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Sample records for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

  1. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: review and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Galit

    2009-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an abnormal dilatation of bronchi and bronchioles associated with repeated cycles of airway infection and inflammation. This review will focus on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children, with regard to etiology, diagnosis, treatment options, and recent advances. PMID:20948713

  2. [Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Huber, L C; Bürgi, U; Schuurmans, M M; Benden, C

    2014-08-01

    Bronchiectasis is the term used for irreversibly dilated airways. Exact epidemiological information on the frequency of bronchiectasis is not available, but the morphological findings are increasingly detected and the associated syndrome is more frequently diagnosed due to improved imaging techniques and increased awareness among chest physicians. The workup of these patients includes a wide panel of investigations guided by patient history and clinical presentation. Despite thorough evaluation the aetiology frequently remains unclear. Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with a severe course of the disease and its detection has impacts on the therapeutic management. Chest physiotherapy, mucoactive substances and antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy. In this review the evaluation of bronchiectasis and the recent therapeutic insights for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis are discussed.

  3. Fungi in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathologic bronchial dilatation with loss of function that can result from multiple inflammatory and infectious injuries to the conducting airways of the lung. Molds, particularly the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, have been implicated as a common cause of both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, the latter primarily in patients with severe asthma. The pathogenesis of mold-associated bronchiectasis is usually due to atopic sensitization to mold allergens in the presence of active chronic endobronchial fungal infection with host innate and adaptive immune deviation to a Th2-dominated inflammation, a condition known as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) (or allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis if a non-Aspergillus mold is implicated). Diagnostic criteria of ABPA continue to evolve, while treatment relies upon downregulation of the allergic inflammatory response with immunomodulatory agents and antifungal pharmacotherapy.

  4. Mucociliary clearance techniques for treating non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: Is there evidence?

    PubMed

    Snijders, D; Fernandez Dominguez, B; Calgaro, S; Bertozzi, I; Escribano Montaner, A; Perilongo, G; Barbato, A

    2015-06-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (nCFb) is an acquired condition of variable etiology. An impaired mucociliary clearance seems to be one of the mechanisms behind nCFb, and treatment involves antibiotics, mucoactive agents, and airway clearance techniques (ACTs). Traditional ACTs have four components: postural drainage, percussion, vibration of the chest wall, and coughing. Reviewing the international medical literature on the use of ACTs for patients with nCFb from 1989 to the present day, we retrieved 93 articles, of which 35 met our selection criteria for this analysis. We reviewed active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT), forced expiration techniques (FET), autogenic drainage, postural drainage, oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPep), high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), and exercise or pulmonary rehabilitation. Overall, ACTs appear to be safe for individuals (adults and children) with stable bronchiectasis; where there may be improvements in sputum expectoration, selected measures of lung function, and health-related quality of life. Unfortunately, there is a lack of RCTs in nCFb patients, especially in children. Moreover, none of the studies describes long-term effects of ACTs. It should be noted that a single intervention might not reflect the longer-term outcome and there is no evidence to recommend or contest any type of ACTs in nCFb management. Multicenter RCTs are necessary to evaluate the different techniques of ACTs especially in children with nCFb.

  5. Association of body mass index with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Q; Li, T; Li, J C; Li, Y

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this observational, multicenter study was to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A total of 339 patients (197 females, 142 males) diagnosed with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography were classified into four groups: underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5≤BMI<25.0 kg/m2), overweight (25.0≤BMI<30.0 kg/m2), and obese (BMI≥30.0 kg/m2). Clinical variables expressing disease severity were recorded, and acute exacerbations, hospitalizations, and survival rates were estimated during the follow-up period. The mean BMI was 21.90 kg/m2. The underweight group comprised 28.61% of all patients. BMI was negatively correlated with acute exacerbations, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, radiographic extent of bronchiectasis, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa and positively correlated with pulmonary function indices. BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year cumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001). The arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, inspiratory capacity, age, BMI, and predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s independently predicted survival in the Cox proportional hazard model. In conclusion, an underweight status was highly prevalent among patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Patients with a lower BMI were prone to developing more acute exacerbations, worse pulmonary function, amplified systemic inflammation, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa. BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks. BMI should be considered in the routine assessment of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

  6. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  7. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-12-02

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9-2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8-18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3-71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5-32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3-11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity.

  8. Differences and similarities in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis between developing and affluent countries.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Nitin; Karadag, Bulent

    2011-06-01

    Non-CF bronchiectasis remains a major cause of morbidity not only in developing countries but in some indigenous groups of affluent countries. Although there is a decline in the prevalence and incidence in developed countries, recent studies in indigenous populations report higher prevalence. Due to the lack of such data, epidemiological studies are required to find the incidence and prevalence in developing countries. Although the main characteristics of bronchiectasis are similar in developing and affluent countries, underlying aetiology, nutritional status, frequency of exacerbations and severity of the disease are different. Delay of diagnosis is surprisingly similar in the affluent and developing countries possibly due to different reasons. Long-term studies are needed for evidence based management of the disease. Successful management and prevention of bronchiectasis require a multidisciplinary approach, while the lack of resources is still a major problem in the developing countries.

  9. Observational study of sleep, respiratory mechanics and quality of life in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: a protocol study

    PubMed Central

    Faria Júnior, Newton Santos; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Apostolico, Nadua; Pereira, Nixon Alves; dos Santos, Israel dos Reis; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Souza, Ismael Dias; Polonio, Igor Bastos; Romaldini, José Gustavo Barian; Pereira, Déborah Madeu; Alves, Vera Lúcia dos Santos; Souza, Ângela Honda; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Jardim, José Roberto; Stirbulov, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bronchiectasis is a chronic disorder characterised by permanent and irreversible abnormal dilation of the bronchi and bronchioles, primarily caused by repeated cycles of pulmonary infections and inflammation, which lead to reduced mucociliary clearance and to the excessive production of sputum. Patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis may be predisposed to hypoxemia during sleep, or to symptoms that may lead to arousals and thereby reduce the quality of life, because of the irreversible dilation of the bronchi and the presence of secretions and airflow obstruction. Methods and analysis For this cross-sectional observational study, patients with a clinical diagnosis of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis will be recruited from the Bronchiectasis Clinic of the Pneumology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital and the Federal University of São Paulo (São Paulo, Brazil). Patients of either sex will be included if high-resolution CT of the thorax and classic sweat test confirms they have non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, are between 18 and 80 years old, use long-acting bronchodilators, are clinically stable for a least 1 month, agree to participate in the study and they sign a statement of informed consent. The first part of the study will involve a clinical evaluation, maximal respiratory pressures, spirometry and the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire. The Sleep Laboratory of the Master's and Doctoral Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences of the Nove de Julho University (São Paulo, Brazil) will perform the polysomnographic studies, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, waist and neck circumferences, modified Mallampati classification and tonsil index. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committees of Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital (process number 178/2012) and Human Research Ethics Committee of Nove de Julho University (process number 370474

  10. Longitudinal assessment of sputum microbiome by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Elena M.; Hennessy, Catherine; Mirza, Ghazala K.; James, Phillip L.; Coleman, Meg; Jones, Andrew; Wilson, Robert; Bilton, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Background Bronchiectasis is accompanied by chronic bronchial infection that may drive disease progression. However, the evidence base for antibiotic therapy is limited. DNA based methods offer better identification and quantification of microbial constituents of sputum than standard clinical culture and may help inform patient management strategies. Our study objective was to determine the longitudinal variability of the non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis microbiome in sputum with respect to clinical variables. Eighty-five patients with non-CF bronchiectasis and daily sputum production were recruited from outpatient clinics and followed for six months. Monthly sputum samples and clinical measurements were taken, together with additional samples during exacerbations. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sputum microbiota was successful for 381 samples from 76 patients and analysed in conjunction with clinical data. Results Microbial communities were highly individual in composition and stability, usually with limited diversity and often containing multiple pathogens. When compared to DNA sequencing, microbial culture had restricted sensitivity in identifying common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis. With some exceptions, community characteristics showed poor correlations with clinical features including underlying disease, antibiotic use and exacerbations, with the subject showing the strongest association with community structure. When present, the pathogens mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae may also shape the structure of the rest of the microbial community. Conclusions The use of microbial community analysis of sputum added to information from microbial culture. A simple model of exacerbations driven by bacterial overgrowth was not supported, suggesting a need for revision of principles for antibiotic therapy. In individual patients, the management of chronic bronchial infection may be

  11. Rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory disease other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: exercise and physical activity interventions in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Burtin, Chris; Hebestreit, Helge

    2015-01-01

    A relevant proportion of children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a marked decrease in exercise tolerance, which can be partly related to impaired muscle function and decreased physical activity levels in daily life, in addition to lung disease. Preliminary findings suggest that patients with non-CF bronchiectasis face the same problems. These patients might be excellent candidates for exercise and physical activity interventions. This review elaborates on the rationale for exercise training and activity behaviour changes and summarizes the existing evidence for these rehabilitation strategies in patients with bronchiectasis, both CF and non-CF bronchiectasis. Furthermore, practical considerations and safety aspects are discussed.

  12. Global impact of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Margarida; Keyt, Holly; Dhar, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Educational aims To recognise the clinical and radiological presentation of the spectrum of diseases associated with bronchiectasis. To understand variation in the aetiology, microbiology and burden of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis across different global healthcare systems. Bronchiectasis is the term used to refer to dilatation of the bronchi that is usually permanent and is associated with a clinical syndrome of cough, sputum production and recurrent respiratory infections. It can be caused by a range of inherited and acquired disorders, or may be idiopathic in nature. The most well recognised inherited disorder in Western countries is cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive condition that leads to progressive bronchiectasis, bacterial infection and premature mortality. Both bronchiectasis due to CF and bronchiectasis due to other conditions are placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems internationally. Treatments for CF are becoming more effective leading to more adult patients with complex healthcare needs. Bronchiectasis not due to CF is becoming increasingly recognised, particularly in the elderly population. Recognition is important and can lead to identification of the underlying cause, appropriate treatment and improved quality of life. The disease is highly diverse in its presentation, requiring all respiratory physicians to have knowledge of the different “bronchiectasis syndromes”. The most common aetiologies and presenting syndromes vary depending on geography, with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease predominating in some parts of North America, post-infectious and idiopathic disease predominating in Western Europe, and post-tuberculosis bronchiectasis dominating in South Asia and Eastern Europe. Ongoing global collaborative studies will greatly advance our understanding of the international impact of bronchiectasis and CF. PMID:28210295

  13. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Topics Atelectasis Cough Cystic Fibrosis Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Respiratory Failure Send a link to NHLBI to ... fibrosis and primary ciliary (SIL-e-ar-e) dyskinesia (dis-kih-NE-ze-ah), or PCD . Bronchiectasis ...

  14. Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changhwan

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of diagnosing bronchiectasis is increasing around the world. Cystic fibrosis is the most common inherited cause of bronchiectasis, but there is increasing recognition of significant numbers of patients with bronchiectasis from various causes. With increasing awareness of bronchiectasis, a significant number of research, concerning the causes and treatments, were published over the past few years. Investigation of the underlying cause of bronchiectasis is the most important key to effective management. The purpose of this report is to review the immunological abnormalities that cause bronchiectasis in those that the cystic fibrosis has been excluded, identify the available evidences of current management, and discuss several controversies in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:23236316

  15. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Bonaiti, Giulia; Pesci, Alberto; Marruchella, Almerico; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Gori, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, a growing interest has been raised in evaluating nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE). This paper reviews several aspects of the correlations between NTM and NCFBE, including pathogenesis, radiological features, diagnosis, and management. Bronchiectasis and NTM lung disease are connected, but which one comes first is still an unresolved question. The rate of NTM lung disease in NCFBE varies through the studies, from 5% to 30%. The most frequent species isolated is MAC. NCFBE patients affected by NTM infection frequently present coinfections, including both other different NTM species and microorganisms, such as P. aeruginosa. Once a diagnosis of NTM disease has been reached, the initiation of therapy is not always mandatory. NTM species isolated, patients' conditions, and disease severity and its evolution should be considered. Risk factors for disease progression in NCFBE patients with NTM are low body mass index, cavitary disease, consolidations, and macrolide resistance at presentation.

  17. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiti, Giulia; Pesci, Alberto; Marruchella, Almerico; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Gori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, a growing interest has been raised in evaluating nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE). This paper reviews several aspects of the correlations between NTM and NCFBE, including pathogenesis, radiological features, diagnosis, and management. Bronchiectasis and NTM lung disease are connected, but which one comes first is still an unresolved question. The rate of NTM lung disease in NCFBE varies through the studies, from 5% to 30%. The most frequent species isolated is MAC. NCFBE patients affected by NTM infection frequently present coinfections, including both other different NTM species and microorganisms, such as P. aeruginosa. Once a diagnosis of NTM disease has been reached, the initiation of therapy is not always mandatory. NTM species isolated, patients' conditions, and disease severity and its evolution should be considered. Risk factors for disease progression in NCFBE patients with NTM are low body mass index, cavitary disease, consolidations, and macrolide resistance at presentation. PMID:26106603

  18. [Bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Chuchalin, A G

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents information on possible approaches to the classification, pathogenesis, and determination of the etiological causes of bronchiectasis. It discusses a group of bronchiectasis-associated diseases. It gives a detailed diagnostic algorithm aimed to establish the etiology of bronchiectasis and the markers of the efficiency of different treatment options. Much attention is paid to genetically predetermined bronchiectasis. Universal approaches to treating patients with bronchiectasis as a whole, as well as treatments for certain entities of bronchiectasis are discussed.

  19. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  20. Nasal mucociliary clearance and ciliary beat frequency in cystic fibrosis compared with sinusitis and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutland, J; Cole, P J

    1981-01-01

    Nasal ciliary function and mucociliary clearance were studied in patients with cystic fibrosis and in three control groups. Ciliary beat frequency and nasal clearance time were measured in groups of 10 subjects with cystic fibrosis, sinusitis and bronchiectasis and age and sex-matched control subjects. Ciliary beat frequency was also measured in normal subjects matched as bronchiectasis controls. Cystic fibrosis patients and their controls, patients with sinusitis, and the bronchiectasis controls did not differ in ciliary beat frequency, but it was slower in the patients with bronchiectasis (p less than 0.05). Nasal mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis was slower than in the cystic fibrosis controls (p less than 0.001) and in patients with sinusitis (p less than 0.01). The finding of a normal beat frequency in cystic fibrosis cilia studied in vitro together with abnormal nasal mucociliary clearance measured in vivo in the same patients suggests the existence of an abnormality of mucus in vivo. The innate function of cystic fibrosis cilia, as measured in vitro by beat frequency, is normal. PMID:7314040

  1. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... test for cystic fibrosis and tests for other diseases PPD skin test to check for a past tuberculosis infection Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis to measure proteins called immunoglobulins in ...

  2. Combined inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist therapy for noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis with airflow limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ping; Yang, Jia-Wei; Lu, Hai-Wen; Mao, Bei; Yang, Wen-Lan; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective: There is presently no clear evidence on the effect of combined treatment for non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (LABA). The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of salmeterol-fluticasone combined inhaled therapy for non-CF bronchiectasis with airflow limitation. Methods: An observational study was performed in 120 non-CF bronchiectasis patients diagnosed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scanning of the chest. Patients received either routine therapy or salmeterol-fluticasone (100/500 μg daily) combined inhaled therapy on the basis of routine therapy. Clinical symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), lung function, short-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (SABA) use, and safety were monitored throughout the study. Results: OF the 120 subjects, 60 received combined inhaled therapy and 60 received routine therapy. Compared to the control group, the combined inhaled therapy group showed significant improvement in their clinical symptom scores (−2.21 vs. −0.31, P = 0.002) and a reduction in number of weekly SABA usage (−4.2 vs. 0.1, P < 0.01). In addition, patients in the inhaled therapy group achieved a significant improvement in HRQL based on mMRC (−1.51 vs. −0.31, P < 0.005) and SGRQ (−7.83 vs. −2.16, P < 0.01) scoring accompanied with no severe adverse events. There were fewer exacerbation frequencies in the combined inhaled therapy group over the 12 months of treatment compared to the control group (1 [0–2] vs. 2 [1–4], P = 0.017). Furthermore, stratified analysis indicated that combined inhaled therapy partially improve lung function for patients for whom it is severely impaired and those with pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated. Conclusion: Our results show that salmeterol-fluticasone combined inhaled therapy should be effective and safe for non-CF bronchiectasis patients

  3. Impact of bronchiectasis and trapped air on quality of life and exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Leonie A; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Caudri, Daan; Bos, Aukje C; Gonzalez-Graniel, Karla; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Wiel, Els C W; Quittner, Alexandra L; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2013-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is primarily characterised by bronchiectasis and trapped air on chest computed tomography (CT). The revised Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire respiratory symptoms scale (CFQ-R RSS) measures health-related quality of life. To validate bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures, we investigated correlations and predictive values for pulmonary exacerbations. CF patients (aged 6-20 years) underwent CT, CFQ-R RSS and 1-year follow-up. Bronchiectasis and trapped air were scored using the CF-CT scoring system. Correlation coefficients and backward multivariate modelling were used to identify predictors of pulmonary exacerbations. 40 children and 32 adolescents were included. CF-CT bronchiectasis (r = -0.38, p<0.001) and CF-CT trapped air (r = -0.35, p = 0.003) correlated with CFQ-R RSS. Pulmonary exacerbations were associated with: bronchiectasis (rate ratio 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19; p = 0.009), trapped air (rate ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.034) and CFQ-R RSS (rate ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98; p = 0.002). The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor of pulmonary exacerbations (rate ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.97; p<0.001). Bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS were associated with pulmonary exacerbations. The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor. This study further validated bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures in CF.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  5. A review of 151 cases of pediatric noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Banjar, Hanaa Hasan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to review the etiological factors and diseases associated with pediatric noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients with confirmed noncystic fibrosis (Non-CF) bronchiectasis by chest X-ray and/or CT chest in a pulmonary clinic during the period 1993–2005 at a tertiary care center in Riyadh. RESULTS: A total of 151 cases were diagnosed as Non-CF bronchiectasis. Seventy-five (49.7%) were male, 76 (50.3%) were female; 148 (98%) are alive and 3 (2%) died. The southwestern regions constituted 72 (50%) of the cases. There was a period of (5 ± 3.2) years between the start of symptoms and diagnosis of bronchiectasis. More than two-thirds of the patients had cough, tachypnea, wheezing, sputum production and failure to thrive. Ninety-one (60%) had associated diseases: Pulmonary diseases in 48 (32%), immunodeficiency in 27 (18%), central nervous system anomalies in 10 (7%), cardiac in 10 (7%) and asthma in 103 (68%) of the patients. Left lower lobe was commonly involved in 114 (76%) patients. Sixty-eight (67%) were found to have sinusitis. More than two-thirds of patients had two or more associated diseases. Forty-nine (32%) developed gastroesophageal reflux. Hemophilus influenza was cultured in 56 (37%), strept pneumoniae in 25 (17%) and pseudomonas aeruginosa in 24 (16%) of the patients. Eighty percent of the patients who had pulmonary function test had abnormal changes. Disease progression was related to development of symptoms before 5 years of age, persistent atelectasis and right lower lobe involvement (P< 0.05). CONCLUSION: Non-CF bronchiectasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent chest infection in Saudi Arabia. Early diagnosis and identification of associated diseases is needed to prevent progression of the disease. PMID:19724667

  6. Inhaled antibiotics in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Tay, George T P; Reid, David W; Bell, Scott C

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathological diagnosis describing dilatation of the airways and is characterized by chronic lung sepsis. Bronchiectasis has multiple etiologies, but is usually considered in terms of whether it is due to the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF) or secondary to other causes (non-CF bronchiectasis, NCFB). Inhaled antibiotics are used in bronchiectasis to suppress bacterial pathogens and reduce long-term lung function decline. The majority of the literature on inhaled antibiotics comes from studies on CF where the dominant bacterial pathogen in the airway is usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, most aerosolized antibiotic regimens target this bacterium, but the emergence of molecular diagnostic methods has questioned this approach and more tailored strategies may need to be considered in CF based on the community composition of the lung microbiome. Similarly, the lung microbiome in NCFB has been found to be a complex polymicrobial one and the current practice of employing the same inhaled antibiotic regimes as are used in CF may no longer be appropriate in many patients. In this article, the use of inhaled antibiotics in CF and NCFB is considered in the light of improved understanding of the lung microbiome and why more tailored therapy may be needed based on molecular identification of the microbial pathogens present. The evidence for the use of currently available inhaled antibiotics and advances in inhaled drug packaging and delivery devices are discussed. Finally, the urgent need for prospective randomized clinical trials in CF and NCFB is highlighted and areas for future research identified.

  7. Automated CT Scan Scores of Bronchiectasis and Air Trapping in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Swiercz, Waldemar; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Anthony, Margaret M.; Szefler, Paul; Klein, Rebecca; Strain, John; Brody, Alan S.; Sagel, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Computer analysis of high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans may improve the assessment of structural lung injury in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to validate automated, observer-independent image analysis software to establish objective, simple criteria for bronchiectasis and air trapping. Methods: HRCT scans of the chest were performed in 35 children with CF and compared with scans from 12 disease control subjects. Automated image analysis software was developed to count visible airways on inspiratory images and to measure a low attenuation density (LAD) index on expiratory images. Among the children with CF, relationships among automated measures, Brody HRCT scanning scores, lung function, and sputum markers of inflammation were assessed. Results: The number of total, central, and peripheral airways on inspiratory images and LAD (%) on expiratory images were significantly higher in children with CF compared with control subjects. Among subjects with CF, peripheral airway counts correlated strongly with Brody bronchiectasis scores by two raters (r = 0.86, P < .0001; r = 0.91, P < .0001), correlated negatively with lung function, and were positively associated with sputum free neutrophil elastase activity. LAD (%) correlated with Brody air trapping scores (r = 0.83, P < .0001; r = 0.69, P < .0001) but did not correlate with lung function or sputum inflammatory markers. Conclusions: Quantitative airway counts and LAD (%) on HRCT scans appear to be useful surrogates for bronchiectasis and air trapping in children with CF. Our automated methodology provides objective quantitative measures of bronchiectasis and air trapping that may serve as end points in CF clinical trials. PMID:24114359

  8. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibody detection in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, E; Drobnic, M; Perez, M; Manresa, J; Ferrer, A; Orriols, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in patients with bronchiectasis. Differentiation between non-infected patients and those with different degrees of P aeruginosa infection could influence the management and prognosis of these patients. The diagnostic usefulness of serum IgG antibodies against P aeruginosa outer membrane proteins was determined in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis.
METHODS—Fifty six patients were classified according to sputum culture into three groups: group A (n=18) with no P aeruginosa in any sample; group B (n=18) with P aeruginosa alternating with other microorganisms; and group C (n=20) with P aeruginosa in all sputum samples. Each patient had at least three sputum cultures in the 6 months prior to serum collection. Detection of antibodies was performed by Western blot and their presence against 20 protein bands (10-121 kd) was assessed.
RESULTS—Antibodies to more than four bands in total or to five individual bands (36, 26, 22, 20 or 18 kd) differentiated group B from group A, while antibodies to a total of more than eight bands or to 10 individual bands (104, 69, 63, 56, 50, 44, 30, 25, 22,13 kd) differentiated group C from group B. When discordant results between the total number of bands and the frequency of P aeruginosa isolation were obtained, the follow up of patients suggested that the former, in most cases, predicted chronic P aeruginosa colonisation.
CONCLUSION—In patients with bronchiectasis the degree of P aeruginosa infection can be determined by the number and type of outer membrane protein bands indicating which serum antibodies are present.

 PMID:11514685

  9. Neutrophilic Bronchial Inflammation Correlates with Clinical and Functional Findings in Patients with Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Dente, Federico L.; Bilotta, Marta; Bartoli, Maria Laura; Bacci, Elena; Cianchetti, Silvana; Latorre, Manuela; Malagrinò, Laura; Nieri, Dario; Roggi, Maria Adelaide; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neutrophilic bronchial inflammation is a main feature of bronchiectasis, but not much is known about its relationship with other disease features. Aim. To compare airway inflammatory markers with clinical and functional findings in subjects with stable noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). Methods. 152 NFCB patients (62.6 years; females: 57.2%) underwent clinical and functional cross-sectional evaluation, including microbiologic and inflammatory cell profile in sputum, and exhaled breath condensate malondialdehyde (EBC-MDA). NFCB severity was assessed using BSI and FACED criteria. Results. Sputum neutrophil percentages inversely correlated with FEV1 (P < 0.0001; rho = −0.428), weakly with Leicester Cough Questionnaire score (P = 0.068; rho = −0.58), and directly with duration of the disease (P = 0.004; rho = 0.3) and BSI severity score (P = 0.005; rho = 0.37), but not with FACED. Sputum neutrophilia was higher in colonized subjects, P. aeruginosa colonized subjects showing greater sputum neutrophilia and lower FEV1. Patients with ≥3 exacerbations in the last year showed a significantly greater EBC-MDA than the remaining patients. Conclusions. Sputum neutrophilic inflammation and biomarkers of oxidative stress in EBC can be considered good biomarkers of disease severity in NCFB patients, as confirmed by pulmonary function, disease duration, bacterial colonization, BSI score, and exacerbation rate. PMID:26819500

  10. Efficacy of Halotherapy for Improvement of Pulmonary function Tests and Quality of Life of Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Bita; Najafizadeh, Katayoon; Vishteh, Hamid Reza Khodami; Shafaghi, Shadi; Karimi, Shirin; Mahmoodian, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Background Halotherapy is a treatment modality suggested for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. In this technique, inhalation of crystal salt stones extracted from mines improves patients’ pulmonary function tests and symptoms by facilitating the secretion or expulsion of phlegm and mucus and reducing the risk of bacterial infections. Bronchiectasis is chronic disease of the airways characterized by irreversible dilation of airways. It has a progressive course and despite the available treatments, many of these patients eventually enter the advanced phase of disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of halotherapy on pulmonary function tests and quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. Materials and Methods This clinical trial evaluated the results of spirometry and 6-minute walk test as well as the quality of life (according to SF-36 questionnaire) of stable non-CF bronchiectatic patients presenting to the pulmonary clinic before and after the use of salt spray for 2 months. Results Of 40 study patients, 20 were excluded due to various reasons and 20 were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 35±11 years and the underlying cause of disease was chronic pulmonary infection in 65% of cases. Comparison of the results of pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk test and quality of life indices in SF-36 questionnaire before and after the intervention showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, 65% of patients were satisfied with halotherapy and requested to receive the medication again. Conclusion Our study results indicated that 2-month halotherapy with Salitair inhaler containing salt crystals extracted from the Klodawa mine in Poland could not improve the pulmonary function tests or quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. No significant side effects were noted in understudy patients. Future studies with larger sample size and longer duration of treatment are recommended to better determine the efficacy of

  11. How Is Bronchiectasis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the bronchiectasis, such as cystic fibrosis or immunodeficiency, also should be treated. Medicines Your doctor may ... the mucus in your lungs. They often are combined with decongestants, which may provide extra relief. Mucus ...

  12. Improvement in health status following bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Mutalithas, Kugathasan; Watkin, Gillian; Willig, Briony; Wardlaw, Andrew; Pavord, Ian D; Birring, Surinder S

    2008-08-01

    Chronic productive cough is a common symptom in patients with bronchiectasis that is associated with a reduction in health-related quality of life (QOL). Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy (BHPT) is widely prescribed for patients with bronchiectasis, although the evidence for its efficacy is limited. We set out to prospectively evaluate the impact of BHPT on health-related QOL in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. We assessed cough symptoms (0-100mm visual analogue scale; VAS) and cough-related QOL in 53 patients with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis at baseline and >4 weeks after outpatient-based BHPT. Cough specific health status was assessed with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ; total score range 3-21, higher scores representing better QOL). All patients with bronchiectasis complained of cough as the major symptom and had mean (SEM) FEV(1) of 2.1 (0.1)L. Cough-related health status was reduced at baseline; mean (SEM) LCQ score 14.3 (0.6). There were significant improvements in cough symptoms (mean cough VAS before 43.3 (3.6) vs after 27.5 (3.1); mean difference 15.8; 95% CI of difference 9.6-22; p<0.0001) and cough-related health status after BHPT (mean LCQ total score before 14.2 vs after 17.3; mean difference 3.1; 95% confidence interval of difference 2.4-3.9; p<0.001). A significant improvement was seen in all LCQ health-related domains (physical, psychological and social; all p<0.001). Our findings suggest that bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy can lead to a significant improvement in cough-related quality of life.

  13. Neutrophil Fates in Bronchiectasis and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Derek W; Gaggar, Amit; Solomon, George M

    2016-04-01

    The neutrophil is a powerful cellular defender of the vulnerable interface between the environment and pulmonary tissues. This cell's potent weapons are carefully calibrated in the healthy state to maximize effectiveness in fighting pathogens while minimizing tissue damage and allowing for repair of what damage does occur. The three related chronic airway disorders of cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency all demonstrate significant derangements of this homeostatic system that result in their respective pathologies. An important shared feature among them is the inefficient resolution of chronic inflammation that serves as a central means for neutrophil-driven lung damage resulting in disease progression. Examining the commonalities and divergences between these diseases in the light of their immunopathology is informative and may help guide us toward future therapeutics designed to modulate the neutrophil's interplay with the pulmonary environment.

  14. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1 % (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P = 0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment.

  15. To investigate the prevention of OM-85 on bronchiectasis exacerbations (iPROBE) in Chinese patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is characterized by the irreversible dilatation of the medium-sized bronchi as a result of airway injury from recurrent or chronic inflammation and lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchiectasis airways are commonly colonized with bacterial species. Infections of the airways play important role in bronchiectasis exacerbations. The non-specific prevention of recurrent airway infections by immunostimulating agents has gained growing interest. OM-85, consisting of extracts of eight kinds of bacteria important in respiratory infections, could support the respiratory tract resistance to the pathogens. OM-85 has been shown to be a benefit by decreasing the risk of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in several perspective clinical trials. Exacerbation of bronchiectasis substantially contributes to a more rapid decline in lung function, reduced quality of life, and healthcare costs. In this context, we plan to conduct a clinical trial to investigate the PReventive effect of OM-85 on Bronchiectasis Exacerbation in Chinese patients (iPROBE). Methods/Design This study is designed as a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial. A total of 244 patients with bronchiectasis, who have had at least one exacerbation of bronchiectasis in the previous year, will be included. The subjects will randomly receive two courses of 7 mg of OM-85 or a matching placebo. The treatment dose of OM-85 will be one daily capsule taken orally for 10 days each month for 3 consecutive months at the beginning of the study, followed by 3 months of no drug. This schedule will repeat until the patient has been seen for one year. Discussion We will investigate whether long-term treatment with an oral immunostimulant (OM-85) could decrease exacerbations of bronchiectasis over a one-year period. We will also assess other relevant outcomes, including the rate of event-based exacerbation, lung

  16. Bronchiectasis: a bacteriological profile

    PubMed Central

    Bopaka, Régis Gothard; El Khattabi, Wiam; Janah, Hind; Jabri, Hasna; Afif, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of bronchiectasis can involve a combination of many environmental factors, including infection. The aim of our work is to determine the bacteriological profile of bronchiectasis. This is a retrospective study of 100 patients hospitalized in between January 2010 and July 2013. The average age was 48 years with a 58% female predominance. Symptomatology was by a bronchial syndrome in 90% of cases. Bacteriological examination was able to isolate the microbe in 35% of cases. In our study it was through the examination of sputum cytology in 27% of cases, through the examination of liquid bronchial aspiration in 5% of cases, and through direct examination of sputum in search of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3% of cases. Microbes isolated were: Streptococcus pneumonia in 11 cases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 10 cases, Klebsiella pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3 cases each; Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter spp, Serratia marcescens, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus in one case each. Through this work, the authors highlight that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly- identified microbes in their patients. It is necessary to have a full bacterial examination and to repeat it regularly over the course of the bronchiectasis. PMID:27047618

  17. Necrotising pneumonia and bronchiectasis in a previously healthy 30-year-old man

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, David G; Castellanos, Angela; Stern, Theodore A; Puig, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a previously healthy 30-year-old man who presented with a necrotising pneumonia and bronchiectasis. His infectious workup revealed a Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. Since bronchiectasis and necrotising pneumonia are unusual findings in an otherwise healthy person, further investigation was pursued. His workup revealed non-classic cystic fibrosis (CF) and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). This case discusses the differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis, the diagnosis and treatment of ABPA, and the role of CF mutations in the pathogenesis of ABPA. PMID:25608981

  18. The EMBARC European Bronchiectasis Registry: protocol for an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Stefano; Polverino, Eva; Vendrell, Montserrat; Crichton, Megan; Loebinger, Michael; Dimakou, Katerina; Clifton, Ian; van der Eerden, Menno; Rohde, Gernot; Murris-Espin, Marlene; Masefield, Sarah; Gerada, Eleanor; Shteinberg, Michal; Ringshausen, Felix; Haworth, Charles; Boersma, Wim; Rademacher, Jessica; Hill, Adam T.; Aksamit, Timothy; O'Donnell, Anne; Morgan, Lucy; Milenkovic, Branislava; Tramma, Leandro; Neves, Joao; Menendez, Rosario; Paggiaro, Perluigi; Botnaru, Victor; Skrgat, Sabina; Wilson, Robert; Goeminne, Pieter; De Soyza, Anthony; Welte, Tobias; Torres, Antoni; Elborn, J. Stuart; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the most neglected diseases in respiratory medicine. There are no approved therapies and few large-scale, representative epidemiological studies. The EMBARC (European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration) registry is a prospective, pan-European observational study of patients with bronchiectasis. The inclusion criterion is a primary clinical diagnosis of bronchiectasis consisting of: 1) a clinical history consistent with bronchiectasis; and 2) computed tomography demonstrating bronchiectasis. Core exclusion criteria are: 1) bronchiectasis due to known cystic fibrosis; 2) age <18 years; and 3) patients who are unable or unwilling to provide informed consent. The study aims to enrol 1000 patients by April 2016 across at least 20 European countries, and 10 000 patients by March 2020. Patients will undergo a comprehensive baseline assessment and will be followed up annually for up to 5 years with the goal of providing high-quality longitudinal data on outcomes, treatment patterns and quality of life. Data from the registry will be available in the form of annual reports. and will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. The European Bronchiectasis Registry aims to make a major contribution to understanding the natural history of the disease, as well as guiding evidence-based decision making and facilitating large randomised controlled trials. PMID:27730179

  19. The EMBARC European Bronchiectasis Registry: protocol for an international observational study.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Aliberti, Stefano; Polverino, Eva; Vendrell, Montserrat; Crichton, Megan; Loebinger, Michael; Dimakou, Katerina; Clifton, Ian; van der Eerden, Menno; Rohde, Gernot; Murris-Espin, Marlene; Masefield, Sarah; Gerada, Eleanor; Shteinberg, Michal; Ringshausen, Felix; Haworth, Charles; Boersma, Wim; Rademacher, Jessica; Hill, Adam T; Aksamit, Timothy; O'Donnell, Anne; Morgan, Lucy; Milenkovic, Branislava; Tramma, Leandro; Neves, Joao; Menendez, Rosario; Paggiaro, Perluigi; Botnaru, Victor; Skrgat, Sabina; Wilson, Robert; Goeminne, Pieter; De Soyza, Anthony; Welte, Tobias; Torres, Antoni; Elborn, J Stuart; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the most neglected diseases in respiratory medicine. There are no approved therapies and few large-scale, representative epidemiological studies. The EMBARC (European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration) registry is a prospective, pan-European observational study of patients with bronchiectasis. The inclusion criterion is a primary clinical diagnosis of bronchiectasis consisting of: 1) a clinical history consistent with bronchiectasis; and 2) computed tomography demonstrating bronchiectasis. Core exclusion criteria are: 1) bronchiectasis due to known cystic fibrosis; 2) age <18 years; and 3) patients who are unable or unwilling to provide informed consent. The study aims to enrol 1000 patients by April 2016 across at least 20 European countries, and 10 000 patients by March 2020. Patients will undergo a comprehensive baseline assessment and will be followed up annually for up to 5 years with the goal of providing high-quality longitudinal data on outcomes, treatment patterns and quality of life. Data from the registry will be available in the form of annual reports. and will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. The European Bronchiectasis Registry aims to make a major contribution to understanding the natural history of the disease, as well as guiding evidence-based decision making and facilitating large randomised controlled trials.

  20. Clinical challenges in managing bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; Bilton, Diana

    2009-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is a common disease in the Asia-Pacific and affected patients suffer from chronic sputum production and recurrent exacerbations. Bronchiectasis is largely idiopathic although there is diverse aetiology. The pathogenesis of bronchiectasis comprises infective, inflammatory and emzymetic elements. These interact to perpetuate continued airway damage in bronchiectasis leading to progressive airway and lung damages. Treatment of bronchiectasis is unsatisfactory and there are only very few trials. Existing data suggest some efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid therapy, which has been shown recently to clinical and anti-inflammatory properties in bronchiectasis. Immunomodulating agent such as low-dose macrolides have also been shown to have some efficacy although more data are needed to advocate their long-term usage. Antibiotic therapy is complex in bronchiectasis and includes short-term empirical treatment for acute exacerbation, and consideration of long-term maintenance of oral, nebulized and i.v. therapy. This long-neglected illness should receive more research attention in order that we can have better understanding of its aetiology, pathogenesis and treatment.

  1. Bronchiectasis: Phenotyping a Complex Disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D

    2017-03-15

    Bronchiectasis is a long-neglected disease currently experiencing a surge in interest. It is a highly complex condition with numerous aetiologies, co-morbidities and a heterogeneous disease presentation and clinical course. The past few years have seen major advances in our understanding of the disease, primarily through large real-life cohort studies. The main outcomes of interest in bronchiectasis are symptoms, exacerbations, treatment response, disease progression and death. We are now more able to identify clearly the radiological, clinical, microbiological and inflammatory contributors to these outcomes. Over the past couple of years, multidimensional scoring systems such as the Bronchiectasis Severity Index have been introduced to predict disease severity and mortality. Although there are currently no licensed therapies for bronchiectasis, an increasing number of clinical trials are planned or ongoing. While this emerging evidence is awaited, bronchiectasis guidelines will continue to be informed largely by real-life evidence from observational studies and patient registries. Key developments in the bronchiectasis field include the establishment of international disease registries and characterisation of disease phenotypes using cluster analysis and biological data.

  2. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, A.; Artiles, I.; Cabanillas, J. J.; Álvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.

    2014-01-01

    There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF), especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ). The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ) of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine. PMID:25295210

  3. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health & Wellness > Health Professionals Lung Health & Wellness > Healthy Air (Indoor & Outdoor) Lung Health & Wellness > LUNG FORCE Updates Lung Health & Wellness > Quit Smoking Lung Health & ...

  4. CFTR gene variant IVS8-5T in disseminated bronchiectasis

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombieri, C.; Benetazzo, M.; Casartelli, A.

    1996-04-01

    Obstructive pulmonary disease includes asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; i.e., pulmonary emphysema and chronic bronchitis), bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis (CF). It represents a leading cause of death in developed countries. Both familial clustering of non-CF obstructive pulmonary disease and familial aggregation of impaired lung function have been described. This suggests that genetic factors contribute to non-CF obstructive pulmonary disease, even if it is difficult to determine the relative contribution of environmental factors. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  6. Azithromycin for Indigenous children with bronchiectasis: study protocol for a multi-centre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis (CF) among Indigenous children in Australia, New Zealand and Alaska is very high. Antibiotics are a major component of treatment and are used both on a short or long-term basis. One aim of long-term or maintenance antibiotics is to reduce the frequency of acute pulmonary exacerbations and symptoms. However, there are few studies investigating the efficacy of long-term antibiotic use for CSLD and non-CF bronchiectasis among children. This study tests the hypothesis that azithromycin administered once a week as maintenance antibiotic treatment will reduce the rate of pulmonary exacerbations in Indigenous children with bronchiectasis. Methods/design We are conducting a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial in Australia and New Zealand. Inclusion criteria are: Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Maori or Pacific Island children aged 1 to 8 years, diagnosed with bronchiectasis (or probable bronchiectasis) with no underlying disease identified (such as CF or primary immunodeficiency), and having had at least one episode of pulmonary exacerbation in the last 12 months. After informed consent, children are randomised to receive either azithromycin (30 mg/kg once a week) or placebo (once a week) for 12–24 months from study entry. Primary outcomes are the rate of pulmonary exacerbations and time to pulmonary exacerbation determined by review of patient medical records. Secondary outcomes include length and severity of pulmonary exacerbation episodes, changes in growth, school loss, respiratory symptoms, forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1; for children ≥6 years), and sputum characteristics. Safety endpoints include serious adverse events. Antibiotic resistance in respiratory bacterial pathogens colonising the nasopharynx is monitored. Data derived from medical records and clinical assessments every 3 to 4

  7. Resolution of extensive severe bronchiectasis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Suzanne; Matthews, Iren

    2010-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is, by definition, an irreversible condition. Following recent reports of reversible bronchiectasis in children, it has been suggested that the definition be broadened to include pre-bronchiectasis and transitional reversible states. We describe the case of a young infant who had extensive, severe bronchiectasis of unknown etiology that resolved following prolonged treatment with antibiotics and a tapering course of oral steroids. We suggest that the prolonged treatment may have played a role, perhaps by eradicating infection and thus enabling regeneration of bronchial anatomy.

  8. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  9. 102 Bronchiectasis: Localization and Characteristics, Identified by Using a High Resolution CT Scan in Adults With Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Laura; Segura Mendez, Nora Hilda; Flores, Francisco; Campos Romero, Freya Helena; Guillén, Nelva

    2012-01-01

    Background The common variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is the second cause of primary immunodeficiency. The bronchiectasis are the most frequent structural pulmonary alterations in CVID, which have been principally described in pediatric population, finding the presence of the same ones in 50% of the cases, nevertheless exists inssuficient information about the location and characteristics as type and distribution of the bronchiectasis; in adult population, less information exists still on this matter. High resolution CT scan is valuable for detection of bronchiectasis and may alter treatment of these patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of bronchiectasis, their characteristics and most frequent location using a high resolution CT scan in adults with diagnosis of CVID. Methods This was a cohort study whit 15 adult subjects whit the diagnosis of CVID, who underwent a chest high-resolution computed tomography scan, previous signature of a letter of informed consent and with the approval of the committee of ethics and investigation (F-2011-3601-21). Results We studied all the subjects (n = 15) whit CVID, finding the presence of bronquiectasias in 73% of the subjects with CVID, 82% was a women and 8% males. The most frequent location was in the left lung in 46% of the cases and 45 bilateral %, with only 9% of location in right lung. These were more frequent in the lower lobe in 42, 17% in top lobe and l6% diffuse, the rest of them were brought like diffuse, bibasal or parahiliar. In one patient we found the presence of a left apical cavitation and only one was brought by presence of pulmonary diffuse fibrosis. Conclusions There was realized a search of bronchiectasis and their characteristics in subjects with CVID disorders, the incidence of bronchiectasis is higher in our poblation (82%) than in the rest (50% described in other pubiclations). The most affected lung was the left in the lower lobe. The most frequent type of

  10. Facial flushing due to multifocal tumorlets in the lung with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoxing; Pu, Qiang; Liu, Lunxu; Che, Guowei

    2009-08-01

    Facial flushing attacks as a Carcinoid syndrome are quite a rare presentation in pulmonary tumorlets and bronchiectasis. We experienced a case in which a 43-year-old woman with bronchiectasis presented to our department with continuous facial flushing attacks for 3 years in the absence of bronchiectasis symptom. Computed tomographic scans revealed bronchiectasis of the left lower lobe and no tumor. A left lower lobectomy was performed, and multiple tumorlets were observed on microscopic examination among the bronchiectasis. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination revealed findings consistent with diffuse tumorlets and bronchiectasis in the lung.

  11. Characterizing Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Infection in Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Stainer, Anna; Bonaiti, Giulia; Zucchetti, Stefano C.; Simonetta, Edoardo; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Marruchella, Almerico; Gori, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Codecasa, Luigi; Pesci, Alberto; Chalmers, James D.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infection is a key aspect of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis. A growing interest has been raised on non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. We aimed at describing the clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, therapeutic options and outcomes of bronchiectasis patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) disease. This was a prospective, observational study enrolling 261 adult bronchiectasis patients during the stable state at the San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, from 2012 to 2015. Three groups were identified: pNTM disease; chronic P. aeruginosa infection; chronic infection due to bacteria other than P. aeruginosa. NTM were isolated in 32 (12%) patients, and among them, a diagnosis of pNTM disease was reached in 23 cases. When compared to chronic P. aeruginosa infection, patients with pNTM were more likely to have cylindrical bronchiectasis and a “tree-in-bud” pattern, a history of weight loss, a lower disease severity and a lower number of pulmonary exacerbations. Among pNTM patients who started treatment, 68% showed a radiological improvement, and 37% achieved culture conversion without recurrence, while 21% showed NTM isolation recurrence. NTM isolation seems to be a frequent event in bronchiectasis patients, and few parameters might help to suspect NTM infection. Treatment indications and monitoring still remain an important area for future research. PMID:27854334

  12. Characterizing Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Infection in Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Stainer, Anna; Bonaiti, Giulia; Zucchetti, Stefano C; Simonetta, Edoardo; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Marruchella, Almerico; Gori, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Codecasa, Luigi; Pesci, Alberto; Chalmers, James D; Loebinger, Michael R; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-11-16

    Chronic airway infection is a key aspect of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis. A growing interest has been raised on non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. We aimed at describing the clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, therapeutic options and outcomes of bronchiectasis patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) disease. This was a prospective, observational study enrolling 261 adult bronchiectasis patients during the stable state at the San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, from 2012 to 2015. Three groups were identified: pNTM disease; chronic P. aeruginosa infection; chronic infection due to bacteria other than P. aeruginosa. NTM were isolated in 32 (12%) patients, and among them, a diagnosis of pNTM disease was reached in 23 cases. When compared to chronic P. aeruginosa infection, patients with pNTM were more likely to have cylindrical bronchiectasis and a "tree-in-bud" pattern, a history of weight loss, a lower disease severity and a lower number of pulmonary exacerbations. Among pNTM patients who started treatment, 68% showed a radiological improvement, and 37% achieved culture conversion without recurrence, while 21% showed NTM isolation recurrence. NTM isolation seems to be a frequent event in bronchiectasis patients, and few parameters might help to suspect NTM infection. Treatment indications and monitoring still remain an important area for future research.

