get RGB three grayscale curves, and extract a clearer pulse wave curves through independent component analysis, and then we get the heart rate under the motion state. At last, by means of compare our system with Fingertip Pulse Oximeter, result show the system can realize a more accurate measurement, the error is less than 3 pats per minute.

  12. A non-contact temperature measurement system for controlling photothermal medical laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ã.-zgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal medical laser treatments are extremely dependent on the generated tissue temperature. It is necessary to reach a certain temperature threshold to achieve successful results, whereas preventing to exceed an upper temperature value is required to avoid thermal damage. One method to overcome this problem is to use previously conducted dosimetry studies as a reference. Nevertheless, these results are acquired in controlled environments using uniform subjects. In the clinical environment, the optical and thermal characteristics (tissue color, composition and hydration level) vary dramatically among different patients. Therefore, the most reliable solution is to use a closed-loop feedback system that monitors the target tissue temperature to control laser exposure. In this study, we present a compact, non-contact temperature measurement system for the control of photothermal medical laser applications that is cost-efficient and simple to use. The temperature measurement is achieved using a focused, commercially available MOEMS infrared thermocouple sensor embedded in an off-axis arrangement on the laser beam delivery hand probe. The spot size of the temperature sensor is ca. 2.5 mm, reasonably smaller than the laser spot sizes used in photothermal medical laser applications. The temperature readout and laser control is realized using a microcontroller for fast operation. The utilization of the developed system may enable the adaptation of several medical laser treatments that are currently conducted only in controlled laboratory environments into the clinic. Laser tissue welding and cartilage reshaping are two of the techniques that are limited to laboratory research at the moment. This system will also ensure the safety and success of laser treatments aiming hyperthermia, coagulation and ablation, as well as LLLT and PDT.

  13. Objective measures of joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Roberson, L; Giurintano, D J

    1995-01-01

    Objective measures of joint stiffness allow for the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment modalities. Without this, the effectiveness of therapy is not quantifiable. Presently, joint stiffness can be quantified by either passive range of motion (PROM) measurement or torque range of motion (TqROM) measurement. PROM measurement does not control the force applied, nor does it require that the other joints in the kinematic chain be held fixed. Also, it demonstrates poor interrater reliability. An idealized device melding existing technologies of constant passive motion devices and computerized workstations is proposed to allow for easier measurement of TqROM angles for analysis data for the determination of the effectiveness of treatment modalities.

  14. Development and application of a portable manual non-contact-type goniometric instrument for measuring human anatomical angular parameters.

    PubMed

    Susato, Shin-ichi

    2013-02-01

    Several manual contact-type goniometric instruments have previously been developed to measure joint range of motion (ROM) during physical-therapy evaluation. These include the universal goniometer and the gravity-dependent goniometer, or inclinometer, which are used to measure the ROM angle of a subject in a fully erect posture. Here, we developed a manual non-contact-type portable goniometric instrument for the measurement of anatomical angular parameters based on the principle of spot irradiation by using laser markers. The accuracy of the developed instrument was tested and its performance was compared with that of a contact-type instrument by using a skeletal model (14 static angle assessments), a free posture manikin (18 static angle assessments), and healthy human bodies (5 males and 5 females; 11 dynamic angle assessments). Measurement errors were examined also. When taking the measurements, a visual landmark-detection method was used in place of the conventional palpation method, which is inappropriate for a non-contact measuring system. The instrument developed here is applicable for practical non-contact goniometry and ROM measurements.

  15. Antennas for Terahertz Applications: Focal Plane Arrays and On-chip Non-contact Measurement Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.

    . Additionally, a butterfly-shaped antenna layout is introduced that enables broadband imaging. The alternative design presented here, allows for video-rate imaging in the 0.6--1.2 THz band and maintains a small antenna footprint, resulting in densely packed FPAs. In both antenna designs, we optimize the impedance matching between the antennas and the integrated electronic devices, thus achieving optimum responsivity levels for high sensitivity and low noise performance. Subsequently, we present the design details of the first THz camera and the first THz camera images captured. With the realized THz camera, imaging of concealed objects is achieved with <1mm diffraction limited spatial resolution. Moreover, motivated by the THz camera's real-time image acquisition, we developed the first camera-based THz computer tomography system that allows rapid cross-sectional imaging (˜2 min). For the design and analysis of the THz camera performance, we developed an in-house hybrid electromagnetic model, combining full-wave and high-frequency computational methods. The antenna radiation and impedance computation is first carried out using full-wave modeling of the FPA. Subsequently, we employ scalar diffraction theory to compute the field distribution at any point in space. Thus, the hybrid electromagnetic model allows fast and accurate design of THz antennas and modeling of the complete THz imaging system. Finally, motivated by the novel THz antenna layouts and the quasioptical techniques, we developed a novel non-contact probe measurement method for on-chip device characterization. In the THz regime, traditional contact probes are too small and fragile, thus inhibiting accurate and reliable circuit measurements. By integrating the device under test (DUT) with THz antennas that act as the measurement probes, we may couple the incident and reflected signal from and to the network analyzer without residing to any physical connection.

  16. Non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity and coverage density of silver nanowires for transparent electrodes using Terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Hyeon; Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging technique was used for non-contact measurement of the conductivity and coverage density (D C) of silver nanowires (SNWs) as transparent electrodes. The reflection mode of THz-TDS with an incident angle of 30° was used, and the sheet resistance (R sh) of SNW films was measured using the four-point probe method. The correlations between the THz reflection ratio and R sh were studied by comparing the results of the four-point probe method and the measured THz reflection ratios. Also, the D C of SNWs was evaluated using THz waveforms with a general refractivity formula. This result matched well with a conventional approximation method using a scanning electron microscope image. Furthermore, defects in the SNWs could be easily detected using the THz-TDS imaging technique. The non-contact THz-TDS measurement method that we developed is expected to be a promising technique for non-contact measurement of the R sh and D C for transparent conductive electrodes.

  17. Long-term vital sign measurement using a non-contact vital sign sensor inside an office cubicle setting.

    PubMed

    Hall, T; Malone, N A; Tsay, J; Lopez, J; Nguyen, T; Banister, R E; Lie, D Y C

    2016-08-01

    Heart and respiration rates can be wirelessly measured by extracting the phase shift caused by the periodic displacement of a patient's chest wall. We have developed a phased-array Doppler-based non-contact vital sign (NCVS) sensor capable of long-term vital signs monitoring using an automatic patient tracking and movement detection algorithm. Our NCVS sensor achieves non-contact heart rate monitoring with accuracies of over 90% (i.e, within ±5 Beats-Per-Minute vs. a reference sensor) across a large number of data points collected over various days of the week inside a typical office cubicle setting at a distance of 1.5 meters.

  18. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  19. Non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement by using laser beam and laser distance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Fan, Bo; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2015-07-01

    Large-scale separated surface is very common in modern manufacturing industry. The measurement of the flatness of such surfaces is one of the most important procedures when evaluating the manufacturing quality. Usually, the measurement needs to be accomplished in an in-situ and non-contact way. Although there are many conventional approaches such as autocollimator, capacitance displacement sensor and even CMM, they can not meet the needs from the separated surfaces measurement either because of their contact-nature or inapplicable to separated surfaces. A non-contact large-scale separated surfaces flatness measurement device utilizing laser beam and laser distance sensor (LDS) is proposed. The laser beam is rotated to form an optical reference plane. The LDS is used to measure the distance between the surface and the sensor accurately. A Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) is mounted with the LDS firmly to determine the distance between the LDS and the reference plane and then the distance between the surface and the reference plane can be obtained by subtracting the two distances. The device can be easily mounted on a machine-tool spindle and is moved to measure all the separated surfaces. Then all the data collected are used to evaluate the flatness of these separated surfaces. The accuracy analysis, the corresponding flatness evaluation algorithm, the prototype construction and experiments are also discussed. The proposed approach and device feature as high accuracy, in-situ usage and the higher degree of automatic measurement, and can be used in the areas that call for non-contact and separated surfaces measurement.

  20. A new non-contact approach for the measurement and uniformity evaluation of coating thickness for sheet metal.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zixue; Zheng, Tianchi; Wan, Liping; Lu, Guan; Shao, Jianxin; Yuan, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    To realize the automatic measurement and uniformity evaluation of the coating thickness for sheet metal, a new non-contact detection method for coating thickness was proposed based on a double laser probe and mechanical servo system. Non-contact measurement of coating thickness can be achieved by differential measurement principle of double laser probe, and the influences of sheet metal's Z position changes and platform's vibration on the measurement results can be removed by this method. A new coating thickness evaluation algorithm by integrating the least squares principle and cubic spline interpolation was given, which can fit the discrete thickness data into visual and accurate 3D graphics; and the measurement accuracy was evaluated based on grey theory, solving the problem of low accuracy by using limited measurement data to evaluate the thickness uniformity of an entire sheet metal. The stability and reliability of the system are verified by experiments, and the measurement results of the specimen show that the measurement uncertainty is 0.016 μm and the maximum range of the uniformity evaluation result is 1.4 μm.

  1. High-precision Non-Contact Measurement of Creep of Ultra-High Temperature Materials for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For high-temperature applications (greater than 2,000 C) such as solid rocket motors, hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines, creep becomes one of the most important design factors to be considered. Conventional creep-testing methods, where the specimen and test apparatus are in contact with each other, are limited to temperatures approximately 1,700 C. Development of alloys for higher-temperature applications is limited by the availability of testing methods at temperatures above 2000 C. Development of alloys for applications requiring a long service life at temperatures as low as 1500 C, such as the next generation of jet turbine superalloys, is limited by the difficulty of accelerated testing at temperatures above 1700 C. For these reasons, a new, non-contact creep-measurement technique is needed for higher temperature applications. A new non-contact method for creep measurements of ultra-high-temperature metals and ceramics has been developed and validated. Using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a spherical sample is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation due to centrifugal acceleration. Very accurate measurement of the deformed shape through digital image analysis allows the stress exponent n to be determined very precisely from a single test, rather than from numerous conventional tests. Validation tests on single-crystal niobium spheres showed excellent agreement with conventional tests at 1985 C; however the non-contact method provides much greater precision while using only about 40 milligrams of material. This method is being applied to materials including metals and ceramics for non-eroding throats in solid rockets and next-generation superalloys for turbine engines. Recent advances in the method and the current state of these new measurements will be presented.

  2. High spatial and temporal resolution measurement of mechanical properties in hydrogels by non-contact laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, N.; Terashima, Y.; Umenai, K.; Maeda, S.

    2016-09-01

    Gels have received increased attention as potential materials for biological materials because they can exhibit similar mechanical properties. One obstacle for using gels is that their mechanical properties are significantly altered by defects, such as an inhomogeneous crosslink density distribution. If these defects could be detected and the values and spatial distributions of mechanical properties in the gel could be determined, it would be possible to apply gels for several fields. To achieve the high spatial and temporal resolution measurement of mechanical properties in hydrogels, in our method, a conventional contact excitation device is replaced with a non-contact excitation using laser ablation for the input and magnetic resonance elastography to measure stress waves is replaced with the Schlieren method with a high-speed camera. Magnetic resonance elastography is a local measurement technique, and consequently, requires a lot of time to characterize a sample, as well as does not have sufficient spatial resolution to obtain a broad range of elasticity coefficients of gels. We use laser ablation to apply non-contact impulse excitations to gels to generate stress waves inside them. We can determine mechanical properties of gels using the stress waves' propagation velocity.

  3. Experimental Methodology for Determining Turbomachinery Blade Damping Using Magnetic Bearing Excitation and Non-Contacting Optical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments to determine the effects of turbomachinery fan blade damping concepts such as passively shunted piezoelectric materials on blade response are ongoing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A vertical rotor is suspended and excited with active magnetic bearings (AMBs) usually in a vacuum chamber to eliminate aerodynamic forces. Electromagnetic rotor excitation is superimposed onto rotor PD-controlled support and can be fixed to either a stationary or rotating frame of reference. The rotor speed is controlled with an air turbine system. Blade vibrations are measured using optical probes as part of a Non-Contacting Stress Measurement System (NSMS). Damping is calculated from these measurements. It can be difficult to get accurate damping measurements using this experimental setup and some of the details of how to obtain quality results are seemingly nontrivial. The intent of this paper is to present those details.

  4. Non-Contact Methods for Measuring Front Cavity Depths of Laboratory Standard Microphones Using a Depth-Measuring Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Nedzelnitsky, Victor; Wagner, Randall P.

    2008-01-01

    To achieve an acceptable degree of accuracy at high frequencies in some standardized methods for primary calibration of laboratory standard (LS) microphones, the front cavity depth lfc of each microphone must be known. This dimension must be measured using non-contact methods to prevent damage to the microphone diaphragm. The basic capabilities of an optical depth-measuring microscope were demonstrated by the agreement of its measurements within 0.7 μm of the known values of reference gage blocks. Using this microscope, two basic methods were applied to measure lfc. One (D) uses direct measurements at the microphone front surface annulus and conventional data reduction techniques. The other (GB) uses measurements at the surface of a gage block placed on the annulus, and plane-fitting data reduction techniques intended to reduce the effects of the slightly imperfect geometries of the microphones. The GB method was developed to provide a smoother surface of measurement than the relatively rough surface of the annulus, and to simulate the contact that occurs between the annulus and the smooth, plane surface of an acoustic coupler during microphone calibration. Using these methods, full data sets were obtained at 33 measurement positions (D), or 25 positions (GB). In addition, D and GB subsampling methods were applied by using subsamples of either the D or the GB full data sets. All these methods were applied to six LS microphones, three each of two different types. The GB subsampling methods are preferred for several reasons. The measurement results for lfc obtained by these methods agree well with those obtained by the GB method using the full data set. The expanded uncertainties of results from the GB subsampling methods are not very different from the expanded uncertainty of results from the GB method using the full data set, and are smaller than the expanded uncertainties of results from the D subsampling methods. Measurements of lfc using the GB subsampling

  5. Non-contact measurement of helicopter device position in wind tunnels with the use of optical videogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruliuk, K. A.; Kulesh, V. P.

    2016-10-01

    An optical videogrammetry method using one digital camera for non-contact measurements of geometric shape parameters, position and motion of models and structural elements of aircraft in experimental aerodynamics was developed. The tests with the use of this method for measurement of six components (three linear and three angular ones) of real position of helicopter device in wind tunnel flow were conducted. The distance between camera and test object was 15 meters. It was shown in practice that, in the conditions of aerodynamic experiment instrumental measurement error (standard deviation) for angular and linear displacements of helicopter device does not exceed 0,02° and 0.3 mm, respectively. Analysis of the results shows that at the minimum rotor thrust deviations are systematic and generally are within ± 0.2 degrees. Deviations of angle values grow with the increase of rotor thrust.

  6. Application of the HHT Method to the Non-contact Thickness Measurement of an Axially Moving Thin Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yangfang; Lu, Qianqian; Xia, Chunlin; Ding, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Non-contact thickness measuring systems can be found in a wide spectrum of technologies. In this paper, Hilbert-Huang transform method is used to analyze the real time signals of a measuring system which includes two round conveyor strings carrying a thin plate, a solar wafer as a sample under test. The vibrations of moving strings and the plate, which are sensitive to moving speed and initial tension in the string, are introduced briefly; the relevant analyses should be helpful for the system design. Using EMD-based time-domain filtering and complementary method, thickness variations and error bands are estimated for different cases. The results show that HHT method as an adaptive time-frequency method, should be potential in measurement engineering applications.

  7. Flexible, non-contact and high-precision measurements of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-accuracy cylindrical coordinate measuring instrument developed for the measurement of optical components is presented. It is equipped with an optical point sensor system including a high aperture probe. This setup allows measurements to be performed with high accuracy in a flexible way. Applications include the measurement of the topography of high-precision aspheric and freeform lenses and diffractive structures. High measuring speeds guarantee the implementation in a closed-loop production process.

  8. Non-contact precision profile measurement to rough-surface objects with optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Taro; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new method for the high precision and contactless profile measurement of rough-surfaced objects using optical frequency combs. The uncertainty of the frequency beats of an optical frequency comb is very small (relative uncertainty is 10-10 in our laboratory). In addition, the wavelengths corresponding to these frequency beats are long enough to measure rough-surfaced objects. We can conduct high-precision measurement because several GHz frequency beats can be used if the capability of the detector permits. Moreover, two optical frequency combs with Rb-stabilized repetition frequencies are used for the measurement instead of an RF frequency oscillator; thus, we can avoid the cyclic error caused by the RF frequency oscillator. We measured the profile of a wood cylinder with a rough surface (diameter is approximately 113.2 mm) and compared the result with that of coordinate measuring machine (CMM).

  9. Non-contact temperature measurement. [in containerless space-based experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. R.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Three methods for noncontact temperature measurement are presented. Ideal gas thermometry is realized by using laser-induced fluorescence to measure the concentration of mercury atoms in a Hg-Ar mixture in the vicinity of hot specimens. Emission polarimetry is investigated by measuring the spatially resolved intensities of polarized light from a hot tungsten sphere. Laser polarimetry is used to measure the optical properties, emissivity, and, in combination with optical pyrometry, the temperature of electromagnetically levitated liquid aluminum. The precision of temperature measurements based on the ideal gas law is + or - 2.6 percent at 1500-2000 K. The polarized emission technique is found to have the capability to determine optical properties and/or spectral emissivities of specimens over a wide range of wavelengths with quite simple instruments.

  10. A novel non-contact profiler design for measuring synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yao; Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; DeBiasse, R.A. ); Wang, Run-Wen . Shanghai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics)

    1990-08-01

    A novel optical profiler is described in this paper for measurement of surface profiles of synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The measurement is based on a combination of an optical heterodyne technique and a precise phase measurement procedure without a reference surface. A Zeeman two-frequency He-Ne laser is employed as the light source. The common-path optical system, which uses a birefringent lens as the beam splitter, minimizes the effects of air turbulence, sample vibration and temperature variation. A special autofocus system allows the profiler to measure the roughness and shape of a sample surface. The optical system is mounted on a large linear air-bearing slide, and is capable of scanning over distances covering the spatial period range from several microns to nearly one meter with a high measurement accuracy. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  11. High-speed non-contact measuring apparatus for gauging the thickness of moving sheet material

    DOEpatents

    Grann, Eric B.; Holcomb, David E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical measurement apparatus is provided for measuring the thickness of a moving sheet material (18). The apparatus has a pair of optical measurement systems (21, 31) attached to opposing surfaces (14, 16) of a rigid support structure (10). A pair of high-power laser diodes (20,30) and a pair of photodetector arrays (22,32) are attached to the opposing surfaces. Light emitted from the laser diodes is reflected off of the sheet material surfaces (17, 19) and received by the respective photodetector arrays. An associated method for implementing the apparatus is also provided.

  12. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  13. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  14. Combined Amplitude and Frequency Measurements for Non-Contacting Turbomachinery Blade Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J. (Inventor); Jagodnik, John J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the vibration of rotating blades, such as turbines, compressors, fans, or pumps, including sensing the return signal from projected energy and/or field changes from a plurality of sensors mounted on the machine housing. One or more of the sensors has a narrow field of measurement and the data is processed to provide the referenced time of arrival of each blade, and therefore the blade tip deflection due to vibration. One or more of the sensors has a wide field of measurement, providing a time history of the approaching and receding blades, and the data is processed to provide frequency content and relative magnitudes of the active mode(s) of blade vibration. By combining the overall tip deflection magnitude with the relative magnitudes of the active modes, the total vibratory stress state of the blade can be determined.

  15. Non-contact measurement of respiratory function and deduction of tidal volume.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Siong; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This paper further the investigation of Doppler radar feasibility in measuring the flow in and out due to inhalation and exhalation under different conditions of breathing activities. Three different experiment conditions were designed to investigate the feasibility and consistency of Doppler radar which includes the combination of the states of normal breathing, deep breathing and apnoea state were demonstrated. The obtained Doppler radar signals were correlated and compared with the gold standard medical device, spirometer, yielding a good correlations between both devices. We also demonstrated the calibration of the Doppler radar signal can be performed in a simple manner in order to have a good agreements with the spirometer readings. The measurement of the flow in and out during the breathing activities can be measured accurately under different dynamics of breathing as long as the calibration is performed correctly.

  16. Research on key technologies of non-contact measurement system of optical aspheric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gujin; Guo, Yinbiao; Liu, Jianchun

    2007-12-01

    According to the requirement of high precision measurement of optical aspheric surface, 4D measurement platform is under development. Open motion control system is adapted and multi-axes motion control card is mounted in IPC. Repeatability accuracy and positioning accuracy of the full travel of the driving unit of the platform can reach to 0.3μm and 1μm respectively. Laser sensor is droven by the ultrasonic LM (USLM) to the position needed to be tested. The fine positioning of the unit is achieved by USLM with its DC drive mode, which can perform nanometer steps proportional to the input voltages. The positioning error of the driving unit can not be prevented. In this paper, the mathematic model of error compensation of the USLM driving unit is found and software compensation is introduced. Results of compensation show that the position accuracy of this driving unit is greatly improved and can fulfill the task of optical aspheric mirror surface measurement.

  17. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-high temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghuyn; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Rogers, Jan; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Continuing pressures for higher performance and efficiency in propulsion are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature materials. Some immediate applications in spaceflight include combustion chambers for advanced chemical rockets and turbomachinery for jet engines and power conversion in nuclear-electric propulsion. In the case of rockets, the combination of high stresses and high temperatures make the characterization of creep properties very important. Creep is even more important in the turbomachinery, where a long service life is an additional constraint. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed, including platinum group metals, carbides, borides, and silicides. But the measurement of creep properties at very high temperatures is itself problematic, because the testing instrument must operate at such high temperatures. Conventional techniques are limited to about 1700 C. A new, containerless technique for measuring creep deformation has been developed. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is heated to the measurement temperature and rotated at a rate such that the centrifugal acceleration causes creep deformation. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  18. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Bradshaw, C.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Wall, J. J.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Hyers, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional techniques for measuring creep are limited to about 1700 C, so a new technique is required for higher temperatures. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  19. Non-contact temperature field measurement of solids by infrared multispectral thermotransmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradere, C.; Ryu, M.; Sommier, A.; Romano, M.; Kusiak, A.; Battaglia, J. L.; Batsale, J. C.; Morikawa, J.

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to achieve contactless absolute-temperature measurements of infrared-semi-transparent solids using an infrared thermal and spectroscopic imaging technique. The multispectral thermo-transmittance coefficient fields in the 3-5 μm wavelength range for Sapphire, KBr, and Silicon are determined to be 6 × 10-4 K-1, 4 × 10-4 K-1, and -3 × 10-3 K-1, respectively. The most interesting result is the high temperature-dependent transmittance coefficient in the middle wave infrared region. With these coefficients, the absolute temperature fields in a range from room temperature to 140 °C are shown.

  20. Non-contact measurement technique of the vapor pressure of liquid and high temperature solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, P.-F.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoda, S.

    2003-05-01

    Here is reported a new scheme to accurately determine the vapor pressure of undercooled, liquid, and high temperature solid materials. The method relies on an imaging technique that measures the time variation of the radius of an electrostatically levitated sample. This scheme, compared to other techniques, offers unique opportunity to explore not only the liquid above the melting point but also the undercooled states of highly reactive materials in a contamination free environment. This was exemplified in this paper with titanium. For the first time, we report the vapor pressure (V_p) of its liquid phase over a large temperature range, covering the undercooled region. Over the 1700 to 2050 K temperature range, it was measured as Log V_p(T) = 9.154 - 17978 T^{-1} (3%). Similarly, for high temperature solid titanium, the vapor pressure could be expressed as Log V_p(T) = 16.634 - 32960 T^{-1} (6%) over the 1770 to 1940 K temperature interval. From these data, the average latent heats of vaporization and sublimation were calculated respectively as 344.8 kJ/kg (8%) and 632.1 kJ/kg (6%) respectively.

  1. Non-Contact, Non-Destructive Airport Pavement Profile, Texture and Deflection Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Measurements Milton E. Harr Z David J. Elton School of Civil Engineering00 ’Purdue University Lafayette, Indiana SDTIC SELECTE MAY 2 7 1983 January 1983...01 0 C 0 Si I i1 I E 9l ili. i! i oII11 1 1111 z u " I t iI i liE ,av I: Ii 6 1J4 6-O - 00 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF TABLES...1lif ~~~ii. ~ ~ ~ ’ =j ’l 1 t;C1 ’ Ai~.i T :f r: rsi in f~r.t Fr 1 i~ z -1 -: Z:tvI I i f- rr 1 1-4 46 4IxlO r__ ___ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ 6 _ 2 6-9-16 3

  2. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun

    2015-04-15

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10{sup −6}(K{sup −1}) at the range of 298 K–598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K–748 K.

  3. Non-contact temperature measurements in support of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent conceptual advances in the understanding of combustion science fundamentals in the context of microgravity processes and phenomenology have resulted in an increased demand for diagnostic systems of greater sophistication. Owing primarily to the severe operational constraints that accompany the space flight environment, measurement systems to date remain fairly primative in nature. Qualitative pictures provided by photographic recording media comprise the majority of the existing data, the remainder consisting of the output of conventional transducers, such as thermocouples, hot wires, and pressure transducers. The absence of the rather strong influence of buoyant convection renders microgravity combustion phenomena more fragile than their 1-G counterparts. The emphasis was placed on nonperturbing optical diagnostics. Other factors such as limited supplies of expendable reactants, and periods of microgravity time of sufficient duration, coupled with more fundamental questions regarding inherent length and time scales and reproducibility have favored multipoint or multidimensional techniques. While the development of optical diagnostics for application to combustion science is an extremely active area at present, the peculiarities of space flight hardware severely restrict the feasibility of implementing the majority of techniques which are being utilized in terrestrial applications. The additional requirements for system reliability and operational simplicity have tended to promote somewhat less commonly emphasized techniques such as refractive index mapping and molecular Rayleigh scattering, which are briefly discussed.

  4. The non-contact measure of the heart rate variability by laser Doppler vibrometry: comparison with electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosoli, G.; Casacanditella, L.; Tomasini, E. P.; Scalise, L.

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of the heart rate variability (HRV) is of utmost importance, being one of the most promising markers of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and associated to cardiovascular mortality. Different signals can be used to perform HRV, primarily electrocardiography (ECG), photoplethysmography (PPG), phonocardiography (PCG) or vibrocardiography (VCG), since the fundamental aspect is the individuation of a periodic feature strictly correlated with cardiac activity (i.e. R-peak in ECG or the first sound in PCG). In this work, the authors demonstrate that the VCG performances in HRV analysis are sufficiently accurate if compared to the ones measured by ECG (i.e. standard methodology); moreover, the authors want to prove the feasibility of such measurement in correspondence of different measurement points (i.e. carotid artery—which is the typical VCG measurement point—and the radial artery on the wrist)1. Results show that VCG has a mean deviation of  <1 bpm with respect to ECG in heart rate (HR) measurement; carotid artery is the most accurate site for the assessment, but also the radial artery is a valid site, even if with a reduced SNR. With regards to HRV parameters, the mean percentage deviation is  <10% in correspondence of carotid artery, and  ≈16% for the radial artery. So, VCG allows for non-contact monitoring of the cardiac activity.

  5. Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Costa, John E.; Plant, William J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Haeni, F. Peter; Melcher, Nick B.; Keller, William C.; Hayes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurement of flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California, is vital to a wide range of Federal and State agencies, environmental interests, and water contractors. The U.S. Geological Survey uses a conventional stage-discharge rating technique to determine flows at Vernalis. Since the flood of January 1997, the channel has scoured and filled as much as 20 feet in some sections near the measurement site resulting in an unstable stage-discharge rating. In response to recent advances in measurement techniques and the need for more accurate measurement methods, the Geological Survey has undertaken a technology demonstration project to develop and deploy a radar-based streamflow measuring system on the bank of the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California. The proposed flow-measurement system consists of a ground-penetrating radar system for mapping channel geometries, a microwave radar system for measuring surface velocities, and other necessary infrastructure. Cross-section information derived from ground penetrating radar provided depths similar to those measured by other instruments during the study. Likewise, surface-velocity patterns and magnitudes measured by the pulsed Doppler radar system are consistent with near surface current measurements derived from acoustic velocity instruments. Since the ratio of surface velocity to mean velocity falls to within a small range of theoretical value, using surface velocity as an index velocity to compute river discharge is feasable. Ultimately, the non-contact radar system may be used to make continuous, near-real-time flow measurements during high and medium flows. This report documents the data collected between April 14, 2002 and May 17, 2002 for the purposes of testing this radar based system. Further analyses of the data collected during this field effort will lead to further development and improvement of the system.

  6. Non-contact multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy system for industrial-scale bio-impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. D.; Marsh, L. A.; Davidson, J. L.; Tan, Y. M.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Biological tissues have a complex impedance, or bio-impedance, profile which changes with respect to frequency. This is caused by dispersion mechanisms which govern how the electromagnetic field interacts with the tissue at the cellular and molecular level. Measuring the bio-impedance spectra of a biological sample can potentially provide insight into the sample’s properties and its cellular structure. This has obvious applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and food-based industrial domains. However, measuring the bio-impedance spectra non-destructively and in a way which is practical at an industrial scale presents substantial challenges. The low conductivity of the sample requires a highly sensitive instrument, while the demands of industrial-scale operation require a fast high-throughput sensor of rugged design. In this paper, we describe a multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) system suitable for industrial-scale, non-contact, spectroscopic bio-impedance measurement over a bandwidth of 156 kHz-2.5 MHz. The system sensitivity and performance are investigated using calibration and known reference samples. It is shown to yield rapid and consistently sensitive results with good long-term stability. The system is then used to obtain conductivity spectra of a number of biological test samples, including yeast suspensions of varying concentration and a range of agricultural produce, such as apples, pears, nectarines, kiwis, potatoes, oranges and tomatoes.

  7. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Losko, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Vallerga, J. V.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (˜739 ± 98 kPa and ˜751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances) is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ˜758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ˜ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others) containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  8. Validating mass spectrometry measurements of nuclear materials via a non-contact volume analysis method of ion sputter craters

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry, optical profilometry and a statistically-driven algorithm was used to develop a non-contact volume analysis method to validate the useful yields of nuclear materials. The volume analysis methodology was applied to ion sputter craters created in silicon and uranium substrates sputtered by 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ions. Sputter yield measurements were determined from the volume calculations and were shown to be comparable to Monte Carlo calculations and previously reported experimental observations. Additionally, the volume calculations were used to determine the useful yields of Si+, SiO+ and SiO2+ ions from the silicon substrate and U+, UO+ and UO2+ ions from the uranium substrate under 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ion bombardment. This work represents the first steps toward validating the interlaboratory and cross-platform performance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of nuclear materials.

  9. Measurement of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials by a Novel Non-Contact Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghyun; Rogers, Jan R.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    A non-contact technique for measuring the creep properties of materials has been developed and validated as part of a collaboration among the University of Massachusetts, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Electrostatic Levitation Facility (ESL), and the University of Tennessee. This novel method has several advantages over conventional creep testing. The sample is deformed by the centripetal acceleration from the rapid rotation, and the deformed shapes are analyzed to determine the strain. Since there is no contact with grips, there is no theoretical maximum temperature and no concern about chemical compatibility. Materials may be tested at the service temperature even for extreme environments such as rocket nozzles, or above the service temperature for accelerated testing of materials for applications such as jet engines or turbopumps for liquid-fueled engines. The creep measurements have been demonstrated to 2400 C with niobium, while the test facility, the NASA MSFC ESL, has processed materials up to 3400 C. Furthermore, the ESL creep method employs a distribution of stress to determine the stress exponent from a single test, versus the many tests required by conventional methods. Determination of the stress exponent from the ESL creep tests requires very precise measurement of the surface shape of the deformed sample for comparison to deformations predicted by finite element models for different stress exponents. An error analysis shows that the stress exponent can be determined to about 1% accuracy with the current methods and apparatus. The creep properties of single-crystal niobium at 1985 C showed excellent agreement with conventional tests performed according to ASTM Standard E-139. Tests on other metals, ceramics, and composites relevant to rocket propulsion and turbine engines are underway.

  10. Large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement using scanning ion conductance microscopy and sub-aperture stitching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian; Guo, Renfei; Li, Fei; Yu, Dehong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a large-scale and non-contact surface topography measurement method using a non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), combined with the sub-aperture stitching technique. The phase correlation techniques were first applied to the three-dimensional (3D) images measured by the SICM to acquire an initially coarse stitching position. Then the tip-tilt compensated sub-aperture stitching algorithm is utilized to eliminate tilts and translations among adjacent images and expand the lateral measuring range of the existing hopping mode SICM system. This SICM and the stitching based method has been used to measure some large-scale samples (micrometer to millimeter scale) in a non-contact, quantitative and high resolution way. Simulation and experimental results on these samples verify the feasibility of this method and the effectiveness of the stitching algorithm. A measuring range of 1.08 mm  ×  0.55 mm and a lateral resolution of 100 nm or even higher were obtained in these experiments. Compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM), the non-contact feature of the proposed method ensures less damage to the surface topography. The non-optical feature makes the data stitching simpler than the existing optical microscopic methods, which need consider how to compensate the vignetting effect caused by the inhomogeneity of light.

  11. Non-contact laser speckle sensor for measuring one- and two-dimensional angular displacement Capteur non-contact de laser speckle pour mesurer le déplacement angulaire à une ou deux dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Bjarke; Imam, Husain; Hanson, Steen G.

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for measurement of angular displacement in one or two dimensions for arbitrarily shaped objects is presented. The method is based on Fourier transforming the scattered field from a single laser beam that illuminates the target. The angular distribution of the light field at the target is linearly mapped onto an array image sensor placed in the Fourier plane. Measuring this displacement facilitates the determination of the angular displacement. It is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the angular displacement sensor is insensitive to object shape, target distance and any longitudinal or transverse movement of the target, if the image sensor is placed in the Fourier plane. A straightforward procedure to place the image sensor in the Fourier plane is presented here. Theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the method has a resolution of 0.3 mdeg for small angular displacements, and methods for further improvement in resolution are discussed. No special surface treatment is required for surfaces having irregularities of the order of or larger than the wavelength of the incident light. It is shown that this is the case for most surfaces of practical interest. Furthermore, it is shown that robust, non-contact optical systems for industrial applications can be produced.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy system with non-contact source and detector for in vivo multi-distance measurement of deep biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Kiguchi, Masashi; Tanikawa, Yukari; Okada, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    A non-contact near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) scanning system with a phosphor cell placed on the skin for in vivo measurement of biological tissue was developed and evaluated. Because the phosphor is excited by the light that propagates in the tissue, and the excitation light is cut by optical filters, the light that propagates in the tissue is selectively detected. The non-contact system was extended to create a scanning system that can flexibly change source positions with a galvano scanner. The optical scanning system was used for non-contact measurement of the human forearm muscle, and the dependence of optical-density change (ΔOD) caused by the upper-arm occlusion and release on source-detector distance was observed. The obtained ΔOD demonstrates the effectiveness of using this system for multi-distance human-forearm measurement. Furthermore, a human forehead was measured with the system. To extract a deep-layer signal, a surface-layer subtraction method with short-distance regression was applied to measured data. On the basis of the correlation with a simultaneously measured laser-Doppler flowmetry signal, it was confirmed that the deep-layer signal was successfully extracted. The extraction result demonstrates that the optical scanning system can be used as a multi-distance NIRS system for measuring the human brain activity at the forehead.

  13. Profile measurement of a bent neutron mirror using an ultrahigh precision non-contact measurement system with an auto focus laser probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Guo, J.; Yamada, N. L.; Torikai, N.; Takeda, S.; Furusaka, M.; Yamagata, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A bent neutron mirror has been considered as one of the best solutions for focusing neutron beams from the viewpoint of cost-benefit performance. Although the form deviation of the bent profile is expected because of the large spot size, it is difficult to measure due to its geometric limitation. Here, we propose a non-contact measurement system using an auto focus (AF) laser probe on an ultrahigh precision machine tool to precisely evaluate the form deviation of the bent mirror. The AF laser probe is composed of a diode laser, a position sensitive sensor, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a microscope objective lens which is actuated by an electromagnetic motor with 1 nm resolution for position sensing and control. The sensor enables a non-contact profile measurement of a high precision surface without any surface damage in contrast with contact-type ultrahigh precision coordinate measurement machines with ruby styli. In the on-machine measurement system, a personal computer simultaneously acquires a displacement signal from the AF laser probe and 3-axis positional coordinates of the ultrahigh machine tool branched between the linear laser scales and the numerical controller. The acquisition rate of the 4-axis positional data in 1 nm resolution is more than 10 Hz and the simultaneity between the axes is negligible. The profile of a neutron bent mirror was measured from a transparent side using the developed system, and the result proves that the form deviation of the mirror enlarged the the spot size of focused neuron beam.

  14. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  15. Thermographic and oxygenation imaging system for non-contact skin measurements to determine the effects of regional block anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Landman, Mattijs; de Roode, Rowland; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2010-02-01

    Regional anesthetic blocks are performed on patients who will undergo surgery of the hand. In this study, thermal and oxygenation imaging techniques were applied to observe the region affected by the peripheral block as a fast objective, non-contact, method compared to the standard pinpricks or cold sensation tests. The temperature images were acquired with an IR thermal camera (FLIR ThermoCam SC640). The data were recorded and analyzed with the ThermaCamTM Researcher software. Images at selected wavelengths were obtained with a CCD camera combined with a Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter (420-730 nm). The concentration changes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the dermis of the skin were calculated using the modified Lambert Beer equation. In 10 patients an anesthetic block was placed by administering 20-30 ml Ropivacaine 7,5 mg/ml around the plexus brachialis. The anesthetic block of the axillary, ulnar, median and radial nerve causes dilatation of the blood vessels inducing an increase of blood flow and, consequently, an increase of the skin temperature and skin oxygenation in the lower arm. Both imaging methods showed distinct oxygenation and temperature differences at the surface of the skin of the hand with a good correlation with the areas with the nerve blocks. For oxygenation imaging a CCD camera with LED light source of selected wavelengths might be a relative inexpensive method to observe the effectiveness of regional blocks.

  16. Sleep-disordered breathing in chronic heart failure is highly variable when measured remotely using a novel non-contact biomotion sensor.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kenneth; O'Hanlon, Rory; Savage, Henry Oluwasefunmi; Khushaba, Rami N; Colefax, Michael; Farrugia, Steven; Javed, Faizan; Schindhelm, Klaus; Wilcox, Ian; Cowie, Martin R

    2017-03-21

    We used a remotely monitored non-contact biosensor (SleepMinder™) to measure breathing during sleep (SDB) in a prospective study of 91 patients with stable class II to IV heart failure (HF). The device algorithm measures a surrogate of the traditional apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) measured in polysomnographic sleep studies. Data was transmitted daily to a central monitoring centre and analysed in consecutive 2-week blocks. A total of 37 465 nights over 3-24 months was analysed. An AHI of >15/h was considered clinically significant. Short- and long-term (total study) patterns of SDB presence and severity were compared. Long-term analysis (total study) showed that significant sleep-disordered breathing was common: paroxysmal in many (38%) and persistent (18%) in others. Short-term analysis showed that the severity of sleep apnoea was highly variable with 48% fluctuating between mild and moderate/severe during the study. In contrast to standard sleep studies a non-contact biosensor combined with remote monitoring can detect short- and long-term trends in SDB in clinically stable HF patients, which may be an index of HF status over time and is potentially a therapeutic target.

  17. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection.

    PubMed

    Bechet, P; Mitran, R; Munteanu, M

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact.

  18. A non-contact method based on multiple signal classification algorithm to reduce the measurement time for accurately heart rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechet, P.; Mitran, R.; Munteanu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Non-contact methods for the assessment of vital signs are of great interest for specialists due to the benefits obtained in both medical and special applications, such as those for surveillance, monitoring, and search and rescue. This paper investigates the possibility of implementing a digital processing algorithm based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) parametric spectral estimation in order to reduce the observation time needed to accurately measure the heart rate. It demonstrates that, by proper dimensioning the signal subspace, the MUSIC algorithm can be optimized in order to accurately assess the heart rate during an 8-28 s time interval. The validation of the processing algorithm performance was achieved by minimizing the mean error of the heart rate after performing simultaneous comparative measurements on several subjects. In order to calculate the error the reference value of heart rate was measured using a classic measurement system through direct contact.

  19. OroSTIFF: Face-referenced measurement of perioral stiffness in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Kieweg, Douglas; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-01-01

    A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects. The OroSTIFF device incorporates a pneumatic glass air cylinder actuator instrumented for pressure, and an integrated subminiature displacement sensor to encode lip aperture. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm passive muscle state for the superior and inferior divisions of the orbicularis oris muscles. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (ΔF) and interangle span (ΔX), was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force. This stiffness growth function also differed significantly between males and females. This study demonstrates the OroSTIFF ‘proof-of-concept’ for cost-effective non-invasive stimulus generation and derivation of perioral stiffness in a group of healthy unrestrained adults, and a case study to illustrate the dose-dependent effects of Levodopa on perioral stiffness in an individual with advanced Parkinson’s disease who exhibited marked dyskinesia and rigidity. PMID:20185131

  20. Non-contact measurement of electric potential of photovoltaic cells in a module and novel characterization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshihiro; Yamagoe, Kengo; Onuma, Tsuyoshi

    2015-08-01

    A novel noncontact method of measuring the electric potential of component cells in photovoltaic (PV) modules is investigated using electrostatic field measurement technology. Experimental results for various kinds of PV cells and modules are presented, and their measurement principle as well as practical factors that affect the measurement results are discussed. It is demonstrated that the DC electric potential of the cells in various crystalline silicon and thin-film PV modules can be measured indoors through their cover glass or backsheet within a resolution of the output voltage of about 1 cell. The method is also applicable to the outdoor measurement of PV modules under grid-connected operation, and enables various kinds of characterization such as identifying low-performance cells in a PV module and degraded modules in a PV array, and determining the balance of their output current under outdoor operating conditions. Different distributions of electric potential measured from the front and back surfaces are observed for some types of modules. These differences are suggested, by the results of the analysis of experiments and numerical simulations, to originate from the modification of the module’s surface electric potential by slight current flow through its component materials such as the cover glass, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), and backsheet.

  1. Comments on containerless bulk crystal growth and epitaxy in space and on their implications regarding non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1989-01-01

    Containerless methods are sought for bulk crystal growth and epitaxy which thus far are a less visible component of materials science in space efforts. In the opinion of the author, this is an anomaly which ought to be corrected, because container interactions are a major problem in earth bound materials processing, including crystal growth, and can be avoided or at least significantly reduced in space. The space environment is unique in solving some of these problems, e.g., memory effects in the integration of different classes of materials in high resolution multilayer heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy or organometallic molecular beam epitaxy. Spectroscopic method of noncontact temperature measurements exist that could be developed in this context. The error in the absolute temperature measurement achieved by these techniques decreases with decreasing substrate temperature and supplements pyrometric measurements that are better suited for high temperature measurements.

  2. Non-contact main cable NDE technique for suspension bridge using magnetic flux-based B-H loop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Kim, Ju-Won; Moon, Dae-Joong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a noncontact main cable NDE method has been developed. This cable NDE method utilizes the direct current (DC) magnetization and a searching coil-based total flux measurement. A total flux sensor head prototype was fabricated that consists of an electro-magnet yoke and a searching coil sensor. To obtain a B-H loop, a magnetic field was generated by applying a cycle of low frequency direct current to the electro-magnet yoke. During the magnetization, a search coil sensor measures the electromotive force from magnetized cable. During the magnetization process, a search coil sensor was measured the magnetic flux density. Total flux was calculated by integrating the measured magnetic flux using a fluxmeter. A B-H loop is obtained by using relationship between a cycle of input DC voltage and measured total flux. The B-H loop can reflect the property of the ferromagnetic materials. Therefore, the cross-sectional loss of cable can be detected using variation of features from the B-H curve. To verify the feasibility of the proposed steel cable NDE method, a series of experimental studies using a main-cable mock-up specimen has been performed in this study.

  3. Using dual-antenna nanosecond pulse near-field sensing technology for non-contact and continuous blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lee, Yen-Shien; Chuang, Bor-Nian

    2012-01-01

    Long-term and continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring has shown that it is the most important to clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and personal home health care. Currently, there are many preferable non-invasive methods, including optical sensor, pressure-sensitive transducers, and applanation tonometry, to get insight of blood pressure and flow signal detection. However, the operation of traditional monitors is cuff accessories needed, and also the sensing probes needed to exert pressure to the user directly. The measurement procedure is limited by long-term, continuous measurement and also easy to cause discomfort. To improve these issues, the non-pressurized and non-invasive measuring method will become an important innovation improvement. In this paper, the novel nanosecond pulse near-field sensing (NPNS) based screening technology with dual-antenna, which includes radio frequency (RF) pulse transmission and two combined flat antenna connected to transceiver of miniature radar, is proposed to derive relative blood pressure parameters from measured blood flow activity (Pulse Wave Velocity, PWV). A dedicated analysis software is also provided to calculate cardiovascular parameters, including PWV, average systolic time, diastolic and systolic pressure, for clinical and homecare applications. To evaluate the performance, the proposed method was applied on blood pressure measurement at the body site of limbs (brachial and leg). As a result, it shows error of DBP and SBP is 5.18±1.61 and 4.09 ± 1.69 mmHg in average compared with the measurement result from commercial product, and performs the capability of continuous long-term monitoring in real-time.

  4. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-04-07

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young's modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r(2) > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r(2) = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  5. Non-contact scanning probe technique for electric field measurements based on nanowire field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, A S; Presnov, D E; Bozhev, I V; Evplov, D A; Desmaris, V; Krupenin, V A

    2017-03-28

    We report on the new active tip for scanning probe microscopy allowing the simultaneous measurements of surface topography and its potential profile. We designed and fabricated a field-effect transistor with nanowire channel located on the apex of silicon-on-insulator small chip. The field-effect transistor with nanowire channel was selected due to its extremely high electric field sensitivity even at room temperature. We developed the scanning probe operated in the tuning fork regime and demonstrated its reasonable spatial and field resolution. The proposed device can be a unique tool for high-sensitive, high-resolution, non-destructive potential profile mapping of nanoscale objects in physics, biology and material science. We discuss the ways to optimize the sensor charge sensitivity to the theoretical limit which is 10(-)(3)e/Hz(-1/2) at room temperature.

  6. The Effect of Electrode Designs Based on the Anatomical Heart Location for the Non-Contact Heart Activity Measurement.

