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Sample records for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

  1. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: review and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Galit

    2009-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an abnormal dilatation of bronchi and bronchioles associated with repeated cycles of airway infection and inflammation. This review will focus on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children, with regard to etiology, diagnosis, treatment options, and recent advances. PMID:20948713

  2. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: its diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Stafler, Patrick; Carr, Siobhán B

    2010-06-01

    An increase in the frequency of diagnosing non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children is due to heightened awareness of the disease and the wider availability of high-resolution computed tomography. The most common underlying conditions leading to bronchiectasis include infections, immunodeficiency, aspiration and primary ciliary dyskinesia. Treatment centres on airway clearance with aggressive antibiotic regimens and physiotherapy; more specific approaches are available for some of the underlying conditions. A high index of suspicion that a child may have underlying bronchiectasis must be maintained in the presence of prolonged or recurrent "wet/productive" cough. The classic definition of bronchiectasis is of irreversible bronchial dilatation; however, at the milder end of the spectrum it appears that radiographic changes may be reversible. Untreated, in its severest form bronchiectasis can progress to end stage pulmonary failure in adult life. In this article, we review its pathogenesis and diagnosis and the evidence base for available treatments.

  3. [Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Huber, L C; Bürgi, U; Schuurmans, M M; Benden, C

    2014-08-01

    Bronchiectasis is the term used for irreversibly dilated airways. Exact epidemiological information on the frequency of bronchiectasis is not available, but the morphological findings are increasingly detected and the associated syndrome is more frequently diagnosed due to improved imaging techniques and increased awareness among chest physicians. The workup of these patients includes a wide panel of investigations guided by patient history and clinical presentation. Despite thorough evaluation the aetiology frequently remains unclear. Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with a severe course of the disease and its detection has impacts on the therapeutic management. Chest physiotherapy, mucoactive substances and antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy. In this review the evaluation of bronchiectasis and the recent therapeutic insights for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis are discussed.

  4. Reduced exercise capacity in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Kuppurao, K V; Somu, N; Vijayan, V K

    2003-07-01

    Bronchiectasis not due to cystic fibrosis is usually a consequence of severe bacterial or tuberculous infection of the lungs, which is commonly seen in children in developing countries. Our aim was to study its functional sequelae and affect on work capacity in children. Seventeen children (7-17 years of age) with clinical and radiological evidence of bronchiectasis of one or both lungs were studied at the Cardiopulmonary Unit of the Tuberculosis Research Centre. Pulmonary function tests including spirometry and lung volume measurements were performed. Incremental exercise stress test was done on a treadmill, and ventilatory and cardiac parameters were monitored. Control values were taken from a previous study. Children with bronchiectasis had lower forced vital capacity (FVC) (1.1 + 0.4 L versus 1.5 + 0.4 L, p = 0.003) and FEV1 (0.95 +/- 0.2 L versus 1.4 +/- 0.3 L, p < 0.002) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The patient group had significantly higher residual lung volumes (0.7 +/- 0.3 L versus 0.4 + 0.1 L, p < 0.02). At maximal exercise, they had lower aerobic capacity (28 +/- 6 ml/min/kg versus 38 +/- 5 ml/min/kg, p < 0.0001) and maximal ventilation (24 +/- 8 L/min versus 39 +/- 10 L/min, p < 0.001). At maximal exercise, while none of the controls desaturated, oxygen saturation fell below 88% in eight of 17 patients. The findings show that children and adolescents with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis have abnormal pulmonary function and reduced exercise capacity. This is likely to interfere with their life as well as future work capacity. Efforts should be made to minimize lung damage in childhood by ensuring early diagnosis and instituting appropriate treatment of respiratory infections.

  5. Fungi in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathologic bronchial dilatation with loss of function that can result from multiple inflammatory and infectious injuries to the conducting airways of the lung. Molds, particularly the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, have been implicated as a common cause of both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, the latter primarily in patients with severe asthma. The pathogenesis of mold-associated bronchiectasis is usually due to atopic sensitization to mold allergens in the presence of active chronic endobronchial fungal infection with host innate and adaptive immune deviation to a Th2-dominated inflammation, a condition known as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) (or allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis if a non-Aspergillus mold is implicated). Diagnostic criteria of ABPA continue to evolve, while treatment relies upon downregulation of the allergic inflammatory response with immunomodulatory agents and antifungal pharmacotherapy.

  6. The Multiple Faces of Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis. A Cluster Analysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Á; Vendrell, Montserrat; Girón, Rosa; Máiz-Carro, Luis; de la Rosa Carrillo, David; de Gracia, Javier; Olveira, Casilda

    2016-09-01

    The clinical presentation and prognosis of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis are both very heterogeneous. To identify different clinical phenotypes for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and their impact on prognosis. Using a standardized protocol, we conducted a multicenter observational cohort study at six Spanish centers with patients diagnosed with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis before December 31, 2005, with a 5-year follow-up from the bronchiectasis diagnosis. A cluster analysis was used to classify the patients into homogeneous groups by means of significant variables corresponding to different aspects of bronchiectasis (clinical phenotypes): age, sex, body mass index, smoking habit, dyspnea, macroscopic appearance of sputum, number of exacerbations, chronic colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, FEV1, number of pulmonary lobes affected, idiopathic bronchiectasis, and associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test) was used to evaluate the comparative survival of the different subgroups. A total of 468 patients with a mean age of 63 (15.9) years were analyzed. Of these, 58% were females, 39.7% had idiopathic bronchiectasis, and 29.3% presented with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. Cluster analysis showed four clinical phenotypes: (1) younger women with mild disease, (2) older women with mild disease, (3) older patients with severe disease who had frequent exacerbations, and (4) older patients with severe disease who did not have frequent exacerbations. The follow-up period was 54 months, during which there were 95 deaths. Mortality was low in the first and second groups (3.9% and 7.6%, respectively) and high for the third (37%) and fourth (40.8%) groups. The third cluster had a higher proportion of respiratory deaths than the fourth (77.8% vs. 34.4%; P < 0.001). Using cluster analysis, it is possible to separate patients with bronchiectasis into distinct clinical phenotypes

  7. The Role of Macrolides in Childhood Non-Cystic Fibrosis-Related Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Masekela, R.; Green, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis-related bronchiectasis is a chronic inflammatory lung disease, which is regarded as an “orphan” lung disease, with little research devoted to the study of this condition. Bronchiectasis results in impaired quality of life and mortality if left untreated. The tools available in the armamentarium for the management of bronchiectasis entail antibiotic therapy traditionally used to treat exacerbations, stratagems to improve mucociliary clearance, and avoidance of toxins. Macrolides have been known for the last two decades to have not only anti-bacterial effects but immunomodulatory properties as well. In cystic fibrosis, the use of macrolides is well documented in subjects colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to improve quality of life and lung function. There is currently emerging evidence to suggest the benefit of macrolides in subjects not colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This beneficial effect has been less explored in the context of bronchiectasis from other causes. The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature on the use of macrolides in non-cystic fibrosis related bronchiectasis in paediatrics. PMID:22570510

  8. A randomised crossover trial of chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Murray, M P; Pentland, J L; Hill, A T

    2009-11-01

    Regular chest physiotherapy is advocated in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis despite little evidence supporting its routine use. This study aimed to establish the efficacy of regular chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis compared with no regular chest physiotherapy. 20 patients not practising regular chest physiotherapy were enrolled in a randomised crossover trial of 3 months of twice daily chest physiotherapy using an oscillatory positive expiratory pressure device compared with 3 months of no chest physiotherapy. The primary end-point was the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). Additional outcomes included 24-h sputum volume, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of FVC (FEF(25-75%)), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), exercise capacity, sputum microbiology and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). The treatment effect was estimated using the differences of the pairs of observations from each patient. There was a significant improvement in all domains and total LCQ score with regular chest physiotherapy (median (interquartile range) total score improvement 1.3 (-0.17-3.25) units; p = 0.002). 24-h sputum volume increased significantly with regular chest physiotherapy (2 (0-6) mL; p = 0.02), as did exercise capacity (40 (15-80) m; p = 0.001) and SGRQ total score (7.77 (-0.99-14.5) unit improvement; p = 0.004). No significant differences were seen in sputum bacteriology, FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75%), MIP or MEP. Regular chest physiotherapy in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis has small, but significant benefits.

  9. Adult Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis Is Characterised by Airway Luminal Th17 Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice C.-H.; Martin, Megan L.; Lourie, Rohan; Rogers, Geraint B.; Burr, Lucy D.; Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; Bowler, Simon D.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Serisier, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is characterised by chronic airway infection and neutrophilic inflammation, which we hypothesised would be associated with Th17 pathway activation. Methods Th17 pathway cytokines were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and gene expression of IL-17A, IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-23 determined from endobronchial biopsies (EBx) in 41 stable bronchiectasis subjects and 20 healthy controls. Relationships between IL-17A levels and infection status, important clinical measures and subsequent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were determined. Results BALF levels of all Th17 cytokines (median (IQR) pg/mL) were significantly higher in bronchiectasis than control subjects, including IL-17A (1.73 (1.19, 3.23) vs. 0.27 (0.24, 0.35), 95% CI 1.05 to 2.21, p<0.0001) and IL-23 (9.48 (4.79, 15.75) vs. 0.70 (0.43, 1.79), 95% CI 4.68 to 11.21, p<0.0001). However, BALF IL-17A levels were not associated with clinical measures or airway microbiology, nor predictive of subsequent P. aeruginosa infection. Furthermore, gene expression of IL-17A in bronchiectasis EBx did not differ from control. In contrast, gene expression (relative to medians of controls) in bronchiectasis EBx was significantly higher than control for IL1β (4.12 (1.24, 8.05) vs 1 (0.13, 2.95), 95% CI 0.05 to 4.07, p = 0.04) and IL-8 (3.75 (1.64, 11.27) vs 1 (0.54, 3.89), 95% CI 0.32 to 4.87, p = 0.02) and BALF IL-8 and IL-1α levels showed significant relationships with clinical measures and airway microbiology. P. aeruginosa infection was associated with increased levels of IL-8 while Haemophilus influenzae was associated with increased IL-1α. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Established adult non-CF bronchiectasis is characterised by luminal Th17 pathway activation, however this pathway may be relatively less important than activation of non-antigen-specific innate neutrophilic immunity. PMID:25822228

  10. Mucociliary clearance techniques for treating non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: Is there evidence?

    PubMed

    Snijders, D; Fernandez Dominguez, B; Calgaro, S; Bertozzi, I; Escribano Montaner, A; Perilongo, G; Barbato, A

    2015-06-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (nCFb) is an acquired condition of variable etiology. An impaired mucociliary clearance seems to be one of the mechanisms behind nCFb, and treatment involves antibiotics, mucoactive agents, and airway clearance techniques (ACTs). Traditional ACTs have four components: postural drainage, percussion, vibration of the chest wall, and coughing. Reviewing the international medical literature on the use of ACTs for patients with nCFb from 1989 to the present day, we retrieved 93 articles, of which 35 met our selection criteria for this analysis. We reviewed active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT), forced expiration techniques (FET), autogenic drainage, postural drainage, oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPep), high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), and exercise or pulmonary rehabilitation. Overall, ACTs appear to be safe for individuals (adults and children) with stable bronchiectasis; where there may be improvements in sputum expectoration, selected measures of lung function, and health-related quality of life. Unfortunately, there is a lack of RCTs in nCFb patients, especially in children. Moreover, none of the studies describes long-term effects of ACTs. It should be noted that a single intervention might not reflect the longer-term outcome and there is no evidence to recommend or contest any type of ACTs in nCFb management. Multicenter RCTs are necessary to evaluate the different techniques of ACTs especially in children with nCFb.

  11. Evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Faria Júnior, Newton Santos; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Santos, Israel Reis; Silva, Anderson Soares; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; Souza, Ângela Honda; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Jardim, José Roberto; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Stirbulov, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between sleep disorders and bronchiectasis has not been well described. We hypothesize that, due to the irreversible dilatation of the bronchi, the presence of secretions, and airflow obstruction, patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis may be predisposed to hypoxemia during sleep, or to symptoms that may lead to arousal. A cross-sectional observational study was performed involving 49 patients with a clinical diagnosis of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, spirometry, and polysomnography, and were evaluated for the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The mean age of the participants was 50.3 ± 13.6 years; 51.1% of patients were male and had a mean body mass index of 23.8 ± 3.4 kg/m2. The mean total sleep time (TST) was 325.15 ± 64.22 min with a slight reduction in sleep efficiency (84.01 ± 29.2%). Regarding sleep stages, stage 1 sleep and REM sleep were abnormal. OSA was present in 40.82% of the patients. The mean arousal index was 5.6 ± 2.9/h and snoring was observed in 71.43% of the patients. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was 14.35 ± 15.36/h, mean minimum oxygen saturation (SpO2 nadir) was 83.29 ± 7.99%, and mean TST with an SpO2 less than 90% was 30.21 ± 60.48 min. EDS was exhibited by 53.06% of the patients and 55.1% were at high risk of developing OSA. The patients infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa had higher apnea-hypopnea indices, ODI, and TST with SpO2 < 90%, and lower values of SpO2 nadir. Adult patients with clinically stable NCFB, especially those infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, display EDS and a high prevalence of OSA, associated with considerable oxygen desaturation during sleep.

  12. Association of body mass index with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Q; Li, T; Li, J C; Li, Y

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this observational, multicenter study was to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A total of 339 patients (197 females, 142 males) diagnosed with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography were classified into four groups: underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5≤BMI<25.0 kg/m2), overweight (25.0≤BMI<30.0 kg/m2), and obese (BMI≥30.0 kg/m2). Clinical variables expressing disease severity were recorded, and acute exacerbations, hospitalizations, and survival rates were estimated during the follow-up period. The mean BMI was 21.90 kg/m2. The underweight group comprised 28.61% of all patients. BMI was negatively correlated with acute exacerbations, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, radiographic extent of bronchiectasis, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa and positively correlated with pulmonary function indices. BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year cumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001). The arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, inspiratory capacity, age, BMI, and predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s independently predicted survival in the Cox proportional hazard model. In conclusion, an underweight status was highly prevalent among patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Patients with a lower BMI were prone to developing more acute exacerbations, worse pulmonary function, amplified systemic inflammation, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa. BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks. BMI should be considered in the routine assessment of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

  13. Review: Quality of Life in Children with Non-cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Anna Marie; de Bruyne, Jessie Anne; Eg, Kah Peng; Thavagnanam, Surendran

    2017-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) has gained renewed interest, due to its increasing health-care burden. Annual mortality statistics in England and Wales showed that under 1,000 people die from bronchiectasis each year, and this number is increasing by 3% yearly. Unfortunately, there is a severe lack of well-powered, randomized controlled trials to guide clinicians how to manage NCFB effectively. Quality-of-life (QOL) measures in NCFB are an important aspect of clinical care that has not been studied well. Commonly used disease-specific questionnaires in children with NCFB are the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire, Short Form-36, the Leicester Cough Questionnaire, and the Parent Cough-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (PC-QOL). Of these, only the PC-QOL can be used in young children, as it is a parent-proxy questionnaire. We reviewed pediatric studies looking at QOL in children with NCFB and cystic fibrosis. All types of airway clearance techniques appear to be safe and have no significant benefit over each other. Number of exacerbations and hospitalizations correlated with QOL scores, while symptom subscales correlated with lung function, worse QOL, frequent antibiotic requirements, and duration of regular follow-up in only one study. There was a correlation between QOL and age of diagnosis in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Other studies have shown no relationship between QOL scores and etiology of NCFB as well as CT changes. As for treatments, oral azithromycin and yoga have demonstrated some improvement in QOL scores. In conclusion, more studies are required to accurately determine important factors contributing to QOL.

  14. Review: Quality of Life in Children with Non-cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Anna Marie; de Bruyne, Jessie Anne; Eg, Kah Peng; Thavagnanam, Surendran

    2017-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) has gained renewed interest, due to its increasing health-care burden. Annual mortality statistics in England and Wales showed that under 1,000 people die from bronchiectasis each year, and this number is increasing by 3% yearly. Unfortunately, there is a severe lack of well-powered, randomized controlled trials to guide clinicians how to manage NCFB effectively. Quality-of-life (QOL) measures in NCFB are an important aspect of clinical care that has not been studied well. Commonly used disease-specific questionnaires in children with NCFB are the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire, Short Form-36, the Leicester Cough Questionnaire, and the Parent Cough-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (PC-QOL). Of these, only the PC-QOL can be used in young children, as it is a parent-proxy questionnaire. We reviewed pediatric studies looking at QOL in children with NCFB and cystic fibrosis. All types of airway clearance techniques appear to be safe and have no significant benefit over each other. Number of exacerbations and hospitalizations correlated with QOL scores, while symptom subscales correlated with lung function, worse QOL, frequent antibiotic requirements, and duration of regular follow-up in only one study. There was a correlation between QOL and age of diagnosis in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Other studies have shown no relationship between QOL scores and etiology of NCFB as well as CT changes. As for treatments, oral azithromycin and yoga have demonstrated some improvement in QOL scores. In conclusion, more studies are required to accurately determine important factors contributing to QOL. PMID:28596950

  15. Inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: clinical and drug delivery perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sugianto, Tiffanie Daisy; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is a chronic, progressive, suppurative lung disease characterized by permanent dilatation of bronchial subdivisions, which further causes accumulation of sputum and bacterial infections. The advent of inhaled antibiotics over the past two decades has been expected to effectively attenuate the problem of chronic bacterial infections in CF and NCFB subjects with higher, local drug concentrations and minimal systemic side effects. This review summarizes and evaluates current clinical evidence of efficacy and adverse effects of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB, as well as ongoing preclinical and clinical studies, followed by a discussion of issues and challenges in clinical practice and drug delivery strategies, together with future research directions. The evidence base of the clinical efficacy of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB is limited and the degrees of reported clinical benefits have been modest and conflicting. Challenges surrounding inhaled antibiotics application and development include the lack of knowledge of disease factors and optimum management strategies, unreceptive lung pathophysiology and the lack of factors that support compliance and tolerability. Nonetheless, research continues to give birth to new clinical findings and novel formulations such as combination antibiotics and sustained-release formulations, which add great value to the development of efficacious, safe and convenient inhalable antibiotics of the future.

  16. Minimal important difference in field walking tests in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis following exercise training.

    PubMed

    Lee, A L; Hill, C J; Cecins, N; Jenkins, S; McDonald, C F; Burge, A T; Rautela, L; Stirling, R G; Thompson, P J; Holland, A E

    2014-09-01

    The 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) are clinically meaningful measures of exercise capacity in people with non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, but the change in walking distance which constitutes clinical benefit is undefined. This study aimed to determine the minimal important difference for the 6MWD and ISWD in non-CF bronchiectasis. Thirty-seven participants with mean FEV1 70% predicted completed both field walking tests before and after an 8-week exercise program. The minimal important difference was calculated using a distribution-based and anchor-based method, with the global rating of change scale used. The mean change in 6MWD in participants who reported themselves to be unchanged was 10 m, compared to 36 m (small change) and 45 m (substantial change) (p = 0.01). For the ISWD, the mean change in participants who reported themselves to be unchanged was 33 m, compared to 54 m (small change) and 73 m (substantial change) (p = 0.04). The anchor-based method defined the minimal important difference for 6MWD as 24.5 m (AUC 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.91) and for ISWD as 35 m (AUC 0.88, 95% CI 0.73-0.99), based on participant's global rating of change. The distribution-based method indicated a value of 22.3 m for the 6MWD and 37 m for the ISWD. There was excellent agreement between the two methods for the 6MWD (kappa = 0.91) and the ISWD (kappa = 0.92). Small changes in 6MWD and ISWD may represent clinically important benefits in people with non-CF bronchiectasis. These data are likely to assist in the interpretation of change in exercise capacity following intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Short-Term Effect of Autogenic Drainage on Ventilation Inhomogeneity in Adult Subjects With Stable Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Poncin, William; Reychler, Grégory; Leeuwerck, Noémie; Bauwens, Nathalie; Aubriot, Anne-Sophie; Nader, Candice; Liistro, Giuseppe; Gohy, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI), a measure of ventilation inhomogeneity derived from a multiple-breath washout test, is a promising tool for assessing airway function in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. However, it is unknown whether ventilation inhomogeneity could improve after successful elimination of excessive secretions within bronchiectasis. The objective of this work was to assess the short-term effects of lung secretion clearance using the autogenic drainage technique on standard lung function tests and LCI in subjects with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Nitrogen-based multiple-breath washout, spirometry, and body plethysmography tests were performed 30 min before autogenic drainage in adults with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. The autogenic drainage session was followed by a 5-min break, after which the tests were repeated in the same order. Sputum expectorated during autogenic drainage was quantified as dry weight and correlated with change between post- and pre-measurements (Δ). Paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare pre- and post-autogenic drainage measurement outcomes. A P value of ≤.05 was considered as statistically significant. Twenty-four subjects were studied (18 females, median age [range]: 65 [21-81] y). Mean ± SD LCI significantly improved after autogenic drainage (10.88 ± 2.62 vs 10.53 ± 2.35, P = .042). However, only 20% of subjects with mucus hyperproduction during autogenic drainage had a ΔLCI that exceeded measurement variability. The percent of predicted slow vital capacity (SVC%) also slightly improved (88.7 ± 19.3% vs 90 ± 19.1%, P = .02). ΔLCI was inversely related to dry sputum weight (r = -.48, P = .02) and ΔSVC% (r = -.64, P = .001). ΔSVC% also correlated with dry sputum weight (r = 0.46, P = .02). In adults with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and mucus hypersecretion, autogenic drainage improved ventilation inhomogeneity. LCI change may be the result of the

  18. Randomised crossover study of the Flutter device and the active cycle of breathing technique in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C; Harrison, S; Ashley, J; Day, K; Smith, D

    2002-01-01

    Methods: A randomised crossover study was performed in 17 stable patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis at home, in which 4 weeks of daily active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT) were compared with 4 weeks of daily physiotherapy with the Flutter device. Results: No significant differences between the two techniques were found. Median weekly sputum weights were similar with a median treatment difference of 7.64 g (p=0.77) and there was no evidence of treatment order or order interaction effects (p=0.70). Health status (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire) and ventilatory function did not change significantly during either treatment period. There was no significant change in peak expiratory flow rate or in breathlessness (Borg score) after individual physiotherapy sessions with either technique. A questionnaire indicated subjectively that patients preferred the Flutter (11/17) to ACBT for routine use. Conclusions: Daily use of the Flutter device in the home is as effective as ACBT in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and has a high level of patient acceptability. PMID:11978924

  19. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  20. The association between combined non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Wook; Jin, Kwang-Nam; Heo, Eun Young; Park, Sung Soo; Chung, Hee Soon; Kim, Deog Kyeom

    2015-01-01

    Background Whereas the epidemiological association between lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease, is well known, limited studies have examined the association between lung cancer and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, a representative chronic airway inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the association between bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with COPD. Methods A matched case–control study was conducted in a referral hospital in South Korea. Among COPD patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity <0.7 and forced expiratory volume in one second ≤70% [% predicted]) who underwent chest computed tomography (CT) between January 1, 2010 and May 30, 2013, patients with lung cancer and controls matched for age, sex, and smoking history were selected. The risk of lung cancer was assessed according to the presence of underlying bronchiectasis confirmed by chest CT. Results The study enrolled 99 cases and 198 controls. Combined bronchiectasis on chest CT was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12–0.52, P<0.001). Significant associations were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.03–0.49, P=0.001) and history of smoking (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.12–0.57, P<0.001). However, the severity and location of bronchiectasis were not associated with the risk of lung cancer. Conclusion Interestingly, the concomitant presence of bronchiectasis in COPD patients was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer. PMID:26005340

  1. The association between combined non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Wook; Jin, Kwang-Nam; Heo, Eun Young; Park, Sung Soo; Chung, Hee Soon; Kim, Deog Kyeom

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the epidemiological association between lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease, is well known, limited studies have examined the association between lung cancer and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, a representative chronic airway inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the association between bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with COPD. A matched case-control study was conducted in a referral hospital in South Korea. Among COPD patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity <0.7 and forced expiratory volume in one second ≤70% [% predicted]) who underwent chest computed tomography (CT) between January 1, 2010 and May 30, 2013, patients with lung cancer and controls matched for age, sex, and smoking history were selected. The risk of lung cancer was assessed according to the presence of underlying bronchiectasis confirmed by chest CT. The study enrolled 99 cases and 198 controls. Combined bronchiectasis on chest CT was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.52, P<0.001). Significant associations were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.03-0.49, P=0.001) and history of smoking (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.12-0.57, P<0.001). However, the severity and location of bronchiectasis were not associated with the risk of lung cancer. Interestingly, the concomitant presence of bronchiectasis in COPD patients was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer.

  2. Pharmacotherapy for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis: Results From an NTM Info & Research Patient Survey and the Bronchiectasis and NTM Research Registry.

    PubMed

    Henkle, Emily; Aksamit, Timothy R; Barker, Alan F; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Daley, Charles L; Anne Daniels, M Leigh; DiMango, Angela; Eden, Edward; Fennelly, Kevin; Griffith, David E; Johnson, Margaret; Knowles, Michael R; Leitman, Amy; Leitman, Philip; Malanga, Elisha; Metersky, Mark L; Noone, Peadar G; O'Donnell, Anne E; Olivier, Kenneth N; Prieto, Delia; Salathe, Matthias; Thomashow, Byron; Tino, Gregory; Turino, Gerard; Wisclenny, Susan; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2017-05-05

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis ("bronchiectasis") is a chronic inflammatory lung disease often associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. Very little data exist to guide bronchiectasis management decisions. We sought to describe patterns of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and antibiotic therapy in the United States. We invited 2,000 patients through NTM Info & Research (NTMir) to complete an anonymous electronic survey. We separately queried baseline clinical and laboratory data from the US Bronchiectasis and NTM Research Registry (BRR). Among 511 NTMir survey responders with bronchiectasis, whose median age was 67 years, 85 (17%) reported asthma and 99 (19%) reported COPD. History of ICS use was reported by 282 (55%), 171 (61%) of whom were treated 1 year or longer, and 150 (53%) were currently taking ICSs. Fewer reported ever taking azithromycin for non-NTM bronchiectasis (203 responders [40%]) or inhaled tobramycin (78 responders [15%]). The median age of 1,912 BRR patients was 69 years; 528 (28%) had asthma and 360 (19%) had COPD. Among 740 patients (42%) without NTM, 314 were taking ICSs at baseline. Among patients without NTM who were taking ICSs, only 178 (57%) had a concurrent diagnosis of COPD or asthma that could explain ICS use. Fewer were taking suppressive macrolides (96 patients [13%]), and of the 70 patients (10%) taking inhaled suppressive antibiotics, 48 (68%) had chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. ICS use was common in two national samples of patients with bronchiectasis, with relatively few patients taking suppressive antibiotic therapies. Further research is needed to clarify the safety and effectiveness of these therapies in patients with bronchiectasis. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-12-02

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9-2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8-18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3-71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5-32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3-11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity.

  4. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9–2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8–18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3–71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5–32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3–11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity. PMID:26627202

  5. Macrolide Treatment Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis. An Analysis from the Bronchiectasis and Low-Dose Erythromycin Study Trial.

    PubMed

    Burr, Lucy D; Rogers, Geraint B; Chen, Alice C-H; Hamilton, Brett R; Pool, Gertruida F; Taylor, Steven L; Venter, Deon; Bowler, Simon D; Biga, Sally; McGuckin, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism by which low-dose macrolide therapy reduces exacerbations in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is not known. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing controls the expression of a range of pathogenicity traits and is inhibited by macrolide in vitro. Quorum sensing inhibition renders P. aeruginosa less pathogenic, potentially reducing its contribution to airway damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether long-term low-dose erythromycin inhibits P. aeruginosa quorum sensing within the airways of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Analysis was performed on induced sputum from P. aeruginosa-positive subjects at recruitment to the BLESS (Bronchiectasis and Low-Dose Erythromycin Study) trial and after 48 weeks of treatment with erythromycin or placebo. To avoid changes in gene expression during culture, bacterial mRNA was extracted directly from sputum, and the relative expression of functionally critical quorum sensing genes was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In keeping with the BLESS study, a significant reduction in total exacerbations was seen in this subgroup (placebo: 6, [interquartile range (IQR), 4-8]; erythromycin: 3, [IQR, 3-4]; P = 0.008; Mann-Whitney test). Erythromycin therapy did not change P. aeruginosa bacterial load determined by polymerase chain reaction. A significant reduction was observed in the expression of the quorum sensing genes, lasR (erythromycin: fold change, 0.065 [IQR, 0.01-0.85], n = 11; placebo: fold change, 1.000 [IQR, 0.05-3.05]; P = 0.047, Mann-Whitney U test) and pqsA (erythromycin: fold change, 0.07 [IQR, 0.02-0.25]; placebo: fold change, 1.000 [IQR, 0.21-4.31], P = 0.017, Mann-Whitney U test), after 48 weeks of erythromycin, compared with placebo. We demonstrate inhibition of P. aeruginosa quorum sensing within the airways of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis receiving long-term, low-dose erythromycin, without a reduction in bacterial load

  6. Prevalence and factors associated with isolation of Aspergillus and Candida from sputum in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Máiz, Luis; Vendrell, Montserrat; Olveira, Casilda; Girón, Rosa; Nieto, Rosa; Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Information on the role of fungi in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is lacking. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with the isolation and persistence of fungi from sputum in these patients. We performed a multicenter observational study comprising adult patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Persistence of Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans was defined as the presence of ≥2 positive sputum cultures taken at least 6 months apart within a period of 5 years. A total of 252 patients (62.7% women with a mean ± SD age of 55.3 ± 16.7 years) were included in the study. All patients had at least 1 sputum sample cultured for fungi, with a mean ± SD of 7 ± 6 cultures per patient. Eighteen (8.7%) and 71 (34.5%) patients had persistent positive cultures for Aspergillus spp. and C. albicans, respectively. Patients with persistence of Aspergillus spp. and C. albicans were older and had more daily purulent sputum. In addition, patients with persistent C. albicans had worse postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), more frequent cystic bronchiectasis, and more hospital-treated exacerbations. They were also more frequently treated with long-term antibiotics. Multivariate analysis showed that daily purulent sputum (OR = 3.75, p = 0.045) and long-term antibiotics (OR = 2.37, p = 0.005) were independently associated with persistence of Aspergillus spp. and C. albicans, respectively. Isolation and persistence of Aspergillus spp. and C. albicans are frequent in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Daily purulent sputum and chronic antibiotic treatment were associated with persistence of Aspergillus spp. and C. albicans, respectively. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The effects of oscillating positive expiratory pressure therapy in adults with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Williamson, Hannah C; Lorensini, Sarah; Spencer, Lissa M

    2015-02-01

    Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) are recommended for patients with stable non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis, but the efficacy of oscillating positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy compared to other techniques has not been reviewed. A systematic review of studies was conducted in stable patients comparing the effect of oscillating PEP therapy to other ACTs or a control condition. Data were extracted related to sputum expectoration, lung function, gas exchange, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, and exacerbation rate. Seven studies were included with a total of 146 patients, with a mean (SD) PEDro score of 7(1). Oscillating PEP therapy enhanced sputum expectoration compared to no treatment, but has equivalent benefits as the active cycle of breathing technique with gravity-assisted drainage (mean difference [95% CI] -2.8 g [-8.8 to 3.2 g]). Oscillating PEP has a similar effect as other ACTs on dynamic lung volumes, gas exchange and breathlessness. Use of oscillating PEP improved disease-specific QOL (p < 0.001) and cough-related QOL (p < 0.002) compared to no treatment but did not reduce exacerbation rate. In conclusion, in stable non-CF bronchiectasis, oscillating PEP therapy is associated with improvement in sputum expectoration and QOL compared to no treatment. Compared to other ACTs, the effect upon sputum expectoration, lung function, gas exchange, and symptoms are equivalent. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Clinical impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A study on 1,790 patients from the Spanish Bronchiectasis Historical Registry

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel; Giron, Rosa Maria; Vendrell, Montserrat; Olveira, Casilda; Borderias, Luis; Maiz, Luis; Torres, Antoni; Martinez-Moragon, Eva; Rajas, Olga; Casas, Francisco; Cordovilla, Rosa; de Gracia, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the coexistence of bronchiectasis (BE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in series of patients diagnosed primarily with BE. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of patients with BE associated with COPD included in the Spanish Bronchiectasis Historical Registry and compare them to the remaining patients with non-cystic fibrosis BE. Methods We conducted a multicentre observational study of historical cohorts, analysing the characteristics of 1,790 patients who had been included in the registry between 2002 and 2011. Of these, 158 (8.8%) were registered as BE related to COPD and were compared to the remaining patients with BE of other aetiologies. Results Patients with COPD were mostly male, older, had a poorer respiratory function and more frequent exacerbations. There were no differences in the proportion of patients with chronic bronchial colonisation or in the isolated microorganisms. A significantly larger proportion of patients with COPD received treatment with bronchodilators, inhaled steroids and intravenous antibiotics, but there was no difference in the use of long term oral or inhaled antibiotherapy. During a follow-up period of 3.36 years, the overall proportion of deaths was 13.8%. When compared to the remaining aetiologies, patients with BE associated with COPD presented the highest mortality rate. The multivariate analysis showed that the diagnosis of COPD in a patient with BE as a primary diagnosis increased the risk of death by 1.77. Conclusion Patients with BE related to COPD have the same microbiological characteristics as patients with BE due to other aetiologies. They receive treatment with long term oral and inhaled antibiotics aimed at controlling chronic bronchial colonisation, even though the current COPD treatment guidelines do not envisage this type of therapy. These patients’ mortality is notably higher than that of remaining patients with non-cystic fibrosis BE

  9. Clinical impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A study on 1,790 patients from the Spanish Bronchiectasis Historical Registry.

    PubMed

    De la Rosa, David; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel; Giron, Rosa Maria; Vendrell, Montserrat; Olveira, Casilda; Borderias, Luis; Maiz, Luis; Torres, Antoni; Martinez-Moragon, Eva; Rajas, Olga; Casas, Francisco; Cordovilla, Rosa; de Gracia, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the coexistence of bronchiectasis (BE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in series of patients diagnosed primarily with BE. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of patients with BE associated with COPD included in the Spanish Bronchiectasis Historical Registry and compare them to the remaining patients with non-cystic fibrosis BE. We conducted a multicentre observational study of historical cohorts, analysing the characteristics of 1,790 patients who had been included in the registry between 2002 and 2011. Of these, 158 (8.8%) were registered as BE related to COPD and were compared to the remaining patients with BE of other aetiologies. Patients with COPD were mostly male, older, had a poorer respiratory function and more frequent exacerbations. There were no differences in the proportion of patients with chronic bronchial colonisation or in the isolated microorganisms. A significantly larger proportion of patients with COPD received treatment with bronchodilators, inhaled steroids and intravenous antibiotics, but there was no difference in the use of long term oral or inhaled antibiotherapy. During a follow-up period of 3.36 years, the overall proportion of deaths was 13.8%. When compared to the remaining aetiologies, patients with BE associated with COPD presented the highest mortality rate. The multivariate analysis showed that the diagnosis of COPD in a patient with BE as a primary diagnosis increased the risk of death by 1.77. Patients with BE related to COPD have the same microbiological characteristics as patients with BE due to other aetiologies. They receive treatment with long term oral and inhaled antibiotics aimed at controlling chronic bronchial colonisation, even though the current COPD treatment guidelines do not envisage this type of therapy. These patients' mortality is notably higher than that of remaining patients with non-cystic fibrosis BE.

  10. [Inhaled colistin in elderly patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchial infection].

    PubMed

    Tabernero Huguet, Eva; Gil Alaña, Pilar; Alkiza Basañez, Ramón; Hernández Gil, Anibal; Garros Garay, Javier; Artola Igarza, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is a frequent cause of admission for elderly patients and chronic respiratory diseases. Although some guidelines recommend long-term treatment with inhaled antibiotics in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection, there is limited evidence supporting these prolonged antibiotic treatments in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of inhaled colistin in elderly patients with bronchiectasis and chronic bronchial P. aeruginosa infection in reducing hospital readmissions. A prospective, controlled and open label study was conducted on patients with bronchiectasis diagnosed by computed tomography and persistence of P. aeruginosa in sputum after appropriate antimicrobial therapy. All patients received education, and physiotherapy training. The intervention group also received nebulized colistin 1 million IU twice a day for one year. Data were collected on the demographics, clinical and functional characteristics, admissions in previous year, and sputum microbiology. Patients were followed up every two months for one year, with readmissions, microbiological results, functional tests, and deaths being evaluated. The study included 39 patients, of whom 20 received nebulized colistin and 19 conventional therapy. There were no differences between the two groups in baseline clinical and functional characteristics or previous hospital stay. The mean age was 77.7+/-5, Charlson index 2.85, and FEV1% 41.3+/-15. Five patients (25%) stopped the nebulized treatment because of adverse effects. P. aeruginosa was eradicated in 45% of the colistin treated patients, and in only one of the control group (statistically significant), but at the end of the study year, there were no differences in the number of hospital admissions (control group 1.6+/-1.7 and 2.7+/-3 colistin group), or days of stay (19+/-31 and 23+/-20). There were no differences in lung function or clinical symptoms between

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: a multicenter observational study.

    PubMed

    Máiz, L; Girón, R; Olveira, C; Vendrell, M; Nieto, R; Martínez-García, M A

    2016-08-22

    Data on the prevalence of and factors associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis are limited. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with isolation of NTM in this population. We performed a multicenter observational study of historical cohorts comprising consecutive patients with non-CF bronchiectasis and at least 2 sputum samples cultured for mycobacteria over a period of 5 years. The study population included 218 adult patients (61.9 % women) with a mean (SD) age of 55.7 (16) years and a mean (SD) of 5.1 (3.3) cultures/patient. NTM was isolated from sputum in 18 patients (8.3 %). Of these, 5 patients (28 %) met the American Thoracic Society criteria for NTM disease. Mycobacterium avium complex was the most frequently isolated microorganism (9 patients, 4.1 %). The variables independently associated with isolation of NTM were FVC ≥ 75 % predicted (OR, 4.84; 95 % CI 1.47 to 15.9; p < 0.05), age ≥ 50 years (OR, 4.74; 95 % CI 1.25 to 17.97; p < 0.05), and body mass index (BMI) ≤ 23 kg/m(2) (OR, 2.97; 95 % CI 1.03-8.58; p < 0.05). Patients with these three characteristics had a 40 % probability of having at least one isolation of NMT. A significant number of patients with non-CF bronchiectasis are positive for the isolation of NTM. M. avium complex is the most frequently isolated mycobacteria. FVC ≥ 75 % predicted, age ≥ 50 years, and a BMI ≤ 23 kg/m(2) were independently associated with the presence of NTM in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis.

  12. Differences and similarities in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis between developing and affluent countries.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Nitin; Karadag, Bulent

    2011-06-01

    Non-CF bronchiectasis remains a major cause of morbidity not only in developing countries but in some indigenous groups of affluent countries. Although there is a decline in the prevalence and incidence in developed countries, recent studies in indigenous populations report higher prevalence. Due to the lack of such data, epidemiological studies are required to find the incidence and prevalence in developing countries. Although the main characteristics of bronchiectasis are similar in developing and affluent countries, underlying aetiology, nutritional status, frequency of exacerbations and severity of the disease are different. Delay of diagnosis is surprisingly similar in the affluent and developing countries possibly due to different reasons. Long-term studies are needed for evidence based management of the disease. Successful management and prevention of bronchiectasis require a multidisciplinary approach, while the lack of resources is still a major problem in the developing countries.

  13. The short and long term effects of exercise training in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis – a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise training is recommended for non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, but the long-term effects are unclear. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine the effects of exercise training and review of airway clearance therapy (ACT) on exercise capacity, health related quality of life (HRQOL) and the incidence of acute exacerbations in people with non-CF bronchiectasis. Methods Participants were randomly allocated to 8 weeks of supervised exercise training and review of ACT, or control. Primary outcomes of exercise capacity and HRQOL (Chronic respiratory disease questionnaire) and secondary outcomes of cough-related QOL (Leicester cough questionnaire) and psychological symptoms (Hospital anxiety and depression scale) were measured at baseline, following completion of the intervention period and at 6 and 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes of the exacerbation rate and time to first exacerbation were analysed over 12 months. Results Eighty-five participants (mean FEV1 74% predicted; median Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea grade of 1 (IQR [1–3]) were included. Exercise training increased the incremental shuttle walk distance (mean difference to control 62 m, 95% CI 24 to 101 m) and the 6-minute walking distance (mean difference to control 41 m, 95% CI 19 to 63 m), but these improvements were not sustained at 6 or 12 months. Exercise training reduced dyspnoea (p = 0.009) and fatigue (p = 0.01) but did not impact on cough-related QOL or mood. Exercise training reduced the frequency of acute exacerbations (median 1[IQR 1–3]) compared to the control group (2[1–3]) over 12 months follow up (p = 0.012), with a longer time to first exacerbation with exercise training of 8 months (95% CI 7 to 9 months) compared to the control group (6 months [95% CI 5 to 7 months], p = 0.047). Conclusions Exercise training in bronchiectasis is associated with short term improvement in exercise capacity, dyspnoea and

  14. The short and long term effects of exercise training in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Hill, Catherine J; Cecins, Nola; Jenkins, Sue; McDonald, Christine F; Burge, Angela T; Rautela, Linda; Stirling, Robert G; Thompson, Philip J; Holland, Anne E

    2014-04-15

    Exercise training is recommended for non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, but the long-term effects are unclear. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine the effects of exercise training and review of airway clearance therapy (ACT) on exercise capacity, health related quality of life (HRQOL) and the incidence of acute exacerbations in people with non-CF bronchiectasis. Participants were randomly allocated to 8 weeks of supervised exercise training and review of ACT, or control. Primary outcomes of exercise capacity and HRQOL (Chronic respiratory disease questionnaire) and secondary outcomes of cough-related QOL (Leicester cough questionnaire) and psychological symptoms (Hospital anxiety and depression scale) were measured at baseline, following completion of the intervention period and at 6 and 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes of the exacerbation rate and time to first exacerbation were analysed over 12 months. Eighty-five participants (mean FEV1 74% predicted; median Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea grade of 1 (IQR [1-3]) were included. Exercise training increased the incremental shuttle walk distance (mean difference to control 62 m, 95% CI 24 to 101 m) and the 6-minute walking distance (mean difference to control 41 m, 95% CI 19 to 63 m), but these improvements were not sustained at 6 or 12 months. Exercise training reduced dyspnoea (p = 0.009) and fatigue (p = 0.01) but did not impact on cough-related QOL or mood. Exercise training reduced the frequency of acute exacerbations (median 1[IQR 1-3]) compared to the control group (2[1-3]) over 12 months follow up (p = 0.012), with a longer time to first exacerbation with exercise training of 8 months (95% CI 7 to 9 months) compared to the control group (6 months [95% CI 5 to 7 months], p = 0.047). Exercise training in bronchiectasis is associated with short term improvement in exercise capacity, dyspnoea and fatigue and fewer exacerbations over 12

  15. Lung clearance index in adults with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung clearance index (LCI) is a measure of abnormal ventilation distribution derived from the multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) technique. We aimed to determine the clinical utility of LCI in non-CF bronchiectasis, and to assess two novel MBW parameters that distinguish between increases in LCI due to specific ventilation inequality (LCIvent) and increased respiratory dead space (LCIds). Methods Forty-three patients with non-CF bronchiectasis and 18 healthy control subjects underwent MBW using the sulphur hexafluoride wash-in technique, and data from 40 adults with CF were re-analysed. LCIvent and LCIds were calculated using a theoretical two-compartment lung model, and represent the proportional increase in LCI above its ideal value due to specific ventilation inequality and increased respiratory dead space, respectively. Results LCI was significantly raised in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis compared to healthy controls (9.99 versus 7.28, p < 0.01), and discriminated well between these two groups (area under receiver operating curve = 0.90, versus 0.83 for forced expiratory volume in one second [% predicted]). LCI, LCIvent and LCIds were repeatable (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.75), and correlated significantly with measures of spirometric airflow obstruction. Conclusion LCI is repeatable, discriminatory, and is associated with spirometric airflow obstruction in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. LCIvent and LCIds are a practical and repeatable alternative to phase III slope analysis and may allow a further level of mechanistic information to be extracted from the MBW test in patients with severe ventilation heterogeneity. PMID:24884343

  16. Economic burden of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in the first year after diagnosis from a US health plan perspective.