  13. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  14. Current management of bronchiectasis: review and 3 case studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Enid; Ebright, Linda; Kwiatkowski, Marianne; Cullina, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is the abnormal, irreversible dilatation of diseased bronchi. Permanently dilated airways, usually in the medium-sized bronchi, are inflamed and often obstructed with thick, purulent secretions. Known causative factors include postinfection bronchial damage, postinhalation injury, hypersensitivity reactions, and congenital airway obstructive disorders. Typical symptoms include sputum overproduction, fever, pleurisy, dyspnea, and chronic cough. Diagnosis involves radiographic studies and pulmonary function testing. Treatment includes oral, aerosolized, or intravenous antibiotic therapy according to the severity of the exacerbation, and mucus clearance by means of bronchial hygiene assistive devices, chest physiotherapy, postural drainage, and high-frequency chest compression. We present a review of bronchiectasis and offer 3 case studies illustrating current management of different presentations, including use of aerosolized antibiotics for patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although an adjunctive program of pulmonary rehabilitation may be useful for patients with bronchiectasis, no confirming studies have been performed to date, and additional research in this area is warranted.

  15. [Cystic fibrosis in a woman aged seventy].

    PubMed

    Ras, Janneke E; van Velzen, Edwin; van Berkhout, Ferdinand Teding; van den Brand, Joop J G

    2010-01-01

    A seventy-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a Staphylococcus aureus respiratory tract infection. She had a history of extensive bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Cystic fibrosis (CF) was suspected and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene analysis showed F508del and R117H-7T mutations. In these mutations there is residual activity in the chloride channel in the cell membrane coded by the CFTR gene. This results in a much milder disease pattern varying from no disease at all to isolated organ disease. This type of disease is known as non-classical cystic fibrosis. In our patient the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made exceptionally late in life.

  16. Aetiology of bronchiectasis in adults: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Hua; Guan, Wei-Jie; Liu, Shao-Xia; Wang, Lei; Cui, Juan-Juan; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-11-01

    While identifying the underlying aetiology is a key part of bronchiectasis management, the prevalence and impact of identifying the aetiologies on clinical management remain unclear. We aimed to determine the etiological spectrum of bronchiectasis, and how often etiological assessment could lead to the changes in patients' management. A comprehensive search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE for observational studies published before October 2015 reporting aetiologies in adults with bronchiectasis. Of the 8216 citations identified, 56 studies including 8608 adults with bronchiectasis were relevant for this systematic review. The crude prevalence for the identified aetiologies ranged from 18% to 95%, which possibly resulted from the differences in the geographic regions and diagnostic workup. Post-infective (29.9%), immunodeficiency (5%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (3.9%), connective tissue disease (3.8%), ciliary dysfunction (2.5%), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (2.6%) were the most common aetiologies. In 1577 patients (18.3%), identifying the aetiologies led to changes in patient's management. Aetiologies varied considerably among different geographic regions (P < 0.001). Intensive investigations of these aetiologies might help change patient's management and therefore should be incorporated into routine clinical practice.

  17. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  18. Bronchiectasis in the Last Five Years: New Developments.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Jun Keng; Venning, Victoria; Wong, Conroy; Jayaram, Lata

    2016-12-08

    Bronchiectasis, a chronic lung disease characterised by cough and purulent sputum, recurrent infections, and airway damage, is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. To date, treatment options have been limited to physiotherapy to clear sputum and antibiotics to treat acute infections. Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and microbiology of this disorder. Over the last five years, methods of assessing severity have been developed, the role of macrolide antibiotic therapy in reducing exacerbations cemented, and inhaled antibiotic therapies show promise in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Novel therapies are currently undergoing Phase 1 and 2 trials. This review aims to address the major developments within the field of bronchiectasis over this time.

  19. Bronchiectasis in the Last Five Years: New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Jun Keng; Venning, Victoria; Wong, Conroy; Jayaram, Lata

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis, a chronic lung disease characterised by cough and purulent sputum, recurrent infections, and airway damage, is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. To date, treatment options have been limited to physiotherapy to clear sputum and antibiotics to treat acute infections. Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and microbiology of this disorder. Over the last five years, methods of assessing severity have been developed, the role of macrolide antibiotic therapy in reducing exacerbations cemented, and inhaled antibiotic therapies show promise in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Novel therapies are currently undergoing Phase 1 and 2 trials. This review aims to address the major developments within the field of bronchiectasis over this time. PMID:27941638

  20. Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: Is the emphysema type associated with the pattern of fibrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Mintzopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Zezos, Petros; Zacharis, George; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Bouros, Demosthenes; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the predominant emphysema type is associated with the high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) pattern of fibrosis in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). METHODS: Fifty-three smokers with upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe pulmonary fibrosis on - HRCT - were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were stratified into 3 groups according to the predominant type of emphysema: Centrilobular (CLE), paraseptal (PSE), CLE = PSE. Patients were also stratified into 3 other groups according to the predominant type of fibrosis on HRCT: Typical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), probable UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). HRCTs were scored at 5 predetermined levels for the coarseness of fibrosis (Coarseness), extent of emphysema (emphysema), extent of interstitial lung disease (TotExtILD), extent of reticular pattern not otherwise specified (RetNOS), extent of ground glass opacity with traction bronchiectasis (extGGOBx), extent of pure ground glass opacity and extent of honeycombing. HRCT mean scores, pulmonary function tests, diffusion capacity (DLCO) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure were compared among the groups. RESULTS: The predominant type of emphysema was strongly correlated with the predominant type of fibrosis. The centrilobular emphysema group exhibited a significantly higher extent of emphysema (P < 0.001) and a lower extent of interstitial lung disease (P < 0.002), reticular pattern not otherwise specified (P < 0.023), extent of ground glass opacity with traction bronchiectasis (P < 0.002), extent of honeycombing (P < 0.001) and coarseness of fibrosis (P < 0.001) than the paraseptal group. The NSIP group exhibited a significantly higher extent of emphysema (P < 0.05), total lung capacity (P < 0.01) and diffusion capacity (DLCO) (P < 0.05) than the typical UIP group. The typical UIP group exhibited a significantly higher extent of interstitial lung disease, extent of reticular pattern not otherwise

  1. Influence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa on Exacerbation in Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Manu, Mohan K; Lazer, Bernaitis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8%) patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008), greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007), a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03), and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis. PMID:25722615

  2. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: evolving concepts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jay H; Moua, Teng; Daniels, Craig E; Hartman, Thomas E; Yi, Eunhee S; Utz, James P; Limper, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) occurs predominantly in middle-aged and older adults and accounts for 20% to 30% of interstitial lung diseases. It is usually progressive, resulting in respiratory failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for IPF have evolved over the years, and IPF is currently defined as a disease characterized by the histopathologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia occurring in the absence of an identifiable cause of lung injury. Understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF has shifted away from chronic inflammation and toward dysregulated fibroproliferative repair in response to alveolar epithelial injury. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is likely a heterogeneous disorder caused by various interactions between genetic components and environmental exposures. High-resolution computed tomography can be diagnostic in the presence of typical findings such as bilateral reticular opacities associated with traction bronchiectasis/bronchiolectasis in a predominantly basal and subpleural distribution, along with subpleural honeycombing. In other circumstances, a surgical lung biopsy may be needed. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute deteriorations (acute exacerbation). Although progress continues in unraveling the mechanisms of IPF, effective therapy has remained elusive. Thus, clinicians and patients need to reach informed decisions regarding management options including lung transplant. The findings in this review were based on a literature search of PubMed using the search terms idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and usual interstitial pneumonia, limited to human studies in the English language published from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2013, and supplemented by key references published before the year 2000.

  3. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  4. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  5. Prevalence of Bronchiectasis in Asthma according to Oral Steroid Requirement: Influence of Immunoglobulin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Xavier; Amengual, María José; Bosque, Montserrat; Mirapeix, Rosa M.; Domingo, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To establish the prevalence of bronchiectasis in asthma in relation to patients' oral corticosteroid requirements and to explore whether the increased risk is due to blood immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration. Methods. Case-control cross-sectional study, including 100 sex- and age-matched patients, 50 with non-steroid-dependent asthma (NSDA) and 50 with steroid-dependent asthma (SDA). Study protocol: (a) measurement of Ig and gG subclass concentration; (b) forced spirometry; and (c) high-resolution thoracic computed tomography. When bronchiectasis was detected, a specific etiological protocol was applied to establish its etiology. Results. The overall prevalence of bronchiectasis was 12/50 in the SDA group and 6/50 in the NSDA group (p = ns). The etiology was documented in six patients (four NSDA and two SDA). After excluding these patients, the prevalence of bronchiectasis was 20% (10/50) in the SDA group and 2/50 (4%) in the NSDA group (P < 0.05). Patients with asthma-associated bronchiectasis presented lower FEV1 values than patients without bronchiectasis, but the levels of Ig and subclasses of IgG did not present differences. Conclusions. Steroid-dependent asthma seems to be associated with a greater risk of developing bronchiectasis than non-steroid-dependent asthma. This is probably due to the disease itself rather than to other influencing factors such as immunoglobulin levels. PMID:24324951

  6. Bronchiectasis and the risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Vidya; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Hurst, John R; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam; Hubbard, Richard B; Brown, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the burden of cardiovascular comorbidities in people with bronchiectasis. Our cross-sectional study estimates the burden of pre-existing diagnoses of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in people with bronchiectasis compared with the general population. The historical cohort study investigates if individuals with bronchiectasis are at increased risk of incident CHD and stroke events. Methods We used primary care electronic records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. The cross-sectional study used logistic regression to quantify the association between bronchiectasis and recorded diagnoses of CHD or stroke. Cox regression was used to investigate if people with bronchiectasis experienced increased incident CHD and strokes compared with the general population, adjusting for age, sex, smoking habit and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Results Pre-existing diagnoses of CHD (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.41) and stroke (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.85 to 2.01) were higher in people with bronchiectasis compared with those without bronchiectasis, after adjusting for age, sex, smoking and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The rate of first CHD and stroke were also higher in people with bronchiectasis (HR for CHD 1.44 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.63) and HR for stroke 1.71 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.90)). Conclusion The risk of CHD and stroke are higher among people with bronchiectasis compared with the general population. An increased awareness of these cardiovascular comorbidities in this population is needed to provide a more integrated approach to the care of these patients. PMID:27573451

  7. Left Pulmonary Agenesis with Right Lung Bronchiectasis in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi; Dixit, Juhi; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of pulmonary parenchyma and vasculature. Bilateral pulmonary agenesis is incompatible with extrauterine life. Unilateral agenesis is often associated with other congenital cardiovascular, genitourinary and gastrointestinal malformations. Right lung agenesis is more frequently associated with congenital anomalies and has poor prognosis as compared to left lung agenesis. Diagnosis is often made in childhood but can be delayed, if the clinician is not aware about this entity. Chest radiograph in unilateral lung agenesis shows opaque hemithorax and these patients are often confused with other common causes of opaque hemithorax like collapse, pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We report a case of left lung agenesis with right lung bronchiectasis in a middle-aged adult who was treated for tuberculous pleural effusion and was referred to our institute for persistent symptoms despite treatment. PMID:27790501

  8. Left Pulmonary Agenesis with Right Lung Bronchiectasis in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi; Dixit, Juhi; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of pulmonary parenchyma and vasculature. Bilateral pulmonary agenesis is incompatible with extrauterine life. Unilateral agenesis is often associated with other congenital cardiovascular, genitourinary and gastrointestinal malformations. Right lung agenesis is more frequently associated with congenital anomalies and has poor prognosis as compared to left lung agenesis. Diagnosis is often made in childhood but can be delayed, if the clinician is not aware about this entity. Chest radiograph in unilateral lung agenesis shows opaque hemithorax and these patients are often confused with other common causes of opaque hemithorax like collapse, pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We report a case of left lung agenesis with right lung bronchiectasis in a middle-aged adult who was treated for tuberculous pleural effusion and was referred to our institute for persistent symptoms despite treatment.

  9. Inhaled fluticasone in bronchiectasis: a 12 month study

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, K; Tan, K; Ho, P; Ooi, G; Ho, J; Mak, J; Tipoe, G; Ko, C; Yan, C; Lam, W; Chan-Yeung, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The clinical efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) treatment has not been evaluated in bronchiectasis, despite the presence of chronic airway inflammation. Methods: After three consecutive weekly visits, 86 patients were randomised to receive either fluticasone 500 µg twice daily (n = 43, 23F, mean (SD) age 57.7 (14.4) years) or matched placebo (n = 43, 34F, 59.2 (14.2) years) and reviewed regularly for 52 weeks in a double blind fashion. Results: 35 and 38 patients in the fluticasone and placebo groups completed the study. Significantly more patients on ICS than on placebo showed improvement in 24 hour sputum volume (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.0, p = 0.03) but not in exacerbation frequency, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, or sputum purulence score. Significantly more patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection receiving fluticasone showed improvement in 24 hour sputum volume (OR 13.5, 95% CI 1.8 to 100.2, p = 0.03) and exacerbation frequency (OR 13.3, 95% CI 1.8 to 100.2, p = 0.01) than those given placebo. Logistic regression models revealed a significantly better response in sputum volume with fluticasone treatment than with placebo among subgroups of patients with 24 hour sputum volume <30 ml (p = 0.04), exacerbation frequency ⩽2/year (p = 0.04), and sputum purulence score >5 (p = 0.03). Conclusions: ICS treatment is beneficial to patients with bronchiectasis, particularly those with P aerurginosa infection. PMID:15741443

  10. The Bronchiectasis Severity Index. An International Derivation and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Goeminne, Pieter; Aliberti, Stefano; McDonnell, Melissa J.; Lonni, Sara; Davidson, John; Poppelwell, Lucy; Salih, Waleed; Pesci, Alberto; Dupont, Lieven J.; Fardon, Thomas C.; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: There are no risk stratification tools for morbidity and mortality in bronchiectasis. Identifying patients at risk of exacerbations, hospital admissions, and mortality is vital for future research. Objectives: This study describes the derivation and validation of the Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI). Methods: Derivation of the BSI used data from a prospective cohort study (Edinburgh, UK, 2008–2012) enrolling 608 patients. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify independent predictors of mortality and hospitalization over 4-year follow-up. The score was validated in independent cohorts from Dundee, UK (n = 218); Leuven, Belgium (n = 253); Monza, Italy (n = 105); and Newcastle, UK (n = 126). Measurements and Main Results: Independent predictors of future hospitalization were prior hospital admissions, Medical Research Council dyspnea score greater than or equal to 4, FEV1 < 30% predicted, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, colonization with other pathogenic organisms, and three or more lobes involved on high-resolution computed tomography. Independent predictors of mortality were older age, low FEV1, lower body mass index, prior hospitalization, and three or more exacerbations in the year before the study. The derived BSI predicted mortality and hospitalization: area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.74–0.86) for mortality and AUC 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.84–0.91) for hospitalization, respectively. There was a clear difference in exacerbation frequency and quality of life using the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire between patients classified as low, intermediate, and high risk by the score (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). In the validation cohorts, the AUC for mortality ranged from 0.81 to 0.84 and for hospitalization from 0.80 to 0.88. Conclusions: The BSI is a useful clinical predictive tool that identifies patients at risk of future mortality

  11. Involvement of pmrAB and phoPQ in Polymyxin B Adaptation and Inducible Resistance in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Schurek, Kristen N.; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Kiffer, Carlos R. V.; Sinto, Sumiko; Mendes, Caio M. F.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2009-01-01

    During investigation of susceptibility testing methods for polymyxins, 24 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed to have a distinct, reproducible phenotype in which skipped wells were observed during broth microdilution testing for polymyxin B. Possible mechanisms underlying this phenotype were investigated. The effects of various concentrations of polymyxin B on growth, the expression of resistance genes, and outer-membrane permeability were observed. Real-time PCR was performed to compare the expression, in response to selected concentrations of polymyxin B, of genes related to the PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory systems in polymyxin B-susceptible isolate PAO1, polymyxin B-resistant isolate 9BR, and two isolates (19BR and 213BR) exhibiting the skipped-well phenotype. 19BR and 213BR appeared to have similar basal levels of expression compared to that of PAO1 for phoQ, arnB, and PA4773 (from the pmrAB operon), and in contrast, 9BR had 52- and 280-fold higher expression of arnB and PA4773, respectively. The expression of arnB and PA4773 increased in response to polymyxin B in a concentration-dependent manner for 9BR but not for 19BR and 213BR. For these isolates, expression was significantly increased for arnB and PA4773, as well as phoQ, only upon exposure to 2 μg/ml polymyxin B but not at a lower concentration of 0.125 μg/ml. The sequencing of the pmrAB and phoPQ operons for all three isolates revealed a number of unique mutations compared to that for PAO1. 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) was used to study the effect of preincubation with polymyxin B on the self-promoted uptake of polymyxin B across the outer membrane. The preincubation of cells with 2 μg/ml polymyxin B affected baseline membrane permeability in 19BR and 213BR and also resulted in a reduced rate of NPN uptake in these isolates and in PAO1 but not in 9BR. The results presented here suggest that the skipped-well isolates have the ability to adapt to specific concentrations of polymyxin B, inducing known polymyxin B resistance genes involved in generating alterations in the outer membrane. PMID:19635950

  12. Maximal mid-expiratory flow is a surrogate marker of lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Yuan, Jing-jing; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the comparative diagnostic value of lung clearance index (LCI) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) in bronchiectasis. We compared the diagnostic performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables, and changes of LCI and MMEF% predicted during bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Patients with stable bronchiectasis underwent history inquiry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), multiple-breath nitrogen wash-out test, spirometry and sputum culture. Patients who experienced BEs underwent these measurements during onset of BEs and 1 week following antibiotics therapy. Sensitivity analyses were performed in mild, moderate and severe bronchiectasis. We recruited 110 bronchiectasis patients between March 2014 and September 2015. LCI demonstrated similar diagnostic value with MMEF% predicted in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis. LCI negatively correlated with MMEF% predicted. Both parameters had similar concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis and correlated significantly with forced expiratory flow in one second, age, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, ventilation heterogeneity and bilateral bronchiectasis. In exacerbation cohort (n = 22), changes in LCI and MMEF% predicted were equally minimal during BEs and following antibiotics therapy. In sensitivity analyses, both parameters had similar diagnostic value and correlation with clinical variables. MMEF% predicted is a surrogate of LCI for assessing bronchiectasis severity. PMID:27339787

  13. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P<0.05). Except for heightened sputum inflammatory responses, there were no notable differences in serum inflammation and lung function as with the increased density of PA. Female gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.10 for PA isolation; OR: 3.74 for PA infection], 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228

  14. Antiinflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Johnson, Cary E

    2005-04-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Antiinflammatory drugs for cystic fibrosis lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease parameters. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possesses antiinflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, colchicine, methotrexate, montelukast, pentoxifylline, nutritional supplements, and protease replacement have not had a significant impact on the disease. Therapy with oral corticosteroids, ibuprofen, and fish oil is limited by adverse effects. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising antiinflammatory therapy available for patients with cystic fibrosis. Pharmacologic therapy with antiinflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred.

  15. Characteristics and prognosis of microscopic polyangiitis with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahide; Komiya, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Kimura, Shinya; Tada, Yoshifumi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko

    2017-01-01

    Background Major pulmonary manifestations associated with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) include diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and interstitial pneumonia (IP).We previously showed bronchiectasis (BE) was one of the pulmonary complications of MPA. However, clinical features of BE patients with MPA are not fully understood. We investigated the characteristics and prognosis of BE patients with MPA. Methods Forty-five MPA patients were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with BE and those without BE. Results Thirty-one of 45 patients (69%) had pulmonary involvement including IP (23/45, 51%), BE (7/45, 16%), and DAH (5/45, 11%). There were no differences between the patients with BE versus those without with regard to clinical characteristics and initial treatments. However, the prognosis for patients with BE was better than those without BE during the first year after diagnosis, but it was worse between 1 and 5 years, which was statistically significant. Two BE patients died between 1 and 5 years as a result of pneumonia. Conclusions BE as a complication of MPA might be related to lower mortality in the acute phase and higher mortality in the chronic phase compared to other pulmonary manifestations. More attention to pulmonary infection is needed for patients with BE during the chronic phase. PMID:28275478

  16. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  17. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made. PMID:26019385

  18. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Andrés Felipe; Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made.

  19. [Surgery of bronchiectasis: what have changed in the last ten years?].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Pinto, Nelson; Bihun, Vyacheslav; Bernardo, João; Antunes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is defined as chronic abnormal dilatation and distortion of the bronchi. Surgery continues to be play an important role in the treatment of this disease especially in focal disease which is both curative. The objective of this study is to characterize the patients who underwent surgical resection of bronchiectasis in 10 years and compare them with patients operated by the same pathology in the previous 10 years. We conducted a review of cases of 78 patients operated in the 2000 ' s and the results were compared with those obtained in the study by the same professional service, referring to the previous decade. We assessed sex, age, symptoms, number of years with symptoms, complementary exams performed prior to surgery, indications for surgery, previous pulmonary diseases, location of bronchiectasis, type of surgical approach, number of hospitalization days and complications of surgery. In the last decade a smaller number of patients with bronchiectasis ( 78 versus 119 ) were submitted to thoracic surgery. In both groups the right lung and the lower lobes were the most affected and the majority of patients was submitted to lobectomy. In the last decade a lower percentage of complications was registed ( 6.4 %, versus 15.0 % (. The surgery was considered to be curative in 94.9 % and only 91 % in the 90 ' s. This study would support the idea that the surgery of bronchiectasis continues to be an excellent alternative to the treatment of localized forms of the disease and its complications.

  20. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. ...

  1. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  2. Bronchodilator response in adults with bronchiectasis: correlation with clinical parameters and prognostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Li, Hui-Min; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial dilation testing is an important tool to assess airway reversibility in adults with bronchiectasis. This study aims to investigate the association of bronchodilator response (BDR) and clinical parameters in bronchiectasis, and the utility of BDR to indicate lung function decline and risks of bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Methods We recruited 129 patients with clinically stable bronchiectasis. Baseline measurements included assessment of sputum inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -9, sputum bacterial culture, spirometry, bronchial dilation test (for baseline FEV1 less than 80% predicted only) and chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Bronchiectasis patients were followed-up for 1 year to determine the incidence of BEs and lung function trajectories. Significant BDR was defined as FEV1 improvement from pre-dose value by at least 200 mL and 12%. Clinical trial registry No.: NCT01761214; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Results BDR was negatively correlated with baseline FEV1 percentage predicted, but not blood or sputum eosinophil count. Significant BDR was not associated with greater proportion of never-smokers, poorer past history, greater HRCT scores, poorer diffusing capacity or increased sputum matrix metalloproteinases (all P>0.05). There was a trend towards higher bronchiectasis severity index (BSI) and greater proportion of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation or infection. Significant BDR at baseline was linked to poorer spirometry, but not more rapid lung function decline, throughout follow-up. Patients with significant BDR demonstrated non-significantly lower risks of experiencing the first BEs than those without (P=0.09 for log-rank test). Conclusions Significant BDR is associated with poorer lung function compared with non-significant BDR. Whether BDR predicts future risks of BEs needs to be tested in a larger cohort. PMID:26904207

  3. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  4. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  5. Time Trends in Hospital Admissions for Bronchiectasis: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2004 to 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Gema; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Pedraza-Serrano, Fernando; Puente-Maestu, Luis; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze changes in the incidence, diagnostic procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay (LOHS), costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for patients with bronchiectasis who were hospitalized in Spain over a 10-year period. Methods We included all admissions for patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis as primary or secondary diagnosis during 2004–2013. Results 282,207 patients were admitted to the study. After controlling for possible confounders, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hospitalizations over the study period when bronchiectasis was a secondary diagnosis. When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis we observed a significant decline in the incidence. In all cases, this pathology was more frequent in males, and the average age and comorbidity increased significantly during the study period (p<0.001). When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis, the most frequent secondary diagnosis was Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. When bronchiectasis was the secondary diagnosis, the most frequent primary diagnosis was COPD. IHM was low, tending to decrease from 2004 to 2013 (p<0.05). The average LOHS decreased significantly during the study period in both cases (p<0.001). The mean cost per patient decreased in patients with bronchiectasis as primary diagnosis, but it increased for cases of bronchiectasis as secondary diagnosis (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results reveal an increase in the incidence of hospital admissions for patients with bronchiectasis as a secondary diagnosis from 2004 to 2013, as opposed to cases of bronchiectasis as the primary diagnosis. Although the average age and comorbidity significantly increased over time, both IHM and average LOHS significantly decreased. PMID:27622273

  6. Raising awareness of bronchiectasis in primary care: overview of diagnosis and management strategies in adults.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Sethi, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease characterised by recurrent infection, inflammation, persistent cough and sputum production. The disease is increasing in prevalence, requiring a greater awareness of the disease across primary and secondary care. Mild and moderate cases of bronchiectasis in adults can often be managed by primary care clinicians. Initial assessments and long-term treatment plans that include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, however, should be undertaken in collaboration with a secondary care team that includes physiotherapists and specialists in respiratory medicine. Bronchiectasis is often identified in patients with other lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and in a lesser but not insignificant number of patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall goals of therapy are to prevent exacerbations, improve symptoms, improve quality of life and preserve lung function. Prompt treatment of exacerbations with antibiotic therapy is important to limit the impact of exacerbations on quality of life and lung function decline. Patient education and cooperation with health-care providers to implement treatment plans are key to successful disease management. It is important for the primary care provider to work with secondary care providers to develop an individualised treatment plan to optimise care with the goal to delay disease progression. Here, we review the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis with a focus on practical considerations that will be useful to primary care.

  7. Tuberculosis, bronchiectasis, and infertility: what ailed George Orwell?

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2005-12-01

    In the last and most productive years of his life, George Orwell struggled with pulmonary tuberculosis, dying at the dawn of the era of chemotherapy. His case history illustrates clinical aspects of tuberculosis with contemporary relevance: the role of poverty in its spread, the limited efficacy of monotherapy, the potential toxicity of treatment, and the prominence of cachexia as a terminal symptom. Orwell's ordeals with collapse therapy may have influenced the portrayal of the tortures of Winston Smith in the novel 1984. I discuss unifying diagnoses for Orwell's respiratory problems and apparent infertility, including tuberculous epididymitis, Young syndrome, immotile cilia syndrome, and cystic fibrosis.

  8. Reduced upper airway nitric oxide in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, I M; Laverty, A; Dinwiddie, R

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced within the respiratory tract is detectable in exhaled and nasal air. Its synthesis may be induced by inflammatory cytokines and reduced by glucocorticoids. Increased concentrations have been found in asthma and bronchiectasis. In this study, NO concentrations were determined in 63 children with cystic fibrosis, of whom 13 were on inhaled steroids (mean age 13.3 years) and 50 were not (mean age 12.3 years); 57 normal children (mean age 12.2 years) were also studied. NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser, exhaled NO following a relaxed vital capacity manoeuvre, and nasal NO with the breath held following a full inspiration. Mean concentration of exhaled NO in cystic fibrosis patients (no steroids) was 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0 to 5.3); this did not differ from values in normal children (mean 4.8 ppb, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.8) or in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled steroids (mean 3.6 ppb, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.8). Nasal concentrations were significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients, with or without inhaled steroids, than in normal children (cystic fibrosis, no inhaled steroids: 460 ppb, 95% CI 399 to 520; cystic fibrosis, inhaled steroids: 522 ppb, 95% CI 313 to 730, v normal children: 1024 ppb, 95% CI 896 to 1152, p < 0.0001). Considering the inflammatory nature of cystic fibrosis, it is surprising exhaled NO levels were not increased, but this may have been due to alteration in NO diffusion through thick mucus. The low nasal NO concentrations, which are probably the result of impaired flow from the paranasal sinuses, may contribute to the recurrent respiratory infections typical of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8984918

  9. Radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Milene Carneiro Barbosa; Ota, Maurício Kenji; Leitão Filho, Fernando Sergio Studart; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Materials and Methods The HRCT scans of 43 patients with bronchiectasis were analyzed by two radiologists, who used a scoring system to grade the findings. Kappa (κ) values and overall agreement were calculated. Results For the measurement and appearance of bronchiectasis, the interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.45 and κ = 0.43, respectively), as was the intraobserver agreement (κ = 0.54 and κ = 0.47, respectively). Agreement on the presence of mucous plugging was fair, for central distribution (overall interobserver agreement of 68.3% and κ = 0.39 for intraobserver agreement) and for peripheral distribution (κ = 0.34 and κ = 0.35 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). The agreement was also fair for peribronchial thickening (κ = 0.21 and κ = 0.30 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). There was fair interobserver and intraobserver agreement on the detection of opacities (κ = 0.39 and 71.9%, respectively), ground-glass attenuation (64.3% and κ = 0.24, respectively), and cysts/bullae (κ = 0.47 and κ = 0.44, respectively). Qualitative analysis of the HRCT findings of bronchiectasis and the resulting individual patient scores showed that there was an excellent correlation between the observers (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.85 and 0.81 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). Conclusion In the interpretation of HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, radiologist agreement appears to be fair. In our final analysis of the findings using the proposed score, we observed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. PMID:28298729

  10. Lessons learned from metabolomics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muhlebach, Marianne S; Sha, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a mono-genetic multi-system disease; however, respiratory manifestations cause the main morbidity and mortality where chronic bacterial infections lead to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Metabolomics allows a relatively complete snapshot of metabolic processes in a sample using different mass spectrometry methods. Sample types used for discovery of biomarkers or pathomechanisms in cystic fibrosis (CF) have included blood, respiratory secretions, and exhaled breath to date. Metabolomics has shown distinction of CF vs. non-CF for matrices of blood, exhaled breath, and respiratory epithelial cultures, each showing different pathways. Severity of lung disease has been addressed by studies in bronchoalveolar lavage and exhaled breath condensate showing separation by metabolites that the authors of each study related to inflammation; e.g., ethanol, acetone, purines. Lipidomics has been applied to blood and sputum samples showing associations with lung function and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Finally, studies of bacteria grown in vitro showed differences of bacterial metabolites to be associated with clinical parameters. Metabolomics, in the sense of global metabolomic profiling, is a powerful technique that has allowed discovery of pathways that had not previously been implicated in CF. These may include purines, mitochondrial pathways, and different aspects of glucose metabolism besides the known differences in lipid metabolism in CF. However, targeted studies to validate such potential metabolites and pathways of interest are necessary. Studies evaluating metabolites of bacterial origin are in their early stages. Thus further well-designed studies could be envisioned.

  11. [Retroperitoneal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Babski, Paweł; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare clinical entity characterised by the presence of patologic collagen tissue in a retroperitoneal space. The fibrous mass covers abdominal organs causing their disfunctions. RPF was described at the begining of XX century but its etiology is not clear yet. Usually it causes an ureter obstuction and hydronephrosis, that is why most commonly is diagnosed by urologists and nephrologists. However, retroperitoneal fibrosis can be multifacial disease. In some patients localisation of fibrosis is atypical and manifestationns can be varied. Gastrological symptoms like jaundice, bowel obstuction, ascites can occure. Besides, some early signs of RPF are nonspecific and can imitate alarming symptoms of neoplasma, e.g.: weight loss, anemia, malaise, anorexia, fever. This force us to initiate gastrological investigation. The awareness of this disease is important. The early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis and alows to avoid heavy complications. In typical cases radiology is often enough for diagnosis. However, histological examination is needed in many cases, especialy when patological mass is located atypical. A treatment is made up of farmacology and surgery. The first one is based on steroids, immunossuppressant and tamoxifen. Surgery is needed to eliminate organs obstruction.

  12. Impacts of Co-Existing Chronic Rhinosinusitis on Disease Severity and Risks of Exacerbations in Chinese Adults with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Yuan, Jing-jing; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence supports the notion of “one airway, one disease.” Objective To determine whether chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) poses adverse impacts on Chinese adults with bronchiectasis. Methods We enrolled 148 consecutive adults with clinically stable bronchiectasis. CRS diagnosed based on the 2012 EP3OS criteria. We systematically evaluated the bronchiectasis etiology, radiology, lung function, sputum bacteriology, airway inflammatory biomarkers, Bronchiectasis Severity Index, cough sensitivity and healthcare resource utilization. All patients were prospectively followed-up for 1 year to examine the frequency of bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Results Forty-seven patients (31.8%) were diagnosed as having CRS. Bronchiectasis etiologies did not vary statistically between CRS and no-CRS group. There was a trend towards non-statistically higher Bronchiectasis Severity Index [6.4±3.4 vs. 5.0(6.0), P = 0.19], a higher proportion of patients with BEs needing hospitalization before enrollment (48.9% vs. 29.7%, P = 0.13), poorer FVC [78.2±19.8% vs. 82.2(16.8)%, P = 0.54] and FEV1 [68.2±24.8% vs. 74.8(21.2)%, P = 0.29], a higher prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated (36.2% vs. 26.7%, P = 0.27) or colonized in sputum (36.2% vs. 21.8%, P = 0.12) and greater capsaicin cough sensitivity [C2: 3.9(123.0) μmol/L vs. 11.7(123.0) μmol/L, P = 0.81; C5: 62.5(996.0) μmol/L vs. 250.0(973.0) μmol/L, P = 0.32]. Patients with CRS had significantly greater risks of experiencing BEs during follow-up (P = 0.02 for negative binominal regression test). Conclusion Chinese adults with bronchiectasis appear to have a lower prevalence of CRS than that in western countries. There was a trend towards greater adverse impacts on bronchiectasis in patients with CRS. Studies with greater sample sizes might help to resolve this issue. In future clinical practice, physicians should be vigilant to the screening of concomitant CRS in bronchiectasis so as to better improve

  13. Chronic rhinosinusitis is associated with higher prevalence and severity of bronchiectasis in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Xu, Yali; Jin, Jianmin; Li, Ruimin; Liu, Xiaofang; Sun, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Bronchiectasis revealed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the causes and risk factors remain to be determined. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is closely associated with bronchiectasis or COPD, but whether it is associated with comorbid bronchiectasis in COPD (COPD-Bx) is unknown. Patients and methods Patients with stable COPD were enrolled consecutively and evaluated for the presence of CRS by questionnaire and paranasal sinus computed tomography. The presence and severity of bronchiectasis on lung HRCT were evaluated by the Smith and severity scores. COPD symptoms were evaluated by COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and Modified British Medical Research Council Questionnaire. The sputum cell differentials and concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-5, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 were measured. Results We enrolled 136 patients with stable COPD, of which 66 (48.5%) were diagnosed with CRS according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) criteria. The prevalence of bronchiectasis was 57.6% in patients with CRS, but 37.1% in those without CRS (P=0.017). COPD-Bx patients with CRS showed a significantly higher severity score of bronchiectasis than those without CRS (P=0.034). COPD patients with CRS had a higher percentage of eosinophils, higher levels of IL-8, IL-6, and MMP-9 in sputum as compared to those without CRS. In COPD-Bx patients with CRS, the percentage of eosinophils and the levels of IL-6 and MMP-9 in sputum were increased as compared to those without CRS. In all the subjects, Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20 correlated with CAT score (r=0.315, P<0.01) and in COPD patients with CRS, Lund–MacKay scores correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (% pred) (r=−0.251, P<0.05). Conclusions CRS was associated with COPD-Bx and this was probably due to increased airway

  14. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  15. A fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis: an unusual rare expression of chronic graft versus host disease. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Violeta, Labžentytė; Silvija, Zemnickienė; Edvardas, Danila; Virginija, Šileikienė; Rolandas, Zablockis; Vygantas, Gruslys

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia whose treatment with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was followed by chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) with lung involvement and bronchiectasis. This report illustrates an unusual course of a fast progression of the bronchiectasis due to BMT. Case description. A 33-year-old female was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. An allogeneic BMT was performed. One month after the transplantation, acute GVHD with skin involvement occurred. Treatment with prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been started. Nine months later, the patient was examined by a pulmonologist due to progressive dyspnoea. A pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan showed normal parenchyma of the lungs and no changes to the bronchi. A CT scan performed 7 months later revealed bronchiectasis for the first time. No clinical response was associated with the treatment and the patient’s respiratory status progressively deteriorated. During the final hospitalization, a CT scan performed 1 year later revealed huge cystic bronchiectasis in both lungs. Despite the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, the patient died one year after the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Conclusions. This case demonstrates that a fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis, that occurs after BMT, should always be considered as a possible manifestation of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) following allogeneic BMT.

  16. Culture and PCR detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Binks, M J; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H

    2012-07-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen.

  17. A case of bronchiectasis needing lung isolation for cerebello pontine angle tumor excision: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, C; Kurian, GP; Mariappan, R

    2016-01-01

    The main goals of neuroanesthesia are the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, avoidance of hypercarbia, hypoxemia, and to provide better brain relaxation. Providing anesthesia for a patient with bronchiectasis needing lung isolation for craniotomy can be challenging. A 56-year-old male patient, case of right lung bronchiectasis with a right cerebello pontine angle tumor underwent excision in the left lateral position. Since he had severe bronchiectasis of the right lung, we had isolated the right lung using right-sided double lumen tube to avoid spillage. Intraoperative split lung test was performed to assess the right lung contribution on carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination and found that there was a significant contribution from the right lung. Hence, both lungs were ventilated to control CO2. The importance of lung isolation to prevent spillage and avoidance of one lung ventilation to control the arterial CO2 are highlighted in this case report. By providing a balanced anesthetic keeping both, the neurosurgical and thoracic concerns are important for better postoperative outcome. PMID:27375400

  18. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  20. The L441P mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and its molecular pathogenic mechanisms in a Korean patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gee, Heon Yung; Kim, Chang Keun; Kim, So Won; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder usually found in populations of white Caucasian descent. CF is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene. A 5-yr-old Korean girl was admitted complaining of coughing and greenish sputum. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scan revealed diffuse bronchiectasis in both lungs. The patient had chronic diarrhea and poor weight gain, and the abdominal pancreaticobiliary CT scan revealed atrophy of the pancreas. Finally, CF was confirmed by the repeated analysis of the quantitative pilocarpine iontophoresis test. The chloride concentration of sweat samples taken from both forearms of the pateint was an average of 88.7 mM/L (normal value <40 mM/L). After a comprehensive search for mutations in the CFTR gene, the patient was found to carry the non-synonymous L441P mutation in one allele. Molecular physiologic analysis of the L441P mutation of CFTR revealed that the L441P mutation completely abolished the CFTR Cl(-) channel activity by disrupting proper protein folding and membrane trafficking of CFTR protein. These results confirmed the pathogenicity of the L441P mutation of CFTR circulating in the Korean population. The possibility of CF should be suspected in patients with chronic bronchiectasis, although the frequency of CF is relatively rare in East Asia.

  1. Bilateral Bronchiectasis as a Presentation Form of Pulmonary Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Bronchus Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Glenda; Torres, Carla; Borsini, Eduardo; Vigovich, Félix; Downey, Daniel; Salvado, Alajandro; Bosio, Martín

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of bronchus associated lymphoid tissue of the lung (BALT) is a rare illness that can remain without symptoms. Radiological findings of pulmonary lymphoma are heterogeneous. In literature, bronchiectasis is only described in one patient who also had besides adenomegalies. We reported on a 48-year-old female patient. She showed symptoms consistent with dyspnea with productive cough; there were crepitant sounds in the auscultation. Pulmonary functional test has shown a severe restrictive pattern with a low FVC and DLCO. CT scan showed bronchiectasis in the medium lobule without adenomegalies. Echocardiogram was normal, and the laboratory findings only showed leukocytosis. There were no findings in the bronchoscopy, but the lung biopsy showed a B-cell pulmonary lymphoma (positive to CD20 and CD79a in immunostaining). A wide variety of radiological manifestations has been previously described; however, we have presented this rare case, with bronchiectasis, as unique radiological finding. PMID:26839723

  2. Multidimensional severity assessment in bronchiectasis: an analysis of seven European cohorts

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, M J; Aliberti, S; Goeminne, P C; Dimakou, K; Zucchetti, S C; Davidson, J; Ward, C; Laffey, J G; Finch, S; Pesci, A; Dupont, L J; Fardon, T C; Skrbic, D; Obradovic, D; Cowman, S; Loebinger, M R; Rutherford, R M; De Soyza, A; Chalmers, J D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bronchiectasis is a multidimensional disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Two disease-specific clinical prediction tools have been developed, the Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI) and the FACED score, both of which stratify patients into severity risk categories to predict the probability of mortality. Methods We aimed to compare the predictive utility of BSI and FACED in assessing clinically relevant disease outcomes across seven European cohorts independent of their original validation studies. Results The combined cohorts totalled 1612. Pooled analysis showed that both scores had a good discriminatory predictive value for mortality (pooled area under the curve (AUC) 0.76, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.78 for both scores) with the BSI demonstrating a higher sensitivity (65% vs 28%) but lower specificity (70% vs 93%) compared with the FACED score. Calibration analysis suggested that the BSI performed consistently well across all cohorts, while FACED consistently overestimated mortality in ‘severe’ patients (pooled OR 0.33 (0.23 to 0.48), p<0.0001). The BSI accurately predicted hospitalisations (pooled AUC 0.82, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.84), exacerbations, quality of life (QoL) and respiratory symptoms across all risk categories. FACED had poor discrimination for hospital admissions (pooled AUC 0.65, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.67) with low sensitivity at 16% and did not consistently predict future risk of exacerbations, QoL or respiratory symptoms. No association was observed with FACED and 6 min walk distance (6MWD) or lung function decline. Conclusion The BSI accurately predicts mortality, hospital admissions, exacerbations, QoL, respiratory symptoms, 6MWD and lung function decline in bronchiectasis, providing a clinically relevant evaluation of disease severity. PMID:27516225

  3. Rare Electrocardiographic Manifestation of Cystic Bronchiectasis in a 34-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Mishra, Vikas; Goel, Amit; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Tiwari, Pradyot; Kumar Singh, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Himalayan P-waves (amplitude > 5 mm) are often known to be classically associated with congenital heart diseases with right to left shunt like tricuspid atresia, Ebstein anomaly, combined tricuspid and pulmonic stenosis, ischemic heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, etc., where they indicate a dilated right atrium and tend to be persistent. This type of P-waves is rarely seen in long-standing bronchiectasis and is usually transient. It can be easily confused with congenital heart disease. Here we report a case of Himalayan P-waves in patient with bronchiectatic lung disease which is a rare entity. PMID:28197254

  4. Pulmonary Opacities and Bronchiectasis Avid on 68Ga-PSMA PET.

    PubMed

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm

    2017-04-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed in prostate cancer, and the expression increases with tumor aggressiveness, metastatic disease, and recurrence. Despite its name, PSMA is also expressed in neovasculature of other tumors including lung cancer. Here, we demonstrate a case of increased PSMA expression on Ga-PSMA PET/CT in benign lung opacities and bronchiectasis in a prostate cancer patient. Thus, increased PSMA activity in the lungs may be due to both benign and malignant diseases and warrants further evaluation.

  5. Bronchiectasis following treatment for high-risk neuroblastoma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Adams, Madeleine; Traunecker, Heidi; Doull, Iolo; Cox, Rachel

    2017-03-10

    High-risk (HR) neuroblastoma remains a very challenging disease to treat and long-term cure is only possible with intensive, multimodal treatment including chemotherapy, high-dose therapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and immunotherapy. As a result, treatment-related morbidity and late effects are common in survivors. This report outlines a case series of six patients who developed a chronic productive cough following treatment for HR neuroblastoma. High-resolution computed tomography scanning confirmed the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Two of the patients who have undergone immunological testing demonstrate hypogammaglobulinaemia and impaired vaccine response. Persistent cough in patients treated for neuroblastoma warrants investigation and consideration of immunological referral.

  6. Assessing idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with bronchoscopic OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Adams, David C.; Colby, Thomas V.; Tager, Andrew M.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal form of fibrotic lung disease, with a significantly worse prognosis than other forms of pulmonary fibrosis (3-year survival rate of 50%). Distinguishing IPF from other fibrotic diseases is essential to patient care because it stratifies prognosis and therapeutic decision-making. However, making the diagnosis often requires invasive, high-risk surgical procedures to look for microscopic features not seen on chest CT, such as characteristic cystic honeycombing in the peripheral lung. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides rapid 3D visualization of large tissue volumes with microscopic resolutions well beyond the capabilities of CT. We aim to determine whether bronchoscopic OCT can provide a low-risk, non-surgical method for IPF diagnosis. We have developed bronchoscopic OCT catheters that access the peripheral lung and conducted in vivo peripheral lung imaging in patients, including those with pulmonary fibrosis. We also conducted bronchoscopic OCT in ex vivo lung from pulmonary fibrosis patients, including IPF, to determine if OCT could successfully visualize features of IPF through the peripheral airways. Our results demonstrate that OCT is able to visualize characteristic features of IPF through the airway, including microscopic honeycombing (< 1 mm diameter) not visible by CT, dense peripheral fibrosis, and spatial disease heterogeneity. We also found that OCT has potential to distinguish mimickers of IPF honeycombing, such as traction bronchiectasis and emphysema, from true honeycombing. These findings support the potential of bronchoscopic OCT as a minimally-invasive method for in vivo IPF diagnosis. However, future clinical studies are needed to validate these findings.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: retroperitoneal fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) Retroperitoneal fibrosis Educational Resources (3 links) Disease InfoSearch: Retroperitoneal fibrosis MalaCards: retroperitoneal fibrosis Orphanet: IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 ...