    PubMed

    Gi, Sun Ok; Lee, Young-Jae; Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Seung Pyo; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeng-Nam; Kang, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2015-12-01

    This research is an extension of a previous research [1] on the different effects of sensor location that is relatively suitable for heart rate sensing. This research aimed to elucidate the causes of wide variations in heart rate measurements from the same sensor position among subjects, as observed in previous research [1], and to enhance designs of the inductive textile electrode to overcome these variations. To achieve this, this study comprised two parts: In part 1, X-ray examinations were performed to determine the cause of the wide variations noted in the findings from previous research [1], and we found that at the same sensor position, the heart activity signal differed with slight differences in the positions of the heart of each subject owing to individual differences in the anatomical heart location. In part 2, three types of dual-loop-type textile electrodes were devised to overcome variations in heart location that were confirmed in part 1 of the study. The variations with three types of sensor designs were compared with that with a single-round type of electrode design, by using computer simulation and by performing a t-test on the data obtained from the experiments. We found that the oval-oval shaped, dual-loop-type textile electrode was more suitable than the single round type for determining morphological characteristics as well as for measuring appropriate heart activity signals. Based on these results, the oval-oval, dual-loop-type was a better inductive textile electrode that more effectively overcomes individual differences in heart location during heart activity sensing based on the magnetic-induced conductivity principle.

  7. Use of a non-contact 3D digitiser to measure the volume of keloid scars: a useful tool for scar assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ben; McGrouther, D Angus; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2007-01-01

    Keloid scars often fail to respond to treatment, so research into new therapeutic regimes is important. However, research is limited by a scarcity of reliable, objective scar assessment tools. The volume of a keloid scar should decrease with successful treatment. This study demonstrates the use of a non-contact 3D digitiser to measure digitally the volume of a keloid scar. The scanner was used to scan 62 keloid scars and one fine-line normal scar. The scan took approximately 9s to complete. The volume was measured using 3D reverse modelling software. A previously validated scar assessment scale was used to score the scars according to their physical parameters. A significant correlation was found between volume and the scar score (Pearson's r=0.627, p<0.001). Linear regression was also statistically significant (p<0.001, R(2)=0.44). Therefore it was possible to predict the scar score from the measured volume. This technique could allow monitoring of a patient on treatment, or comparison of treatments in a research setting. It overcomes previous problems with the measurement of scar volume as it is quantitatively objective and well-tolerated.

  8. Non-contact distance measurement and profilometry using thermal near-field radiation towards a high resolution inspection and metrology solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijster, Roy; Sadeghian, Hamed; van Keulen, Fred

    2016-03-01

    Optical near-field technologies such as solid immersion lenses and hyperlenses are candidate solutions for high resolution and high throughput wafer inspection and metrology for the next technology nodes. Besides sub-diffraction limited optical performance, these concepts share the necessity of extreme proximity to the sample at distances that are measured in tens of nanometers. For the instrument this poses two major challenges: 1) how to measure the distance to the sample? and 2) how to position accurately and at high speed? For the first challenge near-field thermal radiation is proposed as a mechanism for an integrated distance sensor (patent pending). This sensor is realized by making a sensitive calorimeter (accuracy of 2:31nW root sum squared). When used for distance measurement an equivalent uncertainty of 1nm can be achieved for distances smaller than 100 nm. By scanning the distance sensor over the sample, thermal profilometry is realized, which can be used to inspect surfaces in a non-intrusive and non-contact way. This reduces wear of the probe and minimizes the likelihood of damaging the sample.

  9. Analytical, Numerical, and Experimental Investigation on a Non-Contact Method for the Measurements of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Responsive access to space requires re-use of components such as rocket nozzles that operate at extremely high temperatures. For such applications, new ultra-hightemperature materials that can operate over 2,000 C are required. At the temperatures higher than the fifty percent of the melting temperature, the characterization of creep properties is indispensable. Since conventional methods for the measurement of creep is limited below 1,700 C, a new technique that can be applied at higher temperatures is strongly demanded. This research develops a non-contact method for the measurement of creep at the temperatures over 2,300 C. Using the electrostatic levitator in NASA MSFC, a spherical sample was rotated to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deforming sample was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to measure creep deformation. Numerical and analytical analyses have also been conducted to compare the experimental results. Analytical, numerical, and experimental results showed a good agreement with one another.

  10. Exploring Alternative Non-contact temperature measurements for 99Mo production facility NorthStar FY14 Activity 5, Deliverable 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Michael Andrew; Dalmas, Dale

    2015-03-04

    We have conducted an experiment to explore an alternative non-contact method of measuring the Inconel target window temperature. This experiment involves using a standard color camera to observe the visible light emitted from the Inconel target window at high heat in order to estimate the window temperature. The safety limit to prevent target window failure is 700 °C and therefore we need a reliable and accurate method of measuring temperature especially in the range of 600 °C to 700 °C if it is to replace the IR camera. In this temperature range the window will emit a significant amount of black body radiation within the visible range and hence the idea of using a color camera. The goal is to see if the shift in window color (determined by the RBG pixel values of the camera) as the target window is heated to 700 °C can be calibrated to the temperature.The reasons for exploring this as an alternative to an IR are camera are: significant cost reduction and potentially less complicated to calibrate.

  11. Design and modeling of magnetically driven electric-field sensor for non-contact DC voltage measurement in electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Decai; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the design and modeling of a magnetically driven electric-field sensor for non-contact DC voltage measurement are presented. The magnetic drive structure of the sensor is composed of a small solenoid and a cantilever beam with a cylindrical magnet mounted on it. The interaction of the magnet and the solenoid provides the magnetic driving force for the sensor. Employing magnetic drive structure brings the benefits of low driving voltage and large vibrating displacement, which consequently results in less interference from the drive signal. In the theoretical analyses, the capacitance calculation model between the wire and the sensing electrode is built. The expression of the magnetic driving force is derived by the method of linear fitting. The dynamical model of the magnetic-driven cantilever beam actuator is built by using Euler-Bernoulli theory and distributed parameter method. Taking advantage of the theoretical model, the output voltage of proposed sensor can be predicted. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical results. The proposed sensor shows a favorable linear response characteristic. The proposed sensor has a measuring sensitivity of 9.87 μV/(V/m) at an excitation current of 37.5 mA. The electric field intensity resolution can reach 10.13 V/m.

  12. Quantitative assessment of hemodynamic and structural characteristics of in vivo brain tissue using total diffuse reflectance spectrum measured in a non-contact fashion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yinchen; Garcia, Sarahy; Frometa, Yisel; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Soltani, Mohammad; Almadi, Mohamed; Riera, Jorge J.; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a new methodology that investigates the intrinsic structural and hemodynamic characteristics of in vivo brain tissue, in a non-contact fashion, and can be easily incorporated in an intra-operative environment. Within this methodology, relative total diffuse reflectance spectra (RTD(λ)) were acquired from targets using a hybrid spectroscopy imaging system. A spectral interpretation algorithm was subsequently applied to RTD(λ) to retrieve optical properties related to the compositional and structural characteristics of each target. Estimation errors of the proposed methodology were computationally evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation model for photon migration under various conditions. It was discovered that this new methodology could handle moderate noise and achieve very high accuracy, but only if the refractive index of the target is known. The accuracy of the technique was also validated using a series of tissue phantom studies, and consistent and accurate estimates of μs’(λ)/μa(λ) were obtained from all the phantoms tested. Finally, a small-scale animal study was conducted to demonstrate the clinical utility of the reported method, wherein a forepaw stimulation model was utilized to induce transient hemodynamic responses in somatosensory cortices. With this approach, significant stimulation-related changes (p < 0.001) in cortical hemodynamic and structural characteristics were successfully measured. PMID:28101403

  13. Quantitative assessment of hemodynamic and structural characteristics of in vivo brain tissue using total diffuse reflectance spectrum measured in a non-contact fashion.

    PubMed

    Song, Yinchen; Garcia, Sarahy; Frometa, Yisel; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Soltani, Mohammad; Almadi, Mohamed; Riera, Jorge J; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new methodology that investigates the intrinsic structural and hemodynamic characteristics of in vivo brain tissue, in a non-contact fashion, and can be easily incorporated in an intra-operative environment. Within this methodology, relative total diffuse reflectance spectra (RTD(λ)) were acquired from targets using a hybrid spectroscopy imaging system. A spectral interpretation algorithm was subsequently applied to RTD(λ) to retrieve optical properties related to the compositional and structural characteristics of each target. Estimation errors of the proposed methodology were computationally evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation model for photon migration under various conditions. It was discovered that this new methodology could handle moderate noise and achieve very high accuracy, but only if the refractive index of the target is known. The accuracy of the technique was also validated using a series of tissue phantom studies, and consistent and accurate estimates of μs'(λ)/μa(λ) were obtained from all the phantoms tested. Finally, a small-scale animal study was conducted to demonstrate the clinical utility of the reported method, wherein a forepaw stimulation model was utilized to induce transient hemodynamic responses in somatosensory cortices. With this approach, significant stimulation-related changes (p < 0.001) in cortical hemodynamic and structural characteristics were successfully measured.

  14. Non-Contact Gaging with Laser Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Clinesmith, Mike

    2009-03-20

    A gage has been constructed using conventional (high end) components for the application of measuring fragile syntactic foam parts in a non-contact mode. Success with this approach has been achieved through a novel method of transferring (mapping) high accuracy local measurements of a coated aluminum master, taken on a Leitz Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM), to the gage software system. The mapped data is then associated with local voltage readings from two (inner and outer) laser triangulating probes. This couples discreet laser probe offset and linearity characteristics to the measured master geometry. The gage software compares real part measured data against the master data to provide non-contact part inspection that results in a high accuracy and low uncertainty performance. Uncertainty from the part surface becomes the prevailing contributor to the gaging process. The gaging process provides a high speed, hands off measurement with nearly zero impedance.

  15. Non-contact ECG monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexey S.; Erlikh, Vadim V.; Kodkin, Vladimir L.; Keller, Andrei V.; Epishev, Vitaly V.

    2016-03-01

    The research is dedicated to non-contact methods of electrocardiography. The authors describe the routine of experimental procedure and suggest the approach to solving the problems which arise at indirect signal recording. The paper presents the results of experiments conducted by the authors, covers the flow charts of ECG recorders and reviews the drawbacks of filtering methods used in foreign equivalents.

  16. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  17. Relationship between two proprioceptive measures and stiffness at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Carrie L; Arnold, Brent L; Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2004-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the role of proprioception and stiffness in the control of joint stability. However, to date, no research has been done on the relationship between proprioception and stiffness. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between force sense, joint reposition sense, and stiffness at the ankle. A heterogeneous sample was obtained for this study; 20 of the 40 participants had a history of ankle sprains, and 13 of the 20 had been diagnosed by a physician (two mild ankle sprains, seven moderate sprains, four severe sprains). All subjects were asymptomatic and active at the time of the study. Active joint reposition sense was measured using a custom-built ankle goniometer, force sense was measured unilaterally and contralaterally with a load cell, and ankle muscle stiffness was measured via transient oscillation using a custom-built inversion-eversion cradle. We found no significant correlations between stiffness and joint reposition sense, with values of r ranging from 0.01 to 0.21. Significant correlations were found between stiffness and force sense. Specifically, contralateral force sense reproduction was significantly correlated to stiffness in the injured or "involved" ankle (r's ranging from 0.47 to 0.65; P< or =0.008). Whether the decreased ability to appropriately sense force (increased error) sends information to the central nervous system to increase muscle stiffness in response to an unexpected loss of stability, or whether these two phenomena function independently and both change concurrently as a result of injury to the system requires further investigation.

  18. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  19. Features of the non-contact carotid pressure waveform: Cardiac and vascular dynamics during rebreathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, S.; Sirevaag, E. J.; Richter, E. J.; O'Sullivan, J. A.; Scalise, L.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.

    2016-10-01

    This report amplifies and extends prior descriptions of the use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) as a method for assessing cardiovascular activity, on a non-contact basis. A rebreathing task (n = 35 healthy individuals) was used to elicit multiple effects associated with changes in autonomic drive as well as blood gases including hypercapnia. The LDV pulse was obtained from two sites overlying the carotid artery, separated by 40 mm. A robust pulse signal was obtained from both sites, in accord with the well-described changes in carotid diameter over the blood pressure cycle. Emphasis was placed on extracting timing measures from the LDV pulse, which could serve as surrogate measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the associated arterial stiffness. For validation purposes, a standard measure of pulse transit time (PTT) to the radial artery was obtained using a tonometric sensor. Two key measures of timing were extracted from the LDV pulse. One involved the transit time along the 40 mm distance separating the two LDV measurement sites. A second measure involved the timing of a late feature of the LDV pulse contour, which was interpreted as reflection wave latency and thus a measure of round-trip travel time. Both LDV measures agreed with the conventional PTT measure, in disclosing increased PWV during periods of active rebreathing. These results thus provide additional evidence that measures based on the non-contact LDV technique might provide surrogate measures for those obtained using conventional, more obtrusive assessment methods that require attached sensors.

  20. Non-contact contour gage

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1990-12-18

    A fluid probe for measuring the surface contour of a machined part is provided whereby the machined part can remain on the machining apparatus during surface contour measurement. A measuring nozzle in a measuring probe directs a measuring fluid flow onto the surface. The measuring nozzle is on the probe situated midway between two guide nozzles that direct guide fluid flows onto the surface. When the guide fluid flows interact with the surface, they cause the measuring flow and measuring probe to be oriented perpendicular to the surface. The measuring probe includes a pressure chamber whose pressure is monitored. As the measuring fluid flow encounters changes in surface contour, pressure changes occur in the pressure chamber. The surface contour is represented as data corresponding to pressure changes in the pressure chamber as the surface is scanned.

  1. The direct measurement of structural mass, stiffness and damping properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. G.; Dobson, B. J.

    1991-02-01

    A method is described for directly evaluating the spatial properties (i.e., mass, stiffness and damping) of a structure from experimentally measured frequency response data. The resulting structural model can be compared directly with an equivalent finite element idealization. The effects of model reduction, such as the Guyan method, which can be employed to ensure that the experimental and theoretical models contain comparable degrees of freedom, are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to detect regions within the structure at which differences exist between the experimental and theoretical models. Further, it is demonstrated that the resulting experimentally derived models can be used to predict the effects of structural modifications upon the frequency response behaviour of the structure.

  2. Comparing the Bending Stiffness Measurements of Brittle Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Andrea; McGath, Molly; McGuiggan, Patricia

    It has been estimated that one third of the paper materials in libraries are too brittle to handle. A typical paper sheet is comprised of semi-rigid cellulose fibers that are more than ten times longer than the sheet thickness and can be considered a two dimensional random fiber network. The main pathways of degradation, acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and oxidation, cause depolymerization of the cellulose chains and breaking of the intrafiber bonds. Conventional mechanical measurements of aged paper are destructive and often too severe to understand the true extent of deterioration. By comparing the roll test, folding endurance tests, tensile tests and stiffness tests of naturally aged papers with varying amounts of brittleness, we intend to show the limits of each test and relate the state of the paper degradation to the mechanical test results. We thank the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for funding this research.

  3. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  4. Non-Contact Photoacoustic Imaging Using a Commercial Heterodyne Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Feng, Ting; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Oliver, David E; Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan

    2016-12-01

    Most current photoacoustic imaging (PAI) systems employ piezoelectric transducers to receive photoacoustic signals, which requires coupling medium to facilitate photoacoustic wave propagation and are not favored in many applications. Here, we report an all-optical non-contact PAI system based on a commercial heterodyne interferometer working at 1550 nm. The interferometer remotely detects ultrasound-induced surface vibration and does not involve any physical contact with the sample. The theoretically predicated and experimentally measured noise equivalent detection limits of the optical sensor are about 4.5 and 810 Pa over 1.2 MHz bandwidth. Using a raster-scan PAI system equipped with the non-contact design, stereotactic boundaries of an artificial tumor in a pig brain were accurately delineated. The non-contact design also enables the tomographic PAI of biological tissue samples in a non-invasive manner. The preliminary results and analyses reveal that the heterodyne interferometer-based non-contact PAI system holds good potential in biomedical imaging.

  5. A novel method to estimate changes in stress-induced salivary α-amylase using heart rate variability and respiratory rate, as measured in a non-contact manner using a single radar attached to the back of a chair.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Katayose, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The authors have developed a non-contact system which estimates changes in salivary α-amylase (sAA ratio) induced by stress. Before and after stressful sound exposure, a single 24 GHz compact radar which is attached to the back of a chair measures the low frequency (LF) component of heart rate variability and respiratory rate, α-amylase in the subjects' buccal secretions was measured by using an α-amylase assay kit. Using multiple regression analysis, sAA ratio was estimated using stress-induced LF change (LF ratio) and stress-induced respiratory rate change (respiratory rate ratio). Twelve healthy subjects were tested (12 males, 22 ± 2 years), who were exposed to audio stimuli with a composite tone of 2120 Hz and 2130 Hz sine waves at a sound pressure level of 95 dB after a silent period through a headphone. The result showed that sAA ratio estimated using multiple regression analysis significantly correlated with measured sAA ratio (R = 0.76, p < 0.01). This indicates that the system may serve for a stress management in the future.

  6. Sources of variability in musculo-articular stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) with the free-oscillation technique is a popular method with a variety of applications. This study examined the sources of variability (load applied and frequency of oscillation) when MAS is assessed. Over two testing occasions, 14 healthy men (27.7±5.2 yr, 1.82±0.04 m, 79.5±8.4 kg) were measured for isometric maximum voluntary contraction and MAS of the knee flexors using submaximal loads relative to the individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MAS%MVC) and a single absolute load (MASABS). As assessment load increased, MAS%MVC (coefficient of variation (CV)  =  8.1-12.1%; standard error of measurement (SEM)  =  51.6-98.8 Nm⁻¹) and frequency (CV  =  4.8-7.0%; SEM  =  0.060-0.075 s⁻¹) variability increased consequently. Further, similar levels of variability arising from load (CV  =  6.7%) and frequency (CV  =  4.8-7.0%) contributed to the overall MAS%MVC variability. The single absolute load condition yielded better reliability scores for MASABS (CV  =  6.5%; SEM  =  40.2 Nm⁻¹) and frequency (CV  =  3.3%; SEM  =  0.039 s⁻¹). Low and constant loads for MAS assessment, which are particularly relevant in the clinical setting, exhibited superior reliability compared to higher loads expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, which are more suitable for sporting situations. Appropriate sample size and minimum detectable change can therefore be determined when prospective studies are carried out.

  7. PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Forbrigger, C.; Hubbard, T.

    2015-02-01

    A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ~20 nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4 N m-1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen.

  8. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  9. Photonic non-contact estimation of blood lactate level.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Chen; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Ozana, Nisan; Tenner, Felix; Schmidt, Michael; Sanz, Martin; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-10-01

    The ability to measure the blood lactate level in a non-invasive, non-contact manner is very appealing to the sports industry as well as the home care field. That is mainly because this substance level is an imperative parameter in the course of devolving a personal workout programs. Moreover, the blood lactate level is also a pivotal means in estimation of muscles' performance capability. In this manuscript we propose an optical non-contact approach to estimate the concentration level of this parameter. Firstly, we introduce the connection between the physiological muscle tremor and the lactate blood levels. Secondly, we suggest a photonic optical method to estimate the physiological tremor. Lastly, we present the results of tests conducted to establish proof of concept to this connection.

  10. Photonic non-contact estimation of blood lactate level

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Chen; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Ozana, Nisan; Tenner, Felix; Schmidt, Michael; Sanz, Martin; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    The ability to measure the blood lactate level in a non-invasive, non-contact manner is very appealing to the sports industry as well as the home care field. That is mainly because this substance level is an imperative parameter in the course of devolving a personal workout programs. Moreover, the blood lactate level is also a pivotal means in estimation of muscles' performance capability. In this manuscript we propose an optical non-contact approach to estimate the concentration level of this parameter. Firstly, we introduce the connection between the physiological muscle tremor and the lactate blood levels. Secondly, we suggest a photonic optical method to estimate the physiological tremor. Lastly, we present the results of tests conducted to establish proof of concept to this connection. PMID:26504661

  11. A new method of measuring the stiffness of astronauts' EVA gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Bonanno, Alberto; Chen Chen, Fai; Crepaldi, Marco; Demarchi, Danilo; Favetto, Alain; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Hand fatigue is one of the most important problems of astronauts during their missions to space. This fatigue is due to the stiffness of the astronauts' gloves known as Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves. The EVA glove has a multilayered, bulky structure and is pressurized against the vacuum of space. In order to evaluate the stiffness of EVA gloves, different methods have been proposed in the past. In particular, the effects of wearing an EVA glove on the performance of the hands have been published by many researchers to represent the stiffness of the EVA glove. In this paper, a new method for measuring the stiffness of EVA gloves is proposed. A tendon-actuated finger probe is designed and used as an alternative to the human index finger in order to be placed inside an EVA glove and measure its stiffness. The finger probe is equipped with accelerometers, which work as tilt sensors, to measure the angles of its phalanges. The phalanges are actuated by applying different amount of torque using the tendons of the finger probe. Moreover, a hypobaric glove box is designed and realized to simulate the actual operating pressure of the EVA glove and to measure its stiffness in both pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. In order to prove the right performance of the proposed finger probe, an Orlam-DM EVA glove is used to perform a number of tests. The equation of stiffness for the PIP joint of this glove is extracted from the results acquired from the tests. This equation presents the torque required to flex the middle phalanx of the glove. Then, the effect of pressurization on the stiffness is highlighted in the last section. This setup can be used to measure the stiffness of different kinds of EVA gloves and allows direct, numerical comparison of their stiffness.

  12. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-12

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  13. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  14. Report on Non-Contact DC Electric Field Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R; Bond, T; Meyer, G

    2009-06-16

    This document reports on methods used to measure DC electrostatic fields in the range of 100 to 4000 V/m using a non-contact method. The project for which this report is written requires this capability. Non-contact measurements of DC fields is complicated by the effect of the accumulation of random space-charges near the sensors which interfere with the measurement of the field-of-interest and consequently, many forms of field measurements are either limited to AC measurements or use oscillating devices to create pseudo-AC fields. The intent of this document is to report on methods discussed in the literature for non-contact measurement of DC fields. Electric field meters report either the electric field expressed in volts per distance or the voltage measured with respect to a ground reference. Common commercial applications for measuring static (DC) electric fields include measurement of surface charge on materials near electronic equipment to prevent arcing which can destroy sensitive electronic components, measurement of the potential for lightning to strike buildings or other exposed assets, measurement of the electric fields under power lines to investigate potential health risks from exposure to EM fields and measurement of fields emanating from the brain for brain diagnostic purposes. Companies that make electric field sensors include Trek (Medina, NY), MKS Instruments, Boltek, Campbell Systems, Mission Instruments, Monroe Electronics, AlphaLab, Inc. and others. In addition to commercial vendors, there are research activities continuing in the MEMS and optical arenas to make compact devices using the principles applied to the larger commercial sensors.

  15. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Kennedy, Guy G.; Warshaw, David M.; Ali, M. Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  16. Precision non-contact polishing tool

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, John S.

    1997-01-01

    A non-contact polishing tool that combines two orthogonal slurry flow geometries to provide flexibility in altering the shape of the removal footprint. By varying the relative contributions of the two flow geometries, the footprint shape can be varied between the characteristic shapes corresponding to the two independent flow regimes. In addition, the tool can include a pressure activated means by which the shape of the brim of the tool can be varied. The tool can be utilized in various applications, such as x-ray optical surfaces, x-ray lithography, lenses, etc., where stringent shape and finish tolerances are required.

  17. Precision non-contact polishing tool

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, J.S.

    1997-01-07

    A non-contact polishing tool is disclosed that combines two orthogonal slurry flow geometries to provide flexibility in altering the shape of the removal footprint. By varying the relative contributions of the two flow geometries, the footprint shape can be varied between the characteristic shapes corresponding to the two independent flow regimes. In addition, the tool can include a pressure activated means by which the shape of the brim of the tool can be varied. The tool can be utilized in various applications, such as x-ray optical surfaces, x-ray lithography, lenses, etc., where stringent shape and finish tolerances are required. 5 figs.

  18. A Review on Atherosclerotic Biology, Wall Stiffness, Physics of Elasticity, and Its Ultrasound-Based Measurement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anoop K; Suri, Harman S; Singh, Jaskaran; Kumar, Dinesh; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Jain, Sanjay K; Saba, Luca; Gupta, Ajay; Laird, John R; Giannopoulos, Argiris; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-12-01

    Functional and structural changes in the common carotid artery are biomarkers for cardiovascular risk. Current methods for measuring functional changes include pulse wave velocity, compliance, distensibility, strain, stress, stiffness, and elasticity derived from arterial waveforms. The review is focused on the ultrasound-based carotid artery elasticity and stiffness measurements covering the physics of elasticity and linking it to biological evolution of arterial stiffness. The paper also presents evolution of plaque with a focus on the pathophysiologic cascade leading to arterial hardening. Using the concept of strain, and image-based elasticity, the paper then reviews the lumen diameter and carotid intima-media thickness measurements in combined temporal and spatial domains. Finally, the review presents the factors which influence the understanding of atherosclerotic disease formation and cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness, tissue morphological characteristics, and image-based elasticity measurement.

  19. Flow visualization of a non-contact transport device by Coanda effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iki, Norihiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    AIST proposes new technology of non-contact transport device utilizing Coanda effect. A proposed non-contact transport device has a cylindrical body and circular slit for air. The air flow around non-contact device is turbulent and its flow pattern depends on the injection condition. Therefore we tried visualization of the air flow around non -contact device as the first step of PIV measurement. Several tracer particles were tried such as TiO2 particles, water droplets, potatoes starch, rice starch, corn starch. Hot-wire anemometer is employed to velocity measurement. TiO2 particles deposit inside of a slit and clogging of a slit occurs frequently. Potato starch particles do not clog a slit but they are too heavy to trace slow flow area. Water droplets by ultrasonic atomization also deposit inside of slit but they are useful to visualize flow pattern around a non-contact transport device by being supplied from circumference. Coanda effect of proposed non-contact transport device was confirmed and injected air flow pattern switches by a work. Air flow around non-contact trance port device is turbulent and its velocity range is wide. Therefore flow measurement by tracer part icle has traceability issue. Suitable tracer and exposure condition depends on target area.

  20. Measuring the Characteristic Topography of Brain Stiffness with Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew C.; Huston, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Chen, Jun; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a reliable magnetic resonance elastography (MRE)-based method for measuring regional brain stiffness. Methods First, simulation studies were used to demonstrate how stiffness measurements can be biased by changes in brain morphometry, such as those due to atrophy. Adaptive postprocessing methods were created that significantly reduce the spatial extent of edge artifacts and eliminate atrophy-related bias. Second, a pipeline for regional brain stiffness measurement was developed and evaluated for test-retest reliability in 10 healthy control subjects. Results This technique indicates high test-retest repeatability with a typical coefficient of variation of less than 1% for global brain stiffness and less than 2% for the lobes of the brain and the cerebellum. Furthermore, this study reveals that the brain possesses a characteristic topography of mechanical properties, and also that lobar stiffness measurements tend to correlate with one another within an individual. Conclusion The methods presented in this work are resistant to noise- and edge-related biases that are common in the field of brain MRE, demonstrate high test-retest reliability, and provide independent regional stiffness measurements. This pipeline will allow future investigations to measure changes to the brain’s mechanical properties and how they relate to the characteristic topographies that are typical of many neurologic diseases. PMID:24312570

  1. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  2. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  3. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography with a laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Ting; Oliver, David E.; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Most concurrent photoacoustic tomography systems are based on traditional ultrasound measurement regime, which requires the contact or acoustic coupling material between the biological tissue and the ultrasound transducer. This study investigates the feasibility of non-contact measurement of photacoustic signals generated inside biomedical tissues by observing the vibrations at the surface of the tissues with a commercial laser Doppler vibrometer. The vibrometer with 0- 2MHz measurement bandwidth and 5 MHz sampling frequency was integrated to a conventional rotational PAT data acquisition system. The data acquisition of the vibrometer was synchronized to the laser illumination from an Nd:YAG laser with output at 532nm. The laser energy was tuned to 17.5mJ per square centimeter. The PA signals were acquired at 120 angular locations uniformly distributed around the scanned objects. The frequency response of the measurement system was first calibrated. 2-inch-diamater cylindrical phantoms containing small rubber plates and biological tissues were afterwards imaged. The phantoms were made from 5% intralipid solution in 10% porcine gelatin to simulate the light scattering in biological tissue and to backscatter the measurement laser from the vibrometer. Time-domain backprojection method was used for the image reconstruction. Experiments with real-tissue phantoms show that with laser illumination of 17.5 mJ/cm2 at 532 nm, the non-contact photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with 15dB detection bandwidth of 2.5 MHz can resolve spherical optical inclusions with dimension of 500μm and multi-layered structure with optical contrast in strongly scattering medium. The experiment results prompt the potential implementation of the non-contact PAT to achieve "photoacoustic camera".

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Tijjani, Auwal Shehu; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Auwal, Shehu Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m−1, 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N−1, respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young’s modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m−1 and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young’s modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment. PMID:28025571

  5. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Tijjani, Auwal Shehu; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Auwal, Shehu Muhammad

    2016-12-23

    This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m(-1), 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N(-1), respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young's modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m(-1) and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young's modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment.

  7. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  8. Dynamic CT imaging of volumetric changes in pulmonary nodules correlates with physical measurements of stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Frederick M.; Rafat, Marjan; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Dong, Xinzhe; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Mei; Doyle, Timothy; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Maxim, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose A major challenge in CT screening for lung cancer is limited specificity when distinguishing between malignant and non-malignant pulmonary nodules (PN). Malignant nodules have different mechanical properties and tissue characteristics (‘stiffness’) from non-malignant nodules. This study seeks to improve CT specificity by demonstrating in rats that measurements of volumetric ratios in PNs with varying composition can be determined by respiratory-gated dynamic CT imaging and that these ratios correlate with direct physical measurements of PN stiffness. Methods and materials Respiratory-gated MicroCT images acquired at extreme tidal volumes of 9 rats with PNs from talc, matrigel and A549 human lung carcinoma were analyzed and their volumetric ratios (δ) derived. PN stiffness was determined by measuring the Young’s modulus using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each nodule excised immediately after MicroCT imaging. Results There was significant correlation (p = 0.0002) between PN volumetric ratios determined by respiratory-gated CT imaging and the physical stiffness of the PNs determined from AFM measurements. Conclusion We demonstrated proof of concept that PN volume changes measured non-invasively correlate with direct physical measurements of stiffness. These results may translate clinically into a means of improving the specificity of CT screening for lung cancer and/or improving individual prognostic assessments based on lung tumor stiffness. PMID:27989402

  9. A non-contact fiber Bragg grating vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Wei, Li; Zhou, Zude; Zheng, Kai; Guo, Yongxing

    2014-01-01

    A non-contact vibration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing has been proposed and studied in this paper. The principle of the sensor as well as simulation and experimental analyses are introduced. When the distance between the movable head and the measured shaft changed, the diaphragm deformed under magnetic coupling of the permanent magnet on the measured magnetic shaft. As a result, the center wavelength of the FBG connected to the diaphragm changed, based on which the vibration displacement of the rotating shaft could be obtained. Experimental results show that the resonant frequency of the sensor is about 1500 Hz and the working band ranges within 0-1300 Hz, which is consistent with the simulation analysis result; the sensitivity is -1.694 pm/μm and the linearity is 2.92% within a range of 2-2.4 mm. It can be used to conduct non-contact measurement on the vibration of the rotating shaft system.

  10. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Krebs, Hermano I; Bever, Christopher T; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F; Hogan, Neville

    2011-05-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults.

  11. Assessing musculo-articular stiffness using free oscillations: theory, measurement and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Stiffness, the relationship between applied load and elastic deformation, is an important neuromechanical component related to muscular performance and injury risk. The free-oscillation technique is a popular method for stiffness assessment. There has been wide application of this technique assessing a variety of musculature, including the triceps surae, knee flexors, knee extensors and pectorals. The methodology involves the modelling of the system as a linear damped mass-spring system. The use of such a model has certain advantages and limitations that will be discussed within this review. Perhaps the major advantage of such a model is the specificity of the measure, whereby it is possible for the assessment conditions to simulate the type of loading witnessed during functional tasks and sporting situations. High levels of reliability and construct validity have typically been reported using such procedures. Despite these assurances of accuracy, a number of issues have also been identified. The literature reveals some concerns surrounding the use of a linear model for stiffness assessment. Further, procedural issues surrounding the administration of the perturbation, attention focus of the participant during the perturbation, signal collection, data processing and analysis, presentation of stiffness as a linear or torsional value, assessment load (single vs multiple vs maximal) and the stiffness-load relationship have been identified, and are all fundamentally related to the quality of the calculated output data. Finally, several important considerations for practitioners have been recommended to ensure the quality and consistency of stiffness data collection, processing and interpretation.

  12. Non-Contact Heart Rate Monitoring Using Lab Color Space.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Hamidur; Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin; Begum, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Research progressing during the last decade focuses more on non-contact based systems to monitor Heart Rate (HR) which are simple, low-cost and comfortable to use. Most of the non-contact based systems are using RGB videos which is suitable for lab environment. However, it needs to progress considerably before they can be applied in real life applications. As luminance (light) has significance contribution on RGB videos HR monitoring using RGB videos are not efficient enough in real life applications in outdoor environment. This paper presents a HR monitoring method using Lab color facial video captured by a webcam of a laptop computer. Lab color space is device independent and HR can be extracted through facial skin color variation caused by blood circulation considering variable environmental light. Here, three different signal processing methods i.e., Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) have been applied on the color channels in video recordings and blood volume pulse (BVP) has been extracted from the facial regions. In this study, HR is subsequently quantified and compare with a reference measurement. The result shows that high degrees of accuracy have been achieved compared to the reference measurements. Thus, this technology has significant potential for advancing personal health care, telemedicine and many real life applications such as driver monitoring.

  13. System identification of velocity mechanomyogram measured with a capacitor microphone for muscle stiffness estimation.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Tomoshige, Taiki

    2017-04-01

    A mechanomyogram (MMG) measured with a displacement sensor (displacement MMG) can provide a better estimation of longitudinal muscle stiffness than that measured with an acceleration sensor (acceleration MMG), but the displacement MMG cannot provide transverse muscle stiffness. We propose a method to estimate both longitudinal and transverse muscle stiffness from a velocity MMG using a system identification technique. The aims of this study are to show the advantages of the proposed method. The velocity MMG was measured using a capacitor microphone and a differential circuit, and the MMG, evoked by electrical stimulation, of the tibialis anterior muscle was measured five times in seven healthy young male volunteers. The evoked MMG system was identified using the singular value decomposition method and was approximated with a fourth-order model, which provides two undamped natural frequencies corresponding to the longitudinal and transverse muscle stiffness. The fluctuation of the undamped natural frequencies estimated from the velocity MMG was significantly smaller than that from the acceleration MMG. There was no significant difference between the fluctuations of the undamped natural frequencies estimated from the velocity MMG and that from the displacement MMG. The proposed method using the velocity MMG is thus more advantageous for muscle stiffness estimation.

  14. Non-contact electromagnetic exciter design with linear control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  15. Measurement of the UH-60A Hub Large Rotor Test Apparatus Control System Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kufeld, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This purpose of this report is to provides details of the measurement of the control system stiffness of the UH-60A rotor hub mounted on the Large Rotor Test Apparatus (UH-60A/LRTA). The UH-60A/LRTA was used in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel to complete the full-scale wind tunnel test portion of the NASA / ARMY UH-60A Airloads Program. This report describes the LRTA control system and highlights the differences between the LRTA and UH-60A aircraft. The test hardware, test setup, and test procedures are also described. Sample results are shown, including the azimuthal variation of the measured control system stiffness for three different loadings and two different dynamic actuator settings. Finally, the azimuthal stiffness is converted to fixed system values using multi-blade transformations for input to comprehensive rotorcraft prediction codes.

  16. Piezoelectric Sensor to Measure Soft and Hard Stiffness with High Sensitivity for Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Rui; Su, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Jin; Chang, Shuo-Hung

    2015-06-11

    During dental sinus lift surgery, it is important to monitor the thickness of the remaining maxilla to avoid perforating the sinus membrane. Therefore, a sensor should be integrated into ultrasonic dental tools to prevent undesirable damage. This paper presents a piezoelectric (PZT) sensor installed in an ultrasonic transducer to measure the stiffness of high and low materials. Four design types using three PZT ring materials and a split PZT for actuator and sensor ring materials were studied. Three sensor locations were also examined. The voltage signals of the sensor and the displacement of the actuator were analyzed to distinguish the low and high stiffness. Using sensor type T1 made of the PZT-1 material and the front location A1 provided a high sensitivity of 2.47 Vm/kN. The experimental results demonstrated that our design can measure soft and hard stiffness.

  17. Understanding eye deformation in non-contact tonometry.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Roland; Kurita, Yuichi; Iida, Yoshichika; Kaneko, Makoto; Mishima, Hiromu K; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Sugimoto, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Non-contact tonometers are widely used to measure the internal eye pressure, i.e. the IntraOcular Pressure (IOP), which is an important parameter for the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma. During the measurement, the eye is deformed by a short air pulse. Commonly the pressure dependent deformation is estimated from the time when the eye becomes flat, which is derived from the monitored reflection of an incident infrared light. We used a high speed camera to capture the complete motion of the eye directly and obtain more data during the pressure measurement. Assuming a simple eye model with non-linear material properties of the cornea, we extend our previous analysis of the motion of the eye, and obtain a similar principle shape of the eye deformation as observed in the experiments.

  18. Optoelectronic tweezers for the measurement of the relative stiffness of erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Steven L.; Mody, Nimesh; Selman, Colin; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we describe the first use of Optoelectronic Tweezers (OET), an optically controlled micromanipulation method, to measure the relative stiffness of erythrocytes in mice. Cell stiffness is an important measure of cell health and in the case of erythrocytes, the most elastic cells in the body, an increase in cell stiffness can indicate pathologies such as type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension (high blood pressure). OET uses a photoconductive device to convert an optical pattern into and electrical pattern. The electrical fields will create a dipole within any polarisable particles in the device, such as cells, and non-uniformities of the field can be used to place unequal forces onto each side of the dipole thus moving the particle. In areas of the device where there are no field gradients, areas of constant illumination, the force on each side of the dipole will be equal, keeping the cell stationary, but as there are opposing forces on each side of the cell it will be stretched. The force each cell will experience will differ slightly so the stretching will depend on the cells polarisability as well as its stiffness. Because of this a relative stiffness rather than absolute stiffness is measured. We show that with standard conditions (20Vpp, 1.5MHz, 10mSm-1 medium conductivity) the cell's diameter changes by around 10% for healthy mouse erythrocytes and we show that due to the low light intensities required for OET, relative to conventional optical tweezers, multiple cells can be measured simultaneously.

  19. Measurements of stiff-material compliance on the nanoscale using ultrasonic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinelli, F.; Biswas, S. K.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2000-05-01

    Ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) was introduced to probe nanoscale mechanical properties of stiff materials. This was achieved by vibrating the sample far above the first resonance of the probing atomic force microscope cantilever where the cantilever becomes dynamically rigid. By operating UFM at different set force values, it is possible to directly measure the absolute values of the tip-surface contact stiffness. From this an evaluation of surface elastic properties can be carried out assuming a suitable solid-solid contact model. In this paper we present curves of stiffness as a function of the normal load in the range of 0-300 nN. The dependence of stiffness on the relative humidity has also been investigated. Materials with different elastic constants (such as sapphire lithium fluoride, and silicon) have been successfully differentiated. Continuum mechanics models cannot however explain the dependence of stiffness on the normal force and on the relative humidity. In this high-frequency regime, it is likely that viscous forces might play an important role modifying the tip-surface interaction. Plastic deformation might also occur due to the high strain rates applied when ultrasonically vibrating the sample. Another possible cause of these discrepancies might be the presence of water in between the two bodies in contact organizing in a solidlike way and partially sustaining the load.

  20. Limitations and opportunities of non-invasive liver stiffness measurement in children

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Guido; Quader, Jasmin; Teufel, Ulrike; Schenk, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Changes in liver structure are an important issue in chronic hepatopathies. Until the end of the 20th century, these changes could only be determined by histological analyses of a liver specimen obtained via biopsy. The well-known limitations of this technique (i.e., pain, bleeding and the need for sedation) have precluded its routine use in follow-up of patients with liver diseases. However, the introduction of non-invasive technologies, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, for measurement of liver stiffness as an indirect marker of fibroses has changed this situation. Today, several non-invasive tools are available to physicians to estimate the degree of liver fibrosis by analysing liver stiffness. This review describes the currently available tools for liver stiffness determination that are applicable to follow-up of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis with established clinical use in children, and discusses their features in comparison to the “historical” tools. PMID:28357028

  1. The Aqualon SLT: a novel device for measuring hair stiffness and lubricity.

    PubMed

    Vaynberg, K Abraham; Nall, M

    2009-01-01

    The ability to quantify hair property changes in response to treatment is essential to the successful development of new formulations and benefiting agents. In the attempt to expand the toolbox of hair tress testing tools, we developed a device that allows hair scientists to measure hair tress changes in stiffness and lubricity. The tool is based on a system of pins mounted on free rotating bearings and is operated in two modes: rotating and stationary. The hair attributes are measured by threading a hair tress through the pin assembly and measuring the total work of pulling through in rotational and stationary modes (the latter mode is obtained by immobilizing pins by a retaining plate). The data thus obtained is de-convoluted into the work of apparent stiffness (rotational mode) and the work of the friction-on-pins or lubricity (stationary mode minus the apparent stiffness). The data can be further reduced to produce an apparent friction coefficient defined as a ratio of the apparent lubricity to the apparent stiffness. This work demonstrates the utility of the parameters measured by the Aqualon SLT and illustrates how the device can be used to predict and understand the impacts of various hair treatments.

  2. MEMS squeezer for the measurement of single cell rupture force, stiffness change, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazani, B.; Warnat, S.; Fine, A.; Hubbard, T.

    2017-02-01

    A MEMS squeezer able to compress single living cells underwater until rupture was designed and tested. The relatively large motion range of the device in aqueous media (~2.5 µm) allows provoking cell disruption while measuring cell mechanical properties before and after membrane rupture. An AC driven electrothermal micro actuator with mechanical amplification pressed single cells against a reference back spring. Deformations of the cell and the reference spring were measured with nanoscale resolution using optical Fourier transform techniques. The motion of the reference spring divided by the cell deformation provides the cell stiffness relative to the reference spring constant. An abrupt change in the cell stiffness and the appearance of cracks indicated the cell wall rupture force was reached. A total of 22 baker’s yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were squeezed with the micro device. The average force necessary to rupture the cell membrane was 0.47  ±  0.1 µN. Before rupture the cells had an average stiffness of 9.3  ±  3.1 N m-1 the post-rupture stiffness dropped to 0.94  ±  0.57 N m-1. Cell hysteresis was also measured: cells squeezed and released before reaching the rupture force showed residual deformations below 100 nm, while cells squeezed past the rupture force and then released showed residual deformations between 490 and 990 nm.

  3. Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2011-06-28

    Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

  4. Usefulness of liver stiffness measurement during acute cellular rejection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gonzalo; Castro-Narro, Graciela; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Benítez, Carlos; Ruiz, Pablo; Sastre, Lydia; Colmenero, Jordi; Miquel, Rosa; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is a useful method to estimate liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The inflammatory process that takes place in post-liver transplant acute cellular rejection (ACR) may also increase liver stiffness. We aimed to explore the association between liver stiffness and the severity of ACR, as well as to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and response to rejection treatment in a prospective study that included 27 liver recipients with biopsy-proven ACR, 30 stable recipients with normal liver tests, and 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected LT recipients with histologically diagnosed HCV recurrence. Patients with rejection were stratified into 2 groups (mild and moderate/severe) according to the severity of rejection evaluated with the Banff score. Routine biomarkers and LSM with FibroScan were performed at the time of liver biopsy (baseline) and at 7, 30, and 90 days in patients with rejection and at baseline in control patients. Median baseline liver stiffness was 5.9 kPa in the mild rejection group, 11 kPa in the moderate/severe group (P = 0.001), 4.2 kPa in stable recipients (P = 0.02 versus mild rejection), and 13.6 kPa in patients with recurrent HCV (P = 0.17 versus moderate/severe rejection). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM to discriminate mild versus moderate/severe ACR was 0.924, and a LSM value of 8.5 kPa yielded a positive predictive value of 100% to diagnose moderate/severe rejection. Liver stiffness improved in 7%, 21%, and 64% of patients with moderate/severe rejection at 7, 30, and 90 days. In conclusion, according to the results of this exploratory study, LSM is associated with the severity of ACR in liver transplantation and thus may be of help in its assessment.

  5. Increased osteopontin and liver stiffness measurement by transient elastography in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Honsawek, Sittisak; Chayanupatkul, Maneerat; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Vejchapipat, Paisarn; Poovorawan, Yong

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze plasma osteopontin levels and liver stiffness using transient elastography in postoperative biliary atresia (BA) children compared with healthy controls. METHODS: Thirty children with postoperative BA and 10 normal controls were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups according to their jaundice status. Plasma levels of osteopontin were determined using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Liver stiffness was measured by using transient elastography (Fibroscan). Ten validated Fibroscan measurements were performed in each patient and control with the result expressed in kilopascals (kPa). RESULTS: Plasma osteopontin was significantly elevated in BA children compared with that of healthy controls (47.0 ± 56.4 ng/mL vs 15.1 ± 15.0 ng/mL, P = 0.01). The liver stiffness measurement was markedly elevated in the patients with BA compared with that of controls (26.9 ± 24.6 kPa vs 3.9 ± 0.7 kPa, P = 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that the BA patients with jaundice had more pronounced plasma osteopontin levels than those without jaundice (87.1 ± 61.6 ng/mL vs 11.9 ± 6.1 ng/mL, P = 0.001). Furthermore, the mean liver stiffness was significantly greater in the jaundiced BA patients compared with non-jaundiced patients (47.7 ± 21.8 kPa vs 8.7 ± 3.0 kPa, P = 0.001). Additionally, plasma osteopontin was positively related to serum total bilirubin (r = 0.64, P < 0.001). There was also a correlation between plasma osteopontin and liver stiffness values (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: High plasma osteopontin positively correlated with degree of hepatic fibrosis and could be used as a biochemical parameter reflecting disease severity in postoperative BA children. PMID:21086566

  6. Evaluation of Thickness Reduction in a Thin Plate Using a Non-Contact Guided Wave Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Won-Joon; Park, Ik-Keun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Hyun-Mook; Kim, Yong-Kwon; Cho, Yong-Sang

    2006-03-06

    Ultrasonic guided waves are widely being studied and successfully applied to various non-destructive tests with the advantage of a long range inspection. Recently, non-contact methods are also adopted and combined with the guided wave techniques. In this paper, an advanced technique for the nondestructive detection of thinning defects simulating hidden corrosion in thin plates using non-contact guided waves is presented. The proposed approach uses EMAT(Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) for the non-contact generation and detection of guided plate waves in aluminum plates. Interesting features of the dispersive behavior in selected wave modes are used for the detection of plate thinning. The experimental results show that the mode cutoff measurements provide a qualitative measurement of thinning defects and change in the mode group velocity can be used as quantitative parameter of thinning depth measurement.