    PubMed

    Joish, Vijay N; Spilsbury-Cantalupo, Monica; Operschall, Elisabeth; Luong, Ba; Boklage, Susan

    2013-06-01

    Recent estimates suggest the prevalence of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) may be increasing in the US. The objective of this study was to determine the current economic burden of NCFB compared with non-NCFB controls in the first year after diagnosis within a commercially enrolled US population. A retrospective matched cross-sectional case control (1:3) study design was used. Data were derived from MarketScan(®) Commercial Claims and Encounters Database, which captures all patient-level demographic data and all medical and pharmacy claims during the period 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2009. NCFB patients were identified using ICD-9 codes 494.0 and 494.1. Individuals with medical claims for cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded. Incremental burden of NCFB was estimated for overall and respiratory-related expenditures using multivariate regression models which adjusted for baseline characteristics and healthcare resource utilization. All demographic characteristics and economic outcomes were ascertained in 12 months before (baseline period) and 12 months after (follow-up) index event, which was defined as the first bronchiectasis-related medical event. Non-parametric bootstrap technique was used to calculate the 95 % confidence limits for the adjusted estimate. All costs are inflation-adjusted to a baseline year of 2009 using the consumer price index. All statistical tests were conducted using SAS 9.2 and STATA 12.0. The study sample used for healthcare burden analyses had 9,146 cases and 27,438 matched controls. The majority of the sample was between the ages of 45-64 years old and 64 % were female. A greater proportion of cases than controls had an increase from baseline to follow-up in both total (49 vs 40 %) and respiratory-related costs (57 vs 25 %). The average increase in overall and respiratory-related costs compared with controls after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics was US$2,319 (95 % CI 1

  17. Prolonged antibiotics for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Hnin, Khin; Nguyen, Chau; Carson, Kristin V; Evans, David J; Greenstone, Michael; Smith, Brian J

    2015-08-13

    The vicious cycle hypothesis for bronchiectasis predicts that bacterial colonisation of the respiratory tract perpetuates inflammatory change. This damages the mucociliary escalator, preventing bacterial clearance and allowing persistence of pro-inflammatory mediators. Conventional treatment with physiotherapy and intermittent antibiotics is believed to improve the condition of people with bronchiectasis, although no conclusive data show that these interventions influence the natural history of the condition. Various strategies have been tried to interrupt this cycle of infection and inflammation, including prolonging antibiotic treatment with the goal of allowing the airway mucosa to heal. To determine the benefits of prolonged antibiotic therapy in the treatment of patients with bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Trials Register and reference lists of identified articles. Searches were current as of February 2014. Randomised trials examining the use of prolonged antibiotic therapy (for four or more weeks) in the treatment of bronchiectasis compared with placebo or usual care. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors to ask for missing information. Eighteen trials met the inclusion criteria, randomly assigning a total of 1157 participants. Antibiotics were given for between four weeks and 83 weeks. Limited meta-analysis was possible because of the diversity of outcomes reported in these trials. Based on the number of participants with at least one exacerbation, the meta-analysis showed significant effects in favour of the intervention (odds ratio (OR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.52; P value < 0.00001), with events occurring in 271 per 1000 people in the intervention arm (95% CI 126 to 385) and in 546 per 1000 in the control population, based on evidence of moderate quality. A non-statistically significant reduction in hospitalisation favoured the use of prolonged

  18. A Comparison of 2 Respiratory Devices for Sputum Clearance in Adults With Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Yasmin R; Greer, Tracy A; Morgan, Lucy C; Li, Frank; Farah, Claude S

    2017-10-01

    Airway clearance techniques are a vital part of routine care for patients with bronchiectasis. There is no clear superior modality. The Flutter combines oscillations (6-20 Hz) and positive expiratory pressure; the Lung Flute combines positive expiratory pressure and low frequency acoustic waves (18-22 Hz), to augment clearance. This project aimed to compare these devices. This was a randomized crossover study of adult subjects with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (expectorating > 25 mL/d). Subjects attended 2 separate out-patient visits, 1 week apart, and completed a supervised sputum clearance regime and Lickert scale (8 questions regarding subjects' perception of the experience using each device). Total sputum expectorated during supervised intervention (T1) and after 30 min from the end of T1 (T2) was recorded as wet sputum weight. Total wet sputum weight desiccated in a microwave (10 min at 300 watts), allowed measurement of total dry sputum weight. Data were compared using paired t test. We recruited 40 subjects with a mean ± SD age of 63 ± 16 y. Overall, there was no significant difference in wet sputum weight (Flutter, 5.78 ± 6.47 g; Lung Flute, 5.75 ± 0.22 g) and dry sputum weight (Flutter, 0.40 ± 0.86 g; Lung Flute, 0.22 ± 0.21 g). At T1, wet sputum weight was higher for the Flutter (5.10 ± 6.26 g) compared with the Lung Flute (3.74 ± 3.44 g) (P = .038). At T2, wet sputum weight was higher for the Lung Flute (2.02 ± 3.01 g) compared with the Flutter (0.68 ± 0.75 g) (P = .001). Subjects perceived the Flutter as being significantly better at clearing secretions (P = .01), easy to understand (P = .03), and simple to use (P = .01) compared with the Lung Flute. Both devices were well-tolerated and successfully augmented secretion clearance. Most subjects preferred the Flutter because of increased speed of secretion clearance, and greater ease of use. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  19. Observational study of sleep, respiratory mechanics and quality of life in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: a protocol study

    PubMed Central

    Faria Júnior, Newton Santos; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Apostolico, Nadua; Pereira, Nixon Alves; dos Santos, Israel dos Reis; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Souza, Ismael Dias; Polonio, Igor Bastos; Romaldini, José Gustavo Barian; Pereira, Déborah Madeu; Alves, Vera Lúcia dos Santos; Souza, Ângela Honda; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Jardim, José Roberto; Stirbulov, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bronchiectasis is a chronic disorder characterised by permanent and irreversible abnormal dilation of the bronchi and bronchioles, primarily caused by repeated cycles of pulmonary infections and inflammation, which lead to reduced mucociliary clearance and to the excessive production of sputum. Patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis may be predisposed to hypoxemia during sleep, or to symptoms that may lead to arousals and thereby reduce the quality of life, because of the irreversible dilation of the bronchi and the presence of secretions and airflow obstruction. Methods and analysis For this cross-sectional observational study, patients with a clinical diagnosis of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis will be recruited from the Bronchiectasis Clinic of the Pneumology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital and the Federal University of São Paulo (São Paulo, Brazil). Patients of either sex will be included if high-resolution CT of the thorax and classic sweat test confirms they have non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, are between 18 and 80 years old, use long-acting bronchodilators, are clinically stable for a least 1 month, agree to participate in the study and they sign a statement of informed consent. The first part of the study will involve a clinical evaluation, maximal respiratory pressures, spirometry and the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire. The Sleep Laboratory of the Master's and Doctoral Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences of the Nove de Julho University (São Paulo, Brazil) will perform the polysomnographic studies, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, waist and neck circumferences, modified Mallampati classification and tonsil index. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committees of Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital (process number 178/2012) and Human Research Ethics Committee of Nove de Julho University (process number 370474

  20. Inhaled, dual release liposomal ciprofloxacin in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (ORBIT-2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Serisier, David J; Bilton, Diana; De Soyza, Anthony; Thompson, Philip J; Kolbe, John; Greville, Hugh W; Cipolla, David; Bruinenberg, Paul; Gonda, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Background The delivery of antipseudomonal antibiotics by inhalation to Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected subjects with non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is a logical extension of treatment strategies successfully developed in CF bronchiectasis. Dual release ciprofloxacin for inhalation (DRCFI) contains liposomal ciprofloxacin, formulated to optimise airway antibiotic delivery. Methods Phase II, 24-week Australian/New Zealand multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 42 adult bronchiectasis subjects with ≥2 pulmonary exacerbations in the prior 12 months and ciprofloxacin-sensitive P aeruginosa at screening. Subjects received DRCFI or placebo in three treatment cycles of 28 days on/28 days off. The primary outcome was change in sputum P aeruginosa bacterial density to the end of treatment cycle 1 (day 28), analysed by modified intention to treat (mITT). Key secondary outcomes included safety and time to first pulmonary exacerbation—after reaching the pulmonary exacerbation endpoint subjects discontinued study drug although remained in the study. Results DRCFI resulted in a mean (SD) 4.2 (3.7) log10 CFU/g reduction in P aeruginosa bacterial density at day 28 (vs −0.08 (3.8) with placebo, p=0.002). DRCFI treatment delayed time to first pulmonary exacerbation (median 134 vs 58 days, p=0.057 mITT, p=0.046 per protocol). DRCFI was well tolerated with a similar incidence of systemic adverse events to the placebo group, but fewer pulmonary adverse events. Conclusions Once-daily inhaled DRCFI demonstrated potent antipseudomonal microbiological efficacy in adults with non-CF bronchiectasis and ciprofloxacin-sensitive P aeruginosa. In this modest-sized phase II study, DRCFI was also well tolerated and delayed time to first pulmonary exacerbation in the per protocol population. PMID:23681906

  1. Longitudinal assessment of sputum microbiome by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Elena M.; Hennessy, Catherine; Mirza, Ghazala K.; James, Phillip L.; Coleman, Meg; Jones, Andrew; Wilson, Robert; Bilton, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Background Bronchiectasis is accompanied by chronic bronchial infection that may drive disease progression. However, the evidence base for antibiotic therapy is limited. DNA based methods offer better identification and quantification of microbial constituents of sputum than standard clinical culture and may help inform patient management strategies. Our study objective was to determine the longitudinal variability of the non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis microbiome in sputum with respect to clinical variables. Eighty-five patients with non-CF bronchiectasis and daily sputum production were recruited from outpatient clinics and followed for six months. Monthly sputum samples and clinical measurements were taken, together with additional samples during exacerbations. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sputum microbiota was successful for 381 samples from 76 patients and analysed in conjunction with clinical data. Results Microbial communities were highly individual in composition and stability, usually with limited diversity and often containing multiple pathogens. When compared to DNA sequencing, microbial culture had restricted sensitivity in identifying common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis. With some exceptions, community characteristics showed poor correlations with clinical features including underlying disease, antibiotic use and exacerbations, with the subject showing the strongest association with community structure. When present, the pathogens mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae may also shape the structure of the rest of the microbial community. Conclusions The use of microbial community analysis of sputum added to information from microbial culture. A simple model of exacerbations driven by bacterial overgrowth was not supported, suggesting a need for revision of principles for antibiotic therapy. In individual patients, the management of chronic bronchial infection may be

  2. Rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory disease other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: exercise and physical activity interventions in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Burtin, Chris; Hebestreit, Helge

    2015-01-01

    A relevant proportion of children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a marked decrease in exercise tolerance, which can be partly related to impaired muscle function and decreased physical activity levels in daily life, in addition to lung disease. Preliminary findings suggest that patients with non-CF bronchiectasis face the same problems. These patients might be excellent candidates for exercise and physical activity interventions. This review elaborates on the rationale for exercise training and activity behaviour changes and summarizes the existing evidence for these rehabilitation strategies in patients with bronchiectasis, both CF and non-CF bronchiectasis. Furthermore, practical considerations and safety aspects are discussed.

  3. Respiratory Exacerbations in Indigenous Children From Two Countries With Non-Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease/Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Valery, Patricia C.; Williams, Hayley; Grimwood, Keith; Morris, Peter S.; Torzillo, Paul J.; McCallum, Gabrielle B.; Chikoyak, Lori; Holman, Robert C.; Chang, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory exacerbations (AREs) cause morbidity and lung function decline in children with chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study, we determined the patterns of AREs and factors related to increased risks for AREs in children with CSLD/bronchiectasis. METHODS: Ninety-three indigenous children aged 0.5 to 8 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis in Australia (n = 57) and Alaska (n = 36) during 2004 to 2009 were followed for > 3 years. Standardized parent interviews, physical examinations, and medical record reviews were undertaken at enrollment and every 3 to 6 months thereafter. RESULTS: Ninety-three children experienced 280 AREs (median = 2, range = 0-11 per child) during the 3-year period; 91 (32%) were associated with pneumonia, and 43 (15%) resulted in hospitalization. Of the 93 children, 69 (74%) experienced more than two AREs over the 3-year period, and 28 (30%) had more than one ARE in each study year. The frequency of AREs declined significantly over each year of follow-up. Factors associated with recurrent (two or more) AREs included age < 3 years, ARE-related hospitalization in the first year of life, and pneumonia or hospitalization for ARE in the year preceding enrollment. Factors associated with hospitalizations for AREs in the first year of study included age < 3 years, female caregiver education, and regular use of bronchodilators. CONCLUSIONS: AREs are common in children with CSLD/bronchiectasis, but with clinical care and time AREs occur less frequently. All children with CSLD/bronchiectasis require comprehensive care; however, treatment strategies may differ for these patients based on their changing risks for AREs during each year of care. PMID:24811693

  4. Ciprofloxacin Dry Powder for Inhalation in Patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stass, Heino; Nagelschmitz, Johannes; Kappeler, Dominik; Sommerer, Knut; Kietzig, Claudius; Weimann, Boris

    2017-02-01

    Ciprofloxacin dry powder for inhalation (Ciprofloxacin DPI) is in development as long-term intermittent therapy to reduce the frequency of acute exacerbations in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) patients with respiratory bacterial pathogens. There is no approved therapy in this indication. Reliable, reproducible lung deposition is a prerequisite for inhaled drugs. In this phase I study, six patients with NCFB, six with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 12 healthy volunteers (HVs), received one dose of (99m)Tc-Ciprofloxacin DPI 32.5 mg to assess pulmonary drug deposition by quantitative scintigraphy. (81m)Krypton ventilation scans were performed to map lung contours. Systemic exposure as mediated by absorption in the lung was measured using the charcoal block method. HVs ingested activated charcoal orally (20 g before and 2 × 10 g after inhalation) to block gastrointestinal absorption of drug swallowed during inhalation. Indirect determination of pulmonary drug deposition was based on plasma and urine pharmacokinetic (PK) data. Scintigraphic data revealed high, reproducible lung deposition in all participants (intrapulmonary deposition relative to nominal dose, mean [standard deviation; range]: NCFB, 53% [11%; 38%-64%]; COPD, 51% [10%; 34%-61%]; HVs, 51% [7%; 40%-64%] to 53% [8%; 44%-70%]). Similar ratios of central-to-peripheral airway deposition were seen across groups. Systemic exposure to ciprofloxacin was low. Relative bioavailability of Ciprofloxacin DPI was reduced by ∼60% after charcoal block, suggesting that systemic exposure was mainly caused by uptake via the lung. Lung deposition of 30% was estimated from PK data, but this may be an underestimation due to drug clearance from the lung and transintestinal secretion. Adverse events were no more frequent or severe in patients with lung diseases versus HVs, and no clinically relevant influence on vital signs or lung function was observed. This study supports the continued

  5. Phase 3 randomized study of the efficacy and safety of inhaled dry powder mannitol for the symptomatic treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Bilton, Diana; Daviskas, Evangelia; Anderson, Sandra D; Kolbe, John; King, Gregory; Stirling, Rob G; Thompson, Bruce R; Milne, David; Charlton, Brett

    2013-07-01

    Inhaled dry powder mannitol enhanced mucus clearance and improved quality of life over 2 weeks in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. This study's objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of dry powder mannitol over 12 weeks. Patients with bronchiectasis confirmed by high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan, aged 15 to 80 years, with FEV1≥50% predicted and ≥1 L participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Patients with a negative mannitol provocation test were randomized to inhale 320 mg mannitol (n=231) or placebo (n=112) bid for 12 weeks. To further assess safety, the same mannitol dose/frequency was administered to a patient subset in an open-label extension over 52 weeks. Primary end points were changes from baseline at 12 weeks in 24-h sputum weight and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score. There was a significant difference of 4.3 g in terms of change in sputum weight over 12 weeks (95% CI, 1.64-7.00; P=.002) between mannitol and placebo; however, this was largely driven by a decrease in sputum weight in the placebo group. This was associated, in turn, with more antibiotic use in the placebo group (50 of 112 [45%]) than in the inhaled mannitol group (85 of 231 [37%]). There was no statistical difference between the groups (P=.304) in total SGRQ score (mannitol, -3.4 points [95% CI, -4.81 to -1.94] vs placebo, -2.1 points [95% CI, -4.12 to -0.09]). In a subgroup study (n=82), patients receiving mannitol showed less small airway mucus plugging on HRCT scan at 12 weeks compared with patients receiving placebo (P=.048). Compliance rates were high, and mannitol was well tolerated with adverse events similar to those of placebo. Because the difference in sputum weights appears to be associated with increased antibiotic use in the placebo group, a larger controlled study is now required to investigate the long-term mannitol effect on pulmonary exacerbations and antibiotic use. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT0027753; URL

  6. DNase and atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Tom; de Hoog, Matthijs; Lequin, Maarten H; Devos, Annick S; Merkus, Peter JFM

    2005-01-01

    Introduction No evidence based treatment is available for atelectasis. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiologic changes in pediatric patients who received DNase for persistent atelectasis that could not be attributed to cardiovascular causes, and who were unresponsive to treatment with inhaled bronchodilators and physiotherapy. Methods All non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients who received nebulised or endotracheally instilled DNase for atelectasis between 1998 and 2002, with and without mechanical ventilation, were analysed in a retrospective descriptive study. The endpoints were the blood pCO2, the heart rate, the respiratory rate, the FiO2 and the chest X-ray scores before and after treatment. Results In 25 of 30 patients (median [range] age, 1.6 [0.1–11] years) who met inclusion criteria, paired data of at least three endpoints were available. All clinical parameters improved significantly within 2 hours (P < 0.01), except for the heart rate (P = 0.06). Chest X-ray scores improved significantly within 24 hours after DNase treatment (P < 0.001). Individual improvement was observed in 17 patients and no clinical change was observed in five patients. Temporary deterioration (n = 3) was associated with increased airway obstruction and desaturations. No other complications were observed. Conclusion After treatment with DNase for atelectasis of presumably infectious origin in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients, rapid clinical improvement was observed within 2 hours and radiologic improvement was documented within 24 hours in the large majority of children, and increased airway obstruction and ventilation–perfusion mismatch occurred in three children, possibly due to rapid mobilisation of mucus. DNase may be an effective treatment for infectious atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients. PMID:16137347

  7. Dornase Alfa for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Pulmonary Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Thornby, Krisy-Ann; Johnson, Ashley; Axtell, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    To review the literature evaluating the efficacy of dornase alfa for non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis. Articles were retrieved after a search of MEDLINE/PubMed (1946 to April 2014), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2014) was performed using the terms dornase alfa, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease, pulmonary, persistent, and atelectasis. Other relevant articles referenced from the MEDLINE search were also utilized. Data sources were limited to English language clinical trials and case studies including only children; 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports met the criteria. Dornase alfa is used as an off-label treatment option for pulmonary atelectasis because limited treatment modalities exist after conventional therapy has failed. We evaluated 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports involving this pediatric population with varying primary diagnoses. The majority of patients experienced improvement in atelectasis, suggesting benefit after receiving treatment with dornase alfa. However, the outcomes were possibly confounded by those receiving combination therapies, varying primary diagnoses, and varying end points evaluated. Dornase alfa was overall well tolerated, with only a few patients experiencing worsening atelectasis posttreatment. Dornase alfa may be considered as a therapeutic option in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis, who require treatment intervention when conventional therapy is unsuccessful. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Global impact of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Margarida; Keyt, Holly; Dhar, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Educational aims To recognise the clinical and radiological presentation of the spectrum of diseases associated with bronchiectasis. To understand variation in the aetiology, microbiology and burden of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis across different global healthcare systems. Bronchiectasis is the term used to refer to dilatation of the bronchi that is usually permanent and is associated with a clinical syndrome of cough, sputum production and recurrent respiratory infections. It can be caused by a range of inherited and acquired disorders, or may be idiopathic in nature. The most well recognised inherited disorder in Western countries is cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive condition that leads to progressive bronchiectasis, bacterial infection and premature mortality. Both bronchiectasis due to CF and bronchiectasis due to other conditions are placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems internationally. Treatments for CF are becoming more effective leading to more adult patients with complex healthcare needs. Bronchiectasis not due to CF is becoming increasingly recognised, particularly in the elderly population. Recognition is important and can lead to identification of the underlying cause, appropriate treatment and improved quality of life. The disease is highly diverse in its presentation, requiring all respiratory physicians to have knowledge of the different “bronchiectasis syndromes”. The most common aetiologies and presenting syndromes vary depending on geography, with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease predominating in some parts of North America, post-infectious and idiopathic disease predominating in Western Europe, and post-tuberculosis bronchiectasis dominating in South Asia and Eastern Europe. Ongoing global collaborative studies will greatly advance our understanding of the international impact of bronchiectasis and CF. PMID:28210295

  9. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Topics Atelectasis Cough Cystic Fibrosis Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Respiratory Failure Send a link to NHLBI to ... fibrosis and primary ciliary (SIL-e-ar-e) dyskinesia (dis-kih-NE-ze-ah), or PCD . Bronchiectasis ...

  10. Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changhwan

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of diagnosing bronchiectasis is increasing around the world. Cystic fibrosis is the most common inherited cause of bronchiectasis, but there is increasing recognition of significant numbers of patients with bronchiectasis from various causes. With increasing awareness of bronchiectasis, a significant number of research, concerning the causes and treatments, were published over the past few years. Investigation of the underlying cause of bronchiectasis is the most important key to effective management. The purpose of this report is to review the immunological abnormalities that cause bronchiectasis in those that the cystic fibrosis has been excluded, identify the available evidences of current management, and discuss several controversies in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:23236316

  11. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  12. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Bonaiti, Giulia; Pesci, Alberto; Marruchella, Almerico; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Gori, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, a growing interest has been raised in evaluating nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE). This paper reviews several aspects of the correlations between NTM and NCFBE, including pathogenesis, radiological features, diagnosis, and management. Bronchiectasis and NTM lung disease are connected, but which one comes first is still an unresolved question. The rate of NTM lung disease in NCFBE varies through the studies, from 5% to 30%. The most frequent species isolated is MAC. NCFBE patients affected by NTM infection frequently present coinfections, including both other different NTM species and microorganisms, such as P. aeruginosa. Once a diagnosis of NTM disease has been reached, the initiation of therapy is not always mandatory. NTM species isolated, patients' conditions, and disease severity and its evolution should be considered. Risk factors for disease progression in NCFBE patients with NTM are low body mass index, cavitary disease, consolidations, and macrolide resistance at presentation.

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiti, Giulia; Pesci, Alberto; Marruchella, Almerico; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Gori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    During the past decades, a growing interest has been raised in evaluating nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFBE). This paper reviews several aspects of the correlations between NTM and NCFBE, including pathogenesis, radiological features, diagnosis, and management. Bronchiectasis and NTM lung disease are connected, but which one comes first is still an unresolved question. The rate of NTM lung disease in NCFBE varies through the studies, from 5% to 30%. The most frequent species isolated is MAC. NCFBE patients affected by NTM infection frequently present coinfections, including both other different NTM species and microorganisms, such as P. aeruginosa. Once a diagnosis of NTM disease has been reached, the initiation of therapy is not always mandatory. NTM species isolated, patients' conditions, and disease severity and its evolution should be considered. Risk factors for disease progression in NCFBE patients with NTM are low body mass index, cavitary disease, consolidations, and macrolide resistance at presentation. PMID:26106603

  14. [Bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Chuchalin, A G

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents information on possible approaches to the classification, pathogenesis, and determination of the etiological causes of bronchiectasis. It discusses a group of bronchiectasis-associated diseases. It gives a detailed diagnostic algorithm aimed to establish the etiology of bronchiectasis and the markers of the efficiency of different treatment options. Much attention is paid to genetically predetermined bronchiectasis. Universal approaches to treating patients with bronchiectasis as a whole, as well as treatments for certain entities of bronchiectasis are discussed.

  15. Risk factors for bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sly, Peter D; Gangell, Catherine L; Chen, Linping; Ware, Robert S; Ranganathan, Sarath; Mott, Lauren S; Murray, Conor P; Stick, Stephen M

    2013-05-23

    Bronchiectasis develops early in the course of cystic fibrosis, being detectable in infants as young as 10 weeks of age, and is persistent and progressive. We sought to determine risk factors for the onset of bronchiectasis, using data collected by the Australian Respiratory Early Surveillance Team for Cystic Fibrosis (AREST CF) intensive surveillance program. We examined data from 127 consecutive infants who received a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening. Chest computed tomography (CT) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed, while the children were in stable clinical condition, at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years of age. Longitudinal data were used to determine risk factors associated with the detection of bronchiectasis from 3 months to 3 years of age. The point prevalence of bronchiectasis at each visit increased from 29.3% at 3 months of age to 61.5% at 3 years of age. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for bronchiectasis were presentation with meconium ileus (odds ratio, 3.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 6.66; P=0.002), respiratory symptoms at the time of CT and BAL (odds ratio, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.14; P=0.008), free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid (odds ratio, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.70 to 5.35; P<0.001), and gas trapping on expiratory CT (odds ratio, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.59; P=0.01). Free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid at 3 months of age was associated with persistent bronchiectasis (present on two or more sequential scans), with the odds seven times as high at 12 months of age and four times as high at 3 years of age. Neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid in early life was associated with early bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics.)

  16. Early bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis detected by surveillance CT.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Linnane, Barry; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2010-08-01

    There is emerging evidence that cystic fibrosis lung disease begins early in infancy. Newborn screening allows early detection and surveillance of pulmonary disease and the possibility of early intervention in this life-shortening condition. We report two children with cystic fibrosis who underwent a comprehensive assessment from diagnosis that included measurement of lung function, limited-slice high-resolution CT and BAL performed annually. Early aggressive surveillance enabled significant lung disease and bronchiectasis to be detected during the first few years of life and led to a change in management, highlighting a clinical role for CT scanning during the preschool years in children with cystic fibrosis.

  17. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nasal mucociliary clearance and ciliary beat frequency in cystic fibrosis compared with sinusitis and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutland, J; Cole, P J

    1981-01-01

    Nasal ciliary function and mucociliary clearance were studied in patients with cystic fibrosis and in three control groups. Ciliary beat frequency and nasal clearance time were measured in groups of 10 subjects with cystic fibrosis, sinusitis and bronchiectasis and age and sex-matched control subjects. Ciliary beat frequency was also measured in normal subjects matched as bronchiectasis controls. Cystic fibrosis patients and their controls, patients with sinusitis, and the bronchiectasis controls did not differ in ciliary beat frequency, but it was slower in the patients with bronchiectasis (p less than 0.05). Nasal mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis was slower than in the cystic fibrosis controls (p less than 0.001) and in patients with sinusitis (p less than 0.01). The finding of a normal beat frequency in cystic fibrosis cilia studied in vitro together with abnormal nasal mucociliary clearance measured in vivo in the same patients suggests the existence of an abnormality of mucus in vivo. The innate function of cystic fibrosis cilia, as measured in vitro by beat frequency, is normal. PMID:7314040

  19. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... test for cystic fibrosis and tests for other diseases PPD skin test to check for a past tuberculosis infection Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis to measure proteins called immunoglobulins in ...

  20. Combined inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist therapy for noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis with airflow limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ping; Yang, Jia-Wei; Lu, Hai-Wen; Mao, Bei; Yang, Wen-Lan; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective: There is presently no clear evidence on the effect of combined treatment for non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (LABA). The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of salmeterol-fluticasone combined inhaled therapy for non-CF bronchiectasis with airflow limitation. Methods: An observational study was performed in 120 non-CF bronchiectasis patients diagnosed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scanning of the chest. Patients received either routine therapy or salmeterol-fluticasone (100/500 μg daily) combined inhaled therapy on the basis of routine therapy. Clinical symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), lung function, short-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (SABA) use, and safety were monitored throughout the study. Results: OF the 120 subjects, 60 received combined inhaled therapy and 60 received routine therapy. Compared to the control group, the combined inhaled therapy group showed significant improvement in their clinical symptom scores (−2.21 vs. −0.31, P = 0.002) and a reduction in number of weekly SABA usage (−4.2 vs. 0.1, P < 0.01). In addition, patients in the inhaled therapy group achieved a significant improvement in HRQL based on mMRC (−1.51 vs. −0.31, P < 0.005) and SGRQ (−7.83 vs. −2.16, P < 0.01) scoring accompanied with no severe adverse events. There were fewer exacerbation frequencies in the combined inhaled therapy group over the 12 months of treatment compared to the control group (1 [0–2] vs. 2 [1–4], P = 0.017). Furthermore, stratified analysis indicated that combined inhaled therapy partially improve lung function for patients for whom it is severely impaired and those with pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated. Conclusion: Our results show that salmeterol-fluticasone combined inhaled therapy should be effective and safe for non-CF bronchiectasis patients

  1. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for diagnosis and management of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Alshimemeri, Abdullah; Mobeireek, Abdullah; Albanna, Amr S.; Al Shirawi, Nehad N.; Wali, Siraj; Alkattan, Khaled; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A.; Mobaireek, Khalid; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Chang, Anne B.; Aliberti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This is the first guideline developed by the Saudi Thoracic Society for the diagnosis and management of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Local experts including pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, thoracic surgeons, respiratory therapists, and others from adult and pediatric departments provided the best practice evidence recommendations based on the available international and local literature. The main objective of this guideline is to utilize the current published evidence to develop recommendations about management of bronchiectasis suitable to our local health-care system and available resources. We aim to provide clinicians with tools to standardize the diagnosis and management of bronchiectasis. This guideline targets primary care physicians, family medicine practitioners, practicing internists and respiratory physicians, and all other health-care providers involved in the care of the patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:28808486

  2. Association between Mucoid Pseudomonas Infection and Bronchiectasis in Children with Cystic Fibrosis1

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Collins, Jannette; Broderick, Lynn S.; Rock, Michael J.; Li, Zhanhai; Kosorok, Michael R.; Laxova, Anita; Gershan, William M.; Brody, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate the severity of bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis with clinical and microbiologic variables in order to clarify risk factors for the development of irreversible lung disease. Materials and Methods: After institutional review board approval and parental informed consents were obtained, a HIPAA-compliant longitudinal epidemiologic evaluation was performed in patients with cystic fibrosis who were enrolled in the Wisconsin trial of newborn screening from 1985 to 2009. Thin-section chest computed tomography (CT) was used in a prospective cross-sectional design to study patients ranging in age from 6.6 to 17.6 years (mean, 11.5 years). Thin-section CT scores were determined objectively on coded images by multiple raters in a standardized fashion. Microbiologic data were obtained by means of culture of respiratory secretions by using methods for differentiation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) as either nonmucoid or mucoid. Results: Eighty-three percent of patients (68 of 82) showed bronchiectasis of varying severity. Of 12 potential risk factors, only respiratory infection with mucoid PA correlated significantly with bronchiectasis (P = .041). Conclusion: The severity of bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis is significantly related to respiratory infection with mucoid PA; attempts to prevent bronchiectasis should include reducing exposure to and early eradication of PA. PMID:19703887

  3. Impact of bronchiectasis and trapped air on quality of life and exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Leonie A; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Caudri, Daan; Bos, Aukje C; Gonzalez-Graniel, Karla; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Wiel, Els C W; Quittner, Alexandra L; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2013-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is primarily characterised by bronchiectasis and trapped air on chest computed tomography (CT). The revised Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire respiratory symptoms scale (CFQ-R RSS) measures health-related quality of life. To validate bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures, we investigated correlations and predictive values for pulmonary exacerbations. CF patients (aged 6-20 years) underwent CT, CFQ-R RSS and 1-year follow-up. Bronchiectasis and trapped air were scored using the CF-CT scoring system. Correlation coefficients and backward multivariate modelling were used to identify predictors of pulmonary exacerbations. 40 children and 32 adolescents were included. CF-CT bronchiectasis (r = -0.38, p<0.001) and CF-CT trapped air (r = -0.35, p = 0.003) correlated with CFQ-R RSS. Pulmonary exacerbations were associated with: bronchiectasis (rate ratio 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19; p = 0.009), trapped air (rate ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.034) and CFQ-R RSS (rate ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98; p = 0.002). The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor of pulmonary exacerbations (rate ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.97; p<0.001). Bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS were associated with pulmonary exacerbations. The CFQ-R RSS was an independent predictor. This study further validated bronchiectasis, trapped air and CFQ-R RSS as outcome measures in CF.

  4. Elastase-mediated phosphatidylserine receptor cleavage impairs apoptotic cell clearance in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Vandivier, R. William; Fadok, Valerie A.; Hoffmann, Peter R.; Bratton, Donna L.; Penvari, Churee; Brown, Kevin K.; Brain, Joseph D.; Accurso, Frank J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is characterized by an early and sustained influx of inflammatory cells into the airways and by release of proteases. Resolution of inflammation is normally associated with the orderly removal of dying apoptotic inflammatory cells through cell recognition receptors, such as the phosphatidylserine receptor, CD36, and αv integrins. Accordingly, removal of apoptotic inflammatory cells may be impaired in persistent inflammatory responses such as that seen in cystic fibrosis airways. Examination of sputa from cystic fibrosis and non–cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients demonstrated an abundance of apoptotic cells, in excess of that seen in patients with chronic bronchitis. In vitro, cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis airway fluid directly inhibited apoptotic cell removal by alveolar macrophages in a neutrophil elastase-dependent manner, suggesting that elastase may impair apoptotic cell clearance in vivo. Flow cytometry demonstrated that neutrophil elastase cleaved the phosphatidylserine receptor, but not CD36 or CD32 (FcγRII). Cleavage of the phosphatidylserine receptor by neutrophil elastase specifically disrupted phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, implying a potential mechanism for delayed apoptotic cell clearance in vivo. Therefore, defective airway clearance of apoptotic cells in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis may be due to elastase-mediated cleavage of phosphatidylserine receptor on phagocytes and may contribute to ongoing airway inflammation. PMID:11877474

  5. Molecular characterization of Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M Ángeles; Martínez, M Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R; Chaves, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  7. A review of 151 cases of pediatric noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Banjar, Hanaa Hasan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to review the etiological factors and diseases associated with pediatric noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients with confirmed noncystic fibrosis (Non-CF) bronchiectasis by chest X-ray and/or CT chest in a pulmonary clinic during the period 1993–2005 at a tertiary care center in Riyadh. RESULTS: A total of 151 cases were diagnosed as Non-CF bronchiectasis. Seventy-five (49.7%) were male, 76 (50.3%) were female; 148 (98%) are alive and 3 (2%) died. The southwestern regions constituted 72 (50%) of the cases. There was a period of (5 ± 3.2) years between the start of symptoms and diagnosis of bronchiectasis. More than two-thirds of the patients had cough, tachypnea, wheezing, sputum production and failure to thrive. Ninety-one (60%) had associated diseases: Pulmonary diseases in 48 (32%), immunodeficiency in 27 (18%), central nervous system anomalies in 10 (7%), cardiac in 10 (7%) and asthma in 103 (68%) of the patients. Left lower lobe was commonly involved in 114 (76%) patients. Sixty-eight (67%) were found to have sinusitis. More than two-thirds of patients had two or more associated diseases. Forty-nine (32%) developed gastroesophageal reflux. Hemophilus influenza was cultured in 56 (37%), strept pneumoniae in 25 (17%) and pseudomonas aeruginosa in 24 (16%) of the patients. Eighty percent of the patients who had pulmonary function test had abnormal changes. Disease progression was related to development of symptoms before 5 years of age, persistent atelectasis and right lower lobe involvement (P< 0.05). CONCLUSION: Non-CF bronchiectasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent chest infection in Saudi Arabia. Early diagnosis and identification of associated diseases is needed to prevent progression of the disease. PMID:19724667

  8. Inhaled antibiotics in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Tay, George T P; Reid, David W; Bell, Scott C

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathological diagnosis describing dilatation of the airways and is characterized by chronic lung sepsis. Bronchiectasis has multiple etiologies, but is usually considered in terms of whether it is due to the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF) or secondary to other causes (non-CF bronchiectasis, NCFB). Inhaled antibiotics are used in bronchiectasis to suppress bacterial pathogens and reduce long-term lung function decline. The majority of the literature on inhaled antibiotics comes from studies on CF where the dominant bacterial pathogen in the airway is usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, most aerosolized antibiotic regimens target this bacterium, but the emergence of molecular diagnostic methods has questioned this approach and more tailored strategies may need to be considered in CF based on the community composition of the lung microbiome. Similarly, the lung microbiome in NCFB has been found to be a complex polymicrobial one and the current practice of employing the same inhaled antibiotic regimes as are used in CF may no longer be appropriate in many patients. In this article, the use of inhaled antibiotics in CF and NCFB is considered in the light of improved understanding of the lung microbiome and why more tailored therapy may be needed based on molecular identification of the microbial pathogens present. The evidence for the use of currently available inhaled antibiotics and advances in inhaled drug packaging and delivery devices are discussed. Finally, the urgent need for prospective randomized clinical trials in CF and NCFB is highlighted and areas for future research identified.

  9. Complications of peripherally inserted central catheters in adults with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Christian; Gouya, Hervé; Panzo, Rozy; Hubert, Dominique; Correas, Jean-Michel; Agrario, Line; Chapron, Jeanne; Honoré, Isabelle; Kanaan, Reem; Legmann, Paul; Dusser, Daniel; Vignaux, Olivier; Burgel, Pierre-Régis

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are increasingly used in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or with non-CF bronchiectasis, but little data exist on catheter-related complications in this setting. Prospective follow-up of consecutive PICCs inserted for intravenous (IV) antibiotics in adults with CF or with non-CF bronchiectasis at Cochin Hospital (Paris, France). Between March 2009 and December 2011, 182 PICCs were prescribed in 117 adults (67 CF and 50 non-CF patients). Ultrasound-guided placement of catheter was successful in 174/182 (95.6%) procedures; no insertion complication occurred. The mean ± SD catheter dwell time was 15 ± 9 days. No catheter-associated bloodstream infection occurred; main complications were symptomatic upper limb deep vein thrombosis (2%), catheter obstruction (18%) and persistent pain after catheter insertion (18%). Patients' satisfaction was high and PICC could be used to perform antibiotic courses in most patients. PICCs were generally safe for performing IV antibiotic courses in patients with CF or non-CF bronchiectasis, but prolonged pain and/or catheter obstruction occurred in approximately 20% of cases.

  10. Automated CT Scan Scores of Bronchiectasis and Air Trapping in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Swiercz, Waldemar; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Anthony, Margaret M.; Szefler, Paul; Klein, Rebecca; Strain, John; Brody, Alan S.; Sagel, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Computer analysis of high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans may improve the assessment of structural lung injury in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to validate automated, observer-independent image analysis software to establish objective, simple criteria for bronchiectasis and air trapping. Methods: HRCT scans of the chest were performed in 35 children with CF and compared with scans from 12 disease control subjects. Automated image analysis software was developed to count visible airways on inspiratory images and to measure a low attenuation density (LAD) index on expiratory images. Among the children with CF, relationships among automated measures, Brody HRCT scanning scores, lung function, and sputum markers of inflammation were assessed. Results: The number of total, central, and peripheral airways on inspiratory images and LAD (%) on expiratory images were significantly higher in children with CF compared with control subjects. Among subjects with CF, peripheral airway counts correlated strongly with Brody bronchiectasis scores by two raters (r = 0.86, P < .0001; r = 0.91, P < .0001), correlated negatively with lung function, and were positively associated with sputum free neutrophil elastase activity. LAD (%) correlated with Brody air trapping scores (r = 0.83, P < .0001; r = 0.69, P < .0001) but did not correlate with lung function or sputum inflammatory markers. Conclusions: Quantitative airway counts and LAD (%) on HRCT scans appear to be useful surrogates for bronchiectasis and air trapping in children with CF. Our automated methodology provides objective quantitative measures of bronchiectasis and air trapping that may serve as end points in CF clinical trials. PMID:24114359

  11. Prevalence of Osteopenia and Osteoporosis in Patients with Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Nathan; Johnson, Margaret M

    2016-12-01

    The objective of our study was to define the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in patients with noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with physician-diagnosed NCFB evaluated at Mayo Clinic Florida between January 1, 2011 and June 3, 2013. A total of 113 patients with physician-diagnosed NCFB and confirmatory findings on computed tomography scan were identified. The cohort was overwhelmingly women (90%) with a mean age of 72 ± 10.6 and a body mass index of 24.8 ± 6.8. The medical history indicated that 30% (34) had osteoporosis, 39% (44) had osteopenia, and 9% (10) had normal bone density. In 25 (22%) of the subjects, bone density was unknown or undocumented. Most were never smokers (55.7%) or past smokers (41.6%) and airflow obstruction was present in 58% of the 84 subjects who had undergone pulmonary function tests. In total, 57 patients (50.44%) and 45 patients (39.82%) had been prescribed proton pump inhibitors and inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. Bone mineral density testing was performed during the study period in 70 (62%) of the subjects. Decreased bone density consistent with osteoporosis was present in 19 (27%); 41 (59%) had osteopenia, and bone density was normal in 10 (14%) subjects. Diminished bone density was present in 82.8% (24/29) of patients younger than age 70, with 27.6% (8/29) having osteoporosis. There was a greater incidence of diminished bone density in those with reduced body mass index (100% vs 82%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.10). Forty-seven and 32% of patients with diminished bone density were using proton pump inhibitor therapy and inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. This study suggested that diminished bone density is common in patients with bronchiectasis, with >85% of this cohort having osteoporosis or osteopenia confirmed by bone density testing. Although the prevalence of both bronchiectasis and diminished bone

  12. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibody detection in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, E; Drobnic, M; Perez, M; Manresa, J; Ferrer, A; Orriols, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in patients with bronchiectasis. Differentiation between non-infected patients and those with different degrees of P aeruginosa infection could influence the management and prognosis of these patients. The diagnostic usefulness of serum IgG antibodies against P aeruginosa outer membrane proteins was determined in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis.
METHODS—Fifty six patients were classified according to sputum culture into three groups: group A (n=18) with no P aeruginosa in any sample; group B (n=18) with P aeruginosa alternating with other microorganisms; and group C (n=20) with P aeruginosa in all sputum samples. Each patient had at least three sputum cultures in the 6 months prior to serum collection. Detection of antibodies was performed by Western blot and their presence against 20 protein bands (10-121 kd) was assessed.
RESULTS—Antibodies to more than four bands in total or to five individual bands (36, 26, 22, 20 or 18 kd) differentiated group B from group A, while antibodies to a total of more than eight bands or to 10 individual bands (104, 69, 63, 56, 50, 44, 30, 25, 22,13 kd) differentiated group C from group B. When discordant results between the total number of bands and the frequency of P aeruginosa isolation were obtained, the follow up of patients suggested that the former, in most cases, predicted chronic P aeruginosa colonisation.
CONCLUSION—In patients with bronchiectasis the degree of P aeruginosa infection can be determined by the number and type of outer membrane protein bands indicating which serum antibodies are present.

 PMID:11514685

  13. Efficacy of Halotherapy for Improvement of Pulmonary function Tests and Quality of Life of Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Bita; Najafizadeh, Katayoon; Vishteh, Hamid Reza Khodami; Shafaghi, Shadi; Karimi, Shirin; Mahmoodian, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Background Halotherapy is a treatment modality suggested for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. In this technique, inhalation of crystal salt stones extracted from mines improves patients’ pulmonary function tests and symptoms by facilitating the secretion or expulsion of phlegm and mucus and reducing the risk of bacterial infections. Bronchiectasis is chronic disease of the airways characterized by irreversible dilation of airways. It has a progressive course and despite the available treatments, many of these patients eventually enter the advanced phase of disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of halotherapy on pulmonary function tests and quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. Materials and Methods This clinical trial evaluated the results of spirometry and 6-minute walk test as well as the quality of life (according to SF-36 questionnaire) of stable non-CF bronchiectatic patients presenting to the pulmonary clinic before and after the use of salt spray for 2 months. Results Of 40 study patients, 20 were excluded due to various reasons and 20 were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 35±11 years and the underlying cause of disease was chronic pulmonary infection in 65% of cases. Comparison of the results of pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk test and quality of life indices in SF-36 questionnaire before and after the intervention showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, 65% of patients were satisfied with halotherapy and requested to receive the medication again. Conclusion Our study results indicated that 2-month halotherapy with Salitair inhaler containing salt crystals extracted from the Klodawa mine in Poland could not improve the pulmonary function tests or quality of life of non-CF bronchiectatic patients. No significant side effects were noted in understudy patients. Future studies with larger sample size and longer duration of treatment are recommended to better determine the efficacy of

  14. Neutrophilic Bronchial Inflammation Correlates with Clinical and Functional Findings in Patients with Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Dente, Federico L.; Bilotta, Marta; Bartoli, Maria Laura; Bacci, Elena; Cianchetti, Silvana; Latorre, Manuela; Malagrinò, Laura; Nieri, Dario; Roggi, Maria Adelaide; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neutrophilic bronchial inflammation is a main feature of bronchiectasis, but not much is known about its relationship with other disease features. Aim. To compare airway inflammatory markers with clinical and functional findings in subjects with stable noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). Methods. 152 NFCB patients (62.6 years; females: 57.2%) underwent clinical and functional cross-sectional evaluation, including microbiologic and inflammatory cell profile in sputum, and exhaled breath condensate malondialdehyde (EBC-MDA). NFCB severity was assessed using BSI and FACED criteria. Results. Sputum neutrophil percentages inversely correlated with FEV1 (P < 0.0001; rho = −0.428), weakly with Leicester Cough Questionnaire score (P = 0.068; rho = −0.58), and directly with duration of the disease (P = 0.004; rho = 0.3) and BSI severity score (P = 0.005; rho = 0.37), but not with FACED. Sputum neutrophilia was higher in colonized subjects, P. aeruginosa colonized subjects showing greater sputum neutrophilia and lower FEV1. Patients with ≥3 exacerbations in the last year showed a significantly greater EBC-MDA than the remaining patients. Conclusions. Sputum neutrophilic inflammation and biomarkers of oxidative stress in EBC can be considered good biomarkers of disease severity in NCFB patients, as confirmed by pulmonary function, disease duration, bacterial colonization, BSI score, and exacerbation rate. PMID:26819500

  15. The impact of fluoroquinolone resistance of Gram-negative bacteria in respiratory secretions on the outcome of lung transplant (non-cystic fibrosis) recipients.