  8. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine and other stimulants found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and many soft drinks. Studies have not found ... side effects. How do fibrosis and simple cysts affect your risk for breast cancer? Neither fibrosis nor ...

  9. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  10. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a friend. Ways to Give Announcements CHICAGO BEAR JORDAN HOWARD BRINGS HIS FIGHT TO PULMONARY FIBROSIS ... 22-year-old lead rusher for the Chicago Bears, will announce his commitment to fight pulmonary fibrosis ( ...

  11. Reversibility of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengxi; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2015-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious health problem worldwide, which can be induced by a wide spectrum of chronic liver injuries. However, until today, there is no effective therapy available for liver fibrosis except the removal of underlying etiology or liver transplantation. Recent studies indicate that liver fibrosis is reversible when the causative agent(s) is removed. Understanding of mechanisms of liver fibrosis regression will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes recent research progress on mechanisms of reversibility of liver fibrosis. While most of the research has been focused on HSCs/myofibroblasts and inflammatory pathways, the crosstalk between different organs, various cell types and multiple signaling pathways should not be overlooked. Future studies that lead to fully understanding of the crosstalk between different cell types and the molecular mechanism underlying the reversibility of liver fibrosis will definitely give rise to new therapeutic strategies to treat liver fibrosis.

  12. [Beginning rheumatoid arthritis revealed during bronchiectasis surinfections. Value of cyclic antibiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Attucci, S; Maillot, F; Degenne, D; Brunereau, L; Dreyfuss, P; Lemarie, E; Hazouard, E

    2001-09-01

    Incidence of symptomatic bronchiectasis (BR) occurs in around 2% in patients with late rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Its seems that the association BR-RA could be a worsening factor for outcome of RA patients. A 58-year-old woman without dry syndrome, suffering from bronchial purulence over one year was admitted to the Department of Pneumology for hemoptysis and arthritis (knees, ankles, and wrists). Three prior episodes of inflammatory articular pain had occurred after transient bronchial purulence or pneumonitis. CT-scan showed bilateral bronchiectasis. Diagnosis of early RA was proved after the third episode of bronchial purulence related to a strain of Haemophilus influenzae. A strain of Coxiella burnetii was probably responsible for one of the three bronchial surinfections. Latex and Waaler Rose tests were transiently positive during the first episode, and became positive after the third one. At that time, RA was relevant in view of ARA criteria. Cyclic prophylactic antibiotic regimens could be proposed to patients suffering from RA-BR association, in contrast to the cases of patients with isolated BR. This approach could prevent destabilization of RA and reinforce of anti-rheumatic therapy. Activation and release of cytokines (NFk-B, TNF-alpha), and/or bacterial epitopes seems to be directly responsible for the articular destabilization.

  13. Effects of long-term bronchodilators in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation based on bronchodilator response at baseline

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho Jung; Lee, Hyun; Carriere, Keumhee C; Kim, Jung Hoon; Han, Jin-Hyung; Shin, Beomsu; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Kwon, O Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between positive bronchodilator response (BDR) at baseline and the effect of long-term bronchodilator therapy has not been well elucidated in patients with bronchiectasis. The aims of our study were to explore the association between positive BDR at baseline and lung-function improvement following long-term (3–12 months) bronchodilator therapy in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation. Materials and methods The medical records of 166 patients with clinically stable bronchiectasis who underwent baseline pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry and repeated spirometry after 3–12 months of bronchodilator therapy were retrospectively reviewed. For analysis, patients were divided into two groups, responders and poor responders, based on achievement of at least 12% and 200 mL in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) following bronchodilator therapy from baseline FEV1. Results A total of 57 patients (34.3%) were responders. These patients were more likely to have positive BDR at baseline than poor responders (38.6% [22 of 57] vs 18.3% [20 of 109], P=0.004). This association persisted after adjustment for other confounding factors (adjusted odds ratio 2.298, P=0.034). However, we found FEV1 improved significantly following long-term bronchodilator therapy, even in patients without positive BDR at baseline (change in FEV1 130 mL, interquartile range −10 to 250 mL; P<0.001). Conclusion Positive BDR at baseline was independently associated with responsiveness to long-term bronchodilator therapy in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation. However, FEV1 improvement was also evident in bronchiectasis patients without positive BDR at baseline, suggesting that these patients can benefit from long-term bronchodilator therapy. PMID:27853363

  14. CFTR gene mutations--including three novel nucleotide substitutions--and haplotype background in patients with asthma, disseminated bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tzetis, M; Efthymiadou, A; Strofalis, S; Psychou, P; Dimakou, A; Pouliou, E; Doudounakis, S; Kanavakis, E

    2001-03-01

    In order to investigate the incidence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations and unclassified variants in chronic pulmonary disease in children and adults, we studied 20 patients with asthma, 19 with disseminated bronchiectasis (DB) of unknown aetiology, and 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and compared the results to 52 subjects from the general Greek population. Analysis of the whole coding region of the CFTR gene and its flanking intronic regions revealed that the proportion of CFTR mutations was 45% in asthma (P<0.05), 26.3% in DB (P>0.05), 16.7% in COPD (P>0.05), compared to 15.4% in the general population. Seventeen different molecular defects involved in disease predisposition were identified in 16 patients. Three potentially disease-causing mutations, T388 M, M1R and V11I, are novel, found so far only in three asthma patients. The hyperactive M470 allele was found more frequently in COPD patients (frequency 70.8%, P<0.01) than in the controls. The study of the TGmTnM470 V polyvariant CFTR allele revealed the presence of CFTR function-modulating haplotypes TG13/T5/M470, TG11/T5/M470, TG12/T5/V470 and TG12/T7, combined with M470 or V470, in six asthma patients, four DB patients (P<0.01), and two COPD patients (P<0.05). These results confirm the involvement of the CFTR gene in asthma, DB and possibly in COPD.

  15. Airway-Clearance Techniques in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease and Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L.; Button, Brenda M.; Tannenbaum, Esta-Lee

    2017-01-01

    Common symptoms of chronic suppurative lung disease or bronchiectasis in children and adolescents are chronic cough with sputum production, retention of excess secretions in dilated airways, and a history of recurrent infections. Clinical management includes the prescription of airway-clearance techniques (ACTs) to facilitate mucociliary clearance, optimize sputum expectoration, relieve symptoms, and improve well-being. A wide range of ACTs are available for selection, and these strategies may be applied in isolation or in combination. The choice of technique will depend in part on the age of the child, their clinical state, and factors which may influence treatment adherence. While the evidence base for ACTs in children and adolescent with these conditions is not robust, the current available evidence in addition to clinical expertise provides guidance for technique prescription and clinical effect. An overview of the most commonly applied ACTs, including their physiological rationale and discussion of factors influencing prescription in children and adolescents is outlined in this review. PMID:28168184

  16. Tidal expiratory flow limitation, dyspnoea and exercise capacity in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Retsou, S; Kosmas, E; Dimakou, K; Malagari, K; Mantzikopoulos, G; Koutsoukou, A; Milic-Emili, J; Jordanoglou, J

    2003-05-01

    In this study the authors investigated whether expiratory flow limitation (FL) is present during tidal breathing in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis (BB) and whether it is related to the severity of chronic dyspnoea (Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea scale), exercise capacity (maximal mechanical power output (WRmax)) and severity of the disease, as assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scoring. Lung function, MRC dyspnoea, HRCT score, WRmax and FL were assessed in 23 stable caucasian patients (six males) aged 56 +/- 17 yrs. FL was assessed at rest both in seated and supine positions. To detect FL, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique was used. The degree of FL was rated using a five-point FL score. WRmax was measured using a cyclo-ergometer. According to the NEP technique, five patients were FL during resting breathing when supine but not seated, four were FL both seated and supine, and 14 were NFL both seated and supine. Furthermore, it was shown that: 1) in stable BB patients FL during resting breathing is common, especially in the supine position; 2) the degree of MRC dyspnoea is closely related to the five-point FL score; 3) WRmax (% pred) is more closely correlated with the MRC dyspnoea score than with the five-point FL score; and 4) HRCT score is closely related to forced expiratory volume in one second % pred but not five-point FL score. In conclusion, flow limitation is common at rest in sitting and supine positions in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis. Flow limitation and reduced exercise capacity are both associated with more severe dyspnoea. Finally, high-resolution computed tomography scoring correlates best with forced expiratory volume in one second.

  17. Autophagy in hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Fei; Tao, Lichan; Xiao, Junjie; Yang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic fibrosis is usually associated with chronic liver diseases caused by infection, drugs, metabolic disorders, or autoimmune imbalances. Effective clinical therapies are still lacking. Autophagy is a cellular process that degrades damaged organelles or protein aggregation, which participates in many pathological processes including liver diseases. Autophagy participates in hepatic fibrosis by activating hepatic stellate cells and may participate as well through influencing other fibrogenic cells. Besides that, autophagy can induce some liver diseases to develop while it may play a protective role in hepatocellular abnormal aggregates related liver diseases and reduces fibrosis. With a better understanding of the potential effects of autophagy on hepatic fibrosis, targeting autophagy might be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatic fibrosis in the near future.

  18. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  19. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes in Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, Canada).

    PubMed

    de Braekeleer, M; Mari, G; Verlingue, C; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Simard, F; Aubin, G; Férec, C

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of six cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean who bear rare genotypes. Two patients with a delta F508/I148T genotype had pancreatic insufficiency, as did two patients compound heterozygous for the 621 + 1G-->T mutation who also had a major growth retardation. One CF adult who carried a delta F508/Q890X genotype had meconium ileus and bronchiectasis. The sixth patient (A455E/R117C) had borderline sweat chloride concentrations; the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis had remained doubtful until the molecular analysis showed the presence of two CF mutations. The seventh patient with a delta F508/R1158X genotype experienced several complications and is now 43 years old.

  20. Practical management of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2015-07-22

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is relentless progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown etiology. Main pathogenesis is aberrant recovery of epithelial injury and collagen deposition. Majority of IPF patients have been elderly men with smokers. However, there are important differential diagnosis such as fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) associated ILD, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonia (CHP). Clinical point of view, non-productive cough and progressive exertional dyspnea are main symptoms. In addition, scalene muscle hypertrophy, fine crackles and finger clubbing are key findings. Serum marker such as lactate deydrogenase (LDH), Krebs von den Lungeng-6 (KL-6) are sensitive for ILD detection and activity. Pulmonary function test and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) are quite meaningful physiological examination. Serial change of forced vital capacity 6MWT distance predict mortality of IPF. International IPF guideline published recently and highlighted on the importance of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings. Key findings of IPF are honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and subpleural reticular opacity. IPF is chronic progressive disease. Therefore, tracing disease behavior is crucial and unifying clinical, physiological, imaging information over time provide useful information for physicians.In management, many candidate agent failed to have positive result. Pirfenidone which is anti-fibrotic agent showed to slow the decline of vital capacity and prevent of acute exacerbation. Molecular agent such as nintedanib is promising agent for prevention of progression of IPF. In this review, we review the clinical information of IPF and IPF guideline. Lastly, we show the clinical algorithm of this devastated disease.

  1. The Likelihood of Preventing Respiratory Exacerbations in Children and Adolescents with either Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease or Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Grimwood, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis in children and adolescents are important causes of respiratory morbidity and reduced quality of life (QoL), also leading to subsequent premature death during adulthood. Acute respiratory exacerbations in pediatric CSLD and bronchiectasis are important markers of disease control clinically, given that they impact upon QoL and increase health-care-associated costs and can adversely affect future lung functioning. Preventing exacerbations in this population is, therefore, likely to have significant individual, familial, societal, and health-sector benefits. In this review, we focus on therapeutic interventions, such as drugs (antibiotics, mucolytics, hyperosmolar agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents), vaccines and physiotherapy, and care-planning, such as post-hospitalization management and health promotion strategies, including exercise, diet, and reducing exposure to environmental toxicants. The review identified a conspicuous lack of moderate or high-quality evidence for preventing respiratory exacerbations in children and adolescents with CSLD or bronchiectasis. Given the short- and long-term impact of exacerbations upon individuals, their families, and society as a whole, large studies addressing interventions at the primary and tertiary prevention phases are required. This research must include children and adolescents in both developing and developed countries and address long-term health outcomes. PMID:28393062

  2. Predicting high risk of exacerbations in bronchiectasis: the E-FACED score

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, MA; Athanazio, RA; Girón, R; Máiz-Carro, L; de la Rosa, D; Olveira, C; de Gracia, J; Vendrell, M; Prados-Sánchez, C; Gramblicka, G; Corso Pereira, M; Lundgren, FL; Fernandes De Figueiredo, M; Arancibia, F; Rached, SZ

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the FACED score has demonstrated a great prognostic capacity in bronchiectasis, it does not include the number or severity of exacerbations as a separate variable, which is important in the natural history of these patients. Objective Construction and external validation of a new index, the E-FACED, to evaluate the predictive capacity of exacerbations and mortality. Methods The new score was constructed on the basis of the complete cohort for the construction of the original FACED score, while the external validation was undertaken with six cohorts from three countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Chile). The main outcome was the number of annual exacerbations/hospitalizations, with all-cause and respiratory-related deaths as the secondary outcomes. A statistical evaluation comprised the relative weight and ideal cut-off point for the number or severity of the exacerbations and was incorporated into the FACED score (E-FACED). The results obtained after the application of FACED and E-FACED were compared in both the cohorts. Results A total of 1,470 patients with bronchiectasis (819 from the construction cohorts and 651 from the external validation cohorts) were followed up for 5 years after diagnosis. The best cut-off point was at least two exacerbations in the previous year (two additional points), meaning that the E-FACED has nine points of growing severity. E-FACED presented an excellent prognostic capacity for exacerbations (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.82 for at least two exacerbations in 1 year and 0.87 for at least one hospitalization in 1 year) that was statistically better than that of the FACED score (0.72 and 0.78, P<0.05, respectively). The predictive capacities for all-cause and respiratory mortality were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively, with both being similar to those of the FACED. Conclusion E-FACED score significantly increases the FACED capacity to predict future yearly exacerbations while maintaining the

  3. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis, regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis. Because anti-angiogenic therapy has been found to be efficient in the prevention of fibrosis in experimental models of CLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis could be a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are being directed to revealing the mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis. Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesis and fibrosis are closely related in both clinical and experimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer of angiogenesis together with inflammation and hepatic stellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at the intersection between inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis. This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on the relevant features that communicate angiogenesis with progression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point of cirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies. The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associated with portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are also discussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25848465

  4. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear.

  5. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  6. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  7. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  8. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  9. Longitudinal Nasopharyngeal Carriage and Antibiotic Resistance of Respiratory Bacteria in Indigenous Australian and Alaska Native Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Kim M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Grimwood, Keith; Valery, Patricia C.; Cheng, Allen C.; Morris, Peter S.; Leach, Amanda J.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C.; Chatfield, Mark; Redding, Greg; Reasonover, Alisa L.; McCallum, Gabrielle B.; Chikoyak, Lori; McDonald, Malcolm I.; Brown, Ngiare; Torzillo, Paul J.; Chang, Anne B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Indigenous children in Australia and Alaska have very high rates of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD)/bronchiectasis. Antibiotics, including frequent or long-term azithromycin in Australia and short-term beta-lactam therapy in both countries, are often prescribed to treat these patients. In the Bronchiectasis Observational Study we examined over several years the nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic resistance of respiratory bacteria in these two PCV7-vaccinated populations. Methods Indigenous children aged 0.5–8.9 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis from remote Australia (n = 79) and Alaska (n = 41) were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2004–8. At scheduled study visits until 2010 antibiotic use in the preceding 2-weeks was recorded and nasopharyngeal swabs collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Analysis of respiratory bacterial carriage and antibiotic resistance was by baseline and final swabs, and total swabs by year. Results Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage changed little over time. In contrast, carriage of Haemophilus influenzae declined and Staphylococcus aureus increased (from 0% in 2005–6 to 23% in 2010 in Alaskan children); these changes were associated with increasing age. Moraxella catarrhalis carriage declined significantly in Australian, but not Alaskan, children (from 64% in 2004–6 to 11% in 2010). While beta-lactam antibiotic use was similar in the two cohorts, Australian children received more azithromycin. Macrolide resistance was significantly higher in Australian compared to Alaskan children, while H. influenzae beta-lactam resistance was higher in Alaskan children. Azithromycin use coincided significantly with reduced carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, but increased carriage of S. aureus and macrolide-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (proportion of carriers and all swabs), in a ‘cumulative dose-response’ relationship. Conclusions

  10. Genetic Characterization of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated during Ciprofloxacin Therapy from a Patient with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; Ferrandiz, María-José; Tubau, Fe; Pallarés, Román; Manresa, Federico; Liñares, Josefina

    2003-01-01

    Five Spain9V-3 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from a patient with bronchiectasis who had received long-term ciprofloxacin therapy. One ciprofloxacin-susceptible strain was isolated before treatment, and four ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were isolated during treatment. The resistant strains were derived from the susceptible strain either by a parC mutation (low-level resistance) or by parC and gyrA mutations (high-level resistance). This study shows that ciprofloxacin therapy in a patient colonized by susceptible S. pneumoniae may select fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. PMID:12654682

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms include progressive damage to the respiratory system and chronic digestive system problems. The features of ... with cystic fibrosis experience health problems affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Most men with cystic fibrosis have congenital bilateral ...

  12. Adipocytokines and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Anania, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome pose significant risk for progression of many types of chronic illnesses, including liver disease. Hormones released from adipocytes, adipocytokines, associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, have been shown to control hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the final common pathway that can result in cirrhosis, and can ultimately require liver transplantation. Initially, two key adipocytokines, leptin and adiponectin, appeared to control many fundamental aspects of the cell and molecular biology related to hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Leptin appears to act as a profibrogenic molecule while adiponectin possesses strong-anti-fibrotic properties. In this review, we emphasize pertinent data associated with these, and recently discovered, adipocytokines that may drive or halt the fibrogenic response in the liver. PMID:25656826

  13. Assessment of the quantity of microorganisms associated with bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage after periodontal treatment: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Erika Horácio; Longo, Priscila Larcher; de Camargo, Caroline Cristina Batista; Dal Corso, Simone; Lanza, Fernanda De Cordoba; Stelmach, Rafael; Athanazio, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between periodontal disease (PD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been widely studied, with aspiration of periodontal pathogens being one of the most accepted causal mechanisms for pulmonary exacerbation. Periodontal treatment (PT) was associated with a decrease in these exacerbations. Bronchiectasis is a pulmonary disease that has many similarities to COPD; however, there are no studies correlating this condition to PD thus far. This study will evaluate if PT reduces proinflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva, as well as halitosis and the amount of microorganisms associated with exacerbation of bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage 3 months after PT. Methods and analysis A total of 182 patients with PD and bronchiectasis will be randomly allocated to group 1 (positive control; scaling and root planing (SRP)+oral hygiene (OH)) or group 2 (experimental; SRP+photodynamic therapy+OH). After 3 months, samples of saliva, nasal lavage and sputum will be collected to determine the level of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Porphyromonas gingivalis by quantitative PCR. This protocol will determine the efficacy of PT in reducing the most likely niches of bronchiectasis exacerbation by comparing pre- and post-treatment microbiology samples. Furthermore, there will be assessment of oral halitosis and verification of inflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of Universidade Nove de Julho. Data will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number NCT02514226. PMID:27084279

  14. Antioxidants in cystic fibrosis ☆ Conclusions from the CF Antioxidant Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, November 11-12, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, André M.; White, Terry B.; Cross, Carroll E.; Forman, Henry Jay; Sokol, Ronald J.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2009-01-01

    Although great strides are being made in the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), this condition remains the most common fatal hereditary disease in North America. Numerous links exist between progression of CF lung disease and oxidative stress. The defect in CF is the loss of function of the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein; recent evidence that CFTR expression and function are modulated by oxidative stress suggests that the loss may result in a poor adaptive response to oxidants. Pancreatic insufficiency in CF also increases susceptibility to deficiencies in lipophilic antioxidants. Finally the airway infection and inflammatory processes in the CF lung are potential sources of oxidants that can affect normal airway physiology and contribute to the mechanisms causing characteristic changes associated with bronchiectasis and loss of lung function. These multiple abnormalities in the oxidant/antioxidant balance raise several possibilities for therapeutic interventions that must be carefully assessed. PMID:17157190

  15. The Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Management of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Noriega Aldave, Adrian Pedro; William Saliski, DO

    2014-01-01

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by the absence of cartilage in subsegmental bronchi leading to formation of bronchiectasis distal to the affected bronchi. The differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis is broad and the rarity of the disease poses a diagnostic and management challenge for clinicians. This present review aims to help the understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathophysiological features, diagnostic modalities, management and differential diagnosis of Williams-Campbell syndrome. A MedLine/PubMed search was performed identifying all relevant articles. No restrictions were used for publication dates. The author used the keywords “Williams-Campbell syndrome,” “non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis” and “congenital bronchiectasis” finding 503, 195 and 489 articles, respectively. PMID:25317385

  16. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease.

  18. [Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic disorder characterized histopathologically by a pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, with heterogeneous and mutilating interstitial fibrosis with foci of proliferating fibroblasts, honeycomb lung, and little if any inflammation. The diagnosis is based on a pluridisciplinary analysis of the clinical symptoms, the chest high-resolution computerized tomography features, and pathology on video-thoracoscopic lung biopsy when indicated. In half of the cases, the typical tomodensitometric pattern allows to make a confident diagnosis without a lung biopsy. The median survival is only about 3 years and is presently not improved by any treatment. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (antioxydant) in association with corticosteroids and azathioprine may slightly reduce the rate of functional worsening. Clinical trials are in progress to improve the treatment of this still incurable disease.

  19. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  20. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  1. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  2. [Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cavallini, L; Abaterusso, C; Bedogna, V; Pertica, N; Loschiavo, C; Lupo, A

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a new, rare, and severe disease occurring in patients with renal failure who have been exposed to gadolinium. The pathogenesis of NSF is not completely known. In fact, the first warning about a significant relationship between NSF and gadolinium (a contrast medium used in magnetic resonance imaging) was only issued in 2006. No cases of NSF have been reported in Italy to date. A nationwide investigation should therefore be carried out to assess the real prevalence of NSF within the Italian uremic population. Furthermore, we need guidelines to reduce the risk of NSF in renal patients undergoing MRI with contrast medium.

  3. Longitudinal evaluation of bronchopulmonary disease in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; Li, Zhanhai; Kosorok, Michael R; Laxova, Anita; Green, Christopher G; Collins, Jannette; Lai, Hui-Chuan; Makholm, Linda M; Rock, Michael J; Splaingard, Mark L

    2003-09-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) develop bronchopulmonary disease at variable ages. Determining the epidemiology of chronic lung disease and quantifying its severity, however, have been difficult in infants and young children. As part of the Wisconsin CF Neonatal Screening Project, we were presented with an ideal opportunity to assess longitudinally the evolution of symptoms, signs, and quantitative measures of CF respiratory disease. After newborn screening test results led to early recognition, 64 patients diagnosed at a median age of 6.71 weeks were enrolled and studied systematically at a median age of 11.3 years to obtain clinical information, chest radiographs, and pulmonary function tests. Our observations revealed that a frequent cough by history is evident by 10.5 months of age in half the patients. Quantitative chest radiology (CXR scoring) demonstrated that potentially irreversible abnormalities are present in half the children by 2 years. The severity of Wisconsin and Brasfield CXR scores increased in association with respiratory infections. Longitudinal progression of Wisconsin CXR scores was related to age (P < 0.001), pancreatic insufficiency (P = 0.005), and respiratory secretion cultures positive for Staphylococus aureas (P = 0.039). In contrast, serial spirometry showed limited sensitivity, as did lung volume determinations; neither was satisfactory as repeated measures with acceptable quality control until after 7 years of age. Time to event analyses revealed that half the patients had % predicted FEF(25-75) and FEV(1)/FVC values greater than 80% until 10.7 and 9.9 years, respectively. We conclude that of the methods evaluated, quantitative chest radiology is currently the best procedure for frequent assessment of bronchopulmonary disease in CF, and that radiographic progression is evident in approximately 85% of patients by 5 years of age. Our results also suggest that bronchiectasis and other radiographic evidence of chronic infection are

  4. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition A A A What's in this article? CF ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  5. Oxaliplatin-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arpan; Udwadia, Zarir F.; Almel, Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been approved for use as an adjuvant treatment in stage III colorectal carcinoma by the US-FDA. The majority of toxicity caused by this drug is manageable. However, rare, isolated cases of pulmonary fibrosis induced by this drug have been reported in literature. We report one such case of rapidly evolving pulmonary fibrosis following treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:20838550

  6. Combined mediastinal and retroperitoneal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, H. W.

    1968-01-01

    A case of combined idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis and retroperitoneal fibrosis is described. It is possibly the twelfth case to be reported during life. A review of the literature reveals the `ubiquity' of localized collagenosis and the trend of opinion as regards aetiology and treatment. Images PMID:5654073

  7. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Print A A A What's in this article? ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  8. Management strategies for liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Altamirano-Barrera, Alejandra; Barranco-Fragoso, Beatriz; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis resulting from chronic liver injury are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Among causes of hepatic fibrosis, viral infection is most common (hepatitis B and C). In addition, obesity rates worldwide have accelerated the risk of liver injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Also liver fibrosis is associated with the consumption of alcohol, or autoimmune hepatitis and chronic cholangiophaties. The response of hepatocytes to inflammation plays a decisive role in the physiopathology of hepatic fibrosis, which involves the recruitment of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cells such as monocytes and macrophages. As well as the production of other cytokines and chemokines, which increase the stimulus of hepatic stellate cells by activating proinflammatory cells. The aim of this review is to identify the therapeutic options available for the treatment of the liver fibrosis, enabling the prevention of progression when is detected in time.

  9. [Idiopathic lung fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L; Geldszus, R; Molitor, S J

    1990-02-01

    In a 39-year-old patient with chronic progressive idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the genetic aspects, course and therapeutic possibilities of the disease are discussed. In February, 1987, the English-born patient, Anthony V., attended for initial examination on account of progressive dyspnoea, on which occasion radiology and pulmonary function analysis revealed advanced pulmonary fibrosis. The patient's family history revealed a familial genesis, since both his father (?) and his sister had died of this disease. A comparative of the patient's chest films with original chest films of his sister revealed almost identical findings. Within the previous twelve months, follow-up examinations done on A.V. revealed an increase in the restrictive component (reduction of vital capacity from 2,400 ml to 1,500 ml), development of partial respiratory failure at rest, and global respiratory failure in response to mild ergometric exercise despite intermittent high-dose steroid administrations superimposed on long-term, low-dose steroid therapy. The unfavourable evolution observed over the past 12 months is underscored by an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure from 18 mmHg initially to a present 34 mmHg at rest, and 46 mmHg under submaximal ergometric loading. The only option still left to the patient is the possibility of a lung transplantation, which - probably initially unilateral - is scheduled to be carried out in the near future at the Chest Surgery Department of the Medical University at Hannover.

  10. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness.

  11. Cystic fibrosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Gerardo; Aznarez, Isabel; Crispino, Beatriz; Mimbacas, Adriana; Martínez, Liria; Poggio, Rossana; Zielenski, Julian; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Cardoso, Horacio

    2002-03-31

    We conducted clinical and genetic analyses of 52 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Uruguay, which is about half of the known affected individuals in the country. A relatively high proportion had a mild presentation, characterized by pancreatic sufficiency (28%), a strong pulmonary component (97%), and borderline sweat electrolyte measurements (25%). Mutational analysis of CF chromosomes demonstrated a relatively low incidence of the DeltaF508 allele (40%) and a large number of other cystic fibrosis conductance regulator mutations, with an overall detection rate of about 71%. Fifteen different mutations were detected in our patients: DeltaF508, G542X, R1162X, G85E, N1303K, R334W, R75Q, R74W, D1270N, W1282X, DeltaI507, 2789+5G-->A, R1066C, -816C/T, R553X, as well as RNA splicing variant IVS8-5T. This group of Uruguayan CF patients has some characteristics in common with other populations of similar origin (Hispanics), as well as some unique characteristics.

  12. Challenges in pulmonary fibrosis · 2 : Bronchiolocentric fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Jean‐François

    2007-01-01

    Bronchiolocentric fibrosis is essentially represented by the pathological pattern of constrictive fibrotic bronchiolitis obliterans. The corresponding clinical condition (obliterative bronchiolitis) is characterised by dyspnoea, airflow obstruction at lung function testing and air trapping with characteristic mosaic features on expiratory high resolution CT scans. Bronchiolitis obliterans may result from many causes including acute diffuse bronchiolar damage after inhalation of toxic gases or fumes, alloimmune chronic processes after lung or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or connective tissue disease (especially rheumatoid arthritis). Airway‐centred interstitial fibrosis and bronchiolar metaplasia are other features of bronchiolocentric fibrosis. PMID:17600295

  13. COMPARISON BETWEEN SEDATION AND GENERAL ANESTHESIA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CANINE IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS IN WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIERS.

    PubMed

    Roels, Elodie; Couvreur, Thierry; Farnir, Frédéric; Clercx, Cécile; Verschakelen, Johny; Bolen, Géraldine

    2017-02-23

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive interstitial lung disease mainly affecting West Highland white terriers. Thoracic high-resolution computed tomographic (T-HRCT) findings for Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis acquired under general anesthesia have been described previously. However, the use of general anesthesia may be contraindicated for some affected dogs. Sedation may allow improved speed and safety, but it is unknown whether sedation would yield similar results in identification and grading of Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions. The aim of this prospective, observational, method-comparison, case-control study was to compare findings from T-HRCT images acquired under sedation versus general anesthesia for West Highland white terriers affected with Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 9), using the glossary of terms of the Fleischner Society and a scoring system. Ground-glass opacity was identified in all affected West Highland white terriers for both sedation and general anesthesia acquisitions, although the Ground-glass opacity extent varied significantly between the two acquisitions (P < 0.001). Ground-glass opacity was the sole lesion observed in control dogs (n = 6), but was less extensive compared with affected West Highland white terriers. Identification and grading of a mosaic attenuation pattern differed significantly between acquisitions (P < 0.001). Identification of lesions such as consolidations, nodules, parenchymal and subpleural bands, bronchial wall thickening, and bronchiectasis did not differ between acquisitions. The present study demonstrated that T-HRCT obtained under sedation may provide different information than T-HRCT obtained under general anesthesia for identification and grading of some Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions, but not all of them. These differences should be taken into consideration when general anesthesia is contraindicated and sedation is

  14. Oxidative Stress and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Kamp, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as an important molecular mechanism underlying fibrosis in a variety of organs, including the lungs. However, the causal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) released from environmental exposures and inflammatory / interstitial cells in mediating fibrosis as well as how best to target an imbalance in ROS production in patients with fibrosis are not firmly established. We focus on the role of ROS in pulmonary fibrosis and, where possible, highlight overlapping molecular pathways in other organs. The key origins of oxidative stress in pulmonary fibrosis (e.g. environmental toxins, mitochondria / NADPH oxidase of inflammatory and lung target cells, and depletion of antioxidant defenses) are reviewed. The role of alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways are examined. We emphasize an emerging role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pulmonary fibrosis. After briefly summarizing how ROS trigger a DNA damage response, we concentrate on recent studies implicating a role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair mechanisms focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) as well as crosstalk between ROS production, mtDNA damage, p53, Ogg1, and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2). Finally, the association between ROS and TGF-β1-induced fibrosis is discussed. Novel insights into the molecular basis of ROS-induced pulmonary diseases and, in particular, lung epithelial cell death may promote the development of unique therapeutic targets for managing pulmonary fibrosis as well as fibrosis in other organs and tumors, and in aging; diseases for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23219955

  15. Pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kioumis, Ioannis P.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is recognized as a common and life-threatening complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, especially in those who are infected with P. aeruginosa, B. cepacia or Aspergillus, need enteral feeding, are diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), developed massive hemoptysis, and their respiratory function is seriously compromised. Structural impairment and altered airflow dynamics in the lungs of CF patients are considered as the main predisposing factors, but also inhaled medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) could increase the risk of pneumothorax. Clinical presentation could range from dramatic to very mild. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax occurring to patients with CF is essentially similar to that for non-CF patients. Therapeutic options include intercostal tube drainage, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and medical or surgical pleurodesis. Pneumothorax increases both short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in CF patients and causes significant deterioration of their quality of life. PMID:25337406

  16. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  17. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  18. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  19. Annual direct medical costs of bronchiectasis treatment: Impact of severity, exacerbations, chronic bronchial colonization and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease coexistence.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, David; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel; Olveira, Casilda; Girón, Rosa; Máiz, Luis; Prados, Concepción

    2016-04-12

    Patients with bronchiectasis (BE) present exacerbations that increase with severity of the disease. We aimed to determine the annual cost of BE treatment according to its severity, determined by FACED score, as well as the parameters associated with higher costs. Multicentre historical cohorts study with patients from six hospitals in Spain. The costs arising during the course of a year from maintenance treatment, exacerbations, emergency visits and hospital admissions were analysed. In total, 456 patients were included (56.4% mild BE, 26.8% moderate BE and 16.9% severe BE). The mean cost was €4671.9 per patient, which increased significantly with severity. In mild BE, most of the costs were due to bronchodilators and inhaled steroids; in severe BE, most were due to exacerbations and inhaled antibiotics. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), age, colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosaand the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs. The highest costs were found in patients with BE associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the most exacerbations and with chronic bronchial colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosa(PA). In conclusion, BE patients gave rise to high annual costs, and these were doubled on each advance in severity on the FACED score. FEV1%, age, colonization by PA and the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in tissue scarring and organ dysfunction. In the heart, fibrosis may be reparative, replacing areas of myocyte loss with a structural scar following infarction, or reactive, which is triggered in the absence of cell death and involves interstitial ECM deposition in response to long-lasting stress. Interstitial fibrosis can increase the passive stiffness of the myocardium, resulting in impaired relaxation and diastolic dysfunction. Additionally, fibrosis can lead to disruption of electrical conduction in the heart, causing arrhythmias, and can limit myocyte oxygen availability and thus exacerbate myocardial ischemia. Here, we review recent studies that have illustrated key roles for epigenetic events in the control of pro-fibrotic gene expression, and highlight the potential of small molecules that target epigenetic regulators as a means of treating fibrotic cardiac diseases. PMID:26876451

  1. Cardiac Fibrosis: The Fibroblast Awakens

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Joshua G.; Kamal, Fadia A.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Yutzey, Katherine E.; Blaxall, Burns C.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a significant global health problem associated with nearly all forms of heart disease. Cardiac fibroblasts comprise an essential cell type in the heart that is responsible for the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix; however upon injury, these cells transform to a myofibroblast phenotype and contribute to cardiac fibrosis. This remodeling involves pathological changes that include chamber dilation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis, and ultimately leads to the progression to heart failure. Despite the critical importance of fibrosis in cardiovascular disease, our limited understanding of this cell population impedes the development of potential therapies that effectively target this cell type and its pathological contribution to disease progression. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the origins and roles of fibroblasts, mediators and signaling pathways known to influence fibroblast function after myocardial injury, as well as novel therapeutic strategies under investigation to attenuate cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26987915

  2. Haemophilus infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, R J; Hiller, E J; Ispahani, P; Baker, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with cystic fibrosis under the age of 12 years and 27 matched patients with asthma were followed up in a prospective study for one year. The isolation rate of non-capsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from cough swabs and sputum specimens taken at routine clinic visits every two months was significantly greater in cystic fibrosis than in asthma. Haemophilus para-influenzae was equally common in both groups. During exacerbations the isolation rate of H influenzae in cystic fibrosis was significantly greater than at other times, whereas in asthma there was no significant difference. The distribution of biotypes of H influenzae and H parainfluenzae was similar in the two groups. In cystic fibrosis, biotype I was associated with exacerbations. Biotype V was more common than in previous studies, but was not associated with exacerbations. PMID:2185699

  3. Cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Y; Menard, O; Vaillant, P; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N

    1996-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological process characterized by the replacement of normal tissue by mesenchymal cells and the extracellular matrix produced by these cells. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in the area of derangement. The same sequence of events occurs in wound healing with normal granulation tissue and scar formation, but, while normal scar formation is very localized and transient, in contrast, in fibrosis, the repair process is exaggerated and usually widespread and can be chronic. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of three human fibrotic lung diseases, two diffuse [idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)], and one focal (tumor stroma in lung cancer), has shown that several cytokines participate to the local injury and inflammatory reaction [interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)], while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis [platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)]. A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  4. First report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sahami, Abbas; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Monsef, Alireza; Peyman, Hadi

    2014-04-01

    So far, more than 1800 mutations identified in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. In this case report, we presented first report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-old girl with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. A 6-month-old girl with weakness and meconium Ileus referred to the pediatric clinic in Ilam, in the west of Iran. Patient's skin was dark and suffered from bronchiectasis. The sweat test was performed, and the concentration of chloride and sodium in patient's sweat was 130-135 mmol/L and 125-128 mmol/L, respectively. The exon 10 mutation analysis of a CF patient was performed. CFTR mutation analysis revealed the identification of 2 mutations in patient, the mutations were p.F508del (ΔF508) and c. 1499G>C (cd500), respectively. The mutation c. 1499G>C (cd500) were found for the first time in the world. Assessing this mutation in future study and genetic investigation is recommended.

  5. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; de Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Júnior, Jorge; Martinez, José Antonio Baddini

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years-divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. PMID:28100929

  6. [Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Artunc, F; Schanz, S; Metze, D; Heyne, N

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a novel disease entity, increasingly diagnosed over the last years in patients with renal functional impairment and chronic kidney disease. Recently, gadolinium-containing MR contrast agents have been causally associated with the development NSF. Herein, we present the case of a dialysis-dependent young patient with systemic lupus erythematodes, who developed disabling cutaneous sclerosis of extremities, abdomen and mammae. Clinical and laboratory investigations revealed no signs of activity of the underlying disease. Histopathological examination of a skin biopsy was consistent with NSF showing profound thickening of tissue septae with mucine deposition and slight fibroblast proliferation without inflammatory reaction. Analysis of the patient's medical history revealed that she had undergone repeated contrast enhanced MR scans, including MR angiographies with high doses of gadopentetate. UV phototherapy was little effective, and not until kidney transplantation two years later with good allograft function, improvement of clinical symptoms was observed. Discussion of this case summarizes the current knowledge of clinical features and pathogeneses of NSF, including the role of gadolinium-containing contrast agents. Evolving clinical implications are summarized in the current Tübingen University Hospital guideline for the use of contrast-enhanced MR scans in patients with impaired renal function.

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  8. Development, clinical utility, and place of ivacaftor in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Ruth; Elphick, Heather E

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting, multisystem disease characterized by thick viscous secretions leading to recurrent lung infections, bronchiectasis, and progressive deterioration in lung function. CF is caused by loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein which is responsible for transepithelial chloride and water transport. Improved understanding of CFTR protein dysfunction has allowed the development of mutation-specific small-molecule compounds which directly target the underlying CFTR defect. Ivacaftor is the first licensed small-molecule compound for CF patients which targets the CFTR gating mutation Gly551Asp (previously termed G551D) and has the potential to be truly disease-modifying. Ivacaftor is an oral medication given twice daily and has shown benefit in terms of an increase in lung function, decreased sweat chloride, weight gain, improvement in patient-reported quality of life, and reduction in number of respiratory exacerbations in clinical trials. Although ivacaftor is currently only licensed for use in approximately 5% of the CF population (those who have at least one Gly551Asp mutation), the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CFTR modulators that may benefit many more patients. In particular, a CFTR modulator for those with the Phe508del deletion (previously ∆F508) would allow 90% of the CF population to benefit from disease-modifying treatment.

  9. Targeting airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis in children: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Tacjana

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Anti-inflammatory drugs for CF lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease progression. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possess anti-inflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and protease inhibitors have a limited impact on the disease. Adverse effects limit therapy with oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising anti-inflammatory therapy available for patients with CF. Pharmacologic therapy with anti-inflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred. To optimize anti-inflammatory therapy, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of action of these agents in the CF lung, to determine which of these agents would provide the most benefit to patients with CF, and to determine which therapies should be initiated at what age or stage of lung disease.

  10. Respiratory infection rates differ between geographically distant paediatric cystic fibrosis cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Emily; Turkovic, Lidija; Padros-Goossens, Marc; Stick, Stephen M.; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections are a major cause of pulmonary decline in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). We compared the prevalence of infection in early life at geographically distant CF treatment centres participating in the same surveillance programme in Australia. Lower airway microbiology, inflammation and structural lung disease at annual review were evaluated for 260 children 0–8 years old with CF at 1032 visits to CF treatment centres in Melbourne or Perth. Melbourne patients were more likely to be culture-positive for common respiratory pathogens at all age groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.85, 95% CI 1.33–2.58). Subjects <2 years old in Melbourne were also more likely to have neutrophil elastase present (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.62–5.95). Bronchiectasis (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.21–3.38) and air trapping (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.42–4.51) in subjects 2–5 years old was more common in Melbourne subjects. The severity of structural lung disease was also worse in Melbourne patients >5 years old. Patients at both centres had a similar rate of hospitalisations and prescribed antibiotics. No procedural differences were identified that could explain the disparity between pathogen prevalence. Geographical differences in early acquisition of infection may contribute to variability in outcomes between CF centres. PMID:27957481

  11. Respiratory infection rates differ between geographically distant paediatric cystic fibrosis cohorts.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Hart, Emily; Turkovic, Lidija; Padros-Goossens, Marc; Stick, Stephen M; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory infections are a major cause of pulmonary decline in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). We compared the prevalence of infection in early life at geographically distant CF treatment centres participating in the same surveillance programme in Australia. Lower airway microbiology, inflammation and structural lung disease at annual review were evaluated for 260 children 0-8 years old with CF at 1032 visits to CF treatment centres in Melbourne or Perth. Melbourne patients were more likely to be culture-positive for common respiratory pathogens at all age groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.85, 95% CI 1.33-2.58). Subjects <2 years old in Melbourne were also more likely to have neutrophil elastase present (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.62-5.95). Bronchiectasis (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.21-3.38) and air trapping (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.42-4.51) in subjects 2-5 years old was more common in Melbourne subjects. The severity of structural lung disease was also worse in Melbourne patients >5 years old. Patients at both centres had a similar rate of hospitalisations and prescribed antibiotics. No procedural differences were identified that could explain the disparity between pathogen prevalence. Geographical differences in early acquisition of infection may contribute to variability in outcomes between CF centres.

  12. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, L; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. Methods: A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. Results: The mean difference in FEV1 was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval –1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference £1497, 95% confidence interval £688 to £2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year (£2625) than in the second year (£411). Conclusions: Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources. PMID:12149523

  13. Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis related to smoking methamphetamine with talc as filler.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Peter A; Sobenes, Juan R; Vallyathan, Val

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis accompanied by radiographic evidence of progressive massive fibrosis in a patient who had a 15-20 year history of almost daily recreational inhalation of methamphetamine. Mineralogical analysis confirmed the presence of talc on biopsy of the area of progressive massive fibrosis. The coexistence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis suggests that prolonged recreational inhalation of methamphetamine that has been "cut" with talc can result in sufficient amount of talc being inhaled to result in interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis in the absence of other causes.

  14. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future.

  15. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the management of cystic fibrosis patients. It is arguably best provided by a qualified dietitian and nutritional care sister working in conjunction with the rest of the cystic fibrosis team. The patient's nutritional needs should be assessed, regularly reviewed, and nutritional treatment tailored to meet the changing clinical and psychosocial needs of the patient. Nutritional intervention is not without complications, and in particular attention to normal feeding behaviour and vigilance when instituting supplementary nutrition may prevent many feeding difficulties. PMID:8660059

  16. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Print A A A What's in this ... en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an inherited ...

  17. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... with a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  18. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test A A A What's in this ... cloruro en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an ...

  19. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis A A A What's in this article? What ... a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  20. Survival rates in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, R W; Tyson, S L; Dinwiddie, R; Matthew, D J

    1983-01-01

    Life tables were calculated for 273 British children with cystic fibrosis for the period 1974-9. There was a marked improvement in survival rates in the meconium ileus group compared with the 1969-73 data, but there was little improvement in patients presenting later with other symptoms. PMID:6639137

  1. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, M C

    1987-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased requirement for calories and probably for all the major nutrients. The newer, enteric-coated granular preparations of pancreatic enzyme are more effective than preceding preparations and should permit a normal fat intake. Recent work has emphasized the interdependence of respiratory disease and nutrition.