  7. Differentiating untreated and cross-linked porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness with optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally degenerative diseases, such as keratoconus, can significantly alter the stiffness of the cornea, directly affecting the quality of vision. Ultraviolet-induced collagen cross-linking (CXL) effectively increases corneal stiffness and is applied clinically to treat keratoconus. However, measured corneal stiffness is also influenced by intraocular pressure (IOP). Therefore, experimentally measured changes in corneal stiffness may be attributable to the effects of CXL, changes in IOP, or both. We present a noninvasive measurement method using phase-stabilized swept-source optical coherence elastography to distinguish between CXL and IOP effects on measured corneal stiffness. This method compared the displacement amplitude attenuation of a focused air-pulse-induced elastic wave. The damping speed of the displacement amplitudes at each measurement position along the wave propagation were compared for different materials. This method was initially tested on gelatin and agar phantoms of the same stiffness for validation. Consequently, untreated and CXL-treated porcine corneas of the same measured stiffness, but at different IOPs, were also evaluated. The results suggest that this noninvasive method may have the potential to detect the early stages of ocular diseases such as keratoconus or may be applied during CLX procedures by factoring in the effects of IOP on the measured corneal stiffness.

  8. Definition and Validation of a Methodology to Measure the Local Static Stiffness of Large Appendages Interfaces Using Dynamic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Rodriguez Senin, A.; Laduree, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed under the Sentinel 1 spacecraft structure project to measure the local static stiffness of synthetic aperture radar antenna (SAR-A) interfaces using dynamic measurements. The methodology used consists in measuring accelerance [acceleration/force] frequency response functions (FRF) at the SAR-A interfaces and at several points selected as boundary conditions used for the derivation of the local stiffness [1]. The accelerance FRF is used to calculate the flexibility FRF [displacement/force] from which the static term of the flexibility is extracted. The static term is obtained via a least squares approximation at low frequency of the real part of the flexibility FRF (curve fitting approach) and extrapolation of the curve down to 0 Hz.Since the test was performed with the launch vehicle adapter ring clamped, the direct results of these measurements lead to global stiffness values. To calculate the local stiffness values the results were post- processed to subtract the contribution of the global deformation of the spacecraft structure. The local flexibility matrix at the SAR-A interfaces is calculated by imposing zero displacement at those points selected as virtual boundary conditions. Then, the local stiffness components were obtained inverting the diagonal terms of the local flexibility matrix for the three translational and the two in-plane rotational degrees of freedom in 9 SAR-A interfaces.The results obtained using this methodology were validated with a classical static test at one of the interfaces showing a good correlation between static and dynamic tests results. It was concluded that this methodology is suitable for the verification of static stiffness of large appendages interfaces and it can be applied to future missions that carry large payloads with critical structural interfaces.

  9. The Interday Measurement Consistency of and Relationships Between Hamstring and Leg Musculo-articular Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Justin P; Schmitz, Randy J; Shultz, Sandra J

    2015-10-01

    Hamstring stiffness (K(HAM)) and leg stiffness (K(LEG)) are commonly examined relative to athletic performance and injury risk. Given these may be modifiable, it is important to understand day-to-day variations inherent in these measures before use in training studies. In addition, the extent to which K(HAM) and K(LEG) measure similar active stiffness characteristics has not been established. We investigated the interday measurement consistency of K(HAM) and K(LEG), and examined the extent to which K(LEG) predicted K(HAM) in 6 males and 9 females. K(HAM) was moderately consistent day-to-day (ICC(2,5) = .71; SEM = 76.3 N·m(-1)), and 95% limits of agreement (95% LOA) revealed a systematic bias with considerable absolute measurement error (95% LOA = 89.6 ± 224.8 N·m(-1)). Day-to-day differences in procedural factors explained 59.4% of the variance in day-to-day differences in K(HAM). Bilateral and unilateral K(LEG) was more consistent (ICC(2,3) range = .87-.94; SEM range = 1.0-2.91 kN·m(-1)) with lower absolute error (95% LOA bilateral= -2.0 ± 10.3; left leg = -0.36 ± 3.82; right leg = -1.05 ± 3.61 kN·m(-1)). K(LEG) explained 44% of the variance in K(HAM) (P < .01). Findings suggest that procedural factors must be carefully controlled to yield consistent and precise K(HAM) measures. The ease and consistency of K(LEG), and moderate correlation with K(HAM), may steer clinicians toward K(LEG) when measuring lower-extremity stiffness for screening studies and monitoring the effectiveness of training interventions over time.

  10. Contact stiffness and damping identification for hardware-in-the-loop contact simulator with measurement delay compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chenkun; Zhao, Xianchao; Gao, Feng; Ren, Anye; Sun, Qiao

    2016-06-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) contact simulator is to simulate the contact process of two flying objects in space. The contact stiffness and damping are important parameters used for the process monitoring, compliant contact control and force compensation control. In this study, a contact stiffness and damping identification approach is proposed for the HIL contact simulation with the force measurement delay. The actual relative position of two flying objects can be accurately measured. However, the force measurement delay needs to be compensated because it will lead to incorrect stiffness and damping identification. Here, the phase lead compensation is used to reconstruct the actual contact force from the delayed force measurement. From the force and position data, the contact stiffness and damping are identified in real time using the recursive least squares (RLS) method. The simulations and experiments are used to verify that the proposed stiffness and damping identification approach is effective.

  11. A simple indentation device for measuring micrometer-scale tissue stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levental, I.; Levental, K. R.; Klein, E. A.; Assoian, R.; Miller, R. T.; Wells, R. G.; Janmey, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    Mechanical properties of cells and extracellular matrices are critical determinants of function in contexts including oncogenic transformation, neuronal synapse formation, hepatic fibrosis and stem cell differentiation. The size and heterogeneity of biological specimens and the importance of measuring their mechanical properties under conditions that resemble their environments in vivo present a challenge for quantitative measurement. Centimeter-scale tissue samples can be measured by commercial instruments, whereas properties at the subcellular (nm) scale are accessible by atomic force microscopy, optical trapping, or magnetic bead microrheometry; however many tissues are heterogeneous on a length scale between micrometers and millimeters which is not accessible to most current instrumentation. The device described here combines two commercially available technologies, a micronewton resolution force probe and a micromanipulator for probing soft biological samples at sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Several applications of the device are described. These include the first measurement of the stiffness of an intact, isolated mouse glomerulus, quantification of the inner wall stiffness of healthy and diseased mouse aortas, and evaluation of the lateral heterogeneity in the stiffness of mouse mammary glands and rat livers with correlation of this heterogeneity with malignant or fibrotic pathology as evaluated by histology.

  12. Experimental validation of arthroscopic cartilage stiffness measurement using enzymatically degraded cartilage samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyyra, T.; Arokoski, J. P. A.; Oksala, N.; Vihko, A.; Hyttinen, M.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Kiviranta, I.

    1999-02-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of the arthroscopic indentation instrument, originally developed for the measurement of cartilage stiffness during arthroscopy, to detect cartilage degeneration, we compared changes in the stiffness with the structural and constitutional alterations induced by enzymes on the tissue in vitro. The culturing of osteochondral plugs on Petri dishes was initiated in Minimum Essential Medium with Earle's salts and the baseline stiffness was measured. Then, the experimental specimens were digested using trypsin for 24 h, chondroitinase ABC or purified collagenase (type VII) for 24 h or 48 h ( n = 8-15 per group). The control specimens were incubated in the medium. After the enzyme digestion, the end-point stiffness was measured and the specimens for the microscopic analyses were processed. The proteoglycan (PG) distribution was analysed using quantitative microspectrophotometry and the quantitative evaluation of the collagen network was made using a computer-based polarized light microscopy analysis. Decrease of cartilage stiffness was found after 24 h trypsin (36%) and 48 h chondroitinase ABC (24%) digestion corresponding to a decrease of up to 80% and up to 30% in the PG content respectively. Decrease of the superficial zone collagen content or arrangement (78%, ) after 48 h collagenase digestion also induced a decrease (30%, ) in cartilage stiffness. We conclude that our instrument is capable of

  13. Ultrasound elastography: the new frontier in direct measurement of muscle stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Joline E; Eby, Sarah F; Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Brault, Jeffrey S; Chen, Shigao; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The use of brightness-mode ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation has increased dramatically. The continuing evolution of ultrasound technology has also produced ultrasound elastography, a cutting-edge technology that can directly measure the mechanical properties of tissue, including muscle stiffness. Its real-time and direct measurements of muscle stiffness can aid the diagnosis and rehabilitation of acute musculoskeletal injuries and chronic myofascial pain. It can also help monitor outcomes of interventions affecting muscle in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases, and it can better inform the functional prognosis. This technology has implications for even broader use of ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation practice, but more knowledge about its uses and limitations is essential to its appropriate clinical implementation. In this review, we describe different ultrasound elastography techniques for studying muscle stiffness, including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear-wave elastography. We discuss the basic principles of these techniques, including the strengths and limitations of their measurement capabilities. We review the current muscle research, discuss physiatric clinical applications of these techniques, and note directions for future research.

  14. Serial Liver Stiffness Measurements and Monitoring of Liver-Transplanted Patients in a Real-Life Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Luca; Valente, Giovanna; Piai, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver transplanted patients need close surveillance for early signs of graft disease. Objectives Transient elastography can safely be repeated over time, offering serial liver stiffness measurement values. Serial stiffness measurements were compared to single baseline stiffness measurements in predicting the appearance of liver-related clinical events and guiding subsequent clinical decisions. Methods One hundred and sixty liver transplanted patients were observed for three years in our real-life practice. Results Liver stiffness measurements were stable in 75% of patients, decreased in 4% of patients, and increased in 21% of patients. The pattern of increased stiffness measurements was associated with both HCV-RNA positive status and the presence of an active biliary complication of liver transplantation and was more predictive of a clinically significant event resulting from any disease of the transplanted liver when compared to a stable pattern or to a single liver stiffness measurement. The procedures that were consequently performed were often diagnostic for unexpected situations, both in HCV-RNA positive and HCV-RNA negative patients. Conclusions The pattern of longitudinally increased liver stiffness measurements efficiently supported clinical decisions for individualized management strategies. Repeated transient elastography in real-life clinical practice appears to have a practical role in monitoring liver transplanted patients. PMID:28123442

  15. Pulmonary Vascular Stiffness: Measurement, Modeling, and Implications in Normal and Hypertensive Pulmonary Circulations

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lammers, Steven R.; Shandas, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of pulmonary vascular stiffness, discusses its increasingly recognized importance as a diagnostic marker in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular disease, and describes methods to measure and model it clinically, experimentally, and computationally. It begins with a description of systems-level methods to evaluate pulmonary vascular compliance and recent clinical efforts in applying such techniques to better predict patient outcomes in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It then progresses from the systems-level to the local level, discusses proposed methods by which upstream pulmonary vessels increase in stiffness, introduces concepts around vascular mechanics, and concludes by describing recent work incorporating advanced numerical methods to more thoroughly evaluate changes in local mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries. PMID:23733649

  16. Coupled Biomechanical Response of the Cornea Assessed by Non-Contact Tonometry. A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of the cornea subjected to a non-contact air-jet tonometry diagnostic test represents an interplay between its geometry, the corneal material behavior and the loading. The objective is to study this interplay to better understand and interpret the results obtained with a non-contact tonometry test. A patient-specific finite element model of a healthy eye, accounting for the load free configuration, was used. The corneal tissue was modeled as an anisotropic hyperelastic material with two preferential directions. Three different sets of parameters within the human experimental range obtained from inflation tests were considered. The influence of the IOP was studied by considering four pressure levels (10–28 mmHg) whereas the influence of corneal thickness was studied by inducing a uniform variation (300–600 microns). A Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) air-jet simulation determined pressure loading exerted on the anterior corneal surface. The maximum apex displacement showed a linear variation with IOP for all materials examined. On the contrary, the maximum apex displacement followed a cubic relation with corneal thickness. In addition, a significant sensitivity of the apical displacement to the corneal stiffness was also obtained. Explanation to this behavior was found in the fact that the cornea experiences bending when subjected to an air-puff loading, causing the anterior surface to work in compression whereas the posterior surface works in tension. Hence, collagen fibers located at the anterior surface do not contribute to load bearing. Non-contact tonometry devices give useful information that could be misleading since the corneal deformation is the result of the interaction between the mechanical properties, IOP, and geometry. Therefore, a non-contact tonometry test is not sufficient to evaluate their individual contribution and a complete in-vivo characterization would require more than one test to independently determine the membrane

  17. Inductive Non-Contact Position Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Garcia, Alyssa; Simmons, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Optical hardware has been developed to measure the depth of defects in the Space Shuttle Orbiter's windows. In this hardware, a mirror is translated such that its position corresponds to the defect's depth, so the depth measurement problem is transferred to a mirror-position measurement problem. This is preferable because the mirror is internal to the optical system and thus accessible. Based on requirements supplied by the window inspectors, the depth of the defects needs to be measured over a range of 200 microns with a resolution of about 100 nm and an accuracy of about 400 nm. These same requirements then apply to measuring the position of the mirror, and in addition, since this is a scanning system, a response time of about 10 ms is needed. A market search was conducted and no sensor that met these requirements that also fit into the available housing volume (less than one cubic inch) was found, so a novel sensor configuration was constructed to meet the requirements. This new sensor generates a nearly linearly varying magnetic field over a small region of space, which can easily be sampled, resulting in a voltage proportional to position. Experiments were done with a range of inductor values, drive voltages, drive frequencies, and inductor shapes. A rough mathematical model was developed for the device that, in most aspects, describes how it operates and what electrical parameters should be chosen for best performance. The final configuration met all the requirements, yielding a small rugged sensor that was easy to use and had nanometer resolution over more than the 200-micron range required. The inductive position sensor is a compact device (potentially as small as 2 cubic centimeters), which offers nanometer-position resolution over a demonstrated range of nearly 1 mm. One of its advantages is the simplicity of its electrical design. Also, the sensor resolution is nearly uniform across its operational range, which is in contrast to eddy current and

  18. Non-contact current and voltage sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Gary D; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C; Schappert, Michael A

    2014-03-25

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  19. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature.

  20. A Novel Multidirectional, Non-Contact Strain-Sensing Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Paul; Vemuru, Srivishnu; Bachilo, Sergei; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been successfully dispersed in a polymeric host resulting in the development of a novel strain-sensitive nanocomposite material with promise for scalability. Dubbed ``strain paint'' this new material when coated onto a surface becomes a smart-skin sensor that can detect strain through load transfer from the polymeric host to embedded SWCNTs. Strain is easily measured in a non-contact manner via laser excitation and detection of the unique near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectrum of semiconducting SWCNTs. When strained, each (n , m) SWCNT type exhibits a predictable shift in its NIR fluorescence peak. SWCNTs with high intensity are easily detected in the bulk fluorescence spectrum of raw, unsorted SWCNTs embedded in the polymer. Thin films of the polymer/SWCNT nanocomposite were spin-coated onto substrates, strains typically up to 1% were applied, and strain magnitudes were determined by resistive strain gauges bonded to the coating and substrate. Spectral shifts reveal a linear response to strain with little hysteresis. Two SWCNT types exhibiting opposite spectral shifts with strain were used to improve sensitivity. Strain along any direction is determined simply by adjusting the polarization of the excitation laser.

  1. Non-Contact Ultrasonic Characterization of Angled Surface Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Dutton, B.; Rosli, M. H.; Clough, A. R.

    2011-06-01

    Surface ultrasonic waves have been shown to have many uses in non-destructive testing, in particular for gauging the depth of surface defects. Much of the previous work has assumed that these defects are oriented normal to the surface. However, this is not always the case; for example, rolling contact fatigue in rails propagates at an angle of around 25° to the surface, and this angle may affect the characterisation. We present results using non-contact ultrasonic methods to generate and detect ultrasound on samples with a range of defect angles, and compare these with finite element method (FEM) models. We use both electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound. The depth calibration when measuring ultrasound transmission is considered, and what affect the angle of a defect has. Several other methods of characterising crack depth and angle are also discussed, including the arrival times of reflected and mode-converted waves, the delay in the transmission of the high-frequency Rayleigh wave, and the enhancement of the signal at the defect in both the in-plane and out-of-plane components.

  2. Measurement of the passive stiffness of ankle joint in 3 DOF using stewart platform type ankle foot device.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenta; Yonezawa, Teru; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint in three degrees of freedom (DOF) under two motion speeds (1 Hz and 5 degree/s) using a developed Stewart platform-type device. The developed device can reproduce input motions of the foot in 6 DOF by controlling six pneumatic linear motion actuators. We used the device to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint undergoing three kinds of motion, namely dorsi-plantar flexion, inversion-eversion, and adduction-abduction. The measured values of the passive stiffness of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion that we obtained agreed well with that obtained in a previous study, indicating that the developed device is useful for measuring the passive stiffness of ankle joint. In addition, the developed device can be used to measure the stiffness in inversion-eversion and adduction-abduction motions as well, parameters that have never been measured. The results we obtained demonstrated certain interesting features as we varied both the direction and pace of motion (e.g., there were significant differences in the stiffness not only between adduction and abduction during the faster pace, but also between these and the other motions).

  3. Arterial pressure measurement: Is the envelope curve of the oscillometric method influenced by arterial stiffness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelido, G.; Angiletta, S.; Pujalte, A.; Quiroga, P.; Cornes, P.; Craiem, D.

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of peripheral arterial pressure using the oscillometric method is commonly used by professionals as well as by patients in their homes. This non invasive automatic method is fast, efficient and the required equipment is affordable with a low cost. The measurement method consists of obtaining parameters from a calibrated decreasing curve that is modulated by heart beats witch appear when arterial pressure reaches the cuff pressure. Diastolic, mean and systolic pressures are obtained calculating particular instants from the heart beats envelope curve. In this article we analyze the envelope of this amplified curve to find out if its morphology is related to arterial stiffness in patients. We found, in 33 volunteers, that the envelope waveform width correlates to systolic pressure (r=0.4, p<0.05), to pulse pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05) and to pulse pressure normalized to systolic pressure (r=0.6, p<0.05). We believe that the morphology of the heart beats envelope curve obtained with the oscillometric method for peripheral pressure measurement depends on arterial stiffness and can be used to enhance pressure measurements.

  4. Functional instability in non-contact ankle ligament injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A.; Lee, R.; Williams, R.; Thomson, L.; Forsyth, A.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To measure objectively functional standing balance in the acute stages of non-contact ankle sprain, and to compare patients with controls. Methods—A Chattanooga balance machine was used to measure postural stability in patients with acute ankle sprain and uninjured controls over a two week period, in one and two legged stance, with eyes open and closed. Participants also completed the Olerud and Molander questionnaire to provide a subjective measure of ankle function. Results—There was a highly significant improvement in questionnaire scores for the patients during the study period (p<0.0001). Patients appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach significance. There was evidence of improvement over time in the number of tests successfully completed on the injured leg in single legged stance with eyes closed (p = 0.043) between visits 1 and 3. Conclusions—The patient group showed a subjective improvement, which supports clinical experience of treating acute ankle injuries. There is some evidence that on average the patient group appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach statistical significance, even on the uninjured leg. There is a need to carry out further studies to confirm the results found in this pilot study and to investigate the hypotheses generated. It would be useful to evaluate a simple test that could be used clinically to monitor progress after ankle injury, and also to identify athletes with decreased functional stability, who may be more at risk of sustaining ankle injury. Key Words: balance; ankle; sprain; postural stability; injury prevention PMID:11049145

  5. Simultaneous mechanical stiffness and electrical potential measurements of living vascular endothelial cells using combined atomic force and epifluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callies, Chiara; Schön, Peter; Liashkovich, Ivan; Stock, Christian; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Fels, Johannes; Sträter, Alexandra S.; Oberleithner, Hans

    2009-04-01

    The degree of mechanical stiffness of vascular endothelial cells determines the endogenous production of the vasodilating gas nitric oxide (NO). However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. Experiments on vascular endothelial cells suggest that the electrical plasma membrane potential is involved in this regulatory process. To test this hypothesis we developed a technique that simultaneously measures the electrical membrane potential and stiffness of vascular endothelial cells (GM7373 cell line derived from bovine aortic endothelium) under continuous perfusion with physiological electrolyte solution. The cellular stiffness was determined by nano-indentation using an atomic force microscope (AFM) while the electrical membrane potential was measured with bis-oxonol, a voltage-reporting fluorescent dye. These two methods were combined using an AFM attached to an epifluorescence microscope. The electrical membrane potential and mechanical stiffness of the same cell were continuously recorded for a time span of 5 min. Fast fluctuations (in the range of seconds) of both the electrical membrane potential and mechanical stiffness could be observed that were not related to each other. In contrast, slow cell depolarizations (in the range of minutes) were paralleled by significant increases in mechanical stiffness. In conclusion, using the combined AFM-fluorescence technique we monitored for the first time simultaneously the electrical plasma membrane potential and mechanical stiffness in a living cell. Vascular endothelial cells exhibit oscillatory non-synchronized waves of electrical potential and mechanical stiffness. The sustained membrane depolarization, however, is paralleled by a concomitant increase of cell stiffness. The described method is applicable for any fluorophore, which opens new perspectives in biomedical research.

  6. Quantitative sub-surface and non-contact imaging using scanning microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Lucibello, Andrea; Patil, Samadhan B.; Kasper, Manuel; Rankl, Christian; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Marcelli, Romolo; Kienberger, Ferry

    2015-03-01

    The capability of scanning microwave microscopy for calibrated sub-surface and non-contact capacitance imaging of silicon (Si) samples is quantitatively studied at broadband frequencies ranging from 1 to 20 GHz. Calibrated capacitance images of flat Si test samples with varying dopant density (1015-1019 atoms cm-3) and covered with dielectric thin films of SiO2 (100-400 nm thickness) are measured to demonstrate the sensitivity of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) for sub-surface imaging. Using standard SMM imaging conditions the dopant areas could still be sensed under a 400 nm thick oxide layer. Non-contact SMM imaging in lift-mode and constant height mode is quantitatively demonstrated on a 50 nm thick SiO2 test pad. The differences between non-contact and contact mode capacitances are studied with respect to the main parameters influencing the imaging contrast, namely the probe tip diameter and the tip-sample distance. Finite element modelling was used to further analyse the influence of the tip radius and the tip-sample distance on the SMM sensitivity. The understanding of how the two key parameters determine the SMM sensitivity and quantitative capacitances represents an important step towards its routine application for non-contact and sub-surface imaging.

  7. Measuring multi-joint stiffness during single movements: numerical validation of a novel time-frequency approach.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Measuring Multi-Joint Stiffness during Single Movements: Numerical Validation of a Novel Time-Frequency Approach

    PubMed Central

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22448233

  9. Ultrasound imaging system for measuring stiffness variation in the fingerpad skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wan-Chen; Raju, Balasundar I.; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    2005-04-01

    An elasticity imaging system was developed for measuring the stiffness variation at different depths of the human fingerpad skin in vivo. In this system, ultrasonic backscatter microscopy (UBM) with a single high frequency (28MHz) transducer was employed to obtain data on tissue heterogeneity at high axial resolution (~25 mm). The dorsal side of the finger was fixed on a manually controlled vertical stage and an acrylic indentor was applied to the fingerpad. A slit cut vertically through the indentor at the center and a piece of transparency sheet attached to the bottom allowed most of the ultrasound power to pass though while maintaining a flat surface in contact with the skin. With the assumption that the skin can be modeled as a semi-infinite layered structure, only data from a single A-line was obtained for strain analysis. The data at continuous indentation steps were cross-correlated to calculate the displacement at different spots along the depth. The de-correlation at certain regions was resolved by removing the data points with lower correlation coefficients, and curve fitting was applied to overcome the lack of resolution due to sampling. The fingerpads of 10 human subjects were tested in vivo and a gelatin phantom was made and tested for comparison. The results showed that even though some data were degraded due to the hypoechoic nature of the subcutaneous fat, the axial strain profile through the skin thickness (up to 3mm in depth) could be extracted as a measure of the stiffness variation.

  10. Profile stiffness measurements in the Helically Symmetric experiment and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G. M.; Faber, B. J.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.

    2015-05-15

    Stiffness measurements are presented in the quasi-helically symmetric experiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to that in a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. Electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the local electron temperature response to modulated electron cyclotron resonant heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the steep electron temperature gradient (ETG) region of the plasma are used to determine a transient electron thermal diffusivity that is close to the steady-state diffusivity. The low stiffness in the region between 0.2 ≤ r/a ≤ 0.4 agrees with the scaling of the steady-state heat flux with temperature gradient in this region. These experimental results are compared to gyrokinetic calculations in a flux-tube geometry using the gyrokinetic electromagnetic numerical experiment code with two kinetic species. Linear simulations show that the ETG mode may be experimentally relevant within r/a ≤ 0.2, while the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) is the dominant long-wavelength microturbulence instability across most of the plasma. The TEM is primarily driven by the density gradient. Non-linear calculations of the saturated heat flux driven by the TEM and ETG bracket the experimental heat flux.

  11. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  12. Non-contacting techniques for plant drought stress detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-contacting sensing techniques based on plant canopy temperature, plant leaf motion, and plant canopy reflectance were evaluated for drought stress detection using New Guinea Impatiens as a model plant. The performances of Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI), plant motion in the form of Covariance of ...

  13. Non-contact translation-rotation sensor using combined effects of magnetostriction and piezoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bintang; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Ting; Cao, Yudong; Feng, Zhiqiang; Meng, Guang

    2012-10-15

    Precise displacement sensors are an important topic in precision engineering. At present, this type of sensors typically have a single feature of either translation or rotation measurement. They are also inconvenient to integrate with the host devices. In this report we propose a new kind of sensor that enables both translation and rotation measurement by using the combined effect of magnetostriction and piezoelectricity. As a proof of concept, we experimentally realized a prototype of non-contact translation-rotation precise sensor. In the current research stage, through both theoretical and experimental study, the non-contact displacement sensor is shown to be feasible for measuring both translation and rotation either in coarse or fine measurement. Moreover, owing to its compact, rigid structure and fewer components, it can be easily embedded in host equipment.

  14. Stiffness Control of a Continuum Manipulator in Contact with a Soft Environment.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E

    2010-12-03

    Stiffness control of a continuum robot can prevent excessive contact forces during robot navigation inside delicate, uncertain and confined environments. Furthermore, it enables the selection of tip stiffnesses that match varying task requirements. This paper introduces a computationally-efficient approach to continuum-robot stiffness control that is based on writing the forward kinematic model as the product of two transformations. The first transformation calculates the non-contact kinematics of the robot and can be formulated based on the specific type of continuum robot under consideration. The second transformation calculates the tip deflection due to applied forces and is efficiently computed using the special Cosserat rod model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the two transformations are used to solve for the actuator positions that deform the manipulator so as to generate the required tip force at the measured tip position. The efficacy of the proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally on a concentric-tube continuum robot.

  15. Non-contact ultrasonic defect imaging in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenoudji, F. Cohen; Citerne, J. M.; Dutilleul, H.; Busquet, D.

    2016-02-01

    In the situations where conventional NDT ultrasonic techniques using immersion of the part under inspection or its contact with the transducers cannot be used, in-air investigation presents an alternative. The huge impedance mismatch between the part material and air (transmission loss in the order of 80 dB for a thin metallic plate) induces having to deal very small signals and unfavorable signal to noise ratios. The approach adopted here is the use of the crack of a spark generated by an induction coil as a sound source and an electrostatic polyethylene membrane microphone as a receiver [1]. The advantage of this source is that the spark power is high (several kilowatts) and its power is directly coupled to air during the energy release. In some difficult situations, an elliptical mirror is used to concentrate the sound beam power on the surface of the part [2,3]. Stability and reproducibility of the sound generated by the spark, which are a necessity in order to perform quantitative evaluations, are achieved in our experiment. This permits also an increase of the signal to noise ratio by signal accumulation. The sound pulse duration of few microseconds allows operating in pulse echo in some circumstances. The bandwidth of the source is large, of several hundred of kilohertz, and that of the microphone above 100 kHz allow the flexibility to address different kinds of materials. The technique allows an easy, in-air, non contact, inspection of structural composite parts, with pulse waves, with an excellent signal to noise ratio. An X-Y ultrasonic scanning ultrasonic system for material inspection using this technique has been realized. Results obtained in transmission and reflection are presented. Defects in carbon composite plates and in honeycomb are imaged in transmission Echographic measurements show that defect detection can be performed in thin plates using Lamb waves propagation when only one sided inspection of the part is possible.

  16. Non-contact method for characterization of a rotational table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M.; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) uses and evaluates a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircraft. The primary head tracker technologies commercially available are magnetic trackers, inertial trackers, and optical trackers. Each head tracker has a unique method of determining the pilot's head position within the cockpit of the aircraft. Magnetic trackers generally have a small head mounted size and minimal head weight. Because they sense a generated magnetic field, their accuracy can be affected by other magnetic fields or ferrous components within the cockpit. Inertial trackers cover the entire head motion box but require constant motion in order to accommodate drifting of the inertial sensors or a secondary system that updates the inertial system, often referred to as a hybrid system. Although optical head trackers (OHT) are immune to magnetic fields some of their limitations may be daylight/night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility issues and, depending on system configuration, may require numerous emitters and/or receivers to cover a large head motion box and provide a wide field of regard. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure azimuth rotation in both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of determining the accuracy of a variety of head trackers. Before the DTTF could be used as an evaluation tool, it required characterization to determine the amount and location of any induced elevation or roll as the table rotated in azimuth. Optimally, the characterization method would not affect the DTTF's movement so a non-contact method was devised. This paper describes the characterization process and its results.

  17. Single-molecule measurement of the stiffness of the rigor myosin head.

    PubMed

    Lewalle, Alexandre; Steffen, Walter; Stevenson, Olivia; Ouyang, Zhenqian; Sleep, John

    2008-03-15

    The force-extension curve of single myosin subfragment-1 molecules, interacting in the rigor state with an actin filament, has been investigated at low [ATP] by applying a slow triangle-wave movement to the optical traps holding a bead-actin-bead dumbbell. In combination with a measurement of the overall stiffness of the dumbbell, this allowed characterization of the three extensible elements, the actin-bead links and the myosin. Simultaneously, another method, based on an analysis of bead position covariance, gave satisfactory agreement. The mean covariance-based estimate for the myosin stiffness was 1.79 pN/nm (SD = 0.7 pN/nm; SE = 0.06 pN/nm (n = 166 myosin molecules)), consistent with a recent report (1.7 pN/nm) from rabbit muscle fibers. In the triangle-wave protocol, the motion of the trapped beads during interactions was linear within experimental error over the physiological range of force applied to myosin (+/-10 pN), consistent with a Hookean model; any nonlinear terms could not be characterized. Bound states subjected to forces that resisted the working stroke (i.e., positive forces) detached at a significantly lower force than when subjected to negative forces, which is indicative of a strain-dependent dissociation rate.

  18. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.; Franz, R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology is to artificially orbit the center of rotation of an impeller enclosed within a volute over a range of frequencies from zero to synchronous and to measure the resulting forces on the impeller. Preliminary data from the first stage experiments in which the shaft is orbited at low frequency is reported. Steady volute forces along with stiffness matrices due to the change in position of the rotor center are measured. Static pressure taps around the volute are used to obtain volute pressure distributions for various fixed positions of the impeller center and for various flow rates. Static pressure forces are calculated from these pressure distributions allowing a more complete analysis of the components of the impeller forces. Comparison is made with various existing theoretical and experimental results.

  19. Non-Contact Measurement of the Spectral Emissivity through Active/Passive Synergy of CO2 Laser at 10.6 µm and 102F FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren-Hua; Su, Hong-Bo; Tian, Jing; Mi, Su-Juan; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the inversion of land surface temperature (LST) from satellite data, obtaining the information on land surface emissivity is most challenging. How to solve both the emissivity and the LST from the underdetermined equations for thermal infrared radiation is a hot research topic related to quantitative thermal infrared remote sensing. The academic research and practical applications based on the temperature-emissivity retrieval algorithms show that directly measuring the emissivity of objects at a fixed thermal infrared waveband is an important way to close the underdetermined equations for thermal infrared radiation. Based on the prior research results of both the authors and others, this paper proposes a new approach of obtaining the spectral emissivity of the object at 8–14 µm with a single-band CO2 laser at 10.6 µm and a 102F FTIR spectrometer. Through experiments, the spectral emissivity of several key samples, including aluminum plate, iron plate, copper plate, marble plate, rubber sheet, and paper board, at 8–14 µm is obtained, and the measured data are basically consistent with the hemispherical emissivity measurement by a Nicolet iS10 FTIR spectrometer for the same objects. For the rough surface of materials, such as marble and rusty iron, the RMSE of emissivity is below 0.05. The differences in the field of view angle and in the measuring direction between the Nicolet FTIR method and the method proposed in the paper, and the heterogeneity in the degree of oxidation, polishing and composition of the samples, are the main reasons for the differences of the emissivities between the two methods. PMID:27347964

  20. Intracardiac Echocardiography (ICE) Measurement of Dynamic Myocardial Stiffness with Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Goswami, Robi; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based methods have been demonstrated to be a viable tool for noninvasively estimating tissue elastic properties, and shear wave velocimetry has been used to quantitatively measure the stiffening and relaxation of myocardial tissue in open-chest experiments. Dynamic stiffness metrics may prove to be indicators for certain cardiac diseases, but a clinically-viable means of remotely generating and tracking transverse wave propagation in myocardium is needed. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter-tip transducers are demonstrated here as a viable tool for making this measurement. ICE probes achieve favorable proximity to the myocardium, enabling the use of shear wave velocimetry from within the right ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. This work describes the techniques used to overcome the challenges of using a small probe to perform ARF-driven shear wave velocimetry, and presents in vivo porcine data showing the effectiveness of this method in the interventricular septum. Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based methods have been demonstrated to be a viable tool for noninvasively estimating tissue elastic properties, and shear wave velocimetry has been used to quantitatively measure the stiffening and relaxation of myocardial tissue in open-chest experiments. Dynamic stiffness metrics may prove to be indicators for certain cardiac diseases, but a clinically-viable means of remotely generating and tracking transverse wave propagation in myocardium is needed. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter-tip transducers are demonstrated here as a viable tool for making this measurement. ICE probes achieve favorable proximity to the myocardium, enabling the use of shear wave velocimetry from within the right ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. This work describes the techniques used to overcome the challenges of using a small probe to perform ARF-driven shear wave velocimetry, and presents in vivo porcine data showing the

  1. Design of a quasi-zero-stiffness based sensor system for the measurement of absolute vibration displacement of moving platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xingjian; Wang, Yu; Li, Quankun; Sun, Xiuting

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the analysis and design of a novel sensor system for measuring the absolute vibration displacement of moving platforms based on the concept of quasi-zero-stiffness (QZS). The sensor system is constructed using positive- and negative-stiffness springs, which make it possible to achieve an equivalent QZS and consequently to create a broadband vibration-free point for absolute vibration displacement measurement in moving platforms. Theoretical analysis is conducted for the analysis and design of the influence of structure parameters on system measurement performance. A prototype is designed which can avoid the drawback of instability in existing QZS systems with negative stiffness, and corresponding data-processing software is developed to fulfill time domain measurements. Both the simulation and experimental results verify the effectiveness of this novel sensor system.

  2. Simulation Test System of Non-Contact D-dot Voltage Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Jingang; Luo, Ruixi; Gao, Can; Songnong, Li; Kongjun, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    The development trend of future voltage transformer in smart grid is non-contact measurement, miniaturization and intellectualization. This paper proposes one simulation test system of non-contact D-dot transformer for voltage measurement. This simulation test system consists of D-dot transformer, signal processing circuit and ground PC port. D-dot transformer realizes the indirect voltage measurement by measuring the change rate of electric displacement vector, a non-contact means (He et al. 2004, Principles and experiments of voltage transformer based on self-integrating D-dot probe. Proc CSEE 2014;15:2445-51). Specific to the characteristics of D-dot transformer signals, signal processing circuits with strong resistance to interference and distortion-free amplified sensor output signal are designed. WIFI wireless network is used to transmit the voltage detection to LabVIEW-based ground collection port and LabVIEW technology is adopted for signal reception, data processing and analysis and other functions. Finally, a test platform is established to simulate the performance of the whole test system of single-phase voltage transformer. Test results indicate that this voltage transformer has sound real-time performance, high accuracy and fast response speed and the simulation test system is stable and reliable and can be a new prototype of voltage transformers.

  3. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  4. Non-contact fluid characterization in containers using ultrasonic waves

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-15

    Apparatus and method for non-contact (stand-off) ultrasonic determination of certain characteristics of fluids in containers or pipes are described. A combination of swept frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), wide-bandwidth, air-coupled acoustic transducers, narrowband frequency data acquisition, and data conversion from the frequency domain to the time domain, if required, permits meaningful information to be extracted from such fluids.

  5. Analysis of non-contact acousto-thermal signature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criner, Amanda K.; Schehl, Norman

    2016-02-01

    The non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) is a nondestructive evaluation technique with potential to detect fatigue in materials such as noisy titanium and polymer matrix composites. The determination of underlying physical mechanisms and properties may be determined by parameter estimation via nonlinear regression. The nonlinear regression analysis formulation, including the underlying models, is discussed. Several models and associated data analyses are given along with the assumptions implicit in the underlying model. The results of these analyses are discussed.

  6. Force Spectroscopy with Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers: Molecular Stiffness Measurements and Coupled Fluctuations Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. PMID:23199920

  7. Feasibility and repeatability for in vivo measurements of stiffness gradients in the canine gastrocnemius tendon using an acoustoelastic strain gauge

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Michelle; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Delaney, Fern; Danielson, Kelson; Vanderby, Ray; Muir, Peter; Forrest, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    B-mode ultrasound is an established imaging modality for evaluating canine tendon injury. However, full extent of tendon injury often remains difficult to estimate, as small changes in sonographic appearance are associated with large changes in biomechanical strength. The acoustoelastic strain gauge (ASG) is an ultrasound-based tissue evaluation technique that relates the change in echo intensity observed during relaxation or stretching of tendons to the tissue’s mechanical properties. This technique deduces stiffness gradient (the rate of change of normalized stiffness as a function of tissue strain) by analyzing the ultrasound dynamic images captured from gradually deforming tissue. Acoustoelastic strain gauge has been proven to accurately model strain and stiffness within tendons in vitro. To determine the feasibility and repeatability for in vivo ASG measurements of canine tendon function, stiffness gradients for the gastrocnemius tendons of ten clinically normal dogs were recorded by two non-independent observers at three sites (musculotendinous junction, mid tendon, and insertion). Average stiffness gradient indices (0.0132, 0.0141, 0.0136) and dispersion values (0.0053, 0.0054, 0.0057) for each site, respectively, were consistent with published mechanical properties for normal canine tendon. Mean differences of the average stiffness gradient index and dispersion value between observers and between limbs for each site were less than 16%. Using interclass coefficients (ICC), intraobserver (ICC 0.79–0.98) and interobserver (ICC 0.77–0.95) reproducibility was good to excellent. Right and left limb values were symmetric (ICC 0.74–0.92). Findings from this study indicated that ASG is a feasible and repeatable technique for measuring stiffness gradients in canine tendons. PMID:23663072

  8. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography and ultrasonography for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Lévesque, Daniel; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and ultrasonography (US) of biological tissues usually rely on ultrasonic transducers for the detection of ultrasound. For an optimum sensitivity, transducers require a physical contact with the tissue using a coupling fluid (water or gel). Such a contact is a major drawback in important potential applications such as surgical procedures on human beings and small animal imaging in research laboratories. On the other hand, laser ultrasonics (LU) is a well established optical technique for the non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound in industrial materials. In this paper, the remote optical detection scheme used in industrial LU is adapted to allow the detection of ultrasound in biological tissues while remaining below laser exposure safety limits. Both non-contact PAT (NCPAT) and non-contact US (NCUS) are considered experimentally using a high-power single-frequency detection laser emitting suitably shaped pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer in differential configuration. It is shown that an acceptable sensitivity is obtained while remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) of biological tissues. Results were obtained ex vivo on chicken breast specimens with embedded inclusions simulating blood vessels optical properties. Sub-mm inclusions are readily detected at depths approaching 1 cm. The method is expected to be applicable to living tissues.

  9. Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Shin Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Perioral biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyographic signals were sampled and characterized in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of medication state. Method: Passive perioral stiffness was sampled using the OroSTIFF system in 10 individuals with PD in a medication ON and a medication OFF state…

  10. A non-contact FBG vibration sensor with double differential temperature compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude; Zheng, Kai

    2016-02-01

    This paper has presented a non-contact fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibration sensor with double differential temperature compensation. Two FBGs and two states of the sensor have been employed to achieve double differential temperature compensation. Based on magnetic coupling and FBG sensing principle, it can be used to realize non-contact measurement of vibration of the rotating shaft. Experimental results show that the working band ranges are within 0-150 Hz; the sensitivity is -0.67 pm/µm, and the linearity is 3.87 % within a range of 2-2.6 mm. The fitting equation of temperature compensation which is caused by structural inflation can be expressed as: Δ λ 1' - Δ λ 2' = 1.51 × T - 32.97. When used to amend a temperature error, the sensor's temperature error will be reduced to 1.19 % in the range of 25-60 °C.

  11. Preliminary Test Results of a Non-Contacting Finger Seal on a Herringbone-Grooved Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Degado, Irebert R.

    2008-01-01

    Low leakage, non-contacting finger seals have potential to reduce gas turbine engine specific fuel consumption by 2 to 3 percent and to reduce direct operating costs by increasing the time between engine overhauls. A non-contacting finger seal with concentric lift-pads operating adjacent to a test rotor with herringbone grooves was statically tested at 300, 533, and 700 K inlet air temperatures at pressure differentials up to 576 kPa. Leakage flow factors were approximately 70 percent less than state-of-the-art labyrinth seals. Leakage rates are compared to first order predictions. Initial spin tests at 5000 rpm, 300 K inlet air temperature and pressure differentials to 241 kPa produced no measurable wear.

  12. Noninvasive pulse transit time measurement for arterial stiffness monitoring in microgravity.

    PubMed

    McCall, Corey; Rostosky, Rea; Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2015-01-01

    The use of a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor to estimate arterial stiffness, by measurement of pulse transit time (PTT), was demonstrated in microgravity. The monitor's utility for space applications was shown by establishing the correlation between ground-based and microgravity-based measurements. The system consists of a scale-based ballistocardiogram (BCG) and a toe-mounted photoplethysmogram (PPG). PTT was measured from the BCG I-wave to the intersecting tangents of the first trough and maximum first derivative of the PPG waveforms of each subject. The system was tested on a recent series of parabolic flights in which the PTT of nine subjects was measured on the ground and in microgravity. An average of 60.2 ms PTT increase from ground to microgravity environments was shown, and was consistent across all test subjects (standard deviation = 32.9 ms). This increase in PTT could be explained by a number of factors associated with microgravity and reported in previous research, including elimination of hydrostatic pressure, reduction of intrathoracic pressure, and reduction of mean arterial pressure induced by vasodilation.

  13. Evaluation of stiffness changes in a high-rise building by measurements of lateral displacements using GPS technology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Ill Soo; Park, Jae Hwan; Kim, Yousok; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-11-13

    The outrigger truss system is one of the most frequently used lateral load resisting structural systems. However, little research has been reported on the effect of installation of outrigger trusses on improvement of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building through full-scale measurements. In this paper, stiffness changes of a high-rise building due to installation of outrigger trusses have been evaluated by measuring lateral displacements using a global positioning system (GPS). To confirm the error range of the GPS measurement system used in the full-scale measurement tests, the GPS displacement monitoring system is investigated through a free vibration test of the experimental model. Then, for the evaluation of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building under construction, the GPS displacement monitoring system is applied to measurements of lateral displacements of a 66-story high-rise building before and after installation of outrigger truss. The stiffness improvement of the building before and after the installation is confirmed through the changes of the natural frequencies and the ratios of the base shear forces to the roof displacements.

  14. Evaluation of Stiffness Changes in a High-Rise Building by Measurements of Lateral Displacements Using GPS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Ill Soo; Park, Jae Hwan; Kim, Yousok; Sohn, Hong Gyoo; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    The outrigger truss system is one of the most frequently used lateral load resisting structural systems. However, little research has been reported on the effect of installation of outrigger trusses on improvement of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building through full-scale measurements. In this paper, stiffness changes of a high-rise building due to installation of outrigger trusses have been evaluated by measuring lateral displacements using a global positioning system (GPS). To confirm the error range of the GPS measurement system used in the full-scale measurement tests, the GPS displacement monitoring system is investigated through a free vibration test of the experimental model. Then, for the evaluation of lateral stiffness of a high-rise building under construction, the GPS displacement monitoring system is applied to measurements of lateral displacements of a 66-story high-rise building before and after installation of outrigger truss. The stiffness improvement of the building before and after the installation is confirmed through the changes of the natural frequencies and the ratios of the base shear forces to the roof displacements. PMID:24233025

  15. Multi-DOF rotor model based measurement of stiffness and damping for active magnetic bearing using multi-frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng; Chen, Liangliang; Qiao, Xiaoli

    2015-08-01

    To represent the support characteristic of active magnetic bearings (AMB), the commonly used parameters are the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping, which inherit the parameters of the stiffness and the damping from traditional mechanical bearings. First, by analyzing the diversity and the similarity between traditional mechanical bearing and AMB, the prior condition for applying the parametric representation of equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping to AMB is illuminated. Then, a method for measuring the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system is proposed with multi-frequency excitation. One of its outstanding features is that the proposed method is based on the multi-degree of freedom (DOF) rotor model, not the single- DOF model, because the single DOF model cannot be suitably applied to the multi-DOF AMB-rotor systems. Otherwise, in order to decrease the identification error, the multi-frequency excitation can achieve the lowest peak value by means of appropriate selection for the relative phasing of each component, so that the possibility of the rotor displacement exceeding clearances of AMB and the magnetic force reaching saturation is minimized. Finally, the experiments, which are carried out on an AMB-rotor test rig with a vertical shaft, indicate that the proposed method can efficiently reduce the peak value for the superimposed multi-frequency excitation and correctly identify the equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system.