    PubMed

    Shteinberg, Michal; Raviv, Yael; Bishara, Jihad; Stein, Nili; Rosengarten, Dror; Bakal, Ilana; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial airway colonization is frequent among lung transplant recipients. These patients are often treated with antibiotics, which may lead to selection of resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study was to assess whether antibiotic treatment causes acquisition of quinolone-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (QR-GNB), and the effect of such colonization on mortality and on lung rejection. We retrospectively examined data from non-cystic fibrosis, non-bronchiectases lung transplant recipients for antibiotic treatment, GNB in respiratory secretions, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and mortality. Of 126 patients included, 86 patients had QR-GNB, 22 had quinolone-sensitive bacteria (QS-GNB), and 17 had no growth. Median antibiotic exposure, defined as the fraction of days with antibiotic treatment, was 2.8% in patients without growth, 11.1% in patients with QS-GNB (p=0.012), and 26% in patients with QR-GNB (p<0.0001). Age-adjusted mortality hazard ratio was 9.2 (95% CI 1.272-78.9) for patients with QR-GNB compared with QS-GNB. Age-adjusted hazard ratios for BOS was 3.7 (95% CI 1.33-10.3) for QR-GNB compared with QS-GNB. We found a positive correlation between antibiotic treatment and emergence of QR-GNB. Airway colonization with QR-GNB was significantly associated with mortality and with BOS. Further research is needed to determine whether a change in antibiotic subscription policy is required. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Etiology of Non–Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis in Adults and Its Correlation to Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Lonni, Sara; Chalmers, James D.; Goeminne, Pieter C.; McDonnell, Melissa J.; Dimakou, Katerina; De Soyza, Anthony; Polverino, Eva; Van de Kerkhove, Charlotte; Rutherford, Robert; Davison, John; Rosales, Edmundo; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Torres, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Testing for underlying etiology is a key part of bronchiectasis management, but it is unclear whether the same extent of testing is required across the spectrum of disease severity. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify the etiology of bronchiectasis across European cohorts and according to different levels of disease severity. Methods: We conducted an analysis of seven databases of adult outpatients with bronchiectasis prospectively enrolled at the bronchiectasis clinics of university teaching hospitals in Monza, Italy; Dundee and Newcastle, United Kingdom; Leuven, Belgium; Barcelona, Spain; Athens, Greece; and Galway, Ireland. All the patients at every site underwent the same comprehensive diagnostic workup as suggested by the British Thoracic Society. Measurements and Main Results: Among the 1,258 patients enrolled, an etiology of bronchiectasis was determined in 60%, including postinfective (20%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related (15%), connective tissue disease related (10%), immunodeficiency related (5.8%), and asthma related (3.3%). An etiology leading to a change in patient’s management was identified in 13% of the cases. No significant differences in the etiology of bronchiectasis were present across different levels of disease severity, with the exception of a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease–related bronchiectasis (P < 0.001) and a lower prevalence of idiopathic bronchiectasis (P = 0.029) in patients with severe disease. Conclusions: Physicians should not be guided by disease severity in suspecting specific etiologies in patients with bronchiectasis, although idiopathic bronchiectasis appears to be less common in patients with the most severe disease. PMID:26431397

  17. Presence of anxiety and depression in patients with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa María; Fernandes Vasconcelos, Gilda; Cisneros, Carolina; Gómez-Punter, Rosa Mar; Segrelles Calvo, Gonzalo; Ancochea, Julio

    2013-10-01

    Patients with chronic bronchiectasis (BQ) may suffer from psychological disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the presence of anxiety and depression in patients from a specialised BQ Unit, using validated questionnaires. We included patients consecutively diagnosed with BQ (unrelated to cystic fibrosis) by high resolution computed tomography in the study. Patients were clinically stable in the previous three weeks and voluntarily completed the Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, after signing the informed consent. They were classified according to their scores on the psychological screening questionnaires, and their results were compared with the clinical, radiological and functional parameters and Quality of Life. Seventy patients were included, 48 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 64.19years. Thirty-four percent (34%) of patients showed symptoms of depression, and around 55% had scores above the 50th percentile in trait and state anxiety. The amount of sputum was associated with trait anxiety. Bacterial colonization was related to anxiety (trait and state), especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. Female patients showed a higher risk of depression. There was no relationship between the Quality of Life scores and the established classifications of anxiety and depression. A high percentage of patients with BQ presented anxiety (trait and state) and depression. The daily sputum production and bacterial colonization (especially with P. aeruginosa) were the variables most related to anxiety; depression was more common in women. We believe that the presence of psychological disorders should be evaluated, especially in patients with this profile. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Sodium chloride increases the ciliary transportability of cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis sputum on the mucus-depleted bovine trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, P J; Hall, R L; Chan, W; Cole, P J

    1997-01-01

    Mucus retention in the lungs is an important feature of several respiratory diseases (Regnis, J.A., M. Robinson, D.L. Bailey, P. Cook, P. Hooper, H.K. Chan, I. Gonda, G. Bautovich, and P.T.P. Bye. 1994. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 150:66-71 and Currie, D.C., D. Pavia, J.E. Agnew, M.T. Lopez-Vidriero, P.D. Diamond, P.J. Cole, and S.W. Clarke. 1987. Thorax. 42:126-130). On the mucus-depleted bovine trachea, the ciliary transport rate of sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis of other causes was slow, but the rate was doubled by increasing the sodium chloride content by 90 mM. Increasing the sputum osmolality by inspissation or by the addition of nonelectrolytes had a similar effect. The viscoelasticity of sputum, but not the bovine ciliary beat frequency, was markedly saline dependent over the pathophysiological range. This suggests that low mucus salinity, not (as is generally assumed) its under-hydration, contributes to its retention in bronchiectasis due to cystic fibrosis and other causes, probably by affecting its theology. It also indicates how the genetic defect in cystic fibrosis might lead to impaired mucus clearance. Therapies that increase the osmolality of lung mucus might benefit patients with mucus retention. PMID:9011581

  19. Sodium chloride increases the ciliary transportability of cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis sputum on the mucus-depleted bovine trachea.

    PubMed

    Wills, P J; Hall, R L; Chan, W; Cole, P J

    1997-01-01

    Mucus retention in the lungs is an important feature of several respiratory diseases (Regnis, J.A., M. Robinson, D.L. Bailey, P. Cook, P. Hooper, H.K. Chan, I. Gonda, G. Bautovich, and P.T.P. Bye. 1994. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 150:66-71 and Currie, D.C., D. Pavia, J.E. Agnew, M.T. Lopez-Vidriero, P.D. Diamond, P.J. Cole, and S.W. Clarke. 1987. Thorax. 42:126-130). On the mucus-depleted bovine trachea, the ciliary transport rate of sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis of other causes was slow, but the rate was doubled by increasing the sodium chloride content by 90 mM. Increasing the sputum osmolality by inspissation or by the addition of nonelectrolytes had a similar effect. The viscoelasticity of sputum, but not the bovine ciliary beat frequency, was markedly saline dependent over the pathophysiological range. This suggests that low mucus salinity, not (as is generally assumed) its under-hydration, contributes to its retention in bronchiectasis due to cystic fibrosis and other causes, probably by affecting its rheology. It also indicates how the genetic defect in cystic fibrosis might lead to impaired mucus clearance. Therapies that increase the osmolality of lung mucus might benefit patients with mucus retention.

  20. Evidence for eosinophil activation in bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis and bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: discrepancy between blood eosinophil counts and serum eosinophil cationic protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C.; Schuler, M.; Forster, M.; Braun, R.; Grahmann, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Increased serum levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) have been detected in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis. However, ECP concentrations in adult patients with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis have not been studied.
METHODS—Eosinophil numbers and serum concentrations of ECP were determined in 14 patients with known or newly diagnosed bronchiectasis and compared with age and sex matched patients with allergic bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and controls in whom bronchiectasis or obstructive pulmonary disease could be excluded.
RESULTS—Serum ECP levels were significantly raised both in patients with bronchiectasis (median (range) 22.5 µg/l (7-85)) and allergic asthma (35.0 µg/l (7-128)) compared with the sex and age matched subjects suffering from COPD (6.7 µg/l (1.5-28); p<0.006) and non-obstructive normal controls (7.5 µg/l (3.5-19); p<0.003). In contrast, significantly increased peripheral eosinophil numbers were observed in patients with bronchial asthma (305 × 106/l; p<0.01) but not in those with bronchiectasis (102 × 106/l), COPD (117 × 106/l), and healthy controls (101 × 106/l).
CONCLUSIONS—The discrepancy between eosinophil counts and eosinophil numbers in patients with bronchiectasis suggests that serum ECP levels may be more relevant in assessing local eosinophil involvement than blood eosinophil numbers.

 PMID:9713451

  1. A pilot study of pulmonary rehabilitation and chest physiotherapy versus chest physiotherapy alone in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Sidhu, M K; Kope, L; Pollock, W; Stevenson, L M; Pentland, J L; Turnbull, K; Mac Quarrie, S; Hill, A T

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Thirty patients with clinically significant bronchiectasis and limited exercise tolerance were randomized into either the control group receiving chest physiotherapy (8 weeks) or into the intervention group, receiving pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to chest physiotherapy (8 weeks). Both groups were encouraged to maintain their exercise program and or chest physiotherapy, following completion of the study. End of training (8 weeks) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) improved by 56.7 m (p = 0.03), endurance walk test (EWT) by 193.3 m (p = 0.01), Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) improved by 2.6 units (p < 0.001) and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) by 8 units (p < 0.001). At 20 weeks (12 weeks post end of training) No improvement in control group. In the intervention group, ISWT improved by 80 m (p = 0.04) and EWT by 247.5 m (p = 0.003). LCQ improved by 4.4 units (p < 0.001) and SGRQ by 4 units (p < 0.001). Pulmonary rehabilitation in addition to regular chest physiotherapy, improves exercise tolerance and health related quality of life in non cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and the benefit was sustained at 12 weeks post end of pulmonary rehabilitation. Clinical trials regn no. NCT00868075. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mucous solids and liquid secretion by airways: studies with normal pig, cystic fibrosis human, and non-cystic fibrosis human bronchi

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Chelsea J.; Inglis, Sarah K.; Valentine, Vincent G.; Garrison, Jennifer; Conner, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand how airways produce thick airway mucus, nonvolatile solids were measured in liquid secreted by bronchi from normal pig, cystic fibrosis (CF) human, and non-CF human lungs. Bronchi were exposed to various secretagogues and anion secretion inhibitors to induce a range of liquid volume secretion rates. In all three groups, the relationship of solids concentration (percent nonvolatile solids) to liquid volume secretion rate was curvilinear, with higher solids concentration associated with lower rates of liquid volume secretion. In contrast, the secretion rates of solids mass and water mass as functions of liquid volume secretion rates exhibited positive linear correlations. The y-intercepts of the solids mass-liquid volume secretion relationships for all three groups were positive, thus accounting for the higher solids concentrations in airway liquid at low rates of secretion. Predictive models derived from the solids mass and water mass linear equations fit the experimental percent solids data for the three groups. The ratio of solids mass secretion to liquid volume secretion was 5.2 and 2.4 times higher for CF bronchi than for pig and non-CF bronchi, respectively. These results indicate that normal pig, non-CF human, and CF human bronchi produce a high-percent-solids mucus (>8%) at low rates of liquid volume secretion (≤1.0 μl·cm−2·h−1). However, CF bronchi produce mucus with twice the percent solids (∼8%) of pig or non-CF human bronchi at liquid volume secretion rates ≥4.0 μl·cm−2·h−1. PMID:21622844

  3. Improvement in health status following bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Mutalithas, Kugathasan; Watkin, Gillian; Willig, Briony; Wardlaw, Andrew; Pavord, Ian D; Birring, Surinder S

    2008-08-01

    Chronic productive cough is a common symptom in patients with bronchiectasis that is associated with a reduction in health-related quality of life (QOL). Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy (BHPT) is widely prescribed for patients with bronchiectasis, although the evidence for its efficacy is limited. We set out to prospectively evaluate the impact of BHPT on health-related QOL in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. We assessed cough symptoms (0-100mm visual analogue scale; VAS) and cough-related QOL in 53 patients with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis at baseline and >4 weeks after outpatient-based BHPT. Cough specific health status was assessed with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ; total score range 3-21, higher scores representing better QOL). All patients with bronchiectasis complained of cough as the major symptom and had mean (SEM) FEV(1) of 2.1 (0.1)L. Cough-related health status was reduced at baseline; mean (SEM) LCQ score 14.3 (0.6). There were significant improvements in cough symptoms (mean cough VAS before 43.3 (3.6) vs after 27.5 (3.1); mean difference 15.8; 95% CI of difference 9.6-22; p<0.0001) and cough-related health status after BHPT (mean LCQ total score before 14.2 vs after 17.3; mean difference 3.1; 95% confidence interval of difference 2.4-3.9; p<0.001). A significant improvement was seen in all LCQ health-related domains (physical, psychological and social; all p<0.001). Our findings suggest that bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy can lead to a significant improvement in cough-related quality of life.

  4. Neutrophil Fates in Bronchiectasis and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Derek W; Gaggar, Amit; Solomon, George M

    2016-04-01

    The neutrophil is a powerful cellular defender of the vulnerable interface between the environment and pulmonary tissues. This cell's potent weapons are carefully calibrated in the healthy state to maximize effectiveness in fighting pathogens while minimizing tissue damage and allowing for repair of what damage does occur. The three related chronic airway disorders of cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency all demonstrate significant derangements of this homeostatic system that result in their respective pathologies. An important shared feature among them is the inefficient resolution of chronic inflammation that serves as a central means for neutrophil-driven lung damage resulting in disease progression. Examining the commonalities and divergences between these diseases in the light of their immunopathology is informative and may help guide us toward future therapeutics designed to modulate the neutrophil's interplay with the pulmonary environment.

  5. Airway clearance techniques for bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela; Holland, Anne E

    2013-05-31

    People with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis commonly experience chronic cough and sputum production and these features may be associated with progressive decline in clinical status. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) are often prescribed to facilitate expectoration of sputum from the lungs, but the efficacy of these techniques in a stable clinical state or during an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis is unclear. Primary: to determine the effects of ACTs on the rate of acute exacerbations, incidence of hospitalisation and health-related quality of life in individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis.Secondary: to determine whether a) ACTs are safe for individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis and b) ACTs have beneficial effects on physiology and symptoms in individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials from inception to October 2012, PEDro in October 2012 and handsearched relevant journals. Randomised controlled parallel and cross-over trials that compared an ACT to no treatment, sham ACT or directed coughing in participants with bronchiectasis. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Five studies involving 51 participants met the inclusion criteria of the review, all of which were cross-over design. Four studies were on adults with stable bronchiectasis, and the other study was on clinically stable children with bronchiectasis. Three studies were single treatment sessions, two were longer-term studies. The interventions varied and some control groups received a sham intervention while others were inactive. The methodological quality of the studies was variable and the studies were not able to blind participants and personal. Heterogeneity between studies precluded these data from meta-analysis and the review was therefore narrative.One study on 20 adults comparing an airway oscillatory device with no treatment found no significant

  6. Exhaled Breath Condensate Pepsin: Potential Noninvasive Test for Gastroesophageal Reflux in COPD and Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Button, Brenda M; Denehy, Linda; Roberts, Stuart; Bamford, Tiffany; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Mifsud, Nicole; Stirling, Robert; Wilson, John W

    2015-02-01

    Acid gastroesophageal reflux is a common problem in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and COPD. Invasive methods are used to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux, but the ability to detect pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents using this method is unclear. A noninvasive option to detect pulmonary microaspiration is to measure pepsin in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), but this has not been related to esophageal pH monitoring in these lung conditions. This study aimed to measure pepsin concentrations and pH in EBC and to determine the relationship to gastroesophageal reflux in bronchiectasis or COPD. Subjects with bronchiectasis (n=10) or COPD (n=10) and control subjects (n=10) completed 24-h esophageal pH monitoring for detection of acid gastroesophageal reflux, measuring the percentage of reflux time in the proximal esophagus and the DeMeester score (DMS). Concurrently, 3 samples of EBC were collected from each subject, and pH was measured and pepsin concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EBC pepsin was detected in subjects with bronchiectasis (44%) or COPD (56%) and in control subjects (10%). A diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux was not associated with a higher concentration of EBC pepsin in bronchiectasis (P=.21) or COPD (P=.11). EBC pepsin concentration did not correlate with DMS (rs=0.36) or proximal reflux index (rs=0.25) in subjects with bronchiectasis or with DMS (rs=0.28) or proximal reflux index (rs=0.21) in patients with COPD. EBC and sputum pepsin concentrations were moderately correlated in bronchiectasis (rs=0.56) and in COPD (rs=0.43). Pepsin is detectable in EBC samples in bronchiectasis and COPD. Although no association was found between pepsin concentrations and a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux, a moderate relationship between sputum and EBC pepsin concentrations suggests that EBC pepsin may be a useful noninvasive marker of pulmonary microaspiration. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Airway clearance techniques for bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Holland, Anne E

    2015-11-23

    People with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis commonly experience chronic cough and sputum production, features that may be associated with progressive decline in clinical and functional status. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) are often prescribed to facilitate expectoration of sputum from the lungs, but the efficacy of these techniques in a stable clinical state or during an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis is unclear. Primary: to determine effects of ACTs on rates of acute exacerbation, incidence of hospitalisation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis. Secondary: to determine whether:• ACTs are safe for individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis; and• ACTs have beneficial effects on physiology and symptoms in individuals with acute and stable bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials from inception to November 2015 and PEDro in March 2015, and we handsearched relevant journals. Randomised controlled parallel and cross-over trials that compared an ACT versus no treatment, sham ACT or directed coughing in participants with bronchiectasis. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Seven studies involving 105 participants met the inclusion criteria of this review, six of which were cross-over in design. Six studies included adults with stable bronchiectasis; the other study examined clinically stable children with bronchiectasis. Three studies provided single treatment sessions, two lasted 15 to 21 days and two were longer-term studies. Interventions varied; some control groups received a sham intervention and others were inactive. The methodological quality of these studies was variable, with most studies failing to use concealed allocation for group assignment and with absence of blinding of participants and personnel for outcome measure assessment. Heterogeneity between studies precluded inclusion of

  8. The pathophysiology of bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T

    2009-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is defined by permanent and abnormal widening of the bronchi. This process occurs in the context of chronic airway infection and inflammation. It is usually diagnosed using computed tomography scanning to visualize the larger bronchi. Bronchiectasis is also characterized by mild to moderate airflow obstruction. This review will describe the pathophysiology of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Studies have demonstrated that the small airways in bronchiectasis are obstructed from an inflammatory infiltrate in the wall. As most of the bronchial tree is composed of small airways, the net effect is obstruction. The bronchial wall is typically thickened by an inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and macrophages which may form lymphoid follicles. It has recently been demonstrated that patients with bronchiectasis have a progressive decline in lung function. There are a large number of etiologic risk factors associated with bronchiectasis. As there is generally a long-term retrospective history, it may be difficult to determine the exact role of such factors in the pathogenesis. Extremes of age and smoking/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be important considerations. There are a variety of different pathogens involved in bronchiectasis, but a common finding despite the presence of purulent sputum is failure to identify any pathogenic microorganisms. The bacterial flora appears to change with progression of disease. PMID:20037680

  9. Postoperative antimicrobials after lung transplantation and the development of multidrug-resistant bacterial and Clostridium difficile infections: an analysis of 500 non-cystic fibrosis lung transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Whiddon, Alexandra R; Dawson, Kyle L; Fuentes, Amaris; Perez, Katherine K; Peterson, Leif E; Kaleekal, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are given prophylactically post-transplant, although these agents are a risk factor for multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This study aimed to determine whether an association exists between the duration of antimicrobials given early post-transplant and the development of MDR infections or CDI. A single-center retrospective analysis was performed on lung transplants from September 2009 to August 2014. Patients were excluded for cystic fibrosis (CF) or postoperative survival less than 30 d. Qualifying infections were defined as any new positive MDR bacterial culture or C. difficile assay from postoperative day 7-90 d after a broad-spectrum antimicrobial. A total of 500 patients, 61% male, were identified, median age of 62 yr. MDR infections occurred in 169 (34%) and CDI in 31 (6%). Non-ICU days were associated with a decreased risk of MDR/CDI (OR 0.891, p = 0.0002), and duration of Gram-positive antimicrobials (OR 1.073, p = 0.0219) was associated with an increased risk. One-third (34%) of non-CF lung transplants develop MDR infections and 6% develop CDI within 90 d of postoperative antimicrobials. The duration of Gram-positive antimicrobials may increase the risk of MDR/CDI, while early transfer from the ICU may have a protective effect. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. SINUSITIS, BRONCHIECTASIS, AND FLATUS IN A SUMATRAN ORANGUTAN (PONGO ABELII): COULD THIS BE CYSTIC FIBROSIS?

    PubMed

    Stringer, Elizabeth; Cossaboon, Cindy; Han, Sushan; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    A 31-yr-old male Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) presented with 14 yr of chronic purulent nasal drainage and cough with intermittent exacerbation of symptoms requiring systemic antibiotic treatment. He was diagnosed with a cystic fibrosis (CF)-like condition. Evaluation consisted of bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, culture, and computed tomography scanning of the sinuses and chest. Although the presence of low fecal elastase activity increased the suspicion for a diagnosis of CF, pilocarpine iontophoresis with sweat collection and analysis ("sweat testing") was inconclusive. Medical management included twice-daily nebulization with bronchodilators and alternating month inhaled antibiotics, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, and simethicone as needed. Sinopulmonary and gastrointestinal symptoms improved substantially with treatment. Several years later, the animal died acutely of colonic volvulus. Necropsy and histopathology confirmed CF-like lung disease with chronic air sacculitis.

  11. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1 % (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P = 0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment.

  12. To investigate the prevention of OM-85 on bronchiectasis exacerbations (iPROBE) in Chinese patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is characterized by the irreversible dilatation of the medium-sized bronchi as a result of airway injury from recurrent or chronic inflammation and lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchiectasis airways are commonly colonized with bacterial species. Infections of the airways play important role in bronchiectasis exacerbations. The non-specific prevention of recurrent airway infections by immunostimulating agents has gained growing interest. OM-85, consisting of extracts of eight kinds of bacteria important in respiratory infections, could support the respiratory tract resistance to the pathogens. OM-85 has been shown to be a benefit by decreasing the risk of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in several perspective clinical trials. Exacerbation of bronchiectasis substantially contributes to a more rapid decline in lung function, reduced quality of life, and healthcare costs. In this context, we plan to conduct a clinical trial to investigate the PReventive effect of OM-85 on Bronchiectasis Exacerbation in Chinese patients (iPROBE). Methods/Design This study is designed as a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial. A total of 244 patients with bronchiectasis, who have had at least one exacerbation of bronchiectasis in the previous year, will be included. The subjects will randomly receive two courses of 7 mg of OM-85 or a matching placebo. The treatment dose of OM-85 will be one daily capsule taken orally for 10 days each month for 3 consecutive months at the beginning of the study, followed by 3 months of no drug. This schedule will repeat until the patient has been seen for one year. Discussion We will investigate whether long-term treatment with an oral immunostimulant (OM-85) could decrease exacerbations of bronchiectasis over a one-year period. We will also assess other relevant outcomes, including the rate of event-based exacerbation, lung

  13. Bronchiectasis in Children: Current Concepts in Immunology and Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Pizzutto, Susan J.; Hare, Kim M.; Upham, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is a complex chronic respiratory condition traditionally characterized by chronic infection, airway inflammation, and progressive decline in lung function. Early diagnosis and intensive treatment protocols can stabilize or even improve the clinical prognosis of children with bronchiectasis. However, understanding the host immunologic mechanisms that contribute to recurrent infection and prolonged inflammation has been identified as an important area of research that would contribute substantially to effective prevention strategies for children at risk of bronchiectasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the role of the host immune response and important pathogens in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis (not associated with cystic fibrosis) in children. PMID:28611970

  14. Oral supplement enriched in HMB combined with pulmonary rehabilitation improves body composition and health related quality of life in patients with bronchiectasis (Prospective, Randomised Study).

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda; Doña, Esperanza; Palenque, Francisco Javier; Porras, Nuria; Dorado, Antonio; Godoy, Ana M; Rubio-Martínez, Elehazara; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Martín-Valero, Rocío

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) is recommended for bronchiectasis but there is no data about its effect on body composition. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) for 12 weeks in normally-nourished non-cystic-fibrosis bronchiectasis patients compared with the effect of PR plus a hyperproteic oral nutritional supplement enriched with beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on body composition, muscle strength, quality of life and serum biomarkers. single center randomized controlled trial, parallel treatment design: Participants were randomly assigned to receive PR for 12 weeks or PR plus ONS (PRONS) (one can per day). Outcome assessments were performed at baseline, 12 weeks and 24 weeks: body composition (Dual-energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DEXA), mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), phase angle by Bio-impedance), health related quality of life (Spanish QOL-B-V3.0, Physical Functioning Scale), handgrip strength, diet questionnaire, and plasma levels of prealbumin, myostatin and somatomedin-c. Thirty patients were randomized (15 per group) without differences in clinical and respiratory variables. In the PRONS group bone mineral density (BMD), mean and maximum handgrip dynamometry, MAMC, QOLB and prealbumin were significantly increased from baseline at 12 and 24 weeks and Fat free Mass (FFM) and FFM index, at 12 weeks. In the PR group only mean handgrip dynamometry and prealbumin were significantly increased at 12 and 24 weeks. In both groups plasma myostatin was reduced at 12 weeks (without significant differences). The addition of a hyperproteic ONS enriched with HMB to Pulmonary Rehabilitation could improve body composition, BMD, muscle strength and health related quality of life in bronchiectasis patients. Clinical Trials Number NCT02048397. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Etiology of Bronchiectasis in a Cohort of 2047 Patients. An Analysis of the Spanish Historical Bronchiectasis Registry.

    PubMed

    Olveira, Casilda; Padilla, Alicia; Martínez-García, Miguel-Ángel; de la Rosa, David; Girón, Rosa-María; Vendrell, Montserrat; Máiz, Luis; Borderías, Luis; Polverino, Eva; Martínez-Moragón, Eva; Rajas, Olga; Casas, Francisco; Cordovilla, Rosa; de Gracia, Javier

    2017-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is caused by many diseases. Establishing its etiology is important for clinical and prognostic reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiology of bronchiectasis in a large patient sample and its possible relationship with demographic, clinical or severity factors, and to analyze differences between idiopathic disease, post-infectious disease, and disease caused by other factors. Multicenter, cross-sectional study of the SEPAR Spanish Historical Registry (RHEBQ-SEPAR). Adult patients with bronchiectasis followed by pulmonologists were included prospectively. Etiological studies were based on guidelines and standardized diagnostic tests included in the register, which were later included in the SEPAR guidelines on bronchiectasis. A total of 2,047 patients from 36 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. Mean age was 64.9years and 54.9% were women. Etiology was identified in 75.8% of cases (post-Infection: 30%; cystic fibrosis: 12.5%; immunodeficiencies: 9.4%; COPD: 7.8%; asthma: 5.4%; ciliary dyskinesia: 2.9%, and systemic diseases: 1.4%). The different etiologies presented different demographic, clinical, and microbiological factors. Post-infectious bronchiectasis and bronchiectasis caused by COPD and asthma were associated with an increased risk of poorer lung function. Patients with post-infectious bronchiectasis were older and were diagnosed later. Idiopathic bronchiectasis was more common in female non-smokers and was associated with better lung function, a higher body mass index, and a lower rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than bronchiectasis of known etiology. The etiology of bronchiectasis was identified in a large proportion of patients included in the RHEBQ-SEPAR registry. Different phenotypes associated with different causes could be identified. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Humoral immunity and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Stead, A; Douglas, J G; Broadfoot, C J; Kaminski, E R; Herriot, R

    2002-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is a common complication of primary antibody deficiency but the incidence of antibody deficiency as an underlying cause of bronchiectasis is largely undefined. In this study the humoral immune status of a cohort of bronchiectatic patients was investigated to detect the frequency of significant antibody deficiency and to determine the extent of immunological investigation which is appropriate for routine assessment of bronchiectasis patients. Fifty-six out-patients (with a mean age of 59·6 years) had serum immunoglobulins, IgG subclasses and specific antibodies to capsular polysaccharides of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae measured. Where specific antibody levels were low, where possible, appropriate immunization with pneumococcal or conjugated Haemophilus polysaccharide vaccines was offered and the responses quantified. Three of 56 patients had low total serum IgG levels. Thirteen of 56 had deficiencies of either a single IgG subclass or combinations of two or more subclasses, with IgG4 being most frequently implicated (9/56). Twenty-nine of 56 had low basal specific polysaccharide antibody levels. Test immunization, where performed, produced satisfactory responses in all cases except one, where a specific defect of responsiveness to pneumococcal polysaccharide was identified. This study indicates that antibody deficiency is an uncommon aetiological/underlying factor in the causation of bronchiectasis beyond the fourth decade and that detailed investigation of humoral immune status as a routine in bronchiectasis patients, at least at this age, is not generally justified. PMID:12390323

  17. Interventions for bronchiectasis: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Emma J; Evans, David J; Fowler, Stephen J; Spencer, Sally

    2015-07-14

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic respiratory disease characterised by abnormal dilatation of the bronchi, and presents typically with a chronic productive cough (or chronic wet cough in children) and recurrent infective exacerbations. It significantly impacts daily activities and quality of life, and can lead to recurrent hospitalisations, severe lung function impairment, respiratory failure and even death. To provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of interventions for adults and children with bronchiectasis from Cochrane reviews.To identify gaps in the evidence base that will inform recommendations for new research and reviews, and to summarise information on reported outcomes and make recommendations for the reporting of standard outcomes in future trials and reviews. We included Cochrane reviews of non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The search is current to 11 February 2015. We also identified trials that were potentially eligible for, but not currently included in, published reviews to make recommendations for new Cochrane reviews. We assessed the quality of included reviews using the AMSTAR criteria. We presented an evidence synthesis of data from reviews alongside an evidence map of clinical trials and guideline data. The primary outcomes were exacerbations, lung function and quality of life. We included 21 reviews but extracted data from, and rated the quality of, only nine reviews that reported results for people with bronchiectasis alone. Of the reviews with no usable data, two reviews included studies with mixed clinical populations where data were not reported separately for people with bronchiectasis and 10 reviews did not contain any trials. Of the 40 studies included across the nine reviews, three (number of participants nine to 34) included children. The studies ranged from single session to year-long studies. Each review included from one to 11 trials and 28 (70%) trials in the

  18. Inhaled hyperosmolar agents for bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Anna; Sugumar, Karnam; Milan, Stephen J; Fowler, Stephen J; Crossingham, Iain

    2014-05-12

    Mucus retention in the lungs is a prominent feature of bronchiectasis. The stagnant mucus becomes chronically colonised with bacteria, which elicit a host neutrophilic response. This fails to eliminate the bacteria, and the large concentration of host-derived protease may contribute to the airway damage. The sensation of retained mucus is itself a cause of suffering, and the failure to maintain airway sterility probably contributes to the frequent respiratory infections experienced by many patients.Hypertonic saline inhalation is known to accelerate tracheobronchial clearance in many conditions, probably by inducing a liquid flux into the airway surface, which alters mucus rheology in a way favourable to mucociliary clearance. Inhaled dry powder mannitol has a similar effect. Such agents are an attractive approach to the problem of mucostasis, and deserve further clinical evaluation. To determine whether inhaled hyperosmolar substances are effective in the treatment of bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register, trials registries, and the reference lists of included studies and review articles. Searches are current up to April 2014. Any randomised controlled trial (RCT) using hyperosmolar inhalation in patients with bronchiectasis not caused by cystic fibrosis. Two review authors assessed studies for suitability. We used standard methods recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria of the review (1021 participants).Five studies on 833 participants compared inhaled mannitol with placebo but poor outcome reporting meant we could pool very little data and most outcomes were reported by only one study. One 12-month trial on 461 participants provided results for exacerbations and demonstrated an advantage for mannitol in terms of time to first exacerbation (median time to exacerbation 165 versus 124 days for mannitol and placebo respectively (hazard ratio (HR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0

  19. Bacterial colonization and associated factors in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Borekci, Sermin; Halis, Ayse Nigar; Aygun, Gokhan; Musellim, Benan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the bacterial colonization and associated risk factors in patients with bronchiectasis. A total of 121 patients followed at the Bronchiectasis Unit, between 1996 and 2013 and diagnosed as having noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis with high resolution computed tomography or multi-slice computed tomography were included in this retrospective study. The following definition of colonization was used for study purposes: Detection of at least two isolates of an organism separated by at least 3 months in a year. Of these 121 patients, 65 (54%) were female and 56 (46%) were male. Mean age was 50.6 ± 16.1 years. Mean duration of illness was 20.3 ± 15.5 years. 43 (35.5%) cases had colonization. The major pathogens responsible for colonization were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 25; 20.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 14, 11.5%). The stepwise logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between colonization and a low percentage of forced vital capacity (FVC%) and the presence of cystic bronchiectasis (P < 0.05). The following factors have been found to be associated with colonization in patients with bronchiectasis: Low FVC% and the presence of cystic bronchiectasis.

  20. Bronchiectasis: a bacteriological profile

    PubMed Central

    Bopaka, Régis Gothard; El Khattabi, Wiam; Janah, Hind; Jabri, Hasna; Afif, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of bronchiectasis can involve a combination of many environmental factors, including infection. The aim of our work is to determine the bacteriological profile of bronchiectasis. This is a retrospective study of 100 patients hospitalized in between January 2010 and July 2013. The average age was 48 years with a 58% female predominance. Symptomatology was by a bronchial syndrome in 90% of cases. Bacteriological examination was able to isolate the microbe in 35% of cases. In our study it was through the examination of sputum cytology in 27% of cases, through the examination of liquid bronchial aspiration in 5% of cases, and through direct examination of sputum in search of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3% of cases. Microbes isolated were: Streptococcus pneumonia in 11 cases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 10 cases, Klebsiella pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3 cases each; Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter spp, Serratia marcescens, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus in one case each. Through this work, the authors highlight that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly- identified microbes in their patients. It is necessary to have a full bacterial examination and to repeat it regularly over the course of the bronchiectasis. PMID:27047618

  1. The EMBARC European Bronchiectasis Registry: protocol for an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Stefano; Polverino, Eva; Vendrell, Montserrat; Crichton, Megan; Loebinger, Michael; Dimakou, Katerina; Clifton, Ian; van der Eerden, Menno; Rohde, Gernot; Murris-Espin, Marlene; Masefield, Sarah; Gerada, Eleanor; Shteinberg, Michal; Ringshausen, Felix; Haworth, Charles; Boersma, Wim; Rademacher, Jessica; Hill, Adam T.; Aksamit, Timothy; O'Donnell, Anne; Morgan, Lucy; Milenkovic, Branislava; Tramma, Leandro; Neves, Joao; Menendez, Rosario; Paggiaro, Perluigi; Botnaru, Victor; Skrgat, Sabina; Wilson, Robert; Goeminne, Pieter; De Soyza, Anthony; Welte, Tobias; Torres, Antoni; Elborn, J. Stuart; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the most neglected diseases in respiratory medicine. There are no approved therapies and few large-scale, representative epidemiological studies. The EMBARC (European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration) registry is a prospective, pan-European observational study of patients with bronchiectasis. The inclusion criterion is a primary clinical diagnosis of bronchiectasis consisting of: 1) a clinical history consistent with bronchiectasis; and 2) computed tomography demonstrating bronchiectasis. Core exclusion criteria are: 1) bronchiectasis due to known cystic fibrosis; 2) age <18 years; and 3) patients who are unable or unwilling to provide informed consent. The study aims to enrol 1000 patients by April 2016 across at least 20 European countries, and 10 000 patients by March 2020. Patients will undergo a comprehensive baseline assessment and will be followed up annually for up to 5 years with the goal of providing high-quality longitudinal data on outcomes, treatment patterns and quality of life. Data from the registry will be available in the form of annual reports. and will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. The European Bronchiectasis Registry aims to make a major contribution to understanding the natural history of the disease, as well as guiding evidence-based decision making and facilitating large randomised controlled trials. PMID:27730179

  2. The EMBARC European Bronchiectasis Registry: protocol for an international observational study.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Aliberti, Stefano; Polverino, Eva; Vendrell, Montserrat; Crichton, Megan; Loebinger, Michael; Dimakou, Katerina; Clifton, Ian; van der Eerden, Menno; Rohde, Gernot; Murris-Espin, Marlene; Masefield, Sarah; Gerada, Eleanor; Shteinberg, Michal; Ringshausen, Felix; Haworth, Charles; Boersma, Wim; Rademacher, Jessica; Hill, Adam T; Aksamit, Timothy; O'Donnell, Anne; Morgan, Lucy; Milenkovic, Branislava; Tramma, Leandro; Neves, Joao; Menendez, Rosario; Paggiaro, Perluigi; Botnaru, Victor; Skrgat, Sabina; Wilson, Robert; Goeminne, Pieter; De Soyza, Anthony; Welte, Tobias; Torres, Antoni; Elborn, J Stuart; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the most neglected diseases in respiratory medicine. There are no approved therapies and few large-scale, representative epidemiological studies. The EMBARC (European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration) registry is a prospective, pan-European observational study of patients with bronchiectasis. The inclusion criterion is a primary clinical diagnosis of bronchiectasis consisting of: 1) a clinical history consistent with bronchiectasis; and 2) computed tomography demonstrating bronchiectasis. Core exclusion criteria are: 1) bronchiectasis due to known cystic fibrosis; 2) age <18 years; and 3) patients who are unable or unwilling to provide informed consent. The study aims to enrol 1000 patients by April 2016 across at least 20 European countries, and 10 000 patients by March 2020. Patients will undergo a comprehensive baseline assessment and will be followed up annually for up to 5 years with the goal of providing high-quality longitudinal data on outcomes, treatment patterns and quality of life. Data from the registry will be available in the form of annual reports. and will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. The European Bronchiectasis Registry aims to make a major contribution to understanding the natural history of the disease, as well as guiding evidence-based decision making and facilitating large randomised controlled trials.

  3. Necrotising pneumonia and bronchiectasis in a previously healthy 30-year-old man

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, David G; Castellanos, Angela; Stern, Theodore A; Puig, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a previously healthy 30-year-old man who presented with a necrotising pneumonia and bronchiectasis. His infectious workup revealed a Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. Since bronchiectasis and necrotising pneumonia are unusual findings in an otherwise healthy person, further investigation was pursued. His workup revealed non-classic cystic fibrosis (CF) and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). This case discusses the differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis, the diagnosis and treatment of ABPA, and the role of CF mutations in the pathogenesis of ABPA. PMID:25608981

  4. Clinical challenges in managing bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; Bilton, Diana

    2009-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is a common disease in the Asia-Pacific and affected patients suffer from chronic sputum production and recurrent exacerbations. Bronchiectasis is largely idiopathic although there is diverse aetiology. The pathogenesis of bronchiectasis comprises infective, inflammatory and emzymetic elements. These interact to perpetuate continued airway damage in bronchiectasis leading to progressive airway and lung damages. Treatment of bronchiectasis is unsatisfactory and there are only very few trials. Existing data suggest some efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid therapy, which has been shown recently to clinical and anti-inflammatory properties in bronchiectasis. Immunomodulating agent such as low-dose macrolides have also been shown to have some efficacy although more data are needed to advocate their long-term usage. Antibiotic therapy is complex in bronchiectasis and includes short-term empirical treatment for acute exacerbation, and consideration of long-term maintenance of oral, nebulized and i.v. therapy. This long-neglected illness should receive more research attention in order that we can have better understanding of its aetiology, pathogenesis and treatment.

  5. Bronchiectasis in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morehead, R S

    1997-04-01

    Two patients are described with clinical and radiographic bronchiectasis which occurred after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for haematological malignancy. Both had evidence of chronic graft versus host disease in other organs. Increased immunosuppression with corticosteroids resulted in clinical response, although both patients persisted with chronic mucopurulent sputum production and one had progressive airflow obstruction. Bronchiectasis may be an under-recognised manifestation of chronic graft versus host disease of the lung.

  6. Bronchiectasis: Phenotyping a Complex Disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D

    2017-03-15

    Bronchiectasis is a long-neglected disease currently experiencing a surge in interest. It is a highly complex condition with numerous aetiologies, co-morbidities and a heterogeneous disease presentation and clinical course. The past few years have seen major advances in our understanding of the disease, primarily through large real-life cohort studies. The main outcomes of interest in bronchiectasis are symptoms, exacerbations, treatment response, disease progression and death. We are now more able to identify clearly the radiological, clinical, microbiological and inflammatory contributors to these outcomes. Over the past couple of years, multidimensional scoring systems such as the Bronchiectasis Severity Index have been introduced to predict disease severity and mortality. Although there are currently no licensed therapies for bronchiectasis, an increasing number of clinical trials are planned or ongoing. While this emerging evidence is awaited, bronchiectasis guidelines will continue to be informed largely by real-life evidence from observational studies and patient registries. Key developments in the bronchiectasis field include the establishment of international disease registries and characterisation of disease phenotypes using cluster analysis and biological data.

  7. The etiologies of non-CF bronchiectasis in childhood: a systematic review of 989 subjects.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kelly S; Del Vecchio, Michael T; Aronoff, Stephen C

    2014-12-10

    While cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common cause of bronchiectasis in childhood, non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with a wide variety of disorders. The objective of this study was to determine the relative prevalence and specific etiologies on non-CF bronchiectasis in childhood. EMBASE, Medline, OVID Cochrane Reviews, Directory of Open Access Journals, Open Science Directory, EPSCO information services, and OAlster were searched electronically and the bibliographies of selected studies were searched manually. The search was conducted independently by 2 authors. (1) any clinical trial, observational study or cross-sectional case series of 10 or more patients with a description of the conditions associated with bronchiectasis; (2) subjects aged 21 years or younger; (3) cystic fibrosis was excluded and; (4) the diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography of the chest. Patient number, age range, inclusion criteria, diagnostic criteria, patient source, and categorical and specific etiology. From 491 studies identified, 12 studies encompassing 989 children with non-CF bronchiectasis were selected. Sixty-three percent of the subjects had an underlying disorder. Infectious (17%), primary immunodeficiency (16%), aspiration (10%), ciliary dyskinesia (9%), congenital malformation (3%), and secondary immunodeficiency (3%) were the most common disease categories; 999 etiologies were identified. Severe pneumonia of bacterial or viral etiology and B cell defects were the most common disorders identified. The majority of children with non-CF bronchiectasis have an underlying disorder. A focused history and laboratory investigated is recommended.

  8. Bilateral lung transplant for bronchiectasis in asymmetric thorax: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeming; Chen, Jingyu; Wei, Dong; Zheng, Mingfeng; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Patients with suppurative lung diseases such as bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis can be treated surgically, which leads to an asymmetric thorax, making lung transplant difficult in a volume-reduced hemithorax. We report a 52-year-old man with bronchiectasis and ventilation, dependent on a severe asymmetric thorax, who underwent bilateral lung transplant without cardiopulmonary bypass or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. This report suggests that bilateral lung transplant might be an efficient therapeutic option for such patients. Lung transplant is generally accepted as an effective way to deal with end-stage pulmonary diseases. Particularly, in patients with bronchiectasis or cystic fibrosis, single lung transplant may lead to infectious complications more easily. Thus, bilateral lung transplant is a better choice for such patients. However, some patients with bronchiectasis may have a history of surgical resection of target areas, which leads to an asymmetric thorax and makes lung transplant more difficult. We described 1 case of bilateral lung transplant for bronchiectasis in asymmetric thorax.

  9. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, A.; Artiles, I.; Cabanillas, J. J.; Álvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.

    2014-01-01

    There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF), especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ). The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ) of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine. PMID:25295210

  10. Chest physiotherapy techniques in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Flude, Lizzie J; Agent, Penny; Bilton, Diana

    2012-06-01

    Bronchiectasis is a persistent and progressive condition characterized by inflammation and infection causing damage that potentiates impaired mucociliary clearance. The rationale for promoting airway clearance is so that purulent secretions are removed from the airways, ameliorating the inflammation and improving control of symptoms such as cough and sputum plugging. Physiotherapists aim to teach patients one of a variety of airway clearance techniques to regularly perform as part of their daily management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Localised bronchiectasis revealing carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Janah, Hind; Jabri, Hasna; Bopaka, Régis Gothard; Khattabi, Wiam El; Afif, Hicham

    2016-01-01

    We here report the case of a 32-year old female patient with a 5-year history of recurrent purulent bronchial syndrome. Radiological assessment showed a left basithoracic finely ringed bright areas related to cylindrical bronchiectasis located in the left lower lobe. Flexible bronchoscopy showed smooth surface, reddish tumor obstructing the entrance of the left basal pyramid. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy associated with mediastinal lymph node dissection. Histological examination of the surgical specimen was in favor of typical carcinoid tumor. Postoperative outcome was uncomplicated and clinical and radiological evolution was good.