  2. Molecular Endotyping of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Amanda T; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating and incurable progressive fibrotic lung condition associated with a significant disease burden. In recent years there has been an exponential increase in the number of preclinical and clinical studies performed in IPF. IPF is defined according to rigid diagnostic criteria; hence, a significant subset of patients with unclassifiable disease has been excluded from these studies. The traditional diagnostic classification of all progressive fibrotic lung diseases uses specific clinical, radiological, and histopathological features to define each condition. However, the considerable heterogeneity within each form of pulmonary fibrosis has raised the possibility of distinct pathophysiological mechanisms culminating in a common phenotype. Thus, the classification of fibrotic lung diseases according to the driving molecular mechanisms rather than specific user-defined histopathological and radiological features could improve several aspects of clinical care. Discoveries from basic science research have defined multiple complex molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis that may provide markers for the molecular endotyping of this disease. In addition, these molecular pathways have revealed potential therapeutic targets. Reclassifying progressive fibrotic lung diseases according to molecular endotypes may allow for more accurate assessment of prognosis and individualized treatment. Furthermore, recent developments that have been applied to a narrow group of patients with IPF may be applicable to those with other progressive fibrotic lung diseases. This review presents the latest developments from translational research in this area and explains how molecular endotyping could revolutionize the diagnosis, stratification, and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Fibrosis: ultimate and proximate causes

    PubMed Central

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Zhou, Yong; Gaggar, Amit; Duncan, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrotic disorders account for an increasing burden of disease-associated morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although numerous risk factors have been recognized, the etiologies of many of these clinical syndromes have not been identified, and they are often termed idiopathic or cryptogenic. Here, we provide an evolutionary perspective on fibrosis aimed at elucidating its etiopathogenesis. By asking the ultimate question of “why” this process evolved in multicellular organisms, we hope to uncover proximate explanations for “how” it causes disease in humans. We posit that physiological fibrosis-like reactions evolved as an essential process in host defense against pathogens and in normal wound healing. Based on this premise, we reason that pathological fibrosis is related to one or more of the following: unidentified infectious or noninfectious antigens, autoimmunity, impaired regenerative responses, and the antagonistically pleiotropic action of genes involved in wound healing or development. The importance of genetic susceptibility, epigenetics, aging, and the modern-day environment are highlighted. Consideration of both ultimate and proximate causation goes beyond philosophical cogitations, as it will better inform pathobiological mechanisms of disease and aid in the prevention and treatment of fibrotic diseases. PMID:25365073

  4. Biomarkers in Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers in cystic fibrosis are used i. for the measurement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function in order to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and ii. to assess aspects of lung disease severity (e.g. inflammation, infection). Effective biomarkers can aid disease monitoring and contribute to the development of new therapies. The tests of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function each have unique strengths and weaknesses, and biomarkers of inflammation, infection and tissue destruction have the potential to enhance the management of cystic fibrosis through the early detection of disease processes. The development of biomarkers of cystic fibrosis lung disease, in particular airway inflammation and infection, is influenced by the challenges of obtaining relevant samples from infants and children for whom early detection and treatment of disease might have the greatest long term benefits.

  5. Retroperitoneal fibrosis associated with Riedel's struma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chandar R.; Ferguson, George C.; Kyle, Victor N.

    1973-01-01

    A case of retroperitoneal fibrosis with bilateral ureteral obstruction in association with Riedel's struma of the thyroid is reported. There has been a definite increase in incidence of retroperitoneal fibrosis, but with prompt recognition and adequate treatment the mortality rate has been decreased from the original 14%. The association of Riedel's struma with retroperitoneal fibrosis has been noted in the past and its association with sclerosing cholangitis has also been mentioned. It is not known whether Riedel's thyroiditis originates in the thyroid gland and spreads or whether true thyroiditis is part of a generalized process. The temporal relationship of thyroiditis and retroperitoneal fibrosis suggests an extension of fibrosis from the thyroid, but one cannot be sure which condition occurred first. Whatever the cause, the treatment remains the same as for retroperitoneal fibrosis from other causes. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4699273

  6. The advancements of heparanase in fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qianying; Zeng, Ji; He, Long

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is the endpoint in many chronic inflammatory diseases and is defined as an abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix components. Fibrosis can affect almost any tissue, especially heart, lung, liver, and kidney, and numerous studies have been conducted to find satisfactory treatments. Since heparanase is a kind of endo-β-D-glucuronidase that is capable of cleaving heparan sulfate side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on cell surfaces and the extracellular matrix, which further regulate the bioavailability of growth factors (FGF-2, TGF-β). Meanwhile, FGF-2 and TGF-β play a major role in the fibrosis process. Recent studies including ours have consistently demonstrated that heparanase could promote fibrosis process in different organs. Thus in this mini-review, we updated the advancement of heparanase in the regulation of fibrosis generation, and discussed its impact on several critical signaling pathways relevant to fibrosis. PMID:28078057

  7. Isolated right pulmonary artery agenesis with agenesis of right upper lobe and bronchiectasis of right lower lobe with anomalous arterial supply from celiac axis with normal venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, A; Rathore, M; Banavaliker, J N

    2014-01-01

    Isolated unilateral absence of pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. When detected in infancy, the condition is commonly associated with cardiovascular defects which are more frequently associated with left pulmonary artery agenesis. Patients with isolated right pulmonary artery agenesis survive into adulthood with minimal or no symptoms and are diagnosed incidentally on the chest radiographs. We report a case of a 19-year-old female patient who presented to us with recurrent haemoptysis. She was symptomatic since the age of four years. We report the rare occurrence of UAPA on right side, agenesis of right upper lobe and bronchiectasis of right lower lobe with anomalous arterial supply of right lung from coeliac axis in this patient.

  8. The Effect of Lt to Rt Shunt Using Veno-veno-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) on Coronary Oxygenation in Lung Transplantation Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Interstitial Pulmonary Fibrosis ARDS; COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease); Bronchiectasis; Lymphangioleiomyomatosis; Primary Pulmonary Hypertension; ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  10. HIV Infection Accelerates Hepatitis C-Related Liver Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Fibrosis HIV Infection Accelerates Hepatitis C–Related Liver Fibrosis Email Facebook Twitter January 21, 2014 By ... Contributing Writer Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes liver fibrosis that worsens as patients age, potentially progressing ...

  11. [Bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Munck, Anne; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-01-15

    Bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or cocolonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration; intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms. Antibiotherapy, physiotherapy and nutritional management helps to increase the survival and quality of life.

  12. [SWE elastography in assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Pawluś, Aleksander; Kucharska, Marta; Inglot, Marcin

    2015-02-15

    Liver fibrosis is a relatively common consequence of chronic liver diseases, especially chronic viral hepatitis B and C. Biopsy still remains the gold standard in the assessment of liver fibrosis. However, due to its invasiveness and possible complications, less or even non-invasive methods are being developed, e.g. using biochemical parameters (Fibrotest) or elastography. Elastography is a new diagnostic tool that aims to evaluate stiffness of the tissues. Elastography techniques that are used in the assessment of liver fibrosis are transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) and shear-wave elastography (SWE). SWE is a novel real-time two-dimensional elastography technique, which allows one to estimate stiffness quantitatively in kilopascals (kPa). Moreover, lapping elastography over regular B-mode allows precise choice of the region of interest. Therefore SWE creates the opportunity for accurate assessment of liver fibrosis. In this paper we describe processes leading to liver fibrosis as well as methods of liver fibrosis assessment, e.g. liver biopsy, biochemical tests or elastography. The main goal of this paper is to present the SWE technique, its role in liver fibrosis assessment and a short review of the most important clinical studies on SWE. We also present several examples of SWE examinations performed on patients with different stages of liver fibrosis - F0 to F4 on the METAVIR scale.

  13. Negative sweat tests and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarsfield, J K; Davies, J M

    1975-01-01

    Two brothers are described with chronic suppurative pulmonary disease. One has classical cystic fibrosis with complete pancreatic involvement and abnormal sweat test. The other had incomplete pancreatic disease with repeatedly normal sweat tests. The implications of a negative sweat test in patients with cystic fibrosis are discussed. Images FIG. PMID:1147688

  14. [Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2015-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prognosis and management of chronic liver diseases depend on the amount of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy has long remained the gold standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy is an invasive procedure with associated morbidity, it is rarely the cause for mortality, and has a few limitations. During the past two decades, in an attempt to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods for the evaluation of liver fibrosis have been developed, mainly in the field of viral hepatitis. This review will focus on different methods available for non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis including a biological approach which quantifies serum levels of biomarkers of fibrosis and physical techniques which measure liver stiffness by transient elastography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance based elastography, their accuracy, advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  16. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  17. Epigenetics of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent work by our and other groups has identified strong genetic predisposition factors for the development of pulmonary fibrosis while cigarette smoke remains the most strongly associated environmental exposure risk factor. Gene expression profiling studies of IPF lung have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease and those in peripheral blood have provided important biomarkers. However, epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptional changes associated with disease development. Moreover, epigenetic marks represent a promising therapeutic target for IPF. In this review, we will introduce the disease, summarize genetic and gene expression studies in IPF, discuss exposures relevant to IPF and known epigenetic changes associated with cigarette smoke exposure, and summarize epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF. We will end by discussing limitations, challenges and future opportunities in this field. PMID:24746870

  18. Minerals, fibrosis, and the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Heppleston, A G

    1991-01-01

    Determinants of pulmonary fibrosis induced by inhaled mineral dusts include quantity retained, particle size, and surface area, together with their physical form and the reactive surface groups presented to alveolar cells. The outstanding problem is to ascertain how these factors exert their deleterious effects. Both compact and fibrous minerals inflict membrane damage, for which chemical mechanisms still leave uncertainty. A major weakness of cytotoxicity studies, even when lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species are considered, lies in tacitly assuming that membrane damage suffices to account for fibrogenesis, whereas the parallel occurrence of such manifestations does not necessarily imply causation. The two-phase procedure established that particles, both compact and fibrous, induce release of a macrophage factor that provokes fibroblasts into collagen synthesis. The amino acid composition of the macrophage fibrogenic factor was characterized and its intracellular action explained. Fibrous particles introduce complexities respecting type, durability, and dimensions. Asbestotic fibrosis is believed to depend on long fibers, but scrutiny of the evidence from experimental and human sources reveals that a role for short fibers needs to be entertained. Using the two-phase system, short fibers proved fibrogenic. Other mechanisms, agonistic and antagonistic, may participate. Growth factors may affect the fibroblast population and collagen production, with cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor exerting control. Immune involvement is best regarded as an epiphenomenon. Downregulation of fibrogenesis may follow collagenase release from macrophages and fibroblasts, while augmented type II cell secretion of lipid can interfere with the macrophage-particle reaction. PMID:1954926

  19. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases-7 and Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ben; Fan, Chuqiao; Yang, Liping; Fang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is a secreted zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidase that degrades a broad range of extracellular matrix substrates and additional substrates. MMP-7 playsa crucial role in a diverse array of cellular processes and appears to be a key regulator of fibrosis in several diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis, liver fibrosis, and cystic fibrosis. In particular, the relationship between MMP-7 and kidney fibrosis has attracted significant attention in recent years. Growing evidence indicates that MMP-7 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney fibrosis. Here, we summarize the recent progress in the understanding of the role of MMP-7 in kidney fibrosis. In particular, we discuss how MMP-7 contributes to kidney fibrotic lesions via the following three pathways: epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Further dissection of the crosstalk among and regulation of these pathways will help clinicians and researchers develop effective therapeutic approaches for treating chronic kidney disease. PMID:28239354

  1. The Role of PPARs in Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Heather F.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Kottmann, R. Matthew; Garcia, Tatiana M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a group of disorders characterized by accumulation of scar tissue in the lung interstitium, resulting in loss of alveolar function, destruction of normal lung architecture, and respiratory distress. Some types of fibrosis respond to corticosteroids, but for many there are no effective treatments. Prognosis varies but can be poor. For example, patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a median survival of only 2.9 years. Prognosis may be better in patients with some other types of pulmonary fibrosis, and there is variability in survival even among individuals with biopsy-proven IPF. Evidence is accumulating that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play important roles in regulating processes related to fibrogenesis, including cellular differentiation, inflammation, and wound healing. PPARα agonists, including the hypolidipemic fibrate drugs, inhibit the production of collagen by hepatic stellate cells and inhibit liver, kidney, and cardiac fibrosis in animal models. In the mouse model of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin, a PPARα agonist significantly inhibited the fibrotic response, while PPARα knockout mice developed more serious fibrosis. PPARβ/δ appears to play a critical role in regulating the transition from inflammation to wound healing. PPARβ/δ agonists inhibit lung fibroblast proliferation and enhance the antifibrotic properties of PPARγ agonists. PPARγ ligands oppose the profibrotic effect of TGF-β, which induces differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a critical effector cell in fibrosis. PPARγ ligands, including the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic drugs, effectively inhibit lung fibrosis in vitro and in animal models. The clinical availability of potent and selective PPARα and PPARγ agonists should facilitate rapid development of successful treatment strategies based on current and ongoing research. PMID:17710235

  2. [New tools in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Dournes, G; De Boeck, K; Bui, S; Vermeulen, F; Ramalho, A; Chateil, J-F; Laurent, F; Fayon, M

    2016-12-01

    The use of 3 novel tools available for the diagnosis and treatment in cystic fibrosis are described here. 1) The lung clearance index is a sensitive method which can detect functional impairment in the first months after birth. 2) Detailed morphological analyses of the lung can be performed with the new MRI sequences, without any contrast medium or risk of radiation. The analysis of functional MRI data (perfusion, diffusion, ventilation, inflammation) will be possible, and these data will be correlated to morphological data. The exploration of other organs such as the sinuses, liver and abdomen during the same examination represents another definite advantage. 3) Organoïds are a good example of personalized medicine. This tool explores CFTR function and treatment response in each of the 2000 or so known CFTR mutations. These tests are limited to specialized centers, mostly within a research context. However, their generalization after standardization is expected in the near future.

  3. Epidemiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Brett; Collard, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic fibrotic lung disease of unknown cause that occurs in adults and has a poor prognosis. Its epidemiology has been difficult to study because of its rarity and evolution in diagnostic and coding practices. Though uncommon, it is likely underappreciated both in terms of its occurrence (ie, incidence, prevalence) and public health impact (ie, health care costs and resource utilization). Incidence and mortality appear to be on the rise, and prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population. Potential risk factors include occupational and environmental exposures, tobacco smoking, gastroesophageal reflux, and genetic factors. An accurate understanding of its epidemiology is important, especially as novel therapies are emerging. PMID:24348069

  4. Epigenomics of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ivana V

    2012-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Gene-expression profiling studies have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease, but epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptome changes associated with the development of IPF. This review will begin with an introduction to the disease, followed by brief summaries of studies of gene expression in IPF and epigenetic marks associated with exposures relevant to IPF. The majority of the discussion will focus on epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF, the limitations, challenges nd future directions in this field.

  5. Smoking and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chad K.; Murray, Lynne A.; Molfino, Nestor A.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of unknown etiology with considerable morbidity and mortality. Cigarette smoking is one of the most recognized risk factors for development of IPF. Furthermore, recent work suggests that smoking may have a detrimental effect on survival of patients with IPF. The mechanism by which smoking may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF is largely unknown. However, accumulating evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress might promote disease progression in IPF patients who are current and former smokers. In this review, potential mechanisms by which cigarette smoking affects IPF, the effects of cigarette smoking on accelerated loss of lung function in patients with IPF, key genetic studies evaluating the potential candidate genes and gene-environment (smoking) interaction, diagnosis, and treatment with emphasis on recently closed and ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:22448328

  6. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  7. EGFR signaling in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in regulation of multiple biological processes, including proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and survival. Owing to its aberrant expression in a variety of malignant tumors, EGFR has been recognized as a target in anticancer therapy. Increasingly, evidence from animal studies indicates that EGFR signaling is also implicated in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. The therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition has not yet been evaluated in human kidney disease. In this article, we summarize recent research into the role of EGFR signaling in renal fibrogenesis, discuss the mechanism by which EGFR regulates this process, and consider the potential of EGFR as an antifibrotic target. PMID:26312153

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, H L

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration of abnormally high concentrations of electrolytes in eccrine sweat is still the only practical laboratory procedure available for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Properly performed, the sweat test is very reliable, but there are many published reports that all of the methods in current use frequently generate incorrect diagnoses. Analysis of potential for error in sweat test methods shows that of the three essential phases involved, stimulation, collection, and analysis, the major cause of intrinsic inaccuracy occurs in the collection process. In this case the problem is due to condensate formation, which leads to the subsequent analysis of nonrepresentative sweat. Human error is also an important cause of false results and is a direct function of the number of critical manual operations involved in the technic. This review provides a critical examination of sweat test methods, identifying problem areas and suggesting ways to improve procedures in the interests of clinically reliable laboratory data in support of diagnosis.

  9. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Sharon I. S.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing clinical, radiologic, and pathologic recognition of the coexistence of emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis in the same patient, resulting in a clinical syndrome known as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) that is characterized by dyspnea, upper-lobe emphysema, lower-lobe fibrosis, and abnormalities of gas exchange. This syndrome frequently is complicated by pulmonary hypertension, acute lung injury, and lung cancer. The CPFE syndrome typically occurs in male smokers, and the mortality associated with this condition, especially if pulmonary hypertension is present, is significant. In this review, we explore the current state of the literature and discuss etiologic factors and clinical characteristics of the CPFE syndrome. PMID:22215830

  10. Gastrointestinal manifestations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, E

    1996-08-01

    CFTR, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the gene product that is defective in cystic fibrosis, is present in the apical membrane of the epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. In the foregut, the clinical manifestations are not directly related to the primary defect of the CFTR chloride channel. The most troublesome complaints and symptoms originate from the oesophagus as peptic oesophagitis or oesophageal varices. In the small intestinal wall, the clinical expression of CF depends largely on the decreased secretion of fluid and chloride ions, the increased permeability of the paracellular space between adjacent enterocytes and the sticky mucous cover over the enterocytes. As a rule, the brush border enzyme activities are normal and there is some enhanced active transport as shown for glucose and alanine. The results of continuous enteral feeding of CF patients clearly show that the small intestinal mucosa, in the daily situation, is not functioning at maximal capacity. Although CFTR expression in the colon is lower, the large intestine may be the site of several serious complications such as rectal prolapse, meconium ileus equivalent, intussusception, volvulus and silent appendicitis. In recent years colonic strictures, after the use of high-dose pancreatic enzymes, are being increasingly reported; the condition has recently been called CF fibrosing colonopathy. The CF gastrointestinal content itself differs mainly from the normal condition by the lower acidity in the foregut and the accretion of mucins and proteins, eventually resulting in intestinal obstruction, in the ileum and colon. Better understanding of the CF gastrointestinal phenotype may contribute to improvement of the overall wellbeing of these patients.

  11. Tissue remodelling in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lars; Ruppert, Clemens; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Many lung diseases result in fibrotic remodelling. Fibrotic lung disorders can be divided into diseases with known and unknown aetiology. Among those with unknown aetiology, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common diagnosis. Because of its progressive character leading to a rapid decline in lung function, it is a fatal disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Thus, IPF has motivated many studies in the last few decades in order to increase our mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. The current concept suggests an ongoing injury of the alveolar epithelium, an impaired regeneration capacity, alveolar collapse and, finally, a fibroproliferative response. The origin of lung injury remains elusive but a diversity of factors, which will be discussed in this article, has been shown to be associated with IPF. Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells play a key role in lung fibrosis and their crucial role for epithelial regeneration, stabilisation of alveoli and interaction with fibroblasts, all known to be responsible for collagen deposition, will be illustrated. Whereas mechanisms of collagen deposition and fibroproliferation are the focus of many studies in the field, the awareness of other mechanisms in this disease is currently limited to biochemical and imaging studies including quantitative assessments of lung structure in IPF and animal models assigning alveolar collapse and collapse induration crucial roles for the degradation of the lung resulting in de-aeration and loss of surface area. Dysfunctional AE2 cells, instable alveoli and mechanical stress trigger remodelling that consists of collapsed alveoli absorbed by fibrotic tissue (i.e., collapse induration).

  12. Alcaligenes infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth; Conway, Steven P; Brownlee, Keith G; Etherington, Christine; Peckham, Daniel G

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic Alcaligenes species infection of the respiratory tract on the clinical status of patients with cystic fibrosis. We conducted a retrospective case-controlled study. The microbiological records of all patients attending the Leeds Regional Pediatric and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Units from 1992-1999 were examined. Chronic Alcaligenes infection was defined as a positive sputum culture on at least three occasions over a 6-month period. These patients were compared with controls matched for age, gender, respiratory function, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Respiratory function tests, anthropometric data, Shwachman-Kulczycki score, Northern chest x-ray score, intravenous and nebulized antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroid treatment were compared from 2 years before to 2 years after Alcaligenes infection. From a clinic population of 557, 13 (2.3%) fulfilled the criteria for chronic infection. The median age at acquisition of infection was 17.2 years (range, 6.5-33.6). There was no significant difference in the changes of percentage predicted values for FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75), or Shwachman-Kulczycki and Northern chest x-ray scores, or in weight, height, and body mass index z-scores between Alcaligenes-infected cases and controls. There was also no significant difference in the use of antibiotics (intravenous and nebulized) or corticosteroids (inhaled and oral). We conclude that in our clinic, chronic infection with Alcaligenes species was uncommon. Chronically infected patients showed no excess deterioration in clinical or pulmonary function status from 2 years before to 2 years after primary acquisition.

  13. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 1. Common and organ-specific mechanisms associated with tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological scarring process that leads to destruction of organ architecture and impairment of organ function. Chronic loss of organ function in most organs, including bone marrow, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, and skin, is associated with fibrosis, contributing to an estimated one third of natural deaths worldwide. Effective therapies to prevent or to even reverse existing fibrotic lesions are not yet available in any organ. There is hope that an understanding of common fibrosis pathways will lead to development of antifibrotic therapies that are effective in all of these tissues in the future. Here we review common and organ-specific pathways of tissue fibrosis. PMID:23255577

  14. "End-stage" pulmonary fibrosis in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Teirstein, Alvin T; Morgenthau, Adam S

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an unusual "end stage" in patients with sarcoidosis. Fibrosis occurs in a minority of patients, and presents with a unique physiologic combination of airways dysfunction (obstruction) superimposed on the more common restrictive dysfunction. Imagin techniques are essential to the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Standard chest radiographs and CT scans may reveal streaks, bullae, cephalad retraction of the hilar areas, deviation of the trachea and tented diaphragm. Positive gallium and PET scans indicate residual reversible granulomatous disease and are important guides to therapy decisions. Treatment, usually with corticosteroids, is effective in those patients with positive scans, but fibrosis does not improve with any treatment. With severe functional impariment and patient disability, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure may supervene for which the patient will require treatment. Oxygen, careful diuresis, sildenafil and bosentan may be salutary. These patients are candidates for lung transplantation.

  15. Unilateral subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rehan, S; Javaid, Z; Al-Bermani, A

    2015-05-01

    Subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome is a rare, potentially devastating, posterior uveitis of unknown aetiology, characterised bilaterally by initial multifocal choroiditis with later progressive subretinal fibrosis. We report a rare case of unilateral subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome. To date, there are only two case reports of unilateral disease. Our patient presented with unilateral blur and was found to have reduced visual acuity. A Bartonella profile was positive and a diagnosis of Bartonella posterior uveitis was made. Several positive ocular findings in the anterior chamber and on fundoscopy consistent with the syndrome were found. When steroid therapy alone could no longer control active inflammation, the immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate was added. Over time subretinal fibrosis became established sparing the macula and associated complications occurred, but with mycophenolate, at four years, our patient's visual acuity had improved and remains stable. Moreover, four years after her initial presentation, her condition remains strictly unilateral.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern The various syndromes that include congenital hepatic fibrosis can have different inheritance patterns. Most of these disorders are inherited in an ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ma SF, Vij R, Collard HR, Wolters PJ, Garcia CK. Effect of telomere length on survival in ... Raghu G, Weissler JC, Rosenblatt RL, Shay JW, Garcia CK. Adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis caused by mutations ...

  18. Antioxidants as Potential Therapeutics for Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    DAY, BRIAN J.

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease encompasses a large group of chronic lung disorders associated with excessive tissue remodeling, scarring, and fibrosis. The evidence of a redox imbalance in lung fibrosis is substantial, and the rationale for testing antioxidants as potential new therapeutics for lung fibrosis is appealing. Current animal models of lung fibrosis have clear involvement of ROS in their pathogenesis. New classes of antioxidant agents divided into catalytic antioxidant mimetics and antioxidant scavengers are being developed. The catalytic antioxidant class is based on endogenous antioxidant enzymes and includes the manganese-containing macrocyclics, porphyrins, salens, and the non–metal-containing nitroxides. The antioxidant scavenging class is based on endogenous antioxidant molecules and includes the vitamin E analogues, thiols, lazaroids, and polyphenolic agents. Numerous studies have shown oxidative stress to be associated with many interstitial lung diseases and that these agents are effective in attenuating fibroproliferative responses in the lung of animals and humans. PMID:17999627

  19. Ovarian Fibrosis: A Phenomenon of Concern

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Shi, Li-Bing; Zhang, Song-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Ovarian fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of ovarian fibroblasts and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) and it is one of the principal reasons for ovarian dysfunction. This review aimed to investigate the pathogenetic mechanism of ovarian fibrosis and to clarify the relationship between ovarian diseases and fibrosis. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for English language articles published up to November 2016. The search terms included ovarian fibrosis OR fibrosis, ovarian chocolate cyst OR ovarian endometrioma, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), premature ovarian failure, ECM, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and combinations of these terms. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the pathogenic mechanism of ovarian fibrosis and related ovarian diseases. Results: Many cytokines, such as MMPs, TIMPs, TGF-β1, CTGF, PPAR-γ, VEGF, and ET-1, are involved in ovarian fibrogenesis. Ovarian fibrogenesis is associated with various ovarian diseases, including ovarian chocolate cyst, PCOS, and premature ovarian failure. One finding of particular interest is that fibrogenesis in peripheral tissues around an ovarian chocolate cyst commonly causes ovarian function diminution, and therefore, this medical problem should arouse widespread concern in clinicians worldwide. Conclusions: Patients with ovarian fibrosis are susceptible to infertility and tend to have decreased responses to assisted fertility treatment. Thus, protection of ovarian function should be a priority for women who wish to reproduce when making therapeutic decisions about ovarian fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:28139522

  20. Situs inversus, bronchiectasis, and sinusitis and its relation to immotile cilia: history of the diseases and their discoverers-Manes Kartagener and Bjorn Afzelius.

    PubMed

    Berdon, Walter E; Willi, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of Kartagener's syndrome to immobile cilia syndrome is a fascinating merging of clinical observations and basic science in Zurich, Stockholm, and Toronto. In 1933, Manes Kartagener, a Zurich pulmonary physician, reported four patients with the triad of sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. In the following decades, he reviewed reports of hundreds of cases, but the fact that the male patients with the condition never had offspring eluded his notice. In the 1970s, Bjorn Afzelius, a Ph.D. ultrastructuralist from Stockholm, reported cilia immotility in infertile males, some of the cases occurring in families. Half of the cases had Kartagener's triad. The observation of Afzelius was soon applied to children by Jennifer Sturgess, a Ph.D. ultrastructuralist, and her medical colleagues in Toronto. With over 500 MEDLINE references since 1966 on Kartagener's and over 1,000 references on immotile cilia, the causes of the pulmonary infections have become clearer as the patients demonstrate impaired clearance of mucus with resultant sinus and bronchial disease. The cause of the situs inversus remains elusive to this day. It is appropriate to call the condition Kartagener-Afzelius syndrome.

  1. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  2. Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) test accurately identifies liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Parkes, J; Guha, I N; Roderick, P; Harris, S; Cross, R; Manos, M M; Irving, W; Zaitoun, A; Wheatley, M; Ryder, S; Rosenberg, W

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of liver fibrosis is important in determining prognosis and evaluating interventions. Due to limitations of accuracy and patient hazard of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods have been sought to provide information on liver fibrosis, including the European liver fibrosis (ELF) test, shown to have good diagnostic accuracy for the detection of moderate and severe fibrosis. Access to independent cohorts of patients has provided an opportunity to explore if this test could be simplified. This paper reports the simplification of the ELF test and its ability to identity severity of liver fibrosis in external validation studies in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Paired biopsy and serum samples from 347 naïve patients with CHC in three independent cohorts were analysed. Diagnostic performance characteristics were derived (AUROC, sensitivity and specificity, predictive values), and clinical utility modelling performed to determine the proportion of biopsies that could have been avoided if ELF test was used in this patient group. It was possible to simplify the original ELF test without loss of performance and the new algorithm is reported. The simplified ELF test was able to predict severe fibrosis [pooled AUROC of 0.85 (95% CI 0.81-0.89)] and using clinical utility modelling to predict severe fibrosis (Ishak stages 4-6; METAVIR stages 3 and 4) 81% of biopsies could have been avoided (65% correctly). Issues of spectrum effect in diagnostic test evaluations are discussed. In chronic hepatitis C a simplified ELF test can detect severe liver fibrosis with good accuracy.

  3. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  4. NEPHROGENIC SYSTEMIC FIBROSIS: CURRENT CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was first described in 2000 as a scleromyxedema-like illness in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The relationship between NSF and gadolinium contrast during magnetic resonance imaging was postulated in 2006, and subsequently, virtually all published cases of NSF have had documented prior exposure to gadolinium-containing contrast agents. NSF has been reported in patients from a variety of ethnic backgrounds from America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Skin lesions may evolve into poorly demarcated thickened plaques that range from erythematous to hyperpigmented. With time, the skin becomes markedly indurated and tethered to the underlying fascia. Extracutaneous manifestations also occur. The diagnosis of NSF is based on the presence of characteristic clinical features in the setting of chronic kidney disease, and substantiated by skin histology. Differential diagnosis is with scleroderma, scleredema, scleromyxedema, graft-versus-host disease, etc. NSF has a relentlessly progressive course. While there is no consistently successful treatment for NSF, improving renal function seems to slow or arrest the progression of this condition. Because essentially all cases of NSF have developed following exposure to a gadolinium-containing contrast agent, prevention of this devastating condition involves the careful avoidance of administering these agents to individuals at risk. PMID:21572795

  5. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  6. [Azithromycin therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Cantón Moreno, Rafael

    2004-03-06

    Progressive lung disease, caused by chronic endobronchial colonization, is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Several pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are responsible for this effect. The steadily improving prognosis of CF has been attributed to the use of antibiotics with activity against these organisms. Despite a significant increase in the amount of published material demonstrating the potential role of macrolide antibiotics as antiinflammatory agents and their effects on bacterial virulence, their mechanism of action in CF patients is still unknown. Although there is a limited number of clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of azithromycin (AZM) in CF, increasing evidence suggests that 3 to 6-month AZM treatment in CF patients is safe and well tolerated. This treatment results in clinical improvement, decreasing the number of pulmonary exacerbations and increasing pulmonary function. Therefore, chronic treatment with AZM should be considered in CF patients added to conventional therapy. Clinical experience with macrolides other than AZM in CF patients is very limited.

  7. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  8. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction.

  9. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  10. Absence of mutations in the interspecies conserved regions of the CFTR promoter region in cystic fibrosis (CF) and CF related patients.

    PubMed Central

    Verlingue, C; Vuillaumier, S; Mercier, B; Le Gac, M; Elion, J; Férec, C; Denamur, E

    1998-01-01

    This study was aimed at testing if a 5.2 kb untranslated region on both sides of the first CFTR exon, shown to contain regulatory elements, could carry mutations responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) or CF related phenotypes. Selection of the DNA segments studied within this region was based upon the identification of conserved sequences throughout evolution (phylogenetic footprints, PFs). Comparison of the CFTR sequences in eight species representing four orders of mammals (man, gibbon, rhesus monkey, squirrel, monkey, rabbit, cow, rat, and mouse) identified four clusters of PFs within the 3.9 kb of DNA sequence upstream from the initiation codon, as well as two nearby PFs at +1 kb within intron 1. Six DNA segments containing PFs were scanned for mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in patients with CF (n = 29), congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (n = 143), or disseminated bronchiectasis (n = 33), for whom only one or no mutations had been identified despite extensive DGGE analysis of the 27 CFTR exons and exon/intron boundaries. Only one polymorphism (-966 T-->G) was identified with a frequency of 2.2% and no other sequence variations were found. This study reinforces the idea that the promoter region in the CFTR is not frequently mutated. PMID:9507393

  11. Evidence of epigenetic tags in cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Zullo, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Infante, Teresa; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    In cardiac fibrosis, following an injury or a stress, non-functional fibrotic tissue substitutes normal myocardium, thus leading to progressive heart failure. Activated fibroblasts are principal determinants of cardiac fibrosis by producing excessive fibrotic extracellular matrix and causing hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs have been involved in these mechanisms. Therefore, there is a strong interest in reverting such epigenetic transformations in order to arrest myocardial fibrotic degeneration. Demethylating agents, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, some selective histone deacetylase inhibitors, including mocetinostat, trichostatin A, and MPT0E014, have a direct action on important inducers of cardiac fibrosis. Also dietary compounds, such as resveratrol, can suppress the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Although in vivo and in vitro studies suggest specific epigenetic therapies to treat cardiac fibrosis, the related clinical trials are still lacking. A better understanding of the epigenetic effects of dietary compounds (e.g. curcumin and green tea catechins) on the onset and progression of cardiac fibrosis, will allow the identification of protective dietary patterns and/or the generation of novel potential epidrugs.

  12. Toward surface quantification of liver fibrosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuting; Kang, Chiang Huen; Xu, Shuoyu; Tuo, Xiaoye; Trasti, Scott; Tai, Dean C. S.; Raja, Anju Mythreyi; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Welsch, Roy; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring liver fibrosis progression by liver biopsy is important for certain treatment decisions, but repeated biopsy is invasive. We envision redefinition or elimination of liver biopsy with surface scanning of the liver with minimally invasive optical methods. This would be possible only if the information contained on or near liver surfaces accurately reflects the liver fibrosis progression in the liver interior. In our study, we acquired the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of liver tissues from bile duct-ligated rat model of liver fibrosis. We extracted morphology-based features, such as total collagen, collagen in bile duct areas, bile duct proliferation, and areas occupied by remnant hepatocytes, and defined the capsule and subcapsular regions on the liver surface based on image analysis of features. We discovered a strong correlation between the liver fibrosis progression on the anterior surface and interior in both liver lobes, where biopsy is typically obtained. The posterior surface exhibits less correlation with the rest of the liver. Therefore, scanning the anterior liver surface would obtain similar information to that obtained from biopsy for monitoring liver fibrosis progression.

  13. Noninvasive Imaging of Experimental Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Gang; Antony, Veena B.; Ding, Qiang; Nath, Hrudaya; Eary, Janet F.; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Small animal models of lung fibrosis are essential for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying human fibrotic lung diseases; additionally, they are useful for preclinical testing of candidate antifibrotic agents. The current end-point measures of experimental lung fibrosis involve labor-intensive histological and biochemical analyses. These measures fail to account for dynamic changes in the disease process in individual animals and are limited by the need for large numbers of animals for longitudinal studies. The emergence of noninvasive imaging technologies provides exciting opportunities to image lung fibrosis in live animals as often as needed and to longitudinally track the efficacy of novel antifibrotic compounds. Data obtained by noninvasive imaging provide complementary information to histological and biochemical measurements. In addition, the use of noninvasive imaging in animal studies reduces animal usage, thus satisfying animal welfare concerns. In this article, we review these new imaging modalities with the potential for evaluation of lung fibrosis in small animal models. Such techniques include micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and multimodal imaging systems including PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It is anticipated that noninvasive imaging will be increasingly used in animal models of fibrosis to gain insights into disease pathogenesis and as preclinical tools to assess drug efficacy. PMID:25679265

  14. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  15. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YA-LEI; ZHU, RONG-TAO; SUN, YU-LING

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the result of a sustained wound healing response to sustained chronic liver injury, which includes viral, alcoholic and autoimmune hepatitis. Hepatic regeneration is the dominant outcome of liver damage. The outcomes of successful repair are the replacement of dead epithelial cells with healthy epithelial cells, and reconstruction of the normal hepatic structure and function. Prevention of the development of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may control and even reverse liver fibrosis. EMT is a critical process for an epithelial cell to undergo a conversion to a mesenchymal phenotype, and is believed to be an inflammation-induced response, which may have a central role in liver fibrosis. The origin of fibrogenic cells in liver fibrosis remains controversial. Numerous studies have investigated the origin of all fibrogenic cells within the liver and the mechanism of the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of EMT programs during numerous chronic liver diseases. The present study aimed to summarize the evidence to explain the possible role of EMT in liver fibrosis. PMID:26998262

  16. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  17. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  18. Clinical Course and Changes in High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis without Honeycombing

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Masashi; Baba, Tomohisa; Kataoka, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshihito; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Ikushima, Soichiro; Johkoh, Takeshi; Sakai, Fumikazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Hebisawa, Akira; Kawabata, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Ogura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) do not have honeycombing on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) at their initial evaluation. The clinical course and sequential changes in HRCT findings in these patients are not fully understood. We reviewed the cases of 43 patients with IPF without honeycombing on initial HRCT from institutions throughout Japan. All patients were diagnosed with IPF based on a surgical lung biopsy. Multidisciplinary discussions were held five times between 2011 and 2014, to exclude alternative etiologies. We evaluated the sequential changes in HRCT findings in 30 patients with IPF. We classified these 30 patients into three groups based on their HRCT patterns and clarified the clinical characteristics and prognosis among the groups. The patterns of all 30 patients on initial HRCT corresponded to a possible usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern which was described in the 2011 International Statement. On long-term follow-up (71.0±38.7 standard deviation [SD] months), honeycombing was seen in 16 patients (53%, the HoneyCo group); traction bronchiectasis or cysts without honeycombing was observed in 12 patients (40%, the NoHoneyCo group), and two patients showed no interval change (7%, the NoChange group) on HRCT. The mean survival periods of the HoneyCo and NoHoneyCo groups were 67.1 and 61.2 months, respectively (p = 0.76). There are some patients with IPF whose conditions chronically progress without honeycombing on HRCT. The appearance of honeycombing on HRCT during the follow-up might not be related to prognosis. PMID:27829068

  19. Cystic Fibrosis from Laboratory to Bedside: The Role of A20 in NF-κB-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Aidan; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Schock, Bettina C; Ennis, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lifelong, inflammatory multi-organ disease and the most common lethal, genetic condition in Caucasian populations, with a median survival rate of 41.5 years. Pulmonary disease, characterized by infective exacerbations, bronchiectasis and increasing airway insufficiency is the most serious manifestation of this disease process, currently responsible for over 80% of CF deaths. Chronic dysregulation of the innate immune and host inflammatory response has been proposed as a mechanism central to this genetic condition, primarily driven by the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Chronic activation of this transcription factor complex leads to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators such as IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. A20 has been described as a central and inducible negative regulator of NF-κB. This intracellular molecule negatively regulates NF-κB-driven pro-inflammatory signalling upon toll-like receptor activation at the level of TRAF6 activation. Silencing of A20 increases cellular levels of p65 and induces a pro-inflammatory state. We have previously shown that A20 expression positively correlates with lung function (FEV1%) in CF. Despite improvement in survival rates in recent years, advancements in available therapies have been incremental. We demonstrate that the experimental use of naturally occurring plant diterpenes such as gibberellin on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell lines reduces IL-8 release in an A20-dependent manner. We discuss how the use of a novel bio-informatics gene expression connectivity-mapping technique to identify small molecule compounds that similarly mimic the action of A20 may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches capable of reducing chronic airway inflammation in CF.

  20. Gene mutation in microRNA target sites of CFTR gene: a novel pathogenetic mechanism in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Amato, Felice; Seia, Manuela; Giordano, Sonia; Elce, Ausilia; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disorder among Caucasians. It depends on alterations of a chloride channel expressed by most epithelial cells and encoded by CFTR gene. Also using scanning techniques to analyze the whole coding regions of CFTR gene, mutations are not identified in up to 10% of CF alleles, and such figure increases in CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD). Other gene regions may be the site of causing-disease mutations. We searched for genetic variants in the 1500 bp of CFTR 3' untranslated region, typical target of microRNA (miRNA) posttranscriptional gene regulation, in either CF patients with the F508del homozygous genotype and different clinical expression (n = 20), CF (n = 32) and CFTR-RD (n = 43) patients with one or none mutation after CFTR scanning and in controls (n = 50). We identified three SNPs, one of which, the c.*1043A>C, was located in a region predicted to bind miR-433 and miR-509-3p. Such mutation was peculiar of a CFTR-RD patient that had Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens (CBAVD), diffuse bronchiectasis, a borderline sweat chloride test and the heterozygous severe F508del mutation on the other allele. The expression analysis demonstrated that the c.*1043A>C increases the affinity for miR-509-3p and slightly decreases that for the miR-433. Both miRNAs cause in vitro a reduced expression of CFTR protein. Thus, the c.*1043A>C may act as a mild CFTR mutation enhancing the affinity for inhibitory miRNAs as a novel pathogenetic mechanism in CF.

  1. Matrix Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; O'Reilly, Philip; Antony, Veena B; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema are chronic lung diseases characterized by a progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A hallmark of these diseases is recurrent or persistent alveolar epithelial injury, typically caused by common environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke. We propose that critical determinants of the outcome of the injury-repair processes that result in fibrosis versus emphysema are mesenchymal cell fate and associated extracellular matrix dynamics. In this review, we explore the concept that regulation of mesenchymal cells under the influence of soluble factors, in particular transforming growth factor-β1, and the extracellular matrix determine the divergent tissue remodeling responses seen in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

  2. [Regeneration and fibrosis of corneal tissues].

    PubMed

    Simirskiĭ, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the features of the regeneration of corneal tissue and its disorders leading to the development of fibrosis are considered. The data on the presence of stem (clonogenic) cell pool in the corneal tissues (epithelium, endothelium, stroma) are given; these cells can serve as a source for regeneration of the tissues at injury or various diseases. The main steps of regeneration of corneal tissues and their disorders that lead to outstripping proliferation of myofibroblasts and secretion of extracellular matrix in the wound area and eventually cause the formation of connective tissue scar and corneal opacity are considered. Particular attention is given to the successes of translational medicine in the treatment of corneal tissue fibrosis. The methods of cell therapy aimed at the restoration of stem cell pool of corneal tissues are the most promising. Gene therapy provides more opportunities; one of its main objectives is the suppression of the myofibroblast proliferation responsible for the development of fibrosis.

  3. Essential Role of Lyn in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hung; Birtolo, Chiara; Chheda, Chintan; Yang, Wendy; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Liu, Sandy T.; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Lewis, Michael S.; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Pandol, Stephen J.; Ptasznik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic disorders involve replacement of normal parenchyma with myofibroblasts, which deposit connective tissue, leading to obliteration of the function of the underlying organ. The treatment options are inadequate and reflect the fact that signaling targets in myofibroblasts are unknown. Here we identify the hyperactive Lyn signaling in myofibroblasts of patients with chronic pancreatitis-induced fibrosis. Lyn activation coexpress with markers of activated myofibroblasts, and is increased ~11-fold in chronic pancreatitis compared to normal tissue. Inhibition of Lyn with siRNA or INNO-406 leads to the substantial decrease of migration and proliferation of human chronic pancreatitis myofibroblasts in vitro, while leaving migration and proliferation of normal myofibroblasts only slightly affected. Furthermore, inhibition of Lyn prevents synthesis of procollagen and collagen in myofibroblasts in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis-induced fibrosis. We conclude that Lyn, as a positive regulator of myofibroblast migration, proliferation, and collagen production, is a key target for preventing fibrosis. PMID:27630579

  4. The role of EMT in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Carew, Rosemarie M; Wang, Bo; Kantharidis, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    It is clear that the well-described phenomenon of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a pivotal role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis and cancer progression. EMTs have been classified into three subtypes based on the functional consequences and biomarker context in which they are encountered. This review will highlight findings on type II EMT as a direct contributor to the kidney myofibroblast population in the development of renal fibrosis, specifically in diabetic nephropathy, the signalling molecules and the pathways involved in type II EMT and changes in the expression of specific miRNA with the EMT process. These findings have provided new insights into the activation and development of EMT during disease processes and may lead to possible therapeutic interventions to suppress EMTs and potentially reverse organ fibrosis.

  5. [Therapeutical targets for revert liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    García B, Leonel; Gálvez G, Javier; Armendáriz B, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common response to chronic liver injury, ultimately leading to cirrhosis and its complications: portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatic encephalopathy, and hepatocellular carcinoma and others. Efficient and well-tolerated antifibrotic drugs are still lacking, and current treatment of hepatic fibrosis is limited to withdrawal of the noxious agent. Efforts over the past decade have mainly focused on fibrogenic cells generating the scarring response, although promising data on inhibition of parenchymal injury or reduction of liver inflammation have also been obtained. A large number of approaches have been validated in culture studies and in animal models, and several clinical trials are underway or anticipated for a growing number of molecules. This review highlight recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and discusses mechanistically based strategies that have recently emerged.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease affects those individuals with polygenic risk factors. The identified risk loci indicate that the genetic architecture of Crohn’s disease involves both innate and adaptive immunity and the response to the intestinal environment including the microbiome. Genetic risk alone, however, predicts only 25% of disease, indicating that other factors, including the intestinal environment, can shape the epigenome and also confer heritable risk to patients. Patients with Crohn’s disease can have purely inflammatory disease, penetrating disease or fibrostenosis. Analysis of the genetic risk combined with epigenetic marks of Crohn’s disease and other disease associated with organ fibrosis reveals common events are affecting the genes and pathways key to development of fibrosis. This review will focus on what is known about the mechanisms by which genetic and epigenetic risk factors determine development of fibrosis in Crohn’s disease and contrast that with other fibrotic conditions. PMID:27536359

  7. Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis: pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by treatment with butylated hydroxytoluene and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Haschek, W.M.; Brody, A.R.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Witschi, H.

    1981-12-01

    It is proposed that the pulmonary fibrosis induced in mice by treatment with BHT and oxygen is a good experimental model for human pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism of synergistic and additive effects of various agents on pulmonary injury and the epithelial mesenchymal interactions occurring during the early and late phases of lung repair could be studied. This model could be used for study of the effects of various concentrations of oxygen on diffusely damaged lung and assessment of the efficacy of drugs in preventing or resolving excessive collagen accumulation in lung. In addition, the relationship between pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema could be studied.