  16. OLAM: A wearable, non-contact sensor for continuous heart-rate and activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Albright, Ryan K; Goska, Benjamin J; Hagen, Tory M; Chi, Mike Y; Cauwenberghs, G; Chiang, Patrick Y

    2011-01-01

    A wearable, multi-modal sensor is presented that can non-invasively monitor a patient's activity level and heart function concurrently for more than a week. The 4 in(2) sensor incorporates both a non-contact heartrate sensor and a 5-axis inertial measurement unit (IMU), allowing simultaneous heart, respiration, and movement monitoring without requiring physical contact with the skin [1]. Hence, this Oregon State University Life and Activity Monitor (OLAM) provides the unique opportunity to combine motion data with heart-rate information, enabling assessment of actual physical activity beyond conventional movement sensors. OLAM also provides a unique platform for non-contact sensing, enabling the filtering of movement artifacts generated by the non-contact capacitive interface, using the IMU data as a movement noise channel. Intended to be used in clinical trials for weeks at a time with no physician intervention, the OLAM allows continuous non-invasive monitoring of patients, providing the opportunity for long-term observation into a patient's physical activity and subtle longitudinal changes.

  17. Non-contact optoacoustic imaging by raster scanning a piezoelectric air-coupled transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Pang, Genny A.; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic techniques rely on ultrasound transmission between optical absorbers within tissues and the measurement location. Much like in echography, commonly used piezoelectric transducers require either direct contact with the tissue or through a liquid coupling medium. The contact nature of this detection approach then represents a disadvantage of standard optoacoustic systems with respect to other imaging modalities (including optical techniques) in applications where non-contact imaging is needed, e.g. in open surgeries or when burns or other lesions are present in the skin. Herein, non-contact optoacoustic imaging using raster-scanning of a spherically-focused piezoelectric air-coupled ultrasound transducer is demonstrated. When employing laser fluence levels not exceeding the maximal permissible human exposure, it is shown possible to attain detectable signals from objects as small as 1 mm having absorption properties representative of blood at near-infrared wavelengths with a relatively low number of averages. Optoacoustic images from vessel-mimicking tubes embedded in an agar phantom are further showcased. The initial results indicate that the air-coupled ultrasound detection approach can be potentially made suitable for non-contact biomedical imaging with optoacoustics.

  18. Applications of Optical Image Processing Technique for Steel Mill Non-contacting Conveyance System Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Yang, Yung-Yi; Lin, Sheng-Yang

    This paper is aimed to present the design and feasibility investigations of adopting the available on-site optical inspection system, which is commonly used for steel plate dimension measurement, to supply on-line dynamic gap measurements of a non-contacting conveyance structure in a steel mill. Adequate software and hardware implementations based on digital image processing techniques have been adapted to the entire system formulations and estimations. Results show that the system can supply accurate and rapid gap measurements and thus can fulfill the design and operational objectives.

  19. Measuring the bending stiffness of bacterial cells using an optical trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyuan; Arellano-Santoyo, Hugo; Combs, Peter A; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2010-04-26

    We developed a protocol to measure the bending rigidity of filamentous rod-shaped bacteria. Forces are applied with an optical trap, a microscopic three-dimensional spring made of light that is formed when a high-intensity laser beam is focused to a very small spot by a microscope's objective lens. To bend a cell, we first bind live bacteria to a chemically-treated coverslip. As these cells grow, the middle of the cells remains bound to the coverslip but the growing ends are free of this restraint. By inducing filamentous growth with the drug cephalexin, we are able to identify cells in which one end of the cell was stuck to the surface while the other end remained unattached and susceptible to bending forces. A bending force is then applied with an optical trap by binding a polylysine-coated bead to the tip of a growing cell. Both the force and the displacement of the bead are recorded and the bending stiffness of the cell is the slope of this relationship.

  20. Leg stiffness in human running: Comparison of estimates derived from previously published models to direct kinematic-kinetic measures.

    PubMed

    Coleman, David R; Cannavan, Dale; Horne, Sara; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2012-07-26

    It is not presently clear whether mathematical models used to estimate leg stiffness during human running are valid. Therefore, leg stiffness during the braking phase of ground contact of running was calculated directly using synchronous kinematic (high-speed motion analysis) and kinetic (force platform) analysis, and compared to stiffness calculated using four previously published kinetic models. Nineteen well-trained male middle distance runners (age=21.1±4.1yr; VO(2max)=69.5±7.5mlO(2)kg(-1)min(-1)) completed a series of runs of increasing speed from 2.5 to 6.5ms(-1). Leg stiffness was calculated directly from kinetic-kinematic analysis using both vertical and horizontal forces to obtain the resultant force in the line of leg compression (Model 1). Values were also estimated using four previously published mathematical models where only force platform derived and anthropometric measures were required (Models 2-5; Morin et al., 2005, Morin et al., 2011, Blum et al., 2009, Farley et al., 1993, respectively). The greatest statistical similarity between leg stiffness values occurred with Models 1 and 2. The poorest similarity occurred when values from Model 4 were compared with Model 1. Analyses suggest that the poor correlation between Model 1 other models may have resulted from errors in the estimation in change in leg length during the braking phase. Previously published mathematical models did not provide accurate leg stiffness estimates, although Model 2, used by Morin et al. (2005), provided reasonable estimates that could be further improved by the removal of systematic error using a correction factor (K=1.0496K(Model2)).

  1. Comparison of contact and non-contact asphere surface metrology devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFisher, Scott; Fess, Edward M.

    2013-09-01

    Metrology of asphere surfaces is critical in the precision optics industry. Surface metrology serves as feedback into deterministic grinding and polishing platforms. Many different techniques and devices are used to qualify an asphere surface during fabrication. A contact profilometer is one of the most common measurement technologies used in asphere manufacturing. A profilometer uses a fine stylus to drag a diamond or ruby tip over the surface, resulting in a high resolution curved profile. Coordinate measuring machines (CMM) apply a similar concept by touching the optic with a ruby or silicon carbine sphere. A CMM is able to move in three dimensions while collecting data points along the asphere surface. Optical interferometers use a helium-neon laser with transmission spheres to compare a reflected wavefront from an asphere surface to a reference spherical wavefront. Large departure aspheres can be measured when a computer generated hologram (CGH) is introduced between the interferometer and the optic. OptiPro Systems has developed a non-contact CMM called UltraSurf. It utilizes a single point non-contact sensor, and high accuracy air bearings. Several different commercial non-contact sensors have been integrated, allowing for the flexibility to measure a variety of surfaces and materials. Metrology of a sphere and an asphere using a profilometer, CMM, Interferometer with a CGH, and the UltraSurf will be presented. Cross-correlation of the measured surface error magnitude and shape will be demonstrated. Comparisons between the techniques and devices will be also presented with attention to accuracy, repeatability, and overall measurement time.

  2. Microfluidic acoustic trapping force and stiffness measurement using viscous drag effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that it was possible to individually trap 70μm droplets flowing within a 500μm wide microfluidic channel by a 24MHz single element piezo-composite focused transducer. In order to further develop this non-invasive approach as a microfluidic particle manipulation tool of high precision, the trapping force needs to be calibrated to a known force, i.e., viscous drag force arising from the fluid flow in the channel. However, few calibration studies based on fluid viscosity have been carried out with focused acoustic beams for moving objects in microfluidic environments. In this paper, the acoustic trapping force (F(trapping)) and the trap stiffness (or compliance k) are experimentally determined for a streaming droplet in a microfluidic channel. F(trapping) is calibrated to viscous drag force produced from syringe pumps. Chebyshev-windowed chirp coded excitation sequences sweeping the frequency range from 18MHz to 30MHz is utilized to drive the transducer, enabling the beam transmission through the channel/fluid interface for interrogating the droplets inside the channel. The minimum force (F(min,trapping)) required for initially immobilizing drifting droplets is determined as a function of pulse repetition frequency (PRF), duty factor (DTF), and input voltage amplitude (V(in)) to the transducer. At PRF=0.1kHz and DTF=30%, F(min,trapping) is increased from 2.2nN for V(in)=22V(pp) to 3.8nN for V(in)=54V(pp). With a fixed V(in)=54V(pp) and DTF=30%, F(min,trapping) can be varied from 3.8nN at PRF=0.1kHz to 6.7nN at PRF=0.5kHz. These findings indicate that both higher driving voltage and more frequent beam transmission yield stronger traps for holding droplets in motion. The stiffness k can be estimated through linear regression by measuring the trapping force (F(trapping)) corresponding to the displacement (x) of a droplet from the trap center. By plotting F(trapping) - x curves for certain values of V(in) (22/38/54V(pp)) at DTF=10% and

  3. Non-contact displacement estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaomeng; Singh, Aditya; Yavari, Ehsan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Non-contact Doppler radar has been used extensively for detection of physiological motion. Most of the results published to date have been focused on estimation of the physiological rates, such as respiratory rate and heart rate, with CW and modulated waveforms in various settings. Accurate assessment of chest displacement may take this type of monitoring to the new level, by enabling the estimation of associated cardiopulmonary volumes, and possibly pulse pressure. To obtain absolute chest displacement with highest precision, full nonlinear phase demodulation of the quadrature radar outputs must be performed. The accuracy of this type of demodulation is limited by the drifting received RF power, varying dc offset, and channel quadrature imbalance. In this paper we demonstrate that if relatively large motion is used to calibrate the system, smaller motion displacement may be acquired with the accuracy on the order of 30 µm.

  4. Preliminary results of non-contact THz imaging of cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Bajwa, Neha; Deng, Sophie; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel THz optical design that allows the acquisition of THz reflectivity maps of in vivo cornea without the need for a field flattening window and preliminary imaging results of in vivo rabbit cornea. The system's intended use is to sense small changes in corneal tissue water content (CTWC) that can be precursors for a host of diseases and pathologies. Unique beam optics allows the scanning of a curved surface at normal incidence while keeping the source detector and target stationary. Basic system design principles are discussed and image sets of spherical calibration targets and corneal phantom models are presented. The presented design will enable, for the first time, non-contact THz imaging of animal and human cornea.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging for non-contact analysis of forensic traces.

    PubMed

    Edelman, G J; Gaston, E; van Leeuwen, T G; Cullen, P J; Aalders, M C G

    2012-11-30

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy, to obtain both spatial and spectral information from a specimen. This technique enables investigators to analyze the chemical composition of traces and simultaneously visualize their spatial distribution. HSI offers significant potential for the detection, visualization, identification and age estimation of forensic traces. The rapid, non-destructive and non-contact features of HSI mark its suitability as an analytical tool for forensic science. This paper provides an overview of the principles, instrumentation and analytical techniques involved in hyperspectral imaging. We describe recent advances in HSI technology motivating forensic science applications, e.g. the development of portable and fast image acquisition systems. Reported forensic science applications are reviewed. Challenges are addressed, such as the analysis of traces on backgrounds encountered in casework, concluded by a summary of possible future applications.

  6. Effect of neighboring cells on cell stiffness measured by optical tweezers indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Coceano, Giovanna; Mariutti, Alberto; Ndoye, Fatou; Amin, Ladan; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the modification of mechanical properties of breast cancer cells when they get in contact with other neighboring cells of the same type. Optical tweezers vertical indentation was employed to investigate cell mechanics in isolated and contact conditions, by setting up stiffness as a marker. Two human breast cancer cell lines with different aggressiveness [MCF-7 (luminal breast cancer) and MDA-MB-231 (basal-like breast cancer)] and one normal immortalized breast cell line HBL-100 (normal and myoepithelial) were selected. We found that neighboring cells significantly alter cell stiffness: MDA-MB-231 becomes stiffer when in contact, while HBL-100 and MCF-7 exhibit softer character. Cell stiffness was probed at three cellular subregions: central (above nucleus), intermediate (cytoplasm), and near the leading edge. In an isolated condition, all cells showed a significant regional variation in stiffness: higher at the center and fading toward the leading edge. However, the regional variation becomes statistically insignificant when the cells were in contact with other neighboring cells. The proposed approach will contribute to understand the intriguing temporal sequential alterations in cancer cells during interaction with their surrounding microenvironment.

  7. Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Perioral biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyographic signals were sampled and characterized in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of medication state. Method Passive perioral stiffness was sampled using the OroSTIFF system in 10 individuals with PD in a medication ON and a medication OFF state and compared to 10 matched controls. Perioral stiffness, derived as the quotient of resultant force and interoral angle span, was modeled with regression techniques. Labial movement amplitudes and integrated electromyograms from select lip muscles were evaluated during syllable production using a 4-D computerized motion capture system. Results Multilevel regression modeling showed greater perioral stiffness in patients with PD, consistent with the clinical correlate of rigidity. In the medication-OFF state, individuals with PD manifested greater integrated electromyogram levels for the orbicularis oris inferior compared to controls, which increased further after consumption of levodopa. Conclusions This study illustrates the application of biomechanical, electrophysiological, and kinematic methods to better understand the pathophysiology of speech motor control in PD. PMID:25629806

  8. Vertical stiffness is not related to anterior cruciate ligament elongation in professional rugby union players

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Scarvell, Jennie M; Pickering, Mark R; Ball, Nick B; Perriman, Diana; Warmenhoven, John; Smith, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel research surrounding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is necessary because ACL injury rates have remained unchanged for several decades. An area of ACL risk mitigation which has not been well researched relates to vertical stiffness. The relationship between increased vertical stiffness and increased ground reaction force suggests that vertical stiffness may be related to ACL injury risk. However, given that increased dynamic knee joint stability has been shown to be associated with vertical stiffness, it is possible that modification of vertical stiffness could help to protect against injury. We aimed to determine whether vertical stiffness is related to measures known to load, or which represent loading of, the ACL. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study of 11 professional Australian rugby players. Knee kinematics and ACL elongation were measured from a 4-dimensional model of a hopping task which simulated the change of direction manoeuvre typically observed when non-contact ACL injury occurs. The model was generated from a CT scan of the participant's knee registered frame by frame to fluoroscopy images of the hopping task. Vertical stiffness was calculated from force plate data. Results There was no association found between vertical stiffness and anterior tibial translation (ATT) or ACL elongation (r=−0.05; p=0.89, and r=−0.07; p=0.83, respectively). ATT was related to ACL elongation (r=0.93; p=0.0001). Conclusions Vertical stiffness was not associated with ACL loading in this cohort of elite rugby players but a novel method for measuring ACL elongation in vivo was found to have good construct validity. PMID:27900192

  9. Assessing the small-strain soil stiffness for offshore wind turbines based on in situ seismic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteijlen, W. G.; van Dalen, K. N.; Metrikine, A. V.; Hamre, L.

    2014-06-01

    The fundamental natural frequency as measured on installed offshore wind turbines is significantly higher than its designed value, and it is expected that the explanation for this can be found in the currently adopted modeling of soil-structure interaction. The small-strain soil stiffness is an important design parameter, as it has a defining influence on the first natural frequency of these structures. In this contribution, in situ seismic measurements are used to derive the small-strain shear modulus of soil as input for 3D soil-structure interaction models to assess the initial soil stiffness at small strains for offshore wind turbine foundations. A linear elastic finite element model of a half-space of solids attached to a pile is used to derive an equivalent first mode shape of the foundation. The second model extends the first one by introducing contact elements between pile and soil, to take possible slip and gap-forming into account. The deflections derived with the 3D models are smaller than those derived with the p- y curve design code. This higher stiffness is in line with the higher measured natural frequencies. Finally a method is suggested to translate the response of 3D models into 1D engineering models of a beam laterally supported by uncoupled distributed springs.

  10. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Meyers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Thermal Characterization Test of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall thruster is being completed. This thruster is being developed to support of a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of this test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure Hall thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or harsh environment. To increase the accuracy of the measurement, a calibration array was implemented, and a pilot test was performed to determine key design parameters for the calibration array. The raw data is analyzed in conjunction with a simplified thermal model of the channel to account for reflection. The reduced data will be used to refine the thruster thermal model, which is critical to the verification of the thruster thermal specifications. The present paper will give an overview of the decision process that led to identification of the need for a non-contact temperature diagnostic, the development of said diagnostic, the measurement results, and the simplified thermal model of the channel.

  11. Neonatal non-contact respiratory monitoring based on real-time infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Monitoring of vital parameters is an important topic in neonatal daily care. Progress in computational intelligence and medical sensors has facilitated the development of smart bedside monitors that can integrate multiple parameters into a single monitoring system. This paper describes non-contact monitoring of neonatal vital signals based on infrared thermography as a new biomedical engineering application. One signal of clinical interest is the spontaneous respiration rate of the neonate. It will be shown that the respiration rate of neonates can be monitored based on analysis of the anterior naris (nostrils) temperature profile associated with the inspiration and expiration phases successively. Objective The aim of this study is to develop and investigate a new non-contact respiration monitoring modality for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using infrared thermography imaging. This development includes subsequent image processing (region of interest (ROI) detection) and optimization. Moreover, it includes further optimization of this non-contact respiration monitoring to be considered as physiological measurement inside NICU wards. Results Continuous wavelet transformation based on Debauches wavelet function was applied to detect the breathing signal within an image stream. Respiration was successfully monitored based on a 0.3°C to 0.5°C temperature difference between the inspiration and expiration phases. Conclusions Although this method has been applied to adults before, this is the first time it was used in a newborn infant population inside the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The promising results suggest to include this technology into advanced NICU monitors. PMID:22243660

  12. A non-contact time-domain scanning brain imaging system: first in-vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurenka, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Boso, G.; Contini, D.; Pifferi, A.; Dalla Mora, A.; Tosi, A.; Wabnitz, H.; Macdonald, R.

    2013-06-01

    We present results of first in-vivo tests of an optical non-contact scanning imaging system, intended to study oxidative metabolism related processes in biological tissue by means of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy. Our method is a novel realization of the short source-detector separation approach and based on a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode to detect late photons only. The scanning system is built in quasi-confocal configuration and utilizes polarizationsensitive detection. It scans an area of 4×4 cm2, recording images with 32×32 pixels, thus creating a high density of source-detector pairs. To test the system we performed a range of in vivo measurements of hemodynamic changes in several types of biological tissues, i.e. skin (Valsalva maneuver), muscle (venous and arterial occlusions) and brain (motor and cognitive tasks). Task-related changes in hemoglobin concentrations were clearly detected in skin and muscle. The brain activation shows weaker, but yet detectable changes. These changes were localized in pixels near the motor cortex area (C3). However, it was found that even very short hair substantially impairs the measurement. Thus the applicability of the scanner is limited to hairless parts of body. The results of our first in-vivo tests prove the feasibility of non-contact scanning imaging as a first step towards development of a prototype for biological tissue imaging for various medical applications.

  13. Development of Non-contact Respiratory Monitoring System for Newborn Using a FG Vision Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurami, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yushi; Natori, Michiya; Ohzeki, Kazuo; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    In recent years, development of neonatal care is strongly hoped, with increase of the low-birth-weight baby birth rate. Especially respiration of low-birth-weight baby is incertitude because central nerve and respiratory function is immature. Therefore, a low-birth-weight baby often causes a disease of respiration. In a NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit), neonatal respiration is monitored using cardio-respiratory monitor and pulse oximeter at all times. These contact-type sensors can measure respiratory rate and SpO2 (Saturation of Peripheral Oxygen). However, because a contact-type sensor might damage the newborn's skin, it is a real burden to monitor neonatal respiration. Therefore, we developed the respiratory monitoring system for newborn using a FG (Fiber Grating) vision sensor. FG vision sensor is an active stereo vision sensor, it is possible for non-contact 3D measurement. A respiratory waveform is calculated by detecting the vertical motion of the thoracic and abdominal region with respiration. We attempted clinical experiment in the NICU, and confirmed the accuracy of the obtained respiratory waveform was high. Non-contact respiratory monitoring of newborn using a FG vision sensor enabled the minimally invasive procedure.

  14. Non-contact tamper sensing by electronic means

    DOEpatents

    Gritton, Dale G.

    1993-01-01

    A tamper-sensing system for an electronic tag 10 which is to be fixed to a surface 11 of an article 12, the tamper-sensing system comprising a capacitor having two non-contacting, capacitively-coupled elements 16, 19. Fixing of the body to the article will establish a precise location of the capacitor elements 16 and 19 relative to each other. When interrogated, the tag will generate a tamper-sensing signal having a value which is a function of the amount of capacity of the capacitor elements. The precise relative location of the capacitor elements cannot be duplicated if the tag is removed and affixed to a surrogate article having a fiducial capacitor element 19 fixed thereto. A very small displacement, in the order of 2-10 microns, of the capacitor elements relative to each other if the tag body is removed and fixed to a surrogate article will result in the tamper-sensing signal having a different, and detectable, value when the tag is interrogated.

  15. Non-contact wearable single forearm cardiac biopotential acquisition device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Sérgio; Carneiro Martins, Raul

    2013-09-01

    In this work the authors propose a novel approach to obtain the electrocardiogram in the forearm using non-contact sensing. This new solution should be at same time portable, ergonomic and robust, enabling its use in different set of applications. A system of four electrodes was used in an adjustable sleeve to be wrapped in the forearm. No additional electrode references were used in other body parts. In order to increase the sensitivity of the system, an harmonium like approach was used in the design of the electrodes. The prototype was then compared with a similar system with a flat conformation. The developed prototype enabled the acquisition of an ECG signal in the forearm and the inclusion of the harmonium like electrode conformation resulted in a considerable increase of the sensitivity of the system. The acquired signal did not enable the identification of all characteristic cardiac waves. However, it was possible to identify clearly a signal pattern, characteristic of the QRS complex. The properties of the acquired signal restrict their use in rigorous electrocardiographic studies, allowing, however, its application in heart rate variability monitoring and biometric identification without the disadvantages usually associated with conventional electrodes. This makes it specially useful for man-machine interfaces and automated identification.

  16. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    DOEpatents

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  17. Non-contact ultrasonic guided wave inspection of rails: field test results and updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Stefano; Nguyen, Thompson V.; Zhu, Xuan; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood

    2015-04-01

    The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype using an ultrasonic air-coupled guided wave signal generation and air-coupled signal detection, paired with a real-time statistical analysis algorithm, has been realized. This system requires a specialized filtering approach based on electrical impedance matching due to the inherently poor signal-to-noise ratio of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements in rail steel. Various aspects of the prototype have been designed with the aid of numerical analyses. In particular, simulations of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in rails have been performed using a Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) algorithm. The system's operating parameters were selected based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide a quantitative manner to evaluate different detection performances based on the trade-off between detection rate and false positive rate. Results from the first field test of the non-contact air-coupled defect detection prototype conducted at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colorado, in October 2014 are presented and discussed in this paper. The results indicate that the prototype is able to detect internal cracks with high reliability.

  18. Theoretical and experimental research on a disk-type non-contact ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Jingquan; Chen, Di; Cai, Bingchu

    2006-07-01

    We developed a disk-type non-contact ultrasonic motor based on B22 vibration mode. The rotors of SU-8 photoresist are fabricated by the UV-LIGA process to control their shapes and thicknesses. So the structures of them are optimized by the experiments. It is found that the revolution speed of disk-type non-contact ultrasonic motor not only depends on the vibration amplitude of the stator, but also the weight and construction of the rotors. The maximum revolution speed of the optimal rotor is 3569 rpm at the input voltage of 20 V and the driving frequency of 45.6 kHz. The exciting principle of traveling wave is presented with theoretical equations. The electric signals applied to the piezoelectric ceramic are designed by the principle. The natural frequency and corresponding vibration mode are calculated and analyzed using finite element method. It is shown that experimental results are in good agreement with simulation, which verifies the effectiveness of the finite element model. Moreover, the levitation distance between the stator and rotor is measured by a CCD laser displacement transducer.

  19. Acoustic micro-tapping for non-contact 4D imaging of tissue elasticity.

    PubMed

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Pelivanov, Ivan; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-12-23

    Elastography plays a key role in characterizing soft media such as biological tissue. Although this technology has found widespread use in both clinical diagnostics and basic science research, nearly all methods require direct physical contact with the object of interest and can even be invasive. For a number of applications, such as diagnostic measurements on the anterior segment of the eye, physical contact is not desired and may even be prohibited. Here we present a fundamentally new approach to dynamic elastography using non-contact mechanical stimulation of soft media with precise spatial and temporal shaping. We call it acoustic micro-tapping (AμT) because it employs focused, air-coupled ultrasound to induce significant mechanical displacement at the boundary of a soft material using reflection-based radiation force. Combining it with high-speed, four-dimensional (three space dimensions plus time) phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography creates a non-contact tool for high-resolution and quantitative dynamic elastography of soft tissue at near real-time imaging rates. The overall approach is demonstrated in ex-vivo porcine cornea.

  20. Acoustic micro-tapping for non-contact 4D imaging of tissue elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Pelivanov, Ivan; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Elastography plays a key role in characterizing soft media such as biological tissue. Although this technology has found widespread use in both clinical diagnostics and basic science research, nearly all methods require direct physical contact with the object of interest and can even be invasive. For a number of applications, such as diagnostic measurements on the anterior segment of the eye, physical contact is not desired and may even be prohibited. Here we present a fundamentally new approach to dynamic elastography using non-contact mechanical stimulation of soft media with precise spatial and temporal shaping. We call it acoustic micro-tapping (AμT) because it employs focused, air-coupled ultrasound to induce significant mechanical displacement at the boundary of a soft material using reflection-based radiation force. Combining it with high-speed, four-dimensional (three space dimensions plus time) phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography creates a non-contact tool for high-resolution and quantitative dynamic elastography of soft tissue at near real-time imaging rates. The overall approach is demonstrated in ex-vivo porcine cornea. PMID:28008920

  1. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  2. Design of novel non-contact multimedia controller for disability by using visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Lo, Chi-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-12-01

    The design of a novel non-contact multimedia controller is proposed in this study. Nowadays, multimedia controllers are generally used by patients and nursing assistants in the hospital. Conventional multimedia controllers usually involve in manual operation or other physical movements. However, it is more difficult for the disabled patients to operate the conventional multimedia controller by themselves; they might totally depend on others. Different from other multimedia controllers, the proposed system provides a novel concept of controlling multimedia via visual stimuli, without manual operation. The disabled patients can easily operate the proposed multimedia system by focusing on the control icons of a visual stimulus device, where a commercial tablet is used as the visual stimulus device. Moreover, a wearable and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition device is also designed and implemented to easily monitor the user's EEG signals in daily life. Finally, the proposed system has been validated. The experimental result shows that the proposed system can effectively measure and extract the EEG feature related to visual stimuli, and its information transfer rate is also good. Therefore, the proposed non-contact multimedia controller exactly provides a good prototype of novel multimedia controlling scheme.

  3. Acoustic micro-tapping for non-contact 4D imaging of tissue elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Pelivanov, Ivan; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Elastography plays a key role in characterizing soft media such as biological tissue. Although this technology has found widespread use in both clinical diagnostics and basic science research, nearly all methods require direct physical contact with the object of interest and can even be invasive. For a number of applications, such as diagnostic measurements on the anterior segment of the eye, physical contact is not desired and may even be prohibited. Here we present a fundamentally new approach to dynamic elastography using non-contact mechanical stimulation of soft media with precise spatial and temporal shaping. We call it acoustic micro-tapping (AμT) because it employs focused, air-coupled ultrasound to induce significant mechanical displacement at the boundary of a soft material using reflection-based radiation force. Combining it with high-speed, four-dimensional (three space dimensions plus time) phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography creates a non-contact tool for high-resolution and quantitative dynamic elastography of soft tissue at near real-time imaging rates. The overall approach is demonstrated in ex-vivo porcine cornea.

  4. Two non-contact photoelectric angular position sensors for motion control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Xiaolu; Bo, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The angular position sensor can be integrated into most motion control applications where precision monitoring of angular position is required. In order to eliminate mechanical wear of present angular position sensors for determining the rotation orientation, two new non-contact methods utilizing photoelectric switches are proposed and the corresponding sensors are established. One sensor comprises a gravitational ball, one or more light sources and a circular array of photodetectors, and realizes angular position measurement by setting a block between the light source and the corresponding photodetector which is rotated to the lowest point. Another sensor consists of transmitter-receiver sets and an optical encoder. Different from traditional rotary encoder, the transmitter-receiver sets are arranged around the circumference of rotation, and the optical encoder is only one-turn encoder. The concrete configurations of the sensors are described in detail and typical prototypes are illustrated. Both the angular position sensors are non-contact, compact, and low-cost. They can resist harsh environmental conditions such as vibration, excessive ambient temperature, dirt, moisture and dew, so it is especially well-suited for motion control applications.

  5. Rye grass is associated with fewer non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries than bermuda grass

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, J; Chivers, I; Aldous, D; Bennell, K; Seward, H

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the contribution of ground variables including grass type to the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the Australian Football League (AFL), specifically which factors are primarily responsible for previously observed warm season and early season biases for ACL injuries. Methods: Grass types used at the major AFL venues from 1992 to 2004 were established by consultation with ground managers, and ground hardness and other weather variables were measured prospectively. Results: There were 115 ACL injuries occurring in matches during the survey time period, 88 with a non-contact mechanism. In multivariate analysis, use of bermuda (couch) grass as opposed to rye grass, higher grade of match, and earlier stage of the season were independent risk factors for non-contact ACL injury. Ground hardness readings did not show a significant association with ACL injury risk, whereas weather variables of high evaporation and low prior rainfall showed univariate association with injury risk but could not be entered into a logistic regression equation. Discussion: Rye grass appears to offer protection against ACL injury compared with bermuda (couch) grass fields. The likely mechanism is reduced "trapping" of football boots by less thatch. Grass species as a single consideration cannot fully explain the ACL early season bias, but is probably responsible for the warm season bias seen in the AFL. Weather variables previously identified as predictors are probably markers for predominance of bermuda over rye grass in mixed fields. PMID:16183765

  6. Non-contact Breath Motion Monitor ing System in Full Automation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Isao; Nakajima, Masato

    2005-01-01

    It is said that sleep apnea syndrome is one of the main causes of airplane, train and car accidents. We have developed a non-contact breathing measurement system which diagnoses not only sleep apnea syndrome but also other sleep disorders. This system calculates the amount of the volume change and makes the movement of the outside of the body by the breath motion visible. If the patient is breathing abnormally, we are able to recognize the appearance of abnormality at a glance and know the amount of the volume change in that location. To verify the amount of the volume change, we compare the amount of ventilation measured with a spirometer to the amount of volume change measured with this system. As a result, there is a high correlation in the amount of the volume change and the amount of ventilation in any sleeping position.

  7. Atomic force acoustic microscopy: Influence of the lateral contact stiffness on the elastic measurements.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ruiz, F J; Espinoza-Beltrán, F J; Diliegros-Godines, C J; Siqueiros, J M; Herrera-Gómez, A

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy is a dynamic technique where the resonances of a cantilever, that has its tip in contact with the sample, are used to quantify local elastic properties of surfaces. Since the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) monotonically increase with the tip-sample contact stiffness, they are used to evaluate the local elastic properties of the surfaces through a suitable contact mechanical model. The CRFs depends on both, normal and lateral contact stiffness, kN and kS respectively, where the last one is taken either as constant (kS<1), or as zero, leading to uncertainty in the estimation of the elastic properties of composite materials. In this work, resonance spectra for free and contact vibration were used in a finite element analysis of cantilevers to show the influence of kS in the resonance curves due to changes in the kS/kN ratio. These curves have regions for the different vibrational modes that are both, strongly and weakly dependent on kS, and they can be used in a selective manner to obtain a precise mapping of elastic properties.

  8. Study and Experiment on Non-Contact Voltage Sensor Suitable for Three-Phase Transmission Line.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiang; He, Wei; Xiao, Dongping; Li, Songnong; Zhou, Kongjun

    2015-12-30

    A voltage transformer, as voltage signal detection equipment, plays an important role in a power system. Presently, more and more electric power systems are adopting potential transformer and capacitance voltage transformers. Transformers are often large in volume and heavyweight, their insulation design is difficult, and an iron core or multi-grade capacitance voltage division structure is generally adopted. As a result, the detection accuracy of transformer is reduced, a huge phase difference exists between detection signal and voltage signal to be measured, and the detection signal cannot accurately and timely reflect the change of conductor voltage signal to be measured. By aiming at the current problems of electric transformation, based on electrostatic induction principle, this paper designed a non-contact voltage sensor and gained detection signal of the sensor through electrostatic coupling for the electric field generated by electric charges of the conductor to be measured. The insulation structure design of the sensor is simple and its volume is small; phase difference of sensor measurement is effectively reduced through optimization design of the electrode; and voltage division ratio and measurement accuracy are increased. The voltage sensor was tested on the experimental platform of simulating three-phase transmission line. According to the result, the designed non-contact voltage sensor can realize accurate and real-time measurement for the conductor voltage. It can be applied to online monitoring for the voltage of three-phase transmission line or three-phase distribution network line, which is in accordance with the development direction of the smart grid.

  9. Study and Experiment on Non-Contact Voltage Sensor Suitable for Three-Phase Transmission Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; He, Wei; Xiao, Dongping; Li, Songnong; Zhou, Kongjun

    2015-01-01

    A voltage transformer, as voltage signal detection equipment, plays an important role in a power system. Presently, more and more electric power systems are adopting potential transformer and capacitance voltage transformers. Transformers are often large in volume and heavyweight, their insulation design is difficult, and an iron core or multi-grade capacitance voltage division structure is generally adopted. As a result, the detection accuracy of transformer is reduced, a huge phase difference exists between detection signal and voltage signal to be measured, and the detection signal cannot accurately and timely reflect the change of conductor voltage signal to be measured. By aiming at the current problems of electric transformation, based on electrostatic induction principle, this paper designed a non-contact voltage sensor and gained detection signal of the sensor through electrostatic coupling for the electric field generated by electric charges of the conductor to be measured. The insulation structure design of the sensor is simple and its volume is small; phase difference of sensor measurement is effectively reduced through optimization design of the electrode; and voltage division ratio and measurement accuracy are increased. The voltage sensor was tested on the experimental platform of simulating three-phase transmission line. According to the result, the designed non-contact voltage sensor can realize accurate and real-time measurement for the conductor voltage. It can be applied to online monitoring for the voltage of three-phase transmission line or three-phase distribution network line, which is in accordance with the development direction of the smart grid. PMID:26729119

  10. Multi-dimensional, non-contact metrology using trilateration and high resolution FMCW ladar.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Ana Baselga; Barber, Zeb W

    2015-07-01

    Here we propose, describe, and provide experimental proof-of-concept demonstrations of a multidimensional, non-contact-length metrology system design based on high resolution (millimeter to sub-100 micron) frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) ladar and trilateration based on length measurements from multiple, optical fiber-connected transmitters. With an accurate FMCW ladar source, the trilateration-based design provides 3D resolution inherently independent of standoff range and allows self-calibration to provide flexible setup of a field system. A proof-of-concept experimental demonstration was performed using a highly stabilized, 2 THz bandwidth chirped laser source, two emitters, and one scanning emitter/receiver providing 1D surface profiles (2D metrology) of diffuse targets. The measured coordinate precision of <200 microns was determined to be limited by laser speckle issues caused by diffuse scattering of the targets.

  11. Non-contacting transfer of elastic energy into explosive simulants for dynamic property estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Greeney, Nathan S.; Strovink, Kurt M.; Scales, John A.; Jessop, Andrew M.; Stuart Bolton, J.; Watson, Christopher C.; Adams, Douglas E.

    2014-05-21

    Non-contacting acoustical methods can be used to extract various material properties of liquid or solid samples without disturbing the sample. These methods are useful even in the lab since they do not involve coupling anything to the sample, which might change its properties. A forteriori, when dealing with potentially dangerous materials, non-contacting methods may be the only safe solutions to mechanical characterization. Here, we show examples of using laser ultrasound to remotely insonify and monitor the elastic properties of several granular explosive simulants. The relatively short near-infrared laser pulse length (a few hundred nanoseconds) provides a broad-band thermoelastic source of ultrasound; we intentionally stay in the thermoelastic regime to avoid damaging the material. Then, we use a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the ultrasonic response of the sample. LDV technology is well established and very sensitive at ultrasonic frequencies; atomic level motions can be measured with modest averaging. The resulting impulse response of the explosive simulant can be analyzed to determine decay rates and wave speeds, with stiffer samples showing faster wave speeds and lower decay rates. On the other hand, at the low-frequency end of the acoustic spectrum, we use an electronically phased array to couple into a freely suspended sample's normal modes. This allows us to gently heat up the sample (3 °C in just under 5 min, as shown with a thermal IR camera). In addition to the practical interest in making the sample more chemically visible through heat, these two measurements (low-frequency resonant excitation vs high-frequency wave propagation) bracket the frequency range of acoustic non-destructive evaluation methods available.

  12. Comparing AFM cantilever stiffness measured using the thermal vibration and the improved thermal vibration methods with that of an SI traceable method based on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe; Gao, Sai; Engl, Wolfgang; Sulzbach, Thomas; Stahl, Stefan W.; Milles, Lukas F.; Nesterov, Vladimir; Li, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    PTB has developed a new contact based method for the traceable calibration of the normal stiffness of AFM cantilevers in the range from 0.03 N m‑1 to 300 N m‑1 to the SI units based on micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) actuators. This method is evaluated by comparing the measured cantilever stiffness with that measured by PTB’s new primary nanonewton force facility and by PTB’s microforce measuring device. The MEMS system was used to calibrate the stiffness of cantilevers in two case studies. One set of cantilevers for applications in biophysics was calibrated using the well-known thermal vibration method and the second set of cantilevers was calibrated by a cantilever manufacturer who applied an improved thermal vibration method based on calibrated reference cantilevers for the cantilever stiffness calibration. The comparison revealed a stiffness deviation of  +7.7% for the cantilevers calibrated using the thermal vibration method and a deviation of  +6.9% for the stiffnesses of the cantilevers calibrated using the improved thermal vibration method.

  13. Non-contact optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using a magneto-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; García, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we aim to experimentally verify a speckle based technique for non-contact measurement of glucose concentration in blood stream while the vision for the final device aims to contain a single wristwatch-style device containing an AC (alternating) electro-magnet generated by a solenoid, a laser and a camera. The experiments presented in work are performed in-vitro in order to verify the effects that are responsible for the operation principle. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an alternating magnetic field it exhibits Faraday rotation which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle patterns distribution. The temporal frequency resulting from the AC magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  14. Non-contact physiological signal detection using continuous wave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dengyu; He, Tan; Hu, Boping; Li, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show non-contact physiological signal monitoring system based on continuous-wave (CW) Doppler radar, which is becoming highly attractive in the field of health care monitoring of elderly people. Two radar signal processing methods were introduced in this paper: one to extract respiration and heart rates of a single person and the other to separate mixed respiration signals. To verify the validity of the methods, physiological signal is obtained from stationary human subjects using a CW Doppler radar unit. The sensor operating at 24 GHz is located 0.5 meter away from the subject. The simulation results show that the respiration and heart rates are clearly extracted, and the mixed respiration signals are successfully separated. Finally, reference respiration and heart rate signals are measured by an ECG monitor and compared with the results tracked by the CW Doppler radar monitoring system.

  15. Non-contact imaging of venous compliance in humans using an RGB camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Matsuda, Ryohei; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2015-04-01

    We propose a technique for non-contact imaging of venous compliance that uses the red, green, and blue (RGB) camera. Any change in blood concentration is estimated from an RGB image of the skin, and a regression formula is calculated from that change. Venous compliance is obtained from a differential form of the regression formula. In vivo experiments with human subjects confirmed that the proposed method does differentiate the venous compliances among individuals. In addition, the image of venous compliance is obtained by performing the above procedures for each pixel. Thus, we can measure venous compliance without physical contact with sensors and, from the resulting images, observe the spatial distribution of venous compliance, which correlates with the distribution of veins.

  16. Non-contact single shot elastography using line field low coherence holography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Schill, Alexander; Wu, Chen; Singh, Manmohan; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-01-01

    Optical elastic wave imaging is a powerful technique that can quantify local biomechanical properties of tissues. However, typically long acquisition times make this technique unfeasible for clinical use. Here, we demonstrate non-contact single shot elastographic holography using a line-field interferometer integrated with an air-pulse delivery system. The propagation of the air-pulse induced elastic wave was imaged in real time, and required a single excitation for a line-scan measurement. Results on tissue-mimicking phantoms and chicken breast muscle demonstrated the feasibility of this technique for accurate assessment of tissue biomechanical properties with an acquisition time of a few milliseconds using parallel acquisition. PMID:27570694

  17. Non-contact spectroscopic determination of large blood volume fractions in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Rolf H.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Laan, Nick; Amelink, Arjen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a non-contact method to quantitatively determine blood volume fractions in turbid media by reflectance spectroscopy in the VIS/NIR spectral wavelength range. This method will be used for spectral analysis of tissue with large absorption coefficients and assist in age determination of bruises and bloodstains. First, a phantom set was constructed to determine the effective photon path length as a function of μa and μs′ on phantoms with an albedo range: 0.02-0.99. Based on these measurements, an empirical model of the path length was established for phantoms with an albedo > 0.1. Next, this model was validated on whole blood mimicking phantoms, to determine the blood volume fractions ρ = 0.12-0.84 within the phantoms (r = 0.993; error < 10%). Finally, the model was proved applicable on cotton fabric phantoms. PMID:21339884

  18. Design and characteristics of a non-contact rotational sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li-dan; Li, Hong; Yao, Qi-feng; He, Wei; Zhu, Lian-qing

    2016-11-01

    We propose a novel non-contact rotational sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) packaged in a core of a magnetic head, which converts the introduced strain from the circular magnetic railings ruler into the rotational information. A mathematical model is built for processing the data obtained by an interrogator, and the accuracy and resolution of the measurements are analyzed by altering the radius and period of the circular magnetic railings ruler, as well as the dimension of the sensor. The experimental results show that it is in good accordance with the theoretical analysis on rotational angle, and the fitting results indicate that the results obtained from the rotational sensor match very well with the real rotational velocity with a linearity of 0.998 and a standard error of about 0.01.

  19. Knee Kinematics During Non-contact ACL Injury as Determined from Bone Bruise Location

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sophia Y.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Utturkar, Gangadhar M.; Toth, Alison P.; Garrett, William E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The motions causing non-contact ACL injury remain unclear. Tibiofemoral bone bruises are believed to be the result of joint impact near the time of ACL rupture. The locations and frequencies of these bone bruises have been reported, but there is limited data quantifying knee position and orientation near the time of injury based on these contusions. Hypothesis Knee position and orientation near the time of non-contact ACL injury include extension and anterior tibial translation. Study Design Descriptive Laboratory Study Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images of eight subjects with non-contact ACL injuries were acquired within one month of injury and subsequently analyzed. All subjects exhibited bruises on both the femur and tibia in both medial and lateral compartments. The outer margins of bone and the bone bruise surfaces were outlined on each image to create a 3D model of each subject’s knee in its position during MR imaging (MRI position). Numerical optimization was used to maximize overlap of the bone bruises on the femur and tibia and predict the position of injury. Flexion angle, valgus orientation, internal tibial rotation, and anterior tibial translation were measured in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury. Differences in kinematics between the MRI position, which served as an unloaded reference, and the predicted position of injury were compared using paired t-tests. Results Flexion angle was near full extension in both the MRI position and the predicted position of injury (8° versus 12°, p=0.2). Statistically significant increases in valgus orientation (5°, p=0.003), internal tibial rotation (15°, p=0.003), and anterior tibial translation (22mm, p<0.001) were observed in the predicted position of injury relative to the MRI position. Conclusions These results suggest that for the bone bruise pattern studied, landing on an extended knee is high risk for ACL injury. Extension was accompanied by increased anterior

  20. Detection of subclinical keratoconus through non-contact tonometry and the use of discriminant biomechanical functions.

    PubMed

    Peña-García, Pablo; Peris-Martínez, Cristina; Abbouda, Alessandro; Ruiz-Moreno, José M

    2016-02-08

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a discriminant function departing from the biomechanical parameters provided by a non-contact tonometer (Corvis-ST, Oculus Optikgeräte, Wetzlar, Germany) to distinguish subclinical keratoconus from normal eyes. 212 eyes (120 patients) were divided in two groups: 184 healthy eyes of 92 patients aged 32.99 ± 7.85 (21-73 years) and 28 eyes of 28 patients aged 37.79 ± 14.21 (17-75 years) with subclinical keratoconus. The main outcome measures were age, sex, intraocular pressure (IOP), corneal central thickness (CCT) and other specific biomechanical parameters provided by the tonometer. Correlations between all biomechanical parameters and the rest of variables were evaluated. The biomechanical measures were corrected in IOP and CCT (since these variable are not directly related with the corneal structure and biomechanical behavior) to warrant an accurate comparison between both types of eyes. Two discriminant functions were created from the set of corrected variables. The best discriminant function created depended on three parameters: maximum Deformation Amplitude (corrected in IOP and CCT), First Applanation time (corrected in CCT) and CCT. Statistically significant differences were found between groups for this function (p=2·10(-10); Mann-Withney test). The area under the Receiving Operating Characteristic was 0.893 ± 0.028 (95% confidence interval 0.838-0.949). Sensitivity and specificity were 85.7% and 82.07% respectively. These results show that the use of biomechanical parameters provided by non-contact tonometry, previous normalization, combined with the theory of discriminant functions is a useful tool for the detection of subclinical keratoconus.

  1. Thermal screening of facial skin arterial hot spots using non-contact infrared radiometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, E M; Heusch, A I; McCarthy, P W

    2008-03-01

    Non-contact infrared thermometry of facial skin offers advantages over less accessible internal body sites, especially when considering mass screening for febrile infectious disease. The forehead offers an obvious site, but does not present an isothermic surface, as various small arteries passing close to the surface create 'hot-spots'. The aim of this study is to use non-contact infrared (IR) thermometry to determine the link between the temperature at specific facial skin sites and clinical body temperature. A sample of 169 asymptomatic adults (age range 18-54 years) was screened with IR thermometers (Braun Thermoscan proLT for auditory meatus (AM) temperature representing clinical body temperature, and a Raytek, Raynger MX for skin surface temperature). Peak IR skin temperature was measured over the course of each posterior auricular artery (PAA) and each superficial temporal artery (STA). In a sub-group (n = 54) the peak skin temperature of the forehead's metopic region (MR) was also recorded. There were no differences (P > 0.05) between the PAA and STA at 34.2 +/- 0.9 degrees C and 34.2 +/- 0.7 degrees C, respectively, which were 2.5 degrees C cooler than the AM temperature (36.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C, p < 0.001). Although there was no correlation between AM and PAA or STA there was a correlation (r2 = 0.63, p < 0.001) between PAA and STA. There were no asymmetric temperature differences between the left and right sides and males had warmer skin over the MR (F, 33.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C versus M, 34.4 +/- 0.6 degrees C, p < 0.001). Although a lack of correlation between either PAA or STA and AM was apparent in asymptomatics, further research in symptomatics is required to determine the usefulness of these measurements in mass screening of conditions such as fever.

  2. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios.