  12. Impulse oscillometry in adults with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wei-jie; Gao, Yong-hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-min; Lin, Zhi-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-05-01

    The usefulness of impulse oscillometry (IOS) in bronchiectasis has not been systematically investigated. To determine the usefulness of IOS parameters and their correlation with radiology, disease severity, sputum bacteriology, and spirometry, and to compare the changes in IOS parameters during exacerbations and convalescence of bronchiectasis. We recruited 100 patients with bronchiectasis and 28 healthy subjects. Receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted to analyze the diagnostic performance of IOS parameters. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI) assessment, sputum culture, and spirometry were performed. Correlation between IOS parameters and clinical indices was determined using the Spearman model. Changes in IOS parameters, compared with spirometry, during exacerbation were assessed in 16 patients with bronchiectasis. IOS parameters (in particular, resonant frequency) could discriminate patients with bronchiectasis from healthy subjects. Higher levels of IOS parameters were associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, dyshomogeneity, higher BSI and HRCT score, more bronchiectatic lobes, and cystic bronchiectasis (all P < 0.05). All IOS parameters but lung resistance at 5 Hz were positively correlated with the duration of bronchiectasis symptoms, number of bronchiectatic lobes, HRCT total scores, and BSI (all P < 0.05), but not sputum bacterial density (P > 0.05). IOS parameters, but not spirometric parameters, were not statistically different between peripheral and peripheral plus central segment bronchiectasis (all P > 0.05). Increased frequency dependence (higher resonance frequency or reactance area) was more likely to be associated with lower HRCT scores (≤5) than FEV1. Compared with FEV1, any single IOS parameter being abnormal was more common in mild bronchiectasis, particularly in patients with HRCT score of 5 or lower. IOS parameters were not statistically different from

  13. The European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC): experiences from a successful ERS Clinical Research Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Megan; Goeminne, Pieter C.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Haworth, Charles; Almagro, Marta; Vendrell, Montse; De Soyza, Anthony; Dhar, Raja ; Morgan, Lucy; Blasi, Francesco; Aliberti, Stefano; Boyd, Jeanette; Polverino, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to airway diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma, and rare diseases such as cystic fibrosis, there has been little research and few clinical trials in bronchiectasis. Guidelines are primarily based on expert opinion and treatment is challenging because of the heterogeneous nature of the disease. In an effort to address decades of underinvestment in bronchiectasis research, education and clinical care, the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC) was established in 2012 as a collaborative pan-European network to bring together bronchiectasis researchers. The European Respiratory Society officially funded EMBARC in 2013 as a Clinical Research Collaboration, providing support and infrastructure to allow the project to grow. EMBARC has now established an international bronchiectasis registry that is active in more than 30 countries both within and outside Europe. Beyond the registry, the network participates in designing and facilitating clinical trials, has set international research priorities, promotes education and has participated in producing the first international bronchiectasis guidelines. This manuscript article the development, structure and achievements of EMBARC from 2012 to 2017. Educational aims To understand the role of Clinical Research Collaborations as the major way in which the European Respiratory Society can stimulate clinical research in different disease areas To understand some of the key features of successful disease registries To review key epidemiological, clinical and translational studies of bronchiectasis contributed by the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC) project in the past 5 years To understand the key research priorities identified by EMBARC for the next 5 years PMID:28894479

  14. CFTR gene variant IVS8-5T in disseminated bronchiectasis

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombieri, C.; Benetazzo, M.; Casartelli, A.

    1996-04-01

    Obstructive pulmonary disease includes asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; i.e., pulmonary emphysema and chronic bronchitis), bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis (CF). It represents a leading cause of death in developed countries. Both familial clustering of non-CF obstructive pulmonary disease and familial aggregation of impaired lung function have been described. This suggests that genetic factors contribute to non-CF obstructive pulmonary disease, even if it is difficult to determine the relative contribution of environmental factors. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Sex bias in diagnostic delay in bronchiectasis: An analysis of the Spanish Historical Registry of Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Girón, Rosa Ma; de Gracia Roldán, Javier; Olveira, Casilda; Vendrell, Montserrat; Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; de la Rosa, David; Máiz, Luis; Ancochea, Julio; Vázquez, Liliana; Borderías, Luis; Polverino, Eva; Martínez-Moragón, Eva; Rajas, Olga; Soriano, Joan B

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic delay is common in most respiratory diseases, particularly in bronchiectasis. However, sex bias in diagnostic delay has not been studied to date. Assessment of diagnostic delay in bronchiectasis by sex. The Spanish Historical Registry of Bronchiectasis recruited adults diagnosed with bronchiectasis from 2002 to 2011 in 36 centres in Spain. From a total of 2113 patients registered we studied 2099, of whom 1125 (53.6%) were women. No differences were found for sex or age (61.0 ± 20.6, p = 0.88) or for localization of bronchiectasis ( p = 0.31). Bronchiectasis of unknown aetiology and secondary to asthma, childhood infections and tuberculosis was more common in women (all ps < 0.05). More men than women were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related bronchiectasis and colonized by Haemophilus influenzae ( p < 0.001 for both). Onset of symptoms was earlier in women. The diagnostic delay for women with bronchiectasis was 2.1 years more than for men ( p = 0.001). We recorded a substantial delay in the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. This delay was significantly longer in women than in men (>2 years). Independent factors associated with this sex bias were age at onset of symptoms, smoking history, daily expectoration and reduced lung function.

  16. Bronchiectasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health & Wellness > Health Professionals Lung Health & Wellness > Healthy Air (Indoor & Outdoor) Lung Health & Wellness > LUNG FORCE Updates Lung Health & Wellness > Quit Smoking Lung Health & ...

  17. Singing for children and adults with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Irons, Jung Yoon; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Chang, Anne B

    2010-02-17

    Bronchiectasis is a common respiratory disease, especially in developing countries. Its cause varies from chronic infection to rare immune deficiencies. Bronchiectasis can be present with other respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with bronchiectasis may suffer from chronic cough, fatigue, shortness of breath, chest pain and coughing up blood. Their lung function may decline with time. These can also have a negative impact on their quality of life. Thus, a holistic management is needed to provide treatment and support. Therapies which include breathing manoeuvres, such as singing, may have health benefits for respiratory function and psychological well being. To evaluate the effects of a singing intervention as a therapy on the quality of life, morbidity, respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function of children and adults with bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group (CAG) trials register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, major allied complementary databases, and clinical trials registers. Professional organisations and individuals were also contacted. CAG performed searches in February, and additional searches were carried out in June 2009. Randomised controlled trials in which singing (as an intervention) is compared with either a sham intervention or no singing in patients with bronchiectasis. Two authors independently reviewed the titles, abstracts and citations to assess potential relevance for full review. No eligible trials were identified and thus no data were available for analysis. No meta-analysis could be performed. In the absence of data, we cannot draw any conclusion to support or refute the adoption of singing as an intervention for people with bronchiectasis. Given the simplicity of the potentially beneficial intervention, future randomised controlled trials are required to evaluate singing therapy for people with bronchiectasis.

  18. Serum zinc, bronchiectasis, and bronchial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beeley, J. M.; Darke, C. S.; Owen, G.; Cooper, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Beeley, J. M., Darke, C. S., Owen, G., and Cooper, R. D. (1974).Thorax, 29, 21-25. Serum zinc, bronchiectasis, and bronchial carcinoma. Serum zinc levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 65 patients with proven bronchiectasis; the mean level was 93 μg/100 ml, while the levels in two groups of healthy control subjects were 88·6 and 92·7 μg/100 ml respectively. The range of individual values was similar in all groups and the differences between the mean serum zinc levels of the two groups of control subjects and the mean level of the group of patients with bronchiectasis were small and did not attain significance at the conventional 0·05 level. In contrast, the mean level in bronchial carcinoma patients (75·9 μg/100 ml) was significantly less than in each of the other groups of subjects. Zinc sulphate was administered for six weeks on a double-blind cross-over basis to patients with bronchiectasis and, although serum zinc levels rose, no detectable clinical improvement resulted. No definitive evidence of zinc deficiency in bronchiectasis has been established. PMID:4596632

  19. [Anxiety-depressive disorders and bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Boussoffara, L; Boudawara, N; Gharsallaoui, Z; Sakka, M; Knani, J

    2014-03-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease that may be associated with anxiety-depressive disorders affecting the quality of life of patients. Detecting these anxiety-depressive disorders may be necessary in the support and overall management of a patient with bronchiectasis. To evaluate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with bronchiectasis and to investigate the possible correlation between the severity of the disease and the importance of these psychological disorders. This was a prospective study that included 53 patients with stable bronchiectasis and without other comorbidities. All the patients underwent a complete clinical examination, spirometry and chest computed tomography. All the 53 patients responded to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) questionnaire. Anxiety was present in 22.7% of patients and depression in 20.8%. Subjects who had an anxiety disorder had symptoms primarily of dyspnoea (P=0.001), a low FEV (P=0.04) and respiratory failure at a stage requiring home oxygen therapy (P=0.009). A similar comparison of patients with and without depressive disorder again found a high prevalence of dyspnea (P=0.003), a low FEV (P=0.04), and chronic respiratory failure in the depressive patients. Symptoms of depression and anxiety are common in patients with bronchiectasis and appear to be associated with dyspnoea. Early detection is necessary in the context of the overall management of these patients. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Associated with Worse Survival After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Black, Sylvester M; Woodley, Frederick W; Tumin, Dmitry; Mumtaz, Khalid; Whitson, Bryan A; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2016-04-01

    Survival in cystic fibrosis patients after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation is not well studied. To discern survival rates after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation in patients with and without cystic fibrosis. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried from 1987 to 2013. Univariate Cox proportional hazards, multivariate Cox models, and propensity score matching were performed. Liver transplant and liver-lung transplant were performed in 212 and 53 patients with cystic fibrosis, respectively. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified lower survival in cystic fibrosis after liver transplant compared to a reference non-cystic fibrosis liver transplant cohort (HR 1.248; 95 % CI 1.012, 1.541; p = 0.039). Supplementary analysis found graft survival was similar across the 3 recipient categories (log-rank test: χ(2) 2.68; p = 0.262). Multivariate Cox models identified increased mortality hazard among cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation (HR 2.439; 95 % CI 1.709, 3.482; p < 0.001) and liver-lung transplantation (HR 2.753; 95 % CI 1.560, 4.861; p < 0.001). Propensity score matching of cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation to non-cystic fibrosis controls identified a greater mortality hazard in the cystic fibrosis cohort using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on matched pairs (HR 3.167; 95 % CI 1.265, 7.929, p = 0.014). Liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis is associated with poorer long-term patient survival compared to non-cystic fibrosis patients, although the difference is not due to graft survival.

  2. Azithromycin for Indigenous children with bronchiectasis: study protocol for a multi-centre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis (CF) among Indigenous children in Australia, New Zealand and Alaska is very high. Antibiotics are a major component of treatment and are used both on a short or long-term basis. One aim of long-term or maintenance antibiotics is to reduce the frequency of acute pulmonary exacerbations and symptoms. However, there are few studies investigating the efficacy of long-term antibiotic use for CSLD and non-CF bronchiectasis among children. This study tests the hypothesis that azithromycin administered once a week as maintenance antibiotic treatment will reduce the rate of pulmonary exacerbations in Indigenous children with bronchiectasis. Methods/design We are conducting a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial in Australia and New Zealand. Inclusion criteria are: Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Maori or Pacific Island children aged 1 to 8 years, diagnosed with bronchiectasis (or probable bronchiectasis) with no underlying disease identified (such as CF or primary immunodeficiency), and having had at least one episode of pulmonary exacerbation in the last 12 months. After informed consent, children are randomised to receive either azithromycin (30 mg/kg once a week) or placebo (once a week) for 12–24 months from study entry. Primary outcomes are the rate of pulmonary exacerbations and time to pulmonary exacerbation determined by review of patient medical records. Secondary outcomes include length and severity of pulmonary exacerbation episodes, changes in growth, school loss, respiratory symptoms, forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1; for children ≥6 years), and sputum characteristics. Safety endpoints include serious adverse events. Antibiotic resistance in respiratory bacterial pathogens colonising the nasopharynx is monitored. Data derived from medical records and clinical assessments every 3 to 4

  3. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  4. Broncholithiasis presenting as bronchiectasis and recurrent pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Dakkak, Melissa; Siddiqi, Furqan; Cury, James Davis

    2015-01-01

    A broncholith is defined as the presence of calcified material within a bronchus or within a cavity communicating with a bronchus. It is most frequently caused by Histoplasmosis or tuberculosis (TB) spp. Bronchial distortion, irritation and erosion by broncholiths can cause bronchiectasis, recurrent pneumonias and haemoptysis. We present a case of recurrent pneumonia due to a broncholith, which resolved conservatively with antibiotics. Owing to recurrent fevers and post obstructive pneumonias, a lobectomy or rigid bronchoscopic removal were considered but the patient was deemed not to be a candidate for general anaesthesia due to her comorbidities. Broncholiths are an uncommon cause of bronchiectasis and recurrent pneumonias. However, the wide range of symptoms and low clinical suspicion are the main reasons why a diagnosis can be delayed. Various treatment options are available and the choice of therapy should be made depending on the broncholith's size, mobility, location and local surgical expertise. PMID:26106172

  5. Resolution of extensive severe bronchiectasis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Suzanne; Matthews, Iren

    2010-07-01

    Bronchiectasis is, by definition, an irreversible condition. Following recent reports of reversible bronchiectasis in children, it has been suggested that the definition be broadened to include pre-bronchiectasis and transitional reversible states. We describe the case of a young infant who had extensive, severe bronchiectasis of unknown etiology that resolved following prolonged treatment with antibiotics and a tapering course of oral steroids. We suggest that the prolonged treatment may have played a role, perhaps by eradicating infection and thus enabling regeneration of bronchial anatomy.

  6. 102 Bronchiectasis: Localization and Characteristics, Identified by Using a High Resolution CT Scan in Adults With Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Laura; Segura Mendez, Nora Hilda; Flores, Francisco; Campos Romero, Freya Helena; Guillén, Nelva

    2012-01-01

    Background The common variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is the second cause of primary immunodeficiency. The bronchiectasis are the most frequent structural pulmonary alterations in CVID, which have been principally described in pediatric population, finding the presence of the same ones in 50% of the cases, nevertheless exists inssuficient information about the location and characteristics as type and distribution of the bronchiectasis; in adult population, less information exists still on this matter. High resolution CT scan is valuable for detection of bronchiectasis and may alter treatment of these patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of bronchiectasis, their characteristics and most frequent location using a high resolution CT scan in adults with diagnosis of CVID. Methods This was a cohort study whit 15 adult subjects whit the diagnosis of CVID, who underwent a chest high-resolution computed tomography scan, previous signature of a letter of informed consent and with the approval of the committee of ethics and investigation (F-2011-3601-21). Results We studied all the subjects (n = 15) whit CVID, finding the presence of bronquiectasias in 73% of the subjects with CVID, 82% was a women and 8% males. The most frequent location was in the left lung in 46% of the cases and 45 bilateral %, with only 9% of location in right lung. These were more frequent in the lower lobe in 42, 17% in top lobe and l6% diffuse, the rest of them were brought like diffuse, bibasal or parahiliar. In one patient we found the presence of a left apical cavitation and only one was brought by presence of pulmonary diffuse fibrosis. Conclusions There was realized a search of bronchiectasis and their characteristics in subjects with CVID disorders, the incidence of bronchiectasis is higher in our poblation (82%) than in the rest (50% described in other pubiclations). The most affected lung was the left in the lower lobe. The most frequent type of

  7. The importance of smell in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Guilemany, José Maria; Mariño-Sánchez, Franklin Santiago; Angrill, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam; Centellas, Silvia; Pujols, Laura; Berenguer, Joan; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Picado, César; Mullol, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the sense of smell in patients with bronchiectasis. Prospective controlled study was performed on 91 patients with bronchiectasis. Bronchiectasis patients were sub-classified depending on: the presence of chronic rhinosinusitis, with or without nasal polyps, and the bronchiectasis ethiology. Olfactory function was evaluated by means of the Barcelona Smell Test (BAST-24) olfactometry for detection, identification, and forced choice for the first and fifth cranial nerve dependent odours in comparison to a group of 120 healthy volunteers. Most patients with bronchiectasis (80.2%) satisfied EP(3)OS criteria of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and 26.4% presented nasal polyps (NP). Smell detection, identification, and forced choice tests were significantly (p < 0.001) worse in bronchiectasis patients than healthy controls for both the 1st and 5th CN. Among subgroups, patients with CRS presented a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in smell detection compared to both healthy controls and patients without CRS. Patients with both CRS and NP presented a significant (p < 0.01) reduction in both smell detection and forced choice compared to patients with CRS and without NP. Patients with bronchiectasis and primary humoral immunodeficiency had a poorer smell detection (p < 0.001) and forced choice (p < 0.001) compared with post-infective and idiopathic bronchiectasis patients. Patients with bronchiectasis have a moderate loss of smell with a higher impairment in patients with CRS, being maximal in patients with NP. Patients with immunodeficiency bronchiectasis showed high prevalence of CRS, and therefore marked impairment on the sense of smell. The mechanism could be explained through a mixed ethiology (obstruction/inflammation). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Objective Assessment of Cough Frequency in Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Spinou, Arietta; Lee, Kai K; Sinha, Aish; Elston, Caroline; Loebinger, Michael R; Wilson, Robert; Chung, Kian Fan; Yousaf, Nadia; Pavord, Ian D; Matos, Sergio; Garrod, Rachel; Birring, Surinder S

    2017-07-13

    Cough in bronchiectasis is associated with significant impairment in health status. This study aimed to quantify cough frequency objectively with a cough monitor and investigate its relationship with health status. A secondary aim was to identify clinical predictors of cough frequency. Fifty-four patients with bronchiectasis were compared with thirty-five healthy controls. Objective 24-h cough, health status (cough-specific: Leicester Cough Questionnaire LCQ and bronchiectasis specific: Bronchiectasis Health Questionnaire BHQ), cough severity and lung function were measured. The clinical predictors of cough frequency in bronchiectasis were determined in a multivariate analysis. Objective cough frequency was significantly raised in patients with bronchiectasis compared to healthy controls [geometric mean (standard deviation)] 184.5 (4.0) vs. 20.6 (3.2) coughs/24-h; mean fold-difference (95% confidence interval) 8.9 (5.2, 15.2); p < 0.001 and they had impaired health status. There was a significant correlation between objective cough frequency and subjective measures; LCQ r = -0.52 and BHQ r = -0.62, both p < 0.001. Sputum production, exacerbations (between past 2 weeks to 12 months) and age were significantly associated with objective cough frequency in multivariate analysis, explaining 52% of the variance (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant association between cough frequency and lung function. Cough is a common and significant symptom in patients with bronchiectasis. Sputum production, exacerbations and age, but not lung function, were independent predictors of cough frequency. Ambulatory objective cough monitoring provides novel insights and should be further investigated as an outcome measure in bronchiectasis.

  9. The development and validation of the Bronchiectasis Health Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Spinou, Arietta; Siegert, Richard J; Guan, Wei-Jie; Patel, Amit S; Gosker, Harry R; Lee, Kai K; Elston, Caroline; Loebinger, Michael R; Wilson, Robert; Garrod, Rachel; Birring, Surinder S

    2017-05-01

    Health-related quality of life or health status is significantly impaired in bronchiectasis. There is a paucity of brief, simple-to-use, disease-specific health status measures. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the Bronchiectasis Health Questionnaire (BHQ), a new health status measure that is brief and generates a single overall score.Patients with bronchiectasis were recruited from two outpatient clinics, during a clinically stable stage. The development of the questionnaire followed three phases: item generation and item reduction using Rasch analysis, validation, and repeatability testing. The BHQ was translated into 11 languages using standardised methodology.206 patients with bronchiectasis completed a preliminary 65-item questionnaire. 55 items were removed due to redundancy or poor fit to the Rasch model. The final version of the BHQ consisted of 10 items. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach's α=0.85). Convergent validity of the BHQ with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire was high (r= -0.82; p<0.001) and moderate with lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted r= -0.27; p=0.001). There was a significant association between BHQ scores and number of exacerbations of bronchiectasis in the last 12 months (p<0.001), hospital admissions (p=0.001) and computed tomography scan bronchiectasis pulmonary lobe counts (p<0.001). BHQ scores were significantly worse in patients with sputum bacterial colonisation versus no colonisation (p=0.048). The BHQ was highly repeatable after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.89).The BHQ is a brief, valid and repeatable, self-completed health status questionnaire for bronchiectasis that generates a single total score. It can be used in the clinic to assess bronchiectasis from the patient's perspective. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  10. Facial flushing due to multifocal tumorlets in the lung with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoxing; Pu, Qiang; Liu, Lunxu; Che, Guowei

    2009-08-01

    Facial flushing attacks as a Carcinoid syndrome are quite a rare presentation in pulmonary tumorlets and bronchiectasis. We experienced a case in which a 43-year-old woman with bronchiectasis presented to our department with continuous facial flushing attacks for 3 years in the absence of bronchiectasis symptom. Computed tomographic scans revealed bronchiectasis of the left lower lobe and no tumor. A left lower lobectomy was performed, and multiple tumorlets were observed on microscopic examination among the bronchiectasis. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination revealed findings consistent with diffuse tumorlets and bronchiectasis in the lung.

  11. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  12. Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis: early and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Riccardo; Alifano, Marco; Stefani, Alessandro; Legras, Antoine; Grigoroiu, Madalina; Collet, Jean-Yves; Magdelenat, Pierre; Regnard, Jean-François

    2008-08-01

    Management of bronchiectasis remains controversial and information on long-term results of surgical treatment is poor. Clinical records of 45 patients, who underwent surgery for bronchiectasis in an 8-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. Bronchiectasis focus was isolated in 24 cases, associated with a limited homolateral or controlateral focus in 9 and 11, respectively; two patients had bilateral evident foci. Bronchiectasis was responsible for lobe destruction in 23 cases. All patients had symptoms: haemoptysis (n=7), recurrent pneumonia (n=7), persistent bronchorrea with recurrent infection (n=15), hemoptysis and recurrent infection (n=16). A total of 23 lobectomies, 11 lobectomies+segmentectomies, 2 bi-lobectomies, 9 segmentectomies and 1 pneumonectomy were carried out. There were no perioperative deaths; complications occurred in 5 patients (postoperative pneumonia in 2, prolonged air-leak, residual air-space and bronchial infection 1 each). Symptoms disappeared in 32 patients, 10 patients experienced a significant improvement. Exercise tolerance remained stable or improved in 33 and 2 cases, respectively, a slight impairment was observed in 9. Out of 32 evaluable patients 11 had an unchanged FEV(1), 15 had a limited FEV(1) lowering (<15%), and 9 had a more important functional loss. Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis obtains satisfactory long-term results, with acceptable morbidity rates.

  13. European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Goeminne, Pieter C; McDonnell, Melissa J; Aliberti, Stefano; Marshall, Sara E; Loebinger, Michael R; Murris, Marlene; Cantón, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Dimakou, Katerina; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T; Haworth, Charles S; Vendrell, Montserrat; Ringshausen, Felix C; Subotic, Dragan; Wilson, Robert; Vilaró, Jordi; Stallberg, Bjorn; Welte, Tobias; Rohde, Gernot; Blasi, Francesco; Elborn, Stuart; Almagro, Marta; Timothy, Alan; Ruddy, Thomas; Tonia, Thomy; Rigau, David; Chalmers, James D

    2017-09-01

    Bronchiectasis in adults is a chronic disorder associated with poor quality of life and frequent exacerbations in many patients. There have been no previous international guidelines.The European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis describe the appropriate investigation and treatment strategies determined by a systematic review of the literature.A multidisciplinary group representing respiratory medicine, microbiology, physiotherapy, thoracic surgery, primary care, methodology and patients considered the most relevant clinical questions (for both clinicians and patients) related to management of bronchiectasis. Nine key clinical questions were generated and a systematic review was conducted to identify published systematic reviews, randomised clinical trials and observational studies that answered these questions. We used the GRADE approach to define the quality of the evidence and the level of recommendations. The resulting guideline addresses the investigation of underlying causes of bronchiectasis, treatment of exacerbations, pathogen eradication, long term antibiotic treatment, anti-inflammatories, mucoactive drugs, bronchodilators, surgical treatment and respiratory physiotherapy.These recommendations can be used to benchmark quality of care for people with bronchiectasis across Europe and to improve outcomes. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. Characterizing Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Infection in Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Stainer, Anna; Bonaiti, Giulia; Zucchetti, Stefano C.; Simonetta, Edoardo; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Marruchella, Almerico; Gori, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Codecasa, Luigi; Pesci, Alberto; Chalmers, James D.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infection is a key aspect of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis. A growing interest has been raised on non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. We aimed at describing the clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, therapeutic options and outcomes of bronchiectasis patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) disease. This was a prospective, observational study enrolling 261 adult bronchiectasis patients during the stable state at the San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, from 2012 to 2015. Three groups were identified: pNTM disease; chronic P. aeruginosa infection; chronic infection due to bacteria other than P. aeruginosa. NTM were isolated in 32 (12%) patients, and among them, a diagnosis of pNTM disease was reached in 23 cases. When compared to chronic P. aeruginosa infection, patients with pNTM were more likely to have cylindrical bronchiectasis and a “tree-in-bud” pattern, a history of weight loss, a lower disease severity and a lower number of pulmonary exacerbations. Among pNTM patients who started treatment, 68% showed a radiological improvement, and 37% achieved culture conversion without recurrence, while 21% showed NTM isolation recurrence. NTM isolation seems to be a frequent event in bronchiectasis patients, and few parameters might help to suspect NTM infection. Treatment indications and monitoring still remain an important area for future research. PMID:27854334

  15. Characterizing Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Infection in Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Stainer, Anna; Bonaiti, Giulia; Zucchetti, Stefano C; Simonetta, Edoardo; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Marruchella, Almerico; Gori, Andrea; Blasi, Francesco; Codecasa, Luigi; Pesci, Alberto; Chalmers, James D; Loebinger, Michael R; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-11-16

    Chronic airway infection is a key aspect of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis. A growing interest has been raised on non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. We aimed at describing the clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, therapeutic options and outcomes of bronchiectasis patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) disease. This was a prospective, observational study enrolling 261 adult bronchiectasis patients during the stable state at the San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, from 2012 to 2015. Three groups were identified: pNTM disease; chronic P. aeruginosa infection; chronic infection due to bacteria other than P. aeruginosa. NTM were isolated in 32 (12%) patients, and among them, a diagnosis of pNTM disease was reached in 23 cases. When compared to chronic P. aeruginosa infection, patients with pNTM were more likely to have cylindrical bronchiectasis and a "tree-in-bud" pattern, a history of weight loss, a lower disease severity and a lower number of pulmonary exacerbations. Among pNTM patients who started treatment, 68% showed a radiological improvement, and 37% achieved culture conversion without recurrence, while 21% showed NTM isolation recurrence. NTM isolation seems to be a frequent event in bronchiectasis patients, and few parameters might help to suspect NTM infection. Treatment indications and monitoring still remain an important area for future research.

  16. [Cystic fibrosis in a woman aged seventy].

    PubMed

    Ras, Janneke E; van Velzen, Edwin; van Berkhout, Ferdinand Teding; van den Brand, Joop J G

    2010-01-01

    A seventy-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a Staphylococcus aureus respiratory tract infection. She had a history of extensive bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Cystic fibrosis (CF) was suspected and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene analysis showed F508del and R117H-7T mutations. In these mutations there is residual activity in the chloride channel in the cell membrane coded by the CFTR gene. This results in a much milder disease pattern varying from no disease at all to isolated organ disease. This type of disease is known as non-classical cystic fibrosis. In our patient the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made exceptionally late in life.

  17. Current management of bronchiectasis: review and 3 case studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Enid; Ebright, Linda; Kwiatkowski, Marianne; Cullina, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is the abnormal, irreversible dilatation of diseased bronchi. Permanently dilated airways, usually in the medium-sized bronchi, are inflamed and often obstructed with thick, purulent secretions. Known causative factors include postinfection bronchial damage, postinhalation injury, hypersensitivity reactions, and congenital airway obstructive disorders. Typical symptoms include sputum overproduction, fever, pleurisy, dyspnea, and chronic cough. Diagnosis involves radiographic studies and pulmonary function testing. Treatment includes oral, aerosolized, or intravenous antibiotic therapy according to the severity of the exacerbation, and mucus clearance by means of bronchial hygiene assistive devices, chest physiotherapy, postural drainage, and high-frequency chest compression. We present a review of bronchiectasis and offer 3 case studies illustrating current management of different presentations, including use of aerosolized antibiotics for patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although an adjunctive program of pulmonary rehabilitation may be useful for patients with bronchiectasis, no confirming studies have been performed to date, and additional research in this area is warranted.

  18. Inhaled or nebulised ciprofloxacin for the maintenance treatment of bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Cartlidge, Manjit K; Hill, Adam T

    2017-09-01

    Inhaled or nebulised antibiotics are a major topic of ongoing research interest in reducing exacerbations in bronchiectasis. There are no licenced inhaled or nebulised antibiotics currently in bronchiectasis. Areas covered: Inhaled or nebulised ciprofloxacin as a long-term treatment in bronchiectasis. Expert opinion: Results from the Phase III ongoing trials on inhaled or nebulised ciprofloxacin will be key for the outcome of the drugs but additionally, cost-effectiveness and longer-term studies will be necessary to determine the viability of the drug. Head to head studies are needed to decide on the optimum inhaled or nebulised antibiotic and their place with or without long term macrolide therapy. It is also important to determine what treatment is viable for acute exacerbations due to P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin is the only currently available oral agent for exacerbations due to P. aeruginosa. The concern is that using inhaled or nebulised ciprofloxacin will prevent the use and efficacy of its oral equivalent, by developing resistance.

  19. The validity of health-related quality of life questionnaires in bronchiectasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Spinou, Arietta; Fragkos, Konstantinos C; Lee, Kai K; Elston, Caroline; Siegert, Richard J; Loebinger, Michael R; Wilson, Robert; Garrod, Rachel; Birring, Surinder S

    2016-08-01

    A range of questionnaires have been used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in bronchiectasis. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate their psychometric properties and assess associations between HRQOL and clinical measures. Five electronic databases were searched. Studies eligible for inclusion were those that investigated the validity of HRQOL questionnaires and/or their association with other outcomes in adults with bronchiectasis. Patients with cystic fibrosis were excluded. The identified questionnaires were assessed for convergent, discriminant and cross-cultural translation validity; missing data, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, responsiveness and test-retest reliability. A meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the strength of associations between HRQOL and clinical measures. From 1918 studies identified, 43 studies were included in the systematic review, of which 38 were suitable for the meta-analysis. Nine HRQOL questionnaires were identified, with the most widely used being: St George's Respiratory Questionnaire, Leicester Cough Questionnaire, Quality of Life-Bronchiectasis and Short Form-36. HRQOL questionnaires had moderate to good internal consistency and good test-retest reliability. Only 8 of 18 studies that used translated HRQOL questionnaires reported or referred to the validity of the translated questionnaire. There was a stronger correlation (mean r (95% CI)) between HRQOL and subjective outcome measures, such as dyspnoea (0.55 (0.41 to 0.68)) and fatigue (0.42 (0.23 to 0.58)) compared with objective measures; exercise capacity (-0.41 (-0.54 to -0.24)), FEV1% predicted (-0.31 (-0.40 to -0.23)) and extent of bronchiectasis on CT scan (0.35 (0.03 to 0.61)); all p<0.001. This review supports most HRQOL questionnaires used in bronchiectasis have good psychometric properties. There was a weak to moderate association between HRQOL and objective outcome measures. This suggests that HRQOL questionnaires assess a

  20. Aetiology of bronchiectasis in adults: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Hua; Guan, Wei-Jie; Liu, Shao-Xia; Wang, Lei; Cui, Juan-Juan; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-11-01

    While identifying the underlying aetiology is a key part of bronchiectasis management, the prevalence and impact of identifying the aetiologies on clinical management remain unclear. We aimed to determine the etiological spectrum of bronchiectasis, and how often etiological assessment could lead to the changes in patients' management. A comprehensive search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE for observational studies published before October 2015 reporting aetiologies in adults with bronchiectasis. Of the 8216 citations identified, 56 studies including 8608 adults with bronchiectasis were relevant for this systematic review. The crude prevalence for the identified aetiologies ranged from 18% to 95%, which possibly resulted from the differences in the geographic regions and diagnostic workup. Post-infective (29.9%), immunodeficiency (5%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (3.9%), connective tissue disease (3.8%), ciliary dysfunction (2.5%), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (2.6%) were the most common aetiologies. In 1577 patients (18.3%), identifying the aetiologies led to changes in patient's management. Aetiologies varied considerably among different geographic regions (P < 0.001). Intensive investigations of these aetiologies might help change patient's management and therefore should be incorporated into routine clinical practice.

  1. [Results of bronchiectasis surgery: About 64 cases].

    PubMed

    Rabiou, S; Issoufou, I; Ammor, F Z; Harmouchi, H; Belliraj, L; Lakranbi, M; Serraj, M; Ouadnouni, Y; Smahi, M

    2017-09-01

    Bronchiectasis is a serious and disabling disease. Surgical treatment is an interesting alternative to be proposed early to patients in case of complications or deterioration of quality of life, despite an optimal medical treatment. Through this retrospective study and literature review, we analyze surgical results for bronchiectasis. We conducted a monocentric, retrospective, descriptive and analytical study in the Department of thoracic surgery of CHU Hassan II Fès, about 64 patients operated for bronchiectasis during the period from January 2009 to December 2016. There were 30 men and 34 women with an average age of 32years. Twenty six percent (26 %) had a history of recurrent lung infection, and 17.18 % would have been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and declared cured. Productive cough (93 %), morning chronic bronchorrhea (92 %) and repeatedly hemoptysis (62.5 %) were the main symptoms. On CT scanning, the bronchiectasis was unilateral and localized in 49 cases. The right lung was involved in 27 cases and the location was bilateral in 15 cases. It was 38 cystic bronchiectasis, 16 cylindrical bronchiectasis, and 10 mixed lesions predominantly cylindrical. The flexible bronchoscopy carried out in 34 cases, had shown a carcinoid tumor in 1 case, a bronchiolithiasis in 1 case and a intrabronchial foreign body in 1 case. The incision was a conservative posterolateral thoracotomy in all cases. The performed surgical procedure was lobectomy in 53 % of patients. The morbidity rate was 32.80 % and dominated by septic complications. After a mean follow-up of 20.52months, 2 cases of recurrence minimal hemoptysis and 1 case of renewed bronchorrhea are noted. For all other patients the outcome was favorable and no deaths have been noted to date. The surgery of bronchiectasis requires a perfect collaboration between the pulmonologist, the thoracic surgeon, the anesthesiologist, the biologist and particularly the physiotherapist for an optimal care

  2. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  3. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Milger, Katrin; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Teupser, Daniel; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Behr, Jürgen; Kneidinger, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL). No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA) insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null). This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency.

  4. Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: Is the emphysema type associated with the pattern of fibrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Mintzopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Zezos, Petros; Zacharis, George; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Bouros, Demosthenes; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the predominant emphysema type is associated with the high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) pattern of fibrosis in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). METHODS: Fifty-three smokers with upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe pulmonary fibrosis on - HRCT - were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were stratified into 3 groups according to the predominant type of emphysema: Centrilobular (CLE), paraseptal (PSE), CLE = PSE. Patients were also stratified into 3 other groups according to the predominant type of fibrosis on HRCT: Typical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), probable UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). HRCTs were scored at 5 predetermined levels for the coarseness of fibrosis (Coarseness), extent of emphysema (emphysema), extent of interstitial lung disease (TotExtILD), extent of reticular pattern not otherwise specified (RetNOS), extent of ground glass opacity with traction bronchiectasis (extGGOBx), extent of pure ground glass opacity and extent of honeycombing. HRCT mean scores, pulmonary function tests, diffusion capacity (DLCO) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure were compared among the groups. RESULTS: The predominant type of emphysema was strongly correlated with the predominant type of fibrosis. The centrilobular emphysema group exhibited a significantly higher extent of emphysema (P < 0.001) and a lower extent of interstitial lung disease (P < 0.002), reticular pattern not otherwise specified (P < 0.023), extent of ground glass opacity with traction bronchiectasis (P < 0.002), extent of honeycombing (P < 0.001) and coarseness of fibrosis (P < 0.001) than the paraseptal group. The NSIP group exhibited a significantly higher extent of emphysema (P < 0.05), total lung capacity (P < 0.01) and diffusion capacity (DLCO) (P < 0.05) than the typical UIP group. The typical UIP group exhibited a significantly higher extent of interstitial lung disease, extent of reticular pattern not otherwise

  5. Bronchiectasis in the Last Five Years: New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Jun Keng; Venning, Victoria; Wong, Conroy; Jayaram, Lata

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis, a chronic lung disease characterised by cough and purulent sputum, recurrent infections, and airway damage, is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. To date, treatment options have been limited to physiotherapy to clear sputum and antibiotics to treat acute infections. Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and microbiology of this disorder. Over the last five years, methods of assessing severity have been developed, the role of macrolide antibiotic therapy in reducing exacerbations cemented, and inhaled antibiotic therapies show promise in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Novel therapies are currently undergoing Phase 1 and 2 trials. This review aims to address the major developments within the field of bronchiectasis over this time. PMID:27941638

  6. Bronchiectasis in the Last Five Years: New Developments.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Jun Keng; Venning, Victoria; Wong, Conroy; Jayaram, Lata

    2016-12-08

    Bronchiectasis, a chronic lung disease characterised by cough and purulent sputum, recurrent infections, and airway damage, is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. To date, treatment options have been limited to physiotherapy to clear sputum and antibiotics to treat acute infections. Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and microbiology of this disorder. Over the last five years, methods of assessing severity have been developed, the role of macrolide antibiotic therapy in reducing exacerbations cemented, and inhaled antibiotic therapies show promise in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Novel therapies are currently undergoing Phase 1 and 2 trials. This review aims to address the major developments within the field of bronchiectasis over this time.

  7. [Cystic fibrosis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Josserand, R Nove

    2008-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological, physiopathological, clinical and therapeutic knowledge concerning cystic fibrosis (CF). Important modifications in the health organization of the care concerning this orphan disease have been implemented in France. The life expectancy has dramatically increased, as well as the knowledge concerning the pathological structure and function of the CFTR gene and protein. This will lead to the development of emerging drug treatments for this lethal disease. The life expectancy is predicted to exceed 40 years for children born in the 2000s. As a result, there has been a tremendous growth of the adult population that reached 40% of the overall approximately 5000 patients included in the CF French registry (Observatoire National de la Mucoviscidose). Lung disease remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The characteristic phenotypic presentation associates bronchial and rhinosinusal symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency and liver disease. Bronchial damage leads to progressive chronic respiratory insufficiency. Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis frequently appears in adulthood. Neonatal screening has been implemented in France since 2002. It will prevent delayed diagnosis and its deleterious consequences. Some atypical cases of CF presenting only with one or two organ system involvement can be diagnosed in adulthood. Isolated chronic rhinosinusitis, bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens, recurrent pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and some case of cholangitis may so revealed late form of cystic fibrosis. The health care is organized in cystic fibrosis centres. Despite gene discovery, treatment still remains symptomatic, based on intensive pulmonary and nutritional treatments. Challenges for new treatments are to correct the basic defect, either by gene therapy or by pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes.

  8. Pulmonary exacerbation in adults with bronchiectasis: a consensus definition for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adam T; Haworth, Charles S; Aliberti, Stefano; Barker, Alan; Blasi, Francesco; Boersma, Wim; Chalmers, James D; De Soyza, Anthony; Dimakou, Katerina; Elborn, J Stuart; Feldman, Charles; Flume, Patrick; Goeminne, Pieter C; Loebinger, Michael R; Menendez, Rosario; Morgan, Lucy; Murris, Marlene; Polverino, Eva; Quittner, Alexandra; Ringshausen, Felix C; Tino, Gregory; Torres, Antoni; Vendrell, Montserrat; Welte, Tobias; Wilson, Rob; Wong, Conroy; O'Donnell, Anne; Aksamit, Timothy

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a clear definition of exacerbations used in clinical trials in patients with bronchiectasis. An expert conference was convened to develop a consensus definition of an exacerbation for use in clinical research.A systematic review of exacerbation definitions used in clinical trials from January 2000 until December 2015 and involving adults with bronchiectasis was conducted. A Delphi process followed by a round-table meeting involving bronchiectasis experts was organised to reach a consensus definition. These experts came from Europe (representing the European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Research Collaboration), North America (representing the US Bronchiectasis Research Registry/COPD Foundation), Australasia and South Africa.The definition was unanimously approved by the working group as: a person with bronchiectasis with a deterioration in three or more of the following key symptoms for at least 48 h: cough; sputum volume and/or consistency; sputum purulence; breathlessness and/or exercise tolerance; fatigue and/or malaise; haemoptysis AND a clinician determines that a change in bronchiectasis treatment is required.The working group proposes the use of this consensus-based definition for bronchiectasis exacerbation in future clinical research involving adults with bronchiectasis. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  9. Influence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa on Exacerbation in Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Manu, Mohan K; Lazer, Bernaitis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8%) patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008), greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007), a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03), and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis. PMID:25722615

  10. Quality of Life and Bronchial Hyper-Responsiveness in Subjects With Bronchiectasis: Validation of the Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire in Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Bulcun, Emel; Arslan, Mesut; Ekici, Aydanur; Ekici, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Bronchiectasis can adversely affect quality of life. However, the tests examining quality of life in bronchiectasis are not sufficient. We examined the validity of a measure designed for COPD, the Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire (SOLQ), in bronchiectasis. In addition, we aimed to compare the quality of life of subjects with bronchiectasis and bronchial hyper-responsiveness with that of those without to identify the effective factors. We studied 78 subjects with clinically stable bronchiectasis and 41 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Subjects were assessed by the SOLQ. A detailed history, physical examination, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and spirometric measurements were obtained. Cronbach α coefficients, which reflected internal consistency, were >0.70 for all SOLQ components except for treatment satisfaction. SOLQ component scores correlated with all of the component scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, confirming their concurrent validity. All SOLQ scores correlated positively with percent-of-predicted FEV1, whereas the physical function, treatment satisfaction, and emotional function correlated negatively with the exacerbation frequency in Pearson analysis. Emotional and physical functions were positively associated with percent-of-predicted FEV1 in linear regression analysis. Compared with subjects without bronchial hyper-responsiveness, those with bronchial hyper-responsiveness had lower FEV1/FVC and more exacerbations/y. Compared with bronchiectasis subjects without bronchial hyper-responsiveness, those with bronchial hyper-responsiveness had significantly lower SOLQ, physical function, and coping skills scores but not emotional function and treatment satisfaction. The SOLQ is a valid instrument for determining quality of life in subjects with bronchiectasis. Subjects with

  11. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  12. Airway disease: similarities and differences between asthma, COPD and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Athanazio, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Airway diseases are highly prevalent worldwide; however, the prevalence of these diseases is underestimated. Although these diseases present several common characteristics, they have different clinical outcomes. The differentiation between asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis in the early stage of disease is extremely important for the adoption of appropriate therapeutic measures. However, because of the high prevalence of these diseases and the common pathophysiological pathways, some patients with different diseases may present with similar symptoms. The objective of this review is to highlight the similarities and differences between these diseases in terms of the risk factors, pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23184213

  13. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  14. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood inflammation parameter C-RP (p ≤0.019), parameters of

  15. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. Methods 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: – 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; – 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); – 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. Exclusion criteria: lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Results Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood

  16. Prevalence of Bronchiectasis in Asthma according to Oral Steroid Requirement: Influence of Immunoglobulin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Xavier; Amengual, María José; Bosque, Montserrat; Mirapeix, Rosa M.; Domingo, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To establish the prevalence of bronchiectasis in asthma in relation to patients' oral corticosteroid requirements and to explore whether the increased risk is due to blood immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration. Methods. Case-control cross-sectional study, including 100 sex- and age-matched patients, 50 with non-steroid-dependent asthma (NSDA) and 50 with steroid-dependent asthma (SDA). Study protocol: (a) measurement of Ig and gG subclass concentration; (b) forced spirometry; and (c) high-resolution thoracic computed tomography. When bronchiectasis was detected, a specific etiological protocol was applied to establish its etiology. Results. The overall prevalence of bronchiectasis was 12/50 in the SDA group and 6/50 in the NSDA group (p = ns). The etiology was documented in six patients (four NSDA and two SDA). After excluding these patients, the prevalence of bronchiectasis was 20% (10/50) in the SDA group and 2/50 (4%) in the NSDA group (P < 0.05). Patients with asthma-associated bronchiectasis presented lower FEV1 values than patients without bronchiectasis, but the levels of Ig and subclasses of IgG did not present differences. Conclusions. Steroid-dependent asthma seems to be associated with a greater risk of developing bronchiectasis than non-steroid-dependent asthma. This is probably due to the disease itself rather than to other influencing factors such as immunoglobulin levels. PMID:24324951

  17. Involvement of pmrAB and phoPQ in Polymyxin B Adaptation and Inducible Resistance in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Schurek, Kristen N.; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Kiffer, Carlos R. V.; Sinto, Sumiko; Mendes, Caio M. F.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2009-01-01

    During investigation of susceptibility testing methods for polymyxins, 24 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed to have a distinct, reproducible phenotype in which skipped wells were observed during broth microdilution testing for polymyxin B. Possible mechanisms underlying this phenotype were investigated. The effects of various concentrations of polymyxin B on growth, the expression of resistance genes, and outer-membrane permeability were observed. Real-time PCR was performed to compare the expression, in response to selected concentrations of polymyxin B, of genes related to the PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory systems in polymyxin B-susceptible isolate PAO1, polymyxin B-resistant isolate 9BR, and two isolates (19BR and 213BR) exhibiting the skipped-well phenotype. 19BR and 213BR appeared to have similar basal levels of expression compared to that of PAO1 for phoQ, arnB, and PA4773 (from the pmrAB operon), and in contrast, 9BR had 52- and 280-fold higher expression of arnB and PA4773, respectively. The expression of arnB and PA4773 increased in response to polymyxin B in a concentration-dependent manner for 9BR but not for 19BR and 213BR. For these isolates, expression was significantly increased for arnB and PA4773, as well as phoQ, only upon exposure to 2 μg/ml polymyxin B but not at a lower concentration of 0.125 μg/ml. The sequencing of the pmrAB and phoPQ operons for all three isolates revealed a number of unique mutations compared to that for PAO1. 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) was used to study the effect of preincubation with polymyxin B on the self-promoted uptake of polymyxin B across the outer membrane. The preincubation of cells with 2 μg/ml polymyxin B affected baseline membrane permeability in 19BR and 213BR and also resulted in a reduced rate of NPN uptake in these isolates and in PAO1 but not in 9BR. The results presented here suggest that the skipped-well isolates have the ability to adapt to specific concentrations of polymyxin B, inducing known polymyxin B resistance genes involved in generating alterations in the outer membrane. PMID:19635950

  18. Bronchiectasis and the risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Vidya; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Hurst, John R; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam; Hubbard, Richard B; Brown, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the burden of cardiovascular comorbidities in people with bronchiectasis. Our cross-sectional study estimates the burden of pre-existing diagnoses of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in people with bronchiectasis compared with the general population. The historical cohort study investigates if individuals with bronchiectasis are at increased risk of incident CHD and stroke events. Methods We used primary care electronic records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. The cross-sectional study used logistic regression to quantify the association between bronchiectasis and recorded diagnoses of CHD or stroke. Cox regression was used to investigate if people with bronchiectasis experienced increased incident CHD and strokes compared with the general population, adjusting for age, sex, smoking habit and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Results Pre-existing diagnoses of CHD (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.41) and stroke (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.85 to 2.01) were higher in people with bronchiectasis compared with those without bronchiectasis, after adjusting for age, sex, smoking and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The rate of first CHD and stroke were also higher in people with bronchiectasis (HR for CHD 1.44 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.63) and HR for stroke 1.71 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.90)). Conclusion The risk of CHD and stroke are higher among people with bronchiectasis compared with the general population. An increased awareness of these cardiovascular comorbidities in this population is needed to provide a more integrated approach to the care of these patients. PMID:27573451

  19. Is Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Dysfunction in Children With Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis a Forerunner to Bronchiectasis?