  8. Reversible Severe Eosinophilic Endomyocardial Fibrosis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pineton de Chambrun, Marc; Charron, Philippe; Vauthier-Brouzes, Danièle; Cluzel, Philippe; Haroche, Julien; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Amoura, Zahir; Aubart, Fleur Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a condition of unknown origin characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. Cardiac involvement is rare and threatening accounting for 33% to 43% of death in HES. Management of pregnant patients with HES is challenging and have rarely been reported, particularly in the setting of heart failure. We here report on the case of a 29-year-old woman with HES who developed severe endomyocardial fibrosis with heart failure during pregnancy. Outcome was favorable under treatment with prednisone and azathioprine. This case illustrates a favorable outcome of endomyocardial fibrosis during pregnancy. PMID:26266372

  9. Factors associated with massive fibrosis in silicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Chan, S L

    1991-01-01

    Data on 1432 patients with silicosis on a register in Hong Kong were analysed to examine the association of massive fibrosis with possible predisposing factors. Detailed occupational and clinical histories, clinical records, radiographic readings according to the International Standard Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses, and environmental dust measurements from hygiene surveys were used to obtain information for several variables--namely, age at first exposure, relative dust exposure level, duration of exposure, smoking, previous recorded history of tuberculosis, and background profusion of small opacities. The most significant risk factors associated with massive fibrosis were high relative dust exposure level, a history of tuberculosis, and increased background profusion of small opacities. PMID:2038729

  10. Management Issues for Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  11. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype.

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  13. Is pirfenidone effective for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Jeldres, Alejandro; Labarca, Gonzalo

    2017-01-17

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has an ominous prognosis and there are virtually no effective therapies. It has been suggested that pirfenidone, an antifibrotic agent, could change its course. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified 13 systematic reviews comprising nine trials addressing the question of this article, seven of which are randomized and whose results were analyzed in this summary. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded pirfenidone decreases disease progression and mortality in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although it is associated with frequent gastrointestinal and cutaneous adverse effects, these are generally not severe.

  14. The Cystic Fibrosis of Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia, and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatitis, and outline present and potential therapeutic approaches in CF treatment relevant to the pancreas. PMID:23637307

  15. Precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person’s genome can influence their disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one’s genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  16. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF. PMID:27625576

  17. [Cystic fibrosis in a 70-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Lene Søndberg; Jensen, Michael Skov

    2002-05-06

    Cystic fibrosis is usually diagnosed in early childhood, and patients rarely live beyond the age of 40. We present a case of a 70-year-old woman, in whom cystic fibrosis was diagnosed with the rare mutation, R117C. Cystic fibrosis should therefore also be considered in older patients.

  18. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security....04 to evaluate claims involving cystic fibrosis in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the... information on the disability program. 2. Information for individuals with cystic fibrosis who apply...

  19. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  20. [Endomyocardial fibrosis with massive calcification of the left ventricle].

    PubMed

    Trigo, Joana; Camacho, Ana; Gago, Paula; Candeias, Rui; Santos, Walter; Marques, Nuno; Matos, Pedro; Brandão, Victor; Gomes, Veloso

    2010-03-01

    Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rare disease, endemic in tropical countries. It is characterized by fibrosis of the endocardium that can extend to myocardium. Important calcification of the endocardium is rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of endomyocardial fibrosis in a european caucasian patient, associated with massive calcification of left ventricle.

  1. Cadherin-11 Regulation of Fibrosis through Modulation of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Implications for Pulmonary Fibrosis in Scleroderma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Lung fibrosis is the leading cause of death in...Cad11) is increased in fibrotic skin and lung tissues and that Cad11 is a mediator of fibrosis in mouse models. Mechanistically how this occurs is not...have less lung fibrosis. Initial studies studies also suggest that antiCad11 antibodies are effective in treating lung fibrosis in this model. In

  2. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mediators of Intestinal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Ian C; Rogler, Gerhard; Bamias, Giorgos; Breynaert, Christine; Florholmen, Jon; Pellino, Gianluca; Reif, Shimon; Speca, Silvia; Latella, Giovanni

    2015-11-02

    Intestinal fibrosis is a major complication of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and although inflammation is necessary for its development, it would appear that it plays a minor role in its progression as anti-inflammatory treatments in IBD do not prevent fibrosis once it has started. The processes that regulate fibrosis would thus appear to be distinct from those regulating inflammation and, therefore, a detailed understanding of these pathways is vital to the development of anti-fibrogenic strategies. There have been several recent reviews exploring what is known, and what remains unknown, about the development of intestinal fibrosis. This review is designed to add to this literature but with a focus on the cellular components that are involved in the development of fibrogenesis and the major molecular mediators that impact on these cells. The aim is to heighten the understanding of the factors involved in intestinal fibrogenesis so that detailed research can be encouraged in order to advance the processes that could lead to effective treatments.

  4. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team.

  5. [Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alilović, Marija; Peroš-Golubićić, Tatjana; Tekavec Trkanjec, Jasna; Hećimović, Ana; Smojver-Ježek, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    CPFE-combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is a new term for a syndrome whose main characteristic is fibrosis in lower pulmonary lobes with simultaneous emphysema in upper pulmonary lobes. CPFE patients have well preserved pulmonary test values for unexpectedly long period, but extremely lowered carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and significant arterial hypertension. All CPFE studies indicate that CPFE occurs predominately in older male population. Smoking is considered main cause in developing CPFE. Reduced survival rate is linked with arterial hypertension extent, and mortality rate is greater than that for patients with isolated pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema. This study is focused on characteristics of twelve CPFE patients. This paper describes cases of 12 patients with the syndrome of pulmonary fibrosis associated with emphysema. All patients were male, mean age of 68 years. At the certain period of life they all were smokers, but most of them were also exposed to air pollution due to their profession. Shortness of breath on exertion was present in all patients. All patients had neat pulmonary function tests with significantly reduced diffusing capacity for carbon mon- oxide (average 39%). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) averaged 56 mmHg (range 25-75 mmHg) was present in 75% of patients. Four patients died during the period of four months, of which three patients had PAH greater than 70 mmHg. The fourth patient died of lung cancer.

  6. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  7. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  8. Ivacaftor for patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Claire E

    2014-10-01

    Ivacaftor is an oral bioavailable potentiator of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. It is the first therapeutic agent that has been registered for clinical use which targets the basic defect in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation or other rarer specific gating mutations. Clinical trials have shown consistent and impressive clinical benefit that appears to be sustained over time in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation and similar benefits have been seen in those who carry rarer gating mutations. Ivacaftor is orally administered twice daily with a dose that does not vary between children aged 6 years through to adult life in patients with G551D. It appears to be well tolerated although there are potential interactions with drugs that are metabolised through CYPP450 CYP3A. Ivacaftor is also currently being trialled in combination with correctors for patients with the most common mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator the F508del mutation.

  9. Lung disease in mice with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, G; Iles, R; Bear, C E; Huan, L J; Griesenbach, U; McKerlie, C; Frndova, H; Ackerley, C; Gosselin, D; Radzioch, D; O'Brodovich, H; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Tanswell, A K

    1997-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality and morbidity in humans with cystic fibrosis is lung disease. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the lung disease of cystic fibrosis, as well as development of innovative therapeutic interventions, have been compromised by the lack of a natural animal model. The utility of the CFTR-knockout mouse in studying the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been limited because of their failure, despite the presence of severe intestinal disease, to develop lung disease. Herein, we describe the phenotype of an inbred congenic strain of CFTR-knockout mouse that develops spontaneous and progressive lung disease of early onset. The major features of the lung disease include failure of effective mucociliary transport, postbronchiolar over inflation of alveoli and parenchymal interstitial thickening, with evidence of fibrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment. We speculate that the basis for development of lung disease in the congenic CFTR-knockout mice is their observed lack of a non-CFTR chloride channel normally found in CFTR-knockout mice of mixed genetic background. PMID:9399953

  10. Macrophages: Master Regulators of Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Barron, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are found in close proximity with collagen-producing myofibroblasts and indisputably play a key role in fibrosis. They produce profibrotic mediators that directly activate fibroblasts, including transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, and control extracellular matrix turnover by regulating the balance of various matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases. Macrophages also regulate fibrogenesis by secreting chemokines that recruit fibroblasts and other inflammatory cells. With their potential to act in both a pro- and antifibrotic capacity, as well as their ability to regulate the activation of resident and recruited myofibroblasts, macrophages and the factors they express are integrated into all stages of the fibrotic process. These various, and sometimes opposing, functions may be performed by distinct macrophage subpopulations, the identification of which is a growing focus of fibrosis research. Although collagen-secreting myofibroblasts once were thought of as the master “producers” of fibrosis, this review will illustrate how macrophages function as the master “regulators” of fibrosis. PMID:20665377

  11. Exercise is medicine in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Courtney M; Wilkins, Brad W; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    Exercise activates adrenergic and purinergic pathways that regulate activity of ion channels on airway epithelia cells and sweat glands. Therefore, we hypothesize that exercise is not only an important therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by facilitating systemic improvements but, more importantly, that exercise can improve the pathophysiological ion dysregulation at a cellular level, thereby enhancing quality of life in CF.

  12. Craniofacial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, E; Brattström, V; Strandvik, B

    1992-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary metabolic disorder with clinical symptoms of abnormal mucus production. This blocks the airways, gives pancreatic insufficiency, and increases sweat electrolytes. The progressive respiratory disease often leads to respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the facial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis. The sample comprised 11 children with cystic fibrosis, who were divided in two groups, one with gastrointestinal disorders and the other with predominantly respiratory insufficiency. Eleven healthy children with normal occlusions were selected as controls. Lateral skull radiographs obtained in natural head posture were digitized, and linear and angular variables for the different groups calculated and compared statistically. The cystic fibrosis group showed open bite, decreased posterior facial height, increased mandibular and craniocervical inclination. Additionally, within the CF-group, the children with respiratory insufficiency differed more from the controls than the children with gastrointestinal disorders. Despite the small number of subjects, the facial morphology of the CF children showed a similar pattern to that of children with nasal respiratory obstruction due to enlarged adenoids or tonsils.

  13. [New prospects in cystic fibrosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Prados, C; Serrano, S; Alvarez-Sala, R; Villamor, J

    1997-04-01

    Only a few years ago, cystic fibrosis (CF) was considered the most frequent genetic disease in childhood, although survival has increased considerably in recent years owing to improved treatment. We discuss treatments that are still relevant as well as others that are under investigation now, aiming for better understanding of the disease and the therapies that have improved quality of life for CF patients.

  14. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  15. Melatonin: the dawning of a treatment for fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Fan, Chongxi; Deng, Chao; Yan, Xiaolong; Di, Shouyin; Lv, Jianjun; Reiter, Russel J; Yang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    Fibrosis is a common occurrence following organ injury and failure. To date, there is no effective treatment for this condition. Melatonin targets numerous molecular pathways, a consequence of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions that reduce excessive fibrosis. Herein, we review the multiple protective effects of melatonin against fibrosis. There exist four major phases of the fibrogenic response including primary injury to the organ, activation of effector cells, the elaboration of extracellular matrix (ECM) and dynamic deposition. Melatonin regulates each of these phases. Additionally, melatonin reduces fibrosis levels in numerous organs. Melatonin exhibits its anti-fibrosis effects in heart, liver, lung, kidney, and other organs. In addition, adhesions which occur following surgical procedures are also inhibited by melatonin. The information reviewed here should be significant to understanding the protective role of melatonin against fibrosis, contribute to the design of further experimental studies related to melatonin and the fibrotic response and shed light on a potential treatment for fibrosis.

  16. Imaging of intestinal fibrosis: current challenges and future methods

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Peter DR

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) activity assessments are dominated by inflammatory changes without discrete measurement of the coexisting fibrotic contribution to total bowel damage. Intestinal fibrosis impacts the development of severe structural complications and the overall natural history of CD. Measuring intestinal fibrosis is challenging and existing methods of disease assessment are unable to reliably distinguish fibrosis from inflammation. Both the immediate clinical need to measure fibrosis for therapeutic decision-making and the near-future need for tools to assess pipeline anti-fibrotic medications highlight the demand for biomarkers of fibrosis in CD. Developing non-invasive technologies exploit changes in intestinal perfusion, mechanical properties, and macromolecular content to provide quantitative markers of fibrosis. In this review of existing and experimental technologies for imaging intestinal fibrosis, we discuss the expanding capabilities of quantitative MR and ultrasound imaging, encouraging developments in non-invasive elastography, and emerging novel methods including photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27536361

  17. Macrophage heterogeneity in liver injury and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank; Zimmermann, Henning W

    2014-05-01

    Hepatic macrophages are central in the pathogenesis of chronic liver injury and have been proposed as potential targets in combatting fibrosis. Recent experimental studies in animal models revealed that hepatic macrophages are a remarkably heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill diverse functions in homeostasis, disease progression, and regression from injury. These range from clearance of pathogens or cellular debris and maintenance of immunological tolerance in steady state conditions; central roles in initiating and perpetuating inflammation in response to injury; promoting liver fibrosis via activating hepatic stellate cells in chronic liver damage; and, finally, resolution of inflammation and fibrosis by degradation of extracellular matrix and release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Cellular heterogeneity in the liver is partly explained by the origin of macrophages. Hepatic macrophages can either arise from circulating monocytes, which are recruited to the injured liver via chemokine signals, or from self-renewing embryo-derived local macrophages, termed Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells appear essential for sensing tissue injury and initiating inflammatory responses, while infiltrating Ly-6C(+) monocyte-derived macrophages are linked to chronic inflammation and fibrogenesis. In addition, proliferation of local or recruited macrophages may possibly further contribute to their accumulation in injured liver. During fibrosis regression, monocyte-derived cells differentiate into Ly-6C (Ly6C, Gr1) low expressing 'restorative' macrophages and promote resolution from injury. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate hepatic macrophage heterogeneity, either by monocyte subset recruitment, by promoting restorative macrophage polarization or by impacting distinctive macrophage effector functions, may help to develop novel macrophage subset-targeted therapies for liver injury and fibrosis.

  18. Stage scoring of liver fibrosis using Mueller matrix microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jialing; He, Honghui; Wang, Ye; Ma, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common pathological process of varied chronic liver diseases including alcoholic hepatitis, virus hepatitis, and so on. Accurate evaluation of liver fibrosis is necessary for effective therapy and a five-stage grading system was developed. Currently, experienced pathologists use stained liver biopsies to assess the degree of liver fibrosis. But it is difficult to obtain highly reproducible results because of huge discrepancy among different observers. Polarization imaging technique has the potential of scoring liver fibrosis since it is capable of probing the structural and optical properties of samples. Considering that the Mueller matrix measurement can provide comprehensive microstructural information of the tissues, in this paper, we apply the Mueller matrix microscope to human liver fibrosis slices in different fibrosis stages. We extract the valid regions and adopt the Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) and Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters for quantitative analysis. We also use the Monte Carlo simulation to analyze the relationship between the microscopic Mueller matrix parameters and the characteristic structural changes during the fibrosis process. The experimental and Monte Carlo simulated results show good consistency. We get a positive correlation between the parameters and the stage of liver fibrosis. The results presented in this paper indicate that the Mueller matrix microscope can provide additional information for the detections and fibrosis scorings of liver tissues and has great potential in liver fibrosis diagnosis.

  19. A geochemical basis for endomyocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, M S; Kartha, C C; Panday, V K; Dang, H S; Sunta, C M

    1986-09-01

    In a search for geochemical factors that could play a role in the pathogenesis of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, endomyocardial tissue samples obtained from patients at necropsy or operation were analysed for major elements present in laterite and monazite, which are important soil constituents of Kerala State of India. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used for detecting iron, silicon, aluminium, zinc, magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, and manganese and neutron activation analysis for thorium. Compared with control samples from victims of fatal accidents, an excess of thorium, sodium, and calcium and a deficiency of magnesium were present in samples from patients. It has been shown earlier that the staple diets of people in Kerala have high concentrations of thorium, and these data show that thorium can become concentrated in cardiac tissues. It is speculated that thorium excess in conjunction with magnesium deficiency may play a role in the causation of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis.

  20. Cystic fibrosis and physiological responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Williams, Craig A; Saynor, Zoe L; Tomlinson, Owen W; Barker, Alan R

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is underutilized within the clinical management of patients with cystic fibrosis. But within the last 5 years, there has been considerable interest in its implementation, which has included deliberations by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society about incorporating this method within the clinical assessment of patients. This review examines the current use of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in assessing the extent and cause(s) of exercise limitation from a pediatric perspective. Examples of the measured parameters and their interpretation are provided. Critical synthesis of recent work in the oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics response to and following exercise is also discussed, and although identified more as a research tool, its utilization advances researchers understanding of the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular limitations to exercise tolerance. Finally, exercise and its application in therapeutic interventions are highlighted and a number of recommendations made about the utility of exercise prescription.

  1. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Treatment and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Hajime; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Azuma, Arata

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive lung disease with a prognosis that can be worse than for many cancers. The initial stages of the condition were thought to mainly involve chronic inflammation; therefore, corticosteroids and other drugs that have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions were used. However, recently, agents targeting persistent fibrosis resulting from aberrant repair of alveolar epithelial injury have been in the spotlight. There has also been an increase in the number of available antifibrotic treatment options, starting with pirfenidone and nintedanib. These drugs prevent deterioration but do not improve IPF. Therefore, nonpharmacologic approaches such as long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation must be considered as additional treatment modalities. PMID:27980445

  2. Painful connections: densification versus fibrosis of fascia.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Stecco, Antonio; Stern, Robert; Stecco, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Deep fascia has long been considered a source of pain, secondary to nerve pain receptors becoming enmeshed within the pathological changes to which fascia are subject. Densification and fibrosis are among such changes. They can modify the mechanical properties of deep fasciae and damage the function of underlying muscles or organs. Distinguishing between these two different changes in fascia, and understanding the connective tissue matrix within fascia, together with the mechanical forces involved, will make it possible to assign more specific treatment modalities to relieve chronic pain syndromes. This review provides an overall description of deep fasciae and the mechanical properties in order to identify the various alterations that can lead to pain. Diet, exercise, and overuse syndromes are able to modify the viscosity of loose connective tissue within fascia, causing densification, an alteration that is easily reversible. Trauma, surgery, diabetes, and aging alter the fibrous layers of fasciae, leading to fascial fibrosis.

  3. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  4. Macrophages in tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Vannella, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocytes and resident tissue macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. Following tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, with uncontrolled inflammatory mediator and growth factor production, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contributing to a state of persistent injury, which may lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue regenerating phenotypes following injury, and highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26982353

  5. MicroRNAs in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Arthur C.-K.; Lan, Hui Y.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous short non-coding RNAs that regulate most of important cellular processes by inhibiting gene expression through the post-transcriptional repression of their target mRNAs. In kidneys, miRNAs have been associated in renal development, homeostasis, and physiological functions. Results from clinical and experimental animal studies demonstrate that miRNAs play essential roles in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases. Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is characterized by renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is recognized as a major mediator of renal fibrosis because it is able to stimulate the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to impair normal kidney function. Recently, emerging evidence demonstrate the relationship between TGF-β signaling and miRNAs expression during renal diseases. TGF-β regulates expression of several microRNAs, such as miR-21, miR-192, miR-200, miR-433, and miR-29. MiR-21, miR-192, and miR-433 which are positively induced by TGF-β signaling play a pathological role in kidney diseases. In contrast, members in both miR-29 and miR-200 families which are inhibited by TGF-β signaling protect kidneys from renal fibrosis by suppressing the deposition of ECM and preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, respectively. Clinically, the presence of miRNAs in blood and urine has been examined to be early biomarkers for detecting renal diseases. From experimental animal studies of CKD, targeting microRNAs also provides evidence about therapeutic potential of miRNAs during renal diseases. Now, it comes to the stage to examine the exact mechanisms of miRNAs during the initiation and progression of renal diseases. Therefore, determining the function of miRNAs in renal fibrosis may facilitate the development of both early diagnosis and treatment of renal diseases. PMID:25750628

  6. Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis after Wilms' tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Marshall, G.S.; Neblett, W.W.; Gray, G.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1986-04-01

    A 9-yr-old girl developed massive hemorrhage from esophageal varices 2 yr after combined modality therapy for Wilms' tumor. Evaluation showed a patent extrahepatic portal venous system and an elevated splenic pulp pressure. In contrast to previous reports of hepatopathy after irradiation injury, histologic sections of the liver did not demonstrate occlusion of the central veins, but rather a diffuse obliteration of intrahepatic portal venous radicles. This pattern of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has not been described following antitumor therapy.

  7. Substance P modulates colitis-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Zhao, Dezheng; Fazelbhoy, Zafeer; Hing, Tressia; Xu, Hua; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2010-11-01

    Substance P (SP) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) are involved in the development of colitis and mucosal healing after colonic inflammation. We studied whether SP modulates colonic fibrosis by using a chronic model of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and NK-1R-deficient (NK-1R KD) mice. We found increased mRNA expression levels of collagen, vimentin, and the fibrogenic factors transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 in the chronically inflamed colons of WT mice treated with repeated intracolonic TNBS administrations. Fibrosis in TNBS-treated mice was also evident immunohistochemically by collagen deposition in the colon. Treatment of TNBS-exposed WT mice with the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255 reduced colonic inflammation, colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of the fibrogenic factors. NK-1R knockout mice chronically exposed to TNBS had similar colonic inflammation compared with WT, but reduced colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of fibrogenic factors. Immunohistochemical staining also showed co-localization of NK-1R with fibroblasts in inflamed colons of mice and in colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease. Exposure of human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts to SP (10 nmol/L) increased cell migration. SP stimulated collagen synthesis in CCD-18Co fibroblasts in the presence of transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1, and this effect was reduced by Akt inhibition. Thus, SP, via NK-1R, promotes intestinal fibrogenesis after chronic colitis by stimulating fibrotic responses in fibroblasts.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Peritoneal EMT and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Strippoli, Raffaele; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; Battistelli, Cecilia; Cicchini, Carla; Noce, Valeria; Amicone, Laura; Marchetti, Alessandra; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Tripodi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a form of renal replacement alternative to the hemodialysis. During this treatment, the peritoneal membrane acts as a permeable barrier for exchange of solutes and water. Continual exposure to dialysis solutions, as well as episodes of peritonitis and hemoperitoneum, can cause acute/chronic inflammation and injury to the peritoneal membrane, which undergoes progressive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy, eventually leading to discontinuation of the peritoneal dialysis. Among the different events controlling this pathological process, epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells plays a main role in the induction of fibrosis and in subsequent functional deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. Here, the main extracellular inducers and cellular players are described. Moreover, signaling pathways acting during this process are elucidated, with emphasis on signals delivered by TGF-β family members and by Toll-like/IL-1β receptors. The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying fibrosis of the peritoneal membrane has both a basic and a translational relevance, since it may be useful for setup of therapies aimed at counteracting the deterioration as well as restoring the homeostasis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26941801

  9. Promising Therapy Candidates for Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Koyama, Yukinori; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Jun; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Liang, Shuang; Kim, In H.; Brenner, David A.; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing process in response to repeated and chronic injury to hepatocytes and/or cholangiocytes. Ongoing hepatocyte apoptosis or necrosis lead to increase in ROS production and decrease in antioxidant activity, which recruits inflammatory cells from the blood and activate hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) changing to myofibroblasts. Injury to cholangiocytes also recruits inflammatory cells to the liver and activates portal fibroblasts in the portal area, which release molecules to activate and amplify cholangiocytes. No matter what origin of myofibroblasts, either HSCs or portal fibroblasts, they share similar characteristics, including being positive for α-smooth muscle actin and producing extracellular matrix. Based on the extensive pathogenesis knowledge of liver fibrosis, therapeutic strategies have been designed to target each step of this process, including hepatocyte apoptosis, cholangiocyte proliferation, inflammation, and activation of myofibroblasts to deposit extracellular matrix, yet the current therapies are still in early-phase clinical development. There is an urgent need to translate the molecular mechanism of liver fibrosis to effective and potent reagents or therapies in human. PMID:26909046

  10. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided.

  11. [Hepatitis C virus and pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Paolo; Salaffi, Fausto; Pesci, Alberto

    2002-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic inflammatory interstitial lung disease characterized by an accumulation of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in the lower respiratory tract, parenchymal injury, and interstitial fibrosis. Although the etiology of IPF is unknown, it has been suggested that viral agents, among which hepatitis C virus (HCV), may be involved in inducing the disease. In patients with chronic hepatitis HCV+ and in those with mixed cryoglobulinemia HCV-associated, HCV may trigger a subclinical lymphocyte alveolitis. Furthermore, pulmonary fibrosis associated with a variety of rheumatic disorders has been reported in 8/300 patients with active chronic hepatitis HCV+. Bronchoalveolar lavage, carried out in 4/8 patients, showed an increased percentage of neutrophils in all of them and a mild increase of lymphocytes in 2 patients. Thoracoscopic lung biopsy was carried out in 2 patients and showed a desquamative interstitial pneumonia; in one case HCV-RNA was found in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the above observations seem indicate a role for HCV in IFP, further studies are required to define its true importance in the etiopathogenesis of the interstitial lung disease.

  12. [Clinical characteristics and prognosis of mediastinal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Liao, J P; Hu, Y; Qiu, J X; Jin, Z; Zhang, H; Ma, J; Wang, G F

    2017-03-12

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of mediastinal fibrosis. Methods: Twelve patients with mediastinal fibrosis diagnosed between 2008 and 2015 in our hospital were studied retrospectively. Clinical manifestations, radiological characteristics, endoscopic features, treatment and prognosis were analyzed. Results: There were 3 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 68.8 years.Six patients had previous tuberculosis infection. The most common clinical symptoms were dyspnea on exertion (11 cases), cough (7 cases), and wheezing (6 cases). Chest CT scans revealed an infiltrative mediastinal process, with a discrete mass, enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph node calcification (9 case). Twelve patients had bronchial and pulmonary artery compression at lobar or segmental levels, 7 cases had localized pulmonary edema, and 6 cases had pulmonary atelectasis. The principal findings of bronchoscopy were distortion of bronchus with stenosis, multiple pigmentation of bronchial mucosa, and bronchial mucosal edema. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was the main severe complication. One patients suffered from sudden death after bronchoscopy. Eleven patients were followed for 3 month to 7 years, and 5 patients got progression. Anti-tuberculosis therapy with or without corticosteroid was not beneficial. Conclusion: Tuberculosis was the leading cause of mediastinal fibrosis in our study, which was characterized with diffuse bronchial and pulmonary artery compression at lobar or segmental levels, and multiple pigmentation of bronchial mucosa.Anti-tuberculosis therapy with or without corticosteroids was not beneficial.

  13. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  14. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  15. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  16. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  17. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  18. Tenascin-C drives persistence of organ fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Swati; Wang, Wenxia; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Feng, Gang; Wu, Minghua; Zhou, Xiaodong; Lafyatis, Robert; Lee, Jungwha; Hinchcliff, Monique; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Lakota, Katja; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Raparia, Kirtee; Tamaki, Zenshiro; Varga, John

    2016-01-01

    The factors responsible for maintaining persistent organ fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc) are not known but emerging evidence implicates toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the pathogenesis of SSc. Here we show the expression, mechanism of action and pathogenic role of endogenous TLR activators in skin from patients with SSc, skin fibroblasts, and in mouse models of organ fibrosis. Levels of tenascin-C are elevated in SSc skin biopsy samples, and serum and SSc fibroblasts, and in fibrotic skin tissues from mice. Exogenous tenascin-C stimulates collagen gene expression and myofibroblast transformation via TLR4 signalling. Mice lacking tenascin-C show attenuation of skin and lung fibrosis, and accelerated fibrosis resolution. These results identify tenascin-C as an endogenous danger signal that is upregulated in SSc and drives TLR4-dependent fibroblast activation, and by its persistence impedes fibrosis resolution. Disrupting this fibrosis amplification loop might be a viable strategy for the treatment of SSc. PMID:27256716

  19. Role of interleukin-13 in fibrosis, particularly systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation can lead to altered extracellular matrix deposition and ultimately fibrosis. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a cytokine that was found to promote IgE class switching and inhibit proinflammatory cytokines. However, it is now recognized as an important mediator in allergy and most importantly fibrosis. Indeed, animal studies with genetically deleted mice have demonstrated its critical role in fibrosis and although it shares over lapping functions with IL-4 it is the dominant cytokine in fibrosis. Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which there is chronic inflammation and fibrosis. The disease is associated with a Th2 polarization and IL-13 levels are elevated both in the blood and in the skin of patients. This review will examine the role of IL-13 in driving fibrosis with a particular emphasis on systemic sclerosis as a prototypical fibrotic disease. It will highlight recent research into the role of IL-13 and how this cytokine may be targeted in systemic sclerosis.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Curran, David R; McArdle, John R; Talwalkar, Jaideep S

    2009-10-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis are frequently affected with pancreatic insufficiency and are predisposed to the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) and bone demineralization. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus is a clinical entity distinct from type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with important implications for the nutritional and pulmonary health of cystic fibrosis patients. This form of diabetes owes largely to insulin deficiency, but alterations in insulin sensitivity and hepatic glucose production have also been described. Therapy for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes differs substantially from type 2 DM, with careful attention to prandial glycemic excursions crucial to controlling its metabolic effects. Bone disease, including osteopenia and osteoporosis, also occurs with increased frequency in cystic fibrosis, owing to defects in intestinal absorption, chronic inflammation, lung disease, low body weight, and gonadal dysfunction. The pathogenesis, implications, diagnosis, and therapy of cystic fibrosis-related bone demineralization are discussed, with attention to recommended approaches to prevention of and treatment of established bone disease.

  1. Autopsy confirmation of severe pulmonary interstitial fibrosis secondary to Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Philip R; Racz, Mark I; Bloch, John D; Palmer, Charles H

    2005-09-01

    Chronic factitious disorder with physical symptoms, or Munchausen syndrome, is a well-recognized but uncommonly diagnosed psychiatric condition characterized by the deliberate production of signs and symptoms of disease in order to receive medical attention. Clinical suspicion of this disease is rarely confirmed by autopsy, as the patients usually do not die as a consequence of feigning illness. Here we report the autopsy confirmation of a case of a suspected Munchausen syndrome patient who presented with a history of cystic fibrosis. Examination of the lungs demonstrated extensive severe interstitial fibrosis, and polariscopic examination revealed a large quantity of crystalline material throughout the tissue; X-ray diffraction identified the material as talc. Synopses of published cases of Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis, and cases of Munchausen syndrome with pulmonary talcosis are presented as part of the discussion.

  2. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  3. Amine oxidase activity regulates the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Elima, Kati; Auvinen, Kaisa; Veres, Tibor Z; Rantakari, Pia; Weston, Christopher; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Adams, David; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko

    2017-03-01

    In pulmonary fibrosis, an inflammatory reaction and differentiation of myofibroblasts culminate in pathologic deposition of collagen. Amine oxidase copper containing-3 (AOC3) is a cell-surface expressed oxidase that regulates leukocyte extravasation. Here we analyzed the potential role of AOC3 using gene-modified and inhibitor-treated mice in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. Inflammation and fibrosis of lungs were assessed by histologic, flow cytometric, and quantitative PCR analysis. AOC3-deficient mice showed a 30-50% reduction in fibrosis, collagen synthesis, numbers of myofibroblasts, and accumulation of CD4(+) lymphocytes, NK T cells, macrophages, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells compared with wild-type control mice. AOC3 knock-in mice, which express a catalytically inactive form of AOC3, were also protected from lung fibrosis. In wild-type mice, a small-molecule AOC3 inhibitor treatment reduced leukocyte infiltration, myofibroblast differentiation, and fibrotic injury both in prophylactic and early therapeutic settings by about 50% but was unable to reverse the established fibrosis. AOC3 was also induced in myofibroblasts in human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, the oxidase activity of AOC3 contributes to the development of lung fibrosis mainly by regulating the accumulation of pathogenic leukocyte subtypes, which drive the fibrotic response.-Marttila-Ichihara, F., Elima, K., Auvinen, K., Veres, T. Z., Rantakari, P., Weston, C., Miyasaka, M., Adams, D., Jalkanen, S., Salmi, M. Amine oxidase activity regulates the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  4. Halofuginone for fibrosis, regeneration and cancer in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Organ fibrosis and architectural remodeling can severely disrupt tissue function, often with fatal consequences. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli, and the key cellular mediator of fibrosis comprises the myofibroblasts which, when activated, serve as the primary collagen-producing cells. Complex links exist between fibrosis, regeneration and carcinogenesis, and the concept that all organs contain common tissue fibrosis pathways that could be potential therapeutic targets is an attractive one. Because of the major impact of fibrosis on human health there is an unmet need for safe and effective therapies that directly target fibrosis. Halofuginone inhibits tissue fibrosis and regeneration, and thereby affects the development of tumors in various tissues along the gastrointestinal tract. The high efficacy of halofuginone in reducing the fibrosis that affects tumor growth and tissue regeneration is probably due to its dual role in inhibiting the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β, on the one hand, and inhibiting the development of Th17 cells, on the other hand. At present halofuginone is being evaluated in a clinical trial for other fibrotic indication, and any clinical success in that trial would allow the use of halofuginone, also for all other fibrotic indications, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25356039

  5. A Peptide Derived from Endostatin Ameliorates Organ Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yukie; Takihara, Takahisa; Chambers, Roger A.; Veraldi, Kristen L.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroproliferative disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis have no effective therapies and result in significant morbidity and mortality due to progressive organ fibrosis. We examined the effect of peptides derived from endostatin on existing fibrosis and fibrosis triggered by two potent mediators, transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) and bleomycin, in human and mouse tissues in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. We identified one peptide, E4, with potent antifibrotic activity. E4 prevented TGF-β–induced dermal fibrosis in vivo in a mouse model, ex vivo in human skin, and in bleomycin-induced dermal and pulmonary fibrosis in vivo, demonstrating that E4 exerts potent antifibrotic effects. In addition, E4 significantly reduced existing fibrosis in these preclinical models. E4 amelioration of fibrosis was accompanied by reduced cell apoptosis and lower levels of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme that cross-links collagen, and Egr-1 (early growth response gene–1), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of several fibrotic triggers. Our findings identify E4 as a peptide with potent antifibrotic activity and a possible therapeutic agent for organ fibrosis. PMID:22649092

  6. Novel biomarkers of fibrosis in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellino, Gianluca; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis represents a major challenge in Crohn’s disease (CD), and many CD patients will develop fibrotic strictures requiring treatment throughout their lifetime. There is no drug that can reverse intestinal fibrosis, and so endoscopic balloon dilatation and surgery are the only effective treatments. Since patients may need repeated treatments, it is important to obtain the diagnosis at an early stage before strictures become symptomatic with extensive fibrosis. Several markers of fibrosis have been proposed, but most need further validation. Biomarkers can be measured either in biological samples obtained from the serum or bowel of CD patients, or using imaging tools and tests. The ideal tool should be easily obtained, cost-effective, and reliable. Even more challenging is fibrosis occurring in ulcerative colitis. Despite the important burden of intestinal fibrosis, including its detrimental effect on outcomes and quality of life in CD patients, it has received less attention than fibrosis occurring in other organs. A common mechanism that acts via a specific signaling pathway could underlie both intestinal fibrosis and cancer. A comprehensive overview of recently introduced biomarkers of fibrosis in CD is presented, along with a discussion of the controversial areas remaining in this field. PMID:27574564

  7. Halofuginone for fibrosis, regeneration and cancer in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pines, Mark

    2014-10-28

    Organ fibrosis and architectural remodeling can severely disrupt tissue function, often with fatal consequences. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli, and the key cellular mediator of fibrosis comprises the myofibroblasts which, when activated, serve as the primary collagen-producing cells. Complex links exist between fibrosis, regeneration and carcinogenesis, and the concept that all organs contain common tissue fibrosis pathways that could be potential therapeutic targets is an attractive one. Because of the major impact of fibrosis on human health there is an unmet need for safe and effective therapies that directly target fibrosis. Halofuginone inhibits tissue fibrosis and regeneration, and thereby affects the development of tumors in various tissues along the gastrointestinal tract. The high efficacy of halofuginone in reducing the fibrosis that affects tumor growth and tissue regeneration is probably due to its dual role in inhibiting the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β, on the one hand, and inhibiting the development of Th17 cells, on the other hand. At present halofuginone is being evaluated in a clinical trial for other fibrotic indication, and any clinical success in that trial would allow the use of halofuginone, also for all other fibrotic indications, including those of the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  9. Predominant pathogen competition and core microbiota divergence in chronic airway infection

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; van der Gast, Christopher J; Serisier, David J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections associated with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis represent a substantial and growing health-care burden. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the numerically dominant species within these infections, prognosis is significantly worse. However, in many individuals, Haemophilus influenzae predominates, a scenario associated with less severe disease. The mechanisms that determine which pathogen is most abundant are not known. We hypothesised that the distribution of H. influenzae and P. aeruginosa would be consistent with strong interspecific competition effects. Further, we hypothesised that where P. aeruginosa is predominant, it is associated with a distinct ‘accessory microbiota' that reflects a significant interaction between this pathogen and the wider bacterial community. To test these hypotheses, we analysed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data generated previously from 60 adult bronchiectasis patients, whose airway microbiota was dominated by either P. aeruginosa or H. influenzae. The relative abundances of the two dominant species in their respective groups were not significantly different, and when present in the opposite pathogen group the two species were found to be in very low abundance, if at all. These findings are consistent with strong competition effects, moving towards competitive exclusion. Ordination analysis indicated that the distribution of the core microbiota associated with each pathogen, readjusted after removal of the dominant species, was significantly divergent (analysis of similarity (ANOSIM), R=0.07, P=0.019). Taken together, these findings suggest that both interspecific competition and also direct and/or indirect interactions between the predominant species and the wider bacterial community may contribute to the predominance of P. aeruginosa in a subset of bronchiectasis lung infections. PMID:25036925

  10. Predominant pathogen competition and core microbiota divergence in chronic airway infection.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geraint B; van der Gast, Christopher J; Serisier, David J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections associated with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis represent a substantial and growing health-care burden. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the numerically dominant species within these infections, prognosis is significantly worse. However, in many individuals, Haemophilus influenzae predominates, a scenario associated with less severe disease. The mechanisms that determine which pathogen is most abundant are not known. We hypothesised that the distribution of H. influenzae and P. aeruginosa would be consistent with strong interspecific competition effects. Further, we hypothesised that where P. aeruginosa is predominant, it is associated with a distinct 'accessory microbiota' that reflects a significant interaction between this pathogen and the wider bacterial community. To test these hypotheses, we analysed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data generated previously from 60 adult bronchiectasis patients, whose airway microbiota was dominated by either P. aeruginosa or H. influenzae. The relative abundances of the two dominant species in their respective groups were not significantly different, and when present in the opposite pathogen group the two species were found to be in very low abundance, if at all. These findings are consistent with strong competition effects, moving towards competitive exclusion. Ordination analysis indicated that the distribution of the core microbiota associated with each pathogen, readjusted after removal of the dominant species, was significantly divergent (analysis of similarity (ANOSIM), R=0.07, P=0.019). Taken together, these findings suggest that both interspecific competition and also direct and/or indirect interactions between the predominant species and the wider bacterial community may contribute to the predominance of P. aeruginosa in a subset of bronchiectasis lung infections.

  11. Use of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's extensive sputum-culturing protocol for patients without cystic fibrosis: implications for infection control and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has guidelines for culturing respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis. Pulmonary physicians were surveyed regarding their use of these extensive cystic fibrosis culture protocols for patients without cystic fibrosis. The survey results and a discussion of the implications of these practices are reported.

  12. Lysyl oxidase activity contributes to collagen stabilization during liver fibrosis progression and limits spontaneous fibrosis reversal in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Susan B; Ikenaga, Naoki; Peng, Zhen-Wei; Sverdlov, Deanna Y; Greenstein, Andrew; Smith, Victoria; Schuppan, Detlef; Popov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Collagen stabilization through irreversible cross-linking is thought to promote hepatic fibrosis progression and limit its reversibility. However, the mechanism of this process remains poorly defined. We studied the functional contribution of lysyl oxidase (LOX) to collagen stabilization and hepatic fibrosis progression/reversalin vivousing chronic administration of irreversible LOX inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, or vehicle as control) in C57Bl/6J mice with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis. Fibrotic matrix stability was directly assessed using a stepwise collagen extraction assay and fibrotic septae morphometry. Liver cells and fibrosis were studied by histologic, biochemical methods and quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. During fibrosis progression, BAPN administration suppressed accumulation of cross-linked collagens, and fibrotic septae showed widening and collagen fibrils splitting, reminiscent of remodeling signs observed during fibrosis reversal. LOX inhibition attenuated hepatic stellate cell activation markers and promoted F4/80-positive scar-associated macrophage infiltration without an increase in liver injury. In reversal experiments, BAPN-treated fibrotic mice demonstrated accelerated fibrosis reversal after CCl4withdrawal. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LOX contributes significantly to collagen stabilization in liver fibrosis, promotes fibrogenic activation of attenuated hepatic stellate cells, and limits fibrosis reversal. Our data support the concept of pharmacologic targeting of LOX pathway to inhibit liver fibrosis and promote its resolution.-Liu, S. B., Ikenaga, N., Peng, Z.-W., Sverdlov, D. Y., Greenstein, A., Smith, V., Schuppan, D., Popov, Y. Lysyl oxidase activity contributes to collagen stabilization during liver fibrosis progression and limits spontaneous fibrosis reversal in mice.

  13. Cadherin-11 Regulation of Fibrosis through Modulation of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Implications for Pulmonary Fibrosis in Scleroderma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    bleomycin displayed a reduction in lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis . Scale bars: 200 mm (H&E), 100 mm (MT); n= 8 mice per group Progress...the process of EMT. This proposal builds on these recent observations and utilizes the IP bleomycin pulmonary fibrosis model. We hypothesize that...Cad11 regulates the EMT in AEC during the development of pulmonary fibrosis and that cadherin-11 is therapeutic target in the intraperitoneal bleomycin

  14. Subepithelial fibrosis and degradation of the bronchial extracellular matrix in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Peyrol, S; Gindre, D; Bellon, G; Durand, D V; Pacheco, Y

    1998-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Chronic inflammation and proteolysis lead to progressive damage of the bronchial wall. Extracellular matrix determines the structural organization and the mechanical properties of lung airways. It was thus examined in nine patients with cystic fibrosis (six bronchial biopsies and three lobectomies) in order to assess its level of alteration. The submucosal changes in matrix protein distribution were analyzed by immunochemistry and electron microscopy: the subepithelial basal lamina was thinned; an acellular collagen fiber layer composed of interstitial collagens (types I and III) subtended by tenascin and devoid of elastin-associated microfibrils was deposited beneath the basal lamina; this dense fibrous deposit generally formed a thick layer and could extend into the bronchial wall; the bronchial elastic framework lost arborescent distribution and appeared slender, packed, or lacunar; ultrastructural observation gave evidence for elastic and collagenic fiber lysis. Proteolytic activity is probably the major cause of matrix degradation. Fibrosis appears as a repair process rather than as an active fibrogenesis. The reversibility of extracellular matrix alterations is an important challenge and various interventions such as anti-inflammatory treatments can be targeted to halt or reverse this degradation process.

  15. Mineralocorticoid excess, dietary sodium, and myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brilla, C G; Weber, K T

    1992-12-01

    Unlike the non-renin-dependent hypertension associated with infrarenal aorta banding, an abnormal accumulation of fibrillar collagen occurs within the adventitia of intramural coronary arteries and neighboring interstitial space of the left and right ventricles in arterial hypertension associated with primary or secondary hyperaldosteronism. Based on these findings it was suggested that this interstitial and perivascular fibrosis was mediated by mineralocorticoid excess (i.e., elevated plasma aldosterone relative to dietary sodium) and not ventricular loading. To further address the importance of mineralocorticoid excess, we examined the fibrous tissue response after 8 weeks in the following uninephrectomized rat groups receiving a high-sodium diet: D-aldosterone (ALDO) infusion (0.75 micrograms/hr sc, n = 16); deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) administration (100 mg/kg/wk sc, n = 8); and administration of a mineralocorticoid-like substance, glycyrrhizic acid (GA; 1 gm kg/wk sc, n = 8). Compared with ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation (n = 9), untreated controls (n = 14), and uninephrectomized rats with high dietary sodium and no mineralocorticoid administration (n = 15), we found (1) hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy with all forms of mineralocorticoid excess; (2) a rise in collagen volume fraction with ALDO, and an increase in perivascular collagen with DOCA; and (3) no observance of myocardial fibrosis with GA or experimental controls, including ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation. Thus, in the presence of enhanced sodium intake, chronic administration of ALDO or DOCA are associated with collagen accumulation in the myocardium, whereas with the mineralocorticoid-like compound GA, myocardial fibrosis was not seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Cystic fibrosis therapeutics: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lucas R; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco.

  17. [Berberine inhibits cardiac fibrosis of diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Shen, Yongjie; He, Jinfeng; Liu, Guoling; Song, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Objective To explore the effect of berberine on cardiac fibrosis of diabetic rats by observing the expressions of serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) , collagen type 1 (Col1) and collagen type 3 (Col3) in myocardial tissues of diabetic rats after berberine treatment. Methods The diabetic model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptococci (STZ). Forty-three diabetic rats were randomly divided into diabetic model group (n=9), berberine treated groups of different doses [50, 100, 150 mg/(kg.d), gavage administration for 12 weeks; n=9, 9, 8 respectively], and metformin group as positive control (n=8); other 8 normal rats served as a negative control group. After the last administration, fasting blood glucose, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were measured; rats' heart were taken to calculate the heart mass index (HMI); ELISA was used to detect the serum levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF; collagenous fibers in cardiac tissues were tested by Masson staining; collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by image analysis; Col1 and Col3 in cardiac tissues were determined by Western blotting. Results Compared with the normal control group, the fasting blood glucose, LVSP, LVEDP absolute value, HMI, the degree of cardiac fibrosis, the expressions of TGF-β1, CTGF, Col1 and Col3 significantly increased in the model group. All indexes mentioned above were reduced obviously in berberine treated groups of 100 and 150 mg/(kg.d). Conclusion Berberine improves cardiac fibrosis in diabetic rats through down-regulating the expressions of TGF-β1 and CTGF and reducing the synthesis and deposition of Col1 and Col3.