  3. Design and Analyze a New Measuring Lift Device for Fin Stabilizers Using Stiffness Matrix of Euler-Bernoulli Beam.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lihua; Sun, Mingxiao; Shi, Hongyu; Luan, Tiantian

    2017-01-01

    Fin-angle feedback control is usually used in conventional fin stabilizers, and its actual anti-rolling effect is difficult to reach theoretical design requirements. Primarily, lift of control torque is a theoretical value calculated by static hydrodynamic characteristics of fin. However, hydrodynamic characteristics of fin are dynamic while fin is moving in waves. As a result, there is a large deviation between actual value and theoretical value of lift. Firstly, the reasons of deviation are analyzed theoretically, which could avoid a variety of interference factors and complex theoretical derivations. Secondly, a new device is designed for direct measurement of actual lift, which is composed of fin-shaft combined mechanism and sensors. This new device can make fin-shaft not only be the basic function of rotating fin, but also detect actual lift. Through analysis using stiffness matrix of Euler-Bernoulli beam, displacement of shaft-core end is measured instead of lift which is difficult to measure. Then quantitative relationship between lift and displacement is defined. Three main factors are analyzed with quantitative relationship. What is more, two installation modes of sensors and a removable shaft-end cover are proposed according to hydrodynamic characteristics of fin. Thus the new device contributes to maintenance and measurement. Lastly, the effectiveness and accuracy of device are verified by contrasting calculation and simulation on the basis of actual design parameters. And the new measuring lift method can be proved to be effective through experiments. The new device is achieved from conventional fin stabilizers. Accordingly, the reliability of original equipment is inherited. The alteration of fin stabilizers is minor, which is suitable for engineering application. In addition, the flexural properties of fin-shaft are digitized with analysis of stiffness matrix. This method provides theoretical support for engineering application by carrying out finite

  4. Design and Analyze a New Measuring Lift Device for Fin Stabilizers Using Stiffness Matrix of Euler-Bernoulli Beam

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lihua; Sun, Mingxiao; Shi, Hongyu; Luan, Tiantian

    2017-01-01

    Fin-angle feedback control is usually used in conventional fin stabilizers, and its actual anti-rolling effect is difficult to reach theoretical design requirements. Primarily, lift of control torque is a theoretical value calculated by static hydrodynamic characteristics of fin. However, hydrodynamic characteristics of fin are dynamic while fin is moving in waves. As a result, there is a large deviation between actual value and theoretical value of lift. Firstly, the reasons of deviation are analyzed theoretically, which could avoid a variety of interference factors and complex theoretical derivations. Secondly, a new device is designed for direct measurement of actual lift, which is composed of fin-shaft combined mechanism and sensors. This new device can make fin-shaft not only be the basic function of rotating fin, but also detect actual lift. Through analysis using stiffness matrix of Euler-Bernoulli beam, displacement of shaft-core end is measured instead of lift which is difficult to measure. Then quantitative relationship between lift and displacement is defined. Three main factors are analyzed with quantitative relationship. What is more, two installation modes of sensors and a removable shaft-end cover are proposed according to hydrodynamic characteristics of fin. Thus the new device contributes to maintenance and measurement. Lastly, the effectiveness and accuracy of device are verified by contrasting calculation and simulation on the basis of actual design parameters. And the new measuring lift method can be proved to be effective through experiments. The new device is achieved from conventional fin stabilizers. Accordingly, the reliability of original equipment is inherited. The alteration of fin stabilizers is minor, which is suitable for engineering application. In addition, the flexural properties of fin-shaft are digitized with analysis of stiffness matrix. This method provides theoretical support for engineering application by carrying out finite

  5. A non-contact method for imaging the posterior chest using magnetic induction principles that allows to monitor pulmonary oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giirsoy, D.; Scharfetter, H.

    2010-04-01

    Real time monitoring of lung function is of particular importance for the patients who are in the intensive care unit, and thus spend long durations of time in a supine position. This kind of recumbent positioning of the patients gives rise to a markedly increased fluid accumulation in the posterior lung regions associated with the gravity dependency. In order to monitor the temporal behavior of the accumulation, we proposed a non-contact semi-tomography method which uses magnetic induction principles. In the proposed method, an eddy current density is induced within the dorsal tissues including the posterior lungs via the transmitter coils which are embedded into the patient bed, and the magnetic field strength is measured similarly using an array of sensor coils in a non-contact manner. For the assessment of the method, we used a patient specific, MRI-guided realistic chest model and presented the reconstructed time-differential images.

  6. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness. PMID:28216745

  7. Non-contact ultra-widefield retinal imaging of infants with suspected abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, I H; Barnes, J K; Fung, T H M; Elston, J S; Patel, C K

    2017-03-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to audit the use of non-contact ultra-widefield retinal imaging in infants with suspected abusive head trauma (AHT) using the Optos P200MA Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.Patients and methodsA retrospective, observational case series. Ten eyes of five consecutive infants (aged 1-15 months) with suspected (or in 1 case, known) AHT referred for an ophthalmological opinion were included. Each infant underwent non-contact ultra-widefield retinal imaging using the Optos P200MA scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Optos fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) was performed in one infant with oral sedation. The other four infants did not require sedation. The main outcome measure was the acquisition of a single, definitive ultra-widefield retinal image in each eye. Safety was audited by determining adverse changes in heart rate and oxygen saturations that required cessation of imaging.ResultsThe Optos P200MA ultra-widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscope acquired good quality retinal images in all infants. Documentation of acute, widespread retinal haemorrhages contributed to a diagnosis of AHT in three infants. Chronic pre-macular haemorrhage and macular schisis were documented by FFA in a fourth infant. The absence of retinal haemorrhages was documented in a fifth infant contributing to the exclusion of a diagnosis of AHT. There were no adverse safety signals in any infant in this series.ConclusionThe Optos P200MA ultra-widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscope appears safe to use in infants with suspected AHT, providing high-quality retinal images in a single frame without ocular contact. Optos P200MA may be used as alternative to RetCam to document retinal haemorrhages in stable infants with suspected AHT.

  8. Dynamic vehicle-track interaction in switches and crossings and the influence of rail pad stiffness - field measurements and validation of a simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pålsson, Björn A.; Nielsen, Jens C. O.

    2015-06-01

    A model for simulation of dynamic interaction between a railway vehicle and a turnout (switch and crossing, S&C) is validated versus field measurements. In particular, the implementation and accuracy of viscously damped track models with different complexities are assessed. The validation data come from full-scale field measurements of dynamic track stiffness and wheel-rail contact forces in a demonstrator turnout that was installed as part of the INNOTRACK project with funding from the European Union Sixth Framework Programme. Vertical track stiffness at nominal wheel loads, in the frequency range up to 20 Hz, was measured using a rolling stiffness measurement vehicle (RSMV). Vertical and lateral wheel-rail contact forces were measured by an instrumented wheel set mounted in a freight car featuring Y25 bogies. The measurements were performed for traffic in both the through and diverging routes, and in the facing and trailing moves. The full set of test runs was repeated with different types of rail pad to investigate the influence of rail pad stiffness on track stiffness and contact forces. It is concluded that impact loads on the crossing can be reduced by using more resilient rail pads. To allow for vehicle dynamics simulations at low computational cost, the track models are discretised space-variant mass-spring-damper models that are moving with each wheel set of the vehicle model. Acceptable agreement between simulated and measured vertical contact forces at the crossing can be obtained when the standard GENSYS track model is extended with one ballast/subgrade mass under each rail. This model can be tuned to capture the large phase delay in dynamic track stiffness at low frequencies, as measured by the RSMV, while remaining sufficiently resilient at higher frequencies.

  9. A Study of a Handrim-Activated Power-Assist Wheelchair Based on a Non-Contact Torque Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Tae; Jang, Dae-Jin; Kim, Yong Chol; Heo, Yoon; Hong, Eung-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Demand for wheelchairs is increasing with growing numbers of aged and disabled persons. Manual wheelchairs are the most commonly used assistive device for mobility because they are convenient to transport. Manual wheelchairs have several advantages but are not easy to use for the elderly or those who lack muscular strength. Therefore, handrim-activated power-assist wheelchairs (HAPAW) that can aid driving power with a motor by detecting user driving intentions through the handrim are being researched. This research will be on HAPAW that judge user driving intentions by using non-contact torque sensors. To deliver the desired motion, which is sensed from handrim rotation relative to a fixed controller, a new driving wheel mechanism is designed by applying a non-contact torque sensor, and corresponding torques are simulated. Torques are measured by a driving wheel prototype and compared with simulation results. The HAPAW prototype was developed using the wheels and a driving control algorithm that uses left and right input torques and time differences are used to check if the non-contact torque sensor can distinguish users’ driving intentions. Through this procedure, it was confirmed that the proposed sensor can be used effectively in HAPAW. PMID:27509508

  10. Multimodal system for non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography, and mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiss-Holzinger, E.; Brandstetter, M.; Langer, G.; Buchsbaum, A.; Burgholzer, P.; Lendl, B.; Berer, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a multimodal optical setup, allowing non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and non-contact mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic signals are generated using a Nd:YAG laser and a tunable quantum cascade laser for photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy, respectively. Photoacoustic signals are acquired by measuring the surface displacement of a specimen using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In the same fiber-optic network a spectral-domain OCT system is realized. Light from the photoacoustic detection laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber and the same objective is used for both imaging modalities. Light reflected from specimens is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. To allow fast non-contact PAI and OCT imaging the detection spot is scanned across the specimens' surface using a galvanometer scanner. As the same fiber-network and optical components are used for photoacoustic and OCT imaging the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically. Imaging is demonstrated on tissue mimicking and biological samples; spectral information is obtained for polystyrene and hemoglobin.

  11. Clinical accuracy of non-contact infrared thermometer from umbilical region in children: A new side.

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Gözmen, Salih; Keskin-Gözmen, Şükran; Aslan, Fatma; Bayram, Nuri; Devrim, İlker

    2016-01-01

    Measurement from axillary site with digital thermometer has been accepted as the most accurate method. But this method is time consuming. Tympanic and forehead measurements are often used but don't always seem to be more appropriate. Another site, umbilical region, could be an alternative site. This study aims to compare the measurements with axillary digital thermometer and non-contact infrared thermometers at sites from umbilicus and forehead to determine whether umbilical site could be used accurately in children. For each method, 2,048 measurements in total were performed. Using axillary method as gold standard, with a cut-off temperature of 38oC, the sensitivities and specificities, positive and negative predictive values of umbilical and forehead temperatures and area under the ROC curve were determined in non obese children. There was a significant positive correlation between axillary and umbilical temperatures with a correlation coefficient of 0.78. The average difference between the mean of both axillary and umbilical temperatures was -0.47 ± 0.65°C. The Bland-Altman plot showed good accuracy with only 2.5 % of the readings falling outside the 95% level of confidence. Umbilical measurements showed sensitivity of 71.7% and specificity of 95.8%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93. The easy application may lead noncontact measurements from umbilicus site to be the preferable method for health care providers, but agreement limits mentioned in this study should be considered.

  12. A non-contact optical technique for vehicle tracking along bounded trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancola, S.; Giberti, H.; Sala, R.; Tarabini, M.; Cheli, F.; Garozzo, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring the non-controlled trajectory of a cart along a bounded rectilinear path. The method uses non-contact measurement devices to identify the position of a movable laser scanner working in helical mode in order to reconstruct the 3D model of bridges. The main idea of the proposed method is to use vision systems in order to identify the coordinates of the laser scanner placed on the cart with respect to the global reference system. A fit-to-purpose vision system has been implemented: the system uses three CCD's cameras mounted on the cart to identify the relative rotations with respect to the environment. Two lasers pointers and a laser distance meter are fixed at the starting point of the trajectory and pointing in the direction of motion of the cart, creating three dots on a plane placed on the cart. One of the camera detects the cart displacements and rotations in the plane using a blob analysis procedure. The method described in this paper has a constant uncertainty and the measurement range only depends on the lasers power. The theoretical accuracy of the measurement system is close to 1 mm for the translation along the motion direction and around 0.5 mm along the other two directions. Orientations measurement have a theoretical accuracy of less than 0.1 °. The solution has been implemented for the 3D reconstruction of concrete bridge; preliminary experimental results are presented and discussed.

  13. Stiff railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Bacon, J. L.; Weeks, D. A.; Zowarka, R. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stiff guns have been operated with both plasma and solid armatures. A performance gain was seen in the plasma railgun as stiffness was increased. A stiff gun will help to maintain the bore shape and preserve the integrity of the seam between rail and insulator under the extreme asymmetric loads sustained during high-pressure operation. The hydraulically preloaded moly and ceramic gun has been fired six times at pressures as high as 87 ksi, and the bore still holds roughing vacuum up to two hours after the test. The elimination of seam leakage helps control bore erosion associated with plasma reconstitution from the rail and plasma perturbation that might result in loss-initiating instabilities. Reduced rail deflection allows solid and transitioning armatures to track the bore surface. An analysis of the strain energy associated with the deflection of the railgun structure is presented, and this mechanism is found to be a small fraction of the energy associated with armature loss and the rail resistive loss.

  14. Handheld non-contact evaluation of fastener flushness and countersink surface profiles using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James H.; Wang, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We report the use of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for non-contact optical evaluation of fastener flushness and countersink surface profile. Using a handheld galvanometer scanner of only 0.5 lb in weight the SD-OCT can perform line scan surface profile measurement of fastener and countersink without demanding accurate scan center alignment. It demonstrates fast measurement of fastener flushness, radius, slant angle, as well as countersink edge radius and surface angle within 90 ms suitable for handheld operation. With the use of a broadband light source at 840 nm center wavelength and 45 nm spectral bandwidth and a lens of 60 mm focal length, the low coherence interferometry based SD-OCT measurement offers axial depth resolution of 8.5 μm, lateral resolution of 19 μm, and measurement depth of 3.65 mm in the air. Multi-line scans can yield 3D surface profiles of fastener and countersink.

  15. Non-contact, Label-free Monitoring of Cells and Extracellular Matrix using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Votteler, Miriam; Carvajal Berrio, Daniel A.; Pudlas, Marieke; Walles, Heike; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Non-destructive, non-contact and label-free technologies to monitor cell and tissue cultures are needed in the field of biomedical research.1-5 However, currently available routine methods require processing steps and alter sample integrity. Raman spectroscopy is a fast method that enables the measurement of biological samples without the need for further processing steps. This laser-based technology detects the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light.6 As every chemical vibration is assigned to a specific Raman band (wavenumber in cm-1), each biological sample features a typical spectral pattern due to their inherent biochemical composition.7-9 Within Raman spectra, the peak intensities correlate with the amount of the present molecular bonds.1 Similarities and differences of the spectral data sets can be detected by employing a multivariate analysis (e.g. principal component analysis (PCA)).10 Here, we perform Raman spectroscopy of living cells and native tissues. Cells are either seeded on glass bottom dishes or kept in suspension under normal cell culture conditions (37 °C, 5% CO2) before measurement. Native tissues are dissected and stored in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 4 °C prior measurements. Depending on our experimental set up, we then either focused on the cell nucleus or extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as elastin and collagen. For all studies, a minimum of 30 cells or 30 random points of interest within the ECM are measured. Data processing steps included background subtraction and normalization. PMID:22688496

  16. Using the Lomb periodogram for non-contact estimation of respiration rates.

    PubMed

    Vasu, V; Fox, N; Heneghan, C; Sezer, S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a contact-less method for measurement of respiration rate during sleep using a 5.8GHz radio-frequency bio-motion sensor. The sensor operates by sensing phase shifts in reflected radio waves from the torso caused by respiratory movements and other bodily movements such as twitches, positional changes etc. These non-respiratory motion artefacts can obscure reliable estimation of breathinig rates if conventional spectral analysis is used. This paper reports on the accuracy of the respiration rate estimates obtained via algorithmic approaches using Lomb-periodogram based analysis (which can deal with missing or corrupted data), as compared to conventional spectral analysis. Gold-standard respiration rates are derived by expert scoring of respiration rates measured through polysomnography (PSG) from sensors (Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography (RIP) belts) in contact with the subject in an accredited sleep laboratory. Specifically, respiration rates for 15-minute segments chosen from 10 subjects free of Sleep-Disorded Breathing (AHI〈5) were selected for analysis in this paper. Comparison to the expert annotation indicates strong agreement, with the Lomb-periodogram respiration rates with the average error between the measurements being less than 0.4 breaths/min and a standard deviation of 0.3 breaths/minute. Moreover, we showed that the proposed algorithm could track respiration rate over the complete night's recordings for those 10 subjects. We conclude that the non-contact biomotion sensor may provide a promising approach to continuous respiration rate monitoring of reasonable accuracy.

  17. Non-contact Thermoelectronic Imaging of Bi2Te3 and Ag Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymovych, Petro; Kelly, Simon; McGuire, Michale

    2014-03-01

    An outstanding challenge for nanoscale thermoelectrics is probing thermoelectronic processes at sub-10 nm length-scales. We will discuss our development of tunneling thermoelectric microscopy. We showed that tunneling thermovoltage can be decomposed into surface- and vacuum-originated contributions using a set of systematic tunneling spectroscopy measurements. The surface-specific term contains valuable information about electronic structure, in our case the surface-state enhancement of thermopower on silver and intrinsic band-bending on Bi2Te3 The vacuum-term provides a unique and direct approach to thermal gradient measurements in a nanojunction. We will also demonstrate the use of Landauer formalism to interpret non-contact thermoelectric measurements more systematically and accurately than with WKB-approximated analysis. SJ, PM: Research sponsored by the LDRD Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy. MM: Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. P. Maksymovych, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 31, 031804 (2013); S. J. Kelly et al, Nano Lett subm. (2013).

  18. Optical detection of nanometric thermal fluctuations to measure the stiffness of rigid superparamagnetic microrods.

    PubMed

    Gerbal, Fabien; Wang, Yuan

    2017-03-07

    The rigidity of numerous biological filaments and crafted microrods has been conveniently deduced from the analysis of their thermal fluctuations. However, the difficulty of measuring nanometric displacements with an optical microscope has so far limited such studies to sufficiently flexible rods, of which the persistence length ([Formula: see text]) rarely exceeds 1 m at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to probe 10-fold stiffer rods by a combination of superresolutive optical methods and a statistical analysis of the data based on a recent theoretical model that predicts the amplitude of the fluctuations at any location of the rod [Benetatos P, Frey E (2003) Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 67(5):051108]. Using this approach, we report measures of [Formula: see text] up to 0.5 km. We obtained these measurements on recently designed superparamagnetic [Formula: see text]40-[Formula: see text]m-long microrods containing iron-oxide nanoparticles connected by a polymer mesh. Using their magnetic properties, we provide an alternative proof of validity of these thermal measurements: For each individual studied rod, we performed a second measure of its rigidity by deflecting it with a uniform magnetic field. The agreement between the thermal and the magnetoelastic measures was realized with more than a decade of values of [Formula: see text] from 5.1 m to 129 m, corresponding to a bending modulus ranging from 2.2 to 54 (×[Formula: see text] Jm). Despite the apparent homogeneity of the analyzed microrods, their Young modulus follows a broad distribution from 1.9 MPa to 59 MPa and up to 200 MPa, depending on the size of the nanoparticles.

  19. A non-contacting instrument for direct stress mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, David E.

    An instrument called SPATE (stress pattern analysis by measurement of thermal emission) developed for noncontact measurements of stress in structures and components under cyclic load or vibration is described. The method is based on the phenomenon called the thermoelastic or Kelvin effect, whereby cyclic changes in the volume or pressure in a material produce cyclic temperature changes that are proportional to stress. The temperature changes measured by SPATE are totally reversible and are independent of heating due to material hysteresis damping. Two instrument was used to test structural materials including steels, aluminum alloys, a magnesium alloy, titanium, Nimonic 90, copper, brass, silicon nitride, Hylox 961, plexiglass, epoxy, polyester, rubber, Kevlar, wood, brick, concrete, 'live' bone, glass, boron, and various composites. The results of SPATE test on a stage-one turbine blade (tested at 9224 Hz) and a notched aluminum plate loaded in tension at 20 Hz are presented together with a diagram of the SPATE equipment.

  20. Non-contact ECG sensing employing gradiometer electrodes.

    PubMed

    Peng, GuoChen; Bocko, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Noncontact, capacitive electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements are complicated by motion artifacts from the relative movement between the ECG electrodes and the subject. To compensate for such motion we propose to employ first and second order gradiometer electrode designs. A MATLAB-based simulation tool to enable assessment of different electrode configurations and placements on human subjects has been developed to guide the refinement of electrode designs. Experimental measurements of the sensitivity, motion artifact cancellation, and common mode rejection for various prototype designs were conducted with human subjects. Second order gradiometer electrode designs appear to give the best performance as measured by signal to noise plus distortion ratio. Finally, both gradiometer designs were compared with standard ECG recording methods and showed less than 1% beat detection mismatch employing an open source beat detection algorithm.

  1. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nico F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Kilger, Robert; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  2. Beetle adhesive hairs differ in stiffness and stickiness: in vivo adhesion measurements on individual setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James M. R.; Federle, Walter

    2011-05-01

    Leaf beetles are able to climb on smooth and rough surfaces using arrays of micron-sized adhesive hairs (setae) of varying morphology. We report the first in vivo adhesive force measurements of individual setae in the beetle Gastrophysa viridula, using a smooth polystyrene substrate attached to a glass capillary micro-cantilever. The beetles possess three distinct adhesive pads on each leg which differ in function and setal morphology. Visualisation of pull-offs allowed forces to be measured for each tarsal hair type. Male discoidal hairs adhered with the highest forces (919 ± 104 nN, mean ± SE), followed by spatulate (582 ± 59 nN) and pointed (127 ± 19 nN) hairs. Discoidal hairs were stiffer in the normal direction (0.693 ± 0.111 N m-1) than spatulate (0.364 ± 0.039 N m-1) or pointed (0.192 ± 0.044 N m-1) hairs. The greater adhesion on smooth surfaces and the higher stability of discoidal hairs help male beetles to achieve strong adhesion on the elytra of females during copulation. A comparison of pull-off forces measured for single setae and whole pads (arrays) revealed comparable levels of adhesive stress. This suggests that beetles are able to achieve equal load sharing across their adhesive pads so that detachment through peeling is prevented.

  3. Non-contact thrust stand calibration method for repetitively pulsed electric thrusters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andrea R; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A; Pearson, J Boise

    2012-02-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoid to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasi-steady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or "zero" position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke's law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other. The overall error on the linear regression fit used to determine the calibration coefficient was roughly 1%.

  4. Non-contact assessment of melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is a pigment that is highly absorptive in the UV and visible electromagnetic spectra. It is responsible for perceived skin tone, and protects against harmful UV effects. Abnormal melanin distribution is often an indicator for melanoma. We propose a novel approach for non-contact melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding to estimate the two-dimensional melanin distribution based on its absorptive characteristics. In the proposed system, a novel multispectral, cross-polarized, temporally-coded illumination sequence is synchronized with a camera to measure reflectance under both multispectral and ambient illumination. This allows us to eliminate the ambient illumination contribution from the acquired reflectance measurements, and also to determine the melanin distribution in an observed region based on the spectral properties of melanin using the Beer-Lambert law. Using this information, melanin distribution maps can be generated for objective, quantitative assessment of skin type of individuals. We show that the melanin distribution map correctly identifies areas with high melanin densities (e.g., nevi).

  5. Full-field speckle interferometry for non-contact photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Jens; Spahr, Hendrik; Buj, Christian; Münter, Michael; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    A full-field speckle interferometry method for non-contact and prospectively high speed Photoacoustic Tomography is introduced and evaluated as proof of concept. Thermoelastic pressure induced changes of the objects topography are acquired in a repetitive mode without any physical contact to the object. In order to obtain high acquisition speed, the object surface is illuminated by laser pulses and imaged onto a high speed camera chip. In a repetitive triple pulse mode, surface displacements can be acquired with nanometre sensitivity and an adjustable sampling rate of e.g. 20 MHz with a total acquisition time far below one second using kHz repetition rate lasers. Due to recurring interferometric referencing, the method is insensitive to thermal drift of the object due to previous pulses or other motion. The size of the investigated area and the spatial and temporal resolution of the detection are scalable. In this study, the approach is validated by measuring a silicone phantom and a porcine skin phantom with embedded silicone absorbers. The reconstruction of the absorbers is presented in 2D and 3D. The sensitivity of the measurement with respect to the photoacoustic detection is discussed. Potentially, Photoacoustic Imaging can be brought a step closer towards non-anaesthetized in vivo imaging and new medical applications not allowing acoustic contact, such as neurosurgical monitoring or burnt skin investigation.

  6. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Myers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The thermal characterization test of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding has been completed. This thruster was developed to support a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of the preparation for this characterization test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure the temperature of various thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or plasma. An in-situ calibration array was incorporated into the setup to improve the accuracy of the temperature measurement. The key design parameters for the calibration array were determined in a separate pilot test. The raw data from the characterization test was analyzed though further work is needed to obtain accurate anode temperatures. Examination of the front pole and discharge channel temperatures showed that the thruster temperature was driven more by discharge voltage than by discharge power. Operation at lower discharge voltages also yielded more uniform temperature distributions than at higher discharge voltages. When operating at high discharge voltage, increasing the magnetic field strength appeared to have made the thermal loading azimuthally more uniform.

  7. Full-field speckle interferometry for non-contact photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Jens; Spahr, Hendrik; Buj, Christian; Münter, Michael; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    A full-field speckle interferometry method for non-contact and prospectively high speed Photoacoustic Tomography is introduced and evaluated as proof of concept. Thermoelastic pressure induced changes of the objects topography are acquired in a repetitive mode without any physical contact to the object. In order to obtain high acquisition speed, the object surface is illuminated by laser pulses and imaged onto a high speed camera chip. In a repetitive triple pulse mode, surface displacements can be acquired with nanometre sensitivity and an adjustable sampling rate of e.g. 20 MHz with a total acquisition time far below one second using kHz repetition rate lasers. Due to recurring interferometric referencing, the method is insensitive to thermal drift of the object due to previous pulses or other motion. The size of the investigated area and the spatial and temporal resolution of the detection are scalable. In this study, the approach is validated by measuring a silicone phantom and a porcine skin phantom with embedded silicone absorbers. The reconstruction of the absorbers is presented in 2D and 3D. The sensitivity of the measurement with respect to the photoacoustic detection is discussed. Potentially, Photoacoustic Imaging can be brought a step closer towards non-anaesthetized in vivo imaging and new medical applications not allowing acoustic contact, such as neurosurgical monitoring or burnt skin investigation.

  8. Localized non-contact manipulation using artificial bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyer, Kathrin E.; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2011-10-01

    Artificial bacterial flagella (ABFs) are swimming microrobots that mimic the propulsion method of bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. Microrobots have the potential to act as wireless manipulation tools for invitro applications. This paper investigates the micro-flows induced by ABFs for localized contact-free manipulation of micro-objects. The flow is simulated using the method of fundamental solutions and compared to experimental data where the tangential flow was measured by means of tracking polystyrene microbeads. Good agreement with the experimental data was found, and preliminary results show the contact-free rotation away from and the translation of micro-objects near a solid wall.

  9. Inverse measurement of stiffness by the normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric

    2012-06-07

    The single specimen normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness has been successfully employed by several researchers to study the strongly non-linear fracture response of ductile semicrystalline polymers. As part of the normalization technique the load and the plastic component of displacement are normalized. The normalized data is then fit with a normalization function that approximates a power law for small displacements that are dominated by blunting and smoothly transitions to a linear relationship for large displacements that are dominated by stable crack extension. Particularly for very ductile polymers the compliance term used to determine the plastic displacement can dominate the solution and small errors in determining the elastic modulus can lead to large errors in the normalization or even make it ill-posed. This can be further complicated for polymers where the elastic modulus is strong strain rate dependent and simply using a 'quasistatic' modulus from a dogbone measurement may not equate to the dominant strain rate in the compact tension specimen. The current work proposes directly measuring the compliance of the compact tension specimen in the solution of J-integral fracture toughness and then solving for the elastic modulus. By comparison with a range of strain rate data the dominant strain rate can then be determined.

  10. Simultaneous Non-Contact Precision Imaging of Microstructual and Thickness Variation in Dielectric Materials Using Terahertz Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. J.; Seebo, J. P.; Winfree, William P.

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a non-contact single-sided terahertz electromagnetic measurement and imaging method that simultaneously characterizes microstructural (e.g. spatially-lateral density) and thickness variation in dielectric (insulating) materials. The method was demonstrated for Space Shuttle External Tank sprayed-on foam insulation. It is believed that this method can be used for applications where microstructural and/or thickness variation in dielectric materials require precision mapping. Scale-up to more complex shapes such as cylindrical structures and structures with beveled regions would appear to be feasible.

  11. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  12. Air microjet system for non-contact force application and the actuation of micro-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, S. M.; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a non-contact technique to apply calibrated and localized forces in the micro-Newton to milli-Newton range using an air microjet. An electromagnetically actuated diaphragm controlled by a signal generator is used to generate the air microjet. With a nozzle diameter of 150 μm, the microjet diameter was maintained to a maximum of 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm from the nozzle. The force generated by the microjet was measured using a commercial force sensor to determine the velocity profile of the jet. Axial flow velocities of up to 25 m s-1 were obtained at distances as long as 6 mm. The microjet exerted a force up to 1 μN on a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) micropillar (50 μm in diameter, 157 μm in height) and 415 μN on a PDMS membrane (3 mm in diameter, 28 μm thick). We also demonstrate that from a distance of 6 mm our microjet can exert a peak pressure of 187 Pa with a total force of about 84 μN on a flat surface with 8 V operating voltage. Out of the cleanroom fabrication and robust design make this system cost effective and durable.

  13. Novel non-contact control system of electric bed for medical healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2017-03-01

    A novel non-contact controller of the electric bed for medical healthcare was proposed in this study. Nowadays, the electric beds are widely used for hospitals and home-care, and the conventional control method of the electric beds usually involves in the manual operation. However, it is more difficult for the disabled and bedridden patients, who might totally depend on others, to operate the conventional electric beds by themselves. Different from the current controlling method, the proposed system provides a new concept of controlling the electric bed via visual stimuli, without manual operation. The disabled patients could operate the electric bed by focusing on the control icons of a visual stimulus tablet in the proposed system. Besides, a wearable and wireless EEG acquisition module was also implemented to monitor the EEG signals of patients. The experimental results showed that the proposed system successfully measured and extracted the EEG features related to visual stimuli, and the disabled patients could operate the adjustable function of the electric bed by themselves to effectively reduce the long-term care burden.

  14. Development of nondestructive non-contact acousto-thermal evaluation technique for damage detection in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Welter, John T.; Jata, Kumar V.; Schehl, Norman; Boehnlein, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a new non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) nondestructive evaluation technique. The physical basis of the method is the measurement of the efficiency of the material to convert acoustic energy into heat, and a theoretical model has been used to evaluate this. The increase in temperature due to conversion of acoustic energy injected into the material without direct contact was found to depend on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. In addition, it depends on the experimental parameters of the acoustic source power, the distance between sample and acoustic source, and the period of acoustic excitation. Systematic experimental approaches to optimize each of the experimental variables to maximize the observed temperature changes are described. The potential of the NCATS technique to detect microstructural-level changes in materials is demonstrated by evaluating accumulated damage due to plasticity in Ti-6Al-4V and low level thermal damage in polymer matrix composites. The ability of the technique for macroscopic applications in nondestructive evaluation is demonstrated by imaging a crack in an aluminum test sample.

  15. Non-contact magnetic coupled power and data transferring system for an electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Sakamoto, H.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a system which transmits electric power and communication data simultaneously in a non-contact method using a magnetic coupling coil. Already, we are developing the fundamental technology of a non-contact charging system, and this is applied in electric shavers, electric toothbrushes, etc. Moreover, basic experiments are being conducted for applying this non-contact charging system to electric equipments such as an electric vehicle (EV), which is a zero emission vehicle and environmentally excellent and will be the transportation means of the next generation. The technology can also be applied in other electronic equipment, etc. However, since the power supply route for these individual devices is independent, the supply system is complicated. EV also has to perform the transmission of electric power and the transmission of information (data), such as the amount of the charge, in a separate system, and thus is quite complicated. In this study, by performing simultaneously the transmission of electric power and information (data) using magnetic coupling technology in which it does not contact, the basic experiment aimed at attaining and making unification of a system simple was conducted, and the following good results were obtained: (1) Electric power required for load can be transmitted easily by non-contact. (2) A signal can easily be transmitted bidirectionally by non-contact. (3) This system is reliable, and is widely applicable.

  16. Energy transfer, volumetric expansion, and removal of oral biofilms by non-contact brushing.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; Jager, D; Finger, G; Schaefer, N; van der Mei, H C

    2010-04-01

    Non-contact removal of oral biofilms offers advantages beyond the reach of bristles, but it is unknown how energy transfer for removal from brush-to-biofilm occurs. In the present study we evaluated non-contact, oral biofilm removal by oscillating-rotating and sonic toothbrushes, and their acoustic output up to 6 mm distance. Whereas some brushes removed biofilm when used at a distance of up to 6 mm, others lost efficacy at a distance of 2-4 mm from the biofilm. Loss of efficacy was accompanied with high standard deviations and volumetric biofilm expansion. Both sonic and oscillating-rotating brushes caused fluid flows and the inclusion of air-bubbles, while non-contact acoustic energy-transfer was demonstrated to decay with distance for both types of brushes. We put forward the following mechanism for non-contact removal: (i) brush energy is absorbed by biofilm, resulting in the visco-elastic expansion of the biofilm; (ii) if the energy absorbed is sufficient and deformation is beyond the yield point, biofilm removal occurs; and (iii) if deformation is in the plastic range but below the yield point (i.e. at the limiting distance for non-contact removal), biofilm is expanded but not removed.

  17. Non-contact assessment of COD and turbidity concentrations in water using diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Agustsson, Jon; Akermann, Oliver; Barry, D Andrew; Rossi, Luca

    2014-08-01

    Water contamination is an important environmental concern underlining the need for reliable real-time information on contaminant concentrations in natural waters. Here, a new non-contact UV-Vis spectroscopic approach for monitoring contaminants in water, and especially wastewater, is proposed. Diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy was applied to measure simultaneously the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity (TUR) concentrations in water. The measurements were carried out in the wavelength range from 200-1100 nm. The measured spectra were analysed using partial-least-squares (PLS) regression. The correlation coefficient between the measured and the reference concentrations of COD and TUR in the water samples were R(2) = 0.85 and 0.96, respectively. These results highlight the potential of non-contact UV-Vis spectroscopy for the assessment of water contamination. A system built on the concept would be able to monitor wastewater pollution continuously, without the need for laborious sample collection and subsequent laboratory analysis. Furthermore, since no parts of the system are in contact with the wastewater stream the need for maintenance is minimised.

  18. Long-range non-contact imaging photoplethysmography: cardiac pulse wave sensing at a distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.; Piasecki, Alyssa M.; Bowers, Margaret A.; Klosterman, Samantha L.

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses photo-optical sensors to measure variations in light absorption, caused by blood volume pulsations, to assess cardiopulmonary parameters including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, and respiration rate. Recently, researchers have studied the applications and methodology of imaging photoplethysmography. Basic research has examined some of the variables affecting data quality and accuracy of imaging photoplethysmography including signal processing, imager parameters (e.g. frame rate and resolution), lighting conditions, subject motion, and subject skin tone. This technology may be beneficial for long term or continuous monitoring where contact measurements may be harmful (e.g. skin sensitivities) or where imperceptible or unobtrusive measurements are desirable. Using previously validated signal processing methods, we examined the effects of imager-to-subject distance on one-minute, windowed estimates of pulse rate. High-resolution video of 22, stationary participants was collected using an enthusiast-grade, mirrorless, digital camera equipped with a fully-manual, super-telephoto lens at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters with simultaneous contact measurements of electrocardiography, and fingertip photoplethysmography. By comparison, previous studies have usually been conducted with imager-to-subject distances of up to only a few meters. Mean absolute error for one-minute, windowed, pulse rate estimates (compared to those derived from gold-standard electrocardiography) were 2.0, 4.1, and 10.9 beats per minute at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters, respectively. Long-range imaging presents several unique challenges among which include decreased, observed light reflectance and smaller regions of interest. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that accurate pulse rate measurements can be obtained from over long imager-to-participant distances given these constraints.

  19. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurement on spiders in moving-coil loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2014-12-01

    The spider is the dominate stiffness to suspend the cone for a moving-coil loudspeaker unit, and is most commonly a concentrically corrugated fabric disk. A subwoofer closed box is designed to excite the tested spiders pneumatically, and the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the velocity of the moving spiders. The effective stiffness, loss factor and some viscoelastic behaviors such as level dependent stiffness have been investigated. The results find that, this pneumatic non-contact dynamic technique successfully measured the viscoelastic behaviors of spiders from extremely low frequency 5 Hz to 200 Hz, and the effective stiffness of spiders is dependent on the input voltage level, which is higher level with lower stiffness.

  20. Non-contact fiber-optical trapping of motile bacteria: dynamics observation and energy estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Qingyuan; Li, Baojun

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics and energy conversion of bacteria are strongly associated with bacterial activities, such as survival, spreading of bacterial diseases and their pathogenesis. Although different discoveries have been reported on trapped bacteria (i.e. immobilized bacteria), the investigation on the dynamics and energy conversion of motile bacteria in the process of trapping is highly desirable. Here, we report a non-contact optical trapping of motile bacteria using a modified tapered optical fiber. Using Escherichia coli as an example, both single and multiple motile bacteria have been trapped and manipulated in a non-contact manner. Bacterial dynamics has been observed and bacterial energy has been estimated in the trapping process. This non-contact optical trapping provides a new opportunity for better understanding the bacterial dynamics and energy conversion at the single cell level.

  1. Multimodal non-contact photoacoustic and OCT imaging with galvanometer scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, Thomas; Hochreiner, Armin; Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Buchsbaum, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present multimodal non-contact photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using a galvanometer scanner. Photoacoustic signals are acquired without contact on the surface of a specimen using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized in a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. In the same fiber-optic network a spectral-domain OCT system is realized, using a broadband light source at 1300 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into the same fiber and the same objective is used for both imaging modalities. Fast non-contact photoacoustic and OCT imaging is demonstrated by scanning the detection spot utilizing a galvanometer scanner. Multimodal photoacoustic and OCT imaging is shown on agarose phantoms. As the same fiber network and optical components are used for non-contact photoacoustic and OCT imaging the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically.

  2. Non-contact optoacoustic imaging with focused air-coupled transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Pang, Genny A.; Razansky, Daniel; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco

    2015-08-03

    Non-contact optoacoustic imaging employing raster-scanning of a spherically focused air-coupled ultrasound transducer is showcased herein. Optoacoustic excitation with laser fluence within the maximal permissible human exposure limits in the visible and near-infrared spectra is applied to objects with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm and absorption properties representative of the whole blood at near-infrared wavelengths, and these signals are shown to be detectable without contact to the sample using an air-coupled transducer with reasonable signal averaging. Optoacoustic images of vessel-mimicking tubes embedded in an agar phantom captured with this non-contact sensing technique are also showcased. These initial results indicate that an air-coupled ultrasound detection approach can be suitable for non-contact biomedical imaging with optoacoustics.

  3. An innovative non-contact ECG sensor for monitoring heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ye; Yu, Xiong (Bill); Berilla, Jim

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-contact sensing platform to monitor the ECG signals. The non-contact sensing will be based on capacitive coupling the bioelectricity produced by cardiovascular activities around the heart. High sensitivity sensor and electronics are designed to amplify the signals. Our preliminary study has pointed to the promise of this sensing concept. A sensor prototype was able to clearly detect the ECG signals from 10 cm away from the body. Research tasks continue improving the sensor design to detect the polarization in the ECG signals. The final goal is a non-contact sensing platform for ECG signals and for real time diagnostics of the mental distress and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. A remote and non-contact method for obtaining the blood-pulse waveform with a laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Candida L.; Antonelli, Lynn T.; Soares, Edward

    2007-02-01

    The use of lasers to remotely and non-invasively detect the blood pressure waveform of humans and animals would provide a powerful diagnostic tool. Current blood pressure measurement tools, such as a cuff, are not useful for burn and trauma victims, and animals require catheterization to acquire accurate blood pressure information. The purpose of our sensor method and apparatus invention is to remotely and non-invasively detect the blood pulse waveform of both animals and humans. This device is used to monitor an animal or human's skin in proximity to an artery using radiation from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). This system measures the velocity (or displacement) of the pulsatile motion of the skin, indicative of physiological parameters of the arterial motion in relation to the cardiac cycle. Tests have been conducted that measures surface velocity with an LDV and a signal-processing unit, with enhanced detection obtained with optional hardware including a retro-reflector dot. The blood pulse waveform is obtained by integrating the velocity signal to get surface displacement using standard signal processing techniques. Continuous recording of the blood pulse waveform yields data containing information on cardiac health and can be analyzed to identify important events in the cardiac cycle, such as heart rate, the timing of peak systole, left ventricular ejection time and aortic valve closure. Experimental results are provided that demonstrates the current capabilities of the optical, non-contact sensor for the continuous, non-contact recording of the blood pulse waveform without causing patient distress.

  5. Effect of water desorption on the rheology and dynamic response of human hair to a non-contact impact.

    PubMed

    Jamart, J; Djaghloul, M; Bergheau, J M; Zahouani, H

    2015-06-01

    Human hair is a non-homogeneous complex material made of keratin fibers oriented along the longitudinal axis which offer anisotropic mechanical properties. Nowadays, it is possible to measure the mechanical properties of hairs with the classical tests, but most often, these tests are destructive and make hard to measure the influence of some external factors or treatments on the behavior of a same hair fiber. In the current paper, vibrations induced by a non-contact impact have been utilized as a representative response of the mechanical behavior of hair. The characteristics of the vibratory response allow measuring the variation in the mechanical properties and the instantaneous effect of an external factor on the properties of a same sample. First, load relaxation tests have been performed on hair samples after moisturization and for different times of an air-drying process in order to characterize the change in the visco-elastic behavior of hair during the water desorption. Other hair samples have been tested with our non-contact impact and vibration technique in order to observe the change in the vibratory response during the water desorption. The vibratory response has then been correlated to the mechanical properties of the hair fiber.

  6. Non-contact flow gauging for the extension and development of rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew; Large, Andy; Russell, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Accurate measurement of river discharge is fundamental to understanding hydrological processes, associated hazards and ecological responses within fluvial systems. Established protocols for determining river discharge are partial, predominantly invasive and logistically difficult during high flows. There is demand for new methods for accurate quantification of flow velocity under high-flow/flood conditions to in turn enable better post-event reconstruction of peak discharge. As a consequence considerable effort has been devoted to the development of innovative technologies for the representation of flow in open channels. Remotely operated fixed and mobile systems capable of providing quantitative estimates of instantaneous and time-averaged flow characteristics using non-contact methods has been a major development. Amongst the new approaches for stand-alone continuous monitoring of surface flows is Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Here we adapt the LSPIV concept, to provide continuous discharge measurements in non-uniform channels with complex flow conditions. High Definition videos (1080p; 30fps) of the water surface are acquired at 5 minute intervals. The image is rectified to correct for perspective distortion using a new, open source tool which minimises errors resulting from oblique image capture. Naturally occurring artefacts on the water surface (e.g. bubbles, debris, etc.) are tracked with the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) algorithm. The data generated is in the form of a complex surface water velocity field which can be interrogated to extract a range of hydrological information such as the streamwise velocity at a cross-section of interest, or even allow the interrogation of hydrodynamic flow structures. Here we demonstrate that this approach is capable of generating river discharge data comparable to concurrent measurements made using existing, accepted technologies (e.g. ADCP). The outcome is better constraint and extension of rating curves

  7. A novel method of measuring leaf epidermis and mesophyll stiffness shows the ubiquitous nature of the sandwich structure of leaf laminas in broad-leaved angiosperm species

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Yusuke; Schieving, Feike; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaves commonly exhibit a thin, flat structure that facilitates a high light interception per unit mass, but may increase risks of mechanical failure when subjected to gravity, wind and herbivory as well as other stresses. Leaf laminas are composed of thin epidermis layers and thicker intervening mesophyll layers, which resemble a composite material, i.e. sandwich structure, used in engineering constructions (e.g. airplane wings) where high bending stiffness with minimum weight is important. Yet, to what extent leaf laminas are mechanically designed and behave as a sandwich structure remains unclear. To resolve this issue, we developed and applied a novel method to estimate stiffness of epidermis- and mesophyll layers without separating the layers. Across a phylogenetically diverse range of 36 angiosperm species, the estimated Young’s moduli (a measure of stiffness) of mesophyll layers were much lower than those of the epidermis layers, indicating that leaf laminas behaved similarly to efficient sandwich structures. The stiffness of epidermis layers was higher in evergreen species than in deciduous species, and strongly associated with cuticle thickness. The ubiquitous nature of sandwich structures in leaves across studied species suggests that the sandwich structure has evolutionary advantages as it enables leaves to be simultaneously thin and flat, efficiently capturing light and maintaining mechanical stability under various stresses. PMID:25675956

  8. The research and development of the non-contact detection of the tubing internal thread with a line structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yingying; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao

    2013-12-01

    The tubing internal thread plays an irreplaceable role in the petroleum equipment. The unqualified tubing can directly lead to leakage, slippage and bring huge losses for oil industry. For the purpose of improving efficiency and precision of tubing internal thread detection, we develop a new non-contact tubing internal thread measurement system based on the laser triangulation principle. Firstly, considering that the tubing thread had a small diameter and relatively smooth surface, we built a set of optical system with a line structured light to irradiate the internal thread surface and obtain an image which contains the internal thread profile information through photoelectric sensor. Secondly, image processing techniques were used to do the edge detection of the internal thread from the obtained image. One key method was the sub-pixel technique which greatly improved the detection accuracy under the same hardware conditions. Finally, we restored the real internal thread contour information on the basis of laser triangulation method and calculated tubing thread parameters such as the pitch, taper and tooth type angle. In this system, the profile of several thread teeth can be obtained at the same time. Compared with other existing scanning methods using point light and stepper motor, this system greatly improves the detection efficiency. Experiment results indicate that this system can achieve the high precision and non-contact measurement of the tubing internal thread.

  9. Studies on the Evaluation Methods for the Food Quality with a Non-contact type Capacitance Sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narumiya, Tadaoki; Hagura, Yoshio

    Changes of capacitance and temperature of ethyl alcohol, hamburger and dough with cheese filling were measured with specially-made measuring devices during the freezing and thawing. The results of measurement of capacitance and temperature suggest a linear correlation for ethyl alcohol as a single constituent substance. The adequate correlation is too estimated from the results of food samples, though the capacitance of food sample varies greatly at the start and end of freezing and thawing process. It has been demonstrated that the quality or physical condition of food sample can be determined easily by the measurement of capacitance using the specially-made devices. Also the quality or physical condition of food can be determined easily by the non-contact and non-destructive measurements of capacitance. A variety application of the present technique is conceivable for the process control of the freezing and thawing foods.