    PubMed

    Hodge, Sandra; Upham, John W; Pizzutto, Susan; Petsky, Helen L; Yerkovich, Stephanie; Baines, Katherine J; Gibson, Peter; Simpson, Jodie L; Buntain, Helen; Chen, Alice C H; Hodge, Greg; Chang, Anne B

    2016-02-01

    Children with recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) and bronchiectasis share common features, and PBB is likely a forerunner to bronchiectasis. Both diseases are associated with neutrophilic inflammation and frequent isolation of potentially pathogenic microorganisms, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), from the lower airway. Defective alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells (efferocytosis), as found in other chronic lung diseases, may also contribute to tissue damage and neutrophil persistence. Thus, in children with bronchiectasis or PBB and in control subjects, we quantified the phagocytosis of airway apoptotic cells and NTHi by alveolar macrophages and related the phagocytic capacity to clinical and airway inflammation. Children with bronchiectasis (n = 55) or PBB (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 13) were recruited. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis, efferocytosis, and expression of phagocytic scavenger receptors were assessed by flow cytometry. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid interleukin (IL) 1β was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For children with PBB or bronchiectasis, macrophage phagocytic capacity was significantly lower than for control subjects (P = .003 and P < .001 for efferocytosis and P = .041 and P = .004 for phagocytosis of NTHi; PBB and bronchiectasis, respectively); median phagocytosis of NTHi for the groups was as follows: bronchiectasis, 13.7% (interquartile range [IQR], 11%-16%); PBB, 16% (IQR, 11%-16%); control subjects, 19.0% (IQR, 13%-21%); and median efferocytosis for the groups was as follows: bronchiectasis, 14.1% (IQR, 10%-16%); PBB, 16.2% (IQR, 14%-17%); control subjects, 18.1% (IQR, 16%-21%). Mannose receptor expression was significantly reduced in the bronchiectasis group (P = .019), and IL-1β increased in both bronchiectasis and PBB groups vs control subjects. A reduced alveolar macrophage phagocytic host response to apoptotic cells or NTHi may contribute to

  20. [Pulmonary infection caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria in two patients with bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Daniels, J M A; Haitjema, T; van Altena, R; van den Aardweg, J G; Vlaspolder, F; Boersma, W G

    2005-04-30

    Two patients, a woman aged 67 years and a man aged 80 years, had chronic cough among other respiratory symptoms. In the woman, chest radiograph and CT-scan revealed partial atelectasis of the middle lobe and bronchiectasis. In the man, an interstitial pattern was seen on chest radiograph, and CT scan showed diffuse bronchiectasis. In both the man and the woman, non-tuberculous mycobacteria were identified (Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium abscessus, respectively). Treatment was successful in both patients. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria can cause considerable pulmonary infection in patients with bronchiectasis.

  1. Exercise training and inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Newall, C; Stockley, R A; Hill, S L

    2005-11-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic suppurative lung disease often characterised by airflow obstruction and hyperinflation, and leading to decreased exercise tolerance and reduced health status. The role of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has not been investigated in this group of patients. Thirty two patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis were randomly allocated to one of three groups: PR plus sham IMT (PR-SHAM), PR plus targeted IMT (PR-IMT), or control. All patients (except the control group) underwent an 8 week training programme of either PR or PR plus targeted IMT. Exercise training during PR was performed three times weekly at 80% of the peak heart rate. IMT was performed at home for 15 minutes twice daily over the 8 week period. PR-SHAM and PR-IMT resulted in significant increases in the incremental shuttle walking test of 96.7 metres (95% confidence interval (CI) 59.6 to 133.7) and 124.5 metres (95% CI 63.2 to 185.9), respectively, and in endurance exercise capacity of 174.9% (95% CI 34.7 to 426.1) and 205.7% (95% CI 31.6 to 310.6). There were no statistically significant differences in the improvements in exercise between the two groups. Significant improvements in inspiratory muscle strength were also observed both in the PR-IMT group (21.4 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 9.3 to 33.4; p = 0.008) and the PR-SHAM group (12.0 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 1.1 to 22.9; p = 0.04), the magnitude of which were also similar (p = 0.220). Improvements in exercise capacity were maintained in the PR-IMT group 3 months after training, but not in the PR-SHAM group. PR is effective in improving exercise tolerance in bronchiectasis but there is no additional advantage of simultaneous IMT. IMT may, however, be important in the longevity of the training effects.

  2. Maximal mid-expiratory flow is a surrogate marker of lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Yuan, Jing-jing; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the comparative diagnostic value of lung clearance index (LCI) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) in bronchiectasis. We compared the diagnostic performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables, and changes of LCI and MMEF% predicted during bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Patients with stable bronchiectasis underwent history inquiry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), multiple-breath nitrogen wash-out test, spirometry and sputum culture. Patients who experienced BEs underwent these measurements during onset of BEs and 1 week following antibiotics therapy. Sensitivity analyses were performed in mild, moderate and severe bronchiectasis. We recruited 110 bronchiectasis patients between March 2014 and September 2015. LCI demonstrated similar diagnostic value with MMEF% predicted in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis. LCI negatively correlated with MMEF% predicted. Both parameters had similar concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis and correlated significantly with forced expiratory flow in one second, age, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, ventilation heterogeneity and bilateral bronchiectasis. In exacerbation cohort (n = 22), changes in LCI and MMEF% predicted were equally minimal during BEs and following antibiotics therapy. In sensitivity analyses, both parameters had similar diagnostic value and correlation with clinical variables. MMEF% predicted is a surrogate of LCI for assessing bronchiectasis severity. PMID:27339787

  3. Antiinflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Johnson, Cary E

    2005-04-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Antiinflammatory drugs for cystic fibrosis lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease parameters. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possesses antiinflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, colchicine, methotrexate, montelukast, pentoxifylline, nutritional supplements, and protease replacement have not had a significant impact on the disease. Therapy with oral corticosteroids, ibuprofen, and fish oil is limited by adverse effects. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising antiinflammatory therapy available for patients with cystic fibrosis. Pharmacologic therapy with antiinflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred.

  4. Massive haemoptysis following dabigatran administration in a patient with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Manabu; Inoue, Hideki; Wada, Hiromichi; Mio, Tadashi

    2014-02-19

    We report a case of life-threatening haemoptysis after administration of dabigatran in a patient with bronchiectasis. A 72-year-old woman had received dabigatran at a dose of 110 mg twice daily for chronic atrial fibrillation. She was admitted to our hospital for cerebral infarction after a few days of self-interruption of dabigatran. After the diagnosis of cerebral infarction, administration of dabigatran was restarted. Seven days later, she suffered acute-onset massive haemoptysis and required mechanical ventilation. Dabigatran treatment was discontinued, and bronchial artery embolisation (BAE) was performed twice. The bleeding continued for 11 days, but she recovered and was discharged on day 58 after admission.

  5. Massive haemoptysis following dabigatran administration in a patient with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Manabu; Inoue, Hideki; Wada, Hiromichi; Mio, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening haemoptysis after administration of dabigatran in a patient with bronchiectasis. A 72-year-old woman had received dabigatran at a dose of 110 mg twice daily for chronic atrial fibrillation. She was admitted to our hospital for cerebral infarction after a few days of self-interruption of dabigatran. After the diagnosis of cerebral infarction, administration of dabigatran was restarted. Seven days later, she suffered acute-onset massive haemoptysis and required mechanical ventilation. Dabigatran treatment was discontinued, and bronchial artery embolisation (BAE) was performed twice. The bleeding continued for 11 days, but she recovered and was discharged on day 58 after admission. PMID:24554673

  6. Left Pulmonary Agenesis with Right Lung Bronchiectasis in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi; Dixit, Juhi; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of pulmonary parenchyma and vasculature. Bilateral pulmonary agenesis is incompatible with extrauterine life. Unilateral agenesis is often associated with other congenital cardiovascular, genitourinary and gastrointestinal malformations. Right lung agenesis is more frequently associated with congenital anomalies and has poor prognosis as compared to left lung agenesis. Diagnosis is often made in childhood but can be delayed, if the clinician is not aware about this entity. Chest radiograph in unilateral lung agenesis shows opaque hemithorax and these patients are often confused with other common causes of opaque hemithorax like collapse, pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We report a case of left lung agenesis with right lung bronchiectasis in a middle-aged adult who was treated for tuberculous pleural effusion and was referred to our institute for persistent symptoms despite treatment. PMID:27790501

  7. Left Pulmonary Agenesis with Right Lung Bronchiectasis in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi; Dixit, Juhi; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of pulmonary parenchyma and vasculature. Bilateral pulmonary agenesis is incompatible with extrauterine life. Unilateral agenesis is often associated with other congenital cardiovascular, genitourinary and gastrointestinal malformations. Right lung agenesis is more frequently associated with congenital anomalies and has poor prognosis as compared to left lung agenesis. Diagnosis is often made in childhood but can be delayed, if the clinician is not aware about this entity. Chest radiograph in unilateral lung agenesis shows opaque hemithorax and these patients are often confused with other common causes of opaque hemithorax like collapse, pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We report a case of left lung agenesis with right lung bronchiectasis in a middle-aged adult who was treated for tuberculous pleural effusion and was referred to our institute for persistent symptoms despite treatment.

  8. Inhaled fluticasone in bronchiectasis: a 12 month study

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, K; Tan, K; Ho, P; Ooi, G; Ho, J; Mak, J; Tipoe, G; Ko, C; Yan, C; Lam, W; Chan-Yeung, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The clinical efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) treatment has not been evaluated in bronchiectasis, despite the presence of chronic airway inflammation. Methods: After three consecutive weekly visits, 86 patients were randomised to receive either fluticasone 500 µg twice daily (n = 43, 23F, mean (SD) age 57.7 (14.4) years) or matched placebo (n = 43, 34F, 59.2 (14.2) years) and reviewed regularly for 52 weeks in a double blind fashion. Results: 35 and 38 patients in the fluticasone and placebo groups completed the study. Significantly more patients on ICS than on placebo showed improvement in 24 hour sputum volume (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.0, p = 0.03) but not in exacerbation frequency, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, or sputum purulence score. Significantly more patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection receiving fluticasone showed improvement in 24 hour sputum volume (OR 13.5, 95% CI 1.8 to 100.2, p = 0.03) and exacerbation frequency (OR 13.3, 95% CI 1.8 to 100.2, p = 0.01) than those given placebo. Logistic regression models revealed a significantly better response in sputum volume with fluticasone treatment than with placebo among subgroups of patients with 24 hour sputum volume <30 ml (p = 0.04), exacerbation frequency ⩽2/year (p = 0.04), and sputum purulence score >5 (p = 0.03). Conclusions: ICS treatment is beneficial to patients with bronchiectasis, particularly those with P aerurginosa infection. PMID:15741443

  9. Innate immune activation in neutrophilic asthma and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jodie L; Grissell, Terry V; Douwes, Jeroen; Scott, Rodney J; Boyle, Michael J; Gibson, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of asthma is unclear. Activation of innate immune receptors in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, viral infection and particulate matter triggers a pre‐programmed inflammatory response, which involves interleukin (IL)8 and neutrophil influx. The inflammatory response in asthma is heterogeneous. Aim To test the hypothesis that innate immune activation may be a relevant inflammatory mechanism in neutrophilic asthma where IL8 levels are increased. Methods Induced sputum was obtained from non‐smoking adults with asthma (n = 49), healthy controls (n = 13) and a positive reference group with bronchiectasis (n = 9). Subjects with asthma were classified into inflammatory subtypes using induced sputum cell counts. Sputum was examined for mRNA expression of the innate immune receptors toll‐like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4 and CD14, and inflammatory cytokines. A separate sputum portion was dispersed and the supernatant assayed for surfactant protein A, IL8, soluble CD14 and endotoxin. Results Expression of innate immune receptors was increased in subjects with bronchiectasis and neutrophilic asthma compared with other asthma subtypes and controls. Increased expression of the receptors TLR2, TLR4 and CD14, as well as the pro‐inflammatory cytokines IL8 and IL1β, was observed. Subjects with neutrophilic asthma had higher airway levels of endotoxin than the other groups studied. Conclusion There is evidence of activation of the innate immune system in asthma which results in the production of pro‐inflammatory cytokines and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:16844729

  10. The Bronchiectasis Severity Index. An International Derivation and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Goeminne, Pieter; Aliberti, Stefano; McDonnell, Melissa J.; Lonni, Sara; Davidson, John; Poppelwell, Lucy; Salih, Waleed; Pesci, Alberto; Dupont, Lieven J.; Fardon, Thomas C.; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: There are no risk stratification tools for morbidity and mortality in bronchiectasis. Identifying patients at risk of exacerbations, hospital admissions, and mortality is vital for future research. Objectives: This study describes the derivation and validation of the Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI). Methods: Derivation of the BSI used data from a prospective cohort study (Edinburgh, UK, 2008–2012) enrolling 608 patients. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify independent predictors of mortality and hospitalization over 4-year follow-up. The score was validated in independent cohorts from Dundee, UK (n = 218); Leuven, Belgium (n = 253); Monza, Italy (n = 105); and Newcastle, UK (n = 126). Measurements and Main Results: Independent predictors of future hospitalization were prior hospital admissions, Medical Research Council dyspnea score greater than or equal to 4, FEV1 < 30% predicted, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, colonization with other pathogenic organisms, and three or more lobes involved on high-resolution computed tomography. Independent predictors of mortality were older age, low FEV1, lower body mass index, prior hospitalization, and three or more exacerbations in the year before the study. The derived BSI predicted mortality and hospitalization: area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.74–0.86) for mortality and AUC 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.84–0.91) for hospitalization, respectively. There was a clear difference in exacerbation frequency and quality of life using the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire between patients classified as low, intermediate, and high risk by the score (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). In the validation cohorts, the AUC for mortality ranged from 0.81 to 0.84 and for hospitalization from 0.80 to 0.88. Conclusions: The BSI is a useful clinical predictive tool that identifies patients at risk of future mortality

  11. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of bronchiectasis: the key is in the distribution.

    PubMed

    Bueno, J; Flors, L

    2017-08-03

    Diseases that involve the medium caliber airways (segmental and subsegmental bronchi) are common and present clinically with nonspecific respiratory symptoms such as cough, recurrent respiratory infections and occasionally, hemoptysis. The abnormal and irreversible dilation of bronchi is known as "bronchiectasis". The diagnosis can be challenging and the analysis of the regional distribution of the bronchiectasis is the most useful diagnostic guide. The objective of this manuscript is to describe the main imaging findings of bronchiectasis and their classification, review the diseases that most commonly present with this abnormality, and provide an approach to the diagnosis based on their imaging appearance and anatomic distribution. Bronchiectasis is a frequent finding that may result from a broad range of disorders. Imaging plays a paramount role in diagnosis, both in the detection and classification, and in the diagnosis of the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P<0.05). Except for heightened sputum inflammatory responses, there were no notable differences in serum inflammation and lung function as with the increased density of PA. Female gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.10 for PA isolation; OR: 3.74 for PA infection], 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228

  13. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: evolving concepts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jay H; Moua, Teng; Daniels, Craig E; Hartman, Thomas E; Yi, Eunhee S; Utz, James P; Limper, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) occurs predominantly in middle-aged and older adults and accounts for 20% to 30% of interstitial lung diseases. It is usually progressive, resulting in respiratory failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for IPF have evolved over the years, and IPF is currently defined as a disease characterized by the histopathologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia occurring in the absence of an identifiable cause of lung injury. Understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF has shifted away from chronic inflammation and toward dysregulated fibroproliferative repair in response to alveolar epithelial injury. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is likely a heterogeneous disorder caused by various interactions between genetic components and environmental exposures. High-resolution computed tomography can be diagnostic in the presence of typical findings such as bilateral reticular opacities associated with traction bronchiectasis/bronchiolectasis in a predominantly basal and subpleural distribution, along with subpleural honeycombing. In other circumstances, a surgical lung biopsy may be needed. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute deteriorations (acute exacerbation). Although progress continues in unraveling the mechanisms of IPF, effective therapy has remained elusive. Thus, clinicians and patients need to reach informed decisions regarding management options including lung transplant. The findings in this review were based on a literature search of PubMed using the search terms idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and usual interstitial pneumonia, limited to human studies in the English language published from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2013, and supplemented by key references published before the year 2000. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jingjing; Friedman, Scott L.; Aloman, Costica

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will summarize the most significant work that contributed to the understanding of liver fibrosis progression and resolution, which in turn has yielded new areas of therapeutic targeting. Recent findings Liver fibrosis is the result of an imbalance between production and dissolution of extracellular matrix. Stellate cells, portal myofibroblasts, and bone marrow derived cells converge in a complex interaction with hepatocytes and immune cells to provoke scarring in response to liver injury. Uncovering the specific effects of growth factors on these cells, defining the interaction of different cell population during liver fibrosis and characterizing the genetic determinants of fibrosis progression will enable the discovery of new therapeutic approaches. Summary The outcome of improved understanding of liver fibrosis process, especially the regulation and activation of stellate cells, is reflected in the development of new therapeutic strategies, which are validated in animal models. PMID:19396960

  15. [Early lung disease in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Ladipo, Y; Galodé, F; Debelleix, S; Reix, P

    2016-12-01

    Recent data has shown that lung inflammation and infection subvene very early in very young infants with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). This leads to impaired lung function and structural damage, even in asymptomatic children. In the CF-pig model constitutional airway narrowing is present at birth, and is associated with defective mucus migration, and impaired bacterial clearance. At the age of 3 months, 25% of screened CF infants show decreased lung function. Air trapping is also present in 68% and bronchiectasis in 28% of patients. At the same age, the presence of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage is an ominous sign since it triples the risk of bronchiectasis at the age of 3 years. Since only very few drug therapies have been validated in the preschool children, adapted clinical trials are warranted in this age group. Early interventions may have a huge impact on the natural history of CF, on the condition of not interfering with normal lung growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  17. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. ...

  18. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  19. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Andrés Felipe; Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made.

  20. Characteristics and prognosis of microscopic polyangiitis with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahide; Komiya, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Kimura, Shinya; Tada, Yoshifumi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko

    2017-01-01

    Background Major pulmonary manifestations associated with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) include diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and interstitial pneumonia (IP).We previously showed bronchiectasis (BE) was one of the pulmonary complications of MPA. However, clinical features of BE patients with MPA are not fully understood. We investigated the characteristics and prognosis of BE patients with MPA. Methods Forty-five MPA patients were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with BE and those without BE. Results Thirty-one of 45 patients (69%) had pulmonary involvement including IP (23/45, 51%), BE (7/45, 16%), and DAH (5/45, 11%). There were no differences between the patients with BE versus those without with regard to clinical characteristics and initial treatments. However, the prognosis for patients with BE was better than those without BE during the first year after diagnosis, but it was worse between 1 and 5 years, which was statistically significant. Two BE patients died between 1 and 5 years as a result of pneumonia. Conclusions BE as a complication of MPA might be related to lower mortality in the acute phase and higher mortality in the chronic phase compared to other pulmonary manifestations. More attention to pulmonary infection is needed for patients with BE during the chronic phase. PMID:28275478

  1. Disseminated bronchiectasis in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Rojas, Olga Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are traditionally considered childhood diseases; however, adults account for 35% of all patients with PID. Antibody deficiencies, especially Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID), which have their peak incidence in adulthood, require a high suspicion index. Even though the estimated frequency of CVID is not high (1:25,000), high rates of under diagnosis and under reporting are very likely. The delay in diagnosis increases the morbidity and mortality; therefore, adult physicians should be able to suspect, identify and initiate management of individuals with PID. Here we report the case of a 37 year-old man presenting to the emergency room with dyspnea, fever and cough; he developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. He complained of recurring pneumonia associated with widespread bronchiectasis since he was 18 years old. Serum immunoglobulins quantification showed severe hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG <140 mg/dL; total IgA, 2.9 mg/dL; and total IgM <5 mg/dL). Treatment with Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) 10% was started, and with antibiotic treatment for severe pneumonia (during 14 days) was also prescribed. His clinical evolution has been favorable after one year follow-up. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) diagnosis was made. PMID:26019385

  2. [Surgery of bronchiectasis: what have changed in the last ten years?].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Pinto, Nelson; Bihun, Vyacheslav; Bernardo, João; Antunes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is defined as chronic abnormal dilatation and distortion of the bronchi. Surgery continues to be play an important role in the treatment of this disease especially in focal disease which is both curative. The objective of this study is to characterize the patients who underwent surgical resection of bronchiectasis in 10 years and compare them with patients operated by the same pathology in the previous 10 years. We conducted a review of cases of 78 patients operated in the 2000 ' s and the results were compared with those obtained in the study by the same professional service, referring to the previous decade. We assessed sex, age, symptoms, number of years with symptoms, complementary exams performed prior to surgery, indications for surgery, previous pulmonary diseases, location of bronchiectasis, type of surgical approach, number of hospitalization days and complications of surgery. In the last decade a smaller number of patients with bronchiectasis ( 78 versus 119 ) were submitted to thoracic surgery. In both groups the right lung and the lower lobes were the most affected and the majority of patients was submitted to lobectomy. In the last decade a lower percentage of complications was registed ( 6.4 %, versus 15.0 % (. The surgery was considered to be curative in 94.9 % and only 91 % in the 90 ' s. This study would support the idea that the surgery of bronchiectasis continues to be an excellent alternative to the treatment of localized forms of the disease and its complications.

  3. Association between environmental factors and hospitalisations for bronchiectasis in Badalona, Barcelona, Spain (2007-2015).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Olivé, Ignasi; Radua, Joaquim; Sánchez-Berenguer, Dan; Hernández-Biette, Agnes; Raya-Márquez, Patricia; Stojanovic, Zoran; Martínez-Rivera, Carlos; Fernandez Serrano, Silvia; Ruiz Manzano, Juan

    2017-07-26

    The relationship between environmental factors and the exacerbation of respiratory diseases has been widely studied. However, there are no studies examining the relationship between these factors and bronchiectasis exacerbations. Our objective was to analyse the association between various environmental factors and hospitalisation for bronchiectasis. This was a retrospective observational study conducted at two hospitals in Badalona (Barcelona). The number of hospital admissions for exacerbation of bronchiectasis between 2007 and 2015 was obtained. Through multiple regression we analysed the relationship between the number of exacerbations and mean monthly values of temperature, SO2, NO, NO2, O3 and CO. Temperature, SO2, NO, NO2, O3 and CO were significantly associated with an increase in admissions due to exacerbation of bronchiectasis. By controlling the effect of temperature on the pollution variables, only SO2 maintained statistical significance (P=.008). We have detected an increase in hospital admissions for exacerbation of bronchiectasis with increases in the atmospheric concentration of SO2 and the decrease in temperature. Prospective studies with different geographical locations to confirm these results are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Paratracheal air cysts: prevalence and relevance to pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis using thoracic multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Nurefsan; Sen Dokumaci, Dilek; Karakas, Ekrem; Yalcin, Funda; Oney Kurnaz, Ayse Gul

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of paratracheal air cysts (PTACs) and the relationship of PTACs with emphysema and bronchiectasis through retrospective analysis of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings. MDCT findings of 1027 consecutive patients who underwent routine thorax examination between January 2012 and January 2013 were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of PTACs. Localization of the PTACs, as well as their size, shape, and relationship with the trachea were examined. Presence of emphysema and bronchiectasis was recorded, and bronchiectasis severity index was calculated when present. We randomly selected 80 patients who had no visible PTACs as the control group. The findings of patients with and without PTACs were compared. PTACs were determined in 82 of 1027 patients (8%), in 8.8% of females and 7.3% of males. The presence of PTACs was determined to be independent of gender (P = 0.361). Eighty-one PTACs (98.8%) were located in the right side of the trachea and 56.1% had a tracheal connection. The presence of PTACs significantly correlated with the presence and severity of bronchiectasis (P = 0.001 and P = 0.005 respectively). There was no significant relationship between the presence of PTACs and the presence of emphysema on CT images (P = 0.125). The prevalence of PTACs was determined as 8% in this study. There was significant association between PTACs and bronchiectasis.

  5. [Transport of mucoid mucus in healthy individuals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Lima Afonso, J; Tambascio, J; Dutra de Souza, H C; Jardim, J R; Baddini Martinez, J A; Gastaldi, A C

    2013-01-01

    To characterise and compare the in vitro transport properties of respiratory mucoid secretion in individuals with no lung disease and in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis. Samples of mucus were collected, from 21 volunteers presenting no lung disease who had undergone surgery, from 10 patients presenting chronic COPD, and from 16 patients with bronchiectasis. Mucociliary transport (MCT), transport by cough (SCM), and contact angle (CAM) were evaluated. MCT was found to be greater in healthy individuals (1.0±0.19) than in COPD (0.91±0.17) and bronchiectasis (0.76±0.23) patients (p<0.05), whereas SCM was greater in COPD patients (16.31±7.35 cm) than in patients with bronchiectasis (12.16±6.64 cm) and healthy individuals (10.50±25.8 cm) (p<0.05). No significant differences were observed between the groups regarding CAM. Mucus from healthy individuals allows better mucociliary transport compared to that from patients with lung diseases. However, the mucus from COPD patients allows a better transport by coughing, demonstrating that these individuals have adapted to a defence mechanism compared to patients with bronchiectasis, who have impairment in their ciliary and cough transport mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Cystic fibrosis: a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene on chromosome 7, is complex and greatly variable in clinical expression. Airways, pancreas, male genital system, intestine, liver, bone, and kidney are involved. The lack of CFTR or its impaired function causes fat malabsorption and chronic pulmonary infections leading to bronchiectasis and progressive lung damage. Previously considered lethal in infancy and childhood, CF has now attained median survivals of 50 years of age, mainly thanks to the early diagnosis through neonatal screening, recognition of mild forms, and an aggressive therapeutic attitude. Classical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme replacement, respiratory physiotherapy, mucolitics, and aggressive antibiotic therapy. A significant proportion of patients with severe symptoms still requires lung or, less frequently, liver transplantation. The great number of mutations and their diverse effects on the CFTR protein account only partially for CF clinical variability, and modifier genes have a role in modulating the clinical expression of the disease. Despite the increasing understanding of CFTR functioning, several aspects of CF need still to be clarified, e.g., the worse outcome in females, the risk of malignancies, the pathophysiology, and best treatment of comorbidities, such as CF-related diabetes or CF-related bone disorder. Research is focusing on new drugs restoring CFTR function, some already available and with good clinical impact, others showing promising preliminary results that need to be confirmed in phase III clinical trials.

  7. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  8. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  9. Cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, Felix; Bell, Scott C; Rowe, Steven M; Goss, Christopher H; Quittner, Alexandra L; Bush, Andrew

    2015-05-14

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive, monogenetic disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The gene defect was first described 25 years ago and much progress has been made since then in our understanding of how CFTR mutations cause disease and how this can be addressed therapeutically. CFTR is a transmembrane protein that transports ions across the surface of epithelial cells. CFTR dysfunction affects many organs; however, lung disease is responsible for the vast majority of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prenatal diagnostics, newborn screening and new treatment algorithms are changing the incidence and the prevalence of the disease. Until recently, the standard of care in cystic fibrosis treatment focused on preventing and treating complications of the disease; now, novel treatment strategies directly targeting the ion channel abnormality are becoming available and it will be important to evaluate how these treatments affect disease progression and the quality of life of patients. In this Primer, we summarize the current knowledge, and provide an outlook on how cystic fibrosis clinical care and research will be affected by new knowledge and therapeutic options in the near future. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/4VrefN.

  10. Quantitative and qualitative computed tomographic characteristics of bronchiectasis in 12 dogs.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Matthew S; Johnson, Lynelle R; Pesavento, Patricia A; Kass, Philip H; Wisner, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an irreversible dilatation of the bronchi resulting from chronic airway inflammation. In people, computed tomography (CT) has been described as the noninvasive gold standard for diagnosing bronchiectasis. In dogs, normal CT bronchoarterial ratios have been described as <2.0. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe quantitative and qualitative CT characteristics of bronchiectasis in a cohort of dogs with confirmed disease. Inclusion criteria for the study were thoracic radiography, thoracic CT, and a diagnosis of bronchiectasis based on bronchoscopy and/or histopathology. For each included dog, a single observer measured CT bronchoarterial ratios at 6 lobar locations. Qualitative thoracic radiography and CT characteristics were recorded by consensus opinion of two board-certified veterinary radiologists. Twelve dogs met inclusion criteria. The mean bronchoarterial ratio from 28 bronchiectatic lung lobes was 2.71 ± 0.80 (range 1.4 to 4.33), and 23/28 measurements were >2.0. Averaged bronchoarterial ratios from bronchiectatic lung lobes were significantly larger (P < 0.01) than averaged ratios from nonbronchiectatic lung lobes. Qualitative CT characteristics of bronchiectasis included lack of peripheral airway tapering (12/12), lobar consolidation (11/12), bronchial wall thickening (7/12), and bronchial lumen occlusion (4/12). Radiographs detected lack of airway tapering in 7/12 dogs. In conclusion, the most common CT characteristics of bronchiectasis were dilatation, a lack of peripheral airway tapering, and lobar consolidation. Lack of peripheral airway tapering was not visible in thoracic radiographs for some dogs. For some affected dogs, bronchoarterial ratios were less than published normal values. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  11. Bronchodilator response in adults with bronchiectasis: correlation with clinical parameters and prognostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Li, Hui-Min; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial dilation testing is an important tool to assess airway reversibility in adults with bronchiectasis. This study aims to investigate the association of bronchodilator response (BDR) and clinical parameters in bronchiectasis, and the utility of BDR to indicate lung function decline and risks of bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Methods We recruited 129 patients with clinically stable bronchiectasis. Baseline measurements included assessment of sputum inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -9, sputum bacterial culture, spirometry, bronchial dilation test (for baseline FEV1 less than 80% predicted only) and chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Bronchiectasis patients were followed-up for 1 year to determine the incidence of BEs and lung function trajectories. Significant BDR was defined as FEV1 improvement from pre-dose value by at least 200 mL and 12%. Clinical trial registry No.: NCT01761214; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Results BDR was negatively correlated with baseline FEV1 percentage predicted, but not blood or sputum eosinophil count. Significant BDR was not associated with greater proportion of never-smokers, poorer past history, greater HRCT scores, poorer diffusing capacity or increased sputum matrix metalloproteinases (all P>0.05). There was a trend towards higher bronchiectasis severity index (BSI) and greater proportion of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation or infection. Significant BDR at baseline was linked to poorer spirometry, but not more rapid lung function decline, throughout follow-up. Patients with significant BDR demonstrated non-significantly lower risks of experiencing the first BEs than those without (P=0.09 for log-rank test). Conclusions Significant BDR is associated with poorer lung function compared with non-significant BDR. Whether BDR predicts future risks of BEs needs to be tested in a larger cohort. PMID:26904207

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with comorbid bronchiectasis: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yingmeng; Shi, Guochao; Yu, Youchao; Hao, Jimin; Chen, Tiantian; Song, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    In the 2014 Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, bronchiectasis was for the first time defined as a comorbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and this change has been retained in the 2015 update, which emphasizes the influence of bronchiectasis in the natural history of COPD. The present meta-analysis was aimed at summarizing the impact of bronchiectasis on patients with COPD. Databases including Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched comprehensively to identify all relevant human clinical studies published until August 2014. Bronchiectasis was confirmed either by computed tomography or high-resolution computed tomography. One or more clinicopathological or demographical characteristics, including age, sex, smoking history, daily sputum production, exacerbations, inflammatory biomarkers, lung function, and colonization by potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs), were compared between COPD patients with and without bronchiectasis. Six observational studies with 881 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The mean prevalence of bronchiectasis in patients with COPD was 54.3%, ranging from 25.6% to 69%. Coexistence of bronchiectasis and COPD occurred more often in male patients with longer smoking history. Patients with COPD and comorbid bronchiectasis had greater daily sputum production, more frequent exacerbation, poorer lung function, higher level of inflammatory biomarkers, more chronic colonization by PPMs, and higher rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation. In spite of the heterogeneity between included studies and detectable publication bias, this meta-analysis demonstrated the impact of bronchiectasis in patients with COPD in all directions, indicating that coexistence of bronchiectasis should be considered a pathological phenotype of COPD, which may have a predictive value.

  13. Time Trends in Hospital Admissions for Bronchiectasis: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2004 to 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Gema; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Pedraza-Serrano, Fernando; Puente-Maestu, Luis; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze changes in the incidence, diagnostic procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay (LOHS), costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for patients with bronchiectasis who were hospitalized in Spain over a 10-year period. Methods We included all admissions for patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis as primary or secondary diagnosis during 2004–2013. Results 282,207 patients were admitted to the study. After controlling for possible confounders, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hospitalizations over the study period when bronchiectasis was a secondary diagnosis. When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis we observed a significant decline in the incidence. In all cases, this pathology was more frequent in males, and the average age and comorbidity increased significantly during the study period (p<0.001). When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis, the most frequent secondary diagnosis was Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. When bronchiectasis was the secondary diagnosis, the most frequent primary diagnosis was COPD. IHM was low, tending to decrease from 2004 to 2013 (p<0.05). The average LOHS decreased significantly during the study period in both cases (p<0.001). The mean cost per patient decreased in patients with bronchiectasis as primary diagnosis, but it increased for cases of bronchiectasis as secondary diagnosis (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results reveal an increase in the incidence of hospital admissions for patients with bronchiectasis as a secondary diagnosis from 2004 to 2013, as opposed to cases of bronchiectasis as the primary diagnosis. Although the average age and comorbidity significantly increased over time, both IHM and average LOHS significantly decreased. PMID:27622273

  14. [Severe bronchial stenosis with upstream bronchiectasis in an arc welder: causal relation or epiphenomenon?].

    PubMed

    Charpin, D; Jullian, H; Garbe, L; Cau, P; Fuentes, P; Vervloet, D

    1997-04-01

    This case concerns an arc welder who presented suppurative bronchiectasis and episodes of purulent left side pleurisy in relation to cystic bronchiectasis of the left lower lobe and a very severe stenosis at the origin of the main left bronchus. The medicolegal problem was to assess the causal relationship between these lesions and occupational exposure. They do not come under the heading of table 44 of the General List and we made this the aim of discretionary award in front of a regional committee of compensation for occupational disease.

  15. [Mediastinal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Roca Calvo, M J; Suero Molina, F F; Mañes Bonet, N; Alix Trueba, A

    1993-04-01

    Even tough the ultimate etiologic and pathogenic mechanisms of mediastinal fibrosis are not quite established, several causes have been mentioned as the more frequent inducers, such as histoplasmosis, tuberculosis and other granulomatous diseases. Generally the diagnosis is suggested by a hilar or mediastinal mass, which is seen in thorax radiography, because 40% of patients are asymptomatic. Exeresis of fibrotic Magma is difficult because usually there is no separation with trachea neither with superior cava vein. That is why many times we have to restricted ourselves to the surgical approach on the complications. The present work discusses three new cases of mediastinal fibrosis.

  16. Reduced upper airway nitric oxide in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, I M; Laverty, A; Dinwiddie, R

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced within the respiratory tract is detectable in exhaled and nasal air. Its synthesis may be induced by inflammatory cytokines and reduced by glucocorticoids. Increased concentrations have been found in asthma and bronchiectasis. In this study, NO concentrations were determined in 63 children with cystic fibrosis, of whom 13 were on inhaled steroids (mean age 13.3 years) and 50 were not (mean age 12.3 years); 57 normal children (mean age 12.2 years) were also studied. NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser, exhaled NO following a relaxed vital capacity manoeuvre, and nasal NO with the breath held following a full inspiration. Mean concentration of exhaled NO in cystic fibrosis patients (no steroids) was 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0 to 5.3); this did not differ from values in normal children (mean 4.8 ppb, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.8) or in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled steroids (mean 3.6 ppb, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.8). Nasal concentrations were significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients, with or without inhaled steroids, than in normal children (cystic fibrosis, no inhaled steroids: 460 ppb, 95% CI 399 to 520; cystic fibrosis, inhaled steroids: 522 ppb, 95% CI 313 to 730, v normal children: 1024 ppb, 95% CI 896 to 1152, p < 0.0001). Considering the inflammatory nature of cystic fibrosis, it is surprising exhaled NO levels were not increased, but this may have been due to alteration in NO diffusion through thick mucus. The low nasal NO concentrations, which are probably the result of impaired flow from the paranasal sinuses, may contribute to the recurrent respiratory infections typical of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8984918

  17. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the CF gene in many carriers. Alternative ... FJ. Cystic fibrosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  18. Raising awareness of bronchiectasis in primary care: overview of diagnosis and management strategies in adults.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D; Sethi, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic lung disease characterised by recurrent infection, inflammation, persistent cough and sputum production. The disease is increasing in prevalence, requiring a greater awareness of the disease across primary and secondary care. Mild and moderate cases of bronchiectasis in adults can often be managed by primary care clinicians. Initial assessments and long-term treatment plans that include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, however, should be undertaken in collaboration with a secondary care team that includes physiotherapists and specialists in respiratory medicine. Bronchiectasis is often identified in patients with other lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and in a lesser but not insignificant number of patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall goals of therapy are to prevent exacerbations, improve symptoms, improve quality of life and preserve lung function. Prompt treatment of exacerbations with antibiotic therapy is important to limit the impact of exacerbations on quality of life and lung function decline. Patient education and cooperation with health-care providers to implement treatment plans are key to successful disease management. It is important for the primary care provider to work with secondary care providers to develop an individualised treatment plan to optimise care with the goal to delay disease progression. Here, we review the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis with a focus on practical considerations that will be useful to primary care.

  19. Effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on neutrophil function in idiopathic bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ruchaud-Sparagano, Marie-Hélène; Gertig, Helen; Hester, Katy L M; Macfarlane, James G; Corris, Paul A; Simpson, A John; De Soyza, Anthony

    2013-11-01

    Neutrophils are consistently found in inflamed and infected airways in idiopathic bronchiectasis, but relatively little is known about the function of blood neutrophils in this condition. We hypothesized that peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) phagocytosis and superoxide generation are impaired in bronchiectasis, and that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is capable of improving neutrophil function. Neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis who were free of exacerbation, and from healthy controls of similar age (n = 21 in both groups). Ingestion of serum-opsonized zymosan by neutrophils was used to quantify phagocytic capacity. Superoxide generation in neutrophils was measured in response to addition of platelet activating factor and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Experiments were performed in the presence or absence of GM-CSF. No differences were observed in either phagocytic capacity (P = 0.99) or superoxide generation (P = 0.81) when comparing patients and controls. However, a significant increase in phagocytic capacity above baseline levels in both patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P < 0.005) was induced by GM-CSF. Similarly, the superoxide generation in patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P = 0.001) was significantly increased by GM-CSF. PBN function was preserved in idiopathic bronchiectasis. Enhancement of neutrophil phagocytosis and superoxide generation by GM-CSF requires further study. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Milene Carneiro Barbosa; Ota, Maurício Kenji; Leitão Filho, Fernando Sergio Studart; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate radiologist agreement on the quantification of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Materials and Methods The HRCT scans of 43 patients with bronchiectasis were analyzed by two radiologists, who used a scoring system to grade the findings. Kappa (κ) values and overall agreement were calculated. Results For the measurement and appearance of bronchiectasis, the interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.45 and κ = 0.43, respectively), as was the intraobserver agreement (κ = 0.54 and κ = 0.47, respectively). Agreement on the presence of mucous plugging was fair, for central distribution (overall interobserver agreement of 68.3% and κ = 0.39 for intraobserver agreement) and for peripheral distribution (κ = 0.34 and κ = 0.35 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). The agreement was also fair for peribronchial thickening (κ = 0.21 and κ = 0.30 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). There was fair interobserver and intraobserver agreement on the detection of opacities (κ = 0.39 and 71.9%, respectively), ground-glass attenuation (64.3% and κ = 0.24, respectively), and cysts/bullae (κ = 0.47 and κ = 0.44, respectively). Qualitative analysis of the HRCT findings of bronchiectasis and the resulting individual patient scores showed that there was an excellent correlation between the observers (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.85 and 0.81 for interobserver and intraobserver agreement, respectively). Conclusion In the interpretation of HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, radiologist agreement appears to be fair. In our final analysis of the findings using the proposed score, we observed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. PMID:28298729

  1. Lung clearance index is a repeatable and sensitive indicator of radiological changes in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Stephen A; Bradley, Judy M; Bradbury, Ian; Lawson, John; Lynch, Tom; Gustafsson, Per; Horsley, Alex; O'Neill, Katherine; Ennis, Madeleine; Elborn, J Stuart

    2014-03-01

    In bronchiectasis there is a need for improved markers of lung function to determine disease severity and response to therapy. To assess whether the lung clearance index is a repeatable and more sensitive indicator of computed tomography (CT) scan abnormalities than spirometry in bronchiectasis. Thirty patients with stable bronchiectasis were recruited and lung clearance index, spirometry, and health-related quality of life measures were assessed on two occasions, 2 weeks apart when stable (study 1). A separate group of 60 patients with stable bronchiectasis was studied on a single visit with the same measurements and a CT scan (study 2). In study 1, the intervisit intraclass correlation coefficient for the lung clearance index was 0.94 (95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 0.97; P < 0.001). In study 2, the mean age was 62 (10) years, FEV1 76.5% predicted (18.9), lung clearance index 9.1 (2.0), and total CT score 14.1 (10.2)%. The lung clearance index was abnormal in 53 of 60 patients (88%) and FEV1 was abnormal in 37 of 60 patients (62%). FEV1 negatively correlated with the lung clearance index (r = -0.51, P < 0.0001). Across CT scores, there was a relationship with the lung clearance index, with little evidence of an effect of FEV1. There were no significant associations between the lung clearance index or FEV1 and health-related quality of life. The lung clearance index is repeatable and a more sensitive measure than FEV1 in the detection of abnormalities demonstrated on CT scan. The lung clearance index has the potential to be a useful clinical and research tool in patients with bronchiectasis.