  18. [New therapeutic developments in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Bui, S; Macey, J; Fayon, M; Bihouée, T; Burgel, P-R; Colomb, V; Corvol, H; Durieu, I; Hubert, D; Marguet, C; Mas, E; Munck, A; Murris-Espin, M; Reix, P; Sermet-Gaudelus, I

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of chloride secretion by the Cystic Fibrosis Transport regulator CFTR in 1983, and CFTR gene in 1989, knowledge about CFTR synthesis, maturation, intracellular transfer and function has dramatically expanded. These discoveries have led to the distribution of CF mutations into 6 classes with different pathophysiological mechanisms. In this article we will explore the state of art on CFTR synthesis and its chloride secretion function. We will then explore the consequences of the 6 classes of mutations on CFTR protein function and we will describe the new therapeutic developments aiming at correcting these defects.

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Endomyocardial Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Andrea; Mocumbi, Ana Olga

    2017-02-01

    Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) remains an important cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy worldwide. Patients cluster in specific geographic locations and are almost universally living in extreme poverty. Specific etiology remains elusive and is likely multifactorial. Untreated EMF has a very poor prognosis. Medical management can mitigate symptoms for a time but has no curative benefit. Early surgical interventions may improve survival but are not readily available in most EMF-endemic regions. Increased awareness, advocacy, and research are needed to further understand this neglected tropical cardiomyopathy and to improve survival of those affected.

  20. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  1. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Anthony, Reshma M; McCray, Paul B

    2011-04-15

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation.

  2. [Congenital hepatic fibrosis: apropos of 12 cases].

    PubMed

    Murga, M L; Jara, P; Díaz, M C; de la Rubia, L; Arroba, M L; Larrauri, J; Vázquez, C

    1988-02-01

    Twelve patients with congenital hepatic fibrosis have been retrospectively studied and followed for 1 to 14 years. Clinical features, hepatic function tests and biopsy have been analyzed. Presence of portal hypertension and congenital malformation have been investigated. Clinical presentations varies from newborn to nine years of age without male or female predominance. Most frequent clinical form has been hypertensive type. Cholangitic type has worse prognosis. Familiar recurrence rate is 20%. Congenital malformations are associated in 92% most frequently infantile polycystic kidney disease. Hepatic biopsy has confirmed diagnosis in all patients.

  3. Influenza immunization in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adlard, P; Bryett, K

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen children with cystic fibrosis and aged between 5 and 13 years were randomized to receive two doses at monthly intervals of either a split-virion influenza vaccine (MFV-Ject, Institut Merieux) or a sub-unit vaccine (Fluvirin, Evans). In those completing the study, there was a satisfactory serological response. There was no statistically significant difference between the immunogenicity of the two vaccines as evaluated by haemagglutination inhibition or single radial haemolysis tests. The incidence of local side-effects was similar in the two groups.

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William B.; Sparks, Amy A.; Aris, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common inherited genetic respiratory disorder in the Western World. Hypovitaminosis D is almost universal in CF patients, likely due to a combination of inadequate absorption, impaired metabolism, and lack of sun exposure. Inadequate levels are associated with the high prevalence of bone disease or osteoporosis in CF patients, which is associated with increased morbidity including fractures, kyphosis, and worsening pulmonary status. Treatment goals include regular monitoring 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels with aggressive treatment for those with levels <75 nmol/L (<30 ng/mL). More research is needed to determine optimal supplementation goals and strategies. PMID:20148079

  5. Cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Ulrike; Dockter, Gerd; Lammert, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Liver disease is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis (CF). As new therapeutic options emerge, life expectancy increases and common hepatobiliary manifestations impact on quality of life and survival of CF patients. Hepatobiliary abnormalities in CF vary in nature and range from defects attributable to the underlying CFTR gene defect to those related to systemic disease and malnutrition. Today complications of liver disease represent the third most frequent cause of disease-related death in patients with CF. Here we review molecular and clinical genetics of CF, including genetic modifiers of CF-associated liver disease, and provide practical recommendations for genetic testing, diagnosis and treatment of hepatobiliary manifestations in CF.

  6. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults < 18.5 kg/m(2), and in children as percentiles of the body mass index. Worsening of the nutritional status is directly related with the decrease in lung function parameters and it has been proposed as a morbidity (and even mortality) predictive factor in people with cystic fibrosis, independently of the level of pulmonary dysfunction. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is present is approximately 70-90% of the patients with cystic fibrosis and the genotype-phenotype correlation is high. Most of the patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency tolerate a high-fat diet provided that they are treated with pancreatic enzymes at appropriate doses. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, reaching up 40% of the cases in patients older than 30 years. Clinical liver involvement is less prevalent (it approximately affects 1/3 of the patients). Other intestinal complications such as meconial ileus, gastroesophageal reflux, obstruction of the distal intestine, or fibrosing colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are

  7. Eating disorders in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raymond, N C; Chang, P N; Crow, S J; Mitchell, J E; Dieperink, B S; Beck, M M; Crosby, R D; Clawson, C C; Warwick, W J

    2000-06-01

    This study was designed to examine rates of eating disorders and psychopathology in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Fifty-eight CF patients and 43 healthy control participants were evaluated using structured psychiatric interviews and rating scales. Two control participants and no CF patients were diagnosed with an eating disorder. Additionally, 11 CF patients were diagnosed with one or more psychiatric disorders. Group means on the rating scales did not show clinically meaningful elevations in either group. These data indicate no evidence for elevated rates of eating disorders in CF patients. Similarly, rates of other psychiatric disorders in the CF group were not greater than the prevalence reported in the general population.

  8. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  9. [Effects of erdosteine on inflammation and fibrosis in rats with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin].

    PubMed

    Erden, Ersin Sükrü; Kirkil, Gamze; Deveci, Figen; Ilhan, Nevin; Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Turgut, Teyfik; Muz, Mehmet Hamdi

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the levels of some chemokines, inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, histopathological changes in lung tissue, to determine the effect of erdosteine on acute inflammatory changes and fibrosis in a rat fibrosis model induced by bleomycine (BLM). Forty-five Wistar male rats were taken into the study. On day 0, intratracheal saline to control group (group 1, n= 15), intratracheal BLM 7.5 U/kg to BLM (group 2, n= 15) and erdosteine group (group 3, n= 15) was administered. In group 3, oral erdosteine (10 mg/kg/day) was applied two days before BLM. On day 0, 14, and 29th five rats in each groups were sacrificed, BAL fluid was performed. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-2 levels in BAL fluid, hydroxyproline levels in lung tissue were measured. Histopathological examination was performed. When BLM group compared to erdosteine group, the levels of MDA, MIP-1alpha, MIP-2, and neutrophil counts, the hydroxyproline (OH-P) level of lung tissue were decreased in erdosteine group on acute inflammatory phase (day 14) (p< 0.001, p= 0.017, p= 0.009, p< 0.001, p= 0.009, respectively), and late fibrosis phase (day 29) except BAL MIP-2 (p= 0.022, p= 0.025, p= 0.01, p< 0.001, respectively). Fibrosis level was significantly lower in erdosteine group than BLM group on day 29 (p= 0.01). We conclude that erdosteine may prevent the acute lung inflammation and fibrosis by suppressing the accumulation of neutrophils, inhibition of lipid peroxydation, chemokine production, and release.

  10. Noninvasive markers of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Validating the European Liver Fibrosis Panel and exploring simple markers.

    PubMed

    Guha, Indra Neil; Parkes, Julie; Roderick, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Dipanker; Cross, Richard; Harris, Scott; Kaye, Philip; Burt, Alastair D; Ryder, Steve D; Aithal, Guruprasad P; Day, Christopher P; Rosenberg, William M

    2008-02-01

    The detection of fibrosis within nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is important for ascertaining prognosis and the stratification of patients for emerging therapeutic intervention. We validated the Original European Liver Fibrosis panel (OELF) and a simplified algorithm not containing age, the Enhanced Liver fibrosis panel (ELF), in an independent cohort of patients with NAFLD. Furthermore, we explored whether the addition of simple markers to the existing panel test could improve diagnostic performance. One hundred ninety-six consecutively recruited patients from 2 centers were included in the validation study. The diagnostic accuracy of the discriminant scores of the ELF panel, simple markers, and a combined panel were compared using receiver operator curves, predictive values, and a clinical utility model. The ELF panel had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90 for distinguishing severe fibrosis, 0.82 for moderate fibrosis, and 0.76 for no fibrosis. Simplification of the algorithm by removing age did not alter diagnostic performance. Addition of simple markers to the panel improved diagnostic performance with AUCs of 0.98, 0.93, and 0.84 for the detection of severe fibrosis, moderate fibrosis, and no fibrosis, respectively. The clinical utility model showed that 82% and 88% of liver biopsies could be potentially avoided for the diagnosis of severe fibrosis using ELF and the combined panel, respectively. The ELF panel has good diagnostic accuracy in an independent validation cohort of patients with NAFLD. The addition of established simple markers augments the diagnostic performance across different stages of fibrosis, which will potentially allow superior stratification of patients with NAFLD for emerging therapeutic strategies.

  11. Imatinib in the treatment of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sindhu; Petersen, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Charlotte; Fiorentino, David; Doeden, Katherine; Lafayette, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a disabling progressive condition that is being reported with increased frequency in patients with kidney disease. Treatment is extremely limited and largely supportive. We report a case of severe nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in a dialysis patient exposed to multiple doses of gadolinium who improved clinically and histologically with treatment with imatinib.

  12. Evolving strategies for liver fibrosis staging: Non-invasive assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stasi, Cristina; Milani, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Transient elastography and the acoustic radiation force impulse techniques may play a pivotal role in the study of liver fibrosis. Some studies have shown that elastography can detect both the progression and regression of fibrosis. Similarly, research results have been analysed and direct and indirect serum markers of hepatic fibrosis have shown high diagnostic accuracy for advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis. The prognosis of different stages of cirrhosis is well established and various staging systems have been proposed, largely based on clinical data. However, it is still unknown if either non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis or elastography may contribute to a more accurate staging of liver cirrhosis, in terms of prognosis and fibrosis regression after effective therapy. In fact, not enough studies have shown both the fibrosis regression in different cirrhosis stages and the point beyond which the prognosis does not change - even in the event of fibrosis regression. Therefore, future studies are needed to validate non-invasive methods in predicting the different phases of liver cirrhosis. PMID:28127192

  13. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40–OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  14. [Utility of Fibroscan in the evaluation of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Carrión, José A

    2009-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases produce a progressive accumulation of collagenous fiber in the liver parenchyma. For years, liver biopsy has been the gold standard to quantify liver fibrosis. Currently, non-invasive alternatives are available to quantify fibrosis. Transient elastography (TE) or Fibroscan quantifies liver rigidity, which is proportional to the grade of liver fibrosis. Studies are available that have evaluated the reliability and limitations of TE in healthy individuals, in patients with acute hepatitis, in distinct chronic liver diseases and in liver transplant recipients. TE is reliable for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (F4) and significant fibrosis (F2) but its values may vary according to the patient's characteristics and the etiology of the disease. TE can avoid liver biopsy in 90% of patients with cirrhosis and in up to 70% of those with significant fibrosis when combined with other non-invasive methods.

  15. Chinese medicines as a resource for liver fibrosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a condition of abnormal proliferation of connective tissue due to various types of chronic liver injury often caused by viral infection and chemicals. Effective therapies against liver fibrosis are still limited. In this review, we focus on research on Chinese medicines against liver fibrosis in three categories, namely pure compounds, composite formulae and combination treatment using single compounds with composite formulae or conventional medicines. Action mechanisms of the anti-fibrosis Chinese medicines, clinical application, herbal adverse events and quality control are also reviewed. Evidence indicates that some Chinese medicines are clinically effective on liver fibrosis. Strict quality control such as research to identify and monitor the manufacturing of Chinese medicines enables reliable pharmacological, clinical and in-depth mechanism studies. Further experiments and clinical trials should be carried out on the platforms that conform to international standards. PMID:19695098

  16. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

  17. Using ultrasound Nakagami imaging to assess liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Lin, Jen-Jen; Shu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Chang, King-Jen; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2012-02-01

    This study explored the feasibility of using the ultrasound Nakagami image to assess the degree of liver fibrosis in rats. The rat has been widely used as a model in investigations of liver fibrosis. Ultrasound grayscale imaging makes it possible to observe fibrotic rat livers in real time. Statistical analysis of the envelopes of signals backscattered from rat livers may provide useful clues about the degree of liver fibrosis. The Nakagami-model-based image has been shown to be useful for characterizing scatterers in tissues by reflecting the echo statistics, and hence the Nakagami image may serve as a functional imaging tool for quantifying rat liver fibrosis. To validate this idea, fibrosis was induced in each rat liver (n=21) by an intraperitoneal injection of 0.5% dimethylnitrosamine. Livers were excised from rats for in vitro ultrasound scanning using a single-element transducer. The backscattered-signal envelopes of the acquired raw ultrasound signals were used for Nakagami imaging. The Metavir score determined by a pathologist was used to histologically quantify the degree of liver fibrosis. It was found that the Nakagami image could be used to distinguish different degrees of liver fibrosis in rats, since the average Nakagami parameter increased from 0.55 to 0.83 as the fibrosis score increased from 0 (i.e., normal) to 4. This correlation may be due to liver fibrosis in rats involving an increase in the concentration of local scatterers and the appearance of the periodic structures or clustering of scatterers that would change the backscattering statistics. The current findings indicate that the ultrasound Nakagami image has great potential as a functional imaging tool to complement the use of the conventional B-scan in animal studies of liver fibrosis.

  18. Relationships among injury, fibrosis, and time in human kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Jeffery M.; Famulski, Konrad S.; Reeve, Jeff; Chang, Jessica; Halloran, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney transplant biopsies offer an opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. We studied the relationships between the time of biopsy after transplant (TxBx), histologic fibrosis, diseases, and transcript expression. METHODS. Expression microarrays from 681 kidney transplant indication biopsies taken either early (n = 282, <1 year) or late (n = 399, >1 year) after transplant were used to analyze the molecular landscape of fibrosis in relationship to histologic fibrosis and diseases. RESULTS. Fibrosis was absent at transplantation but was present in some early biopsies by 4 months after transplant, apparently as a self-limited response to donation implantation injury not associated with progression to failure. The molecular phenotype of early biopsies represented the time sequence of the response to wounding: immediate expression of acute kidney injury transcripts, followed by fibrillar collagen transcripts after several weeks, then by the appearance of immunoglobulin and mast cell transcripts after several months as fibrosis appeared. Fibrosis in late biopsies correlated with injury, fibrillar collagen, immunoglobulin, and mast cell transcripts, but these were independent of time. Pathway analysis revealed epithelial response-to-wounding pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin. CONCLUSION. Fibrosis in late biopsies had different associations because many kidneys had potentially progressive diseases and subsequently failed. Molecular correlations with fibrosis in late biopsies were independent of time, probably because ongoing injury obscured the response-to-wounding time sequence. The results indicate that fibrosis in kidney transplants is driven by nephron injury and that progression to failure reflects continuing injury, not autonomous fibrogenesis. TRIAL REGISTRATION. INTERCOM study (www.clinicalTrials.gov; NCT01299168). FUNDING. Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada. PMID:27699214

  19. Hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and cancer in elderly cadavers.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Kwong, Allison J; Chu, Edward; Hoo, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and cancer in the elderly population remains unknown. Human cadavers used in anatomy teaching, which come largely from older adults, may provide liver tissue for examining their pathologies. Livers were obtained from 68 cadavers (mean age 82.1 ± 10.4 years) with diverse causes of death in the Anatomy course at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Sirius red and evaluated for steatosis, fibrosis, cancer, and lipofuscin. Tissue preservation was graded as good in 38.2% of the embalmed livers, fair in 36.7%, and poor in 25.0%. Steatosis was observed in 35.3% of the livers, central vein fibrosis in 49.2%, perisinusoidal fibrosis in 63.2%, portal tract (PT) fibrosis in 47.0%, septa formation in 44.1%, bridging fibrosis in 30.8%, and cirrhosis in 4.4%. One hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and six metastatic tumors were detected. Lobular inflammation occurred in 20.8% of the livers and PT inflammation in 38.8%. Nine livers showed minimal change. Lipofuscin was detected in 60.2% of the livers. Steatosis, fibrosis, and cancer are highly prevalent in elderly cadavers with diverse causes of death. The prevalence of steatosis and fibrosis is consistent with the data in patients with specific liver diseases. Steatosis alongside fibrosis can accelerate the progression of fibrosis to cirrhosis and ultimately HCC. Though not indicated as the primary cause of death, the liver injury may have compromised hepatic functions and enhanced disease susceptibility, thereby exacerbating the health conditions in this elderly population.

  20. Caveolin-1 signaling in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tourkina, Elena; Hoffman, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a master regulator of several signaling cascades because it is able to bind to and thereby inhibit members of a variety of kinase families. While associated with caveolae and involved in their generation, caveolin-1 is also present at other sites. A variety of studies have suggested that caveolin-1 may be a useful therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases of the lung and other tissues because in these diseases a low level of caveolin-1 expression is associated with a high level of collagen expression and fibrosis. Reduced caveolin-1 expression is observed not only in the fibroblasts that secrete collagen, but also in epithelial cells and monocytes. This is intriguing because both epithelial cells and monocytes have been suggested to be precursors of fibroblasts. Likely downstream effects of loss of caveolin-1 in fibrosis include activation of TGF-β signaling and upregulation of CXCR4 in monocytes resulting in their enhanced migration into damaged tissue where its ligand CXCL12 is produced. Finally, it may be possible to target caveolin-1 in fibrotic diseases without the use of gene therapy. A caveolin-1 peptide (caveolin-1 scaffolding domain) has been identified that retains the function of the full-length molecule to inhibit kinases and that can be modified by addition of the Antennapedia internalization sequence to allow it to enter cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, S.; Chan, V. O.; Ridge, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:28250993

  2. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  4. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  5. [Vitamin E deficiency in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Polanco, I; Hernanz, A; Carrasco, S; Barea, I; Murga, M L; Arroba, M L; Codoceo, R

    1987-12-01

    Plasma vitamin E levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 42 children with cystic fibrosis and were correlated with the following parameters: sex, age, time of follow-up, clinical evolution (Schwachman score), vitamin E/cholesterol and faecal fat excretion. All children in this study received oral alfa-tocoferol (50-100 mg daily) from the diagnosis. According to the vitamin E level patients were distributed in two groups. Group I: 27 patients (64.3%) with normal concentrations. Group II: 15 patients (35.7%) with decreases plasma levels but without clinical manifestations. Steatorrhea was present in all children except 4 patients from group I and one patient from group II. On the other hand, vitamin E/cholesterol was normal in 80% of patients with vitamin E deficiency (group II). We did not find any correlation between plasma vitamin E levels and the different clinical and biological parameters studied. Further studies should be carried out to throw more light on the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of vitamin E deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Comparative biology of cystic fibrosis animal models.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are critical for dissecting mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapies. In the context of cystic fibrosis (CF), mouse models have been the dominant species by which to study CF disease processes in vivo for the past two decades. Although much has been learned through these CF mouse models, limitations in the ability of this species to recapitulate spontaneous lung disease and several other organ abnormalities seen in CF humans have created a need for additional species on which to study CF. To this end, pig and ferret CF models have been generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and are currently being characterized. These new larger animal models have phenotypes that appear to closely resemble human CF disease seen in newborns, and efforts to characterize their adult phenotypes are ongoing. This chapter will review current knowledge about comparative lung cell biology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biology among mice, pigs, and ferrets that has implications for CF disease modeling in these species. We will focus on methods used to compare the biology and function of CFTR between these species and their relevance to phenotypes seen in the animal models. These cross-species comparisons and the development of both the pig and the ferret CF models may help elucidate pathophysiologic mechanisms of CF lung disease and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  7. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: emerging concepts on pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thannickal, Victor J; Flaherty, Kevin R; Martinez, Fernando J; Lynch, Joseph P

    2004-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fibrosing disease of the distal air spaces of the lung of unknown aetiology. IPF is usually fatal with a median survival of < 3 years. There are currently no effective pharmacotherapeutic agents for the treatment of IPF. In this review, unifying concepts on the pathogenesis of IPF based on understanding of host responses to tissue injury are presented. These host responses involve tightly regulated and contextually orchestrated inflammatory and repair processes. Dysregulation of either of these processes can lead to pathological outcomes. Fibrosis results from an exaggerated or dysregulated repair process that proceeds 'uncontrolled' even after inflammatory responses have subsided. Disease heterogeneity may arise when inflammation and repair are in different (dys)regulatory phases, thus accounting for regional disparity. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), the histopathological correlate of clinical IPF, represents a more fibrotic tissue reaction pattern and for which anti-inflammatory agents are ineffective. Emerging 'antifibrotic' drugs and strategies for UIP/IPF are discussed. The importance of accurately phenotyping a highly heterogeneous disease process that may require individualised and 'combined' therapies is emphasised.

  9. Exhaled breath condensate pH and ammonia in cystic fibrosis and response to treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Newport, Sharon; Amin, Nikhil; Dozor, Allen J

    2009-09-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH reflects the acid-base homeostasis of the airway lining fluid and is up to 3 log order lower in various inflammatory lung diseases including asthma, COPD, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis (CF) than in normal controls. The aim of this study was to confirm this finding in CF and determine if there was a significant change in EBC pH after treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation. Ten subjects with CF and a pulmonary exacerbation, and 10 healthy age-matched control subjects were studied. EBC was collected at the onset of an acute pulmonary exacerbation and after treatment with intravenous antibiotics (median duration: 14 days (interquartile range, IQR): 12-14) when the exacerbation was considered resolved. The median age for CF patients was 15.9 years (IQR: 13-18.8), compared to 18 years (IQR: 15-24.8) for the control group, P = 0.242. All CF subjects had severe lung disease, median FEV(1) = 41.5% of predicted (IQR: 30.8-46.5%). Median EBC pH in CF subjects at the onset of a pulmonary exacerbation was 6.61 (IQR: 6.17-7.91) compared to median EBC pH of 8.14 (IQR: 7.45-9.08) in the control group, P < 0.02. Median EBC pH after resolution of an exacerbation was 7.02 (IQR: 5.8-8.64), not significantly different (P = 0.667) than during the acute exacerbation. EBC pH decreased in five subjects, increased in three subjects and there was no change in two subjects. There was no correlation between EBC pH and FEV(1) either before or after intravenous antibiotics. EBC ammonia, an important buffer of ASL, was also measured and similarly found to be lower than in normal controls. EBC pH is lower in CF than age-matched controls, and did not change consistently in response to treatment of an acute pulmonary exacerbation.

  10. Enteral tube feeding for individuals with cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation evidence-informed guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Hempstead, Sarah E; McDonald, Catherine M; Powers, Scott W; Wooldridge, Jamie; Blair, Shaina; Freedman, Steven; Harrington, Elaine; Murphy, Peter J; Palmer, Lena; Schrader, Amy E; Shiel, Kyle; Sullivan, Jillian; Wallentine, Melissa; Marshall, Bruce C; Leonard, Amanda Radmer

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition is integral to the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Better nutritional status is associated with improved pulmonary function. In some individuals with CF, enteral tube feeding can be useful in achieving optimal nutritional status. Current nutrition guidelines do not include detailed recommendations for enteral tube feeding. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened an expert panel to develop enteral tube feeding recommendations based on a systematic review of the evidence and expert opinion. These guidelines address when to consider enteral tube feeding, assessment of confounding causes of poor nutrition in CF, preparation of the patient for placement of the enteral feeding tube, management of the tube after placement and education about enteral feeding. These recommendations are intended to guide the CF care team, individuals with CF, and their families through the enteral tube feeding process.

  11. Fibro/adipogenic progenitors safeguard themselves: a novel mechanism to reduce fibrosis is discovered.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Osvaldo; Brandan, Enrique

    2016-12-20

    PDGFRα regulates several cellular processes, and exacerbated PDGF signaling cause fibrosis in different tissues. Different research groups have shown that fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) are responsible for pathological fibrosis found in skeletal muscle disorders. Rando's Lab describes that an intronic polyadenylation of Pdgfra regulates FAPs activity, and therefore fibrosis. This discovery opens a new potential target for treating fibrosis.

  12. Mechanisms of initiation and progression of intestinal fibrosis in IBD.

    PubMed

    Latella, Giovanni; Di Gregorio, Jacopo; Flati, Vincenzo; Rieder, Florian; Lawrance, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a common complication of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). It becomes clinically apparent in >30% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and in about 5% with ulcerative colitis (UC). Fibrosis is a consequence of local chronic inflammation and is characterized by excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition. ECM is produced by activated myofibroblasts, which are modulated by both, profibrotic and antifibrotic factors. Fibrosis depends on the balance between the production and degradation of ECM proteins. This equilibrium can be impacted by a complex and dynamic interaction between profibrotic and antifibrotic mediators. Despite the major therapeutic advances in the treatment of active inflammation in IBD over the past two decades, the incidence of intestinal strictures in CD has not significantly changed as the current anti-inflammatory therapies neither prevent nor reverse the established fibrosis and strictures. This implies that control of intestinal inflammation does not necessarily affect the associated fibrotic process. The conventional view that intestinal fibrosis is an inevitable and irreversible process in patients with IBD is also gradually changing in light of an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Comprehension of the mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis is thus vital and may pave the way for the developments of antifibrotic agents and new therapeutic approaches in IBD.

  13. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  14. Effects of Heterogeneous Diffuse Fibrosis on Arrhythmia Dynamics and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazbanov, Ivan V.; Ten Tusscher, Kirsten H. W. J.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is an important risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias. Previous experimental and numerical studies have shown that the texture and spatial distribution of fibrosis may play an important role in arrhythmia onset. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis affects arrhythmia onset using numerical methods. We generate various tissue textures that differ by the mean amount of fibrosis, the degree of heterogeneity and the characteristic size of heterogeneity. We study the onset of arrhythmias using a burst pacing protocol. We confirm that spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis increases the probability of arrhythmia induction. This effect is more pronounced with the increase of both the spatial size and the degree of heterogeneity. The induced arrhythmias have a regular structure with the period being mostly determined by the maximal local fibrosis level. We perform ablations of the induced fibrillatory patterns to classify their type. We show that in fibrotic tissue fibrillation is usually of the mother rotor type but becomes of the multiple wavelet type with increase in tissue size. Overall, we conclude that the most important factor determining the formation and dynamics of arrhythmia in heterogeneous fibrotic tissue is the value of maximal local fibrosis.

  15. Commensal microbiota is hepatoprotective and prevents liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mazagova, Magdalena; Wang, Lirui; Anfora, Andrew T.; Wissmueller, Max; Lesley, Scott A.; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars; Dhungana, Suraj; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Sumner, Susan; Westwater, Caroline; Brenner, David A.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of bacteria and their products across the intestinal barrier is common in patients with liver disease, and there is evidence that experimental liver fibrosis depends on bacterial translocation. The purpose of our study was to investigate liver fibrosis in conventional and germ-free (GF) C57BL/6 mice. Chronic liver injury was induced by administration of thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water for 21 wk or by repeated intraperitoneal injections of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Increased liver fibrosis was observed in GF mice compared with conventional mice. Hepatocytes showed more toxin-induced oxidative stress and cell death. This was accompanied by increased activation of hepatic stellate cells, but hepatic mediators of inflammation were not significantly different. Similarly, a genetic model using Myd88/Trif-deficient mice, which lack downstream innate immunity signaling, had more severe fibrosis than wild-type mice. Isolated Myd88/Trif-deficient hepatocytes were more susceptible to toxin-induced cell death in culture. In conclusion, the commensal microbiota prevents fibrosis upon chronic liver injury in mice. This is the first study describing a beneficial role of the commensal microbiota in maintaining liver homeostasis and preventing liver fibrosis.—Mazagova, M., Wang, L., Anfora, A. T., Wissmueller, M., Lesley, S. A., Miyamoto, Y., Eckmann, L., Dhungana, S., Pathmasiri, W., Sumner, S., Westwater, C., Brenner, D. A., Schnabl, B. Commensal microbiota is hepatoprotective and prevents liver fibrosis in mice. PMID:25466902

  16. AMPK in cardiac fibrosis and repair: Actions beyond metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Dufeys, Cécile; Bertrand, Luc; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine

    2016-02-01

    Fibrosis is a general term encompassing a plethora of pathologies that span all systems and is marked by increased deposition of collagen. Injury of variable etiology gives rise to complex cascades involving several cell-types and molecular signals, leading to the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix that promotes fibrosis and eventually leads to organ failure. Cardiac fibrosis is a dynamic process associated notably with ischemia, hypertrophy, volume- and pressure-overload, aging and diabetes mellitus. It has profoundly deleterious consequences on the normal architecture and functioning of the myocardium and is associated with considerable mortality and morbidity. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitously expressed cellular energy sensor and an essential component of the adaptive response to cardiomyocyte stress that occurs during ischemia. Nevertheless, its actions extend well beyond its energy-regulating role and it appears to possess an essential role in regulating fibrosis of the myocardium. In this review paper, we will summarize the main elements and crucial players of cardiac fibrosis. In addition, we will provide an overview of the diverse roles of AMPK in the heart and discuss in detail its implication in cardiac fibrosis. Lastly, we will highlight the recently published literature concerning AMPK-targeting current therapy and novel strategies aiming to attenuate fibrosis.

  17. Effects of leflunomide on inflamation and fibrosis in bleomycine induced pulmonary fibrosis in wistar albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Guzel, Aygul; Duran, Latif; Tutuncu, Serife; Guzel, Ahmet; Gunaydın, Mithat; Salis, Osman; Okuyucu, Ali; Selcuk, Mustafa Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Purposes Pulmonary fibrosis is a rare and progressive lung disease with a high mortality rate. The treatment regimens still fail to recover the disease. Leflunomide (LEF) is an immunomodulatory agent with antiproliferative activity that is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the potential therapeutic efficacy of LEF in bleomycin (BLM) induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods A total of 21 male, adult wistar albino rats were used. The animals were divided into three groups as control, BLM and BLM plus LEF groups (n=7). In BLM group, mice were treated with intratracheal instillation of BLM (2.5 U/kg). Control group received the same volume of saline instead of BLM. In LEF group, in addition to BLM, LEF (10 mg/kg, daily) was administrated by oral gavage. The effect of LEF on pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was studied by measurements of serum clara cell protein-16 (CC-16), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) levels and lung tissue contents of IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB by immunhistochemical examinations. Results LEF significantly increased the level of CC-16 and decreased the level of AOPP (P=0.042 and P=0.003 respectively). Lung tissue contents of IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB significantly decreased in LEF group compared to BLM group by immunhistochemical examinations (P<0.001). Conclusions LEF reduces oxidative stress factors, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis. PMID:24255778

  18. Glycolytic Reprogramming in Myofibroblast Differentiation and Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Na; Tan, Zheng; Banerjee, Sami; Cui, Huachun; Ge, Jing; Liu, Rui-Ming; Bernard, Karen; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Dysregulation of cellular metabolism has been shown to participate in several pathologic processes. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming is not well appreciated in the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. Objectives: To determine if glycolytic reprogramming participates in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and assess the therapeutic potential of glycolytic inhibition in treating lung fibrosis. Methods: A cell metabolism assay was performed to determine glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration. Lactate levels were measured to assess glycolysis in fibroblasts and lungs. Glycolytic inhibition by genetic and pharmacologic approaches was used to demonstrate the critical role of glycolysis in lung fibrosis. Measurements and Main Results: Augmentation of glycolysis is an early and sustained event during myofibroblast differentiation, which is dependent on the increased expression of critical glycolytic enzymes, in particular, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3). Augmented glycolysis contributes to the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α, a master regulator of glycolytic enzymes implicated in organ fibrosis, by increasing cellular levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate succinate in lung myofibroblasts. Inhibition of glycolysis by the PFKFB3 inhibitor 3PO or genomic disruption of the PFKFB3 gene blunted the differentiation of lung fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, and attenuated profibrotic phenotypes in myofibroblasts isolated from the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3PO demonstrates therapeutic benefit in bleomycin-induced and transforming growth factor-β1–induced lung fibrosis in mice. Conclusions: Our data support the novel concept of glycolytic reprogramming in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and provide proof-of-concept that targeting this pathway may be efficacious in treating fibrotic disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26284610

  19. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  20. Blood Gene Expression Profiling of Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Landmark-Hoyvik, Hege; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Reinertsen, Kristin V.; Edvardsen, Hege; Fossa, Sophie D.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To extend knowledge on the mechanisms and pathways involved in maintenance of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by performing gene expression profiling of whole blood from breast cancer (BC) survivors with and without fibrosis 3-7 years after end of radiotherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles from blood were obtained for 254 BC survivors derived from a cohort of survivors, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer 3-7 years earlier. Analyses of transcriptional differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with fibrosis (n = 31) and BC survivors without fibrosis (n = 223) were performed using R version 2.8.0 and tools from the Bioconductor project. Gene sets extracted through a literature search on fibrosis and breast cancer were subsequently used in gene set enrichment analysis. Results: Substantial differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with and without fibrosis were observed, and 87 differentially expressed genes were identified through linear analysis. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 signaling was identified as the most significant gene set, showing a down-regulation of most of the core genes, together with up-regulation of a transcriptional activator of the inhibitor of fibrinolysis, Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in the BC survivors with fibrosis. Conclusion: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 signaling was found down-regulated during the maintenance phase of fibrosis as opposed to the up-regulation reported during the early, initiating phase of fibrosis. Hence, once the fibrotic tissue has developed, the maintenance phase might rather involve a deregulation of fibrinolysis and altered degradation of extracellular matrix components.

  1. [Airway clearance techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome : 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Opdekamp, C

    2011-09-01

    For many years the airway clearance techniques used in chest physical therapy were assimilated with the singular technique of postural drainage, percussions and vibrations. However the side effects and counter indications and the lack of scientific proof regarding this technique have forced reflection and development of other techniques more comfortable and without deleterious effects. If all these techniques show a high efficiency in terms of improved mucociliary clearance, the literature is unanimous on how little effect these techniques have in the short and the long-term with regards to lung function and arterial blood gases. In view of the scientific literature, it is clear that the airway clearance techniques don't have the same recognition concerning their efficiency in all obstructive pulmonary diseases. As the cornerstone in the management of cystic fibrosis, the efficiency of the bronchial hygiene techniques are in general poorly documented in the management of the non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, bronchitis or emphysema. The use of the chest physical therapy seems more to do with the interpretation of the imagery and symptomatology. The airway clearance techniques should be individualised according to symptoms, the amount of expectorated mucus and the objectives signs of secretions retention or subjective signs of difficulty expectorating secretions with progression of the disease.

  2. The potential of liposome-encapsulated ciprofloxacin as a tularemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Karleigh A; Wong, Jonathan P; Blanchard, James D; Atkins, Helen S

    2014-01-01

    Liposome-encapsulation has been suggested as method to improve the efficacy of ciprofloxacin against the intracellular pathogen, Francisella tularensis. Early work with a prototype formulation, evaluated for use against the F. tularensis live vaccine strain, showed that a single dose of liposomal ciprofloxacin given by the intranasal or inhalational route could provide protection in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. Liposomal ciprofloxacin offered better protection than ciprofloxacin given by the same routes. Liposomal ciprofloxacin has been further developed by Aradigm Corporation for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. This advanced development formulation is safe, effective and well tolerated in human clinical trials. Further evaluation of the advanced liposomal ciprofloxacin formulation against the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain has shown that aerosolized CFI (Ciprofloxacin encapsulated in liposomes for inhalation) provides significantly better protection than oral ciprofloxacin. Thus, liposomal ciprofloxacin is a promising treatment for tularemia and further research with the aim of enabling licensure under the animal rule is warranted.

  3. Macrolide antibiotics and the risk of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K; Schuller, Joseph L

    2014-05-15

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended.

  4. Lung transplantation: overall approach regarding its major aspects

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Afonso, José Eduardo; Costa, André Nathan; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a well-established treatment for patients with advanced lung disease. The evaluation of a candidate for transplantation is a complex task and involves a multidisciplinary team that follows the patient beyond the postoperative period. Currently, the mean time on the waiting list for lung transplantation in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is approximately 18 months. For Brazil as a whole, data from the Brazilian Organ Transplant Association show that, in 2014, there were 67 lung transplants and 204 patients on the waiting list for lung transplantation. Lung transplantation is most often indicated in cases of COPD, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and pulmonary hypertension. This comprehensive review aimed to address the major aspects of lung transplantation: indications, contraindications, evaluation of transplant candidates, evaluation of donor candidates, management of transplant recipients, and major complications. To that end, we based our research on the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines and on the protocols used by our Lung Transplant Group in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26785965

  5. Liver fibrosis identification based on ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guitao; Shi, Pengfei; Hu, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is one of useful and noninvasive tools for clinical medicine. However, due to its qualitative, subjective and experience-based nature, ultrasound images can be influenced by image conditions such as scanning frequency and machine settings. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to extract the liver features using the joint features of fractal dimension and the entropies of texture edge co-occurrence matrix based on ultrasound images, which is not sensitive to changes in emission frequency and gain. Then, Fisher linear classifier and Support Vector Machine are employed to test on a group of 99 liver fibrosis images from 18 patients, as well as other 273 healthy liver images from 18 specimens.

  6. Nutrition and growth in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hankard, Régis; Munck, Anne; Navarro, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic diseases in children and may lead to growth impairment (stunting). Malnutrition in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from increased energy expenditure, decreased energy intakes, malabsorption of ingested nutrients because of pancreatic insufficiency and chronic inflammation. Malnutrition and high levels of inflammatory cytokines affect IGF-1 production through interrelated mechanisms. Nutritional support was shown to improve both nutritional status and outcome in CF. However, some nutrients have a direct effect on the disease. n-3 fatty acids supplementation is able to correct lipid abnormalities resulting from a primary mechanism. Moreover, n-3 fatty acids have a direct effect on the inflammatory response, decreasing eicosanoid synthesis and modulating nuclear transcriptional factors nuclear factor kappaB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma. Nutritional support may be considered part of the care of the CF patient together with antibiotics, pancreatic enzymes and physiotherapy, influencing significantly the evolution of the disease.

  7. High dose Nutrizym 22 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Dinwiddie, R; Madge, S; Prescott, P; Hudson, G

    1993-09-01

    New high dose pancreatic enzyme preparations could be potentially helpful to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the new high dose pancreatic enzyme preparation, Nutrizym 22 with the standard preparation Nutrizym GR. Twenty-five CF children (aged 7-16 years) entered the study and 22 completed it; 3 did not, due to non-compliance. All were taking Nutrizym GR for at least 2 weeks before entering the study. A randomised double blind, crossover method using standard Nutrizym GR or double strength Nutrizym 22 capsules was carried out over two consecutive 14-day periods. Crossover analyses of variance showed no statistically significant differences in actual weight gain, appetite, abdominal pain, stool consistency or faecal fat during the prestudy and study periods. It is concluded that half the capsule numbers of the high strength preparation are just as effective as the standard capsule dosage.

  8. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Anthony, Reshma M.; McCray, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation. PMID:21422098

  9. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  10. Myocardial fibrosis in an veteran endurance athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mathew; O'Hanlon, Rory; Prasad, Sanjay; Basavarajaiah, Sandeep; Stephens, Nigel; Senior, Roxy; Shaw, Anthony; Sharma, Sanjay; Whyte, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the cardiac structure and function of a lifelong male endurance athlete, who has run over 148 000 miles, who presented with symptoms of chest discomfort, dyspnoea and loss of competitive running performance. Importantly, the athlete documented several periods of regular intensive endurance activity while suffering with flu-like symptoms. Cardiovascular MRI demonstrated a pattern of late gadolinium enhancement, which indicated myocardial scarring as a result of previous myocarditis. Myocarditis is a non-ischaemic inflammatory disease of the myocardium associated with cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmogenic substrate. The clinical course of viral myocarditis is mostly insidious with limited cardiac inflammation and dysfunction. However, as in the present case, overwhelming inflammation may occur in a subset of patients leading to myocardial fibrosis due to recurrent inflammation. PMID:21847425

  11. Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Harold R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Brown, Kevin K.; Kaner, Robert J.; King, Talmadge E.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Loyd, James E.; Noth, Imre; Olman, Mitchell A.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Ryu, Jay H.; Zisman, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Colby, Thomas V.; Egan, Jim J.; Hansell, David M.; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lynch, David A.; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Myers, Jeffrey L.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Selman, Moisés; Toews, Galen B.; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been characterized as a steady, predictable decline in lung function over time. Recent evidence suggests that some patients may experience a more precipitous course, with periods of relative stability followed by acute deteriorations in respiratory status. Many of these acute deteriorations are of unknown etiology and have been termed acute exacerbations of IPF. This perspective is the result of an international effort to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding acute exacerbations of IPF. Acute exacerbations of IPF are defined as acute, clinically significant deteriorations of unidentifiable cause in patients with underlying IPF. Proposed diagnostic criteria include subjective worsening over 30 days or less, new bilateral radiographic opacities, and the absence of infection or another identifiable etiology. The potential pathobiological roles of infection, disordered cell biology, coagulation, and genetics are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. PMID:17585107

  12. Other mucoactive agents for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bye, Peter T P; Elkins, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    This review examines specific mucoactive agents from three classes: expectorants, which add water to the airway; ion-transport modifiers, which promote ion and water transport across the epithelium of the airway; and mucokinetics, which improve cough-mediated clearance by increasing airflow or reducing sputum adhesivity. The agents are isotonic and hypertonic saline, mannitol, denufosol and beta-agonists. Our understanding of these agents has recently improved through pre-clinical research, clinical trials and, in particular, extensive research into the nature of the liquid lining the surface of the airway, both in health and in cystic fibrosis (CF). For each agent, recent research is reviewed, highlighting the evidence for possible mechanisms of action and for clinical efficacy in CF, as well as the implications for the optimal clinical application of the agent.

  13. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Early detection and referral

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Noth, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a devastating progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) with no known cause or cure, is the most common and deadly of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. With a median survival of 3–5 years following diagnosis, IPF is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and quality of life in most patients. Vigilance among clinicians in recognizing IPF early in the disease course remains critical to properly caring for these patients, as this provides the widest range of management options. When IPF is suspected, a multidisciplinary evaluation (MDE) by a clinician, radiologist and pathologist with ILD expertise should occur, as this improves diagnostic agreement in both community and academic settings. When community MDE is not possible, or diagnostic doubt exists, referral to an ILD center should be considered. ILD center referral may also provide access specialized care, including clinical trials and lung transplantation, and should be considered for any patient with an established diagnosis of IPF. PMID:24746629

  14. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: treatment of pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Flume, Patrick A; Mogayzel, Peter J; Robinson, Karen A; Goss, Christopher H; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Kuhn, Robert J; Marshall, Bruce C

    2009-11-01

    The natural history of cystic fibrosis lung disease is one of chronic progression with intermittent episodes of acute worsening of symptoms frequently called acute pulmonary exacerbations These exacerbations typically warrant medical intervention. It is important that appropriate therapies are recommended on the basis of available evidence of efficacy and safety. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation therefore established a committee to define the key questions related to pulmonary exacerbations, review the clinical evidence using an evidence-based methodology, and provide recommendations to clinicians. It is hoped that these guidelines will be helpful to clinicians in the treatment of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

  15. Hepatic Fibrosis: Evaluation with Semiquantitative Contrast-enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Varenika, Vanja; Fu, Yanjun; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Gao, Dongwei; Kakar, Sanjay; Cabarrus, Miguel C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using contrast material–enhanced computed tomographic (CT) measurements of hepatic fractional extracellular space (fECS) and macromolecular contrast material (MMCM) uptake to measure severity of liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods: All procedures were approved by and executed in accordance with University of California, San Francisco, institutional animal care and use committee regulations. Twenty-one rats that received intragastric CCl4 for 0–12 weeks were imaged with respiratory-gated micro-CT by using both a conventional contrast material and a novel iodinated MMCM. Histopathologic hepatic fibrosis was graded qualitatively by using the Ishak fibrosis score and quantitatively by using morphometry of the fibrosis area. Hepatic fECS and MMCM uptake were calculated for each examination and correlated with histopathologic findings by using uni- and multivariate linear regressions. Results: Ishak fibrosis scores ranged from a baseline of 0 in untreated animals to a maximum of 5. Histopathologic liver fibrosis area increased from 0.46% to 3.5% over the same interval. Strong correlations were seen between conventional contrast-enhanced CT measurements of fECS and both the Ishak fibrosis scores (R2 = 0.751, P < .001) and the fibrosis area (R2 = 0.801, P < .001). Strong negative correlations were observed between uptake of MMCM in the liver and Ishak fibrosis scores (R2 = 0.827, P < .001), as well as between uptake of MMCM in the liver and fibrosis area (R2 = 0.643, P = .001). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed a trend toward independence for fECS and MMCM uptake in the prediction of Ishak fibrosis scores, with an R2 value of 0.86 (P = .081 and P = .033, respectively). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT measurements of fECS and MMCM uptake are individually capable of being used to estimate the degree of early hepatic fibrosis in a rat model. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  16. Recent advances in understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Daccord, Cécile; Maher, Toby M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite major research efforts leading to the recent approval of pirfenidone and nintedanib, the dismal prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unchanged. The elaboration of international diagnostic criteria and disease stratification models based on clinical, physiological, radiological, and histopathological features has improved the accuracy of IPF diagnosis and prediction of mortality risk. Nevertheless, given the marked heterogeneity in clinical phenotype and the considerable overlap of IPF with other fibrotic interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), about 10% of cases of pulmonary fibrosis remain unclassifiable. Moreover, currently available tools fail to detect early IPF, predict the highly variable course of the disease, and assess response to antifibrotic drugs. Recent advances in understanding the multiple interrelated pathogenic pathways underlying IPF have identified various molecular phenotypes resulting from complex interactions among genetic, epigenetic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic, and environmental factors. These different disease endotypes appear to confer variable susceptibility to the condition, differing risks of rapid progression, and, possibly, altered responses to therapy. The development and validation of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are necessary to enable a more precise and earlier diagnosis of IPF and to improve prediction of future disease behaviour. The availability of approved antifibrotic therapies together with potential new drugs currently under evaluation also highlights the need for biomarkers able to predict and assess treatment responsiveness, thereby allowing individualised treatment based on risk of progression and drug response. This approach of disease stratification and personalised medicine is already used in the routine management of many cancers and provides a potential road map for guiding clinical care in IPF. PMID:27303645

  17. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Skolimowski, M.; Weiss Nielsen, M.; Abeille, F.; Skafte-Pedersen, P.; Sabourin, D.; Fercher, A.; Papkovsky, D.; Molin, S.; Taboryski, R.; Sternberg, C.; Dufva, M.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-01-01

    A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23908680

  18. Endomyocardial fibrosis: still a mystery after 60 years.

    PubMed

    Bukhman, Gene; Ziegler, John; Parry, Eldryd

    2008-02-27

    The pathologist Jack N. P. Davies identified endomyocardial fibrosis in Uganda in 1947. Since that time, reports of this restrictive cardiomyopathy have come from other parts of tropical Africa, South Asia, and South America. In Kampala, the disease accounts for 20% of heart disease patients referred for echocardiography. We conducted a systematic review of research on the epidemiology and etiology of endomyocardial fibrosis. We relied primarily on articles in the MEDLINE database with either "endomyocardial fibrosis" or "endomyocardial sclerosis" in the title. The volume of publications on endomyocardial fibrosis has declined since the 1980s. Despite several hypotheses regarding cause, no account of the etiology of this disease has yet fully explained its unique geographical distribution.