  10. NON-CONTACT ACOUSTO-THERMAL SIGNATURES OF PLASTIC DEFORMATION IN TI-6AL-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Welter, J. T.; Jata, K. V.; Blodgett, M. P.; Malott, G.; Schehl, N.; Sathish, S.

    2010-02-22

    Plastic deformation introduces changes in a material which include increases in: dislocations, strains, residual stress, and yield stress. However, these changes have a very small impact on the material properties such as elastic modulus, conductivity and ultrasonic wave speed. This is due to the fact that interatomic forces govern these properties, and they are not affected by plastic deformation to any large degree. This is evident from the fact that the changes in electrical resistance and ultrasonic velocity in plastically deformed and virgin samples are very small and can only be determined by highly controlled experiments. Except for X-ray diffraction, there are no direct nondestructive methods for measuring strain and the residual stress. This paper presents an application of the non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) NDE methodology to detect plastic deformation in flat dog bone Ti-6Al-4V samples. Results of the NCATS measurements on samples subjected to incremental amounts of plastic deformation are presented. The maximum temperature attained by the sample due to acoustic excitation is found to be sensitive to the amount of plastic strain. It is observed that the temperature induced by acoustic excitation increases to a peak followed by a decrease to failure. The maximum temperature peak occurs at plastic strains of 12-14%. It is observed that there is a correlation between the peak in maximum temperature rise and the strain at the experimentally determined ultimate tensile strength. A microstructural based explanation for this will be presented. The results are discussed in reference to utilizing this technique for detection and evaluation of plastic deformation.

  11. Development of a non-contact diagnostic tool for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jed A.; Guttman, Jeffrey L.; McCauley, John

    2016-03-01

    High power lasers in excess of 1 kW generate enough Rayleigh scatter, even in the NIR, to be detected by silicon based sensor arrays. A lens and camera system in an off-axis position can therefore be used as a non-contact diagnostic tool for high power lasers. Despite the simplicity of the concept, technical challenges have been encountered in the development of an instrument referred to as BeamWatch. These technical challenges include reducing background radiation, achieving high signal to noise ratio, reducing saturation events caused by particulates crossing the beam, correcting images to achieve accurate beam width measurements, creating algorithms for the removal of non-uniformities, and creating two simultaneous views of the beam from orthogonal directions. Background radiation in the image was reduced by the proper positioning of the back plane and the placement of absorbing materials on the internal surfaces of BeamWatch. Maximizing signal to noise ratio, important to the real-time monitoring of focus position, was aided by increasing lens throughput. The number of particulates crossing the beam path was reduced by creating a positive pressure inside BeamWatch. Algorithms in the software removed non-uniformities in the data prior to generating waist width, divergence, BPP, and M2 results. A dual axis version of BeamWatch was developed by the use of mirrors. By its nature BeamWatch produced results similar to scanning slit measurements. Scanning slit data was therefore taken and compared favorably with BeamWatch results.

  12. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  13. Illumination-compensated non-contact imaging photoplethysmography via dual-mode temporally coded illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact camera-based imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is useful for measuring heart rate in conditions where contact devices are problematic due to issues such as mobility, comfort, and sanitation. Existing iPPG methods analyse the light-tissue interaction of either active or passive (ambient) illumination. Many active iPPG methods assume the incident ambient light is negligible to the active illumination, resulting in high power requirements, while many passive iPPG methods assume near-constant ambient conditions. These assumptions can only be achieved in environments with controlled illumination and thus constrain the use of such devices. To increase the number of possible applications of iPPG devices, we propose a dual-mode active iPPG system that is robust to changes in ambient illumination variations. Our system uses a temporally-coded illumination sequence that is synchronized with the camera to measure both active and ambient illumination interaction for determining heart rate. By subtracting the ambient contribution, the remaining illumination data can be attributed to the controlled illuminant. Our device comprises a camera and an LED illuminant controlled by a microcontroller. The microcontroller drives the temporal code via synchronizing the frame captures and illumination time at the hardware level. By simulating changes in ambient light conditions, experimental results show our device is able to assess heart rate accurately in challenging lighting conditions. By varying the temporal code, we demonstrate the trade-off between camera frame rate and ambient light compensation for optimal blood pulse detection.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation and characterization of GFRP using non-contact ultrasound and complementary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Dobrescu, G. S.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Curtu, I.; Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents two methods, non-contact low frequency ultrasound method and fiber Bragg gratings, and their application to nondestructive testing of glass fiber reinforced composites used in wind turbine blades. Theoretical models are used and experimental results are in good concordance with destructive testing results.

  15. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media.

    PubMed

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-25

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  16. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  17. Endoluminal non-contact soft tissue ablation using fiber-based Er:YAG laser delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrat, Dennis; Fuchs, Alexander; Schoob, Andreas; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of Er:YAG lasers for soft and hard tissue ablation has proven promising results over the last decades due to strong absorption at 2.94 μm wavelength by water molecules. An extension to endoluminal applications demands laser delivery without mirror arms due to dimensional constraints. Therefore, fiber-based solutions are advanced to provide exible access while keeping space requirements to a minimum. Conventional fiber-based treatments aim at laser-tissue interactions in contact mode. However, this procedure is associated with disadvantages such as advancing decrease in power delivery due to particle coverage of the fiber tip, tissue carbonization, and obstructed observation of the ablation progress. The objective of this work is to overcome aforementioned limitations with a customized fiber-based module for non-contact robot-assisted endoluminal surgery and its associated experimental evaluation. Up to the authors knowledge, this approach has not been presented in the context of laser surgery at 2.94 μm wavelength. The preliminary system design is composed of a 3D Er:YAG laser processing unit enabling automatic laser to fiber coupling, a GeO2 solid core fiber, and a customized module combining collimation and focusing unit (focal length of 20 mm, outer diameter of 8 mm). The performance is evaluated with studies on tissue substitutes (agar-agar) as well as porcine samples that are analysed by optical coherence tomography measurements. Cuts (depths up to 3mm) with minimal carbonization have been achieved under adequate moistening and sample movement (1.5mms-1). Furthermore, an early cadaver study is presented. Future work aims at module miniaturization and integration into an endoluminal robot for scanning and focus adaptation.

  18. Sleep stage classification by non-contact vital signs indices using Doppler radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Suzumura, Kazuki; Matsui, Takemi

    2016-08-01

    Disturbed sleep has become more common in recent years. To improve the quality of sleep, undergoing sleep observation has gained interest as a means to resolve possible problems. In this paper, we evaluate a non-restrictive and non-contact method for classifying real-time sleep stages and report on its potential applications. The proposed system measures heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body movements, and respiratory signals of a sleeping person using two 24-GHz microwave radars placed beneath the mattress. We introduce a method that dynamically selects the window width of the moving average filter to extract the pulse waves from the radar output signals. The Pearson correlation coefficient between two HR measurements derived from the radars overnight, and the reference polysomnography was the average of 88.3% and the correlation coefficient for HRV parameters was the average of 71.2%. For identifying wake and sleep periods, the body-movement index reached sensitivity of 76.0%, and a specificity of 77.0% with 10 participants. Low-frequency (LF) components of HRV and the LF/HF ratio had a high degree of contribution and differed significantly across the three sleep stages (REM, LIGHT, and DEEP; p <; 0.01). In contrast, high-frequency (HF) components of HRV were not significantly different across the three sleep stages (p > 0.05). We applied a canonical discriminant analysis to identify wake or sleep periods and to classify the three sleep stages with leave-one-out cross validation. Classification accuracy was 66.4% for simply identifying wake and sleep, 57.1% for three stages (wake, REM, and NREM) and 34% for four stages (wake, REM, LIGHT, and DEEP). This is a novel system for measuring HRs, HRV, body movements, and respiratory intervals and for measuring high sensitivity pulse waves using two radar signals. It simplifies measurement of sleep stages and may be employed at nursing care facilities or by the general public to improve sleep quality.

  19. [Efficiency of FibroScan and FibroTouch in liver stiffness measurement and fat quantification: a comparative analysis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, J; Sun, W L; Chen, G Y; Pan, Q; Yan, S Y; Sun, C; Xu, Z J; Fan, J G

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To investigate the efficiency of FibroScan(FS)and FibroTouch(FT)in liver stiffness measurement(LSM)and fat quantification through a comparative analysis. Methods: The outpatients or hospitalized patients who underwent LSM and fat quantification using FS and FT were enrolled. The differences in success rate and detecting parameters between FS and FT were analyzed, as well as the correlation between FS and FT values. The t-test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data between groups, and a one-way analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison between multiple groups. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of non-normally distributed continuous data between groups. Results: A total of 1621 patients were enrolled. The success rates of FT and FS were 100% and 94.96%, respectively, and the success rate of FS was influenced by sex, age, body mass index, and biochemical markers of liver function. FT has a significantly shorter duration of single detection and a significantly lower number of times of single detection than FS(duration of single detection: 190.21±38.78 s vs 220.89±68.36 s, P < 0.01; number of single detection times: 10.31±1.32 vs 11.81±3.76, P < 0.01), as well as a significantly lower ratio of interquartile range to median of fat quantification in the same patient(5.39%±4.81% vs 17.18%±14.07%, P < 0.01). The LSM and fat quantification of FS were significantly correlated with those of FT(r = 0.645 and 0.620, both Based on the duration and number of times of single detection, success rate, and stability of fat quantification, FT seems to have a better detection efficiency than FS. The detection values of FT and FS can be calculated with regression equations < 0.01). The equations of linear regression were LSM(FT)= 4.435+0.477×LSM(FS); CAP(FT)= 134.71+0.456×CAP(FS). Conclusion: Based on the duration and number of times of single detection, success rate, and stability of fat

  20. Extracting accurate temperatures of molten basalts from non-contact thermal infrared radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanella, N. R.; Ramsey, M. S.; Lee, R.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptive and emplacement temperature of a lava flow relates important information on parameters such as the composition, rheology, and emplacement processes. It can also serve as a critical input into flow cooling and propagation models used for hazard prediction. One of the most common ways to determine temperatures of active lava flows is to use non-contact thermal infrared (TIR) measurements, either from ground-based radiometers and cameras or air and space-based remote sensing instruments. These temperature measurements assume a fixed value for the lava emissivity in order to solve the Planck Equation for temperature. The research presented here examines the possibility of variable emissivity in a material's molten state and the effect it has on deriving accurate surface temperature. Emplacement of a pahoehoe lava lobe at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii was captured with high spatial resolution/high frame rate TIR video in order to study this phenomenon. The data show the appearance of molten lava at a breakout point until it cools to form a glassy crust that begins to fold. Emissivity was adjusted sequentially along linear transects from a starting value of 1.0 to lower values until the TIR temperature matched the known temperature measured with a thermocouple. Below an emissivity of ~0.89, temperatures of the molten lava rose above the known lava temperature. This value suggests a decrease in emissivity with a change of state and is likely due to changes in the atomic bond structure of the melt. We have also recently completed the first ever calibrated laboratory-based emissivity measurements of molten basalts, and these high spectral resolution data confirm the field-based estimates. In contrast to rhyolites, basalts appear to display a less dramatic change between their glassy and molten spectra due to their higher melting and glass transition temperatures and the quick formation time of the crust. Therefore, the change in emissivity for molten rhyolite could

  1. Visualization of Venous Compliance of Superficial Veins Using Non-Contact Plethysmography Based on Digital Red-Green-Blue Images

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    We propose the visualization of venous compliance (VC) using a digital red-green-blue (RGB) camera. The new imaging method, which transforms RGB values into VC, combines VC evaluation with blood concentration estimation from the RGB values of each pixel. We evaluate a non-contact plethysmography (NCPG) system for VC based on comparisons with conventional strain gauge plethysmography (SPG). We conduct in vivo measurements using both systems and investigate their differences by evaluating the VC. The results show that the two methods measure different blood vessels and that errors caused by interstitial fluid accumulation are negligible for the NCPG system, whereas SPG is influenced by such errors. Additionally, we investigate the relationship between VC and physical activity using NCPG. PMID:27897981

  2. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  3. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  4. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  5. [Design and research of an interface compatible non-contacting respiratory signal detection system].

    PubMed

    Song, Kui; Qi, Jiajun; Lin, Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Respiration-induced displacements of organs greatly affect the safety and efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system. The key to solve this problem is accurate, real-time detection of respiratory signals. The present study gives a new design of an interface compatible non-contacting respiratory signal detection system using the method of irradiating the laser beam onto certain region of the surface of human body that is intensely influenced by the breathing movements (mostly the breast or the dorsum) at a certain angle, and meanwhile using a camera to acquire information from the location of the laser projection. Then we can draw a curve of the location of laser projection versus time base, that is the respiration curve. This respiratory signal detection method is non-contacting, interface compatible and easy to be integrated into the treatment system.

  6. Non-contact in vivo diffuse optical imaging using a time-gated scanning system

    PubMed Central

    Mazurenka, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Boso, G.; Contini, D.; Pifferi, A.; Mora, A. Dalla; Tosi, A.; Wabnitz, H.; Macdonald, R.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the design and first in vivo tests of a novel non-contact scanning imaging system for time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy. Our system is based on a null source-detector separation approach and utilizes polarization-selective detection and a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode to record late photons only. The in-vivo tests included the recording of hemodynamics during arm occlusion and two brain activation tasks. Localized and non-localized changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration were detected for motor and cognitive tasks, respectively. The tests demonstrate the feasibility of non-contact imaging of absorption changes in deeper tissues. PMID:24156081

  7. Acanthamoeba keratitis in a non-contact lens wearer with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Birgitte; Kronborg, Gitte

    2003-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is potentially blinding and often associated with contact lens wearing. A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient, a non-contact lens wearer, presented with keratitis. She experienced a protracted course of disease, characterized by exacerbations and remissions, and was treated with various topical antibiotics and steroids. 13 months after symptom onset the eye was removed owing to serious scarring of cornea and unbearable pain. Microbiological and histopathological examination of the cornea showed Acanthamoeba. In non-contact lens wearers suffering from Acanthamoeba keratitis the diagnosis is delayed, pathognomonic features are often not seen and visual outcome is usually poor. There is no known relation between HIV infection and Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  8. Arterial Stiffness: Recommendations and Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of arterial stiffness measurements in longitudinal cohorts of normal populations, hypertensive patients, diabetic patients, healthy elderly, and patients on hemodialysis have confirmed the value of this important measure of arterial health, and established its complementary role to measures of blood pressure. Its contribution to understanding cardiovascular and mortality risk beyond blood pressure measurements has moved measures of arterial stiffness into the ranks of factors such as elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and left ventricular hypertrophy in considering cardiovascular risk. The recent international collaboration's publication of reference ranges for normal people and those with hypertension, along with the American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on standardizing arterial stiffness measurements are important aspects to consider in future studies employing these valuable methods, particularly as interventions that not only lower blood pressure but improve arterial function are tested in the clinical arena. PMID:28275588

  9. An improved non-contact thermometer and hygrometer with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Bell, S.; de Podesta, M.

    2017-02-01

    Previously (Underwood et al 2015 Meteorol. Appl. 22 830) we reported first tests of a device capable of simultaneous, non-contact, temperature and humidity (NCTAH) measurements in air. The device used an acoustic thermometer and a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS), a combination which should be capable of an extremely rapid response to changes in humidity as it does not require moisture in a solid-state matrix to equilibrate with the surrounding air. In this paper we report recent developments of the instrument focussed on reducing its response time so that it can be used as a reference instrument for assessing the response time of conventional humidity sensors. In addition, the interdependence of the temperature and humidity estimates is now accounted for in real-time using an iterative procedure, which eliminates the need for data post-processing. The TDLAS measures water molecule number density based on the transmission of an infrared beam (approximate wavelength 1360 nm) through a 0.6 m path length. The acoustic thermometer is based around a fixed-path acoustic interferometer. The improved NCTAH device now produces estimates of the water molecule number density every 20 ms and the temperature output displays an RC filter-like response, with a time constant of approximately 30 ms. The instrument has been tested in a climatic chamber through a temperature range of  ‑40 °C to  +40 °C and a dew point range of  ‑43 °C to  +38 °C, at atmospheric pressure, comparing the instrument readings with those from a calibrated hygrometer and four platinum resistance thermometers. In steady-state conditions, the instrument readings are in good agreement with the conventional sensors, with temperature differences less than 1 °C (repeatability 0.1 °C), and humidity differences mostly within 5% of mixing ratio. Under transient conditions, we demonstrate how the instrument can be used to evaluate the response times of conventional

  10. Analytical model development of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Lin, Sheng-Yang; Yang, Yung-Yi; Hwang, Chang-Chou

    A concise model for analyzing and predicting the quasi-static electromagnetic characteristics of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system has been developed. Confirmed by three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA), adequacy of the analytical model can be demonstrated. Such an effective approach, which can be conveniently used by the potential industries for preliminary system operational performance evaluations, will be essential for designers and on-site engineers.

  11. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method

    PubMed Central

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This “open-shielded” device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities. PMID:27841358

  12. Demonstration of a non-contact x-ray source using an inductively heated pyroelectric accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Michael; Satchouk, Vladimir; Cao, Anh; Wolowiec, Thomas; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-04-01

    X-ray emission from pyroelectric sources can be produced through non-contact thermal cycling using induction heating. In this study, we demonstrated a proof of concept non-contact x-ray source powered via induction heating. An induction heater operating at 62.5 kHz provided a total of 6.5 W of delivered peak thermal power with 140 V DC of driving voltage. The heat was applied to a ferrous substrate mechanically coupled to a cubic 1 cm3 Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric crystal maintained in a 3-12 mTorr vacuum. The maximum temperature reached was 175 °C in 86 s of heating. The cooling cycle began immediately after heating and was provided by passive radiative cooling. The total combined cycle time was 250 s. x-ray photons were produced and analyzed in both heating and cooling phases. Maximum photon energies of 59 keV and 55 keV were observed during heating and cooling, respectively. Non-contact devices such as this, may find applications in cancer therapy (brachytherapy), non-destructive testing, medical imaging, and physics education fields.

  13. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    PubMed

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  14. STM-Controlled Capillary Based Non-Contact Fluid Deposition Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfurakhmanov, Artur; Sailer, Rob; Schulz, Doug; Akhatov, Iskander

    2007-11-01

    A new method of fluid deposition based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. STM-Controlled Capillary Based Non-Contact Fluid Deposition Nanolithography consists of a Au-coated glass nanocapillary tip integrated into a commercial STM scanner platform where the tip serves the dual purpose of imaging and deposition. The small diameter hollow fiber (O.D. less than 500 nm) coupled with a conducting coating allows sub-angstrom-level z-resolution imaging using standard STM methodology. For fluid deposition, the tip is first located within 10 nm of the substrate before the nanocapillary is pressurized with a fluid (P = 50-500 KPa) leading to the formation of a small meniscus that then interacts with the underlying surface to give small spot of fluid deposition. Initial results show the ability to form features less than 500 nm in diameter using alpha-terpineol as the model fluid and highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite as the substrate. In addition to non-contact deposition, this technology also allows non-contact imaging using the constant height STM mode thereby eliminating the difficulties associated with finding nanometer-sized features.

  15. Unusual case of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus and acanthamoeba keratitis in a non-contact lens wearer from Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Lone, Rubina; Syed, Khurshid; Abdul, Rashid; Sheikh, Sajjad Ahmed; Shah, Faisal

    2009-01-01

    Acanthamoeba species can cause a chronic, progressive, ulcerative keratitis of the eye, which is not responsive to the usual antimicrobial treatment and is frequently mistaken for stromal herpes keratitis. Acanthamoeba keratitis continues to be a burgeoning and unsolved problem. Although soft contact lens wear is reported as the major risk factor in other parts of the world, reports from India suggest that acanthamoeba keratitis is more common among non-contact lens wearers. An unusual case of coinfection with Acanthamoeba and methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as causes of corneal keratitis in a contact lens wearer from Kashmir, India, is reported. Recent findings have shown that MRSA uses amoebae to spread, sidestepping hospital and other protection measures. Cysts of the isolated Acanthamoeba tolerated an incubation temperature of 40°C, indicating a pathogenic species. This case highlights the importance of culture methods in the diagnosis of corneal infection and the choice of treatment regimen.

  16. Reversible wetting of NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidities below deliquescence observed by environmental non-contact AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzewicz, D.A.; Lewis, E.; Ocko, B. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2009-12-14

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) was characterized by depositing particles on a prepared hydrophobic surface and measuring their height via non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact AFM allows greater sensitivity to changes in the size of particles than does contact AFM or scanning electron microscopy, and greater sensitivity to changes in shape than do mass-based techniques. Crystalline cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 to 150 nm were found to reversibly take up water with increasing RH, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 4 nm at humidities well below the deliquescence point of 75.0% at 20°C. Measurable uptake begins at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increases with increasing RH for a given particle size and, for a given RH, increases with increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer is indicated by a reversible “rounding” at the tops of the particles, where the ratio of particle height to radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 at 74% RH. These observations suggest that a reorganization of mass occurs on the solid NaCl nanoparticle, and hence that the behavior of NaCl aerosol nanoparticles at RH between 70 and 75% RH is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. Theoretical treatments of the phase transition should therefore account for both the presence of a liquid-like layer prior to deliquescence, and the RH-dependent thickness of the layer.

  17. Automated real-time search and analysis algorithms for a non-contact 3D profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark; Wu, Chih-Hang John; Beck, B. Terry; Peterman, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new means of identifying and extracting geometrical feature statistics from a non-contact precision-measurement 3D profilometer. Autonomous algorithms have been developed to search through large-scale Cartesian point clouds to identify and extract geometrical features. These algorithms are developed with the intent of providing real-time production quality control of cold-rolled steel wires. The steel wires in question are prestressing steel reinforcement wires for concrete members. The geometry of the wire is critical in the performance of the overall concrete structure. For this research a custom 3D non-contact profilometry system has been developed that utilizes laser displacement sensors for submicron resolution surface profiling. Optimizations in the control and sensory system allow for data points to be collected at up to an approximate 400,000 points per second. In order to achieve geometrical feature extraction and tolerancing with this large volume of data, the algorithms employed are optimized for parsing large data quantities. The methods used provide a unique means of maintaining high resolution data of the surface profiles while keeping algorithm running times within practical bounds for industrial application. By a combination of regional sampling, iterative search, spatial filtering, frequency filtering, spatial clustering, and template matching a robust feature identification method has been developed. These algorithms provide an autonomous means of verifying tolerances in geometrical features. The key method of identifying the features is through a combination of downhill simplex and geometrical feature templates. By performing downhill simplex through several procedural programming layers of different search and filtering techniques, very specific geometrical features can be identified within the point cloud and analyzed for proper tolerancing. Being able to perform this quality control in real time

  18. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2003: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Direct nanoscale and atomic resolution imaging is a key issue in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The invention of the dynamic force microscope in the early 1990s was an important step forward in this direction as this instrument provides a universal tool for measuring the topography and many other physical and chemical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale. Operation in the so-called non-contact mode now allows direct atomic resolution imaging of electrically insulating surfaces and nanostructures which has been an unsolved problem during the first decade of nanotechnology. Today, we face a most rapid development of the technique and an extension of its capabilities far beyond imaging; atomically resolved force spectroscopy provides information about local binding properties and researchers now develop sophisticated schemes of force controlled atomic manipulation with the tip of the force microscope. Progress in the field of non-contact force microscopy is discussed at the annually held NC-AFM conferences that are part of a series started in 1998 with a meeting in Osaka, Japan. The 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy took place in Dingle, Ireland, from 31 August to 3 September 2003 and this special issue is a compilation of the original publications of work presented at this meeting. The papers published here well reflect recent achievements, current trends and some of the challenging new directions in non-contact force microscopy that have been discussed during the most stimulating conference days in Dingle. Fundamental aspects of forces and dissipation relevant in imaging and spectroscopy have been covered by experimental and theoretical contributions yielding a more detailed understanding of tip--surface interaction in force microscopy. Novel and improved imaging and spectroscopy techniques have been introduced that either improve the performance of force microscopy or pave the way towards new functionalities and applications

  19. "Non-Contact Ultrasonic Treatment of Metals in a Magnetic Field"

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-

    2007-01-01

    A concept has been originated for non-contact ultrasonic treatment of metals based on the use of an induction coil located in a high-field superconducting magnet. An advantage of using a high magnetic field environment (> 9 T) is that this allows the induced surface current in the sample to be decreased proportionately. As a result, the incidental induction heating associated with the use of the EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustical Transducer) is greatly reduced, which improves the energy efficiency of the EMAT approach. The method can be coupled with high-field magnetic processing, but can also be used where only ultrasonic treatment is beneficial. In the proof-of-principle experiments, a high-field EMAT was used for non-contact ultrasonic processing of aluminum samples during solidification. The magnetic field for the EMAT was supplied by a high-field (20 Tesla) resistive magnet, and the current was provided by an induction coil. This resulted in a highly efficient EMAT that delivered 0.5 MPa (~5 atmospheres) of acoustic drive to the surface of the sample while coupling less than 100 watts of incidental induction heating. The exceptionally high energy efficiency of the electromagnetic transducer is due to the use of the high magnetic field, which reduces the current needed to achieve the same acoustic pressure. In these initial experiments, aluminum samples of A356 alloy were heated to the liquid state and allowed to solidify at a controlled cooling rate while subjected to the non-contact ultrasonic stimulation (0.5 MPa @ 165 kHz) provided by an induction coil located within the 200 mm (~8-inch) bore of a 20-T Bitter resistive magnet.

  20. Fos expression at the cerebellum following non-contact arousal and mating behavior in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Jorge; Miquel, Marta; Toledo, Rebeca; Mayor-Mar, Justo Abraham; Garcia, Luis I.; Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E.; Caba, Mario; Hernandez, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum is considered a center underlying fine movements, cognition, memory and sexual responses. The latter feature led us to correlate sexual arousal and copulation in male rats with neural activity at the cerebellar cortex. Two behavioral paradigms were used in this investigation: the stimulation of males by distant receptive females (non-contact sexual stimulation), and the execution of up to three consecutive ejaculations. The vermis area of the cerebellum was removed following behavioral experiments, cut into sagittal sections, and analyzed with Fos immunohistochemistry to determine neuronal activation. At the mid-vermis region (sections from the midline to 0.1 mm laterally), non-contact stimulation significantly increased the activity of granule neurons. The number of activated cells increased in every lobule, but lobules 1 and 6 to 9 showed the greatest increment. In sexual behavior tests, males reaching one ejaculation had a high number of activated neurons similar to those counted after non-contact stimulation. However, two or three consecutive ejaculations showed a smaller number of Fos-ir cells. In contrast to the mid-vermis region, sections farthest from the midline (0.1 to 0.9 mm laterally) revealed that only lobule 7 expressed activated neurons. These data suggest that a well-delineated group of granule neurons have a sexual biphasic response at the cerebellar vermis, and that Fos in them is under an active degradation mechanism. Thus, they participate as a neural substrate for male rat sexual responses with an activation-deactivation process corresponding with the sensory stimulation and motor performance occurring during copulation. PMID:17936859

  1. Characterization of optical components using contact and non-contact interferometry techniques: advanced metrology for optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Conroy, Mike; Smith, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Advanced metrology plays an important role in the research, production and quality control of optical components. With surface finish, form error and other parameter specifications becoming more stringent, precision measurements are increasingly demanded by optics manufacturers and users. The modern metrologist now has both contact and noncontact measurement solutions available and a combination of these techniques now provides a more detailed understanding of optical components. Phase Grating Interferometry (PGI) with sub-nanometre vertical resolution and sub-micron lateral resolution can provide detailed characterization of a wide range of components including shallow and steep-sided optics. PGI is ideal for precision form measurement of a comprehensive range of lenses, moulds and other spherical or aspheric products. Because of the complex nature of these components, especially precision aspheric and asphero-diffractive optics, control of the form is vital to ensure they perform correctly. Recent hardware and software developments now make it possible to gain a better understanding and control of the form and function of this optics. Another change is the use of high speed 3D non-contact measurement of optics which is becoming more popular. Often scanning interferometric techniques such as coherence correlation interferometry (CCI) can be used to study components not suited to 2D contact analysis, including fragile surfaces and structured surfaces. Scanning interferometry can also be used to measure film thickness and uniformity of any coating present. In this paper the use of both PGI and CCI to measure optical lenses and coatings is discussed.

  2. Non-contact 3D fingerprint scanner using structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, Mike; Hassebrook, Laurence; Yalla, Veeraganesh; Daley, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    As crime prevention and national security remain a top priority, requirements for the use of fingerprints for identification continue to grow. While the size of fingerprint databases continues to expand, new technologies that can improve accuracy and ultimately matching performance will become more critical to maintain the effectiveness of the systems. FlashScan3D has developed non-contact, fingerprint scanners based on the principles of Structured Light Illumination (SLI) that capture 3Dimensional data of fingerprints quickly, accurately and independently of an operator. FlashScan3D will present findings from various research projects performed for the US Army and the Department of Homeland Security.

  3. Mapping and ablation of ventricular tachycardia with the aid of a non-contact mapping system

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, R; Peters, N; Davies, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Treatment of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in coronary heart disease has to date been limited to palliative treatment with drugs or implantable defibrillators. The results of curative treatment with catheter ablation have proved disappointing because the complexity of the VT mechanism makes identification of the substrate using conventional mapping techniques difficult. The use of a mapping technology that may address some of these issues, and thus make possible a cure for VT with catheter ablation, is reported.
PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION—The non-contact system, consisting of a multielectrode array catheter (MEA) and a computer mapping system, was used to map VT in 24 patients. Twenty two patients had structural heart disease, the remainder having "normal" left ventricles with either fasicular tachycardia or left ventricular ectopic tachycardia.
RESULTS—Exit sites were demonstrated in 80 of 81 VT morphologies by the non-contact system, and complete VT circuits were traced in 17. In another 37 morphologies of VT 36 (30)% (mean (SD)) of the diastolic interval was identified. Thirty eight VT morphologies were ablated using 154 radiofrequency energy applications. Successful ablation was achieved by 77% of radiofrequency within diastolic activation identified by the non-contact system and was significantly more likely to ablate VT than radiofrequency at the VT exit, or remote from diastolic activation. Over a mean follow up of 1.5 years, 14 patients have had no recurrence of VT and only two target VTs have recurred. Five patients have had recurrence of either slower non-sustained, undocumented or fast non-target VT. Five patients have died, one from tamponade from a pre-existing temporary pacing wire, and four from causes unrelated to the procedure.
CONCLUSION—The non-contact system can safely be used to map and ablate haemodynamically stable VT with low VT recurrence rates. It is yet to be established whether this system may be applied

  4. Regression analysis of non-contact acousto-thermal signature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criner, Amanda; Schehl, Norman

    2016-05-01

    The non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) is a nondestructive evaluation technique with potential to detect fatigue in materials such as noisy titanium and polymer matrix composites. The underlying physical mechanisms and properties may be determined by parameter estimation via nonlinear regression. The nonlinear regression analysis formulation, including the underlying models, is discussed. Several models and associated data analyses are given along with the assumptions implicit in the underlying model. The results are anomalous. These anomalous results are evaluated with respect to the accuracy of the implicit assumptions.

  5. Experimental stiffness of tapered bore seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness of tapered-bore ring seals was measured with air as the sealed fluid. Static stiffness agreed fairly well with results of a previous analysis. Cross-coupled stiffness due to shaft rotation was much less than predicted. It is suggested that part of the disparity may be due to simplifying assumptions in the analysis; however, these do not appear to account for the entire difference observed.

  6. Reliability Criteria for Liver Stiffness Measurements with Real-Time 2D Shear Wave Elastography in Different Clinical Scenarios of Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Thiele, M; Madsen, B S; Procopet, B; Hansen, J F; Møller, L M S; Detlefsen, S; Berzigotti, A; Krag, A

    2016-06-07

    Purpose: Liver stiffness measurement by real-time 2-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE) lacks universal reliability criteria. We sought to assess whether previously published 2D-SWE reliability criteria for portal hypertension were applicable for the evaluation of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, and to look for criteria that minimize the risk of misclassification in this setting. Materials and Methods: In a biopsy-controlled diagnostic study, we obtained five 2D-SWE measurements of optimal image quality. Correctly classified cases of fibrosis and cirrhosis were compared to misclassified cases. We compared reliability predictors (standard deviation (SD), SD/mean, size of region of interest (ROI) and difference between a single measurement and the patient's median) with those obtained in a prior study on clinically significant portal hypertension. Results: We obtained 678 2D-SWE measurements from 142 patients. Overall, the variability in liver stiffness within single 2D-SWE measurements was low (SD = 1.1 ± 1.5kPa; SD/mean = 12 ± 9 %). Intra-observer analysis showed almost perfect concordance (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.94 - 0.96; average difference from median = 0.4 ± 0.9kPa). For the diagnosis of cirrhosis, a smaller SD (optimally ≤ 1.75 kPa) and larger ROI size (optimally ≥ 18 mm) were associated with higher accuracy. Similarly, within the published cohort of patients assessed for portal hypertension, a low variability of measurements was associated with high reliability. Conclusion: A high quality 2D-SWE elastogram ensures low variability and high reliability, regardless of indication. We recommend aiming for a combination of low standard deviation and large ROI.

  7. Non-contact and Unrestrained Respiration Monitoring System for Sleeping Person Using Near-infrared Bright Spots Matrix Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Aoki, Hiroichi; Nakajima, Masato

    Measurement of biological information appears to be an effective method to obtain an understanding of health conditions measures to maintain and improve the health of elderly people. However, every conventional bioinstrumentation technique imposes a sense of restraint that results in aversion against measurements that would last over consecutive days. To solve this problem, we propose a system for monitoring the respiration of sleepers, and it uses a fiber grating vision sensor, which is a type of optical range finder, to achieve non-contact and unrestrained monitoring. The signals obtained by the system include the respiration rate, shifts of the ventilation, and the body movement interval of the sleeper. The information enables to investigate the stability of the sleeper throughout the night. We examined the measuring accuracy, validity, and effectiveness of our proposed system. And all-night monitoring performed at elderly care facility revealed that respiratory disturbances during sleep occurred in many of the residents and that sleep apnea is a common syndrome, especially among residents who have senile dementia or have had a stroke. We were able to carry out the all-night monitoring with this system for a total of about 370 times, according to our schedule, without experiencing any failure, accident, or interruption. Our proposed system is highly effective for monitoring elderly dementia patients who are likely to become uncooperative during measurement with existing monitoring methods that use certain amounts of restraint.

  8. Calibration of non-contact ultrasound as an online sensor for wood characterization: Effects of temperature, moisture, and scanning direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vun, R. Y.; Hoover, K.; Janowiak, J.; Bhardwaj, M.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous handheld moisture meters are available for measuring moisture levels of wood and building materials for a vast range of quality control and moisture diagnosis applications. However, many methods currently available require physical contact of a probe with the test material to operate. The contact requirement of such devices has limited applications for these purposes. There is a tremendous demand for dynamic online quality assessment of in-process materials for moisture content (MC) measurements. In this paper, a non-destructive non-contact ultrasound technology was used to evaluate the effects of increasing temperature in two MC levels and of increasing MC in lumber. The results show that the ultrasonic absolute transmittance and velocity parameters are directly correlated very well (R2≥0.87) with temperature for the two moisture levels in wood. At constant temperature, however, the velocity is inversely correlated with MC. It was also found that the distribution of MC along the length is marginally insignificant to both ultrasonic measurements. The transmittance measurement along the orthogonal thickness direction is insignificant above the fiber saturation MC; similarly, the velocity measurement is marginally insignificant. The study concludes a positive correlation and a good fit for this technology to advance into the development of an automated device for determining wood moisture levels, which will in turn be used to control the dynamics of wood drying/sterilization processes. Further calibration research is recommended to ascertain the constraints and limitations of the technology to specific wood species and dimension.

  9. Stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ciccoto, Giuseppe; Blaya, Maike; Kelley, Roger E

    2013-02-01

    Recognizing stiff person syndrome is clinically important. It is uncommon, characterized by body stiffness associated with painful muscle spasms, and varies in location and severity. It is subdivided into stiff trunk versus stiff limb presentation, and as a progressive encephalomyelitis. Stiff person-type syndrome also reflects a paraneoplastic picture. Most patients demonstrate exaggerated lumbar lordosis. Roughly 60% of patients have antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid. The differential diagnosis includes many severe conditions. There are reports of response to muscle relaxants, immunosuppressants, intravenous gamma globulin, plasma exchange, a number of anticonvulsants, and botulinum toxin.

  10. Lamb wave dispersion and anisotropy profiling of composite plates via non-contact air-coupled and laser ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb, M. S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound inspection has been a standard non-destructive testing method for providing an in-service evaluation and noninvasive means of probing the interior of a structure. In particular, measurement of the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves allows inspection of plates that are typical components in aerospace industry. A rapid, complete non-contact hybrid approach for excitation and detection of Lamb waves is presented and applied for non-destructive evaluation of composites. An air-coupled transducer (ACT) excites ultrasonic waves on the surface of a composite plate, generating different propagating Lamb wave modes and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the out-of-plane velocity of the plate. This technology, based on direct waveform imaging, focuses on measuring dispersive curves for A0 mode in a composite laminate and its anisotropy. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) is applied to out-of-plane velocity data captured experimentally using LDV to go from the time-spatial domain to frequency-wavenumber domain. The result is a 2D array of amplitudes at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers for A0 mode in a given propagation direction along the composite. The peak values of the curve are then used to construct frequency wavenumber and phase velocity dispersion curves, which are also obtained directly using Snell's law and the incident angle of the excited ultrasonic waves. A high resolution and strong correlation between numerical and experimental results are observed for dispersive curves with Snell's law method in comparison to 2D-FFT method. Dispersion curves as well as velocity curves for the composite plate along different directions of wave propagation are measured. The visual read-out of the dispersion curves at different propagation directions as well as the phase velocity curves provide profiling and measurements of the composite anisotropy. The results proved a high sensitivity of the air-coupled and laser

  11. Preliminary Test Results of a Non-Contacting Finger Seal on a Herringbone-Grooved Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2009-01-01

    The baseline non-contacting finger seal is a NASA patented design. The primary difference between it and Gul Aroras design patented by AlliedSignal is that there are no lift pads on the high pressure fingers. The baseline non-contacting finger seal is comprised of a back plate, aft spacer, aft (or low pressure) finger element, forward (or high pressure) finger element, forward spacer, and front plate. The components are held together with 20 flat head screws. A typical seal would have a back plate of approximately the same thickness as the front plate and would be riveted together. The thicker back plate allows use of threaded fasteners so that different finger elements can be tested without having to replace all the individual seal components. The finger elements are essentially washers made of thin sheet stock with multiple curved slots machined around the inner diameter to form the fingers. They are clocked so that the fingers of one cover the slots of the other. The aft finger element fingers have axial extensions or "lift pads" at the seal id that are concentric to the rotor. The fingers act as cantilever beams and flex in response to rotor dynamic motion and radial growth of the rotor due to centrifugal or thermal forces.

  12. High-Throughput Non-Contact Vitrification of Cell-Laden Droplets Based on Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Meng; Ling, Kai; Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Feng, Shangsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is the most promising way for long-term storage of biological samples e.g., single cells and cellular structures. Among various cryopreservation methods, vitrification is advantageous by employing high cooling rate to avoid the formation of harmful ice crystals in cells. Most existing vitrification methods adopt direct contact of cells with liquid nitrogen to obtain high cooling rates, which however causes the potential contamination and difficult cell collection. To address these limitations, we developed a non-contact vitrification device based on an ultra-thin freezing film to achieve high cooling/warming rate and avoid direct contact between cells and liquid nitrogen. A high-throughput cell printer was employed to rapidly generate uniform cell-laden microdroplets into the device, where the microdroplets were hung on one side of the film and then vitrified by pouring the liquid nitrogen onto the other side via boiling heat transfer. Through theoretical and experimental studies on vitrification processes, we demonstrated that our device offers a high cooling/warming rate for vitrification of the NIH 3T3 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) with maintained cell viability and differentiation potential. This non-contact vitrification device provides a novel and effective way to cryopreserve cells at high throughput and avoid the contamination and collection problems.

  13. Fully-Non-Contact Masking-Based Holography Inspection on Dimensionally Responsive Artwork Materials.

    PubMed

    Tornari, Vivi; Bernikola, Eirini; Nevin, Austin; Kouloumpi, Eleni; Doulgeridis, Michalis; Fotakis, Costas

    2008-12-18

    Environmental control in galleries and museums is a necessity and is informed by the knowledge of ongoing processes of deterioration which can threaten the integrity and stability of artworks. Invisible dimensional changes in many works of art occur following environmental fluctuations as materials respond to the changes in humidity and temperature. The constant influence of dimensional changes usually remains invisible until displacement generates visible deterioration and irreversible damage. This paper exploits fully non contact coherent interferometry in a sequential masking procedure for visualising and studying surface deformation which is the direct effect of dimensional alterations induced by humidity changes. Surface deformation during dimensional displacements of constituent materials may occur on any artwork within an unstable environment. In this context, the presented research study explores the diagnostic potential of fully non contact sensors for the direct structural assessment of environmental effects as they occur in real time on works of art. The method is employed to characterise material responses, complementing and improving understanding of material behaviour in unstable environments.

  14. High-Throughput Non-Contact Vitrification of Cell-Laden Droplets Based on Cell Printing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meng; Ling, Kai; Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Feng, Shangsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the most promising way for long-term storage of biological samples e.g., single cells and cellular structures. Among various cryopreservation methods, vitrification is advantageous by employing high cooling rate to avoid the formation of harmful ice crystals in cells. Most existing vitrification methods adopt direct contact of cells with liquid nitrogen to obtain high cooling rates, which however causes the potential contamination and difficult cell collection. To address these limitations, we developed a non-contact vitrification device based on an ultra-thin freezing film to achieve high cooling/warming rate and avoid direct contact between cells and liquid nitrogen. A high-throughput cell printer was employed to rapidly generate uniform cell-laden microdroplets into the device, where the microdroplets were hung on one side of the film and then vitrified by pouring the liquid nitrogen onto the other side via boiling heat transfer. Through theoretical and experimental studies on vitrification processes, we demonstrated that our device offers a high cooling/warming rate for vitrification of the NIH 3T3 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) with maintained cell viability and differentiation potential. This non-contact vitrification device provides a novel and effective way to cryopreserve cells at high throughput and avoid the contamination and collection problems. PMID:26655688

  15. Non-contact left ventricular endocardial mapping in cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lambiase, P D; Rinaldi, A; Hauck, J; Mobb, M; Elliott, D; Mohammad, S; Gill, J S; Bucknall, C A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Up to 30% of patients with heart failure do not respond to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). This may reflect placement of the coronary sinus lead in regions of slow conduction despite optimal positioning on current criteria. Objectives: To characterise the effect of CRT on left ventricular activation using non-contact mapping and to examine the electrophysiological factors influencing optimal left ventricular lead placement. Methods and results: 10 patients implanted with biventricular pacemakers were studied. In six, the coronary sinus lead was found to be positioned in a region of slow conduction with an average conduction velocity of 0.4 m/s, v 1.8 m/s in normal regions (p < 0.02). Biventricular pacing with the left ventricle paced 32 ms before the right induced the optimal mean velocity time integral and timing for fusion of depolarisation wavefronts from the right and left ventricular pacing sites. Pacing outside regions of slow conduction decreased left ventricular activation time and increased cardiac output and dP/dtmax significantly. Conclusions: In patients undergoing CRT for heart failure, non-contact mapping can identify regions of slow conduction. Significant haemodynamic improvements can occur when the site of left ventricular pacing is outside these slow conduction areas. Failure of CRT to produce clinical benefits may reflect left ventricular lead placement in regions of slow conduction which can be overcome by pacing in more normally activating regions. PMID:14676240

  16. An infrared-driven flexible pyroelectric generator for non-contact energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Jiang, Weitao; Liu, Hongzhong; Niu, Dong; Li, Xin; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xuan; Chen, Bangdao; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-04-21

    In recent years, energy harvesting technologies, which can scavenge many kinds of energies from our living environment to power micro/nanodevices, have attracted increasing attention. However, remote energy transmission, flexibility and electric waveform controllability remain the key challenges for wireless power supply by an energy harvester. In this paper, we design a new infrared-driven non-contact pyroelectric generator for harvesting heat energy, which avoids direct contact between the pyroelectric generator and heat source and realizes remote energy transfer exploiting the photothermal and penetrability of infrared light. The output voltage (under the input impedance of 100 MOhm) and short-circuit current of the pyroelectric generator consisting of a CNT/PVDF/CNT layer (20 mm × 5 mm × 100 μm) can be as large as 1.2 V and 9 nA, respectively, under a 1.45 W cm(-2) near-infrared laser (808 nm). We also demonstrate the means by which the pyroelectric generator can modulate square waveforms with controllable periods through irradiation frequency, which is essential for signal sources and medical stimulators. The overshoot of square waveforms are in a range of 9.0%-13.1% with a rise time of 120 ms. The prepared pyroelectric generator can light a liquid crystal display (LCD) in a vacuum chamber from outside. This work paves the way for non-contact energy harvesting for some particular occasions where near-field energy control is not available.

  17. Viscous drag effect in the flexural rigidity and cantilever stiffness of bio- and nano-filaments measured with the shooting-bead method.

    PubMed

    Samarbakhsh, Abdorreza; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2009-07-01

    The so-called shooting-bead method is a fast and easy experimental technique for evaluating cantilever stiffness and flexural rigidity of semiflexible to semirigid rodlike biological and nano-filaments based on the measurement of just two distances. In this paper we have derived the shooting-bead formula for cantilever stiffness and flexural rigidity taking into account the effects of the viscous drag force exerted on the filament itself. To this end, we have defined a key variable, called the filament energy-loss factor (or filament drag factor), which accounts for all the energy-loss effects. It has been shown that due to the logarithmic dependence of the filament energy-loss factor on the radius and the length of the filament, inclusion of this factor in the formula for the flexural rigidity has a very noticeable effect on the result even for very thin or long filaments. It has also been shown that the effect due to the consideration of filament energy-loss factor on calculation of the flexural rigidity increases with increasing the flexibility of the filament. We have also considered various sources of experimental error and estimated their effects.

  18. [Non-contact measurement of the increase in pulp temperature during thermal debonding].

    PubMed

    Baumann, M; Ruppenthal, T

    1991-01-01

    Thermal debonding of ceramic brackets is now used for some time. In this context the possibility of a thermal damage of the pulp is one of the main questions. With the aid of a touchless infrared thermography device (SST/Theta 1,000; Heimann, FRG-Wiesbaden) the consequences of thermal debonding with the "Ceramic Debonding Unit" (Dentaurum, Pforzheim) have been studied. A use according to the manufacturer's device led to temperature changes up to 3 degrees C as maximum. Therefore our in vitro results indicate that the orderly use of the system is safe for the pulp. If the debonding fails, the temperature increase is much higher if the resistance wire is left in place. The influence of different composites is discussed.