  2. [Study on the effect and predictive to bronchiectasis combined with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ding, W; Zhao, Y F; Lu, H W; Liang, S; Cheng, K B; Xu, J F

    2017-01-12

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis(BR)coexisting in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: One hundred and forty-eight bronchiectasis patients were retrospectively analyzed. These cases were all diagnosed in the Respiratory Department of Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital and Shanghai Gongli Hospital of Pudong New Area during Jan. 2012 to Dec.2015.The patients consisted of 74 males and 74 females, aging from 45 to 79 [mean(65±11)] years. In these patients, coexisting rheumatoid arthritis was found in 34 males and 36 females, aging from 45 to 79[mean(68±12)] years(RA-BR group). Patients with bronchiectasis alone consisted of 40 males and 38 females, aging from 49 to 76 [mean(63±10)] years (BR alone group). Data between the 2 groups of patients were compared, including general clinical features, serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF), chest high-resolution CT (HRCT), and lung function . FACED scores were used to assess the severity of bronchiectasis. Meanwhile, we analyzed the correlation between anti-CCP and FACED scores in the 2 groups. Results: We observed an increase of serum anti-CCP in RA-BR patients compared with BR alone patients (196±68 versus 64±26, P<0.05). In addition, FACED scores in RA-BR patients were higher than those in BR patients (5.2±1.8 versus 3.1±1.4 , P< 0.05). Positive correlations between serum anti-CCP levels and FACED scores (r=0.678, r=0.461, P<0.05) in both RA-BR and BR alone groups were observed in this study. Conclusions: The disease severity scores of RA-BR patients were higher than those of patients with BR alone. Levels of serum anti-CCP may act as a predictor for the diagnosis and prognosis of bronchiectasis in patients with RA.

  3. Tuberculosis, bronchiectasis, and infertility: what ailed George Orwell?

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2005-12-01

    In the last and most productive years of his life, George Orwell struggled with pulmonary tuberculosis, dying at the dawn of the era of chemotherapy. His case history illustrates clinical aspects of tuberculosis with contemporary relevance: the role of poverty in its spread, the limited efficacy of monotherapy, the potential toxicity of treatment, and the prominence of cachexia as a terminal symptom. Orwell's ordeals with collapse therapy may have influenced the portrayal of the tortures of Winston Smith in the novel 1984. I discuss unifying diagnoses for Orwell's respiratory problems and apparent infertility, including tuberculous epididymitis, Young syndrome, immotile cilia syndrome, and cystic fibrosis.

  4. Lessons learned from metabolomics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muhlebach, Marianne S; Sha, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a mono-genetic multi-system disease; however, respiratory manifestations cause the main morbidity and mortality where chronic bacterial infections lead to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Metabolomics allows a relatively complete snapshot of metabolic processes in a sample using different mass spectrometry methods. Sample types used for discovery of biomarkers or pathomechanisms in cystic fibrosis (CF) have included blood, respiratory secretions, and exhaled breath to date. Metabolomics has shown distinction of CF vs. non-CF for matrices of blood, exhaled breath, and respiratory epithelial cultures, each showing different pathways. Severity of lung disease has been addressed by studies in bronchoalveolar lavage and exhaled breath condensate showing separation by metabolites that the authors of each study related to inflammation; e.g., ethanol, acetone, purines. Lipidomics has been applied to blood and sputum samples showing associations with lung function and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Finally, studies of bacteria grown in vitro showed differences of bacterial metabolites to be associated with clinical parameters. Metabolomics, in the sense of global metabolomic profiling, is a powerful technique that has allowed discovery of pathways that had not previously been implicated in CF. These may include purines, mitochondrial pathways, and different aspects of glucose metabolism besides the known differences in lipid metabolism in CF. However, targeted studies to validate such potential metabolites and pathways of interest are necessary. Studies evaluating metabolites of bacterial origin are in their early stages. Thus further well-designed studies could be envisioned.

  5. [Retroperitoneal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Babski, Paweł; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare clinical entity characterised by the presence of patologic collagen tissue in a retroperitoneal space. The fibrous mass covers abdominal organs causing their disfunctions. RPF was described at the begining of XX century but its etiology is not clear yet. Usually it causes an ureter obstuction and hydronephrosis, that is why most commonly is diagnosed by urologists and nephrologists. However, retroperitoneal fibrosis can be multifacial disease. In some patients localisation of fibrosis is atypical and manifestationns can be varied. Gastrological symptoms like jaundice, bowel obstuction, ascites can occure. Besides, some early signs of RPF are nonspecific and can imitate alarming symptoms of neoplasma, e.g.: weight loss, anemia, malaise, anorexia, fever. This force us to initiate gastrological investigation. The awareness of this disease is important. The early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis and alows to avoid heavy complications. In typical cases radiology is often enough for diagnosis. However, histological examination is needed in many cases, especialy when patological mass is located atypical. A treatment is made up of farmacology and surgery. The first one is based on steroids, immunossuppressant and tamoxifen. Surgery is needed to eliminate organs obstruction.

  6. Impacts of Co-Existing Chronic Rhinosinusitis on Disease Severity and Risks of Exacerbations in Chinese Adults with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Yuan, Jing-jing; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence supports the notion of “one airway, one disease.” Objective To determine whether chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) poses adverse impacts on Chinese adults with bronchiectasis. Methods We enrolled 148 consecutive adults with clinically stable bronchiectasis. CRS diagnosed based on the 2012 EP3OS criteria. We systematically evaluated the bronchiectasis etiology, radiology, lung function, sputum bacteriology, airway inflammatory biomarkers, Bronchiectasis Severity Index, cough sensitivity and healthcare resource utilization. All patients were prospectively followed-up for 1 year to examine the frequency of bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Results Forty-seven patients (31.8%) were diagnosed as having CRS. Bronchiectasis etiologies did not vary statistically between CRS and no-CRS group. There was a trend towards non-statistically higher Bronchiectasis Severity Index [6.4±3.4 vs. 5.0(6.0), P = 0.19], a higher proportion of patients with BEs needing hospitalization before enrollment (48.9% vs. 29.7%, P = 0.13), poorer FVC [78.2±19.8% vs. 82.2(16.8)%, P = 0.54] and FEV1 [68.2±24.8% vs. 74.8(21.2)%, P = 0.29], a higher prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated (36.2% vs. 26.7%, P = 0.27) or colonized in sputum (36.2% vs. 21.8%, P = 0.12) and greater capsaicin cough sensitivity [C2: 3.9(123.0) μmol/L vs. 11.7(123.0) μmol/L, P = 0.81; C5: 62.5(996.0) μmol/L vs. 250.0(973.0) μmol/L, P = 0.32]. Patients with CRS had significantly greater risks of experiencing BEs during follow-up (P = 0.02 for negative binominal regression test). Conclusion Chinese adults with bronchiectasis appear to have a lower prevalence of CRS than that in western countries. There was a trend towards greater adverse impacts on bronchiectasis in patients with CRS. Studies with greater sample sizes might help to resolve this issue. In future clinical practice, physicians should be vigilant to the screening of concomitant CRS in bronchiectasis so as to better improve

  7. Nasal Nitric Oxide Measurement and a Modified PICADAR Score for the Screening of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Adults with Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, J; Buck, A; Schwerk, N; Price, M; Fuge, J; Welte, T; Ringshausen, F C

    2017-08-01

    Background Determining the underlying diagnosis is essential for the targeted and specific treatment of bronchiectasis. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disease, which is characterized by abnormalities in ciliary structure and/or function and which may result in bronchiectasis. The disease is probably underestimated among adults with bronchiectasis due to the fact that extensive diagnostic testing is required and that the recognition of PCD is low. Objective To evaluate a feasible screening algorithm for PCD among adults with bronchiectasis. Methods Data from all patients who presented to our bronchiectasis outpatient clinic from June 2010 until July 2016 were retrospectively analysed from our database. Nasal NO (nNO) and a modified PICADAR score (PrImary CiliAry DyskinesiA Rule) were measured and compared in the two groups of PCD-bronchiectasis and non-PCD-bronchiectasis. Results 185 of 365 patients (75 males, 110 females) had a sufficient measurement of nNO concentration and complete clinical data and were eligible for analysis. The mean (SD) nNO concentration in nL/ml was significant lower in the PCD group compared to the non-PCD group (25 [31] and 227 [112] nL/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A nNO level of 77 nL/min had the best discriminative value to differentiate between the two groups. Patients with PCD had a significant higher modified PIDACAR score than patients without PCD (5 2 and 1 1, respectively [p < 0.001]). Using ROC curve analysis, the modified PICADAR score of 2 had the best discriminative value with a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.89. Conclusions Low nNO concentration and the modified PICADAR score are suitable and cheap screening tests for PCD in adults with bronchiectasis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Chronic rhinosinusitis is associated with higher prevalence and severity of bronchiectasis in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Xu, Yali; Jin, Jianmin; Li, Ruimin; Liu, Xiaofang; Sun, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Bronchiectasis revealed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the causes and risk factors remain to be determined. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is closely associated with bronchiectasis or COPD, but whether it is associated with comorbid bronchiectasis in COPD (COPD-Bx) is unknown. Patients and methods Patients with stable COPD were enrolled consecutively and evaluated for the presence of CRS by questionnaire and paranasal sinus computed tomography. The presence and severity of bronchiectasis on lung HRCT were evaluated by the Smith and severity scores. COPD symptoms were evaluated by COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and Modified British Medical Research Council Questionnaire. The sputum cell differentials and concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-5, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 were measured. Results We enrolled 136 patients with stable COPD, of which 66 (48.5%) were diagnosed with CRS according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) criteria. The prevalence of bronchiectasis was 57.6% in patients with CRS, but 37.1% in those without CRS (P=0.017). COPD-Bx patients with CRS showed a significantly higher severity score of bronchiectasis than those without CRS (P=0.034). COPD patients with CRS had a higher percentage of eosinophils, higher levels of IL-8, IL-6, and MMP-9 in sputum as compared to those without CRS. In COPD-Bx patients with CRS, the percentage of eosinophils and the levels of IL-6 and MMP-9 in sputum were increased as compared to those without CRS. In all the subjects, Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20 correlated with CAT score (r=0.315, P<0.01) and in COPD patients with CRS, Lund–MacKay scores correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (% pred) (r=−0.251, P<0.05). Conclusions CRS was associated with COPD-Bx and this was probably due to increased airway

  9. Cystic fibrosis in adult age.

    PubMed

    Lerín, M; Prados, C; Martínez, M T; Maíz, L; Girón, R; Solé, A; Cabanillas, J J; Alvarez-Sala, R

    2014-01-01

    To know the prevalence of the patients diagnosed of cystic fibrosis (CF) older than 18 years old of five specific Spanish Units and to analyze their clinical, genetic and microbiological characteristics. Observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study of patients diagnosed with CF at age or older than 18 years. The variables analyzed were: current age, age at diagnosis, sex, nationality, lung function parameters, pathologies presented at diagnosis, microbiological features and genetic findings. Eigthy nine patients (14.8% of the total of 600 CF patients followed at the participating units), of which 45 patients were female (50.6%) and 44 were males (49.4%), were included with a mean age at diagnosis of 36.4 years. Eigthy one patients (91%) were Spaniards. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 (86.5%) of the patients studied. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 of the 89 patients studied (86.5%). The most frequently detected mutations were F508del/other and G542X/other, and the most frequent clinical findings at diagnosis were the presence of bronchiectasis in 33 patients (37.1%) followed by sterility in 12 patients (13.5%). The most common colonizing organisms were meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) (23.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (13.5%). Most patients presented a mild obstructive ventilatory defect and had no pancreatic involvement. The sweat test used to be indeterminate. CF is also a disease which diagnosis can be in adulthood. CF patients diagnosed in adulthood have a mild lung function and lower incidence of pancreatic involvement, so their prognosis tends to be favorable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. A fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis: an unusual rare expression of chronic graft versus host disease. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Violeta, Labžentytė; Silvija, Zemnickienė; Edvardas, Danila; Virginija, Šileikienė; Rolandas, Zablockis; Vygantas, Gruslys

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia whose treatment with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was followed by chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) with lung involvement and bronchiectasis. This report illustrates an unusual course of a fast progression of the bronchiectasis due to BMT. Case description. A 33-year-old female was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. An allogeneic BMT was performed. One month after the transplantation, acute GVHD with skin involvement occurred. Treatment with prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been started. Nine months later, the patient was examined by a pulmonologist due to progressive dyspnoea. A pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan showed normal parenchyma of the lungs and no changes to the bronchi. A CT scan performed 7 months later revealed bronchiectasis for the first time. No clinical response was associated with the treatment and the patient’s respiratory status progressively deteriorated. During the final hospitalization, a CT scan performed 1 year later revealed huge cystic bronchiectasis in both lungs. Despite the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, the patient died one year after the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Conclusions. This case demonstrates that a fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis, that occurs after BMT, should always be considered as a possible manifestation of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) following allogeneic BMT.

  11. Severe disseminated lung disease and bronchiectasis probably due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Halal, F.; Brochu, P.; Delage, G.; Lamarre, A.; Rivard, G.

    1977-01-01

    Severe disseminated lung disease causing acute respiratory failure developed in a previously healthy 6 1/2-year-old boy. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was implicated and a complement-fixing antibody titre of 1:1024 against this organism was detected. At autopsy bronchiectasis was found, affecting chiefly the right middle and lower lobes. The unusual radiologic and pathologic findings are discussed. Images FIG. 1 PMID:578782

  12. Latin America validation of FACED score in patients with bronchiectasis: an analysis of six cohorts.

    PubMed

    Athanazio, Rodrigo; Pereira, Mônica Corso; Gramblicka, Georgina; Cavalcanti-Lundgren, Fernando; de Figueiredo, Mara Fernandes; Arancibia, Francisco; Rached, Samia; de la Rosa, David; Máiz-Carro, Luis; Girón, Rosa; Olveira, Casilda; Prados, Concepción; Martinez-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2017-04-26

    The FACED score is an easy-to-use multidimensional grading system that has demonstrated an excellent prognostic value for mortality in patients with bronchiectasis. A Spanish group developed the score but no multicenter international validation has yet been published. Retrospective and multicenter study conducted in six historical cohorts of patients from Latin America including 651 patients with bronchiectasis. Clinical, microbiological, functional, and radiological variables were collected, following the same criteria used in the original FACED score study. The vital status of all patients was determined in the fifth year of follow-up. The area under ROC curve (AUC-ROC) was used to calculate the predictive power of the FACED score for all-cause and respiratory deaths and both number and severity of exacerbations. The discriminatory power to divide patients into three groups of increasing severity was also analyzed. Mean (SD) age of 48.2 (16), 32.9% of males. The mean FACED score was 2.35 (1.68). During the follow up, 95 patients (14.6%) died (66% from respiratory causes). The AUC ROC to predict all-cause and respiratory mortality were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77 to 0.85) 0.84 (95% CI: 0.80 to 0.88) respectively, and 0.82 (95% CI: 078-0.87) for at least one hospitalization per year. The division into three score groups separated bronchiectasis into distinct mortality groups (mild: 3.7%; moderate: 20.7% and severe: 48.5% mortality; p < 0.001). The FACED score was confirmed as an excellent predictor of all-cause and respiratory mortality and severe exacerbations, as well as having excellent discriminative capacity for different degrees of severity in various bronchiectasis populations.

  13. Airway clearance in bronchiectasis: a randomized crossover trial of active cycle of breathing techniques versus Acapella.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Janet E; Bradley, Judy M; Hewitt, Oonagh; Bradbury, Ian; Elborn, J Stuart

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of a new airway clearance device (Acapella) has not been previously investigated. Active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBT) is the standard airway clearance technique used in patients with bronchiectasis. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of ACBT with Acapella as methods of airway clearance in adults with stable, productive bronchiectasis. Twenty patients (7 males), age 58 +/- 11 years (mean +/- SD), FEV1 64 +/- 22% predicted with stable (change of not greater than FEV1 10% predicted during 3 months prior to study), productive (history of expectoration of half an egg cup sputum/day) bronchiectasis attended the respiratory clinic on 3 days. Day 1: 40-min training session on ACBT and Acapella. Days 2 and 3: 30-min treatment session of either ACBT or Acapella. Treatment order was determined by a concealed randomization procedure. The following outcomes were measured before and after treatment spirometry, SpO2 and breathlessness by an independent assessor who was blinded to treatment order. Weight of sputum (during treatment plus 30 min after treatment), number of coughs and patient preference were also recorded. No significant differences were found at baseline indicating that patients were stable. No significant differences were found between weight of sputum expectorated with ACBT treatment and weight of sputum expectorated with Acapella treatment--mean difference 0.54 g (95% CI -0.39 to 1.46). A greater proportion of patients preferred Acapella (14/20). Acapella is as effective a method of airway clearance as ACBT and may offer a user-friendly alternative to ACBT for patients with bronchiectasis. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Culture and PCR detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Hare, K M; Binks, M J; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H

    2012-07-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen.

  15. Phase II study of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor (AZD9668) in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Robert; De Soyza, Anthony; Gunawardena, Kulasiri; Perrett, John; Forsman-Semb, Kristina; Entwistle, Neil; Snell, Noel

    2013-04-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity is increased in bronchiectasis and may play a role in this condition. We wished to determine the effect of AZD9668, a selective oral inhibitor of NE. Efficacy and safety of AZD9668 60 mg twice daily over 4 weeks were evaluated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, Phase II, signal-searching study in patients with bronchiectasis. Outcome measures included: waking and post-waking sputum neutrophil counts; lung function tests; 24-h sputum weight; BronkoTest(®) diary card data; St George's Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD patients (SGRQ-C); sputum NE activity; inflammatory biomarker levels; desmosine levels; adverse events, safety haematology and biochemistry. AZD9668 levels in plasma and sputum were measured to confirm exposure. Thirty-eight patients were randomised: 16 to placebo and 22 to AZD9668. There was no change in sputum neutrophils with AZD9668. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s improved by 100 mL in the AZD9668 group compared with placebo (p = 0.006). Significant changes (defined a priori as p < 0.1) in favour of AZD9668 were also seen in slow vital capacity, plasma interleukin-8, and post-waking sputum interleukin-6 and Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted levels. Non-significant changes in favour of AZD9668 were seen in other lung function tests, sputum weight and the SGRQ-C. AZD9668 was well tolerated. In this small signal-searching study, 4 weeks' treatment with AZD9668 improved lung function in patients with bronchiectasis and there were trends for reductions in sputum inflammatory biomarkers. Larger studies of longer duration would be needed to confirm the potential benefits of this agent in bronchiectasis. NCT00769119. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Culture and PCR Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Binks, M. J.; Grimwood, K.; Chang, A. B.; Leach, A. J.; Smith-Vaughan, H.

    2012-01-01

    A PCR for protein D (hpd#3) was used to differentiate nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) from Haemophilus haemolyticus. While 90% of nasopharyngeal specimens and 100% of lower-airway specimens from 84 Indigenous Australian children with bronchiectasis had phenotypic NTHI isolates confirmed as H. influenzae, only 39% of oropharyngeal specimens with phenotypic NTHI had H. influenzae. The nasopharynx is therefore the preferred site for NTHI colonization studies, and NTHI is confirmed as an important lower-airway pathogen. PMID:22553240

  17. Acapella versus 'usual airway clearance' during acute exacerbation in bronchiectasis: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J E; Hewitt, O; Kent, L; Bradbury, I; Elborn, J S; Bradley, J M

    2007-01-01

    Devices such as the Acapella may facilitate independent airway clearance, however, few clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of Acapella. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Acapella to 'usual airway clearance' in adults during an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis requiring oral antibiotic therapy. Twenty patients with bronchiectasis and an acute exacerbation requiring oral antibiotic therapy were recruited into a randomized crossover trial. Patients were allocated to one of two groups determined by concealed computer generated randomization. Group 1 (n=10): airway clearance session using Acapella at home twice daily during oral antibiotic therapy. Group 2 (n=10): 'usual' airway clearance sessions at home during oral antibiotic therapy. Patients recorded duration of each treatment session, volume of sputum produced and perception of breathlessness. An independent assessor performed outcome measures of spirometric lung function, pulse oximetry and breathlessness at the beginning and end of the study period. The mean volume of sputum expectorated during Acapella sessions was greater than for usual airway clearance sessions although this difference was not significant 2.61 ml (95% CI-1.62 to 6.84). Mean duration of Acapella sessions was greater than usual airway clearance sessions and approached significance. There were no significant between group differences in changes in lung function. This study demonstrates that the Acapella device may offer an acceptable, user-friendly method of airway clearance in patients with bronchiectasis.

  18. Renal amyloidosis in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (Bruton's disease) and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Sánchez-Vega, S; Pérez-Calderón, R; Pérez-Rangel, I; Corrales-Vargas, S; Fernández de Mera, J J; Robles, R

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with Bruton's disease and bronchiectasis who developed renal AA amyloidosis. A 38 year-old man was diagnosed with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (Bruton's disease) when he was 3 years old, and he has been treated with parenteral immunoglobulin since then. Eighteen years later, he was diagnosed with central pulmonary bronchiectasis by computerized tomography (CT). In 2008, he gradually developed anemia, edema of lower limbs, and loss of weight. Laboratory studies revealed deterioration of renal function, normocytic normochromic anemia and nephrotic range proteinuria. Hepatitis B and C and HIV serology were negative. Ultrasound and CT of abdomen were normal. A renal biopsy revealed deposits with positive PAS and Congo red staining in glomeruli, interstitium, and vessel's walls. Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining of the A amyloid. Direct immunofluorescence was positive with thioflavin and showed focal and glomerular mesangial IgG deposits, suggesting renal AA amyloidosis. For 2 years the patient conducted pharmacological treatment and follow-up for the Nephrology department with poor prognosis and progression of renal function impairment. In January 2011 he began dialysis treatment with improvement, and he is currently on the waiting list for renal transplantation. We present a patient with Bruton's disease and bronchiectasis who developed renal AA amyloidosis a finding rarely reported.

  19. A case of bronchiectasis needing lung isolation for cerebello pontine angle tumor excision: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, C; Kurian, GP; Mariappan, R

    2016-01-01

    The main goals of neuroanesthesia are the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure, avoidance of hypercarbia, hypoxemia, and to provide better brain relaxation. Providing anesthesia for a patient with bronchiectasis needing lung isolation for craniotomy can be challenging. A 56-year-old male patient, case of right lung bronchiectasis with a right cerebello pontine angle tumor underwent excision in the left lateral position. Since he had severe bronchiectasis of the right lung, we had isolated the right lung using right-sided double lumen tube to avoid spillage. Intraoperative split lung test was performed to assess the right lung contribution on carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination and found that there was a significant contribution from the right lung. Hence, both lungs were ventilated to control CO2. The importance of lung isolation to prevent spillage and avoidance of one lung ventilation to control the arterial CO2 are highlighted in this case report. By providing a balanced anesthetic keeping both, the neurosurgical and thoracic concerns are important for better postoperative outcome. PMID:27375400

  20. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  1. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2017-05-16

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  2. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  3. The L441P mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and its molecular pathogenic mechanisms in a Korean patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gee, Heon Yung; Kim, Chang Keun; Kim, So Won; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder usually found in populations of white Caucasian descent. CF is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene. A 5-yr-old Korean girl was admitted complaining of coughing and greenish sputum. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scan revealed diffuse bronchiectasis in both lungs. The patient had chronic diarrhea and poor weight gain, and the abdominal pancreaticobiliary CT scan revealed atrophy of the pancreas. Finally, CF was confirmed by the repeated analysis of the quantitative pilocarpine iontophoresis test. The chloride concentration of sweat samples taken from both forearms of the pateint was an average of 88.7 mM/L (normal value <40 mM/L). After a comprehensive search for mutations in the CFTR gene, the patient was found to carry the non-synonymous L441P mutation in one allele. Molecular physiologic analysis of the L441P mutation of CFTR revealed that the L441P mutation completely abolished the CFTR Cl(-) channel activity by disrupting proper protein folding and membrane trafficking of CFTR protein. These results confirmed the pathogenicity of the L441P mutation of CFTR circulating in the Korean population. The possibility of CF should be suspected in patients with chronic bronchiectasis, although the frequency of CF is relatively rare in East Asia.

  4. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella M; Höglund, Peter; Bozovic, Gracijela; Wiklund, Marie; Geijer, Mats

    2012-12-01

    To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examinations were scored using the new scoring system. Observer agreements for the tomosynthesis score were almost perfect for the total score with square-weighted kappa >0.90, and generally substantial to almost perfect for subscores. Correlation between the tomosynthesis score and the Brasfield score was good for the three observers (Kendall's rank correlation tau 0.68, 0.77 and 0.78). Tomosynthesis was generally scored higher as a percentage of the maximum score. Observer agreements for the total score for Brasfield score were almost perfect (square-weighted kappa 0.80, 0.81 and 0.85). The tomosynthesis scoring system seems robust and correlates well with the Brasfield score. Compared with radiography, tomosynthesis is more sensitive to cystic fibrosis changes, especially bronchiectasis and mucus plugging, and the new tomosynthesis scoring system offers the possibility of more detailed and accurate scoring of disease severity. Tomosynthesis is more sensitive than conventional radiography for pulmonary cystic fibrosis changes. The radiation dose from chest tomosynthesis is low compared with computed tomography. Tomosynthesis may become useful in the regular follow-up of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  5. Clinical case: Differential diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Carlos Robalo; Alfaro, Tiago M; Freitas, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis can be quite challenging, even after careful clinical evaluation, imaging and pathological tests. This case report intends to demonstrate and discuss these difficulties, especially those concerning the differential diagnosis with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A 58-year-old white male presented with shortness of breath, dry cough, fatigue and weight loss for two months. He was a former smoker and had regular exposure to a parakeet and poultry. Physical examination revealed bilateral basal crackles and chest imaging showed subpleural cystic lesions and traction bronchiectasis with a right side and upper level predominance. Auto-antibodies and IgG immunoglobulins to parakeet and fungal proteins were negative. Lung function tests displayed moderate restriction, low diffusion capacity and resting hypoxaemia. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed increased lymphocytes (28%) and neutrophils (12%) and surgical lung biopsy was compatible with a pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. According to the possibility of either idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, treatment included prednisolone, azathioprine, acetylcysteine and avoidance of contact with the parakeet, but there was an unfavorable response and the patient was subsequently referred for lung transplant. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis can present with the same clinical and radiological manifestations In this case, despite careful evaluation, no definite diagnosis could be achieved.

  6. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis in Asthma and Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Alan P.; Slavin, Raymond G.

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7–9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA. PMID:21603163

  7. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Alan P; Slavin, Raymond G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7-9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  8. Assessing idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with bronchoscopic OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Adams, David C.; Colby, Thomas V.; Tager, Andrew M.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal form of fibrotic lung disease, with a significantly worse prognosis than other forms of pulmonary fibrosis (3-year survival rate of 50%). Distinguishing IPF from other fibrotic diseases is essential to patient care because it stratifies prognosis and therapeutic decision-making. However, making the diagnosis often requires invasive, high-risk surgical procedures to look for microscopic features not seen on chest CT, such as characteristic cystic honeycombing in the peripheral lung. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides rapid 3D visualization of large tissue volumes with microscopic resolutions well beyond the capabilities of CT. We aim to determine whether bronchoscopic OCT can provide a low-risk, non-surgical method for IPF diagnosis. We have developed bronchoscopic OCT catheters that access the peripheral lung and conducted in vivo peripheral lung imaging in patients, including those with pulmonary fibrosis. We also conducted bronchoscopic OCT in ex vivo lung from pulmonary fibrosis patients, including IPF, to determine if OCT could successfully visualize features of IPF through the peripheral airways. Our results demonstrate that OCT is able to visualize characteristic features of IPF through the airway, including microscopic honeycombing (< 1 mm diameter) not visible by CT, dense peripheral fibrosis, and spatial disease heterogeneity. We also found that OCT has potential to distinguish mimickers of IPF honeycombing, such as traction bronchiectasis and emphysema, from true honeycombing. These findings support the potential of bronchoscopic OCT as a minimally-invasive method for in vivo IPF diagnosis. However, future clinical studies are needed to validate these findings.

  9. Bilateral Bronchiectasis as a Presentation Form of Pulmonary Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Bronchus Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Glenda; Torres, Carla; Borsini, Eduardo; Vigovich, Félix; Downey, Daniel; Salvado, Alajandro; Bosio, Martín

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of bronchus associated lymphoid tissue of the lung (BALT) is a rare illness that can remain without symptoms. Radiological findings of pulmonary lymphoma are heterogeneous. In literature, bronchiectasis is only described in one patient who also had besides adenomegalies. We reported on a 48-year-old female patient. She showed symptoms consistent with dyspnea with productive cough; there were crepitant sounds in the auscultation. Pulmonary functional test has shown a severe restrictive pattern with a low FVC and DLCO. CT scan showed bronchiectasis in the medium lobule without adenomegalies. Echocardiogram was normal, and the laboratory findings only showed leukocytosis. There were no findings in the bronchoscopy, but the lung biopsy showed a B-cell pulmonary lymphoma (positive to CD20 and CD79a in immunostaining). A wide variety of radiological manifestations has been previously described; however, we have presented this rare case, with bronchiectasis, as unique radiological finding. PMID:26839723

  10. Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Jones, A P; Rowe, B H

    2000-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is a form of chest physical therapy including chest percussion and postural drainage to remove lung secretions. These are applied commonly to patients with both acute and chronic airway diseases. Despite controversies in the literature regarding its efficacy, it remains in use in a variety of clinical settings. The various forms of this therapy are labour intensive and need to be evaluated. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles up to July 1997. We also wrote to study authors. Randomised trials in which postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing or forced exhalation technique was compared to other drainage or breathing techniques, placebo or no treatment. Two reviewers applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria on masked publications independently. They assessed the trial quality independently. Only data from the first arm of crossover trials were included. The seven included trials involved six comparisons and a total of 126 people. The trials were small and not generally of high quality. The results could not be combined as trials addressed different patient groups and outcomes. In most comparisons, bronchial hygiene physical therapy produced no significant effects on pulmonary function, apart from clearing sputum in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in bronchiectasis. There is not enough evidence to support or refute the use of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

  11. WITHDRAWN: Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Arthur P; Rowe, Brian H

    2011-07-06

    Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is a form of chest physical therapy including chest percussion and postural drainage to remove lung secretions. These are applied commonly to patients with both acute and chronic airway diseases. Despite controversies in the literature regarding its efficacy, it remains in use in a variety of clinical settings. The various forms of this therapy are labour intensive and need to be evaluated. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles up to January 2007. We also wrote to study authors. Randomised trials in which postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing or forced exhalation technique was compared to other drainage or breathing techniques, placebo or no treatment. Two reviewers applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria on masked publications independently. They assessed the trial quality independently. Only data from the first arm of crossover trials were included. The seven included trials involved six comparisons and a total of 126 people. The trials were small and not generally of high quality. The results could not be combined as trials addressed different patient groups and outcomes. In most comparisons, bronchial hygiene physical therapy produced no significant effects on pulmonary function, apart from clearing sputum in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in bronchiectasis. An update search carried out in January 2007 did not identify any new studies for inclusion. There is not enough evidence to support or refute the use of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Colonization on Prognosis in Adult Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Finch, Simon; McDonnell, Melissa J; Abo-Leyah, Hani; Aliberti, Stefano; Chalmers, James D

    2015-11-01

    Eradication and suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key priority in national guidelines for bronchiectasis and is a major focus of drug development and clinical trials. An accurate estimation of the clinical impact of P. aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is therefore essential. Data derived from 21 observational cohort studies comparing patients with P. aeruginosa colonization with those without it were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. Data were collected for key longitudinal clinical outcomes of mortality, hospital admissions, exacerbations, and lung function decline, along with cross-sectional outcomes such as quality of life. In the aggregate, the included studies comprised 3,683 patients. P. aeruginosa was associated with a highly significant and consistent increase in all markers of disease severity, including mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-4.40; P < 0.0001), hospital admissions (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 3.19-13.51; P < 0.0001), and exacerbations (mean difference, 0.97/yr; 95% CI, 0.64-1.30; P < 0.0001). The patients with P. aeruginosa also had worse quality of life on the basis of their St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire results (mean difference, 18.2 points; 95% CI, 14.7-21.8; P < 0.0001). Large differences in lung function and radiological severity were also observed. The definitions of colonization were inconsistent among the studies, but the findings were robust regardless of the definition used. P. aeruginosa is associated with an approximately threefold increased risk of death and an increase in hospital admissions and exacerbations in adult bronchiectasis.

  13. Multidimensional severity assessment in bronchiectasis: an analysis of seven European cohorts

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, M J; Aliberti, S; Goeminne, P C; Dimakou, K; Zucchetti, S C; Davidson, J; Ward, C; Laffey, J G; Finch, S; Pesci, A; Dupont, L J; Fardon, T C; Skrbic, D; Obradovic, D; Cowman, S; Loebinger, M R; Rutherford, R M; De Soyza, A; Chalmers, J D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bronchiectasis is a multidimensional disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Two disease-specific clinical prediction tools have been developed, the Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI) and the FACED score, both of which stratify patients into severity risk categories to predict the probability of mortality. Methods We aimed to compare the predictive utility of BSI and FACED in assessing clinically relevant disease outcomes across seven European cohorts independent of their original validation studies. Results The combined cohorts totalled 1612. Pooled analysis showed that both scores had a good discriminatory predictive value for mortality (pooled area under the curve (AUC) 0.76, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.78 for both scores) with the BSI demonstrating a higher sensitivity (65% vs 28%) but lower specificity (70% vs 93%) compared with the FACED score. Calibration analysis suggested that the BSI performed consistently well across all cohorts, while FACED consistently overestimated mortality in ‘severe’ patients (pooled OR 0.33 (0.23 to 0.48), p<0.0001). The BSI accurately predicted hospitalisations (pooled AUC 0.82, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.84), exacerbations, quality of life (QoL) and respiratory symptoms across all risk categories. FACED had poor discrimination for hospital admissions (pooled AUC 0.65, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.67) with low sensitivity at 16% and did not consistently predict future risk of exacerbations, QoL or respiratory symptoms. No association was observed with FACED and 6 min walk distance (6MWD) or lung function decline. Conclusion The BSI accurately predicts mortality, hospital admissions, exacerbations, QoL, respiratory symptoms, 6MWD and lung function decline in bronchiectasis, providing a clinically relevant evaluation of disease severity. PMID:27516225

  14. Reversibility of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengxi; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2015-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is a serious health problem worldwide, which can be induced by a wide spectrum of chronic liver injuries. However, until today, there is no effective therapy available for liver fibrosis except the removal of underlying etiology or liver transplantation. Recent studies indicate that liver fibrosis is reversible when the causative agent(s) is removed. Understanding of mechanisms of liver fibrosis regression will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes recent research progress on mechanisms of reversibility of liver fibrosis. While most of the research has been focused on HSCs/myofibroblasts and inflammatory pathways, the crosstalk between different organs, various cell types and multiple signaling pathways should not be overlooked. Future studies that lead to fully understanding of the crosstalk between different cell types and the molecular mechanism underlying the reversibility of liver fibrosis will definitely give rise to new therapeutic strategies to treat liver fibrosis.

  15. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  16. Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002437.htm Cystic fibrosis - nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening disease that causes ...

  17. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine and other stimulants found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and many soft drinks. Studies have not found ... side effects. How do fibrosis and simple cysts affect your risk for breast cancer? Neither fibrosis nor ...

  18. Rare Electrocardiographic Manifestation of Cystic Bronchiectasis in a 34-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Mishra, Vikas; Goel, Amit; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Tiwari, Pradyot; Kumar Singh, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Himalayan P-waves (amplitude > 5 mm) are often known to be classically associated with congenital heart diseases with right to left shunt like tricuspid atresia, Ebstein anomaly, combined tricuspid and pulmonic stenosis, ischemic heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, etc., where they indicate a dilated right atrium and tend to be persistent. This type of P-waves is rarely seen in long-standing bronchiectasis and is usually transient. It can be easily confused with congenital heart disease. Here we report a case of Himalayan P-waves in patient with bronchiectatic lung disease which is a rare entity. PMID:28197254

  19. Pulmonary Opacities and Bronchiectasis Avid on 68Ga-PSMA PET.

    PubMed

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm

    2017-04-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed in prostate cancer, and the expression increases with tumor aggressiveness, metastatic disease, and recurrence. Despite its name, PSMA is also expressed in neovasculature of other tumors including lung cancer. Here, we demonstrate a case of increased PSMA expression on Ga-PSMA PET/CT in benign lung opacities and bronchiectasis in a prostate cancer patient. Thus, increased PSMA activity in the lungs may be due to both benign and malignant diseases and warrants further evaluation.

  20. Bronchiectasis following treatment for high-risk neuroblastoma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Adams, Madeleine; Traunecker, Heidi; Doull, Iolo; Cox, Rachel

    2017-03-10

    High-risk (HR) neuroblastoma remains a very challenging disease to treat and long-term cure is only possible with intensive, multimodal treatment including chemotherapy, high-dose therapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and immunotherapy. As a result, treatment-related morbidity and late effects are common in survivors. This report outlines a case series of six patients who developed a chronic productive cough following treatment for HR neuroblastoma. High-resolution computed tomography scanning confirmed the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Two of the patients who have undergone immunological testing demonstrate hypogammaglobulinaemia and impaired vaccine response. Persistent cough in patients treated for neuroblastoma warrants investigation and consideration of immunological referral.

  1. The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Vermeulen, Francois; Dupont, Lieven

    2017-06-01

    Establishing the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is straight forward in the majority of patients: they present with a clear clinical picture (most frequently chronic respiratory symptoms plus malabsorption), the sweat chloride value is>60mmol/L and two known disease causing CFTR mutations are identified. In less than 5% of subjects, mainly those with a milder or limited phenotype, the diagnostic process is more complex, because initial diagnostic test results are inconclusive: sweat chloride concentration in the intermediate range, less than 2 CF causing mutations identified or both. These patients should be referred to expert centers where bioassays of CFTR function like nasal potential difference measurement or intestinal current measurement can be done. Still, in some patients, despite symptoms compatible with CF and some indication of CFTR dysfunction (e.g. only intermediate sweat chloride value), diagnostic criteria are not met (e.g. only 1 CFTR mutation identified). For these subjects, the term CFTR related disorder (CFTR-RD) is used. Patients with disseminated bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and acute or recurrent pancreatitis may fall in this category. CF has a very wide disease spectrum and increasingly the diagnosis is being made during adult life, mainly in subjects with milder phenotypes. In many countries, nationwide CF newborn screening (NBS) has been introduced. In screen positive babies, the diagnosis of CF must be confirmed by a sweat test demonstrating a sweat chloride concentration above 60mmol/L. To achieve the benefit of NBS, every baby in whom the diagnosis of CF is confirmed must receive immediate follow-up and treatment in a CF reference center. CF NBS is not full proof: some diagnoses will be missed and in some babies the diagnosis cannot be confirmed nor ruled out with certainty. Screening algorithms that include gene sequencing will detect a high number of such babies that are screen positive with an

  2. Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy in bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jones, A; Rowe, B H

    2000-01-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to examine the effects of bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis; (2) to determine any differences between manual and mechanical techniques for bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy. The study design was a systematic review of the literature that used an exhaustive search for trials and review methods prescribed by the Cochrane Collaboration. Randomized controlled trials examined patient groups, interventions, and dependent variables. Patients included those with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (emphysema or chronic bronchitis) or bronchiectasis. Any of the following interventions or combinations thereof were included: manual interventions, such as postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing, or forced exhalation technique. Controls of the study were as follows: no intervention; placebo; coughing; and mechanical interventions, such as mechanical vibration. The search identified 99 potential trials; inclusion or exclusion analysis left 7, which examined a total of 126 patients. Mean score on trial quality was 1.4 (5 = greatest). Three separate trials (N = 51) found statistically significant effects for bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy on sputum production and radioaerosol clearance. No trials (N = 126) found statistically significant effects on pulmonary function variables or differences between manual and mechanical techniques. Considering the small sizes, low quality, and mixed results from the trials, the research on bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is inconclusive. There is a need for adequately sized, high-quality, randomized controlled trials with uniform patient populations to examine the effects of bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy.

  3. [Beginning rheumatoid arthritis revealed during bronchiectasis surinfections. Value of cyclic antibiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Attucci, S; Maillot, F; Degenne, D; Brunereau, L; Dreyfuss, P; Lemarie, E; Hazouard, E

    2001-09-01

    Incidence of symptomatic bronchiectasis (BR) occurs in around 2% in patients with late rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Its seems that the association BR-RA could be a worsening factor for outcome of RA patients. A 58-year-old woman without dry syndrome, suffering from bronchial purulence over one year was admitted to the Department of Pneumology for hemoptysis and arthritis (knees, ankles, and wrists). Three prior episodes of inflammatory articular pain had occurred after transient bronchial purulence or pneumonitis. CT-scan showed bilateral bronchiectasis. Diagnosis of early RA was proved after the third episode of bronchial purulence related to a strain of Haemophilus influenzae. A strain of Coxiella burnetii was probably responsible for one of the three bronchial surinfections. Latex and Waaler Rose tests were transiently positive during the first episode, and became positive after the third one. At that time, RA was relevant in view of ARA criteria. Cyclic prophylactic antibiotic regimens could be proposed to patients suffering from RA-BR association, in contrast to the cases of patients with isolated BR. This approach could prevent destabilization of RA and reinforce of anti-rheumatic therapy. Activation and release of cytokines (NFk-B, TNF-alpha), and/or bacterial epitopes seems to be directly responsible for the articular destabilization.

  4. Thoracoscopic pneumonectomy for severe bronchiectasis in a 9-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Dean M; Perez, Iris A; Shaul, Donald B

    2008-10-01

    Thoracoscopic total pneumonectomy has not been previously described in the pediatric surgical literature. In this paper, we describe a case of pneumonectomy performed through a minimally invasive approach in a 9-year-old female with Down's syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease. The patient suffered from multiple recurrent aspiration pneumonias, which progressed to bronchiectasis of the entire left lung. As a result, the patient was hypoxemic and required continuous supplemental oxygen. Preoperative perfusion scans showed diminished perfusion of the left lung. Thoracoscopy was performed by using 3-5 mm trocars and one 12-mm trocar. Insufflation pressure was maintained at 5 mm Hg. Dissection was performed at the hilum by using hook electrocautery and the LigaSure device (ValleyLab, Boulder, CO). The pulmonary artery, veins, and left mainstem bronchus were sequentially divided by using a 35-mm ENDO GIA vascular stapler (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH). There were no intraoperative complications. Eight months following surgery, her health is improved and she no longer requires supplemental oxygen. Thoracoscopic pneumonectomy is a safe, technically feasible approach for severe bronchiectasis in children.