  19. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  20. The wound healing, chronic fibrosis, and cancer progression triad

    PubMed Central

    Rybinski, Brad; Franco-Barraza, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    For decades tumors have been recognized as “wounds that do not heal.” Besides the commonalities that tumors and wounded tissues share, the process of wound healing also portrays similar characteristics with chronic fibrosis. In this review, we suggest a tight interrelationship, which is governed as a concurrence of cellular and microenvironmental reactivity among wound healing, chronic fibrosis, and cancer development/progression (i.e., the WHFC triad). It is clear that the same cell types, as well as soluble and matrix elements that drive wound healing (including regeneration) via distinct signaling pathways, also fuel chronic fibrosis and tumor progression. Hence, here we review the relationship between fibrosis and cancer through the lens of wound healing. PMID:24520152

  1. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  2. Mechanisms of Accelerated Liver Fibrosis Progression during HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Debes, Jose D.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dramatic reduction in HIV-related morbidity and mortality has been observed. However, it is now becoming increasingly clear that liver-related complications, particularly rapid fibrosis development from ART as well as from the chronic HIV infection itself, are of serious concern to HIV patients. The pathophysiology of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV is a multifactorial process whereby persistent viral replication, and bacterial translocation lead to chronic immune activation and inflammation, which ART is unable to fully suppress, promoting production of fibrinogenic mediators and fibrosis. In addition, mitochondrial toxicity, triggered by both ART and HIV, contributes to intrahepatic damage, which is even more severe in patients co-infected with viral hepatitis. In recent years, new insights into the mechanisms of accelerated fibrosis and liver disease progression in HIV has been obtained, and these are detailed and discussed in this review. PMID:28097102

  3. Hepatitis virus C infection, adipokines and hepatic steato-fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ciurtin, Coziana; Stoica, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato-fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus-induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy.

  4. Evaluation of liver fibrosis: "Something old, something new…".

    PubMed

    Almpanis, Zannis; Demonakou, Maria; Tiniakos, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrogenesis may gradually result to cirrhosis due to the accumulation of extracellular matrix components as a response to liver injury. Thus, therapeutic decisions in chronic liver disease, regardless of the cause, should first and foremost be guided by an accurate quantification of hepatic fibrosis. Detection and assessment of the extent of hepatic fibrosis represent a challenge in modern Hepatology. Although traditional histological staging systems remain the "best standard", they are not able to quantify liver fibrosis as a dynamic process and may not accurately substage cirrhosis. This review aims to compare the currently used non-invasive methods of measuring liver fibrosis and provide an update in current tissue-based digital techniques developed for this purpose, that may prove of value in daily clinical practice.

  5. Noninvasive Measures of Liver Fibrosis and Severity of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Catherine; Brown, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the degree of fibrosis is an important step in the assessment of disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. Liver biopsy has been the gold standard for estimating the extent of inflammation and fibrosis, although the procedure has limitations such as sampling error and variability. Noninvasive testing has been shown to be equally predictive in ruling out fibrosis or ruling in advanced fibrosis. Serum biomarkers and imaging-based tests have more limited predictive ability when classifying intermediate stages, but these tools can help identify which patients should receive antiviral treatment sooner and require ongoing cancer surveillance without the need for biopsy. Using a combination of serum markers and imaging tests may also be helpful in providing functional assessment of portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:27330502

  6. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4Rα, myeloid specific IL-4Rα, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  7. Gallium-67 imaging and computed tomography in early retroperitoneal fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowich, S.; Tumeh, S.S.

    1988-11-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is characterized by symptoms associated with gradual compression of retroperitoneal structures. This case report demonstrates the use of Ga-67 imaging and CT in the early diagnostic work-up of this disorder.

  8. HEPATITIS VIRUS C INFECTION, ADIPOKINES AND HEPATIC STEATO–FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ciurtin, C

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C viral infection is accompanied by various serum alterations that could explain its molecular impact on hepatic structure and metabolic homeostasis. Recently it has been shown that adipocytokines play a pivotal role in development of hepatic steato–fibrosis, different studies giving a support of the hypothesis that the balance of adipocytokine expression is a key regulator for the progression of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. The association between insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus genotypes and liver fibrosis stage foreshadowed that virus–induced insulin resistance may be a mechanism for fibrogenesis in chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The main importance of adipocytokine profile detection consists in the prediction of steatosis induction that has clinical relevance, being associated with advanced fibrosis and hyporesponsiveness to antiviral therapy. PMID:20108479

  9. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  10. Treatment and prognosis of rectal prolapse in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Izant, R J; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-04-01

    Rectal prolapse occurred in 112 (18.5%) of 605 cystic fibrosis patients. In 48 patients prolapse preceded diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, but physicians (pediatricians, pediatric and general surgeons, and proctologists) rarely appreciated its importance as a symptom of this disease. Prolapses frequently cease with institution of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy following diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. However, even when the disease remains undiagnosed, the symptom is often transient and frequently resolves at 3-5 yr of age. Prolapse occurring initially after cystic fibrosis is diagnosed rarely responds to manipulation of diet or enzyme doses. Many patients develop a method of reduction which involves voluntary abdominal, perineal, and gluteal muscles and does not require manual pressure on the prolapsed segment. Most patients do not need specific treatment for the prolapse. Surgery is rarely necessary. A sweat test should be obtained on any child who has had even a single episode of rectal prolapse.

  11. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  12. Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Modi, Apurva A; Feld, Jordan J; Park, Yoon; Kleiner, David E; Everhart, James E; Liang, T Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H

    2010-01-01

    Although coffee consumption has been associated with reduced frequency of liver disease, it is unclear whether the effect is from coffee or caffeine and whether there is an effect on hepatic fibrosis specifically. This study was undertaken to use a food-frequency instrument for dietary caffeine consumption to evaluate the relationship between caffeine intake and liver fibrosis. Patients undergoing liver biopsy completed a detailed caffeine questionnaire on three occasions over a 6-month period. Caffeine intake was compared between patients with mild and advanced liver fibrosis (bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and hepatic fibrosis. One hundred seventy-seven patients (99 male, 104 white, 121 with chronic hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection) undergoing liver biopsy completed the caffeine questionnaire on up to three occasions. Results from repeated questionnaires were consistent. Daily caffeine consumption above the 75(th) percentile for the cohort (308 mg = approximately 2.25 cups of coffee equivalents) was associated with reduced liver fibrosis (odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.80; P = 0.015) and the protective association persisted after controlling for age, sex, race, liver disease, body mass index, and alcohol intake in all patients (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.09-0.67; P = 0.006), as well as the subset with HCV infection (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.66; P = 0.009). Despite a modest trend, consumption of caffeine from sources other than coffee or of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with reduced liver fibrosis. A reliable tool for measurement of caffeine consumption demonstrated that caffeine consumption, particularly from regular coffee, above a threshold of approximately 2 coffee-cup equivalents per day, was associated with less severe hepatic fibrosis.

  13. Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    COVER&PAGE& ) ) Award)Number:)W81XWH&14&1&0224) ) ) TITLE:)Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis...Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis 5a.&CONTRACT&NUMBER& ) ) ) ) 5b.&GRANT&NUMBER& W81XWH-14-1-0224) ) 5c.&PROGRAM&ELEMENT&NUMBER& ) 6...STATEMENT& Approved)for)Public)Release;)Distribution)Unlimited)) ) ) ) ) 13.&SUPPLEMENTARY&NOTES) ))14.&ABSTRACT)) ) This)project)is)focused)on) Systemic

  14. A practical new way to measure kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2016-11-01

    Proper histological measurement of kidney fibrosis is essentially important in both clinical pathology and basic research using animal models of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, standard histology techniques and their blind evaluation are cumbersome. Ranjit et al. applied an advanced optical microscopy technique for hassle-free, unbiased, and highly sensitive characterization of kidney fibrosis and tested it in a classic model of chronic kidney disease in mice. This commentary emphasizes the advantages and future promise of this new approach.

  15. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  16. Prediction of fibrosis progression in chronic viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of liver fibrosis progression has a key role in the management of chronic viral hepatitis, as it will be translated into the future risk of cirrhosis and its various complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. Both hepatitis B and C viruses mainly lead to fibrogenesis induced by chronic inflammation and a continuous wound healing response. At the same time direct and indirect profibrogenic responses are also elicited by the viral infection. There are a handful of well-established risk factors for fibrosis progression including older age, male gender, alcohol use, high viral load and co-infection with other viruses. Metabolic syndrome is an evolving risk factor of fibrosis progression. The new notion of regression of advanced fibrosis or even cirrhosis is now strongly supported various clinical studies. Even liver biopsy retains its important role in the assessment of fibrosis progression, various non-invasive assessments have been adopted widely because of their non-invasiveness, which facilitates serial applications in large cohorts of subjects. Transient elastography is one of the most validated tools which has both diagnostic and prognostic role. As there is no single perfect test for liver fibrosis assessment, algorithms combining the most validated noninvasive methods should be considered as initial screening tools. PMID:25320725

  17. Common pathway signature in lung and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Makarev, Eugene; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Aihara, Fumiaki; Wysocki, Piotr T.; Zhu, Qingsong; Buzdin, Anton; Sidransky, David; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Atala, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fibrosis, a progressive accumulation of extracellular matrix components, encompasses a wide spectrum of distinct organs, and accounts for an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the tremendous clinical impact, the mechanisms governing the fibrotic process are not yet understood, and to date, no clinically reliable therapies for fibrosis have been discovered. Here we applied Regeneration Intelligence, a new bioinformatics software suite for qualitative analysis of intracellular signaling pathway activation using transcriptomic data, to assess a network of molecular signaling in lung and liver fibrosis. In both tissues, our analysis detected major conserved signaling pathways strongly associated with fibrosis, suggesting that some of the pathways identified by our algorithm but not yet wet-lab validated as fibrogenesis related, may be attractive targets for future research. While the majority of significantly disrupted pathways were specific to histologically distinct organs, several pathways have been concurrently activated or downregulated among the hepatic and pulmonary fibrosis samples, providing new evidence of evolutionary conserved pathways that may be relevant as possible therapeutic targets. While future confirmatory studies are warranted to validate these observations, our platform proposes a promising new approach for detecting fibrosis-promoting pathways and tailoring the right therapy to prevent fibrogenesis. PMID:27267766

  18. Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Santamaria, F; Andreotti, M R; Minella, R; Ercolini, P; Oggero, V; de Ritis, G

    1991-01-01

    Abnormal degrees of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were detected by 24 hour intraoesophageal pH measurement in 12 of 14 children (mean age 7.9 years; range 5 months-16 years) affected by cystic fibrosis and complaining of symptoms suggesting GOR. These patients underwent combined recording of distal oesophageal motility and intraluminal pH in order to investigate mechanisms of GOR. Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was the most common mechanism of reflux in all patients. Other mechanisms (appropriate relaxation or lowered pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter, increased intragastric pressure) were detected less frequently. Frequency of inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations was significantly higher in patients with cystic fibrosis than in other study groups (symptomatic GOR, GOR disease complicated by respiratory complaints). Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations occurred with the same frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis and in a group of children with GOR disease complicated by oesophagitis. Abnormalities of distal oesophageal contractions such as decreased amplitude or uncoordinated waves were also recorded in cystic fibrosis patients. Seven patients with cystic fibrosis completed a therapeutic trial for eight weeks consisting of postural treatment and oral cisapride, a new prokinetic drug. The oesophageal acid exposure improved in only three patients. We conclude that pathologic GOR is commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. The predominant reflux mechanism in these patients is a transient inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation rather than a low steady state basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:2039253

  19. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs) have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis. PMID:27331812

  20. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  1. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  2. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  3. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  4. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  5. Collagen polymorphism in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1976-01-01

    Collagens in normal human lung and in idiopathic chronic fibrosis were investigated in terms of their covalent structure and compared for possible alterations in the diseased state. Collagens were solubilized by limited digestion with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification they, were fractionated into types I and III. Carboxymethylcellulose and agarose chromatography of both types I and III collagens, and amino acid and carbohydrate analyses of the resulting alpha-chains indicated that the alpha 1 (I), alpha 2, and alpha 1 (III) chains of normal human lung were identical with the human skin alpha-chains in all respects examined except that the normal lung chains contained higher levels of hydroxylysine. Examination of collagens obtained from the diseased lung revealed that the content of hydroxylysine of the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains appeared to be diminished as compared to the normal lung chains. The values, expressed as residues per 1,000 residues, are 7.1 and 8.3 for the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains, respectively, as compared to 10.0 and 11.1 for the alpha-chains from the normal tissue. The chromatographic properties and amino acid and carbohydrate composition of the alpha-chains from the diseased tissue were otherwise indistinguishable from those of normal lung. In addition, isolation and characterization of the CNBr peptides of alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 and alpha 1 (III) from the diseased lung revealed no significant differences from the CNBr peptides from other human tissues reported previously. Normal and diseased lungs were also digested with CNBr, and the resultant alpha 1 (I) and alpha 1 (III) peptides were separated chromatographically. The relative quantities of these peptides indicate that type III collagen constitutes 33% of the total collagen in normal human lung, with the remainder being type I, whereas in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis, the relative content of type III collagen is markedly

  6. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  8. MicroRNA-21 in scleroderma fibrosis and its function in TGF-β-regulated fibrosis-related genes expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Li, Yisha; Zhou, Yaou; Jiang, Ying; Chai, Jin; Xiao, Xianzhong; You, Yunhui; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2013-08-01

    Uncontrolled fibrosis in multiple organs is the main cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation plays a fundamental role in the process. Our previous study demonstrated that miR-21 was significantly up-regulated in SSc fibroblasts. Here, we found that TGF-β regulated the expression of miR-21 and fibrosis-related genes, and decreased Smad7 expression. Over-expression of miR-21 in fibroblasts decreased the levels of Smad7, whereas knockdown of miR-21 increased its expression. Further study using a reporter gene assay demonstrated Smad7 was a direct target of miR-21. Similar to human SSc, the expression of miR-21 increased in the bleomycin induced skin fibrosis. Inhibition of fibrosis by treatment with anti-fibrosis drug bortezomib restored the levels of miR-21 and Smad7. MiR-21 may function in an amplifying circuit to enhance TGF-β signaling events in SSc fibrosis, and suggesting that miR-21 may act as a potential therapeutic target.

  9. Pirfenidone treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ye; Herzog, Erica L; Gomer, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a discrete clinicopathologic entity defined by the presence of usual interstitial pneumonia on high-resolution CT scan and/or open lung biopsy and the absence of an alternate diagnosis or exposure explaining these findings. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies available to treat this disease, and the 5-year mortality is ∼80%. The pyridone derivative pirfenidone has been studied extensively as a possible therapeutic agent for use in this deadly disease. This review will present the unique clinical features and management issues encountered by physicians caring for IPF patients, including the poor response to conventional therapy. The biochemistry and preclinical efficacy of pirfenidone will be discussed along with a comprehensive review of the clinical efficacy, safety, and side effects and patient-centered foci such as quality of life and tolerability. It is hoped that this information will lend insight into the complex issues surrounding the use of pirfenidone in IPF and lead to further investigation of this agent as a possible therapy in this devastating disease. PMID:21339942

  10. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research.

  11. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Soo, E; Adamali, H; Edey, A J

    2017-01-21

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common idiopathic interstitial pneumonia and is increasingly recognised. Prior to the advent of effective therapies, achieving an early diagnosis was arguably of little prognostic consequence given IPF was considered an untreatable and uniformly fatal disease. The advent of new drug treatments has given hope for the future and raised the profile of IPF. International management guidelines highlight the critical role of radiology as part of an interstitial lung disease multidisciplinary team approach in reaching an accurate and early diagnosis of IPF. The diagnostic criteria and levels of diagnostic confidence for the radio-pathological pattern associated with the clinical syndrome of IPF, usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), appear seemingly straightforward; however, with increasing research and recognition of radiopathological interobserver variability, limitations of this classification model are becoming increasingly apparent. This review describes ancillary radiological features, comorbidities, and emerging new entities that potentially co-exist with IPF. Beyond diagnosis radiology is developing as a key prognostic tool to inform longitudinal patient evaluation. These diagnostic and prognostic clinical challenges and the future role of radiology in IPF are discussed.

  12. IRON HOMEOSTASIS DURING CYSTIC FIBROSIS PULMONARY EXACERBATION

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Alex H.; Moulton, Lisa A.; Dorman, Dana B.; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Parker, H. Worth; Stanton, Bruce A.; O’Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoferremia is a marker of disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of systemic antibiotics on iron homeostasis during CF pulmonary exacerbation (CFPE) is unknown. Our central hypotheses were that, by the completion of treatment, serum iron would increase, serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and hepcidin-25, two mediators of hypoferremia, would decrease, and sputum iron would decrease. Methods: Blood and sputum samples were collected from 12 subjects with moderate-to-severe CF (median percent-predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) = 29%; median weight = 56 kg) within 24 hours of starting and completing a course of systemic antibiotics. Results: After treatment, subjects showed median FEV1% and body weight improvements of 4.5% and 2.0 kg, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum iron rose by 2.4 μmol/l (p <0.05), but 75% of patients remained hypoferremic. Median serum IL-6 and hepcidin-25 levels fell by 12.1 pg/ml and 37.5 ng/ml, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum erythropoietin (EPO) and hemoglobin levels were unaffected by treatment. We observed a trend toward lower sputum iron content after treatment. Conclusions: Hypoferremia is a salient characteristic of CFPE that improves with waning inflammation. Despite antibiotic treatment, many patients remain hypoferremic and anemic due to ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:22883617

  13. A millennial view of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A

    2015-01-01

    Although only identified as a distinct disease in the 1930s, it was soon apparent that Cystic Fibrosis (CF) had been present, but unrecognised, in European populations for many years - perhaps even centuries [1] . Within a decade of the early descriptions, the autosomal recessive nature of this genetic disease had been clarified, and its clinical features had been expanded. Secondary nutritional deficiencies complicated the underlying condition: the first clear description of CF as "a new disease", which included a speculation about its genetic basis (because there were 2 pairs of sibs in the case series) was published as Vitamin A deficiency in children [2]. The diagnosis was most often made at autopsy. When it was suspected in life, the diagnostic tests used included duodenal intubation to obtain fluid which would show impaired tryptic digestion of the coating of X-Ray film in CF children, and measurement of vitamin A in the blood. Some nutritional improvement could be expected with simple, rather inefficient pancreatic enzyme preparations, but it was not until mid-century that antibiotics began to treat pulmonary infections effectively. As a young doctor in the 1950s I soon became aware that the median age at death for affected children was about one year, and most died before reaching school age. .

  14. Sodium chloride deficiency in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, U; Göçmen, A; Kiper, N; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Ozgüç, M

    1994-11-01

    Sodium chloride deficiency (SCD) was observed within the 1st year of life in 12 of 46 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients between July 1989 and September 1992. All patients showed sweating, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, irritation, dehydration, weakness, and cyanosis during an attack. Mean plasma sodium, potassium and chloride levels were 122.9 (range 106-135), 2.5 (range 1.6-3.5), and 73.3 (range 60-90) mEq/l respectively. Alkalosis and elevated plasma renin activity were detected in all patients. Of the patients, 50% showed microscopic haematuria, and hypercalciuria was detected in two out of four patients. Low urinary sodium and high urinary potassium were observed in the four examined patients. Increased creatinine, BUN and uric acid values returned to normal with treatment. All the patients were treated initially with intravenous fluids and electrolyte solutions. All patients were less than 7 months of age during the first attack, five received only breast milk and the others breast milk with formula milk. Their oral salt supplement was 2-4 mEq/kg per day, which is recommended for CF patients, but could be deficient in excessively sweating infants. The genotype of these patients might be cause of high salt losses. F508 is the most common mutation with the frequency of 38% in our CF patients with SCD, but the frequency of unknown mutations is high (54%).

  15. Appetite stimulants use in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samya Z; Drury, Donna

    2008-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease. It affects multiple body organs. The lungs and pancreas are the most affected which results in progressive lung damage and pancreatic insufficiency. Due to the disease process, CF patients require significantly higher caloric intake than recommended for other individuals. The nutritional goal for CF patients is to achieve normal growth and development and, once genetic potential is reached, to maintain good nutritional status throughout life. Evidence has shown that lung function is closely associated with nutritional status in CF and that nutritional status is an independent predictor of survival. Most CF patients are on a high calorie diet to help achieve normal growth and development and maintain good lung function. Inadequate caloric intake in CF can lead to malnutrition. Malnutrition in CF requires careful, multidisciplinary history taking, physical exam, and overall patient/family assessment. Only by determining the actual cause of the malnutrition can appropriate and safe therapies be used to treat it. Appetite stimulants, although efficacious in treating malnutrition in CF, should only be prescribed if decreased food intake secondary to inadequate appetite is the principal cause of the malnutrition and all other contributing factors have been assessed, ruled-out or treated. In this review, we attempted to summarize the use of several appetite stimulants used in CF and other diseases to improve appetite and maximize caloric intake.

  16. Tracheal microaspiration in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ledson, M J; Wilson, G E; Tran, J; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been implicated in the aetiology of lung disease. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a high incidence of GOR symptoms with demonstrable episodes of oesophageal acidification. We studied 24-hour ambulatory tracheal and oesophageal pH in 11 CF patients with GOR symptoms to identify any episodes of tracheal acidification and define their temporal relation to oesophageal reflux and respiratory symptoms. 8 patients had evidence of significant GOR (DeMeester score mean 58; range 17-107) and in 6 it was gross (DeMeester score > 30). 4 patients had tracheal acidification (defined as tracheal pH < 5.5): all had greatly raised DeMeester scores. Two patterns of lowered tracheal pH were seen: a gradual drift downwards of tracheal pH to < 5.5 which recovered slowly, and an acute fall in tracheal pH to < 5.5 with rapid recovery. Only one patient had a fall in peak expiratory flow in conjunction with a decline in tracheal pH, and no association was found between the presence of tracheal microaspiration and pulmonary function. We conclude that tracheal acidification occurs in adult CF patients with GOR.

  17. Staging Liver Fibrosis with Statistical Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Jonathan Frieman

    Chronic liver disease is a worldwide health problem, and hepatic fibrosis (HF) is one of the hallmarks of the disease. Pathology diagnosis of HF is based on textural change in the liver as a lobular collagen network that develops within portal triads. The scale of collagen lobules is characteristically on order of 1mm, which close to the resolution limit of in vivo Gd-enhanced MRI. In this work the methods to collect training and testing images for a Hotelling observer are covered. An observer based on local texture analysis is trained and tested using wet-tissue phantoms. The technique is used to optimize the MRI sequence based on task performance. The final method developed is a two stage model observer to classify fibrotic and healthy tissue in both phantoms and in vivo MRI images. The first stage observer tests for the presence of local texture. Test statistics from the first observer are used to train the second stage observer to globally sample the local observer results. A decision of the disease class is made for an entire MRI image slice using test statistics collected from the second observer. The techniques are tested on wet-tissue phantoms and in vivo clinical patient data.

  18. Is cystic fibrosis genetic medicine's canary?

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan; Mueller, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    In 1989 the gene that causes cystic fibrosis (CF) was identified in a search accompanied by intense anticipation that the gene, once discovered, would lead rapidly to gene therapy. Many hoped that the disease would effectively disappear. Those affected were going to inhale vectors packed with functioning genes, which would go immediately to work in the lungs. It was a bewitching image, repeatedly invoked in both scientific and popular texts. Gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with a range of strategies and occasionally success seemed close, but by 1996 the idea that gene therapy for CF would quickly provide a cure was being abandoned by the communities engaged with treatment and research. While conventional wisdom holds that the death of Jesse Gelsinger in an unrelated gene therapy trial in 1999 produced new skepticism about gene therapy, the CF story suggests a different trajectory, and some different lessons. This article considers the rise and fall of gene therapy for CF and suggests that CF may provide a particularly compelling case study of a failed genomic technology, perhaps even of a medical "canary." The story of CF might be a kind of warning to us that genetic medicine may create as many problems as it solves, and that moving forward constructively with these techniques and practices requires many kinds of right information, not just about biology, but also about values, priorities, market forces, uncertainty, and consumer choice.

  19. Sirtuin 3 Deregulation Promotes Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sosulski, Meredith L; Gongora, Rafael; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Lasky, Joseph A; Sanchez, Cecilia G

    2016-08-13

    Oxidative stress leads to alveolar epithelial cell injury and fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation (FMD), key events in the pathobiology of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a mitochondrial protein deacetylase regulator of antioxidant response and mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate reduced SIRT3 expression in the lungs of old mice compared to young mice, as well as in two murine models of PF. The analysis of the pattern of SIRT3 expression in the lungs of patients with PF revealed low SIRT3 staining within the fibrotic regions. We also demonstrated, using murine models of PF and human lung fibroblasts, that reduced SIRT3 expression in response to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) promotes acetylation (inactivation) of major oxidative stress response regulators, such as SOD2 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2. Reduction of SIRT3 in human lung fibroblasts promoted FMD. By contrast, overexpression of SIRT3 attenuated TGFβ1-mediated FMD and significantly reduced the levels of SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3). Resveratrol induced SIRT3 expression and ameliorated acetylation changes induced by TGFβ1. We demonstrated that SIRT3-deficient mice are more susceptible to PF compared to control mice, and concomitantly exhibit enhanced SMAD3 expression. Collectively, these data define a SIRT3/TGFβ1 interaction during aging that may play a significant role in the pathobiology of PF.

  20. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  1. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome.

    PubMed

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes.

  2. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care

    PubMed Central

    Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  3. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  4. Lymphatics in lymphangioleiomyomatosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Connie G.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Moss, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The primary function of the lymphatic system is absorbing and transporting macromolecules and immune cells to the general circulation, thereby regulating fluid, nutrient absorption and immune cell trafficking. Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in tissue inflammation and tumour cell dissemination. Lymphatic involvement is seen in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). LAM, a disease primarily affecting females, involves the lung (cystic destruction), kidney (angiomyolipoma) and axial lymphatics (adenopathy and lymphangioleiomyoma). LAM occurs sporadically or in association with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Cystic lung destruction results from proliferation of LAM cells, which are abnormal smooth muscle-like cells with mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. Lymphatic abnormalities arise from infiltration of LAM cells into the lymphatic wall, leading to damage or obstruction of lymphatic vessels. Benign appearing LAM cells possess metastatic properties and are found in the blood and other body fluids. IPF is a progressive lung disease resulting from fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. Lymphangiogenesis is associated with pulmonary destruction and disease severity. A macrophage subset isolated from IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) express lymphatic endothelial cell markers in vitro, in contrast to the same macrophage subset from normal BALF. Herein, we review lymphatic involvement in LAM and IPF. PMID:22941884

  5. [Inhaled antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa M; Salcedo Posadas, Antonio; Mar Gómez-Punter, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent fatal genetically-transmitted disease among Caucasians. Chronic bronchial infection, especially by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in this disease. Aerosolized antibiotic therapy achieves high drug concentrations in the airway with low toxicity, allowing chronic use. Currently, two antibiotics have been approved for inhalation therapy, tobramycin inhalation solution and colistimethate sodium aerosol. There is less evidence from clinical trials for the latter. The main indication for these drugs is chronic bronchial colonization by P. aeruginosa, although there is increasing evidence of the importance of the primary infection by this bacterium, whether treated by oral or intravenous antibiotics or not. More controversial is the use of aerosolized antibiotic therapy in bacterial prophylaxis or respiratory exacerbations. For many years, intravenous formulations of distinct antibiotics for aerosolized use have been employed, which are in distinct phases of research for use in nebulizer therapy. In addition to being used to treat P. aeruginosa infection, aerosolized antibiotics have been used to treat other pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus, Mycobacterium abscessus and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  6. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  7. CXCR4 Antagonism Attenuates the Development of Diabetic Cardiac Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Yin; Walder, Ken; Horlock, Duncan; Williams, David; Nelson, Erin; Byrne, Melissa; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin; Zimmet, Paul; Kaye, David M

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly recognized complication of diabetes. Cardiac fibrosis is an important causative mechanism of HF associated with diabetes. Recent data indicate that inflammation may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis. We sought to determine the mechanism by which cardiac fibrosis develops and to specifically investigate the role of the CXCR4 axis in this process. Animals with type I diabetes (streptozotocin treated mice) or type II diabetes (Israeli Sand-rats) and controls were randomized to treatment with a CXCR4 antagonist, candesartan or vehicle control. Additional groups of mice also underwent bone marrow transplantation (GFP+ donor marrow) to investigate the potential role of bone marrow derived cell mobilization in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Both type I and II models of diabetes were accompanied by the development of significant cardiac fibrosis. CXCR4 antagonism markedly reduced cardiac fibrosis in both models of diabetes, similar in magnitude to that seen with candesartan. In contrast to candesartan, the anti-fibrotic actions of CXCR4 antagonism occurred in a blood pressure independent manner. Whilst the induction of diabetes did not increase the overall myocardial burden of GFP+ cells, it was accompanied by an increase in GFP+ cells expressing the fibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin and this was attenuated by CXCR4 antagonism. CXCR4 antagonism was also accompanied by increased levels of circulating regulatory T cells. Taken together the current data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 significantly reduces diabetes induced cardiac fibrosis, providing a potentially important therapeutic approach.

  8. Role of mast cells in fibrosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Nishiwaki, Uta; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu

    2016-12-01

    The underlying mechanism of fibrosis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) remains uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the association of fibrosis in the lymph nodes of patients with CHL through histological examination of the expression of cytokines associated with fibrosis and mast cell proliferation. Additionally, we sought to determine the degree of mast cell infiltration in a nodular sclerosis subtype of CHL (NSCHL) compared with that in non-NSCHL. We analyzed lymph nodes from 22 patients with CHL, of which eight were of the NSCHL and 14 of the non-NSCHL subtype, using immunohistochemical staining of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-13, and stem cell factor (SCF). Mast cells were positive for TGF-β and IL-13, and FOXP3-positive cells were negative for TGF-β. Only the expression of IL-13 in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells was significantly more frequently observed in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0028) and was associated with a higher rate of fibrosis (P = 0.0097). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0001). A significantly positive correlation was observed between the rate of fibrosis and the number of mast cells (correlation coefficient, 0.8524; 95% CI, 0.6725-0.9372) (P <0.0001). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in the group with IL-13-positive HRS cells than that in the group with IL-13-negative HRS cells (P = 0.0157). Based on these findings, we hypothesize that IL-13 production by HRS cells may lead to fibrosis, and furthermore, promote mast cell proliferation and infiltration. This in turn might further produce the fibrotic cytokines IL-13 and TGF-β, resulting in fibrosis typical of NSCHL.

  9. Yin Yang 1 Is a Novel Regulator of Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Sime, Patricia J.; Xu, Haodong; Williams, Marc A.; LaRussa, Larry; Georas, Steve N.; Guo, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: The differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a cardinal feature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) plays a role in the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types, but its role in fibrotic lung diseases is not known. Objectives: To elucidate the mechanism by which YY1 regulates fibroblast differentiation and lung fibrosis. Methods: Lung fibroblasts were cultured with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β or tumor necrosis factor-α. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB, YY1, and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) were determined in protein, mRNA, and promoter reporter level. Lung fibroblasts and lung fibrosis were assessed in a partial YY1-deficient mouse and a YY1f/f conditional knockout mouse after being exposed to silica or bleomycin. Measurements and Main Results: TGF-β and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulated YY1 expression in lung fibroblasts. TGF-β–induced YY1 expression was dramatically decreased by an inhibitor of NF-κB, which blocked I-κB degradation. YY1 is significantly overexpressed in both human IPF and murine models of lung fibrosis, including in the aggregated pulmonary fibroblasts of fibrotic foci. Furthermore, the mechanism of fibrogenesis is that YY1 can up-regulate α-SMA expression in pulmonary fibroblasts. YY1-deficient (YY1+/−) mice were significantly protected from lung fibrosis, which was associated with attenuated α-SMA and collagen expression. Finally, decreasing YY1 expression through instilled adenovirus-cre in floxed-YY1f/f mice reduced lung fibrosis. Conclusions: YY1 is overexpressed in fibroblasts in both human IPF and murine models in a NF-κB–dependent manner, and YY1 regulates fibrogenesis at least in part by increasing α-SMA and collagen expression. Decreasing YY1 expression may provide a new therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21169469

  10. Gene Expression Patterns Associated With Histopathology in Toxic Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Danielle L; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Tawa, Gregory J; Baer, Christine E; Permenter, Matthew G; McDyre, Bonna C; Dennis, William E; Boyle, Molly H; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Streicker, Michael A; Snowden, Bobbi S; Lewis, John A; Wallqvist, Anders; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals induce liver injury, which is difficult to diagnose without invasive procedures. Identifying indicators of end organ injury can complement exposure-based assays and improve predictive power. A multiplexed approach was used to experimentally evaluate a panel of 67 genes predicted to be associated with the fibrosis pathology by computationally mining DrugMatrix, a publicly available repository of gene microarray data. Five-day oral gavage studies in male Sprague Dawley rats dosed with varying concentrations of 3 fibrogenic compounds (allyl alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, and 4,4'-methylenedianiline) and 2 nonfibrogenic compounds (bromobenzene and dexamethasone) were conducted. Fibrosis was definitively diagnosed by histopathology. The 67-plex gene panel accurately diagnosed fibrosis in both microarray and multiplexed-gene expression assays. Necrosis and inflammatory infiltration were comorbid with fibrosis. ANOVA with contrasts identified that 51 of the 67 predicted genes were significantly associated with the fibrosis phenotype, with 24 of these specific to fibrosis alone. The protein product of the gene most strongly correlated with the fibrosis phenotype PCOLCE (Procollagen C-Endopeptidase Enhancer) was dose-dependently elevated in plasma from animals administered fibrogenic chemicals (P < .05). Semiquantitative global mass spectrometry analysis of the plasma identified an additional 5 protein products of the gene panel which increased after fibrogenic toxicant administration: fibronectin, ceruloplasmin, vitronectin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, and α2-macroglobulin. These results support the data mining approach for identifying gene and/or protein panels for assessing liver injury and may suggest bridging biomarkers for molecular mediators linked to histopathology.

  11. Losartan attenuates paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, F; Sun, Y B; Su, L; Li, S; Liu, Z F; Li, J; Hu, X T; Li, J

    2015-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and can cause pulmonary fibrosis in the cases with intoxication. Losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, has beneficial effects on the treatment of fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of losartan on pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-intoxicated rats. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 32, 180-220 g) were randomly assigned to four groups: (i) control group; (ii) PQ group; (iii) PQ + losartan 7d group; and (iv) PQ + losartan 14d group. Losartan treatment (intragastrically (i.g.), 10 mg/kg) was performed for 7 and 14 days after a single i.g. dose of 40 mg/kg PQ. All rats were killed on the 16th day, and hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining were used to examine lung injury and fibrosis. The levels of hydroxyproline and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and relative expression levels of collagen type I and III were also detected. PQ caused a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Mmp9, and TIMP-1, and relative expression levels of collagen type I and III ( p < 0.05), while losartan significantly decreased the amount of hydroxyproline and downregulated TGF-β1, Mmp9, and TIMP-1 mRNA and collagen type I and III expressions ( p < 0.05). Histological examination of PQ-treated rats showed lung injury and widespread inflammatory cell infiltration in the alveolar space and pulmonary fibrosis, while losartan could markedly reduce such damage and prevent pulmonary fibrosis. The results of this study indicated that losartan could reduce lung damage and prevent pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ.

  12. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  13. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  14. Guidelines for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in newborns through older adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation consensus report.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; Rosenstein, Beryl J; White, Terry B; Accurso, Frank J; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R; Durie, Peter R; Legrys, Vicky A; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B; Rock, Michael J; Campbell, Preston W

    2008-08-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF.

  15. Relationships between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, extracellular nucleotides and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2006-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic diseases in the Caucasian population, with a frequency of about 1 in 3000 livebirths. CF is due to a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein, a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated chloride channel localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells. CFTR is a multifunctional protein which, in addition to be a Cl-channel, is also a regulator of multiple ion channels and other proteins. In particular CFTR has been reported to play a role in the outflow of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) from cells, but this remains controversial. Extracellular nucleotides are signaling molecules that regulate ion transport and mucociliary clearance by acting on P2 nucleotide receptors, in particular the P2Y(2) receptor. Nucleotides activating the P2Y(2) receptor represent thus one pharmacotherapeutic strategy to treat CF disease, via improvement of mucus hydration and mucociliary clearance in airways. Phase II clinical trials have recently shown that aerosolized denufosol (INS37217, Inspire(R)) improves pulmonary function in CF patients: denufosol was granted orphan drug status and phase III trials are planned. Here, we review what is known about the relationship between extracellular nucleotides and CFTR, the role of extracellular nucleotides in epithelial pathophysiology and their putative role as therapeutic agents.

  16. The association between indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Guldal; Ozenirler, Seren

    2014-08-01

    We proposed to evaluate the association between serum indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) genotype 1b. Biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients' demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the clinical, laboratory and demographic features of the histologically proven liver fibrosis in CHC patients. A total of 112 biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients were enrolled into the study. Liver fibrosis scores were measured by using Ishak fibrosis scores and were divided into two groups; fibrosis scores ≤ 2 were categorized as mild fibrosis, 82 patients (73.2%), whereas fibrosis scores >2 were categorized as advanced fibrosis group, 30 patients (26.8%). Patients with advanced fibrosis had lower indirect bilirubin levels than the mild fibrosis group (0.28 ± 0.02 mg/dl vs. 0.44 ± 0.032 mg/dl, p<0.001, respectively). Indirect bilirubin level was negatively correlated with advanced fibrosis scores (r=-0.416 and p<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, low indirect bilirubin level was an independent predicting factor of advanced liver fibrosis (OR: 0.001, 95% CI: 0.0-0.005, p<0.001). There is an inverse relationship between indirect bilirubin levels and advanced liver fibrosis caused by CHC genotype 1b.

  17. Therapy of Experimental NASH and Fibrosis with Galectin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Peter G.; Zomer, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and resultant liver fibrosis is a major health problem without effective therapy. Some data suggest that galectin-3 null mice are resistant to the development of NASH with fibrosis. We examined the ability of two complex carbohydrate drugs that bind galectin-3, GM-CT-01 and GR-MD-02, to treat NASH with fibrosis in a murine model. GR-MD-02 treatment resulted in marked improvement in liver histology with significant reduction in NASH activity and collagen deposition. Treatments seemed also to improve both glomerulopathy and interstitial fibrosis observed in kidneys. The improvement in liver histology was evident when animals were treated early in disease or after establishment of liver fibrosis. In all measures, GM-CT-01 had an intermediate effect between vehicle and GR-MD-02. Galectin-3 protein expression was increased in NASH with highest expression in macrophages surrounding lipid laden hepatocytes, and reduced following treatment with GR-MD-02, while the number of macrophages was unchanged. Treatment with GR-MD-02 also reduced the expression of pathological indicators including iNOS, an important TH1 inflammatory mediator, CD36, a scavenger receptor for lipoproteins on macrophages, and α-smooth muscle actin, a marker for activated stellate cells which are the primary collagen producing cells in liver fibrosis. We conclude that treatment with these galectin-3 targeting drugs improved histopathological findings of NASH and markedly reduced fibrosis in a murine model of NASH. While the mechanisms require further investigation, the treatment effect is associated with a reduction of galectin-3 expressed by activated macrophages which was associated with regression of NASH, including hepatocellular fat accumulation, hepatocyte ballooning, intra-portal and intra-lobular inflammatory infiltrate, and deposition of collagen. Similar effects were found with GM-CT-01, but with approximately four-fold lower potency than GR-MD-02. The

  18. Therapy of experimental NASH and fibrosis with galectin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Traber, Peter G; Zomer, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and resultant liver fibrosis is a major health problem without effective therapy. Some data suggest that galectin-3 null mice are resistant to the development of NASH with fibrosis. We examined the ability of two complex carbohydrate drugs that bind galectin-3, GM-CT-01 and GR-MD-02, to treat NASH with fibrosis in a murine model. GR-MD-02 treatment resulted in marked improvement in liver histology with significant reduction in NASH activity and collagen deposition. Treatments seemed also to improve both glomerulopathy and interstitial fibrosis observed in kidneys. The improvement in liver histology was evident when animals were treated early in disease or after establishment of liver fibrosis. In all measures, GM-CT-01 had an intermediate effect between vehicle and GR-MD-02. Galectin-3 protein expression was increased in NASH with highest expression in macrophages surrounding lipid laden hepatocytes, and reduced following treatment with GR-MD-02, while the number of macrophages was unchanged. Treatment with GR-MD-02 also reduced the expression of pathological indicators including iNOS, an important TH1 inflammatory mediator, CD36, a scavenger receptor for lipoproteins on macrophages, and α-smooth muscle actin, a marker for activated stellate cells which are the primary collagen producing cells in liver fibrosis. We conclude that treatment with these galectin-3 targeting drugs improved histopathological findings of NASH and markedly reduced fibrosis in a murine model of NASH. While the mechanisms require further investigation, the treatment effect is associated with a reduction of galectin-3 expressed by activated macrophages which was associated with regression of NASH, including hepatocellular fat accumulation, hepatocyte ballooning, intra-portal and intra-lobular inflammatory infiltrate, and deposition of collagen. Similar effects were found with GM-CT-01, but with approximately four-fold lower potency than GR-MD-02. The

  19. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  20. Remission of liver fibrosis by interferon-alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M G; Muriel, P

    1995-08-08

    Fibrosis is a dynamic process associated with the continuous deposition and resorption of connective tissue, mainly collagen. Therapeutic strategies are emerging by which this dynamic process can be modulated. Since interferons are known to inhibit collagen production, the aim of this study was to investigate if the administration of interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha) can restore the normal hepatic content of collagen in rats with established fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced by prolonged bile duct ligation. IFN-alpha (100,000 IU/rat/day; s.c.) was administered to fibrotic rats for 15 days. Bile duct ligation increased liver collagen content 6-fold. In addition, serum and liver markers of hepatic injury increased significantly; liver histology showed an increase in collagen deposition, and the normal architecture was lost, with large zones of necrosis being observed frequently. IFN-alpha administration reversed to normal the values of all the biochemical markers measured and restored the normal architecture of the liver. Our results demonstrated that IFN-alpha is useful in reversing fibrosis and liver damage induced by biliary obstruction in the rat. However, further investigations are required to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of interferons on non-viral fibrosis and cholestasis.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shufang; Pan, Chuli; Zhou, Feifei; Yuan, Zhi; Wang, Huiying; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced endogenously by the activation of two major H2S-generating enzymes (cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase), plays important regulatory roles in different physiologic and pathologic conditions. The abnormal metabolism of H2S is associated with fibrosis pathogenesis, causing damage in structure and function of different organs. A number of in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that both endogenous H2S level and the expressions of H2S-generating enzymes in plasma and tissues are significantly downregulated during fibrosis. Supplement with exogenous H2S mitigates the severity of fibrosis in various experimental animal models. The protective role of H2S in the development of fibrosis is primarily attributed to its antioxidation, antiapoptosis, anti-inflammation, proangiogenesis, and inhibition of fibroblasts activities. Future studies might focus on the potential to intervene fibrosis by targeting the pathway of endogenous H2S-producing enzymes and H2S itself. PMID:26078809

  2. SnoN upregulation ameliorates renal fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lirong; Shi, Mingjun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changzhi; Su, Bo; Xiao, Ying; Guo, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Progressive reduction of SnoN is associated with gradual elevation of TGF-β1 during diabetic nephropathy progression, suggesting SnoN to be a possible mediator of TGF-β1 signaling, with potential therapeutic benefits against TGF- β1 –induced renal fibrosis. To characterize SnoN for its role in renal fibrosis, we assessed SnoN expression patterns in response to high glucose stress, and evaluated the effects of upregulating SnoN on renal fibrosis. High glucose stress induced significantly elevated SnoN, TGF-β1, and Arkadia transcription; however, significantly reduced SnoN protein levels were observed under these conditions. Upregulating the SnoN protein was achieved by Arkadia knockdown, which resulted in inhibited high glucose-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal tubular cells, the onset phase of renal fibrosis. Alternatively, EMT was suppressed by dominantly expressed exogenous SnoN without interfering with TGF-β1. Overall, renal SnoN upregulation ameliorates renal fibrosis by relieving high glucose-induced EMT; these findings support a translational approach targeting SnoN for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28350874

  3. Antifibrotic effect of heparin on liver fibrosis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Shah, Gaurang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chronic thrombin inhibition by heparin on experimentally induced chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) in rats. METHODS: Chronic liver injury (liver fibrosis) was induced in Wistar rats by oral administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 7 wk, an animal model with persistent severe hepatic fibrosis. Intravenous administration of the thrombin antagonist (heparin) started 1 wk after the start of CCl4 intoxication for 6 wk. After completion of treatment (7 wk), markers of hepatic dysfunction were measured and changes evaluated histopathologically. RESULTS: Higher serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels, as well as lower fibrinogen levels, were found in CCl4 intoxicated rats. Heparin, silymarin and combination of drug (heparin and silymarin) treatment for 6 wk prevented a rise in SGOT, SGPT, ALP, total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels and improved fibrinogen levels. Deterioration in hepatic function determined by the fibrosis area was retarded, as evident from hepatic histopathology. Total protein levels were not changed in all groups. CONCLUSION: Heparin, a thrombin antagonist, preserved hepatic function and reduced severity of hepatic dysfunction/fibrogenesis. Combination of heparin and silymarin produced additional benefits on liver fibrosis. PMID:23494756

  4. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  5. ADAM17 substrate release in proximal tubule drives kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Muthu, Muthu Lakshmi; Kaeppler, Jakob; Sun, Xiaoming; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Chalaris, Athena; Rose-John, Stefan; Wong, Eitan; Sagi, Irit; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Rennke, Helmut; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis following kidney injury is an unresolved health problem and causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In a study into its molecular mechanism, we identified essential causative features. Acute or chronic kidney injury causes sustained elevation of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17); of its cleavage-activated proligand substrates, in particular of pro-TNFα and the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (pro-AREG); and of the substrates’ receptors. As a consequence, EGFR is persistently activated and triggers the synthesis and release of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, resulting in macrophage/neutrophil ingress and fibrosis. ADAM17 hypomorphic mice, specific ADAM17 inhibitor–treated WT mice, or mice with inducible KO of ADAM17 in proximal tubule (Slc34a1-Cre) were significantly protected against these effects. In vitro, in proximal tubule cells, we show that AREG has unique profibrotic actions that are potentiated by TNFα-induced AREG cleavage. In vivo, in acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, fibrosis) patients, soluble AREG is indeed highly upregulated in human urine, and both ADAM17 and AREG expression show strong positive correlation with fibrosis markers in related kidney biopsies. Our results indicate that targeting of the ADAM17 pathway represents a therapeutic target for human kidney fibrosis. PMID:27642633

  6. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr(-/-) mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [(14)C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr(-/-) tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl(-)-oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr(-/-) mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  7. Transcription factor TBX4 regulates myofibroblast accumulation and lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ting; Liang, Jiurong; Liu, Ningshan; Huan, Caijuan; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Weijia; Kumar, Maya; Xiao, Rui; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Stripp, Barry R.; Jiang, Dianhua

    2016-01-01

    Progressive tissue fibrosis is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with repeated epithelial injuries and accumulation of myofibroblasts. Successful treatment options are limited by an incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate myofibroblast accumulation. Here, we employed in vivo lineage tracing and real-time gene expression transgenic reporting methods to analyze the early embryonic transcription factor T-box gene 4 (TBX4), and determined that TBX4-lineage mesenchymal progenitors are the predominant source of myofibroblasts in injured adult lung. In a murine model, ablation of TBX4-expressing cells or disruption of TBX4 signaling attenuated lung fibrosis after bleomycin-induced injury. Furthermore, TBX4 regulated hyaluronan synthase 2 production to enable fibroblast invasion of matrix both in murine models and in fibroblasts from patients with severe pulmonary fibrosis. These data identify TBX4 as a mesenchymal transcription factor that drives accumulation of myofibroblasts and the development of lung fibrosis. Targeting TBX4 and downstream factors that regulate fibroblast invasiveness could lead to therapeutic approaches in lung fibrosis. PMID:27400124

  8. In hepatic fibrosis, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells acquire enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Michael K; Bedrosian, Andrea S; Malhotra, Ashim; Henning, Justin R; Ibrahim, Junaid; Vera, Valery; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E; Hassan, Burhan U; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven; Frey, Alan B; Miller, George

    2010-08-15

    The normal liver is characterized by immunologic tolerance. Primary mediators of hepatic immune tolerance are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). LSECs block adaptive immunogenic responses to Ag and induce the generation of T regulatory cells. Hepatic fibrosis is characterized by both intense intrahepatic inflammation and altered hepatic immunity. We postulated that, in liver fibrosis, a reversal of LSEC function from tolerogenic to proinflammatory and immunogenic may contribute to both the heightened inflammatory milieu and altered intrahepatic immunity. We found that, after fibrotic liver injury from hepatotoxins, LSECs become highly proinflammatory and secrete an array of cytokines and chemokines. In addition, LSECs gain enhanced capacity to capture Ag and induce T cell proliferation. Similarly, unlike LSECs in normal livers, in fibrosis, LSECs do not veto dendritic cell priming of T cells. Furthermore, whereas in normal livers, LSECs are active in the generation of T regulatory cells, in hepatic fibrosis LSECs induce an immunogenic T cell phenotype capable of enhancing endogenous CTLs and generating potent de novo CTL responses. Moreover, depletion of LSECs from fibrotic liver cultures mitigates the proinflammatory milieu characteristic of hepatic fibrosis. Our findings offer a critical understanding of the role of LSECs in modulating intrahepatic immunity and inflammation in fibro-inflammatory liver disease.