  19. Utilizing Non-Contact Stress Measurement System (NSMS) as a Health Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Terry; Hayes, Bryan; Bynum, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Continuously monitor all 156 blades throughout the entire operating envelope without adversely affecting tunnel conditions or compromise compressor shell integrity, Calculate dynamic response and identify the frequency/mode to determine individual blade deflection amplitudes, natural frequencies, phase, and damping (Q), Log static deflection to build a database of deflection values at certain compressor conditions to use as basis for real-time online Blade Stack monitor, Monitor for stall, surge, flutter, and blade damage, Operate with limited user input, low maintenance cost, safe illumination of probes, easy probe replacement, and require little or no access to compressor.

  20. Non-contact Measurement of Creep in Ultra-High-Temperature Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-04

    were successfully processed at relevant temperatures, and coupled well to the new magnetic device used to induce the rotation that applies the load to...Task 1: Process UHTC materials at the relevant temperatures in Electrostatic Levitation for extended periods. 5 3.5 Task 2: Prepare the required high...Electrostatic Levitation ITI Industrial Tectonics, Inc. MSFC NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center NASA National Aeronautics and Space

  1. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  2. Study on the Non-contact Acoustic Inspection Method for Concrete Structures by using Strong Ultrasonic Sound source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Uechi, Itsuki; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    Hammering test is widely used to inspect the defects in concrete structures. However, this method has a major difficulty in inspect at high-places, such as a tunnel ceiling or a bridge girder. Moreover, its detection accuracy is dependent on a tester's experience. Therefore, we study about the non-contact acoustic inspection method of the concrete structure using the air borne sound wave and a laser Doppler vibrometer. In this method, the concrete surface is excited by air-borne sound wave emitted with a long range acoustic device (LRAD), and the vibration velocity on the concrete surface is measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer. A defect part is detected by the same flexural resonance as the hammer method. It is already shown clearly that detection of a defect can be performed from a long distance of 5 m or more using a concrete test object. Moreover, it is shown that a real concrete structure can also be applied. However, when the conventional LRAD was used as a sound source, there were problems, such as restrictions of a measurement angle and the surrounding noise. In order to solve these problems, basic examination which used the strong ultrasonic wave sound source was carried out. In the experiment, the concrete test object which includes an imitation defect from 5-m distance was used. From the experimental result, when the ultrasonic sound source was used, restrictions of a measurement angle become less severe and it was shown that circumference noise also falls dramatically.

  3. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach.

  4. Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Male Perioral Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to extend previous published findings in the authors' laboratory using a new automated technology to quantitatively characterize nonparticipatory perioral stiffness in healthy male adults. Method: Quantitative measures of perioral stiffness were sampled during a nonparticipatory task using a…

  5. Modeling and prediction of density distribution and microstructure in particleboards from acoustic properties by correlation of non-contact high-resolution pulsed air-coupled ultrasound and X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Hilbers, Ulrich; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Thömen, Heiko; Wenker, Jan L

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive density and microstructure quality control testing in particleboards (PBs) is necessary in production lines. A pulsed air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) high-resolution normal transmission system, together with a first wave tracking algorithm, were developed to image amplitude transmission G(p) and velocity c(p) distributions at 120kHz for PBs of specific nominal densities and five particle geometries, which were then correlated to X-ray in-plane density images ρ(s). Test PBs with a homogeneous vertical density profile were manufactured in a laboratory environment and conditioned in a standard climate (T=20°C, RH=65%) before the measurements. Continuous trends (R(2)>0.97) were obtained by matching the lateral resolution of X-ray images with the ACU sound field radius (σ(w)(o)=21mm) and by clustering the scatter plots. ρ(s)↦c(p) was described with a three-parameter non-linear model for each particle geometry, allowing for ACU density prediction with 3% uncertainty and PB testing according to EN312. ρ(s)↦G(p) was modeled by calculating ACU coupling gain and by fitting inverse power laws with offset of ρ(s) and c(p) to material attenuation, which scaled with particle volume. G(p) and c(p) variations with the frequency were examined, showing thickness resonances and scattering attenuation. The combination of ACU and X-ray data enabled successful particle geometry classification. The observed trends were interpreted in terms of multi-scale porosity and grain scattering with finite-difference time-domain simulations, which modeled arbitrarily complex stiffness and density distributions. The proposed method allows for non-contact determination of relations between acoustic properties and in-plane density distribution in plate materials. In future work, commercial PBs with non-uniform vertical density profiles should be investigated.

  6. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-11-12

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  7. Real-time detection of respiration rate with non-contact mode based on low-end imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoli; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Ming; Yang, Lei; Liu, Weiyu; Zhao, Jingsheng; Xing, Jinhui

    2013-09-01

    Standard instrumentation for the assessment of respiration rate is large and based on invasive method, and not suitable for daily inspection. An optical, simple and non-contact measurement method to detect human respiration rate using lowend imaging equipment is discussed. This technology is based on the visible light absorption of blood, which contains many important physiological information of the cardiovascular system. The light absorption of facial area can be indirectly reflected to gray value of the corresponding area image. In this paper, we acquire the respiration rate through the video signal captured by low-end imaging equipment. Firstly, the color CCD captures the facial area below the eyes and every frame of the video can be separated into three RGB channels. The blue channel is extracted as the research object. Then, we calculate the mean gray value for each image and draw the mean gray curve along the time. Fourier transform can get the frequency spectrogram of the graph, which is filtered through the Fourier filter. The extreme point is the value of the respiratory rate. Finally, an available interface program is designed and we have some volunteers tested. The correlation coefficient between the experimental data and the data provided by a reference instrument is 0.98. The consistency of the experimental results is very well. This technology costs so low that it will be widely used in medical and daily respiration rate measurement.

  8. Non-contact inline monitoring of thermoplastic CFRP tape quality using air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, W.; Fey, P.; Meiler, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2017-02-01

    Beginning with the aerospace industry, fiber reinforced plastics have spread towards many applications such as automotive, civil engineering as well as sports and leisure articles. Their superior strength and stiffness to mass ratio made them the number one material for achieving high performance. Especially continuous fiber reinforced plastics allow for the construction of structures which are custom tailored to their mechanical loads by adjusting the paths of the fibers to the loading direction. The two main constituents of CFRP are carbon fibers and matrix. Two possibilities for matrix material exist: thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix. While thermosetting matrix may yield better properties with respect to thermal loads, thermoplasticity opens a wide range of applications due to weldability, shapeability, and compatibility to e.g. injection molded thermoplastic materials. Thin (0.1 mm) thermoplastic continuous fiber CFRP tapes with a width of 100 mm were examined using air-coupled ultrasound. Transducers were arranged in reflection as well as transmission setup. By slanted incidence of the ultrasound on the tape surface, guided waves were excited in the material in fiber direction and perpendicular to the fiber direction. Artificial defects - fiber cuts, matrix cuts, circular holes, low velocity impacts from tool drop, and sharp bends - were produced. Experiments on a stationary tape showed good detectability of all artificial defects by guided waves. Also the effects of variation in material properties, fiber volume content and fiber matrix adhesion being the most relevant, on guided wave propagation were examined, to allow for quality assessment. Guided wave measurements were supported by destructive analysis. Also an apparatus containing one endless loop of CFRP tape was constructed and built to simulate inline testing of CFRP tapes, as it would be employed in a CFRP tape production environment or at a CFRP tape processing facility. The influences of tape

  9. Non-Contact Guide for Traveling Continuous Steel Plates in Loop Shaping Part Using Electromagnetic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwabara, Ken; Kumagai, Hiroaki; Oshinoya, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa; Kasuya, Hirakazu

    In the factory, the continuous steel plates subjected to iron and steel processes are supported by a series of rollers during processes such as rolling. However, because roller comes in contact with the steel plates, the problem of surface quality deterioration arises. To solve this problem, we develop a non-contact guide for parts of the steel plate at which its traveling direction changes in high-speed traveling by applying an electromagnetic force from the direction of the edge of the steel plate, and experimentally examine the effectiveness of the system. Moreover, when the position of the plate is controlled, it is extremely difficult to determine the mass of the control target. We confirm the suppressive effect of a sliding mode control theory that has robustness in mass variation. The results indicate that the proposed system can be achieved.

  10. A novel radar sensor for the non-contact detection of speech signals.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Mingke; Lu, Guohua; Jing, Xijing; Li, Sheng; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Jianqi

    2010-01-01

    Different speech detection sensors have been developed over the years but they are limited by the loss of high frequency speech energy, and have restricted non-contact detection due to the lack of penetrability. This paper proposes a novel millimeter microwave radar sensor to detect speech signals. The utilization of a high operating frequency and a superheterodyne receiver contributes to the high sensitivity of the radar sensor for small sound vibrations. In addition, the penetrability of microwaves allows the novel sensor to detect speech signals through nonmetal barriers. Results show that the novel sensor can detect high frequency speech energies and that the speech quality is comparable to traditional microphone speech. Moreover, the novel sensor can detect speech signals through a nonmetal material of a certain thickness between the sensor and the subject. Thus, the novel speech sensor expands traditional speech detection techniques and provides an exciting alternative for broader application prospects.

  11. Non-contact photoacoustic imaging using a fiber based interferometer with optical amplification

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiner, Armin; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Burgholzer, Peter; Jakoby, Bernhard; Berer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In photoacoustic imaging the ultrasonic signals are usually detected by contacting transducers. For some applications contact with the tissue should be avoided. As alternatives to contacting transducers interferometric means can be used to acquire photoacoustic signals remotely. In this paper we report on non-contact three and two dimensional photoacoustic imaging using an optical fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A detection beam is transmitted through an optical fiber network onto the surface of the specimen. Back reflected light is collected and coupled into the same optical fiber. To achieve a high signal/noise ratio the reflected light is amplified by means of optical amplification with an erbium doped fiber amplifier before demodulation. After data acquisition the initial pressure distribution is reconstructed by a Fourier domain reconstruction algorithm. We present remote photoacoustic imaging of a tissue mimicking phantom and on chicken skin. PMID:24298397

  12. Non-contact photoacoustic imaging using a fiber based interferometer with optical amplification.

    PubMed

    Hochreiner, Armin; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Burgholzer, Peter; Jakoby, Bernhard; Berer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In photoacoustic imaging the ultrasonic signals are usually detected by contacting transducers. For some applications contact with the tissue should be avoided. As alternatives to contacting transducers interferometric means can be used to acquire photoacoustic signals remotely. In this paper we report on non-contact three and two dimensional photoacoustic imaging using an optical fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A detection beam is transmitted through an optical fiber network onto the surface of the specimen. Back reflected light is collected and coupled into the same optical fiber. To achieve a high signal/noise ratio the reflected light is amplified by means of optical amplification with an erbium doped fiber amplifier before demodulation. After data acquisition the initial pressure distribution is reconstructed by a Fourier domain reconstruction algorithm. We present remote photoacoustic imaging of a tissue mimicking phantom and on chicken skin.

  13. Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Ikawa, Satoshi

    2012-06-18

    To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  14. An infrared-driven flexible pyroelectric generator for non-contact energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Jiang, Weitao; Liu, Hongzhong; Niu, Dong; Li, Xin; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xuan; Chen, Bangdao; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, energy harvesting technologies, which can scavenge many kinds of energies from our living environment to power micro/nanodevices, have attracted increasing attention. However, remote energy transmission, flexibility and electric waveform controllability remain the key challenges for wireless power supply by an energy harvester. In this paper, we design a new infrared-driven non-contact pyroelectric generator for harvesting heat energy, which avoids direct contact between the pyroelectric generator and heat source and realizes remote energy transfer exploiting the photothermal and penetrability of infrared light. The output voltage (under the input impedance of 100 MOhm) and short-circuit current of the pyroelectric generator consisting of a CNT/PVDF/CNT layer (20 mm × 5 mm × 100 μm) can be as large as 1.2 V and 9 nA, respectively, under a 1.45 W cm-2 near-infrared laser (808 nm). We also demonstrate the means by which the pyroelectric generator can modulate square waveforms with controllable periods through irradiation frequency, which is essential for signal sources and medical stimulators. The overshoot of square waveforms are in a range of 9.0%-13.1% with a rise time of 120 ms. The prepared pyroelectric generator can light a liquid crystal display (LCD) in a vacuum chamber from outside. This work paves the way for non-contact energy harvesting for some particular occasions where near-field energy control is not available.In recent years, energy harvesting technologies, which can scavenge many kinds of energies from our living environment to power micro/nanodevices, have attracted increasing attention. However, remote energy transmission, flexibility and electric waveform controllability remain the key challenges for wireless power supply by an energy harvester. In this paper, we design a new infrared-driven non-contact pyroelectric generator for harvesting heat energy, which avoids direct contact between the pyroelectric generator and heat

  15. Non-contact hemodynamic imaging reveals the jugular venous pulse waveform

    PubMed Central

    Amelard, Robert; Hughson, Richard L.; Greaves, Danielle K.; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Leung, Jason; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular monitoring is important to prevent diseases from progressing. The jugular venous pulse (JVP) waveform offers important clinical information about cardiac health, but is not routinely examined due to its invasive catheterisation procedure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the JVP can be consistently observed in a non-contact manner using a photoplethysmographic imaging system. The observed jugular waveform was strongly negatively correlated to the arterial waveform (r = −0.73 ± 0.17), consistent with ultrasound findings. Pulsatile venous flow was observed over a spatially cohesive region of the neck. Critical inflection points (c, x, v, y waves) of the JVP were observed across all participants. The anatomical locations of the strongest pulsatile venous flow were consistent with major venous pathways identified through ultrasound. PMID:28065933

  16. Design and Development of Non-Contact Bio-Potential Electrodes for Pervasive Health Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, Anthony J.; Nasuto, Slawomir J.

    2017-01-01

    For the advent of pervasive bio-potential monitoring, it will be necessary to utilize a combination of cheap, quick to apply, low-noise electrodes and compact electronics with wireless technologies. Once available, all electrical activity resulting from the processes of the human body could be actively and constantly monitored without the need for cumbersome application and maintenance. This could significantly improve the early diagnosis of a range of different conditions in high-risk individuals, opening the possibility for new treatments and interventions as conditions develop. This paper presents the design and implementation of compact, non-contact capacitive bio-potential electrodes utilising a low impedance current-to-voltage configuration and a bootstrapped voltage follower, demonstrating results applicable to research applications for capacitive electrocardiography and capacitive electromyography. The presented electrodes use few components, have a small surface area and are capable of acquiring a range of bio-potential signals. PMID:28045439

  17. Apparatus and method for non-contact surface voltage probing by scanning photoelectron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1992-09-01

    An apparatus and method for non-contact sensing electrical potentials of selected regions on the surface of a sample are provided. A typical sample is an integrated circuit, electronic device, or semiconductor material. The sample is positioned within a vacuum chamber and irradiated with an ultraviolet light beam so that the material emits electrons by the photoelectric effect. The electrons have kinetic energies which are variable according to the electrical potential of the surface of the material. Emitted electrons having kinetic energies within a predetermined range are selected by an electron energy analyzer. An electron detector receives the selected electrons and produces electrical signals corresponding to the energies of said selected electrons. In another embodiment of the invention, a modulated light beam other than the ultraviolet light probe beam irradiates the material in order to produce time varying modulation of the photoelectron energy spectrum.

  18. Scanning, non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Johannes D.; Mireles, Miguel; Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Farzam, Parisa; Martínez-Lozano, Mar; Casanovas, Oriol; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-01-01

    A scanning system for small animal imaging using non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (ncDOS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (ncDCS) is presented. The ncDOS uses a two-dimensional spectrophotometer retrieving broadband (610-900 nm) spectral information from up to fifty-seven source-detector distances between 2 and 5 mm. The ncDCS data is simultaneously acquired from four source-detector pairs. The sample is scanned in two dimensions while tracking variations in height. The system has been validated with liquid phantoms, demonstrated in vivo on a human fingertip during an arm cuff occlusion and on a group of mice with xenoimplanted renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26977357

  19. A Novel Radar Sensor for the Non-Contact Detection of Speech Signals

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Mingke; Lu, Guohua; Jing, Xijing; Li, Sheng; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Jianqi

    2010-01-01

    Different speech detection sensors have been developed over the years but they are limited by the loss of high frequency speech energy, and have restricted non-contact detection due to the lack of penetrability. This paper proposes a novel millimeter microwave radar sensor to detect speech signals. The utilization of a high operating frequency and a superheterodyne receiver contributes to the high sensitivity of the radar sensor for small sound vibrations. In addition, the penetrability of microwaves allows the novel sensor to detect speech signals through nonmetal barriers. Results show that the novel sensor can detect high frequency speech energies and that the speech quality is comparable to traditional microphone speech. Moreover, the novel sensor can detect speech signals through a nonmetal material of a certain thickness between the sensor and the subject. Thus, the novel speech sensor expands traditional speech detection techniques and provides an exciting alternative for broader application prospects. PMID:22399895

  20. Non-Contact Printed Aluminum Metallization of Si Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, H. A. S.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Li, Y.; Novak, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    Alternative solution-based techniques such as aerosol jet printing offer the dual benefits of contactless pattern deposition and high material utilization. We have used aerosol jet printing to investigate non-contact printed Al metal ink as a replacement for screen printed Al back contacts on wafer Si solar cells. This particle-based ink can be prepared at high loadings of 60 weight % metal, which enables rapid deposition of 1 - 10 um thick lines. Al lines printed on Si wafers and heated between 550 and 800 degrees C form low resistance contacts suitable for current extraction. The effectiveness of these printed Al back contacts has further been demonstrated by incorporating them into a series of 21 cm2 crystalline Si solar cells that produced a champion power conversion efficiency of 13%.

  1. Non-contact hemodynamic imaging reveals the jugular venous pulse waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Hughson, Richard L.; Greaves, Danielle K.; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Leung, Jason; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular monitoring is important to prevent diseases from progressing. The jugular venous pulse (JVP) waveform offers important clinical information about cardiac health, but is not routinely examined due to its invasive catheterisation procedure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the JVP can be consistently observed in a non-contact manner using a photoplethysmographic imaging system. The observed jugular waveform was strongly negatively correlated to the arterial waveform (r = ‑0.73 ± 0.17), consistent with ultrasound findings. Pulsatile venous flow was observed over a spatially cohesive region of the neck. Critical inflection points (c, x, v, y waves) of the JVP were observed across all participants. The anatomical locations of the strongest pulsatile venous flow were consistent with major venous pathways identified through ultrasound.

  2. UCSD/FRA non-contact ultrasonic guided-wave system for rail inspection: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, Stefano; Phillips, Robert; Nucera, Claudio; Bartoli, Ivan; Salamone, Salvatore; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood; Carr, Gary

    2011-04-01

    The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype has been designed and field tested with the support of Volpe National Transportation Systems Center and ENSCO, Inc. The goal of this project is to develop a rail defect detection system that provides (a) better defect detection reliability (including internal transverse head defects under shelling and vertical split head defects), and (b) higher inspection speed than achievable by current rail inspection systems. This effort is also in direct response to Safety Recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) following the disastrous train derailments at Superior, WI in 1992 and Oneida, NY in 2007 among others. The UCSD prototype uses non-contact ultrasonic probing of the rail head (laser and air-coupled), ultrasonic guided waves, and a proprietary real-time statistical analysis algorithm that maximizes the sensitivity to defects while minimizing false positives. The current design allows potential inspection speeds up to 40 mph, although all field tests have been conducted up to 15 mph so far. This paper summarizes (a) the latest technology development test conducted at the rail defect farm of Herzog, Inc. in St Joseph, MO in June 2010, and (b) the completion of the new Rail Defect Farm facility at the UCSD Camp Elliott Field Station with partial in-kind donations from the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway.

  3. The passive stiffness of the wrist and forearm

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Steven K.; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2012-01-01

    Because wrist rotation dynamics are dominated by stiffness (Charles SK, Hogan N. J Biomech 44: 614–621, 2011), understanding how humans plan and execute coordinated wrist rotations requires knowledge of the stiffness characteristics of the wrist joint. In the past, the passive stiffness of the wrist joint has been measured in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). Although these 1-DOF measurements inform us of the dynamics the neuromuscular system must overcome to rotate the wrist in pure flexion-extension (FE) or pure radial-ulnar deviation (RUD), the wrist rarely rotates in pure FE or RUD. Instead, understanding natural wrist rotations requires knowledge of wrist stiffness in combinations of FE and RUD. The purpose of this report is to present measurements of passive wrist stiffness throughout the space spanned by FE and RUD. Using a rehabilitation robot designed for the wrist and forearm, we measured the passive stiffness of the wrist joint in 10 subjects in FE, RUD, and combinations. For comparison, we measured the passive stiffness of the forearm (in pronation-supination), as well. Our measurements in pure FE and RUD agreed well with previous 1-DOF measurements. We have linearized the 2-DOF stiffness measurements and present them in the form of stiffness ellipses and as stiffness matrices useful for modeling wrist rotation dynamics. We found that passive wrist stiffness was anisotropic, with greater stiffness in RUD than in FE. We also found that passive wrist stiffness did not align with the anatomical axes of the wrist; the major and minor axes of the stiffness ellipse were rotated with respect to the FE and RUD axes by ∼20°. The direction of least stiffness was between ulnar flexion and radial extension, a direction used in many natural movements (known as the “dart-thrower's motion”), suggesting that the nervous system may take advantage of the direction of least stiffness for common wrist rotations. PMID:22649208

  4. Materials with negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim

    Negative stiffness, or a reversal in the usual assumed direction between causal forces and ensuing deformations, has been proposed as a pathway to materials which exceed theoretical performance bounds. Negative stiffness, as a concept, represents a relaxation of tacitly assumed material behavior, but it violates no natural laws. Negative stiffness, normally unstable without constraint, is permissible for stability under special conditions, for example a rigid boundary constraint so long as the material satisfies strong ellipticity in the parlance of elasticity. Hence, negative stiffness is not observed in materials or structures which are not constrained. If negative stiffness is allowed for inclusions of material, which are surrounded by a stabilizing positive stiffness matrix, composite theory predicts large increases in the mechanical damping and composite stiffness. The work herein explores several material systems which possess negative stiffness, and seeks to characterize the composite mechanical properties of these systems. Two metal matrix composite systems, namely Sn-VO2 and Sn-BaTIO3, were investigated. Here, negative stiffness arises from the ferroelastic phase transformations in the ceramic inclusions; stability is imparted by the tin matrix. Polycrystalline In-Tl and BaTIO 3 were also studied. Here, the entire material volume is phase transforming. Constraint is imparted on a small volume fraction of crystallites by the surrounding material. Various manifestations of negative stiffness were observed. Thermally broad damping peaks which depended upon thermal cycling were observed in the Sn-VO2 composites. Furthermore, mechanical instabilities were seen in composites intentionally designed to be unstable. Negative stiffness was indicated in the In-Tl alloy by magnification of damping peaks over those observed in single crystals, increases in damping peaks with increased cooling rates, occurrence of damping peaks before the appearance of martensite and

  5. Defect detection performance of the UCSD non-contact air-coupled ultrasonic guided wave inspection of rails prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Stefano; Nguyen, Thompson V.; Sternini, Simone; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood; Wilson, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype using an ultrasonic air-coupled guided wave signal generation and air-coupled signal detection, paired with a real-time statistical analysis algorithm, has been realized. This system requires a specialized filtering approach based on electrical impedance matching due to the inherently poor signal-to-noise ratio of air-coupled ultrasonic measurements in rail steel. Various aspects of the prototype have been designed with the aid of numerical analyses. In particular, simulations of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in rails have been performed using a Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) algorithm. The system's operating parameters were selected based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide a quantitative manner to evaluate different detection performances based on the trade-off between detection rate and false positive rate. The prototype based on this technology was tested in October 2014 at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colorado, and again in November 2015 after incorporating changes based on lessons learned. Results from the 2015 field test are discussed in this paper.

  6. Indirect measure of visceral adiposity ‘A Body Shape Index’ (ABSI) is associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bouchi, Ryotaro; Asakawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Takato; Murakami, Masanori; Sasahara, Yuriko; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Minami, Isao; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among indirect measures of visceral adiposity, A Body Shape Index (ABSI), which is defined as waist circumference (WC)/(body mass index (BMI)2/3×height1/2), is unique in that ABSI is positively correlated with visceral adiposity and is supposed to be independent of BMI. ABSI has been also shown to be linearly and positively associated with visceral fat mass and all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population. It is, however, uncertain whether ABSI could be associated with arterial stiffness in patients with diabetes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 607 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 64±12 years; 40.0% female). Visceral fat area (VFA, cm2) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA, cm2) were assessed with a dual-impedance analyzer. In order to estimate the risk for CVD, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, cm) was used for the assessment of arterial stiffness. Results ABSI was significantly and positively correlated with VFA (r=0.138, p=0.001) and negatively associated with BMI (r=−0.085, p=0.037). The correlation of z-score for ABSI with VFA remained significant (r=0.170, p<0.001) but not with BMI (r=0.009, p=0.820). ABSI (standardized β 0.095, p=0.043) but not WC (standardized β −0.060, p=0.200) was significantly and positively correlated with baPWV in the multivariate model including BMI as a covariate. Conclusions ABSI appears to reflect visceral adiposity independently of BMI and to be a substantial marker of arterial stiffening in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27026809

  7. Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot’s coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions. PMID:24273466

  8. Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-04-01

    This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot's coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions.

  9. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

  10. Non-contact printing of high aspect ratio Ag electrodes for polycrystalline silicone solar cell with electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yonghee; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Tak, Hyowon; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Kang, TaeSam; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a non-contact printing mechanism for high aspect ratio silver (Ag) electrodes fabricated by an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technique. Using high viscosity Ag paste ink, we were able to fabricate narrow and high aspect ratio electrodes. We investigated the effect of the surface energy of the substrate and improved the aspect ratio of printed lines through multiple printing. We fabricated the polycrystalline silicone solar cell with the Ag electrode and achieved cell efficiency of around 13.7%. The EHD jet printing mechanism may be an alternative method for non-contact fabrication of solar cells electrodes.

  11. A novel non-contact radar sensor for affective and interactive analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Lee, Yen-Shien; Shih, Hsiang-Lan; Chuang, Bor-Nian

    2013-01-01

    Currently, many physiological signal sensing techniques have been applied for affective analysis in Human-Computer Interaction applications. Most known maturely developed sensing methods (EEG/ECG/EMG/Temperature/BP etc. al.) replied on contact way to obtain desired physiological information for further data analysis. However, those methods might cause some inconvenient and uncomfortable problems, and not easy to be used for affective analysis in interactive performing. To improve this issue, a novel technology based on low power radar technology (Nanosecond Pulse Near-field Sensing, NPNS) with 300 MHz radio-frequency was proposed to detect humans' pulse signal by the non-contact way for heartbeat signal extraction. In this paper, a modified nonlinear HRV calculated algorithm was also developed and applied on analyzing affective status using extracted Peak-to-Peak Interval (PPI) information from detected pulse signal. The proposed new affective analysis method is designed to continuously collect the humans' physiological signal, and validated in a preliminary experiment with sound, light and motion interactive performance. As a result, the mean bias between PPI (from NPNS) and RRI (from ECG) shows less than 1ms, and the correlation is over than 0.88, respectively.

  12. Non-contact type time-domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quantitative analysis of fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Furukawa, Daisuke; Awasthi, Kamlesh

    2013-03-01

    A non-contact type time-domain system for the fluorescence diffuse optical tomography was designed. The system is evaluated by a phantom with a fluorescence target. The contamination of the non-specific scattering superimposed on the excitation profile but it could be reduced with closely locating the detection fiber to the surface (~1 mm). Next, we analyzed the contamination in the temporal profiles with an Intralipid solution phantom with a fluorescent target. The contamination to the excitation profile is not clearly observed but that to the fluorescence is strong with a short distance between the excitation source and detection. Finally, we have concluded that a larger distance of source and detector yields better fluorescence sensitivity because the background is limiting the fluorescence detection. On the other hand, the signal quality depends on the statistics and thus the optimum range of the distance comes around 30 mm. Finally, this research gives the idea for the design of the source and detection configuration.

  13. Development and study of novel non-contact ultrasonic motor based on principle of structural asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Dmitry A; Minchenya, Vladimir T

    2012-09-01

    The article presents novel design of non-contact rotary ultrasonic motor consisting of ring-shaped stator vibrating in in-plane flexural mode and rotor provided with blades. In contrast to other motors with similar design proposed motor relies on the use of standing ultrasonic waves. This simplifies design and electronic control of motor and becomes possible due to introduction of artificial asymmetry, for example by tilting one or several blades of the rotor relative to the surface normal. Operating principle of the proposed motor is based on acoustic radiation torque exerted on rotor by ultrasonic waves propagating in air or fluid gap between rotor and stator. This torque is calculated using finite element method by means of COMSOL Multiphysics software. Dynamics of rotor is studied using MathCad software and general theory of nonlinear conservative oscillators. Role of asymmetry is explained on the basis of comparative analysis of potential functions and phase trajectories for symmetric and asymmetric cases. It is shown that direction of rotation is determined by structural parameters of motor, particularly tilting direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise) of the blades. Conceptual design of motor with bidirectional rotation is described. Direction and velocity of rotation in the proposed conceptual design can be potentially controlled by changing excitation frequency of stator.

  14. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2013-09-10

    One or more of the embodiments of the present invention provide for a method of non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis which includes axial and radial acoustic standing wave fields. Particles are suspended in an aqueous solution, and this solution then flows into the cylindrical flow channel. While the solution flows through the flow channel, the outer structure of the flow channel is vibrated at a resonant frequency, causing a radial acoustic standing wave field to form inside the flow channel in the solution. These radial acoustic standing waves focus the particles suspended in the solution to the center axis of the cylindrical flow channel. At the same time, a transducer is used to create an axial acoustic standing wave field in the flow channel parallel to the axis of the flow channel. This drives the particles, which are already being focused to the center axis of the flow channel, to nodes or anti-nodes of the axial standing wave at half-wavelength intervals, depending on whether the particles are more or less dense and more or less compressible than the surrounding fluid.

  15. Non-contact start/stop motion control of HDD suspension using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo-Cheol; Park, Jong-Sung; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Pil

    2001-10-01

    In hard disk drives (HDD), an important issue related to increased storage density is the tribological problem of the head/disk interface. The conventional head gimbal assembly (HGA) of the HDD is used in a contact start/stop mode which results in wear particles and debris. This may cause a serious problem for the read/write function. In this paper, we propose a new type of suspension featuring a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator in order to prevent friction between the head (slider) and disk. As a first step, a finite element analysis is undertaken to investigate modal characteristics of the proposed HGA. Using the principal modal parameters, such as natural frequency, a control system model is established and a sliding mode control algorithm to achieve a non-contact start/stop (non-CSS) mode is formulated. The key control principle for accomplishing the non-CSS mode is that the control input is to be employed in the SMA actuator before the disk rotates, and is disconnected when the angular velocity of the disk is fully developed to achieve a certain flying height. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control system, a conventional HGA is modified to integrate the SMA actuator. The control algorithm is experimentally realized and controlled motions for the non-CSS mode are presented in the time domain.

  16. Resolving Intra- and Inter-Molecular Structure with Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Samuel Paul

    2015-08-21

    A major challenge in molecular investigations at surfaces has been to image individual molecules, and the assemblies they form, with single-bond resolution. Scanning probe microscopy, with its exceptionally high resolution, is ideally suited to this goal. With the introduction of methods exploiting molecularly-terminated tips, where the apex of the probe is, for example, terminated with a single CO, Xe or H2 molecule, scanning probe methods can now achieve higher resolution than ever before. In this review, some of the landmark results related to attaining intramolecular resolution with non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are summarised before focussing on recent reports probing molecular assemblies where apparent intermolecular features have been observed. Several groups have now highlighted the critical role that flexure in the tip-sample junction plays in producing the exceptionally sharp images of both intra- and apparent inter-molecular structure. In the latter case, the features have been identified as imaging artefacts, rather than real intermolecular bonds. This review discusses the potential for NC-AFM to provide exceptional resolution of supramolecular assemblies stabilised via a variety of intermolecular forces and highlights the potential challenges and pitfalls involved in interpreting bonding interactions.

  17. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S.; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets additional challenges on biocompatibility, temperature and chemical sensitivity and limited reagent volume. In this paper, we target at combining the desired features from the non-contact inkjet printing and the dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, minute volume manipulation with minimal dead volume, high-throughput and biocompatible printing process, multiplexed patterning with automatic alignment, printing availability for complex medium (cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable microfluidic cartridge design with out-of-cleanroom microfabrication, simple printing system assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards biological applications. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed. Printed droplets with 80µm in diameter have been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two unique features of MI-printer platform, multiplexed printing and self-alignment printing, have been successfully experimentally demonstrated (less than 10µm misalignment). In addition, combinatorial patterning and biological patterning, which utilizes the multiplexed and self-alignment printing nature of the MI-printer, have been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this robust printing technique for emerging biomedical applications. PMID:23525299

  18. Resolving Intra- and Inter-Molecular Structure with Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Samuel Paul

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular investigations at surfaces has been to image individual molecules, and the assemblies they form, with single-bond resolution. Scanning probe microscopy, with its exceptionally high resolution, is ideally suited to this goal. With the introduction of methods exploiting molecularly-terminated tips, where the apex of the probe is, for example, terminated with a single CO, Xe or H2 molecule, scanning probe methods can now achieve higher resolution than ever before. In this review, some of the landmark results related to attaining intramolecular resolution with non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are summarised before focussing on recent reports probing molecular assemblies where apparent intermolecular features have been observed. Several groups have now highlighted the critical role that flexure in the tip-sample junction plays in producing the exceptionally sharp images of both intra- and apparent inter-molecular structure. In the latter case, the features have been identified as imaging artefacts, rather than real intermolecular bonds. This review discusses the potential for NC-AFM to provide exceptional resolution of supramolecular assemblies stabilised via a variety of intermolecular forces and highlights the potential challenges and pitfalls involved in interpreting bonding interactions. PMID:26307976

  19. Crystallization and birefringence studies on fast structural changes followed by non-contact spectral birefringence and Raman spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serhatkulu, Toprak Fakr

    2000-11-01

    differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering. In general, it was found that the heat setting for samples stretched to low stretch ratios (2.0X) results in partial or complete relaxation of orientation. This relaxation disappears above certain conditions (≥2.5X) followed by rapid increase in birefringence and long-term slow increase. At higher stretch ratios where the precursor films attain high crystallinities, the rate of structural changes slows down. These results are attributed primarily to the establishment of highly constrained network structure where nodes are composed of crystallized regions formed during stretching stage. The measurements are performed at temperatures, where the crystallization rates are the fastest and our technique performed exceptionally well to follow these structural changes. As part of this dissertation, we also developed another robust, non-contact on-line measurement technique to monitor crystallinity of semicrystalline polymers (low-density polyethylene and polyoxymethylene) using laser Raman spectroscopy. In this technique, Raman instrument is calibrated off-line by partial least squares calibration method using the data from independent dynamic techniques such as small-angle light scattering, depolarized light intensity and DSC. The utility of this technique as an on-line measurement technique was illustrated by its application on the melt spinning of LDPE tape. In these experiments, the non-contact Raman spectroscopy technique successfully predicted the development of crystallinity along the spinline.

  20. Serial changes of liver stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in acute liver failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hidekatsu; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Onodera, Mio; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Yoshida, Yuichi; Kataoka, Koujiro; Sawara, Kei; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Oikawa, Kanta; Endo, Ryujin; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new technology used to determine liver elasticity. We report the case of a patient that survived hyperacute-type acute liver failure (ALF) and who showed a dramatic change in the value of shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by ARFI, which corresponded with the severity of her liver damage. The value of SWV increased significantly up to 3.6 ± 0.3 m/s during the encephalopathy phase and then decreased along with the recovery of liver function, the blood flow of the right portal vein, and the liver volume. These findings suggest the value of SWV in ALF as a reliable marker of liver tissue damage. Further investigations of the pathophysiological significance of SWV in ALF are warranted.

  1. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  2. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary-time are associated with arterial stiffness in Brazilian young adults

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Bielemann, Renata Moraes; Vianna, Carolina Ávila; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Barros, Fernando C.; Ekelund, Ulf; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time with pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Brazilian young adults. Methods Cross-sectional analysis with participants of the 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort who were followed-up from birth to 30 years of age. Overall physical activity (PA) assessed as the average acceleration (mg), time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA – min/day) and sedentary time (min/day) were calculated from acceleration data. Carotid-femoral PWV (m/s) was assessed using a portable ultrasound. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed as possible mediators. Multiple linear regression and g-computation formula were used in the analyses. Results Complete data were available for 1241 individuals. PWV was significantly lower in the two highest quartiles of overall PA (0.26 m/s) compared with the lowest quartile. Participants in the highest quartile of sedentary time had 0.39 m/s higher PWV (95%CI: 0.20; 0.57) than those in the lowest quartile. Individuals achieving ≥30 min/day in MVPA had lower PWV (β = −0.35; 95%CI: −0.56; −0.14). Mutually adjusted analyses between MVPA and sedentary time and PWV changed the coefficients, although results from sedentary time remained more consistent. WC captured 44% of the association between MVPA and PWV. DBP explained 46% of the association between acceleration and PWV. Conclusions Physical activity was inversely related to PWV in young adults, whereas sedentary time was positively associated. Such associations were only partially mediated by WC and DBP. PMID:26386211

  3. Non-contact detection of cardiac rate based on visible light imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huishi; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact method to detect human cardiac rate at a distance. This detection is based on the general lighting condition. Using the video signal of human face region captured by webcam, we acquire the cardiac rate based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory. In this paper, the cardiac rate detecting method is mainly in view of the blood's different absorptivities of the lights various wavelengths. Firstly, we discompose the video signal into RGB three color signal channels and choose the face region as region of interest to take average gray value. Then, we draw three gray-mean curves on each color channel with time as variable. When the imaging device has good fidelity of color, the green channel signal shows the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy information most clearly. But the red and blue channel signals can provide more other physiological information on the account of their light absorptive characteristics of blood. We divide red channel signal by green channel signal to acquire the pulse wave. With the passband from 0.67Hz to 3Hz as a filter of the pulse wave signal and the frequency spectrum superimposed algorithm, we design frequency extracted algorithm to achieve the cardiac rate. Finally, we experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable. The difference is about 2bmp. Through the experiment, we deduce that the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory based on visible light can also be used to detect other physiological information.

  4. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  5. High-speed defect detection in rails by non-contact guided ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Bartoli, Ivan; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Coccia, Stefano; Fateh, Mahmood

    2005-05-01

    Recent train accidents and associated direct and indirect repair costs have reaffirmed the need for developing rail defect detection systems more effective than those used today. The group at the UCSD NDE & Structural Health Monitoring Laboratory, in collaboration with the US Federal Railroad Administration, is conducting a study that aims at developing an inspection strategy for rails based on guided ultrasonic waves. This paper illustrates a guided-wave inspection system that is targeted to the detection of transverse-type cracks in the rail head, that are among the most dangerous flaws in rails. The methodology is based on a hybrid non-contact system that uses a pulsed laser for generating waves and multiple air-coupled sensors for detecting waves. The remote sensors are positioned as far away as 76 mm (3") from the top of rail head. Signal processing based on the Continuous Wavelet Transform is used to characterize the time-frequency content of the propagating waves. Features extracted after Discrete Wavelet processing of the wave signals result in a damage index that is robust with respect to noise and is related to the crack depth; the method allows for fast inspection with the potential for quantifying the extent of the flaw. It is demonstrated that the adopted setup allows for the detection of small cracks, as shallow as 1 mm in depth. It is also shown that the ultrasonic wave features considered in this study are directly related to the reduction of the rail head cross-sectional area caused by a transverse crack.

  6. Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Sievi, Noriane A; Franzen, Daniel; Kohler, Malcolm; Clarenbach, Christian F

    2015-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness. Methods In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted), arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI). Daily physical activity level (PAL) was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™) >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities. Results Patients suffered from moderate (35%), severe (32%), and very severe (33%) COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile) PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5) and mean (standard deviation) AI 26% (9.2%). PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=−9.32, P=0.017) independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation. Conclusion In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773 PMID:26392763

  7. [Correlation of liver stiffness measured by FibroTouch and FibroScan with Ishak fibrosis score in patients with chronic hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Chen, G F; Ping, J; Gu, H T; Zhao, Z M; Zhou, Y; Xing, F; Tao, Y Y; Mu, Y P; Liu, P; Liu, C H

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of liver stiffness measured by FibroTouch (FT) and FibroScan (FS) with Ishak fibrosis score in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: A total of 313 patients with chronic hepatitis B who visited Department of Liver Cirrhosis in Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from November 2014 to May 2016 were enrolled. All the patients underwent liver biopsy, and FT and FS were used to determine liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Serum biochemical parameters were measured, and the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) in a multi-parameter model of liver fibrosis and fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) index were calculated. The consistency between the results of four noninvasive examinations and Ishak fibrosis score was compared. The t-test was used for comparison of LSM determined by FT and FS. Pearson correlation analysis was used investigate the correlation between LSM determined by FT and FS; Spearman correlation analysis was used to investigate the correlation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and Knodell score with LSM determined by FT and FS; the correlation between LSM determined by FT and FS and fibrosis stage was analyzed by partial correlation analysis adjusted by Knodell score for liver inflammatory activity; Spearman correlation analysis was used for APRI, FIB-4, and fibrosis stage. Based on the Ishak fibrosis score, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the values of four noninvasive methods in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis. Results: There was no significant difference in LSM measured by FT and FS in all patients (15.75±9.42 kPa vs 15.42±10.52 kPa, P > 0.05) and Pearson correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation between them (r = 0.858, P < 0.01); serum ALT and AST levels and liver inflammatory activity were correlated with LSM determined by FT and FS. There

  8. Nanocharacterization of the negative stiffness of ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Skandani, A.; Ctvrtlik, R.; Al-Haik, M.

    2014-08-01

    Phase changing materials such as ferroelectric materials could exhibit negative stiffness under certain thermomechanical environments. This negative stiffness is embodied by a deflection along the opposite direction of the applied load. So far negative stiffness materials were investigated with the specific morphology of embedded inclusions in stiff matrices then the resulting composite is studied to measure the behavior of each constituent indirectly. In this study, a modified nonisothermal nanoindentation method is developed to measure the negative stiffness of triglycine sulfate single crystal directly. This in-situ method is intended to first demonstrate the feasibility of detecting the negative stiffness via nanoindentation and nanocreep of a ferroelectric material at its Curie point and then to quantify the negative stiffness without the need for embedding the crystal within a stiffer matrix.

  9. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension. PMID:27652829

  10. Validity and inter-day reliability of a free-oscillation test to measure knee extensor and knee flexor musculo-articular stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and inter-day reliability of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) in the knee-extensor (KE) and knee-flexor (KF) muscle groups, measured with a free-oscillation technique. Fourteen participants were measured, on two occasions, for KE and KF maximal isometric voluntary contraction, rate of torque development (RTD) and electromechanical delay (EMD), along with MAS using multiple sub-maximal loads relative to the individual's maximal voluntary contraction (MAS(%MVC)). Furthermore, 18 participants were tested for MAS using one fixed assessment load for each muscle group (MAS(FL)) during a separate series of tests on three occasions. MAS(%MVC) was significantly increased as load increased both in KE and in KF (p<0.01) fitting a curvilinear relationship as depicted in similar studies. Validity was demonstrated relating MAS(%MVC) to RTD (r=0.51-0.71, p<0.05) and to EMD (r=-0.56 to -0.67, p<0.05). While MAS(%MVC) reliability (ICC=0.62-0.89; CV=8.1-13.1%) was questionable to acceptable, MAS(FL) exhibited good to excellent reliability (ICC=0.81-0.94; CV=3.7-6.5%). No significant systematic bias was detected for any of the variables considered. The assessment of KE and KF MAS using the free-oscillation technique appears to be valid and reliable, with the use of MAS(FL) yielding higher reliability than the use of MAS(%MVC).

  11. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  12. Macroscopic Stiffness of Breast Tumors Predicts Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fenner, Joseph; Stacer, Amanda C.; Winterroth, Frank; Johnson, Timothy D.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tumors differ substantially from normal cells and tissues. Changes in stiffness or elasticity regulate pro-metastatic behaviors of cancer cells, but effects have been documented predominantly in isolated cells or in vitro cell culture systems. To directly link relative stiffness of tumors to cancer progression, we combined a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer with ex vivo measurements of bulk moduli of freshly excised, intact tumors. We found a high, inverse correlation between bulk modulus of resected tumors and subsequent local recurrence and metastasis. More compliant tumors were associated with more frequent, larger local recurrences and more extensive metastases than mice with relatively stiff tumors. We found that collagen content of resected tumors correlated with bulk modulus values. These data establish that relative differences in tumor stiffness correspond with tumor progression and metastasis, supporting further testing and development of tumor compliance as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. PMID:24981707

  13. Non-invasive assessment of changes in liver fibrosis via liver stiffness measurement in patients with chronic hepatitis B: impact of antiviral treatment on fibrosis regression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Choi, Eun Hee; Seok, Jae Yeon; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Young Nyun; Chon, Chae Yoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) can assess liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). We evaluated whether LSM can be used to assess changes in liver fibrosis during antiviral treatment using nucleos(t)ide analogs in patients with CHB. Methods We recruited 41 patients with CHB who had significant liver fibrosis, normal or slightly elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (≤2 × upper limit of normal), and detectable serum hepatitis B virus DNA before antiviral treatment. Patients in Group 1 (n = 23) and Group 2 (n = 18) underwent follow-up LSM after antiviral treatment for 1 and 2 years, respectively. Results The mean age, ALT and LSM value of all patients (34 men and 7 women) before antiviral treatment were 46.6 ± 9.5 years, 40.6 ± 17.2 IU/L and 12.9 ± 8.6 kPa, respectively. Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) was detected in 31 patients (75.6%). Fibrosis stage was F2 in 12 (29.3%), F3 in 6 (14.6%) and F4 in 23 (56.1%) patients. After antiviral treatment, LSM values and DNA positivity decreased significantly as compared to baseline (P = 0.018 and P < 0.001 in Group 1; P = 0.017 and P < 0.001 in Group 2, respectively), whereas ALT levels were unchanged (P = 0.063 in Group 1; P = 0.082 in Group 2). Conclusions Our preliminary data suggest that LSM can be used to assess liver fibrosis regression after antiviral treatment using nucleos(t)ide analogs in patients with CHB. PMID:21286337

  14. Improved noninvasive prediction of liver fibrosis by liver stiffness measurement in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease accounting for controlled attenuation parameter values.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Wong, Vincent Wai-Sun; Cammà, Calogero; Hiriart, Jean-Baptiste; Wong, Grace Lai-Hung; Marra, Fabio; Vergniol, Julien; Chan, Anthony Wing-Hung; Di Marco, Vito; Merrouche, Wassil; Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen; Barbara, Marco; Le-Bail, Brigitte; Arena, Umberto; Craxì, Antonio; de Ledinghen, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) frequently overestimates the severity of liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) is a new parameter provided by the same machine used for LSM and associated with both steatosis and body mass index, the two factors mostly affecting LSM performance in NAFLD. We aimed to determine whether prediction of liver fibrosis by LSM in NAFLD patients is affected by CAP values. Patients (n = 324) were assessed by clinical and histological (Kleiner score) features. LSM and CAP were performed using the M probe. CAP values were grouped by tertiles (lower 132-298, middle 299-338, higher 339-400 dB/m). Among patients with F0-F2 fibrosis, mean LSM values, expressed in kilopascals, increased according to CAP tertiles (6.8 versus 8.6 versus 9.4, P = 0.001), and along this line the area under the curve of LSM for the diagnosis of F3-F4 fibrosis was progressively reduced from lower to middle and further to higher CAP tertiles (0.915, 0.848-0.982; 0.830, 0.753-0.908; 0.806, 0.723-0.890). As a consequence, in subjects with F0-F2 fibrosis, the rates of false-positive LSM results for F3-F4 fibrosis increased according to CAP tertiles (7.2% in lower versus 16.6% in middle versus 18.1% in higher). Consistent with this, a decisional flowchart for predicting fibrosis was suggested by combining both LSM and CAP values.