  5. Residual volume/total lung capacity ratio confers limited additive significance to lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing-jing; Huang, Yan; Li, Hui-min; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2017-01-01

    Background Mosaicism and hyperinflation are common pathophysiologic features of bronchiectasis. The magnitude of ventilation heterogeneity might have been affected by the degree of hyperinflation. Some studies have evaluated the discriminative performance of lung clearance index (LCI) in bronchiectasis patients, but the additive diagnostic value of hyperinflation metrics to LCI is unknown. Objective To compare LCI and the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC), along with the LCI normalized with RV/TLC, in terms of discriminative performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables in adults with bronchiectasis. Methods Measurement items included chest high-resolution computed tomography, multiple-breath nitrogen washout test, spirometry, and sputum culture. We analyzed bronchodilator responses by stratifying LCI and RV/TLC according to their median levels (LCIHigh/RV/TLCHigh, LCILow/RV/TLCHigh, LCIHigh/RV/TLCLow, and LCILow/RV/TLCLow). Results Data from 127 adults with clinically stable bronchiectasis were analyzed. LCI had greater diagnostic value than RV/TLC in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis, had greater concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics (including the number of bronchiectatic lobes, radiological severity score, and the presence of cystic bronchiectasis). Normalization of LCI with RV/TLC did not contribute to greater discriminative performance or concordance with clinical variables. The LCI, before and after normalization with RV/TLC, correlated statistically with age, sex, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, and ventilation heterogeneity (all P<0.05). Different bronchodilator responses were not significant among the four subgroups of bronchiectasis patients, including those with discordant LCI and RV/TLC levels. Conclusion LCI is superior to RV/TLC for bronchiectasis assessment. Normalization with RV/TLC is not required. Stratification of LCI and RV

  6. Effects of functional endoscopic sinus surgery on the treatment of bronchiectasis combined with chronic rhino-sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Hai-Bo

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic bronchiectasis is closely associated with chronic rhino-sinusitis. It can effectively control bronchiectasic symptoms to treat chronic rhino-sinusitis by FESS in the cases with bronchiectasis and chronic rhino-sinusitis. To explore the effect of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) on the treatment of bronchiectasis combined with chronic rhino-sinusitis. In this study, a total of 161 cases with bronchiectasis and chronic rhino-sinusitis were divided into medication group and operation group according to the therapeutic method for chronic rhino-sinusitis selected by them. For the treatment of chronic rhino-sinusitis, the cases in the operation group received FESS, but in the medication group cases took drugs alone. The score of clinical symptoms for bronchiectasis, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), SNOT-22 score, and Lund-Mackay score were evaluated for all cases before and after treatment, respectively, and then the value changes in the score of clinical symptoms, FEV1, SNOT-22 score, and Lund-Mackay score between both time points were calculated. The frequency of acute exacerbation for bronchiectasis was also recorded within the 6-month follow-up. In this study, 58.9% of cases with bronchiectasis had chronic rhino-sinusitis. Follow-up lasted 6 months. Compared with pre-therapy, post-therapy score of clinical symptoms, SNOT-22 score, and Lund-Mackay score were all significantly decreased (all p < 0.05), but post-therapy FEV1 failed to significantly improve (p > 0.05) in both groups. During the 6-month follow-up, the frequency of acute exacerbation was significantly less in the operation group than in the medication group (p < 0.01). Post-treatment score of clinical symptoms (p < 0.01), SNOT-22 score (p < 0.05), and Lund-Mackay score (p < 0.05) also were all significantly less in the operation group than in the medication group. However, there was no significant difference in post-therapy FEV1 between the two groups (p

  7. Effects of long-term bronchodilators in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation based on bronchodilator response at baseline

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ho Jung; Lee, Hyun; Carriere, Keumhee C; Kim, Jung Hoon; Han, Jin-Hyung; Shin, Beomsu; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Kwon, O Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between positive bronchodilator response (BDR) at baseline and the effect of long-term bronchodilator therapy has not been well elucidated in patients with bronchiectasis. The aims of our study were to explore the association between positive BDR at baseline and lung-function improvement following long-term (3–12 months) bronchodilator therapy in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation. Materials and methods The medical records of 166 patients with clinically stable bronchiectasis who underwent baseline pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry and repeated spirometry after 3–12 months of bronchodilator therapy were retrospectively reviewed. For analysis, patients were divided into two groups, responders and poor responders, based on achievement of at least 12% and 200 mL in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) following bronchodilator therapy from baseline FEV1. Results A total of 57 patients (34.3%) were responders. These patients were more likely to have positive BDR at baseline than poor responders (38.6% [22 of 57] vs 18.3% [20 of 109], P=0.004). This association persisted after adjustment for other confounding factors (adjusted odds ratio 2.298, P=0.034). However, we found FEV1 improved significantly following long-term bronchodilator therapy, even in patients without positive BDR at baseline (change in FEV1 130 mL, interquartile range −10 to 250 mL; P<0.001). Conclusion Positive BDR at baseline was independently associated with responsiveness to long-term bronchodilator therapy in bronchiectasis patients with airflow limitation. However, FEV1 improvement was also evident in bronchiectasis patients without positive BDR at baseline, suggesting that these patients can benefit from long-term bronchodilator therapy. PMID:27853363

  8. Pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with bronchiectasis: pulmonary function, arterial blood gases, and the 6-minute walk test.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, Mafalda; Mota, Patrícia Caetano; Amorim, Adelina; Viana, Paulo; Martins, Paula; Gaspar, Luís; Hespanhol, Venceslau; Gomes, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Information regarding the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on pulmonary function (PF), arterial blood gases (ABG), and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) in patients with bronchiectasis is scant in the literature. To evaluate the effects of PR on these indices in this population, a retrospective evaluation of those who attended PR from 2007 to 2010, was made. Pulmonary rehabilitation lasted a mean of 12 weeks and included cycle ergometer exercise for 30 minutes, 3 times per week, with additional upper limbs and quadriceps training. PF, ABG, and 6MWD were evaluated before and after PR to determine the potential influence of gender, exacerbations, underlying cause of bronchiectasis, severity of obstruction, and colonization with bacteria. Forty-one patients (48.8% males; median age, 54 years) were included; 25 had severe obstruction and 19 were colonized with bacteria. Following PR, no significant changes were detected in PF or ABG. Median 6MWD before PR was 425 m and post-PR was 450 m (P = .431). Outcomes did not show any interaction with gender, colonization, or exacerbations. However, patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis did show a significant improvement in forced vital capacity in percent of predicted and residual volume after PR (P = .016 and .048, respectively). Patients with severe obstruction showed a statistically significant decrease in percent of predicted residual volume (P = .025). There appears to be a beneficial impact of PR on PF in certain groups of patients with bronchiectasis. In addition, PR indications and protocols for patients with bronchiectasis may need to be adapted to accommodate specific patients, so that expressive exercise capacity improvement can be achieved.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of bronchial mucus after respiratory physiotherapy in subjects with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ercy M C; Ramos, Dionei; Moreira, Graciane L; Macchione, Mariangela; Guimarães, Eliane T; Rodrigues, Fernanda Maria M; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Jardim, José R

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of postural drainage (PD), percussion (PERC), the coughing technique (CT), and other types of coughing in subjects with bronchiectasis. However, the application times of these techniques and the quality of the expectorated mucus require further study. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PD, percussion, CT, and huffing in subjects with bronchiectasis and assess the quantity and quality of bronchial mucus produced (measurement of wet and dry weight and determination of viscoelastic properties). Twenty-two subjects with stable bronchiectasis (6 men; mean age: 51.5 y) underwent 4 d of experimental study (CT, PD+CT, PD+PERC+CT, and PD+huffing). The techniques were performed in 3 20-min periods separated by 10 min of rest. Before performing any technique (baseline) and after each period (30, 60, and 90 min), expectorated mucus was collected for analysis of viscoelasticity. A significant increase in the dry weight/wet weight ratio was found after 60 min of PD+PERC+CT (P = .01) and 90 min of PD+huffing (P = .03) and PD+PERC+CT (P = .007) in comparison with CT. PD+PERC+CT and PD+huffing led to the greatest removal of viscoelastic mucus at 60 min (P = .02 and P = .002, respectively) and continued to do so at 90 min (P = .02 and P = .01, respectively) in comparison with CT. An interaction effect was found, as all techniques led to a greater removal of elastic mucus in comparison with CT at 60 min (PD+CT, P = .001; PD+PERC+CT, P < .001; PD+huffing, P < .001), but only PD+PERC+CT and PD+huffing led to a greater removal of elastic mucus than CT at 90 min (P < .001 and P = .005, respectively). PD+PERC+CT and PD+huffing performed similarly regarding the removal of viscoelastic mucus in 2 and 3 20-min periods separated by 10 min of rest. PD+PERC+CT led to the greatest removal of mucus in the shortest period (2 20-min periods separated by 10 min of rest). Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. CFTR gene mutations--including three novel nucleotide substitutions--and haplotype background in patients with asthma, disseminated bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tzetis, M; Efthymiadou, A; Strofalis, S; Psychou, P; Dimakou, A; Pouliou, E; Doudounakis, S; Kanavakis, E

    2001-03-01

    In order to investigate the incidence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations and unclassified variants in chronic pulmonary disease in children and adults, we studied 20 patients with asthma, 19 with disseminated bronchiectasis (DB) of unknown aetiology, and 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and compared the results to 52 subjects from the general Greek population. Analysis of the whole coding region of the CFTR gene and its flanking intronic regions revealed that the proportion of CFTR mutations was 45% in asthma (P<0.05), 26.3% in DB (P>0.05), 16.7% in COPD (P>0.05), compared to 15.4% in the general population. Seventeen different molecular defects involved in disease predisposition were identified in 16 patients. Three potentially disease-causing mutations, T388 M, M1R and V11I, are novel, found so far only in three asthma patients. The hyperactive M470 allele was found more frequently in COPD patients (frequency 70.8%, P<0.01) than in the controls. The study of the TGmTnM470 V polyvariant CFTR allele revealed the presence of CFTR function-modulating haplotypes TG13/T5/M470, TG11/T5/M470, TG12/T5/V470 and TG12/T7, combined with M470 or V470, in six asthma patients, four DB patients (P<0.01), and two COPD patients (P<0.05). These results confirm the involvement of the CFTR gene in asthma, DB and possibly in COPD.

  11. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals Treatment & Programs Health Information Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial ...

  12. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated? Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, ... help oral pancreatic enzymes work better. Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis Complications A common complication of CF is diabetes . ...

  13. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Teens > Cystic Fibrosis: ... Food Enzyme Supplements Beating the Frustration What Is Cystic Fibrosis? At lunch, Lindsay often gets bored with having ...

  14. Airway-Clearance Techniques in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease and Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L.; Button, Brenda M.; Tannenbaum, Esta-Lee

    2017-01-01

    Common symptoms of chronic suppurative lung disease or bronchiectasis in children and adolescents are chronic cough with sputum production, retention of excess secretions in dilated airways, and a history of recurrent infections. Clinical management includes the prescription of airway-clearance techniques (ACTs) to facilitate mucociliary clearance, optimize sputum expectoration, relieve symptoms, and improve well-being. A wide range of ACTs are available for selection, and these strategies may be applied in isolation or in combination. The choice of technique will depend in part on the age of the child, their clinical state, and factors which may influence treatment adherence. While the evidence base for ACTs in children and adolescent with these conditions is not robust, the current available evidence in addition to clinical expertise provides guidance for technique prescription and clinical effect. An overview of the most commonly applied ACTs, including their physiological rationale and discussion of factors influencing prescription in children and adolescents is outlined in this review. PMID:28168184

  15. Tidal expiratory flow limitation, dyspnoea and exercise capacity in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Retsou, S; Kosmas, E; Dimakou, K; Malagari, K; Mantzikopoulos, G; Koutsoukou, A; Milic-Emili, J; Jordanoglou, J

    2003-05-01

    In this study the authors investigated whether expiratory flow limitation (FL) is present during tidal breathing in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis (BB) and whether it is related to the severity of chronic dyspnoea (Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea scale), exercise capacity (maximal mechanical power output (WRmax)) and severity of the disease, as assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scoring. Lung function, MRC dyspnoea, HRCT score, WRmax and FL were assessed in 23 stable caucasian patients (six males) aged 56 +/- 17 yrs. FL was assessed at rest both in seated and supine positions. To detect FL, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique was used. The degree of FL was rated using a five-point FL score. WRmax was measured using a cyclo-ergometer. According to the NEP technique, five patients were FL during resting breathing when supine but not seated, four were FL both seated and supine, and 14 were NFL both seated and supine. Furthermore, it was shown that: 1) in stable BB patients FL during resting breathing is common, especially in the supine position; 2) the degree of MRC dyspnoea is closely related to the five-point FL score; 3) WRmax (% pred) is more closely correlated with the MRC dyspnoea score than with the five-point FL score; and 4) HRCT score is closely related to forced expiratory volume in one second % pred but not five-point FL score. In conclusion, flow limitation is common at rest in sitting and supine positions in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis. Flow limitation and reduced exercise capacity are both associated with more severe dyspnoea. Finally, high-resolution computed tomography scoring correlates best with forced expiratory volume in one second.

  16. An evaluation of automated broncho-arterial ratios for reliable assessment of bronchiectasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    Bronchiectasis, the permanent dilatation of the airways, is frequently evaluated by computed tomography (CT) in order to determine disease progression and response to treatment. Normal airways have diameters of approximately the same size as their accompanying artery, and most scoring systems for quantifying bronchiectasis severity ask physicians to estimate the broncho-arterial ratio. However, the lack of standardization coupled with inter-observer variability limits diagnostic sensitivity and the ability to make reliable comparisons with follow-up CT studies. We have developed a Computer Aided Diagnosis method to detect airway disease by locating abnormal broncho-arterial ratios. Our approach is based on computing a tree model of the airways followed by automated measurements of broncho-arterial ratios at peripheral airway locations. The artery accompanying a given bronchus is automatically determined by correlation of its orientation and proximity to the airway, while the diameter measurements are based on the full-width half maximum method. This method was previously evaluated subjectively; in this work we quantitatively evaluate the airway and vessel measurements on 9 CT studies and compare the results with three independent readers. The automatically selected artery location was in agreement with the readers in 75.3% of the cases compared with 65.6% agreement of the readers with each other. The reader-computer variability in lumen diameters (7%) was slightly lower than that of the readers with respect to each other (9%), whereas the reader-computer variability in artery diameter (18%) was twice that of the readers (8%), but still acceptable for detecting disease. We conclude that the automatic system has comparable accuracy to that of readers, while providing greater speed and consistency.

  17. Flutter valve improves respiratory mechanics and sputum production in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro H S; Zin, Walter A; Guimarães, Fernando S

    2012-03-01

    Although the application of airway clearance techniques is considered an important component in the treatment of several obstructive pulmonary diseases, there is no scientific evidence supporting the use of Flutter Valve™ in the management of patients with bronchiectasis. Moreover, the consequences of respiratory physiotherapy techniques on respiratory mechanics have not been fully studied. Therefore, we investigated the acute, short-term effects of Flutter Valve™ on respiratory mechanics and sputum production in bronchiectatic patients.  EIGHT patients were evaluated in a randomized, blinded, cross-over trial. Impedance at 5 Hz (R5), resistance as a function of oscillation frequency (dR/dF), reactance at 5 Hz (X5), resonant frequency (f(0) ) and integral of reactance between 5 Hz and resonant frequency (AX) were recorded.  Flutter Valve™ cleared 8.4 mL more secretions than the Sham Flutter intervention (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.4-13.4). There was a higher percentage decrease in R5 (-11.2%; 95% CI, -4.4 to -18.2), dR/dF (-20.8%; 95% CI, -32.4 to -9) and AX (-7.8%; 95% CI, -11.9 to -3.7) under Flutter Valve™. X5 and f(0) variation did not differ between interventions.   Flutter Valve™ increases sputum removal during treatment and diminishes total and peripheral airway resistance in hypersecretive patients with bronchiectasis. Impulse oscillometry is a user-friendly tool to evaluate the effects of airway clearance techniques on respiratory mechanics. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Lung Microbiota and Bacterial Abundance in Patients with Bronchiectasis when Clinically Stable and during Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Gisli G.; Wei, Lan; Drain, Maire; Klem, Erich R.; Cardwell, Chris; Ennis, Madeleine; Boucher, Richard C.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Characterization of bacterial populations in infectious respiratory diseases will provide improved understanding of the relationship between the lung microbiota, disease pathogenesis, and treatment outcomes. Objectives: To comprehensively define lung microbiota composition during stable disease and exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis. Methods: Sputum was collected from patients when clinically stable and before and after completion of antibiotic treatment of exacerbations. Bacterial abundance and community composition were analyzed using anaerobic culture and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Measurements and Main Results: In clinically stable patients, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were detected in 40 of 40 (100%) and 33 of 40 (83%) sputum samples, respectively. The dominant organisms cultured were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10 patients), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 12), Prevotella (n = 18), and Veillonella (n = 13). Pyrosequencing generated more than 150,000 sequences, representing 113 distinct microbial taxa; the majority of observed community richness resulted from taxa present in low abundance with similar patterns of phyla distribution in clinically stable patients and patients at the onset of exacerbation. After treatment of exacerbation, there was no change in total (P = 0.925), aerobic (P = 0.917), or anaerobic (P = 0.683) load and only a limited shift in community composition. Agreement for detection of bacteria by culture and pyrosequencing was good for aerobic bacteria such as P. aeruginosa (κ = 0.84) but poorer for other genera including anaerobes. Lack of agreement was largely due to bacteria being detected by pyrosequencing but not by culture. Conclusions: A complex microbiota is present in the lungs of patients with bronchiectasis and remains stable through treatment of exacerbations, suggesting that changes in microbiota composition do not account for exacerbations. PMID:23348972

  19. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes in Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, Canada).

    PubMed

    de Braekeleer, M; Mari, G; Verlingue, C; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Simard, F; Aubin, G; Férec, C

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of six cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean who bear rare genotypes. Two patients with a delta F508/I148T genotype had pancreatic insufficiency, as did two patients compound heterozygous for the 621 + 1G-->T mutation who also had a major growth retardation. One CF adult who carried a delta F508/Q890X genotype had meconium ileus and bronchiectasis. The sixth patient (A455E/R117C) had borderline sweat chloride concentrations; the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis had remained doubtful until the molecular analysis showed the presence of two CF mutations. The seventh patient with a delta F508/R1158X genotype experienced several complications and is now 43 years old.

  20. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  1. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Nonscreened Populations.

    PubMed

    Sosnay, Patrick R; White, Terry B; Farrell, Philip M; Ren, Clement L; Derichs, Nico; Howenstine, Michelle S; Nick, Jerry A; De Boeck, Kris

    2017-02-01

    Although the majority of cases of cystic fibrosis (CF) are now diagnosed through newborn screening, there is still a need to standardize the diagnostic criteria for those diagnosed outside of the neonatal period. This is because newborn screening started relatively recently, it is not performed everywhere, and even for individuals who were screened, there is the possibility of a false negative. To limit irreversible organ pathology, a timely diagnosis of CF and institution of CF therapies can greatly benefit these patients. Experts on CF diagnosis were convened at the 2015 CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. The participants reviewed and discussed published works and instructive cases of CF diagnosis in individuals presenting with signs, symptoms, or a family history of CF. Through a modified Delphi methodology, several consensus statements were agreed upon. These consensus statements were updates of prior CF diagnosis conferences and recommendations. CF diagnosis in individuals outside of newborn screening relies on the clinical evidence and on evidence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Clinical evidence can include typical organ pathologies seen in CF such as bronchiectasis or pancreatic insufficiency but often represent a broad range of severity including mild cases. CFTR dysfunction can be demonstrated using sweat chloride testing, CFTR molecular genetic analysis, or CFTR physiologic tests. On the basis of the large number of patients with bona fide CF currently followed in registries with sweat chloride levels between 30 and 40 mmol/L, the threshold considered "intermediate" was lowered from 40 mmol/L in the prior diagnostic guidelines to 30 mmol/L. The CF diagnosis was also discussed in the context of CFTR-related disorders in which CFTR dysfunction may be present, but the individual does not meet criteria for CF. CF diagnosis remains a rare but important condition that can be diagnosed when characteristic clinical

  2. Practical management of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2015-07-22

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is relentless progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown etiology. Main pathogenesis is aberrant recovery of epithelial injury and collagen deposition. Majority of IPF patients have been elderly men with smokers. However, there are important differential diagnosis such as fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) associated ILD, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonia (CHP). Clinical point of view, non-productive cough and progressive exertional dyspnea are main symptoms. In addition, scalene muscle hypertrophy, fine crackles and finger clubbing are key findings. Serum marker such as lactate deydrogenase (LDH), Krebs von den Lungeng-6 (KL-6) are sensitive for ILD detection and activity. Pulmonary function test and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) are quite meaningful physiological examination. Serial change of forced vital capacity 6MWT distance predict mortality of IPF. International IPF guideline published recently and highlighted on the importance of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings. Key findings of IPF are honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and subpleural reticular opacity. IPF is chronic progressive disease. Therefore, tracing disease behavior is crucial and unifying clinical, physiological, imaging information over time provide useful information for physicians.In management, many candidate agent failed to have positive result. Pirfenidone which is anti-fibrotic agent showed to slow the decline of vital capacity and prevent of acute exacerbation. Molecular agent such as nintedanib is promising agent for prevention of progression of IPF. In this review, we review the clinical information of IPF and IPF guideline. Lastly, we show the clinical algorithm of this devastated disease.

  3. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you can ... with your doctors to learn how to manage CF. Ongoing Care Having ongoing medical care by a ...

  4. [Early lung disease in infants with cystic fibrosis. Diagnostic tools and possible therapeutic pathways].

    PubMed

    Reix, P; Matecki, S; Fayon, M

    2016-02-01

    The lungs of infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) have been considered to be normal at birth. However, recent data indicates that this is unlikely to be true in most cases. Animal CF-models developed in the early 2000s have shown that constitutional airway narrowing may be present at birth, and is associated with both functional and structural abnormalities. Longitudinal birth cohort studies have shown that 25 % of CF infants followed in specialized centers, while being asymptomatic, showed decreased lung function at 3months of age. Air trapping was present in 68 % and bronchiectasis in 28 % of patients at the same age. The presence of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage at 3months of age tripled the risk of bronchiectasis at the age of 3years. Currently available tools such as infant pulmonary function tests (both the jacket and multiple breath washout) as well as high-resolution volume controlled chest-computed tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging will facilitate early intervention trials in the very near future. The role of such tools for the routine follow-up of patients, and the ability of early therapeutic interventions to alter the natural history of CF-lung disease should soon be established. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A pilot study of the safety and efficacy of tobramycin solution for inhalation in patients with severe bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, Paul; Shore, Eric

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of tobramycin solution for inhalation (TSI) in patients with severe bronchiectasis. Open-label clinical trial consisting of three treatment cycles (14 days of drug therapy, and 14 days off drug) and an additional 40-week follow-up by chart review. Nine clinical sites throughout the United States. Forty-one adult patients (>/= 18 years old) with diffuse bronchiectasis affecting two or more lung segments and a history of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. TSI, 300 mg tobramycin per dose bid. During the 12-week treatment period, significant improvements (reduction of 1.5 U [p = 0.006]) occurred in mean pulmonary total symptom severity score, a composite score that assesses the severity of cough, shortness of breath, sputum production, fatigue, and wheezing. Significant improvements (reduction of 9.8 U [p < 0.001]) were also observed in St. George Respiratory Questionnaire scores, which measure health-related quality of life. Eradication or presumed eradication of P aeruginosa occurred in 6 of 27 evaluable subjects (22.2%). Tobramycin-resistant P aeruginosa developed in two subjects (minimal inhibitory concentration >/= 16 microg/mL). Ten subjects withdrew from the study due to adverse events; in nine of these subjects, adverse events were considered probably or possibly related to treatment. The most common adverse events were cough, wheezing, and dyspnea. TSI therapy resulted in significant improvements in respiratory symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with severe bronchiectasis, but some subjects did not tolerate TSI therapy. Bronchiectasis patients receiving this therapy should be monitored for signs of intolerance.

  6. The Likelihood of Preventing Respiratory Exacerbations in Children and Adolescents with either Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease or Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Grimwood, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis in children and adolescents are important causes of respiratory morbidity and reduced quality of life (QoL), also leading to subsequent premature death during adulthood. Acute respiratory exacerbations in pediatric CSLD and bronchiectasis are important markers of disease control clinically, given that they impact upon QoL and increase health-care-associated costs and can adversely affect future lung functioning. Preventing exacerbations in this population is, therefore, likely to have significant individual, familial, societal, and health-sector benefits. In this review, we focus on therapeutic interventions, such as drugs (antibiotics, mucolytics, hyperosmolar agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents), vaccines and physiotherapy, and care-planning, such as post-hospitalization management and health promotion strategies, including exercise, diet, and reducing exposure to environmental toxicants. The review identified a conspicuous lack of moderate or high-quality evidence for preventing respiratory exacerbations in children and adolescents with CSLD or bronchiectasis. Given the short- and long-term impact of exacerbations upon individuals, their families, and society as a whole, large studies addressing interventions at the primary and tertiary prevention phases are required. This research must include children and adolescents in both developing and developed countries and address long-term health outcomes. PMID:28393062

  7. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis, regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis. Because anti-angiogenic therapy has been found to be efficient in the prevention of fibrosis in experimental models of CLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis could be a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are being directed to revealing the mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis. Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesis and fibrosis are closely related in both clinical and experimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer of angiogenesis together with inflammation and hepatic stellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at the intersection between inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis. This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on the relevant features that communicate angiogenesis with progression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point of cirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies. The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associated with portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are also discussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25848465

  8. Apoptosis, fibrosis and senescence.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a major hallmark of progressive kidney disease. The cellular mechanisms that lead to kidney tissue fibrosis are complex and include, for example, increased inflammation, increased oxidative stress, and proximal tubule cell death in the form of apoptosis or senescence. Recent studies have identified TWEAK, a tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis, as a novel cytokine that mediates kidney inflammation in models of renal fibrosis. Inhibition of apoptosis via TWEAK inhibition has been shown to reduce kidney fibrosis. Recent studies using lineage tracing suggest that interstitial pericytes/perivascular fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts and undergo proliferative expansion during fibrosis. Furthermore, increased expression of nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in proximal tubules can directly reduce increased expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and interstitial inflammation in models of renal fibrosis, which suggests preservation of proximal tubule cell metabolism and integrity represents an important new therapeutic target. In this review, the current evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the development of kidney fibrosis are discussed. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. [The activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Wang, Xue; Yang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel activity. CFTR-mediated iodide influx assay and patch-clamp tests were done on FRT cells stably co-transfected with human CFTR and EYFP/H148Q. Nobiletin potently activated CFTR chloride channel activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The CFTR blocker CFTR(inh)-172 could completely reverse the effect. Preliminary mechanism study indicated that nobiletin activated CFTR chloride channel through a direct binding way. In addition, ex vivo tests done on mice trachea showed that nobiletin time-dependently stimulated submucosal gland fluid secretion. Nobiletin may be a therapeutic lead compound in treating CFTR-related diseases including disseminated bronchiectasis.

  10. Predicting high risk of exacerbations in bronchiectasis: the E-FACED score.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, M A; Athanazio, R A; Girón, R; Máiz-Carro, L; de la Rosa, D; Olveira, C; de Gracia, J; Vendrell, M; Prados-Sánchez, C; Gramblicka, G; Corso Pereira, M; Lundgren, F L; Fernandes De Figueiredo, M; Arancibia, F; Rached, S Z

    2017-01-01

    Although the FACED score has demonstrated a great prognostic capacity in bronchiectasis, it does not include the number or severity of exacerbations as a separate variable, which is important in the natural history of these patients. Construction and external validation of a new index, the E-FACED, to evaluate the predictive capacity of exacerbations and mortality. The new score was constructed on the basis of the complete cohort for the construction of the original FACED score, while the external validation was undertaken with six cohorts from three countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Chile). The main outcome was the number of annual exacerbations/hospitalizations, with all-cause and respiratory-related deaths as the secondary outcomes. A statistical evaluation comprised the relative weight and ideal cut-off point for the number or severity of the exacerbations and was incorporated into the FACED score (E-FACED). The results obtained after the application of FACED and E-FACED were compared in both the cohorts. A total of 1,470 patients with bronchiectasis (819 from the construction cohorts and 651 from the external validation cohorts) were followed up for 5 years after diagnosis. The best cut-off point was at least two exacerbations in the previous year (two additional points), meaning that the E-FACED has nine points of growing severity. E-FACED presented an excellent prognostic capacity for exacerbations (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.82 for at least two exacerbations in 1 year and 0.87 for at least one hospitalization in 1 year) that was statistically better than that of the FACED score (0.72 and 0.78, P<0.05, respectively). The predictive capacities for all-cause and respiratory mortality were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively, with both being similar to those of the FACED. E-FACED score significantly increases the FACED capacity to predict future yearly exacerbations while maintaining the score's simplicity and prognostic capacity for

  11. Predicting high risk of exacerbations in bronchiectasis: the E-FACED score

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, MA; Athanazio, RA; Girón, R; Máiz-Carro, L; de la Rosa, D; Olveira, C; de Gracia, J; Vendrell, M; Prados-Sánchez, C; Gramblicka, G; Corso Pereira, M; Lundgren, FL; Fernandes De Figueiredo, M; Arancibia, F; Rached, SZ

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the FACED score has demonstrated a great prognostic capacity in bronchiectasis, it does not include the number or severity of exacerbations as a separate variable, which is important in the natural history of these patients. Objective Construction and external validation of a new index, the E-FACED, to evaluate the predictive capacity of exacerbations and mortality. Methods The new score was constructed on the basis of the complete cohort for the construction of the original FACED score, while the external validation was undertaken with six cohorts from three countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Chile). The main outcome was the number of annual exacerbations/hospitalizations, with all-cause and respiratory-related deaths as the secondary outcomes. A statistical evaluation comprised the relative weight and ideal cut-off point for the number or severity of the exacerbations and was incorporated into the FACED score (E-FACED). The results obtained after the application of FACED and E-FACED were compared in both the cohorts. Results A total of 1,470 patients with bronchiectasis (819 from the construction cohorts and 651 from the external validation cohorts) were followed up for 5 years after diagnosis. The best cut-off point was at least two exacerbations in the previous year (two additional points), meaning that the E-FACED has nine points of growing severity. E-FACED presented an excellent prognostic capacity for exacerbations (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.82 for at least two exacerbations in 1 year and 0.87 for at least one hospitalization in 1 year) that was statistically better than that of the FACED score (0.72 and 0.78, P<0.05, respectively). The predictive capacities for all-cause and respiratory mortality were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively, with both being similar to those of the FACED. Conclusion E-FACED score significantly increases the FACED capacity to predict future yearly exacerbations while maintaining the

  12. Evaluation of a novel information resource for patients with bronchiectasis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hester, Katy L M; Newton, Julia; Rapley, Tim; De Soyza, Anthony

    2016-04-23

    There is currently little patient information on bronchiectasis, a chronic lung disease with rising prevalence. Previous work shows that patients and their families want more information, which could potentially improve their understanding and self-management. Using interviews and focus groups, we have co-developed a novel patient and carer information resource, aiming to meet their identified needs. The aims and objectives are: 1. To assess the potential impact of the information resource 2. To evaluate and refine the intervention 3. To establish the feasibility of carrying out a multi-centre randomised controlled trial to determine its effect on understanding, self-management and health outcomes This is a feasibility study, with a single-centre, randomised controlled trial design, comparing use of a novel patient information resource to usual care in bronchiectasis. Additionally, patients and carers will be invited to focus groups to discuss their views on both the intervention itself and the trial process. The study duration for each participant will be 3 months from the study entry date. A total of 70 patients will be recruited to the study, and a minimum of 30 will be randomised to each arm. Ten participants (and their carers if applicable) will be invited to attend focus groups on completion of the study visits. Participants will be adults with bronchiectasis diagnosed as per national bronchiectasis guidelines. Once consented, participants will be randomised to the intervention or control arm using random permuted blocks to ensure treatment group numbers are evenly balanced. Randomisation will be web-based. Those randomised to the intervention will receive the information resource (website and booklet) and instructions on its use. Outcome measures (resource satisfaction, resource use and alternative information seeking, quality of life questionnaires, unscheduled healthcare visits, exacerbation frequency, bronchiectasis knowledge questionnaire and lung

  13. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis: Your Genes, Your Health [yourgenesyourhealth.org] Multimedia educational site including screening and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. What is ...

  14. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to issue a television public service announcement (PSA). STARS PERFORM FOR SOLD-OUT AUDIENCE AT BROADWAY BELTS ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  15. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Frequency of common cystic fibrosis gene mutations in chronic bronchitis patients.

    PubMed

    Entzian, P; Müller, E; Boysen, A; Artlich, A; Schwinger, E; Schlaak, M

    1995-05-01

    It has been suggested that the delta F508 deletion, the most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, might be linked to chronic bronchial hypersecretion. We investigated whether such an association could be found in chronic bronchitis, since chronic bronchial hypersecretion is an important and specific element of chronic bronchitis. We screened 100 patients hospitalized for chronic bronchitis with six of the most frequently occurring CF gene mutations: delta F508, R553X, G542X, G551D, N1303K, and 621-1G-->T. Only one patient affected by chronic bronchitis and diffuse bronchiectasis was heterozygous for the deletion delta F508; no other mutations were found. This is not significantly different from the expected frequency of CF carriers in northern Europe, which is 1 in 25. Thus, no association between the most commonly occurring cystic fibrosis genes and chronic bronchitis is likely to exist and routine screening of patients without further signs of cystic fibrosis would seem to be of no benefit in northern Europe.

  17. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  19. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  20. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A ... strength to deal with cystic fibrosis. What Is CF? Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease that causes ...

  1. [A rare case of huge aspergilloma developed within a lesion of pulmonary fibrosis secondary with a systemic scleroderma in an immunocompetent patient in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rakotoson, J L; Vololontiana, H M D; Raherison, R E; Andrianasolo, R; Rakotomizao, J R; Randria, M J D; Rapelanoro, R F; Andrianarisoa, A C F; Rajaona, H R

    2011-12-01

    We report a rare case of a huge aspergilloma developed within a bronchiectasis due to pulling by a pulmonary fibrosis of systemic scleroderma. The patient is a 58-year-old woman presenting a deterioration of the general state associated with repeating hemoptysis, dyspnea, dysphagia, sclérodactylia, generalized cutaneous sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon. There was no antecedent pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient had a pulmonary arterial hypertension complicated by a chronic pulmonary heart at the stage of right cardiac decompensation. Aspergillosis serology was positive and the immunological assessment confirmed scleroderma. The computed tomography showed a huge oblong opacity in a small round bell shape ("signe du grelot", Monad's sign) in the left upper lobe developed within a bronchiectasis, and a bilateral pulmonary fibrosis. Although surgery remains the recommended treatment of an aspergilloma, the management of our patient was medical in front of contra-indication for surgery. The evolution was marked by repeating hemoptysis and stability of the pulmonary lesions 2 years later. The management of this entity remains difficult and complicated; the prognosis is in general unfavourable and depends at the same time on the evolution of scleroderma and the aspergilloma infection.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: retroperitoneal fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a disorder in which inflammation and extensive scar tissue (fibrosis) occur in the back of the abdominal ... the lower body, due to the development of scar tissue around blood vessels. The fibrosis usually develops first ...

  3. Immune mechanisms and the impact of the disrupted lung microbiome in chronic bacterial lung infection and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Reynolds, C J; Quigley, K J; Altmann, D M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies analysing immunogenetics and immune mechanisms controlling susceptibility to chronic bacterial infection in bronchiectasis implicate dysregulated immunity in conjunction with chronic bacterial infection. Bronchiectasis is a structural pathological end-point with many causes and disease associations. In about half of cases it is termed idiopathic, because it is of unknown aetiology. Bronchiectasis is proposed to result from a ‘vicious cycle’ of chronic bacterial infection and dysregulated inflammation. Paradoxically, both immune deficiency and excess immunity, either in the form of autoimmunity or excessive inflammatory activation, can predispose to disease. It appears to be a part of the spectrum of inflammatory, autoimmune and atopic conditions that have increased in prevalence through the 20th century, attributed variously to the hygiene hypothesis or the ‘missing microbiota’. Immunogenetic studies showing a strong association with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Cw*03 and HLA-C group 1 homozygosity and combinational analysis of HLA-C and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) genes suggests a shift towards activation of natural killer (NK) cells leading to lung damage. The association with HLA-DR1, DQ5 implicates a role for CD4 T cells, possibly operating through influence on susceptibility to specific pathogens. We hypothesize that disruption of the lung microbial ecosystem, by infection, inflammation and/or antibiotic therapy, creates a disturbed, simplified, microbial community (‘disrupted microbiota’) with downstream consequences for immune function. These events, acting with excessive NK cell activation, create a highly inflammatory lung environment that, in turn, permits the further establishment and maintenance of chronic infection dominated by microbial pathogens. This review discusses the implication of these concepts for the development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:23286938

  4. Severe obstructive disease: similarities and differences between smoker and non-smoker patients with COPD and/or bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Rezende Gonçalves, J; Corso Pereira, M; Figueiras Pedreira De Cerqueira, E M; Oliveira Magro, D; Mello Moreira, M; Paschoal, I A

    2013-01-01

    Poorly reversible airflow obstruction may or may not be related to smoking. To describe patients with severe obstructive lung disease including etiology, imaging, functional aspects, systemic manifestations, and the pattern of bronchodilator response. Sixty-eight patients (age 55.9±13.7 years, FEV(1) [forced expiratory volume in one second] 31.9±10.2% predicted) underwent spirometry, evaluation of body mass composition, 6-minute walk test, X-ray, thorax high-resolution CT scanning, and clinical evaluation. Of 68 patients enrolled, 37 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 31, extensive bronchiectasis. Among COPD patients the CT scans showed emphysema in 78.4%, and bronchiectasis in 48.6%. There were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers, except for vital capacity, significantly smaller in non-smokers (p<0.001). We found 29 and 20 volume responders (VR) according to Paré et al. (FEV(1)/FVC>1=flow responder or <1=VR) and ATS/ERS criteria, respectively. According to Paré et al. criteria, there were 18 patients with FEV(1)<30% predicted among 29 VR, and 12 with FEV(1)<30% predicted among 39 without volume response (p=0.0101). In patients with severe obstruction, smoking does not appear to be relevant in determining functional or systemic differences, and Paré et al. criteria can detect more VR. Bronchiectasis is a common finding in severe COPD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Adipocytokines and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Anania, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome pose significant risk for progression of many types of chronic illnesses, including liver disease. Hormones released from adipocytes, adipocytokines, associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, have been shown to control hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Hepatic fibrosis is the final common pathway that can result in cirrhosis, and can ultimately require liver transplantation. Initially, two key adipocytokines, leptin and adiponectin, appeared to control many fundamental aspects of the cell and molecular biology related to hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Leptin appears to act as a profibrogenic molecule while adiponectin possesses strong-anti-fibrotic properties. In this review, we emphasize pertinent data associated with these, and recently discovered, adipocytokines that may drive or halt the fibrogenic response in the liver. PMID:25656826

  6. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  7. Longitudinal Nasopharyngeal Carriage and Antibiotic Resistance of Respiratory Bacteria in Indigenous Australian and Alaska Native Children with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Kim M.; Singleton, Rosalyn J.; Grimwood, Keith; Valery, Patricia C.; Cheng, Allen C.; Morris, Peter S.; Leach, Amanda J.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C.; Chatfield, Mark; Redding, Greg; Reasonover, Alisa L.; McCallum, Gabrielle B.; Chikoyak, Lori; McDonald, Malcolm I.; Brown, Ngiare; Torzillo, Paul J.; Chang, Anne B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Indigenous children in Australia and Alaska have very high rates of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD)/bronchiectasis. Antibiotics, including frequent or long-term azithromycin in Australia and short-term beta-lactam therapy in both countries, are often prescribed to treat these patients. In the Bronchiectasis Observational Study we examined over several years the nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic resistance of respiratory bacteria in these two PCV7-vaccinated populations. Methods Indigenous children aged 0.5–8.9 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis from remote Australia (n = 79) and Alaska (n = 41) were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2004–8. At scheduled study visits until 2010 antibiotic use in the preceding 2-weeks was recorded and nasopharyngeal swabs collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Analysis of respiratory bacterial carriage and antibiotic resistance was by baseline and final swabs, and total swabs by year. Results Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage changed little over time. In contrast, carriage of Haemophilus influenzae declined and Staphylococcus aureus increased (from 0% in 2005–6 to 23% in 2010 in Alaskan children); these changes were associated with increasing age. Moraxella catarrhalis carriage declined significantly in Australian, but not Alaskan, children (from 64% in 2004–6 to 11% in 2010). While beta-lactam antibiotic use was similar in the two cohorts, Australian children received more azithromycin. Macrolide resistance was significantly higher in Australian compared to Alaskan children, while H. influenzae beta-lactam resistance was higher in Alaskan children. Azithromycin use coincided significantly with reduced carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, but increased carriage of S. aureus and macrolide-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (proportion of carriers and all swabs), in a ‘cumulative dose-response’ relationship. Conclusions

  8. Genetic Characterization of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Isolated during Ciprofloxacin Therapy from a Patient with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; Ferrandiz, María-José; Tubau, Fe; Pallarés, Román; Manresa, Federico; Liñares, Josefina

    2003-01-01

    Five Spain9V-3 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from a patient with bronchiectasis who had received long-term ciprofloxacin therapy. One ciprofloxacin-susceptible strain was isolated before treatment, and four ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were isolated during treatment. The resistant strains were derived from the susceptible strain either by a parC mutation (low-level resistance) or by parC and gyrA mutations (high-level resistance). This study shows that ciprofloxacin therapy in a patient colonized by susceptible S. pneumoniae may select fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. PMID:12654682

  9. Genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated during ciprofloxacin therapy from a patient with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    de la Campa, Adela G; Ferrandiz, María-José; Tubau, Fe; Pallarés, Román; Manresa, Federico; Liñares, Josefina

    2003-04-01

    Five Spain(9V-3) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from a patient with bronchiectasis who had received long-term ciprofloxacin therapy. One ciprofloxacin-susceptible strain was isolated before treatment, and four ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were isolated during treatment. The resistant strains were derived from the susceptible strain either by a parC mutation (low-level resistance) or by parC and gyrA mutations (high-level resistance). This study shows that ciprofloxacin therapy in a patient colonized by susceptible S. pneumoniae may select fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants.

  10. Antioxidants in cystic fibrosis ☆ Conclusions from the CF Antioxidant Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, November 11-12, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, André M.; White, Terry B.; Cross, Carroll E.; Forman, Henry Jay; Sokol, Ronald J.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2009-01-01

    Although great strides are being made in the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), this condition remains the most common fatal hereditary disease in North America. Numerous links exist between progression of CF lung disease and oxidative stress. The defect in CF is the loss of function of the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein; recent evidence that CFTR expression and function are modulated by oxidative stress suggests that the loss may result in a poor adaptive response to oxidants. Pancreatic insufficiency in CF also increases susceptibility to deficiencies in lipophilic antioxidants. Finally the airway infection and inflammatory processes in the CF lung are potential sources of oxidants that can affect normal airway physiology and contribute to the mechanisms causing characteristic changes associated with bronchiectasis and loss of lung function. These multiple abnormalities in the oxidant/antioxidant balance raise several possibilities for therapeutic interventions that must be carefully assessed. PMID:17157190

  11. Assessment of the quantity of microorganisms associated with bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage after periodontal treatment: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Erika Horácio; Longo, Priscila Larcher; de Camargo, Caroline Cristina Batista; Dal Corso, Simone; Lanza, Fernanda De Cordoba; Stelmach, Rafael; Athanazio, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between periodontal disease (PD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been widely studied, with aspiration of periodontal pathogens being one of the most accepted causal mechanisms for pulmonary exacerbation. Periodontal treatment (PT) was associated with a decrease in these exacerbations. Bronchiectasis is a pulmonary disease that has many similarities to COPD; however, there are no studies correlating this condition to PD thus far. This study will evaluate if PT reduces proinflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva, as well as halitosis and the amount of microorganisms associated with exacerbation of bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage 3 months after PT. Methods and analysis A total of 182 patients with PD and bronchiectasis will be randomly allocated to group 1 (positive control; scaling and root planing (SRP)+oral hygiene (OH)) or group 2 (experimental; SRP+photodynamic therapy+OH). After 3 months, samples of saliva, nasal lavage and sputum will be collected to determine the level of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Porphyromonas gingivalis by quantitative PCR. This protocol will determine the efficacy of PT in reducing the most likely niches of bronchiectasis exacerbation by comparing pre- and post-treatment microbiology samples. Furthermore, there will be assessment of oral halitosis and verification of inflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of Universidade Nove de Julho. Data will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number NCT02514226. PMID:27084279

  12. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease.

  13. [Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic disorder characterized histopathologically by a pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, with heterogeneous and mutilating interstitial fibrosis with foci of proliferating fibroblasts, honeycomb lung, and little if any inflammation. The diagnosis is based on a pluridisciplinary analysis of the clinical symptoms, the chest high-resolution computerized tomography features, and pathology on video-thoracoscopic lung biopsy when indicated. In half of the cases, the typical tomodensitometric pattern allows to make a confident diagnosis without a lung biopsy. The median survival is only about 3 years and is presently not improved by any treatment. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (antioxydant) in association with corticosteroids and azathioprine may slightly reduce the rate of functional worsening. Clinical trials are in progress to improve the treatment of this still incurable disease.

  14. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  15. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  16. High rhinovirus burden in lower airways of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kieninger, Elisabeth; Singer, Florian; Tapparel, Caroline; Alves, Marco P; Latzin, Philipp; Tan, Hui-Leng; Bossley, Cara; Casaulta, Carmen; Bush, Andrew; Davies, Jane C; Kaiser, Laurent; Regamey, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Rhinovirus (RV)-induced pulmonary exacerbations are common in cystic fibrosis (CF) and have been associated with impaired virus clearance by the CF airway epithelium in vitro. Here, we assess in vivo the association of RV prevalence and load with antiviral defense mechanisms, airway inflammation, and lung function parameters in children with CF compared with a control group and children with other chronic respiratory diseases. RV presence and load were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in BAL samples and were related to antiviral and inflammatory mediators measured in BAL and to clinical parameters. BAL samples were obtained from children with CF (n = 195), non-CF bronchiectasis (n = 40), or asthma (n = 29) and from a control group (n = 35) at a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 8.2 (4.0-11.7) years. RV was detected in 73 samples (24.4%). RV prevalence was similar among groups. RV load (median [IQR] x 10(3) copies/mL) was higher in children with CF (143.0 [13.1-1530.0]), especially during pulmonary exacerbations, compared with children with asthma (3.0 [1.3-25.8], P = .006) and the control group (0.5 [0.3-0.5], P < .001), but similar to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis (122.1 [2.7-4423.5], P = not significant). In children with CF, RV load was negatively associated with interferon (IFN)- b and IFN- l , IL-1ra levels, and FEV 1 , and positively with levels of the cytokines CXCL8 and CXCL10. RV load in CF BAL is high, especially during exacerbated lung disease. Impaired production of antiviral mediators may lead to the high RV burden in the lower airways of children with CF. Whether high RV load is a cause or a consequence of inflammation needs further investigation in longitudinal studies.