  9. [Biomarkers for liver fibrosis: advances, advantages and disadvantages].

    PubMed

    Cequera, A; García de León Méndez, M C

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis in Mexico is one of the most important causes of death in persons between the ages of 25 and 50 years. One of the reasons for therapeutic failure is the lack of knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that cause liver disorder and make it irreversible. One of its prevalent anatomical characteristics is an excessive deposition of fibrous tissue that takes different forms depending on etiology and disease stage. Liver biopsy, traditionally regarded as the gold standard of fibrosis staging, has been brought into question over the past decade, resulting in the proposal for developing non-invasive technologies based on different, but complementary, approaches: a biological one that takes the serum levels of products arising from the fibrosis into account, and a more physical one that evaluates scarring of the liver by methods such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography; some of the methods were originally studied and validated in patients with hepatitis C. There is great interest in determining non-invasive markers for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, since at present there is no panel or parameter efficient and reliable enough for diagnostic use. In this paper, we describe the biomarkers that are currently being used for studying liver fibrosis in humans, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as the implementation of new-generation technologies and the evaluation of their possible use in the diagnosis of fibrosis.

  10. Targeting the isoprenoid pathway to abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Alan J.; Shi, Lei; Glogauer, Michael; Neighbors, Jeffrey D.; Hohl, Raymond; Carter, A. Brent

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic remodeling in lung injury is a major cause of morbidity. The mechanism that mediates the ongoing fibrosis is unclear, and there is no available treatment to abate the aberrant repair. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a critical role in inducing fibrosis by modulating extracellular matrix deposition. Specifically, mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis as inhibition of mitochondrial H2O2 attenuates the fibrotic response in mice. Prior studies indicate that the small GTP-binding protein, Rac1, directly mediates H2O2 generation in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Geranylgeranylation of the C-terminal cysteine residue (Cys189) is required for the for Rac1 activation and mitochondrial import. We hypothesized that impairment of geranylgeranylation would limit mitochondrial oxidative stress, and, thus, abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis. By targeting the isoprenoid pathway with a novel agent, digeranyl bisphosphonate (DGBP), which impairs geranylgeranylation, we demonstrate that Rac1 mitochondrial import, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and progression of the fibrotic response to lung injury are significantly attenuated. These observations reveal that targeting the isoprenoid pathway to alter Rac1 geranylgeranylation halts the progression of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. PMID:25958207

  11. Molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Claudio M; Lichtner, Miriam; Mascia, Claudia; Zuccalà, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-26

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Several studies have shown that HIV infection promotes accelerated HCV hepatic fibrosis progression, even with HIV replication under full antiretroviral control. The pathogenesis of accelerated hepatic fibrosis among HIV/HCV coinfected individuals is complex and multifactorial. The most relevant mechanisms involved include direct viral effects, immune/cytokine dysregulation, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases and fibrosis biomarkers, increased oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis, HIV-associated gut depletion of CD4 cells, and microbial translocation. In addition, metabolic alterations, heavy alcohol use, as well drug use, may have a potential role in liver disease progression. Understanding the pathophysiology and regulation of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infection may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the management of all patients with ongoing liver disease. In this review, we therefore discuss the evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the accelerated liver fibrosis seen in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV.

  12. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  13. Natural regression of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shogo; Hirono, Haruka; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Katsuhiko; Kamimura, Kenya; Yano, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The fibrosis of liver cirrhosis was considered to be irreversible before the anti-viral drugs showed that it is reversible when they lead to continuous suppression of viral replication and inflammation. However, several reports previously showed that fibrosis of type B liver cirrhosis was almost completely absorbed after the natural remission of chronic inflammation. This phenomenon might not be limited to exceptional patients, but rather occur commonly, considering the dynamic clinical features of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), where inactive carrier stage normally follows aggravation of hepatitis and progression of fibrosis at the time of HBeAg seroconversion. Thus, fibrosis levels of CHB as a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-surveillance marker, particularly those of the inactive stage, could be underestimated, because some of them might have been (pre)cirrhotic in the past and recovered with the natural regression of fibrosis. We argue that cirrhosis-induced HCC mechanisms, rather than direct action of viral genome, may be more common than generally considered in CHB patients. This may have some impact on reconsidering the surveillance rationale for HCC in CHB, from where advanced HCCs tended to be missed. In addition, a molecular marker to assess the cancer-prone characteristics of the liver will definitely be needed to resolve the issue. PMID:27350724

  14. Tubular Overexpression of Angiopoietin-1 Attenuates Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heedoo; Kim, Yeawon; Liu, Tuoen; Guo, Qiusha; Geminiani, Julio J.; Austin, Paul F.; Chen, Ying Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of microvasculature injury in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a secreted vascular growth factor that binds to the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor. Ang-1/Tie2 signaling is critical for regulating blood vessel development and modulating vascular response after injury, but is dispensable in mature, quiescent vessels. Although dysregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has been well studied in renal pathologies, much less is known about the role of the Ang-1/Tie2 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. Previous studies have shown contradicting effects of overexpressing Ang-1 systemically on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis when different engineered forms of Ang-1 are used. Here, we investigated the impact of site-directed expression of native Ang-1 on the renal fibrogenic process and peritubular capillary network by exploiting a conditional transgenic mouse system [Pax8-rtTA/(TetO)7 Ang-1] that allows increased tubular Ang-1 production in adult mice. Using a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) fibrosis model, we demonstrate that targeted Ang-1 overexpression attenuates myofibroblast activation and interstitial collagen I accumulation, inhibits the upregulation of transforming growth factor β1 and subsequent phosphorylation of Smad 2/3, dampens renal inflammation, and stimulates the growth of peritubular capillaries in the obstructed kidney. Our results suggest that Ang-1 is a potential therapeutic agent for targeting microvasculature injury in renal fibrosis without compromising the physiologically normal vasculature in humans. PMID:27454431

  15. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; de Jonge, Hugo R; Bronsveld, Inez; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Brandsma, Arianne M; de Jong, Nienke W M; Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Scholte, Bob J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Middendorp, Sabine; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in CFTR, encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Forskolin induces rapid swelling of organoids derived from healthy controls or wild-type mice, but this effect is strongly reduced in organoids of subjects with cystic fibrosis or in mice carrying the Cftr F508del mutation and is absent in Cftr-deficient organoids. This pattern is phenocopied by CFTR-specific inhibitors. Forskolin-induced swelling of in vitro-expanded human control and cystic fibrosis organoids corresponds quantitatively with forskolin-induced anion currents in freshly excised ex vivo rectal biopsies. Function of the CFTR F508del mutant protein is restored by incubation at low temperature, as well as by CFTR-restoring compounds. This relatively simple and robust assay will facilitate diagnosis, functional studies, drug development and personalized medicine approaches in cystic fibrosis.

  16. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in Denmark– A Nationwide Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Elmholdt, Tina R.; Olesen, Anne B. B.; Jørgensen, Bettina; Kvist, Stinne; Skov, Lone; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Marckmann, Peter; Pedersen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a debilitating and painful disorder with an increased stimulation of the connective tissue in the skin and systemic tissues. The disease is associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging in patients with renal impairment. Methods The prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has so far never been determined at a national level. In 2009, Denmark was the first country to design a guideline for the tracing of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients. The aim of this paper is to communicate the main findings of this quest. Results The outcome of the nationwide investigation revealed that Denmark had 65 patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and thereby the highest prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis worldwide with 65 per 5.6 million inhabitants, or 12 per million. Conclusions The nationwide investigation in Denmark revealed the highest prevalence of NSF worldwide. This may be rooted in a high level of awareness of NSF both among doctors, politicians and, not least, the media, combined with the fact that a nationwide NSF investigation was initiated. PMID:24349178

  17. Cystic Fibrosis in the African Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Identifying mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) is important for making an early, unambiguous diagnosis, which, in turn, is linked to better health and a greater life expectancy. In patients of African descent, a molecular diagnosis is often confounded by the fact that the majority of investigations undertaken to identify causative mutations have been conducted on European populations, and CF-causing mutations tend to be population specific. We undertook a survey of published data with the aim of identifying causative CF mutations in patients of African descent in the Americas. We found that 1,584 chromosomes had been tested in only 6 countries, of which 876 alleles (55.3%) still remained unidentified. There were 59 mutations identified. Of those, 41 have been shown to cause CF, 17 have no associated functional studies, and one (R117H) is of varying clinical consequence. The most common mutations identified in the patients of African descent were: ΔF508 (29.4% identified in the United States, Colombia, Brazil, and Venezuela); 3120 + 1G>A (8.4% identified in Brazil, the United States, and Colombia); G85E (3.8% identified in Brazil); 1811 + 1.6kbA>G (3.7% identified in Colombia); and 1342 - 1G>C (3.1% identified in the United States). The majority of the mutations identified (81.4%) have been described in just one country. Our findings indicate that there is a need to fully characterize the spectrum of CF mutations in the diaspora to improve diagnostic accuracy for these patients and facilitate treatment.

  18. Developing Optimal Parameters for Hyperpolarized Noble Gas and Inert Fluorinated Gas MRI of Lung Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lung Transplant; Lung Resection; Lung Cancer; Asthma; Cystic Fibrosis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Emphysema; Mesothelioma; Asbestosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Interstitial Lung Disease; Pulmonary Fibrosis; Bronchiectasis; Seasonal Allergies; Cold Virus; Lung Infection; Pulmonary Hypertension; Pulmonary Dysplasia; Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  19. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: an increasingly recognized condition* **

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) has been increasingly recognized in the literature. Patients with CPFE are usually heavy smokers or former smokers with concomitant lower lobe fibrosis and upper lobe emphysema on chest HRCT scans. They commonly present with severe breathlessness and low DLCO, despite spirometry showing relatively preserved lung volumes. Moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension is common in such patients, who are also at an increased risk of developing lung cancer. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective treatment for CPFE. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and prognostic factors of CPFE. Given that most of the published data on CPFE are based on retrospective analysis, more studies are needed in order to address the role of emphysema and its subtypes; the progression of fibrosis/emphysema and its correlation with inflammation; treatment options; and prognosis. PMID:25029654

  20. Endomyocardial Fibrosis: Still a Mystery after 60 Years

    PubMed Central

    Bukhman, Gene; Ziegler, John; Parry, Eldryd

    2008-01-01

    The pathologist Jack N. P. Davies identified endomyocardial fibrosis in Uganda in 1947. Since that time, reports of this restrictive cardiomyopathy have come from other parts of tropical Africa, South Asia, and South America. In Kampala, the disease accounts for 20% of heart disease patients referred for echocardiography. We conducted a systematic review of research on the epidemiology and etiology of endomyocardial fibrosis. We relied primarily on articles in the MEDLINE database with either “endomyocardial fibrosis” or “endomyocardial sclerosis” in the title. The volume of publications on endomyocardial fibrosis has declined since the 1980s. Despite several hypotheses regarding cause, no account of the etiology of this disease has yet fully explained its unique geographical distribution. PMID:18301727

  1. Molecular pathways: connecting fibrosis and solid tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2014-07-15

    Pathologic organ fibrosis is a condition that can affect all major tissues and is typically ascribed to the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components, predominantly collagens. It typically leads to compromise of organ function and subsequent organ failure, and it is estimated that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases.

  2. Retroperitoneal fibrosis in three siblings with the sickle cell trait

    PubMed Central

    Phills, James A.; Geggie, Peter; Hidvegi, Robert I.; Oliva, Luis A.

    1973-01-01

    Three West-Indian black siblings with the sickle cell trait developed retroperitoneal fibrosis, a previously unreported association. Other well known renal manifestations associated with the sickle cell trait were also present in some of these cases and included renal medullary necrosis and spontaneous hematuria. It is postulated that the sickling of the erythrocytes in the periureteral vessels resulted in thrombosis, ischemia, reactive scarring and progressive fibrosis indistinguishable from the known histological picture of retroperitoneal fibrosis. The finding of fibrin thrombi in the small veins of the fibrotic tissue of one of these patients would support this explanation. ImagesFIG. 1AFIG. 1BFIG. 2FIG. 3AFIG. 3BFIG. 4AFIG. 4BFIG. 4C PMID:4699274

  3. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized.

  4. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, G; Rippa, E; Raia, V; Salvatore, D; Massa, C; de Ritis, G; Salvatore, F

    1996-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of seven cystic fibrosis patients from southern Italy who bear rare genotypes: (1) a patient homozygous for the 2183 AA-->G mutation who was affected by a very early pulmonary form of cystic fibrosis, and five patients who were compound heterozygotes either for the 2183 AA-->G mutation or for the I148T mutation, in both instances with the delta F508 mutation; and (2) a patient homozygous for the early nonsense R553X mutation who showed only a moderately severe form of cystic fibrosis. Our results confirm that environmental or genetic factors unrelated to the CF disease contribute significantly to the development of the phenotype. Images PMID:8825054

  5. Hepatic steatosis and fibrosis: Non-invasive assessment

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, Rustam N; Crossey, Mary M E; Cox, I Jane; Fye, Haddy K S; Njie, Ramou; Goldin, Robert D; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and usually develops over many years, as a result of chronic inflammation and scarring, resulting in end-stage liver disease and its complications. The progression of disease is characterised by ongoing inflammation and consequent fibrosis, although hepatic steatosis is increasingly being recognised as an important pathological feature of disease, rather than being simply an innocent bystander. However, the current gold standard method of quantifying and staging liver disease, histological analysis by liver biopsy, has several limitations and can have associated morbidity and even mortality. Therefore, there is a clear need for safe and non-invasive assessment modalities to determine hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. This review covers key mechanisms and the importance of fibrosis and steatosis in the progression of liver disease. We address non-invasive imaging and blood biomarker assessments that can be used as an alternative to information gained on liver biopsy. PMID:28018096

  6. Cystic fibrosis and pregnancy: counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2015-03-01

    The progress in research of in vitro fertilization and fetal-maternal medicine allows more women and men, with fertility problems due to cystic fibrosis, to have a baby. In the majority of cases, pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis results in favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the incidence of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, caesarean section and deterioration of the maternal health are increased. Pre-pregnancy counseling is a crucial component of overall obstetric care, especially in women with poor pulmonary function. Additionally, closer monitoring during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary approach is required. The value of serial ultrasound scans and fetal Doppler assessment is important for the control of maternal and fetal wellbeing, as well as for the definition of the appropriate timing of delivery. In this article, clinical issues of pregnant women with cystic fibrosis are reviewed; counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcomes are being discussed.

  7. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  9. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Modulation of surgical fibrosis by microbial zwitterionic polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Perez, Begonia; Chung, Doo R.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Yagita, Hideo; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Tzianabos, Arthur O.

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial carbohydrates have long been considered T cell-independent antigens that primarily induce humoral immune responses. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bacterial capsules that possess a zwitterionic charge motif can activate CD4+ T cells after processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells. Here we show that these zwitterionic polysaccharides can prevent T helper 1-mediated fibrosis by signaling for the release of IL-10 from CD4+ T cells in vivo. IL-10 production by these T cells and their ability to prevent fibrosis is controlled by the inducible costimulator (ICOS)-ICOS ligand pathway. These data demonstrate that the interaction of the zwitterionic polysaccharides with T cells results in modulation of surgical fibrosis in vivo and suggest a previously undescribed approach to "harnessing" T cell function to prevent inflammatory tissue disorders in humans. IL-10 | microbial polysaccharides | inducible costimulator

  11. [Isolation of Nocardia species in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Isabel; Martínez, M Carmen; Prados, Concepción; Girón, Rosa M; Maiz, Luis; Martínez, M Teresa

    2008-02-01

    The isolation of Nocardia species from the respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis presents problems with important clinical implications. From the sputum culture of a total of 387 patients with cystic fibrosis, Nocardia species was isolated in 9 cases (2%; 8 females and 1 male) with a mean (SD) age of 17 (7) years. Sixty-seven percent of the patients were asymptomatic and no relevant radiographic or analytical changes were detected. In only 3 patients was of Nocardia species isolated again in successive samples. Two patients were not treated, 7 were treated with cotrimoxazole and 3 with minocycline; in 2 cases therapy was intravenous. After a mean follow-up of 48 (33) months, all patients had improved. Isolation of Nocardia species from the secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis does not necessarily imply infection and the need for treatment should be assessed on an individual basis.

  12. Treatment and prognosis of nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-12-01

    Nasal polyposis complicated the course of fibrosis in 157 (26%) of 605 patients. Onset before age 5 years or after age 20 years was rare. Polyposis was the initial symptom of cystic fibrosis in 13 patients. Common symptoms included obstruction to nasal air flow, mouth breathing, epistaxis, and rhinorrhea. Intranasal and oral corticosteroids and antihistamines were ineffective in preventing recurrences but did occasionally afford symptomatic relief of obstruction. Nineteen (31%) of 62 patients who never had surgery had spontaneous and permanent disappearance of polyps. Simple polypectomy was an adequate procedure for patients with substantial nasal symptoms. There were no visual complications. Other surgical complications were rare. Children and adolescents with nasal polyps should have sweat tests by pilocarpine iontophoresis to rule out cystic fibrosis.

  13. Surgical options for recalcitrant carpal tunnel syndrome with perineural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Jacoby, Sidney M; Osterman, A Lee

    2012-03-01

    Surgical release of the transverse carpal ligament for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is, in general, a very successful procedure. Some patients, however, fail this standard release and have persistent or recurrent symptoms. Such recalcitrance may relate to incomplete release but more often relates to perineural or intraneural fibrosis of the median nerve. While there is no good treatment for intraneural fibrosis, numerous procedures have evolved in an attempt to treat perineural fibrosis which restricts nerve gliding. These include procedures to isolate the nerve from scar as well as procedures to bring neovascularization to the median nerve. This review describes the various surgical treatment options for recalcitrant CTS as well as their reported outcomes.

  14. A novel case of diabetic muscle necrosis in a patient with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Sreelatha; Bettadahalli, Shankar S; Bhupathi, Satya V; Aswani, Vijay H

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is a common comorbidity of cystic fibrosis. Diabetic myonecrosis is a rare self-limited complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus that commonly presents with acute, intense pain and swelling of lower extremities and responds well to conservative management. We report the first case of diabetic myonecrosis in a patient with CFRD.

  15. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elenice RA; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species. PMID:27812598

  16. Inflammatory macrophages can transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts during renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Chen; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Yang; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play a central role in renal fibrosis although the origin of these cells remains controversial. We recently reported that bone marrow-derived macrophages can give rise to myofibroblasts through macrophage to myofibroblast transition (MMT). However, several important issues remain to be addressed, including whether MMT occurs in human kidney disease and verification of the MMT process through lineage tracing. Biopsies from a cohort of 58 patients with various forms of kidney disease were examined for MMT cells that co-express macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers. MMT cells were evident in active fibrotic lesions, but were largely absent in acute inflammatory or sclerotic lesions, suggesting that MMT cells contribute to progressive renal fibrosis. Fate-mapping studies in LysMCreTomato mice identified substantial numbers of Tomato+ myeloid cells with F4/80+ macrophage phenotype expressing α-SMA and collagen I in the unilateral ureteral obstructive model of renal fibrosis, providing direct evidence for the MMT process during the development of renal fibrosis. In addition, MMT cells had a predominant M2 phenotype in both human and mouse renal fibrosis. Finally, selective depletion of myeloid cells via diphtheria toxin in LysMCreiDTR mice largely abolished macrophage infiltration and MMT cells in the obstructed kidney and substantially reduced accumulation of α-SMA+ myofibroblasts and collagen deposition, revealing a pathogenic role for inflammatory macrophages in MMT and tissue fibrosis. In conclusion, these findings provide substantial new data to support the postulate that macrophages can directly transdifferentiate into collagen-producing myofibroblasts in human and experimental kidney disease. PMID:27906172

  17. Smad3 signaling involved in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Ask, Kjetil; Martin, Gail; Bonniaud, Philippe; Warburton, David

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of finding evidence of both emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis in the same patient has received increased attention. Several investigators have found on biopsy the presence of emphysema of the upper zones and diffuse parenchymal disease with fibrosis of the lower zones of the lung, especially associated with current or previous heavy smokers. Believed previously to be two different disease mechanisms, there are now data to implicate some common pathways of cell and molecular activation leading to the different morphologic and physiologic outcomes. According to a current view, emphysema may originate from a protease/antiprotease imbalance, whereas a role for antiproteases has been proposed in the modulation of fibrosis. Overexpression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) in experimental rodent models leads to progressive pulmonary fibrosis, accompanied with marked up-regulation of protease inhibitors, such as tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) genes, along with excessive matrix accumulation. It may be that a "matrix degrading" pulmonary microenvironment, one in which metalloproteinase activities prevail, favors the development of emphysema, whereas a "matrix nondegrading" microenvironment, with enhanced presence of TIMPs, would lead to matrix accumulation and fibrosis. Surprisingly, although Smad3 null mice, deficient in TGF-beta signal transmission, are resistant to bleomycin- and TGF-beta-mediated fibrosis, they develop spontaneous age-related airspace enlargement, consistent with emphysema, with a lack of ability to repair tissue damage appropriately. A common element is tissue damage and repair, with TGF-beta and the Smad signaling pathway playing prominent molecular roles. Both changes can be followed in experimental models with noninvasive imaging and physiologic measurements.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  19. Growth hormone resistance exacerbates cholestasis-induced murine liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiedl, Patricia; McMahon, Robert; Blaas, Leander; Stanek, Victoria; Svinka, Jasmin; Grabner, Beatrice; Zollner, Gernot; Kessler, Sonja M.; Claudel, Thierry; Müller, Mathias; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Bilban, Martin; Esterbauer, Harald; Eferl, Robert; Haybaeck, Johannes; Trauner, Michael; Casanova, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance has been associated with liver cirrhosis in humans but its contribution to the disease remains controversial. In order to elucidate whether GH resistance plays a causal role in the establishment and development of liver fibrosis, or rather represents a major consequence thereof, we challenged mice lacking the Growth hormone receptor gene (Ghr-/-, a model for GH resistance) by crossing them with Mdr2 knockout mice (Mdr2-/-), a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice showed elevated serum markers associated with liver damage and cholestasis, extensive bile duct proliferation and increased collagen deposition relative to Mdr2 -/- mice, thus suggesting a more severe liver fibrosis phenotype. Additionally, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice had a pronounced down-regulation of hepato-protective genes Hnf6, Egfr and Igf-1, and significantly increased levels of ROS and apoptosis in hepatocytes, compared to control mice. Moreover, single knockout mice (Ghr-/-) fed with a diet containing 1% cholic acid displayed an increase in hepatocyte ROS production, hepatocyte apoptosis and bile infarcts compared to their wildtype littermates, indicating that loss of Ghr renders hepatocytes more susceptible to toxic bile acid accumulation. Surprisingly, and despite their severe fibrotic phenotype, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice displayed a significant decrease in tumour incidence compared to Mdr2-/- mice, indicating that loss of Ghr signaling may slow the progression from fibrosis/cirrhosis to cancer in the liver. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GH resistance dramatically exacerbates liver fibrosis in a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis, therefore suggesting that GH resistance plays a causal role in the disease and provides a novel target for the development of liver fibrosis treatments. PMID:25179284

  20. Low-Level Laser Therapy Decreases Renal Interstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fabiana Aparecida Mayrink; Moraes, Ana Carolina Meneghin; Paiva, Amanda Povoa; Schinzel, Vânia; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Semedo, Patricia; Castoldi, Angêla; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Oliveira, Roberto Sotto-Maior Fortes; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Background data: Regardless of the etiology, CKD involves progressive widespread tissue fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and loss of kidney function. This process also occurs in kidney allograft. At present, effective therapies for this condition are lacking. We investigated the effects of LLLT on the interstitial fibrosis that occurs after experimental UUO in rats. Methods: The occluded kidney of half of the 32 Wistar rats that underwent UUO received a single intraoperative dose of LLLT (AlGaAs laser, 780 nm, 22.5 J/cm2, 30 mW, 0.75 W/cm2, 30 sec on each of nine points). After 14 days, renal fibrosis was assessed by Sirius red staining under polarized light. Immunohistochemical analyses quantitated the renal tissue cells that expressed fibroblast (FSP-1) and myofibroblast (α-SMA) markers. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and Smad3. Results: The UUO and LLLT animals had less fibrosis than the UUO animals, as well having decreased expression inflammatory and pro-fibrotic markers. Conclusions: For the first time, we showed that LLLT had a protective effect regarding renal interstitial fibrosis. It is conceivable that by attenuating inflammation, LLLT can prevent tubular activation and transdifferentiation, which are the two processes that mainly drive the renal fibrosis of the UUO model. PMID:23134313

  1. The role of cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, P; Menard, O; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N; Martinet, Y

    1996-04-01

    Fibrosis is a disorder characterized by a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the deposition of extracellular matrix with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in replacement of normal tissue. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in this area. A similar sequence of events occurs in wound healing with formation of normal, limited and transient granulation tissue, while in fibrosis, a maladaptive repair leads to an extensive, exaggerated process with functional impairment. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of several human fibrotic lung diseases, five diffuse (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP); Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS); systemic sclerosis (SS)) and two focal (tumour stroma in lung cancer; and obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) after lung transplantation), has shown that several cytokines participate in the local injury and inflammatory reaction (interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)). A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  3. Targeting sphingosine kinase 1 attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Long Shuang; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Mathew, Biji; Fu, Panfeng; Gorshkova, Irina A; He, Donghong; Ma, Wenli; Noth, Imre; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Pendyala, Srikanth; Reddy, Sekhar P; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Wei; Garzon, Steven A; Garcia, Joe G N; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2013-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and progressive interstitial lung disease, wherein transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) contribute to the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, the in vivo contribution of sphingosine kinase (SphK) in fibrotic processes has not been documented. Microarray analysis of blood mononuclear cells from patients with IPF and SphK1- or SphK2-knockdown mice and SphK inhibitor were used to assess the role of SphKs in fibrogenesis. The expression of SphK1/2 negatively correlated with lung function and survival in patients with IPF. Also, the expression of SphK1 was increased in lung tissues from patients with IPF and bleomycin-challenged mice. Knockdown of SphK1, but not SphK2, increased survival and resistance to pulmonary fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged mice. Administration of SphK inhibitor reduced bleomycin-induced mortality and pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Knockdown of SphK1 or treatment with SphK inhibitor attenuated S1P generation and TGF-β secretion in a bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis mouse model that was accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of Smad2 and MAPKs in lung tissue. In vitro, bleomycin-induced expression of SphK1 in lung fibroblast was found to be TGF-β dependent. Taken together, these data indicate that SphK1 plays a critical role in the pathology of lung fibrosis and is a novel therapeutic target.

  4. Radiation Fibrosis of the Vocal Fold: From Man to Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Michael M.; Kolachala, Vasantha; Berg, Eric; Muller, Susan; Creighton, Frances X.; Branski, Ryan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize fundamental late tissue effects in the human vocal fold following radiation therapy. To develop a murine model of radiation fibrosis to ultimately develop both treatment and prevention paradigms. Design Translational study using archived human and fresh murine irradiated vocal fold tissue. Methods 1) Irradiated vocal fold tissue from patients undergoing laryngectomy for loss of function from radiation fibrosis were identified from pathology archives. Histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and whole-genome microarray as well as real-time transcriptional analyses was performed. 2) Focused radiation to the head and neck was delivered to mice in a survival fashion. One month following radiation, vocal fold tissue was analyzed with histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR transcriptional analysis for selected markers of fibrosis. Results Human irradiated vocal folds demonstrated increased collagen transcription with increased deposition and disorganization of collagen in both the thyroarytenoid muscle and the superficial lamina propria. Fibronectin were increased in the superficial lamina propria. Laminin decreased in the thyroarytenoid muscle. Whole genome microarray analysis demonstrated increased transcription of markers for fibrosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, glycosaminoglycan production and apoptosis. Irradiated murine vocal folds demonstrated increases in collagen and fibronectin transcription and deposition in the lamina propria. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β increased in the lamina propria. Conclusion Human irradiated vocal folds demonstrate molecular changes leading to fibrosis that underlie loss of vocal fold pliability that occurs in patients following laryngeal irradiation. Irradiated murine tissue demonstrates similar findings, and this mouse model may have utility in creating prevention and treatment strategies for vocal fold radiation fibrosis. PMID:23242839

  5. Reversible Severe Eosinophilic Endomyocardial Fibrosis During Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pineton de Chambrun, Marc; Charron, Philippe; Vauthier-Brouzes, Danièle; Cluzel, Philippe; Haroche, Julien; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Amoura, Zahir; Aubart, Fleur Cohen

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a condition of unknown origin characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. Cardiac involvement is rare and threatening accounting for 33% to 43% of death in HES. Management of pregnant patients with HES is challenging and have rarely been reported, particularly in the setting of heart failure.We here report on the case of a 29-year-old woman with HES who developed severe endomyocardial fibrosis with heart failure during pregnancy. Outcome was favorable under treatment with prednisone and azathioprine.This case illustrates a favorable outcome of endomyocardial fibrosis during pregnancy.

  6. Instructive Role of the Microenvironment in Preventing Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kei; Xavier, Sandhya; Chen, Jun; Kida, Yujiro; Lipphardt, Mark; Ikeda, Reina; Gevertz, Annie; Caviris, Mario; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Kalajzic, Ivo; Dutton, James; Ratliff, Brian B; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbygniew; Rose-John, Stefan; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2016-10-05

    : Accumulation of myofibroblasts is a hallmark of renal fibrosis. A significant proportion of myofibroblasts has been reported to originate via endothelial-mesenchymal transition. We initially hypothesized that exposing myofibroblasts to the extract of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) could reverse this transition. Indeed, in vitro treatment of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-activated fibroblasts with EPC extract prevented expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA); however, it did not enhance expression of endothelial markers. In two distinct models of renal fibrosis-unilateral ureteral obstruction and chronic phase of folic acid-induced nephropathy-subcapsular injection of EPC extract to the kidney prevented and reversed accumulation of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts and reduced fibrosis. Screening the composition of EPC extract for cytokines revealed that it is enriched in leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and vascular endothelial growth factor. Only LIF was capable of reducing fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition of TGF-β1-activated fibroblasts. In vivo subcapsular administration of LIF reduced the number of myofibroblasts and improved the density of peritubular capillaries; however, it did not reduce the degree of fibrosis. A receptor-independent ligand for the gp130/STAT3 pathway, hyper-interleukin-6 (hyper-IL-6), not only induced a robust downstream increase in pluripotency factors Nanog and c-Myc but also exhibited a powerful antifibrotic effect. In conclusion, EPC extract prevented and reversed fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition and renal fibrosis. The component of EPC extract, LIF, was capable of preventing development of the contractile phenotype of activated fibroblasts but did not eliminate TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts and models of renal fibrosis, whereas a receptor-independent gp130/STAT3 agonist, hyper-IL-6, prevented fibrosis. In summary, these studies, through the evolution from EPC extract to

  7. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in those with cystic fibrosis. Patients with cystic fibrosis are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but also are prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including anti-pseudomonal properties make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class is also discussed. PMID:22968160

  8. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  9. Australian standards of care for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Peter G; Wagenaar, Monica; Matson, Angela G; Craig, Maria E; Holmes-Walker, Deborah Jane; Katz, Tamarah; Hameed, Shihab

    2014-02-01

    Multiple guidelines have been published over the last few years for the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) and cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), although some of the recommendations are based on extrapolation from other forms of diabetes and/or expert opinions. This document seeks to combine the guidelines to provide an Australian approach to the management of CFRD and establish the guidelines within the Australian CF Standards of Care. It is intended that this document will provide assistance to doctors, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, diabetes educators and CF patients concerning the issues surrounding CFRD, and will be reviewed and updated in 2016.

  10. Utility of Noninvasive Markers of Fibrosis in Cholestatic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Corpechot, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Methods of liver fibrosis assessment have changed considerably in the last 20 years, and noninvasive markers now have been recognized as major first-line tools in the management of patients with chronic viral hepatitis infection. But what about the efficiency and utility of these surrogate indices for the more uncommon chronic cholestatic liver diseases, namely primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis? This article provides clinicians with a global overview of what is currently known in the field. Both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of noninvasive markers of fibrosis in cholestatic liver diseases are presented and discussed.

  11. Paracrine Functions of Fibrocytes to Promote Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kleaveland, Kathryn R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrocytes derive from the bone marrow and are found in the circulation. They can be recruited to sites of injury and contribute to repair/remodeling. In vitro evidence suggests that fibrocytes may differentiate into fibroblasts to promote lung fibrosis. However, in vivo evidence for this is sparse. This review summarizes recent literature which may suggest that fibrocytes function to promote fibrosis via paracrine actions. In this way, secretion of growth factors, proteases and matricellular proteins may strongly influence the actions of resident epithelial and mesenchymal cells to promote repair and resolution or to tip the scale towards pathologic remodeling. PMID:24451025

  12. Instructive Role of the Microenvironment in Preventing Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kei; Xavier, Sandhya; Chen, Jun; Kida, Yujiro; Lipphardt, Mark; Ikeda, Reina; Gevertz, Annie; Caviris, Mario; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Kalajzic, Ivo; Dutton, James; Ratliff, Brian B; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbygniew; Rose-John, Stefan; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2017-03-01

    Accumulation of myofibroblasts is a hallmark of renal fibrosis. A significant proportion of myofibroblasts has been reported to originate via endothelial-mesenchymal transition. We initially hypothesized that exposing myofibroblasts to the extract of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) could reverse this transition. Indeed, in vitro treatment of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-activated fibroblasts with EPC extract prevented expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA); however, it did not enhance expression of endothelial markers. In two distinct models of renal fibrosis-unilateral ureteral obstruction and chronic phase of folic acid-induced nephropathy-subcapsular injection of EPC extract to the kidney prevented and reversed accumulation of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts and reduced fibrosis. Screening the composition of EPC extract for cytokines revealed that it is enriched in leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and vascular endothelial growth factor. Only LIF was capable of reducing fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition of TGF-β1-activated fibroblasts. In vivo subcapsular administration of LIF reduced the number of myofibroblasts and improved the density of peritubular capillaries; however, it did not reduce the degree of fibrosis. A receptor-independent ligand for the gp130/STAT3 pathway, hyper-interleukin-6 (hyper-IL-6), not only induced a robust downstream increase in pluripotency factors Nanog and c-Myc but also exhibited a powerful antifibrotic effect. In conclusion, EPC extract prevented and reversed fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition and renal fibrosis. The component of EPC extract, LIF, was capable of preventing development of the contractile phenotype of activated fibroblasts but did not eliminate TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts and models of renal fibrosis, whereas a receptor-independent gp130/STAT3 agonist, hyper-IL-6, prevented fibrosis. In summary, these studies, through the evolution from EPC extract to LIF

  13. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  14. Update on diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Baddini-Martinez, José; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; da Costa, Cláudia Henrique; Jezler, Sérgio; Lima, Mariana Silva; Rufino, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a type of chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia, of unknown etiology, which is associated with a progressive decrease in pulmonary function and with high mortality rates. Interest in and knowledge of this disorder have grown substantially in recent years. In this review article, we broadly discuss distinct aspects related to the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We list the current diagnostic criteria and describe the therapeutic approaches currently available, symptomatic treatments, the action of new drugs that are effective in slowing the decline in pulmonary function, and indications for lung transplantation. PMID:26578138

  15. Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival: a response.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François; Wells, Athol U

    2011-07-25

    Better survival in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema than in lone pulmonary fibrosis: bias or reality? A response to Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival by Todd et al., Fibrogenesis & Tissue Repair 2011, 4:6.Please see related letter http://fibrogenesis.com/content/4/1/17.

  16. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  17. Targeting Interleukin-13 with Tralokinumab Attenuates Lung Fibrosis and Epithelial Damage in a Humanized SCID Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huilan; Oak, Sameer R.; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Herath, Athula; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Lee, Joyce; Bell, Matt; Knight, Darryl A.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Herzog, Erica L.; Hogaboam, Cory M.

    2014-01-01

    The aberrant fibrotic and repair responses in the lung are major hallmarks of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Numerous antifibrotic strategies have been used in the clinic with limited success, raising the possibility that an effective therapeutic strategy in this disease must inhibit fibrosis and promote appropriate lung repair mechanisms. IL-13 represents an attractive target in IPF, but its disease association and mechanism of action remains unknown. In the present study, an overexpression of IL-13 and IL-13 pathway markers was associated with IPF, particularly a rapidly progressive form of this disease. Targeting IL-13 in a humanized experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis using tralokinumab (CAT354) was found to therapeutically block aberrant lung remodeling in this model. However, targeting IL-13 was also found to promote lung repair and to restore epithelial integrity. Thus, targeting IL-13 inhibits fibrotic processes and enhances repair processes in the lung. PMID:24325475

  18. Structure-function analysis of a double-mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein occurring in disorders related to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fanen, P; Clain, J; Labarthe, R; Hulin, P; Girodon, E; Pagesy, P; Goossens, M; Edelman, A

    1999-06-11

    A number of disorders related to cystic fibrosis have been described since the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene, including infertility due to the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens. We have identified, in several patients, complex cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotypes like double-mutant alleles. We have now analyzed the structure-function relationships of one of these mutants, R74W-D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, expressed in HeLa cells, to evaluate the contribution of each mutation in the phenotype. We found that R74W cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator appears to be a polymorphism, while D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator could be responsible for the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens phenotype. The combination of the two produced a more severe effect on the chloride conductance pathway as well as on the phenotype.

  19. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fayong; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Mills, Tingting; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Molina, Jose G; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Liu, Hong; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease with limited treatment options. The signaling molecule adenosine is produced in response to injury and serves a protective role in early stages of injury and is detrimental during chronic stages of disease such as seen in lung conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis. Understanding the association of extracellular adenosine levels and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis is critical for designing adenosine based approaches to treat pulmonary fibrosis. The goal of this study was to use various models of experimental lung fibrosis to understand when adenosine levels are elevated during pulmonary fibrosis and whether these elevations were associated with disease progression and severity. To accomplish this, extracellular adenosine levels, defined as adenosine levels found in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, were determined in mouse models of resolvable and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. We found that relative bronchioalveolar lavage fluid adenosine levels are progressively elevated in association with pulmonary fibrosis and that adenosine levels diminish in association with the resolution of lung fibrosis. In addition, treatment of these models with dipyridamole, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters that potentiates extracellular adenosine levels, demonstrated that the resolution of lung fibrosis is blocked by the failure of adenosine levels to subside. Furthermore, exacerbating adenosine levels led to worse fibrosis in a progressive fibrosis model. Increased adenosine levels were associated with elevation of IL-6 and IL-17, which are important inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that extracellular adenosine levels are closely associated with the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis and that this signaling pathway may mediate fibrosis by regulating IL-6 and IL-17 production.

  20. Adverse outcome pathway development from protein alkylation to liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Tomislav; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lostia, Alfonso; Vinken, Mathieu; Munn, Sharon; Whelan, Maurice

    2017-04-01

    In modern toxicology, substantial efforts are undertaken to develop alternative solutions for in vivo toxicity testing. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept could facilitate knowledge-based safety assessment of chemicals that does not rely exclusively on in vivo toxicity testing. The construction of an AOP is based on understanding toxicological processes at different levels of biological organisation. Here, we present the developed AOP for liver fibrosis and demonstrate a linkage between hepatic injury caused by chemical protein alkylation and the formation of liver fibrosis, supported by coherent and consistent scientific data. This long-term process, in which inflammation, tissue destruction, and repair occur simultaneously, results from the complex interplay between various hepatic cell types, receptors, and signalling pathways. Due to the complexity of the process, an adequate liver fibrosis cell model for in vitro evaluation of a chemical's fibrogenic potential is not yet available. Liver fibrosis poses an important human health issue that is also relevant for regulatory purposes. An AOP described with enough mechanistic detail might support chemical risk assessment by indicating early markers for downstream events and thus facilitating the development of an in vitro testing strategy. With this work, we demonstrate how the AOP framework can support the assembly and coherent display of distributed mechanistic information from the literature to support the use of alternative approaches for prediction of toxicity. This AOP was developed according to the guidance document on developing and assessing AOPs and its supplement, the users' handbook, issued by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.