  15. Sagittal abdominal diameter is a more independent measure compared with waist circumference to predict arterial stiffness in subjects with type 2 diabetes - a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthropometric measurements are useful in clinical practice since they are non-invasive and cheap. Previous studies suggest that sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) may be a better measure of visceral fat depots. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore and compare how laboratory and anthropometric risk markers predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years. Methods Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55–65 years old. Results There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r = 0.144, p = 0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.172, p = 0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.130, p = 0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r = 0.147, p = 0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r = 0.184, p = 0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p = 0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV. Conclusions We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23536999

  16. Development of a practicable non-contact bedside autonomic activation monitoring system using microwave radars and its clinical application in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Yoshida, Yuto; Kagawa, Masayuki; Kubota, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We developed a practicable, non-contact, autonomic activation monitoring system using microwave radars without imposing any stress on monitored individuals. Recently, the rapid increase in the aging population has raised concerns in developed countries. Thus, hospitals and care facilities will need to perform long-term health monitoring of elderly patients. The system allows monitoring of geriatric autonomic dysfunctions caused by chronic diseases, such as diabetes or myocardial infarction (MI), while measuring vital signs in non-contact way. The system measures heart rate variability (HRV) of elderly people in bed using dual, 24-GHz, compact microwave radars attached beneath the bed mattress. HRV parameters (LF, HF, and LF/HF) were determined from the cardiac peak-to-peak intervals, which were detected by radars using the maximum entropy method. We tested the system on 15 elderly people with and without diabetes or MI (72-99 years old) from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. at a special nursing home in Tokyo. LF/HF obtained by the system correlated significantly (R = 0.89; p < 0.01) with those obtained by Holter electrocardiography (ECG). Diabetic subjects showed significantly lower LF (radar) than non-diabetic (119.8 ± 57.8 for diabetic, 405.9 ± 112.6 for non-diabetic, p < 0.01). HF (radar) of post-MI subjects was significantly lower than that of non-MI (219.7 ± 131.7 for post-MI and 580.0 ± 654.6 for non-MI, p < 0.05). Previous studies using conventional ECG reveal that diabetic neuropathy decreases LF, and also MI causes parasympathetic attenuation which leads to HF reduction. Our study showed that average SDNN of post-MI patients is smaller than 50 ms which is known to have high mortality. The non-contact autonomic activation monitoring system allows a long-term health management especially during sleeping hours for elderly people at healthcare facilities.

  17. Exercise, Vascular Stiffness, and Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Jandu, Simran; Barodka, Viachaslau; Halushka, Marc K.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.; Belkin, Alexey M.; Nyhan, Daniel; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular aging is closely associated with increased vascular stiffness. It has recently been demonstrated that decreased nitric oxide (NO)‐induced S‐nitrosylation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) contributes to age‐related vascular stiffness. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that exercise restores NO signaling and attenuates vascular stiffness by decreasing TG2 activity and cross‐linking in an aging rat model. Methods and Results Rats were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise. Aging was associated with diminished phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylated vasodilator‐stimulated phosphoprotein abundance, suggesting reduced NO signaling. TG2 cross‐linking activity was significantly increased in old animals, whereas TG2 abundance remained unchanged. These alterations were attenuated in the exercise cohort. Simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) demonstrated increased aortic stiffness in old rats, compared to young, at all values of mean arterial pressure (MAP). The PWV‐MAP correlation in the old sedentary and old exercise cohorts was similar. Tensile testing of the vessels showed increased stiffness of the aorta in the old phenotype with a modest restoration of mechanical properties toward the young phenotype with exercise. Conclusions Increased vascular stiffness during aging is associated with decreased TG2 S‐nitrosylation, increased TG2 cross‐linking activity, and increased vascular stiffness likely the result of decreased NO bioavailability. In this study, a brief period of moderate aerobic exercise enhanced NO signaling, attenuated TG cross‐linking activity, and reduced ex vivo tensile properties, but failed to reverse functional vascular stiffness in vivo, as measured by PWV. PMID:24721796

  18. A Laboratory Laser-Ultrasonic Instrument for Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Paper Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, Emmanuel; Ridgway, Paul; Jackson, Ted; Habeger, Chuck; Russo, Rick

    2003-03-01

    For the paper industry, stiffness properties are an important parameter for producing more efficiently a fibrous material like paper. Some stiffness properties of paper webs can be obtained in a non-contact fashion using two lasers. The authors have developed an automated laboratory laser-ultrasonics instrument for paper, described here. The results of non-contact laser generation and detection of ultrasound are also presented. The paper grades investigated were heavy grades like linerboard, as well as copy paper.

  19. Simulation of the observability of atomic defects by atomic force microscopy in contact and non-contact modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. Yu.; Henderson, G. S.

    2002-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans of a crystal surface containing an atomic defect were simulated in both contact and non-contact regimes. When scanning in contact mode near a defect, the tip-sample force interaction experiences bifurcation of the lines of constant force. When the load force is small, the bifurcation causes the tip to be "pushed" out of the defect. However, if scan force is higher than some critical value (dependent upon the composition of the tip and sample) the AFM tip becomes "trapped" in the vicinity of defect. The trapped tip remains at the level of the vacancy and consequently crashes into the sample, as the scan continues. This results in either the tip apex being destroyed, or disruption of the crystal lattice around the defect. Both effects result in the "disappearance" of the defect from the scan images. The trap is intrinsic and cannot be avoided. For the case of non-contact mode, the tip position is driven by the scan force gradient rather than the force. Simulations show that for this case the trap does not exist and atomic defects will not be destroyed. This explains why atomic defects are generally not observed when using contact mode AFM, but are observed in non-contact AFM.

  20. Modified spleen stiffness measurement by transient elastography is associated with presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated hepatitis C virus cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Calvaruso, V; Bronte, F; Conte, E; Simone, F; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of liver transient elastography (TE), spleen TE and other noninvasive tests (AAR, APRI score, platelet count, platelet/spleen ratio) in predicting the presence and the size of oesophageal varices in compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis, we studied 112 consecutive patients with compensated HCV cirrhosis who underwent biochemical tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, liver TE and spleen TE by Fibroscan(®) (Echosens, Paris, France) using a modified software version with a range between 1.5 and 150 kPa. Spleen TE was not reliable in 16 patients (14.3%). Among the 96 patients with a valid measurement (69.8% men, mean age: 63.2 ± 9.5 years), 43.7% had no oesophageal varices, 29.2% had grade 1% and 27.1% had grade 2 or grade 3 oesophageal varices. Patients with values of 75 kPa by standard spleen TE had mean values of modified spleen TE of 117 kPa (range: 81.7-149.5). Linear regression revealed a significant correlation between modified spleen TE and oesophageal varix size (r = 0.501; beta: 0.763, SE: 0.144; P < 0.001). On univariate analysis, the variables associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices were AAR score, APRI score, platelet/spleen ratio, liver TE and modified spleen TE. On multivariate analysis, only modified spleen TE (OR: 1.026; 95% CI: 1.007-1.046; P = 0.006) and AAR (OR: 14.725; 95% CI: 1.928-112.459; P = 0.010) remained independently associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices. Platelet/spleen ratio was the best predictor of oesophageal varices area under the ROC curve (AUROC: 0.763, cut-off: 800, sensitivity: 74%, specificity: 70%), while modified spleen TE was more accurate in predicting grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices (AUROC: 0.82, cut-off: 54.0 kPa, sensitivity: 80%, specificity: 70%). Portal hypertension increases spleen stiffness, and the measurement of modified spleen TE is an accurate, noninvasive tool for predicting the presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated HCV

  1. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  2. Comparison of a novel non-contact biomotion sensor with wrist actigraphy in estimating sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Pallin, Michael; O'Hare, Emer; Zaffaroni, Alberto; Boyle, Patricia; Fagan, Ciara; Kent, Brian; Heneghan, Conor; de Chazal, Philip; McNicholas, Walter T

    2014-08-01

    Ambulatory monitoring is of major clinical interest in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. We compared a novel non-contact biomotion sensor, which provides an estimate of both sleep time and sleep-disordered breathing, with wrist actigraphy in the assessment of total sleep time in adult humans suspected of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Both systems were simultaneously evaluated against polysomnography in 103 patients undergoing assessment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a hospital-based sleep laboratory (84 male, aged 55 ± 14 years and apnoea-hypopnoea index 21 ± 23). The biomotion sensor demonstrated similar accuracy to wrist actigraphy for sleep/wake determination (77.3%: biomotion; 76.5%: actigraphy), and the biomotion sensor demonstrated higher specificity (52%: biomotion; 34%: actigraphy) and lower sensitivity (86%: biomotion; 94%: actigraphy). Notably, total sleep time estimation by the biomotion sensor was superior to actigraphy (average overestimate of 10 versus 57 min), especially at a higher apnoea-hypopnoea index. In post hoc analyses, we assessed the improved apnoea-hypopnoea index accuracy gained by combining respiratory measurements from polysomnography for total recording time (equivalent to respiratory polygraphy) with total sleep time derived from actigraphy or the biomotion sensor. Here, the number of misclassifications of obstructive sleep apnoea severity compared with full polysomnography was reduced from 10/103 (for total respiratory recording time alone) to 7/103 and 4/103 (for actigraphy and biomotion sensor total sleep time estimate, respectively). We conclude that the biomotion sensor provides a viable alternative to actigraphy for sleep estimation in the assessment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. As a non-contact device, it is suited to longitudinal assessment of sleep, which could also be combined with polygraphy in ambulatory studies.

  3. Research on the high-precision non-contact optical detection technology for banknotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaofeng; Liang, Tiancai; Luo, Pengfeng; Sun, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    The technology of high-precision laser interferometry was introduced for optical measurement of the banknotes in this paper. Taking advantage of laser short wavelength and high sensitivity, information of adhesive tape and cavity about the banknotes could be checked efficiently. Compared with current measurement devices, including mechanical wheel measurement device, Infrared measurement device, ultrasonic measurement device, the laser interferometry measurement has higher precision and reliability. This will improve the ability of banknotes feature information in financial electronic equipment.

  4. Stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Shahrzad; Noyce, Alastair J; Leslie, R David; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2011-10-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterised by fluctuating rigidity and stiffness of the axial and proximal lower limb muscles, with superimposed painful spasms and continuous motor unit activity on electromyography. Although rare in general neurology practice, once observed it is unforgettable. The general neurologist may see only one or two cases during his or her career and as such it remains underdiagnosed. Left untreated, SPS symptoms can progress to cause significant disability. Patients have a poor quality of life and an excess rate of comorbidity and mortality. The severity of symptoms and lack of public awareness of the condition create anxiety and uncertainty for people with the disease. This review aims to raise awareness of SPS and to improve the likelihood of its earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  5. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Nic Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used.

  6. Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Male Perioral Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shin-Ying; Lee, Jaehoon

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to extend previous published findings in the authors’ laboratory using a new automated technology to quantitatively characterize nonparticipatory perioral stiffness in healthy male adults. Method Quantitative measures of perioral stiffness were sampled during a nonparticipatory task using a computer-controlled linear motor servo programmed to impose a series of tensile displacements over a span of approximately 24 mm at the oral angle in 20 healthy young male adults. Perioral electromyograms were simultaneously sampled to confirm nonparticipation or passive muscle state. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force (ΔF) and oral span (ΔX), was modeled with regression techniques, and subsequently compared to previously reported perioral stiffness data for female adults. Results Multilevel regression analysis revealed a significant quadratic relation between the perioral stiffness and interangle span; however, no significant difference was found between adult males and females. Conclusion These normative measures will have application to future studies designed to objectively assess the effects of pathology (i.e., progressive neuromotor disease, traumatic brain insult) and intervention (pharmacologic, neurosurgical, and reconstructive surgery of the face [i.e., cleft lip, trauma, missile injuries]) on facial animation and speech kinematics. PMID:19717655

  7. Electrochemical stiffness in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassol, Hadi; Jones, Elizabeth M. C.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-11-01

    Although lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous in portable electronics, increased charge rate and discharge power are required for more demanding applications such as electric vehicles. The high-rate exchange of lithium ions required for more power and faster charging generates significant stresses and strains in the electrodes that ultimately lead to performance degradation. To date, electrochemically induced stresses and strains in battery electrodes have been studied only individually. Here, a new technique is developed to probe the chemomechanical response of electrodes by calculating the electrochemical stiffness via coordinated in situ stress and strain measurements. We show that dramatic changes in electrochemical stiffness occur due to the formation of different graphite-lithium intercalation compounds during cycling. Our analysis reveals that stress scales proportionally with the lithiation/delithiation rate and strain scales proportionally with capacity (and inversely with rate). Electrochemical stiffness measurements provide new insights into the origin of rate-dependent chemomechanical degradation and the evaluation of advanced battery electrodes.

  8. A non-contact energy transferring system for an electric vehicle-charging system based on recycled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Shibuya, H.; Murata, S.

    2006-04-01

    A non-contact automatic charging system for electric vehicle application is presented. The principle is the same as that of the transformer where the primary and the secondary circuits are separable but coupled with each other without using the hand coupler. In this paper, we present a possibility of removing the core of the secondary coil on the body for reducing the weight of the car. In our experiments, the primary core, which is placed on the earth floor, is made of Mn-Zn ferrite with square shape as 1 m×1 m×10 mm for a large cross-sectional area. The steel floor of the car assists to pass the magnetic flux. An efficiency rate over 90% with the test device of 2 kW is obtained without the conventional secondary core. The leakage inductance is well compensated by a resonance capacitor inserted in the secondary coil. In this experiment, the distance between the primary and the secondary coil is 100 mm and the switching frequency is 100 kHz. In addition, we developed a pavement method for the system. The method utilizes plates made from the waste of expanded polystyrene and rubber mats made from used tire. The plates are set up on the rubber mats and these mats are arranged over the non-contact charging system. The pavements can be replaced easily when the system is exchanged. Therefore, this pavement method is not only practical for the non-contact charging system but is also useful for recycling of resources and reduction of waste matters.

  9. The relationship between lower-body stiffness and dynamic performance.

    PubMed

    Pruyn, Elizabeth C; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron

    2014-10-01

    Greater levels of lower-body stiffness have been associated with improved outcomes for a number of physical performance variables involving rapid stretch-shorten cycles. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several measures of lower-body stiffness and physical performance variables typically evident during team sports in female athletes. Eighteen female athletes were assessed for quasi-static stiffness (myometry) for several isolated muscles in lying and standing positions. The muscles included the medial gastrocnemius (MedGast), lateral gastrocnemius, soleus, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic stiffness during unilateral hopping was also assessed. Participants were separated into relatively stiff and compliant groups for each variable. A number of significant differences in performance were evident between stiff and compliant subjects. When considering the quasi-static stiffness of the MedGast in lying and standing positions, relatively stiff participants recorded significantly superior results during agility, bounding, sprinting, and jumping activities. Stiffness as assessed by hopping did not discriminate between performance ability in any test. Relationships highlighted by MedGast results were supported by further significant differences in eccentric utilisation ratio and drop jump results between stiff and compliant groups for the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus in lying and standing positions. Higher levels of lower-body stiffness appear to be advantageous for females when performing rapid and (or) repeated stretch-shorten cycle movements, including sprinting, bounding, and jumping. Further, the stiffness of the MedGast is of particular importance during the performance of these activities. It is important for practitioners working with athletes in sports that rely upon these activities for success to consider stiffness assessment and modification.

  10. Non-contact continuous-wave diffuse optical tomographic system to capture vascular dynamics in the foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, Jennifer W.; Kim, Hyun K.; Khalil, Michael A.; Fong, Christopher J.; Marone, Alessandro; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic optical tomographic imaging has shown promise in diagnosing and monitoring peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which affects 8 to 12 million in the United States. PAD is the narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the lower extremities. Prolonged reduced blood flow to the foot leads to ulcers and gangrene, which makes placement of optical fibers for contact-based optical tomography systems difficult and cumbersome. Since many diabetic PAD patients have foot wounds, a non-contact interface is highly desirable. We present a novel non-contact dynamic continuous-wave optical tomographic imaging system that images the vasculature in the foot for evaluating PAD. The system images at up to 1Hz by delivering 2 wavelengths of light to the top of the foot at up to 20 source positions through collimated source fibers. Transmitted light is collected with an electron multiplying charge couple device (EMCCD) camera. We demonstrate that the system can resolve absorbers at various locations in a phantom study and show the system's first clinical 3D images of total hemoglobin changes in the foot during venous occlusion at the thigh. Our initial results indicate that this system is effective in capturing the vascular dynamics within the foot and can be used to diagnose and monitor treatment of PAD in diabetic patients.

  11. Anatomical co-registration using spatio-temporal features of a non-contact near-infrared optical scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Jean; Rodriguez, Suset; Velez Mejia, Maximiliano; Clark, Gabrielle; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2014-02-01

    Non-contact based near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging devices are developed for non-invasive imaging of deep tissues in various clinical applications. Most of these devices focus on obtaining the spatial information for anatomical co-registration of blood vessels as in sub-surface vein localization applications. In the current study, the anatomical co-registration of blood vessels based on spatio-temporal features was performed using NIR optical imaging without the use of external contrast agents. A 710 nm LED source and a compact CCD camera system were employed during simple cuff (0 to 60 mmHg) experiment in order to acquire the dynamic NIR data from the dorsum of a hand. The spatio-temporal features of dynamic NIR data were extracted from the cuff experimental study to localize vessel according to blood dynamics. The blood vessels shape is currently reconstructed from the dynamic data based on spatio-temporal features. Demonstrating the spatio-temporal feature of blood dynamic imaging using a portable non-contact NIR imaging device without external contrast agents is significant for applications such as peripheral vascular diseases.

  12. Non-contact versus contact-based sensing methodologies for in-home upper arm robotic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ayanna; Brooks, Douglas; Brown, Edward; Gebregiorgis, Adey; Chen, Yu-Ping

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, robot-assisted rehabilitation has gained momentum as a viable means for improving outcomes for therapeutic interventions. Such therapy experiences allow controlled and repeatable trials and quantitative evaluation of mobility metrics. Typically though these robotic devices have been focused on rehabilitation within a clinical setting. In these traditional robot-assisted rehabilitation studies, participants are required to perform goal-directed movements with the robot during a therapy session. This requires physical contact between the participant and the robot to enable precise control of the task, as well as a means to collect relevant performance data. On the other hand, non-contact means of robot interaction can provide a safe methodology for extracting the control data needed for in-home rehabilitation. As such, in this paper we discuss a contact and non-contact based method for upper-arm rehabilitation exercises that enables quantification of upper-arm movements. We evaluate our methodology on upper-arm abduction/adduction movements and discuss the advantages and limitations of each approach as applied to an in-home rehabilitation scenario.

  13. Optical full-field holographic detection system for non-contact photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    We introduce an innovative detection approach for photoacoustic tomography. The pressure induced surface displacement is obtained in 2D by Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) in a repetitive measurement with a variable time delay between excitation- and detection pulses. The detection approach works without any physical contact to the object surface and is very versatile in terms of an adjustable object surface area and an adjustable temporal sampling rate. Furthermore, the approach is potentially very fast by the use of a high speed camera and a high repetition laser excitation and detection. In a proof of concept measurement, transparent silicone cubes with black silicone sphere absorbers are measured. In order to validate the acquired displacement data, the pressure is measured using a lipstick needle hydrophone and correlated to the measured displacement.

  14. Elastic-Stiffness Coefficients of Titanium Diboride

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Hassel; Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-01-01

    Using resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured the monocrystal elastic-stiffness coefficients, the Voigt Cij, of TiB2. With hexagonal symmetry, TiB2 exhibits five independent Cij: C11, C33, C44, C12, C13. Using Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging, we converted these monocrystal values to quasiisotropic (polycrystal) elastic stiffnesses. Briefly, we comment on effects of voids. From the Cij, we calculated the Debye characteristic temperature, the Grüneisen parameter, and various sound velocities. Our study resolves the enormous differences between two previous reports of TiB2’s Cij. PMID:27504232

  15. Use of a laser displacement sensor with a non-contact electromagnetic vibration device for assessment of simulated periodontal tissue conditions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Masaru; Hayashi, Makoto; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2016-01-01

    A non-contact electromagnetic vibration device (NEVD) was previously developed to monitor the condition of periodontal tissues by assessing mechanical parameters. This system requires placement of an accelerometer on the target tooth, to detect vibration. Using experimental tooth models, we evaluated the performance of an NEVD system with a laser displacement sensor (LDS), which does not need an accelerometer. Simulated teeth (polyacetal rods) were submerged at various depths in simulated bone (polyurethane or polyurethane foam) containing simulated periodontal ligament (tissue conditioner). Then, mechanical parameters (resonant frequency, elastic modulus, and viscosity coefficient) were assessed using the NEVD with the following detection methods: Group 1, measurement with an accelerometer; Group 2, measurement with an LDS in the presence of the accelerometer; and Group 3, measurement with an LDS in the absence of the accelerometer. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric methods (n = 5) (P < 0.05). The three mechanical parameters significantly increased with increasing depth. In addition, the mechanical parameters significantly differed between the polyurethane and polyurethane foam models. Although Groups 1 and 2 did not significantly differ, most all mechanical parameters in Group 3 were significantly larger and more distinguishable than those in Groups 1 and 2. The LDS was more accurate in measuring mechanical parameters and better able to differentiate periodontal tissue conditions. (J Oral Sci 58, 93-99, 2016).

  16. Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart-Rate Detection in Ambient Light Using Photoplethysmographic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart-Rate Detection in Ambient Light Using Photoplethysmographic...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7136 October 2014 Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Examination of a Novel Method for

  17. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  18. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy, held in Bad Essen, Germany, from 15 18th August 2005, attracted a record breaking number of participants presenting excellent contributions from a variety of scientific fields. This clearly demonstrated the high level of activity and innovation present in the community of NC-AFM researchers and the continuous growth of the field. The strongest ever participation of companies for a NC-AFM meeting is a sign for the emergence of new markets for the growing NC-AFM community; and the high standard of the products presented at the exhibition, many of them brand-new developments, reflected the unbroken progress in technology. The development of novel technologies and the sophistication of known techniques in research laboratories and their subsequent commercialization is still a major driving force for progress in this area of nanoscience. The conference was a perfect demonstration of how progress in the development of enabling technologies can readily be transcribed into basic research yielding fundamental insight with an impact across disciplines. The NC-AFM 2005 scientific programme was based on five cornerstones, each representing an area of vivid research and scientific progress. Atomic resolution imaging on oxide surfaces, which has long been a vision for the catalysis community, appears to be routine in several laboratories and after a period of demonstrative experiments NC-AFM now makes unique contributions to the understanding of processes in surface chemistry. These capabilities also open up new routes for the analysis of clusters and molecules deposited on dielectric surfaces where resolution limits are pushed towards the single atom level. Atomic precision manipulation with the dynamic AFM left the cradle of its infancy and flourishes in the family of bottom-up fabrication nanotechnologies. The systematic development of established and the introduction of new concepts of contrast

  19. Quality Control of Injection Molded Eyewear by Non-Contact Deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A.; Zelzer, B.; Langenbucher, A.; Eppig, T.

    2014-07-01

    Occupational eye wear such as safety spectacles are manufactured by injection molding techniques. Testing of the assembled safety spectacle lenses in transmission is state of the art, but there is a lack of surface measurement systems for occupational safety lenses. The purpose of this work was to validate a deflectometric setup for topography measurement, detection of defects and visualization of the polishing quality, e.g. casting indentations or impressions, for the production process of safety spectacles. The setup is based on a customized stereo phase measuring deflectometer (PMD), equipped with 3 cameras with f'1,2 = 16 mm and f'3 = 8.5 mm and a specified measurement uncertainty of ± 3 μm. Sixteen plastic lenses and 8 corresponding injection molds from 4 parallel cavities were used for validation of the deflectometer. For comparison an interferometric method and a reference standard (< λ/10 super polished) was used. The accuracy and bias with a spherical safety spectacle sample was below 1 μm, according to DIN ISO 5725-2.2002-12. The repeatability was 2.1 μm and 35.7 μm for a blind radius fit. In conclusion, the PMD technique is an appropriate tool for characterizing occupational safety spectacle and injections mold surfaces. With the presented setup we were able to quantify the surface quality. This can be useful and may optimize the quality of the end product, in addition to standardized measuring systems in transmission.

  20. Non-contact current and voltage sensing method using a clamshell housing and a ferrite cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Gary D.; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C.; Schappert, Michael

    2016-04-26

    A method of measurement using a detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient technique for to measuring current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  1. Non-contact Doppler radar monitoring of cardiorespiratory motion for Siberian sturgeon.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Noah; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first reported use of Doppler radar to remotely sense heart and ventilation rates of fish. The Radar reported 35 to 40 BPM heart rate and 115 to 145 BPM ventilation rates for Siberian Sturgeon, with agreement from a video reference. Conventional fish vital signs measurements require invasive surgery and human handling--these are problematic for large scale monitoring, for measuring deep sea fish, and other situations which preclude human interaction with each individual subject. These results show a useful application of radar to augment existing cardiovascular and ventilatory activity sensing techniques and enable monitoring in a wider range of situations.

  2. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a

  3. A Hygroscopic Sensor Electrode for Fast Stabilized Non-Contact ECG Signal Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2015-08-05

    A capacitive electrocardiography (cECG) technique using a non-invasive ECG measuring technology that does not require direct contact between the sensor and the skin has attracted much interest. The system encounters several challenges when the sensor electrode and subject's skin are weakly coupled. Because there is no direct physical contact between the subject and any grounding point, there is no discharge path for the built-up electrostatic charge. Subsequently, the electrostatic charge build-up can temporarily contaminate the ECG signal from being clearly visible; a stabilization period (3-15 min) is required for the measurement of a clean, stable ECG signal at low humidity levels (below 55% relative humidity). Therefore, to obtain a clear ECG signal without noise and to reduce the ECG signal stabilization time to within 2 min in a dry ambient environment, we have developed a fabric electrode with embedded polymer (FEEP). The designed hygroscopic FEEP has an embedded superabsorbent polymer layer. The principle of FEEP as a conductive electrode is to provide humidity to the capacitive coupling to ensure strong coupling and to allow for the measurement of a stable, clear biomedical signal. The evaluation results show that hygroscopic FEEP is capable of rapidly measuring high-accuracy ECG signals with a higher SNR ratio.

  4. Computing Real-time Streamflow Using Emerging Technologies: Non-contact Radars and the Probability Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, J. W.; Bjerklie, D. M.; Jones, J. W.; Minear, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring streamflow, developing, and maintaining rating curves at new streamgaging stations is both time-consuming and problematic. Hydro 21 was an initiative by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide vision and leadership to identify and evaluate new technologies and methods that had the potential to change the way in which streamgaging is conducted. Since 2014, additional trials have been conducted to evaluate some of the methods promoted by the Hydro 21 Committee. Emerging technologies such as continuous-wave radars and computationally-efficient methods such as the Probability Concept require significantly less field time, promote real-time velocity and streamflow measurements, and apply to unsteady flow conditions such as looped ratings and unsteady-flood flows. Portable and fixed-mount radars have advanced beyond the development phase, are cost effective, and readily available in the marketplace. The Probability Concept is based on an alternative velocity-distribution equation developed by C.-L. Chiu, who pioneered the concept. By measuring the surface-water velocity and correcting for environmental influences such as wind drift, radars offer a reliable alternative for measuring and computing real-time streamflow for a variety of hydraulic conditions. If successful, these tools may allow us to establish ratings more efficiently, assess unsteady flow conditions, and report real-time streamflow at new streamgaging stations.

  5. A Hygroscopic Sensor Electrode for Fast Stabilized Non-Contact ECG Signal Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Ee-May; Chung, Wan-Young

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive electrocardiography (cECG) technique using a non-invasive ECG measuring technology that does not require direct contact between the sensor and the skin has attracted much interest. The system encounters several challenges when the sensor electrode and subject’s skin are weakly coupled. Because there is no direct physical contact between the subject and any grounding point, there is no discharge path for the built-up electrostatic charge. Subsequently, the electrostatic charge build-up can temporarily contaminate the ECG signal from being clearly visible; a stabilization period (3–15 min) is required for the measurement of a clean, stable ECG signal at low humidity levels (below 55% relative humidity). Therefore, to obtain a clear ECG signal without noise and to reduce the ECG signal stabilization time to within 2 min in a dry ambient environment, we have developed a fabric electrode with embedded polymer (FEEP). The designed hygroscopic FEEP has an embedded superabsorbent polymer layer. The principle of FEEP as a conductive electrode is to provide humidity to the capacitive coupling to ensure strong coupling and to allow for the measurement of a stable, clear biomedical signal. The evaluation results show that hygroscopic FEEP is capable of rapidly measuring high-accuracy ECG signals with a higher SNR ratio. PMID:26251913

  6. Non-Contact Tabletop Mechanical Testing of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    system by conducting a series of creep testing on a relevant UHTC. EMMA-2s key design improvements were driven by the limitations of EMMA-1 which...empirically measure the flux density at the ribbon location. It operates on the principle that a semiconductor carrying current develops an electromotive

  7. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  8. Arterial stiffness in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Stuart B; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness is an age-related process that is a shared consequence of numerous diseases including diabetes mellitus (DM), and is an independent predictor of mortality both in this population and in the general population. While much has been published about arterial stiffness in patients with DM, a thorough review of the current literature is lacking. Using a systematic literature search strategy, we aimed to summarize our current understanding related to arterial stiffness in DM. We review key studies demonstrating that, among patients with established DM, arterial stiffness is closely related to the progression of complications of DM, including nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. It is also becoming clear that arterial stiffness can be increased even in pre-diabetic populations with impaired glucose tolerance, and in those with the metabolic syndrome (METS), well before the onset of overt DM. Some data suggests that arterial stiffness can predict the onset of DM. However, future work is needed to further clarify whether large artery stiffness and the pulsatile hemodynamic changes that accompany it are involved in the pathogenesis of DM, and whether interventions targeting arterial stiffness are associated with improved clinical outcomes in DM. We also review of the potential mechanisms of arterial stiffness in DM, with particular emphasis on the role of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and nitric oxide dysregulation, and address potential future directions for research.

  9. An investigation into the concurrent collection of human scent and epithelial skin cells using a non-contact sampling device.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Norma Iris; Mendel, Julian; Holness, Howard; La Salvia, Joel; Moroose, Tina; Eckenrode, Brian; Stockham, Rex; Furton, Kenneth; Mills, DeEtta

    2016-09-01

    In criminal investigations, the collection of human scent often employs a non-contact, dynamic airflow device, known as the Scent Transfer Unit 100 (STU-100), to transfer volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from an object/person onto a collection material that is subsequently presented to human scent discriminating canines. Human scent is theorized to be linked to epithelial skin cells that are shed at a relatively constant rate allowing both scent and cellular material to be deposited into the environment and/or onto objects. Simultaneous collection of cellular material, with adequate levels of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (nDNA), and human scent using a non-invasive methodology would facilitate criminal investigations. This study evaluated the STU-100 for the concurrent collection of human scent and epithelial skin cells from a porous (paper) and non-porous (stainless steel bar) object that was held for a specified period of time in the dominant hand of twenty subjects (10 females and 10 males). Human scent analysis was performed using headspace static solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS). A polycarbonate filter was used to trap epithelial skin cells which, upon extraction, were subsequently analyzed, inter-laboratory, using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The STU-100 proved to be inadequate for collecting the minimum number of epithelial skin cells required to obtain nuclear DNA concentrations above the limit of detection for the qPCR kit. With regard to its use for human scent collection, a reduction in the number and mass of compounds was observed when compared to samples that were directly collected. However, when the indirect collection of human scent from the two different objects was compared, a greater number and mass of compounds was observed from the non-porous object than from the porous object. This outcome suggests that the matrix composition of the scent source could affect the

  10. Through-transmission ultrasonic imaging of subsurface defects using non-contact laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, R. J.; Shan, Q.

    Through-transmission ultrasonic NDT measurements have been performed with a noncontact laser combination system. High power (about 2 MW) laser pulses were used for the generation of longitudinal pulses in metallic samples. On reaching the far surface, ultrasound was detected with a 50 cm confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. The interferometer analysed speckle from backscattered laser light so that measurements could be made from samples with only a machine finish. Signal-to-noise ratios were sufficiently good for 2D scans to be performed, producing optical images of artificial defects. For improved image quality, signals were normalized taking into account changes in sample surface reflectivity. Median filtering was also used. Results show that images of 4-mm diameter drill holes can be obtained with resolutions of +/- 0.5 mm.

  11. Non-contact current and voltage sensor having detachable housing incorporating multiple ferrite cylinder portions

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Gary D.; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C.; Schappert, Michael A.

    2016-04-26

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing formed from two portions that mechanically close around the wire and that contain the current and voltage sensors. The current sensor is a ferrite cylinder formed from at least three portions that form the cylinder when the sensor is closed around the wire with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap between two of the ferrite portions along the circumference to measure current. A capacitive plate or wire is disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  12. Real-time image processing for non-contact monitoring of dynamic displacements using smartphone technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jae-Hong; Gelo, Nikolas J.; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    The newly developed smartphone application, named RINO, in this study allows measuring absolute dynamic displacements and processing them in real time using state-of-the-art smartphone technologies, such as high-performance graphics processing unit (GPU), in addition to already powerful CPU and memories, embedded high-speed/ resolution camera, and open-source computer vision libraries. A carefully designed color-patterned target and user-adjustable crop filter enable accurate and fast image processing, allowing up to 240fps for complete displacement calculation and real-time display. The performances of the developed smartphone application are experimentally validated, showing comparable accuracy with those of conventional laser displacement sensor.

  13. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Wray, William O.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established.

  14. Non-contact vibration sensor using bifurcated bundle glass fiber for real-time monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putha, K.; Dinakar, D.; Shankar, M. Sai; Srimannarayana, K.; Vengal Rao, P.; Sengupta, D.; Reddy, P. Saidi

    2011-12-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor is demonstrated using bifurcated bundle fiber based on the principle of extrinsic displacement sensor. An IR source is used along with glass fibers to avoid the effect of stray light in sensing. The encapsulation of the sensor enables easy alignment, flexible handling and usage in harsh environments. The sensor is capable of measuring the frequencies up to 650Hz with vibration amplitude resolution of 10μm, enough to monitor the vibrations generated in heavy machines. The sensor is tested in the field to monitor the health condition of the diesel engine.

  15. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Wray, W.O.

    1994-12-27

    The apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established. 3 figures.

  16. Non-contact analysis of the adsorptive ink capacity of nano silica pigments on a printing coating base.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Yu Dong

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared spectra combined with partial least squares were proposed as a means of non-contact analysis of the adsorptive ink capacity of recording coating materials in ink jet printing. First, the recording coating materials were prepared based on nano silica pigments. 80 samples of the recording coating materials were selected to develop the calibration of adsorptive ink capacity against ink adsorption (g/m2). The model developed predicted samples in the validation set with r2  = 0.80 and SEP = 1.108, analytical results showed that near infrared spectra had significant potential for the adsorption of ink capacity on the recording coating. The influence of factors such as recording coating thickness, mass ratio silica: binder-polyvinyl alcohol and the solution concentration on the adsorptive ink capacity were studied. With the help of the near infrared spectra, the adsorptive ink capacity of a recording coating material can be rapidly controlled.

  17. Fusion of wireless and non-contact technologies for the dynamic testing of a historic RC bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Rosalba; Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio; Gentile, Carmelo; Chatzi, Eleni N.; Serantoni, Eugenio; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a dynamic testing and corresponding signal processing methodology is presented for condition assessment of bridge structures, via use of a diverse and potentially dense grid of low-cost and easily deployable monitoring technologies. In particular, wireless and non-contact sensors are simultaneously deployed on a historic reinforced concrete bridge in order to record acceleration and dynamic displacement response, under operational loading conditions. An innovative monitoring approach is proposed on both the hardware (sensors) and software (algorithmic) front, in which an effective data fusion procedure is adopted for fusing these alternative technologies for vibration-based monitoring in terms of both acceleration and displacement information. The demonstrated efficacy of the fusion procedure on the case-study of an actual operating system, the historic Brivio bridge, reveals the potential of this approach within the context of structural monitoring, where acquisition of heterogeneous information certainly proves advantageous.

  18. Monitoring the Bending Stiffness of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiongwen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden

    2007-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the accessibility of genomic sequences provides an inherent regulation mechanism for gene expression through variations in bending stiffness encoded by the nucleic acid sequence. Cyclization of dsDNA is the prevailing method for determining DNA bending stiffness. Recent cyclization data for short dsDNA raises several fundamental questions about the soundness of the cyclization method, particularly in cases where the probability of highly bent DNA conformations is low. We herein evaluate the role of T4 DNA ligase in the cyclization reaction by inserting an environmental sensitive base analogue, 2-amino purine, to the DNA molecule. By monitoring the 2-AP fluorescence under standard cyclization conditions, it is found that in addition to trapping highly-bent cyclic DNA conformations, T4 DNA ligase enhances the apparent base pair flip out rate, thus exaggerating the measured flexibility. This result is further confirmed using fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We show that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on suitably labeled dsDNA provides an alternative approach for quantifying the bending stiffness of short fragments. DNA bending stiffness results obtained using FRET are compared with literature values.

  19. Spot morphology of non-contact printed protein molecules on non-porous substrates with a range of hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-01-21

    Non-contact inkjet printing technology is one of the most promising tools for producing microarrays. The quality of the microarray depends on the type of the substrate used for printing biomolecules. Various porous and non-porous substrates have been used in the past, but due to low production cost and easy availability, non-porous substrates like glass and plastic are preferred over porous substrates. On these non-porous substrates, obtaining spot uniformity and a high signal to noise ratio is a big challenge. In our research work, we have modified pristine glass slides using various silanes to produce a range of hydrophobic glass substrates. The hydrophobicities of the slides expressed in the contact angle (θ) of a sessile drop of water were 49°, 61°, 75°, 88° and 103°. Using a non-contact inkjet printer, microarrays of biotinylated biomolecules (BSA and IgG) were produced on these modified glass substrates, pristine (untreated) glass and also on HTA polystyrene slides. The uniformity of the spots, reflecting the distribution of the biomolecules in the spots, was analyzed and compared using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The quality of the spots was superior on the glass slide with a contact angle of ∼75°. We also investigated the influence of the hydrophobicity of the substrate on a two-step, real diagnostic antibody assay. This nucleic acid microarray immunoassay (NAMIA) for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus showed that on highly hydrophilic (θ < 10°) and hydrophobic substrates (θ > 100°) the assay signal was low, whereas an excellent signal was obtained on the substrates with intermediate contact angles, θ ∼ 61° and θ ∼ 75°, respectively.

  20. Non-contact respiration monitoring for in-vivo murine micro computed tomography: characterization and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Wait, J. Matthew; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto Z.

    2012-09-01

    A cone beam micro-CT has previously been utilized along with a pressure-tracking respiration sensor to acquire prospectively gated images of both wild-type mice and various adult murine disease models. While the pressure applied to the abdomen of the subject by this sensor is small and is generally without physiological effect, certain disease models of interest, as well as very young animals, are prone to atelectasis with added pressure, or they generate too weak a respiration signal with this method to achieve optimal prospective gating. In this work we present a new fibre-optic displacement sensor which monitors respiratory motion of a subject without requiring physical contact. The sensor outputs an analogue signal which can be used for prospective respiration gating in micro-CT imaging. The device was characterized and compared against a pneumatic air chamber pressure sensor for the imaging of adult wild-type mice. The resulting images were found to be of similar quality with respect to physiological motion blur; the quality of the respiration signal trace obtained using the non-contact sensor was comparable to that of the pressure sensor and was superior for gating purposes due to its better signal-to-noise ratio. The non-contact sensor was then used to acquire in-vivo micro-CT images of a murine model for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and of 11-day-old mouse pups. In both cases, quality CT images were successfully acquired using this new respiration sensor. Despite the presence of beam hardening artefacts arising from the presence of a fibre-optic cable in the imaging field, we believe this new technique for respiration monitoring and gating presents an opportunity for in-vivo imaging of disease models which were previously considered too delicate for established animal handling methods.

  1. Voluntary control of static endpoint stiffness during force regulation tasks.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Eric J; Kirsch, Robert F; Crago, Patrick E

    2002-06-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the degree to which subjects could voluntarily modulate static endpoint stiffness orientation and to quantify the effects of simultaneously generated voluntary endpoint forces on this ability. Static endpoint stiffness, which characterizes the relationship between externally imposed displacements of the hand and the elastic forces generated in response, was estimated in real time during the application of planar, stochastic perturbations of endpoint position. This estimation was accomplished using a real-time parametric identification algorithm on measured force and position data. Subjects were provided with real-time visual feedback of endpoint stiffness, and their ability to modulate the orientation of maximum static stiffness was measured for different endpoint force magnitudes and directions. We found that individuals can voluntarily change stiffness orientation but that the magnitude of these changes is small, the range of available stiffness orientations decreases as endpoint force exertion increases, and endpoint force direction significantly constrains direction and magnitude of the stiffness orientations that can be achieved. Given these findings it appears unlikely that static endpoint stiffness orientation is controlled independently of force by voluntary neural mechanisms during postural tasks.

  2. Non-contact thermoacoustic detection of embedded targets using airborne-capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Hao; Boyle, Kevin C.; Apte, Nikhil; Aliroteh, Miaad S.; Bhuyan, Anshuman; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Arbabian, Amin

    2015-02-01

    A radio frequency (RF)/ultrasound hybrid imaging system using airborne capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is proposed for the remote detection of embedded objects in highly dispersive media (e.g., water, soil, and tissue). RF excitation provides permittivity contrast, and ultra-sensitive airborne-ultrasound detection measures thermoacoustic-generated acoustic waves that initiate at the boundaries of the embedded target, go through the medium-air interface, and finally reach the transducer. Vented wideband CMUTs interface to 0.18 μm CMOS low-noise amplifiers to provide displacement detection sensitivity of 1.3 pm at the transducer surface. The carefully designed vented CMUT structure provides a fractional bandwidth of 3.5% utilizing the squeeze-film damping of the air in the cavity.

  3. Effective leg stiffness in running.

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Lipfert, Susanne W; Seyfarth, Andre

    2009-10-16

    Leg stiffness is a common parameter used to characterize leg function during bouncing gaits, like running and hopping. In the literature, different methods to approximate leg stiffness based on kinetic and kinematic parameters are described. A challenging point in estimating leg stiffness is the definition of leg compression during contact. In this paper four methods (methods A-D) based on ground reaction forces (GRF) and one method (method E) relying on temporal parameters are described. Leg stiffness calculated by these five methods is compared with running patterns, predicted by the spring mass model. The best and simplest approximation of leg stiffness is method E. It requires only easily accessible parameters (contact time, flight time, resting leg length, body mass and the leg's touch down angle). Method D is of similar quality but additionally requires the time-dependent progression of the GRF. The other three methods show clear differences from the model predictions by over- or underestimating leg stiffness, especially at slow speeds. Leg stiffness is derived from a conceptual model of legged locomotion and does not exist without this model. Therefore, it is important to prove which experimental method is suited best for approximating the stiffness in a specific task. This will help to interpret the predictions of the conceptual model in comparison with experimental data.

  4. Jerking stiff-man syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alberca, R; Romero, M; Chaparro, J

    1982-01-01

    A female patient had permanent axial muscular rigidity similar to the "stiff-man syndrome", together with axial myoclonus triggered by stretch reflexes and by supramaximal stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. The disorder responded to treatment with diazepam and baclofen. This disorder bore a marked similarity to the so-called "jerking stiff-man syndrome". PMID:7161612

  5. Corneal endothelial cell analysis using two non-contact specular microscopes in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leon, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    To compare specular microscopy values obtained using the Perseus (CSO, Italy) and the Nidek CEM-530 (NIDEK Co., Ltd. Japan) specular microscopes. This prospective study used specular microscopy to examine sixty eyes from thirty healthy subjects (29.83 ± 9.41 years; range 18-79 years). This was done with both the Nidek CEM-530 and the Perseus on three occasions and results were evaluated by one independent observer. Measurement differences between instruments and agreement between devices were determined. The endothelial cell sample was larger with the Perseus than with the CEM-530 (235.92 ± 38.26 vs. 184.38 ± 43.88, respectively) with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Mean endothelial cell density (ECD) with the Perseus and CEM-530 was 2692.75 ± 306.66 and 2556.47 ± 257.38 cells/mm(2) (P = 0.001), respectively; mean coefficient of variation (CV) was 33.43 ± 4.29 and 28.70 ± 3.82 (P = 0.001), respectively, and hexagonality 56.66 ± 6.19 % and 68.50 ± 3.64 (P = 0.001), respectively. The mean of the differences (Perseus minus CEM-530) for ECD was 136.27 ± 106.16 cells/mm(2) (95 % CI 108.85-163.70 cells/mm(2)); 4.73 ± 2.70 % (95 % CI 4.03-5.41) in CV; and -11.83 ± 5.05 for percentage of hexagonal cells. Both instruments showed significant differences in the measurement of all cell forms, predominantly higher values were found with the Perseus vs the CEM-530, except 4-sided cells. Endothelial cell density, coefficient of variation, and percentage of hexagonal cells between the Perseus and CEM-530 differ statistically. This shows that these instruments should not be used interchangeably.

  6. New sensor and non-contact geometrical survey for the vibrating wire technique