  17. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  19. [Computed tomography in evaluating the development of different types of pulmonary fibrosis in patients with interstitial lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Speranskaya, A A; Novikova, L N; Baranova, O P; Dvorakovskaya, I V; Kameneva, M Yu; Amosova, N A

    2015-01-01

    to assess the favorable and unfavorable types of lung tissue fibrotic changes in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) detected by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). MATERIAL AND METHODS. The results of examinations were analyzed in 385 patients: 181 with respiratory organ sarcoidosis, 130 with fibrosing alveolitis, 36 with histiocytosis X, and 38 with lymphangiolciomyomatosis. All the patients underwent HRCT; the data were compared with the results of comprehensive functional study of external respiration (CFSER), histological examination (in 70.1%), and the pattern of the disease. Comparison of the clinical and functional course of ILD with the types of lung tissue fibrotic changes detected by HRCT and morphological examination showed that the favorable types of pulmonary fibrosis included stringy central and peripheral interstitial fibrotic changes and the atelectatic type of fibrosis, the occurrence of which failed to affect the development of obvious perfusion and diffusion disorders and to give rise to respiratory failure. The unfavorable types of pulmonary fibrosis included the peripheral pulmonary interstitial fibrotic changes (acinar fibrosis, honeycomb lung), which led to restrictive changes and perfusion disorders, which were accompanied by significant respiratory failure, decreases in quality of life and survival, as well as fibrotic changes in the walls of long-lasting air-containing cysts and a fibrotic Aevity mass that resulted Ind complications (pulmonary hemorrhage, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum). The type of pulmonary fibrosis development is one of the major prognostic criteria for he course of ILD. HRCT makes it possible to assess its clinical picture as a whole and to reveal the type of development of fibrotic changes, their extent, the degree of involvement of the tracheobronchial tree in the process (formation of different types of bronchiectasis), concomitant extrapulmonary changes that may be clinically and

  20. Cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Mary C.; Nelson, R.; Anderson, Charlotte M.

    1973-01-01

    Two children, unrelated, in whom cystic fibrosis had been diagnosed at the ages of 14 weeks and 10 months, respectively, were found subsequently to suffer from coeliac disease as well. Both children are responding well to dietary gluten withdrawal and to conventional treatment for cystic fibrosis. It is suggested that cystic fibrosis may predispose to the development of coeliac disease. Therefore, jejunal biopsy may be a useful investigation in the occasional child with cystic fibrosis, who presents with unusual features, and who fails to thrive as well as expected. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4517654

  1. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  2. Increased Mortality from Lung Cancer and Bronchiectasis in Young Adults after Exposure to Arsenic in Utero and in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan H.; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Ferreccio, Catterina; Liaw, Jane; von Ehrenstein, Ondine; Steinmaus, Craig; Bates, Michael N.; Selvin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is an established cause of lung cancer, and preliminary evidence suggests that ingested arsenic may also cause nonmalignant lung disease. Antofagasta is the second largest city in Chile and had a distinct period of very high arsenic exposure that began in 1958 and lasted until 1971, when an arsenic removal plant was installed. This unique exposure scenario provides a rare opportunity to investigate the long-term mortality impact of early-life arsenic exposure. In this study, we compared mortality rates in Antofagasta in the period 1989–2000 with those of the rest of Chile, focusing on subjects who were born during or just before the peak exposure period and who were 30–49 years of age at the time of death. For the birth cohort born just before the high-exposure period (1950–1957) and exposed in early childhood, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer was 7.0 [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.4–8.9; p < 0.001] and the SMR for bronchiectasis was 12.4 (95% CI, 3.3–31.7; p < 0.001). For those born during the high-exposure period (1958–1970) with probable exposure in utero and early childhood, the corresponding SMRs were 6.1 (95% CI, 3.5–9.9; p < 0.001) for lung cancer and 46.2 (95% CI, 21.1–87.7; p < 0.001) for bronchiectasis. These findings suggest that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has pronounced pulmonary effects, greatly increasing subsequent mortality in young adults from both malignant and nonmalignant lung disease. PMID:16882542

  3. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation.

  4. The efficiency of sputum cell counts in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Lata; Labiris, N Renee; Efthimiadis, Ann; Vlachos-Mayer, Helen; Hargreave, Frederick E; Freitag, Andreas P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Technical factors relating to processing viscid sputum in cystic fibrosis (CF) and their influence on the reproducibility and validity of cell counts need to be evaluated. In addition, the methods need to be standardized so that they can be applied clinically and in research. OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficiency, reliability and validity of processing small volumes of spontaneously expectorated sputum from subjects with CF. METHODS: Sputum was collected from adults with CF (n=35) and compared with sputum from adults with infective bronchitis or bronchiectasis (IB/B) (n=16), or with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AS/COPD) (n=25). Selected sputum (100 mg to 200 mg) was processed with dithiothreitol (0.1%) and filtered. Total cell count (TCC) and viability were obtained in a counting chamber and cytospins were prepared and stained with Wright’s for a differential cell count. Sputum and filter remnant were processed for TCC, viability and differential cell count, and the efficiency was determined by comparing the mean loss in cell yield to the filter. Two different portions from the same sputum sample were processed for cell counts to determine reproducibility. Results were compared with those from IB/B and AS/COPD groups. RESULTS: Efficiency of cell dispersal was excellent and similar to that in AS/COPD and IB/B groups. Reproducibility of cell counts from two portions of a sputum sample was high (R≥0.80). CF sputum demonstrated a raised TCC and neutrophilia similar to IB/B but significantly higher than AS/COPD. CONCLUSION: The selection method of evaluating cell counts in viscid CF sputum is efficient, reproducible and valid. PMID:17372637

  5. Longitudinal evaluation of bronchopulmonary disease in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; Li, Zhanhai; Kosorok, Michael R; Laxova, Anita; Green, Christopher G; Collins, Jannette; Lai, Hui-Chuan; Makholm, Linda M; Rock, Michael J; Splaingard, Mark L

    2003-09-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) develop bronchopulmonary disease at variable ages. Determining the epidemiology of chronic lung disease and quantifying its severity, however, have been difficult in infants and young children. As part of the Wisconsin CF Neonatal Screening Project, we were presented with an ideal opportunity to assess longitudinally the evolution of symptoms, signs, and quantitative measures of CF respiratory disease. After newborn screening test results led to early recognition, 64 patients diagnosed at a median age of 6.71 weeks were enrolled and studied systematically at a median age of 11.3 years to obtain clinical information, chest radiographs, and pulmonary function tests. Our observations revealed that a frequent cough by history is evident by 10.5 months of age in half the patients. Quantitative chest radiology (CXR scoring) demonstrated that potentially irreversible abnormalities are present in half the children by 2 years. The severity of Wisconsin and Brasfield CXR scores increased in association with respiratory infections. Longitudinal progression of Wisconsin CXR scores was related to age (P < 0.001), pancreatic insufficiency (P = 0.005), and respiratory secretion cultures positive for Staphylococus aureas (P = 0.039). In contrast, serial spirometry showed limited sensitivity, as did lung volume determinations; neither was satisfactory as repeated measures with acceptable quality control until after 7 years of age. Time to event analyses revealed that half the patients had % predicted FEF(25-75) and FEV(1)/FVC values greater than 80% until 10.7 and 9.9 years, respectively. We conclude that of the methods evaluated, quantitative chest radiology is currently the best procedure for frequent assessment of bronchopulmonary disease in CF, and that radiographic progression is evident in approximately 85% of patients by 5 years of age. Our results also suggest that bronchiectasis and other radiographic evidence of chronic infection are

  6. Statins and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin-Fu; Washko, George R.; Nakahira, Kiichi; Hatabu, Hiroto; Patel, Avignat S.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Ross, James C.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Li, Hui-Ping; Qu, Jie-Ming; Himes, Blanca E.; Come, Carolyn E.; D'Aco, Katherine; Martinez, Fernando J.; Han, MeiLan K.; Lynch, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Morse, Danielle; Ryter, Stefan W.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in the development or progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) is controversial. Objectives: To evaluate the association between statin use and ILD. Methods: We used regression analyses to evaluate the association between statin use and interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in a large cohort of smokers from COPDGene. Next, we evaluated the effect of statin pretreatment on bleomycin-induced fibrosis in mice and explored the mechanism behind these observations in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: In COPDGene, 38% of subjects with ILA were taking statins compared with 27% of subjects without ILA. Statin use was positively associated in ILA (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–2.50; P = 0.04) after adjustment for covariates including a history of high cholesterol or coronary artery disease. This association was modified by the hydrophilicity of statin and the age of the subject. Next, we demonstrate that statin administration aggravates lung injury and fibrosis in bleomycin-treated mice. Statin pretreatment enhances caspase-1–mediated immune responses in vivo and in vitro; the latter responses were abolished in bone marrow–derived macrophages isolated from Nlrp3−/− and Casp1−/− mice. Finally, we provide further insights by demonstrating that statins enhance NLRP3-inflammasome activation by increasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation in macrophages. Conclusions: Statin use is associated with ILA among smokers in the COPDGene study and enhances bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in the mouse through a mechanism involving enhanced NLRP3-inflammasome activation. Our findings suggest that statins may influence the susceptibility to, or progression of, ILD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00608764). PMID:22246178

  7. Cytokines and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Phan, S H

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, significant progress in many aspects of pulmonary fibrosis research has been made. Among them, the finding that a variety of cytokines play important roles in the complex process appears most intriguing. These cytokines include at least transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factors, (TGF-alpha), interleukin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. These cytokines have been demonstrated to be produced at the sites of active fibrosis where they appear to be expressed by activated inflammatory cells, such as macrophages and eosinophils. More interestingly, other noninflammatory lung cells including mesenchymal cells, such as myofibroblasts, and epithelial cells, have been found to be significant sources as well, albeit in most instances at somewhat different time points than those by inflammatory cells. Study of the individual cytokines in vitro has revealed a variety of potential roles for these cytokines in the regulation of the fibrotic process in vivo, including chemoattractant, mitogenic activities for fibroblasts, stimulation of extracellular matrix and alpha-smooth muscle actin gene expression, alteration of the contractile phenotype of fibroblasts and regulation of diverse functions of lung inflammatory and epithelial cells which can further impact on the fibrotic process by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Of these cytokines, it appears that TGF-beta is probably the most important cytokine in terms of the direct stimulation of lung matrix expression which typifies fibrosis. Recently however, there is accumulating evidence to indicate that the situation is much more complex than any one single cytokine being solely responsible for the fibrotic response. The concept of complex lung cytokine networks, orchestrated by a few key cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, being responsible for this response has

  8. Screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, J A; Ryley, H C

    1982-01-01

    Practicable methods are now available for whole population screening of neonates for cystic fibrosis. Although diagnosis and treatment of the disease from birth has not yet been unequivocally shown to improve prognosis, existing evidence suggests that this is likely. Further ethical reasons are proposed in support of neonatal diagnosis and early treatment. The development of tests for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection is under active investigation, and raises ethical problems for heterozygotes and their medical advisers. The heavy financial and emotional burden this disease imposes on the patient and the family should not be underestimated when policy decisions are made. PMID:7138066

  9. Cystic fibrosis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Katz, Eliot S

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently observed in cystic fibrosis (CF). The resultant sleep fragmentation, short sleep duration, and gas-exchange abnormalities are postulated to contribute to the neurocognitive, cardiovascular, and metabolic abnormalities associated with CF. There are no outcomes data to establish the optimal procedure for screening and treating CF patients for sleep-related respiratory abnormalities. Therapy with supplemental oxygen and bilevel ventilation are widely considered to be effective in the short term, but there are few evidence-based data to support long-term improvements in morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cavallini, L; Abaterusso, C; Bedogna, V; Pertica, N; Loschiavo, C; Lupo, A

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a new, rare, and severe disease occurring in patients with renal failure who have been exposed to gadolinium. The pathogenesis of NSF is not completely known. In fact, the first warning about a significant relationship between NSF and gadolinium (a contrast medium used in magnetic resonance imaging) was only issued in 2006. No cases of NSF have been reported in Italy to date. A nationwide investigation should therefore be carried out to assess the real prevalence of NSF within the Italian uremic population. Furthermore, we need guidelines to reduce the risk of NSF in renal patients undergoing MRI with contrast medium.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Print A A A What's in this article? ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  12. Oxaliplatin-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arpan; Udwadia, Zarir F.; Almel, Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been approved for use as an adjuvant treatment in stage III colorectal carcinoma by the US-FDA. The majority of toxicity caused by this drug is manageable. However, rare, isolated cases of pulmonary fibrosis induced by this drug have been reported in literature. We report one such case of rapidly evolving pulmonary fibrosis following treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:20838550

  13. Combined mediastinal and retroperitoneal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, H. W.

    1968-01-01

    A case of combined idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis and retroperitoneal fibrosis is described. It is possibly the twelfth case to be reported during life. A review of the literature reveals the `ubiquity' of localized collagenosis and the trend of opinion as regards aetiology and treatment. Images PMID:5654073

  14. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition A A A What's in this article? CF ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid and renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pradère, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Julien; Klein, Julie; Valet, Philippe; Grès, Sandra; Salant, David; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Schanstra, Joost P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The development of fibrosis involves a multitude of events and molecules. Until now the majority of these molecules were found to be proteins or peptides. But recent data show significant involvement of the phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the development of pulmonary, liver and renal fibrosis. The latest data on the role of LPA and the G-protein-coupled LPA1 receptor in the development of renal fibrosis will be discussed. LPA1 receptor-activation was found to be associated with increased vascular leakage and increased fibroblast recruitment in pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, in renal fibrosis LPA1 receptor-activation stimulates macrophage recruitment and connective tissue growth factor expression. The observations make this receptor an interesting alternative and new therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:18455518

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid and renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pradère, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Julien; Klein, Julie; Valet, Philippe; Grès, Sandra; Salant, David; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Schanstra, Joost P

    2008-09-01

    The development of fibrosis involves a multitude of events and molecules. Until now the majority of these molecules were found to be proteins or peptides. But recent data show significant involvement of the phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the development of pulmonary, liver and renal fibrosis. The latest data on the role of LPA and the G-protein-coupled LPA1 receptor in the development of renal fibrosis will be discussed. LPA1-receptor activation was found to be associated with increased vascular leakage and increased fibroblast recruitment in pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, in renal fibrosis LPA1-receptor activation stimulates macrophage recruitment and connective tissue growth factor expression. The observations make this receptor an interesting alternative and new therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases.

  17. Management strategies for liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Altamirano-Barrera, Alejandra; Barranco-Fragoso, Beatriz; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis resulting from chronic liver injury are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Among causes of hepatic fibrosis, viral infection is most common (hepatitis B and C). In addition, obesity rates worldwide have accelerated the risk of liver injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Also liver fibrosis is associated with the consumption of alcohol, or autoimmune hepatitis and chronic cholangiophaties. The response of hepatocytes to inflammation plays a decisive role in the physiopathology of hepatic fibrosis, which involves the recruitment of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cells such as monocytes and macrophages. As well as the production of other cytokines and chemokines, which increase the stimulus of hepatic stellate cells by activating proinflammatory cells. The aim of this review is to identify the therapeutic options available for the treatment of the liver fibrosis, enabling the prevention of progression when is detected in time.

  18. Spirometer-triggered high-resolution computed tomography and pulmonary function measurements during an acute exacerbation in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T E; Leung, A N; Northway, W H; Blankenberg, F G; Bloch, D A; Oehlert, J W; Al-Dabbagh, H; Hubli, S; Moss, R B

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate a high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scoring system, clinical parameters, and pulmonary function measurements in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) before and after therapy for a pulmonary exacerbation. Patients (n = 17) were evaluated by spirometer-triggered HRCT imaging, clinical parameters, and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) before and after treatment. HRCT scans were reviewed by 3 radiologists using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, and air trapping were identified in all subjects on initial evaluation. The initial total HRCT score correlated significantly with the Brasfield score (r = -.91, P <.001) and several PFT measures. After treatment, there were improvements in the acute change clinical score (ACCS) (P <.001), most pulmonary function measurements, and total HRCT score (P <.05). Bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, and air trapping did not significantly change. Mucus plugging subcomponent HRCT score, slow vital capacity (SVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), and forced vital capacity (FVC) (percent predicted) and reversible and total HRCT scores were most sensitive to change by effect size analysis. Improvements occurred with treatment in total and reversible HRCT scores, PFTs, and ACCS. Total and reversible HRCT scores and percent predicted SVC, FEV1, and FVC were the most sensitive to change. The greatest change was seen in the mucus plugging subcomponent HRCT score.

  19. Cystic fibrosis since 1938.

    PubMed

    Davis, Pamela B

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) was distinguished from celiac disease in 1938. Then, it was a pathologic diagnosis, life expectancy was approximately 6 months, and the autosomal recessive disease was believed to arise from abnormal mucus plugging exocrine ducts. Death often occurred from lung infection. Discovery of the sweat electrolyte defect in 1953 and standardization of the sweat test in 1959 allowed identification of milder cases, and CF was no longer considered only a disorder of mucus. In 1955, establishment of centers with programs of aggressive, comprehensive care initiated striking improvement in longevity. The pillars of care established then (attention to nutrition, airway clearance, treatment of lung infection) remain today. In 1983, chloride transport was identified as the basic physiologic CF defect, accompanied by increased sodium reabsorption. In 1980, we learned that inflammation contributes independently to lung disease and constitutes an independent therapeutic target. In 1989, the discovery of the CF gene demonstrated the basic defect to be in a cAMP-regulated chloride channel. This afforded new diagnostic tests, opportunities for research, and prospects for using the gene as therapy. Since then, substantial advances in basic and clinical research catalyzed therapeutic improvements: median survival age now exceeds 30 years. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation center network provides not only opportunity to conduct clinical trials but also means to disseminate new therapies. In the future, treatments directed at the basic defect can be expected, with concomitant improvements in morbidity and mortality.

  20. Cystic fibrosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Gerardo; Aznarez, Isabel; Crispino, Beatriz; Mimbacas, Adriana; Martínez, Liria; Poggio, Rossana; Zielenski, Julian; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Cardoso, Horacio

    2002-03-31

    We conducted clinical and genetic analyses of 52 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Uruguay, which is about half of the known affected individuals in the country. A relatively high proportion had a mild presentation, characterized by pancreatic sufficiency (28%), a strong pulmonary component (97%), and borderline sweat electrolyte measurements (25%). Mutational analysis of CF chromosomes demonstrated a relatively low incidence of the DeltaF508 allele (40%) and a large number of other cystic fibrosis conductance regulator mutations, with an overall detection rate of about 71%. Fifteen different mutations were detected in our patients: DeltaF508, G542X, R1162X, G85E, N1303K, R334W, R75Q, R74W, D1270N, W1282X, DeltaI507, 2789+5G-->A, R1066C, -816C/T, R553X, as well as RNA splicing variant IVS8-5T. This group of Uruguayan CF patients has some characteristics in common with other populations of similar origin (Hispanics), as well as some unique characteristics.

  1. [Idiopathic lung fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L; Geldszus, R; Molitor, S J

    1990-02-01

    In a 39-year-old patient with chronic progressive idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the genetic aspects, course and therapeutic possibilities of the disease are discussed. In February, 1987, the English-born patient, Anthony V., attended for initial examination on account of progressive dyspnoea, on which occasion radiology and pulmonary function analysis revealed advanced pulmonary fibrosis. The patient's family history revealed a familial genesis, since both his father (?) and his sister had died of this disease. A comparative of the patient's chest films with original chest films of his sister revealed almost identical findings. Within the previous twelve months, follow-up examinations done on A.V. revealed an increase in the restrictive component (reduction of vital capacity from 2,400 ml to 1,500 ml), development of partial respiratory failure at rest, and global respiratory failure in response to mild ergometric exercise despite intermittent high-dose steroid administrations superimposed on long-term, low-dose steroid therapy. The unfavourable evolution observed over the past 12 months is underscored by an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure from 18 mmHg initially to a present 34 mmHg at rest, and 46 mmHg under submaximal ergometric loading. The only option still left to the patient is the possibility of a lung transplantation, which - probably initially unilateral - is scheduled to be carried out in the near future at the Chest Surgery Department of the Medical University at Hannover.

  2. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness.

  3. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Burstein, Sumner H

    2016-11-01

    Cannabinoids apparently act on inflammation through mechanisms different from those of agents such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As a class, the cannabinoids are generally free from the adverse effects associated with NSAIDs. Their clinical development thus provides a new approach to treatment of diseases characterized by acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis. A concise survey of the anti-inflammatory actions of the phytocannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, cannabichromene, and cannabinol is presented. Mention is also made of the noncannabinoid plant components and pyrolysis products, followed by a discussion of 3 synthetic preparations-Cesamet (nabilone; Meda Pharmaceuticals, Somerset, NJ, USA), Marinol (dronabinol; THC; AbbVie, Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA), and Sativex (Cannabis extract; GW Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge United Kingdom)-that have anti-inflammatory effects. A fourth synthetic cannabinoid, ajulemic acid (AJA; CT-3; Resunab; Corbus Pharmaceuticals, Norwood, MA, USA), is discussed in greater detail because it represents the most recent advance in this area and is currently undergoing 3 phase 2 clinical trials by Corbus Pharmaceuticals. The endogenous cannabinoids, including the closely related lipoamino acids, are then discussed. The review concludes with a presentation of a possible mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic actions of these substances. Thus, several cannabinoids may be considered candidates for development as anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic agents. Of special interest is their possible use for treatment of chronic inflammation, a major unmet medical need.-Zurier, R. B., Burstein, S. H. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis. © FASEB.

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN SEDATION AND GENERAL ANESTHESIA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CANINE IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS IN WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIERS.

    PubMed

    Roels, Elodie; Couvreur, Thierry; Farnir, Frédéric; Clercx, Cécile; Verschakelen, Johny; Bolen, Géraldine

    2017-02-23

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive interstitial lung disease mainly affecting West Highland white terriers. Thoracic high-resolution computed tomographic (T-HRCT) findings for Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis acquired under general anesthesia have been described previously. However, the use of general anesthesia may be contraindicated for some affected dogs. Sedation may allow improved speed and safety, but it is unknown whether sedation would yield similar results in identification and grading of Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions. The aim of this prospective, observational, method-comparison, case-control study was to compare findings from T-HRCT images acquired under sedation versus general anesthesia for West Highland white terriers affected with Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 9), using the glossary of terms of the Fleischner Society and a scoring system. Ground-glass opacity was identified in all affected West Highland white terriers for both sedation and general anesthesia acquisitions, although the Ground-glass opacity extent varied significantly between the two acquisitions (P < 0.001). Ground-glass opacity was the sole lesion observed in control dogs (n = 6), but was less extensive compared with affected West Highland white terriers. Identification and grading of a mosaic attenuation pattern differed significantly between acquisitions (P < 0.001). Identification of lesions such as consolidations, nodules, parenchymal and subpleural bands, bronchial wall thickening, and bronchiectasis did not differ between acquisitions. The present study demonstrated that T-HRCT obtained under sedation may provide different information than T-HRCT obtained under general anesthesia for identification and grading of some Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions, but not all of them. These differences should be taken into consideration when general anesthesia is contraindicated and sedation is

  5. Challenges in pulmonary fibrosis · 2 : Bronchiolocentric fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Jean‐François

    2007-01-01

    Bronchiolocentric fibrosis is essentially represented by the pathological pattern of constrictive fibrotic bronchiolitis obliterans. The corresponding clinical condition (obliterative bronchiolitis) is characterised by dyspnoea, airflow obstruction at lung function testing and air trapping with characteristic mosaic features on expiratory high resolution CT scans. Bronchiolitis obliterans may result from many causes including acute diffuse bronchiolar damage after inhalation of toxic gases or fumes, alloimmune chronic processes after lung or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or connective tissue disease (especially rheumatoid arthritis). Airway‐centred interstitial fibrosis and bronchiolar metaplasia are other features of bronchiolocentric fibrosis. PMID:17600295

  6. Assessment of the quantity of microorganisms associated with bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage after periodontal treatment: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Erika Horácio; Longo, Priscila Larcher; de Camargo, Caroline Cristina Batista; Dal Corso, Simone; Lanza, Fernanda De Cordoba; Stelmach, Rafael; Athanazio, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini

    2016-04-15

    The association between periodontal disease (PD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been widely studied, with aspiration of periodontal pathogens being one of the most accepted causal mechanisms for pulmonary exacerbation. Periodontal treatment (PT) was associated with a decrease in these exacerbations. Bronchiectasis is a pulmonary disease that has many similarities to COPD; however, there are no studies correlating this condition to PD thus far. This study will evaluate if PT reduces proinflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva, as well as halitosis and the amount of microorganisms associated with exacerbation of bronchiectasis in saliva, sputum and nasal lavage 3 months after PT. A total of 182 patients with PD and bronchiectasis will be randomly allocated to group 1 (positive control; scaling and root planing (SRP)+oral hygiene (OH)) or group 2 (experimental; SRP+photodynamic therapy+OH). After 3 months, samples of saliva, nasal lavage and sputum will be collected to determine the level of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Porphyromonas gingivalis by quantitative PCR. This protocol will determine the efficacy of PT in reducing the most likely niches of bronchiectasis exacerbation by comparing pre- and post-treatment microbiology samples. Furthermore, there will be assessment of oral halitosis and verification of inflammatory cytokines in serum and saliva. This protocol has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of Universidade Nove de Julho. Data will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. NCT02514226. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Effects of ELTGOL and Flutter VRP1® on the dynamic and static pulmonary volumes and on the secretion clearance of patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Fernando S; Moço, Vanessa J R; Menezes, Sara L S; Dias, Cristina M; Salles, Raquel E B; Lopes, Agnaldo J

    2012-04-01

    Although respiratory physical therapy is considered fundamental in the treatment of hypersecretive patients, there is little evidence of its physiological and therapeutic effects in bronchiectasis patients. To evaluate the acute physiological effects of ELTGOL and Flutter VRP1® in dynamic and static lung volumes in patients with bronchiectasis and, secondarily, to study the effect of these techniques in sputum elimination. Patients with clinical and radiological diagnosis of bronchiectasis were included. Patients underwent three interventions in a randomized order and with a one-week washout interval between them. Before all interventions patients inhaled two puffs of 100 mcg of salbutamol. There was a cough period of five minutes before and after the control protocol and the interventions (ELTGOL and Flutter VRP1®). After each cough series patients underwent assessments of dynamic and static lung volumes by spirometry and plethysmography. The expectorated secretions were collected during the interventions and during the second cough series, and quantified by its dry weight. We studied 10 patients, two males and eight females (mean age: 55.9±18.1 years). After using Flutter VRP1®and ELTGOL there was a significant decrease in residual volume (RV), functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) (p<0.05). There was a higher sputum production during ELTGOL compared with Control and Flutter VRP1® (p<0.05). The ELTGOL and Flutter VRP1® techniques acutely reduced lung hyperinflation, but only the ELTGOL increased the removal of pulmonary secretions from patients with bronchiectasis.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Kamp, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as an important molecular mechanism underlying fibrosis in a variety of organs, including the lungs. However, the causal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) released from environmental exposures and inflammatory / interstitial cells in mediating fibrosis as well as how best to target an imbalance in ROS production in patients with fibrosis are not firmly established. We focus on the role of ROS in pulmonary fibrosis and, where possible, highlight overlapping molecular pathways in other organs. The key origins of oxidative stress in pulmonary fibrosis (e.g. environmental toxins, mitochondria / NADPH oxidase of inflammatory and lung target cells, and depletion of antioxidant defenses) are reviewed. The role of alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways are examined. We emphasize an emerging role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pulmonary fibrosis. After briefly summarizing how ROS trigger a DNA damage response, we concentrate on recent studies implicating a role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair mechanisms focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) as well as crosstalk between ROS production, mtDNA damage, p53, Ogg1, and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2). Finally, the association between ROS and TGF-β1-induced fibrosis is discussed. Novel insights into the molecular basis of ROS-induced pulmonary diseases and, in particular, lung epithelial cell death may promote the development of unique therapeutic targets for managing pulmonary fibrosis as well as fibrosis in other organs and tumors, and in aging; diseases for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23219955

  9. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  10. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  11. Pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kioumis, Ioannis P.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is recognized as a common and life-threatening complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, especially in those who are infected with P. aeruginosa, B. cepacia or Aspergillus, need enteral feeding, are diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), developed massive hemoptysis, and their respiratory function is seriously compromised. Structural impairment and altered airflow dynamics in the lungs of CF patients are considered as the main predisposing factors, but also inhaled medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) could increase the risk of pneumothorax. Clinical presentation could range from dramatic to very mild. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax occurring to patients with CF is essentially similar to that for non-CF patients. Therapeutic options include intercostal tube drainage, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and medical or surgical pleurodesis. Pneumothorax increases both short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in CF patients and causes significant deterioration of their quality of life. PMID:25337406

  12. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  13. Proline-Glycine-Proline (PGP) and High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB1): Potential Mediators of Cystic Fibrosis Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gaggar, Amit; Rowe, Steven M; Matthew, Hardision; Blalock, J Edwin

    2010-03-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung disease characterized by an unrelenting neutrophil-predominant airway inflammatory response. This inflammation leads to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and eventually to the development of bronchiectasis. While many components of the immune response in CF have been well-characterized, recent data suggests that small molecules may play an important and underappreciated role in this inflammation. This review will examine two novel molecules: proline-glycine-proline (PGP) and high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1), and their potential impact in CF lung disease. This review will provide a brief overview of CF lung disease and background on both HMGB1 and PGP. It will then focus on these molecules in a murine model of CF-like airway disease and in human biological specimens from CF individuals. Finally, this manuscript will address possible mechanisms for therapeutic targeting of these bioactive mediators.

  14. Proline-Glycine-Proline (PGP) and High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB1): Potential Mediators of Cystic Fibrosis Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gaggar, Amit; Rowe, Steven M; Matthew, Hardision; Blalock, J. Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung disease characterized by an unrelenting neutrophil-predominant airway inflammatory response. This inflammation leads to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and eventually to the development of bronchiectasis. While many components of the immune response in CF have been well-characterized, recent data suggests that small molecules may play an important and underappreciated role in this inflammation. This review will examine two novel molecules: proline-glycine-proline (PGP) and high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1), and their potential impact in CF lung disease. This review will provide a brief overview of CF lung disease and background on both HMGB1 and PGP. It will then focus on these molecules in a murine model of CF-like airway disease and in human biological specimens from CF individuals. Finally, this manuscript will address possible mechanisms for therapeutic targeting of these bioactive mediators. PMID:20448817

  15. Short-term effects of three slow expiratory airway clearance techniques in patients with bronchiectasis: a randomised crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Cortina, B; Vilaró, J; Martí, D; Torres, A; San Miguel-Pagola, M; Alcaraz, V; Polverino, E

    2016-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of three slow expiratory airway clearance techniques (ACTs). Randomised crossover trial. Tertiary hospital. Thirty-one outpatients with bronchiectasis and chronic sputum expectoration. Autogenic drainage (AD), slow expiration with glottis opened in lateral posture (ELTGOL), and temporary positive expiratory pressure (TPEP). Sputum expectoration during each session (primary endpoint) and in the 24-hour period after each session. Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) score and spirometry results were recorded at the beginning and after each week of treatment. Data were summarised as median difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Median (interquartile range) daily expectoration at baseline was 21.1 (15.3 to 35.6)g. During physiotherapy sessions, AD and ELTGOL expectorated more sputum than TPEP [AD vs TPEP 3.1g (95% CI 1.5 to 4.8); ELTGOL vs TPEP 3.6g (95% CI 2.8 to 7.1)], while overall expectoration in the 24-hour period after each session was similar for all techniques (P=0.8). Sputum clearance at 24hours post-intervention was lower than baseline assessment for all techniques [AD vs baseline -10.0g (95% CI -15.0 to -6.8); ELTGOL vs baseline -9.2g (95% CI -14.2 to -7.9); TPEP vs baseline -6.0g (95% CI -12.0 to -6.1)]. The LCQ score increased with all techniques (AD 0.5, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5; ELTGOL 0.9, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1; TPEP 0.4, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.2), being similar for all ACTs (P=0.6). No changes in lung function were observed. Slow expiratory ACTs enhance mucus clearance during treatment sessions, and reduce expectoration for the rest of the day in patients with bronchiectasis. NCT01854788. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac Fibrosis: The Fibroblast Awakens

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Joshua G.; Kamal, Fadia A.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Yutzey, Katherine E.; Blaxall, Burns C.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a significant global health problem associated with nearly all forms of heart disease. Cardiac fibroblasts comprise an essential cell type in the heart that is responsible for the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix; however upon injury, these cells transform to a myofibroblast phenotype and contribute to cardiac fibrosis. This remodeling involves pathological changes that include chamber dilation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis, and ultimately leads to the progression to heart failure. Despite the critical importance of fibrosis in cardiovascular disease, our limited understanding of this cell population impedes the development of potential therapies that effectively target this cell type and its pathological contribution to disease progression. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the origins and roles of fibroblasts, mediators and signaling pathways known to influence fibroblast function after myocardial injury, as well as novel therapeutic strategies under investigation to attenuate cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26987915

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Haemophilus infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, R J; Hiller, E J; Ispahani, P; Baker, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with cystic fibrosis under the age of 12 years and 27 matched patients with asthma were followed up in a prospective study for one year. The isolation rate of non-capsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from cough swabs and sputum specimens taken at routine clinic visits every two months was significantly greater in cystic fibrosis than in asthma. Haemophilus para-influenzae was equally common in both groups. During exacerbations the isolation rate of H influenzae in cystic fibrosis was significantly greater than at other times, whereas in asthma there was no significant difference. The distribution of biotypes of H influenzae and H parainfluenzae was similar in the two groups. In cystic fibrosis, biotype I was associated with exacerbations. Biotype V was more common than in previous studies, but was not associated with exacerbations. PMID:2185699

  19. [Lung physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Gursli, S; Haanaes, O C

    1991-02-28

    This article is intended as a brief practical guide for physicians and physiotherapists concerned with the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Physiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of chest diseases have been developed and modified as advances have taken place in the medical management of cystic fibrosis. The article describes forced expiratory technique, positive expiratory pressure, postural drainage, autogenic drainage and other techniques. Patients with cystic fibrosis live longer and have a better quality of life than ever before, but progressive deterioration of lung function will always be their most serious problem. Physical activity and chest physiotherapy are essential parts of all treatment regimens for cystic fibrosis. It is important to realize that the physiotherapist is a very important member of the team which includes nurses, physicians-and the patient.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in tissue scarring and organ dysfunction. In the heart, fibrosis may be reparative, replacing areas of myocyte loss with a structural scar following infarction, or reactive, which is triggered in the absence of cell death and involves interstitial ECM deposition in response to long-lasting stress. Interstitial fibrosis can increase the passive stiffness of the myocardium, resulting in impaired relaxation and diastolic dysfunction. Additionally, fibrosis can lead to disruption of electrical conduction in the heart, causing arrhythmias, and can limit myocyte oxygen availability and thus exacerbate myocardial ischemia. Here, we review recent studies that have illustrated key roles for epigenetic events in the control of pro-fibrotic gene expression, and highlight the potential of small molecules that target epigenetic regulators as a means of treating fibrotic cardiac diseases. PMID:26876451

  1. Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Massie, John; Sontag, Marci; Southern, Kevin W

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1970s when the potential of the immunoreactive trypsinogen assay for early identification of infants with cystic fibrosis was first recognised, the performance of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) has been continually assessed and its use has gradually expanded. NBS for cystic fibrosis is a cost-effective strategy and, if standards of care are fully implemented and robust management pathways are in place, has a positive effect on clinical outcomes. In the past decade, NBS has undergone rapid expansion and an unprecedented number of infants with cystic fibrosis have access to early diagnosis and care. Cystic fibrosis NBS has now moved on from the development phase and is entering an era of consolidation. In the future, research should focus on the rationalisation and optimisation of existing programmes, with particular attention to bioethical implications such as unwanted detection of carriers and inconclusive diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. First report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sahami, Abbas; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Monsef, Alireza; Peyman, Hadi

    2014-04-01

    So far, more than 1800 mutations identified in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. In this case report, we presented first report of c. 1499G>C mutation in a 6-month-old girl with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. A 6-month-old girl with weakness and meconium Ileus referred to the pediatric clinic in Ilam, in the west of Iran. Patient's skin was dark and suffered from bronchiectasis. The sweat test was performed, and the concentration of chloride and sodium in patient's sweat was 130-135 mmol/L and 125-128 mmol/L, respectively. The exon 10 mutation analysis of a CF patient was performed. CFTR mutation analysis revealed the identification of 2 mutations in patient, the mutations were p.F508del (ΔF508) and c. 1499G>C (cd500), respectively. The mutation c. 1499G>C (cd500) were found for the first time in the world. Assessing this mutation in future study and genetic investigation is recommended.

  3. Physical training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J; Moran, F

    2008-01-23

    Physical training may form an important part of the care package for people with cystic fibrosis. To determine whether a prescribed regimen of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: September 2007. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regimen of physical training is compared to no physical training in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 26 studies identified, seven studies which included 231 participants, met the inclusion criteria. This review does provide some limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that aerobic or anaerobic physical training has a positive effect on primary outcomes (exercise capacity, strength and lung function) but improvements are not consistent between studies. Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the studies included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most people with cystic fibrosis and there is a lack of evidence to actively discourage this. The benefits obtained from including physical training in a package of care may be influenced by the type of training programme. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the benefits of exercise programmes in people with cystic fibrosis and the relative benefits of the addition of aerobic versus anaerobic versus a combination of both types of physical training to the care

  4. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2014-08-05

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 15 May 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  5. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2012-09-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 10 July 2012. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; de Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Júnior, Jorge; Martinez, José Antonio Baddini

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years-divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. PMID:28100929

  7. A comparison of the Acapella and a threshold inspiratory muscle trainer for sputum clearance in bronchiectasis-A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Naraparaju, Sushmitha; Vaishali, K; Venkatesan, Prem; Acharya, Vishak

    2010-08-01

    Inspiratory muscle training is used to specifically strengthen the respiratory muscles. Controversy exists regarding the use of inspiratory muscle training as a method of facilitating airways clearance. Acapella is already known to be effective in airway clearance. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of the Acapella and a threshold inspiratory muscle trainer as a method of airway clearance in subjects with bronchiectasis and to determine patient preference between the two techniques. Thirty patients (10 males, 20 females) mean age of 50.67+/-6.37 (mean+/-SD) with a history of expectoration of more than 30 ml sputum per day were recruited. The sequence of therapy was allocated by block randomization. Assessment and familiarization session was performed on day 1. Treatments employing the Acapella and inspiratory muscle trainer were done on days 2 and 3. Treatment order and allocation was determined by block randomization. Sputum volume was measured during and 2 hours after the treatment and patient treatment preference was recorded. A statistically significant difference was found in the sputum volume expectorated after treatment with the Acapella (7.16+/-1.12 ml) compared with the threshold inspiratory muscle trainer (6.46+/-1.08 ml). Patients preferred Acapella in terms of usefulness of clearing secretions. The present study demonstrated increased sputum clearance following the use of the Acapella when compared to the threshold inspiratory muscle trainer. In addition, the Acapella was preferred by patients who judged that it was more useful in clearing secretions.

  8. Annual direct medical costs of bronchiectasis treatment: Impact of severity, exacerbations, chronic bronchial colonization and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease coexistence.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, David; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel; Olveira, Casilda; Girón, Rosa; Máiz, Luis; Prados, Concepción

    2016-04-12

    Patients with bronchiectasis (BE) present exacerbations that increase with severity of the disease. We aimed to determine the annual cost of BE treatment according to its severity, determined by FACED score, as well as the parameters associated with higher costs. Multicentre historical cohorts study with patients from six hospitals in Spain. The costs arising during the course of a year from maintenance treatment, exacerbations, emergency visits and hospital admissions were analysed. In total, 456 patients were included (56.4% mild BE, 26.8% moderate BE and 16.9% severe BE). The mean cost was €4671.9 per patient, which increased significantly with severity. In mild BE, most of the costs were due to bronchodilators and inhaled steroids; in severe BE, most were due to exacerbations and inhaled antibiotics. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), age, colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosaand the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs. The highest costs were found in patients with BE associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the most exacerbations and with chronic bronchial colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosa(PA). In conclusion, BE patients gave rise to high annual costs, and these were doubled on each advance in severity on the FACED score. FEV1%, age, colonization by PA and the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs.

  9. [Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Artunc, F; Schanz, S; Metze, D; Heyne, N

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a novel disease entity, increasingly diagnosed over the last years in patients with renal functional impairment and chronic kidney disease. Recently, gadolinium-containing MR contrast agents have been causally associated with the development NSF. Herein, we present the case of a dialysis-dependent young patient with systemic lupus erythematodes, who developed disabling cutaneous sclerosis of extremities, abdomen and mammae. Clinical and laboratory investigations revealed no signs of activity of the underlying disease. Histopathological examination of a skin biopsy was consistent with NSF showing profound thickening of tissue septae with mucine deposition and slight fibroblast proliferation without inflammatory reaction. Analysis of the patient's medical history revealed that she had undergone repeated contrast enhanced MR scans, including MR angiographies with high doses of gadopentetate. UV phototherapy was little effective, and not until kidney transplantation two years later with good allograft function, improvement of clinical symptoms was observed. Discussion of this case summarizes the current knowledge of clinical features and pathogeneses of NSF, including the role of gadolinium-containing contrast agents. Evolving clinical implications are summarized in the current Tübingen University Hospital guideline for the use of contrast-enhanced MR scans in patients with impaired renal function.

  10. Development, clinical utility, and place of ivacaftor in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Ruth; Elphick, Heather E

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting, multisystem disease characterized by thick viscous secretions leading to recurrent lung infections, bronchiectasis, and progressive deterioration in lung function. CF is caused by loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein which is responsible for transepithelial chloride and water transport. Improved understanding of CFTR protein dysfunction has allowed the development of mutation-specific small-molecule compounds which directly target the underlying CFTR defect. Ivacaftor is the first licensed small-molecule compound for CF patients which targets the CFTR gating mutation Gly551Asp (previously termed G551D) and has the potential to be truly disease-modifying. Ivacaftor is an oral medication given twice daily and has shown benefit in terms of an increase in lung function, decreased sweat chloride, weight gain, improvement in patient-reported quality of life, and reduction in number of respiratory exacerbations in clinical trials. Although ivacaftor is currently only licensed for use in approximately 5% of the CF population (those who have at least one Gly551Asp mutation), the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CFTR modulators that may benefit many more patients. In particular, a CFTR modulator for those with the Phe508del deletion (previously ∆F508) would allow 90% of the CF population to benefit from disease-modifying treatment.

  11. Respiratory infection rates differ between geographically distant paediatric cystic fibrosis cohorts.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Hart, Emily; Turkovic, Lidija; Padros-Goossens, Marc; Stick, Stephen M; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory infections are a major cause of pulmonary decline in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). We compared the prevalence of infection in early life at geographically distant CF treatment centres participating in the same surveillance programme in Australia. Lower airway microbiology, inflammation and structural lung disease at annual review were evaluated for 260 children 0-8 years old with CF at 1032 visits to CF treatment centres in Melbourne or Perth. Melbourne patients were more likely to be culture-positive for common respiratory pathogens at all age groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.85, 95% CI 1.33-2.58). Subjects <2 years old in Melbourne were also more likely to have neutrophil elastase present (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.62-5.95). Bronchiectasis (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.21-3.38) and air trapping (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.42-4.51) in subjects 2-5 years old was more common in Melbourne subjects. The severity of structural lung disease was also worse in Melbourne patients >5 years old. Patients at both centres had a similar rate of hospitalisations and prescribed antibiotics. No procedural differences were identified that could explain the disparity between pathogen prevalence. Geographical differences in early acquisition of infection may contribute to variability in outcomes between CF centres.

  12. Targeting airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis in children: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Tacjana

    2011-06-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Anti-inflammatory drugs for CF lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease progression. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possess anti-inflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and protease inhibitors have a limited impact on the disease. Adverse effects limit therapy with oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising anti-inflammatory therapy available for patients with CF. Pharmacologic therapy with anti-inflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred. To optimize anti-inflammatory therapy, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of action of these agents in the CF lung, to determine which of these agents would provide the most benefit to patients with CF, and to determine which therapies should be initiated at what age or stage of lung disease.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis: Antibiotic therapy and the science behind the magic.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N E

    1997-11-01

    Respiratory failure secondary to chronic bronchiectasis is the cause of death in more than 90% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The predominant microbes involved in CF lung disease are unusual: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Burkolderia cepacia. While antimicrobial therapy has been a component of CF care programs for decades, randomized controlled studies in the 1980s and early 1990s failed to show consistent measurable benefit. Research that stemmed from the discovery of the CF gene has shed new light on the inter-relationship of these microbes and the respiratory epithelial lung changes secondary to the CF gene. Five mechanisms have been proposed to explain the increased P aeruginosa colonization of the lower airway in CF. Recent research has also shown that antimicrobial therapy in CF may be effective not through eradication of the organism but by decreasing bacterial density and exoproduct production in the lung and thus decreasing inflammatory stimulus; by protecting against the consequences of an overexhuberant host response and in patients with stop mutations, potentially by correcting the gene defect. This tale of misunderstanding of the role and value of antimicrobial therapy in CF care illustrates the importance of ensuring close communiation between clinicians and researchers. The randomized controlled studies of the 1980s were not designed to answer the 'right' questions. The clinicians' observations that the CF patients did improve with antimicrobial therapy have been validated by recent studies using different endpoints.

  14. Respiratory infection rates differ between geographically distant paediatric cystic fibrosis cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Emily; Turkovic, Lidija; Padros-Goossens, Marc; Stick, Stephen M.; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections are a major cause of pulmonary decline in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). We compared the prevalence of infection in early life at geographically distant CF treatment centres participating in the same surveillance programme in Australia. Lower airway microbiology, inflammation and structural lung disease at annual review were evaluated for 260 children 0–8 years old with CF at 1032 visits to CF treatment centres in Melbourne or Perth. Melbourne patients were more likely to be culture-positive for common respiratory pathogens at all age groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.85, 95% CI 1.33–2.58). Subjects <2 years old in Melbourne were also more likely to have neutrophil elastase present (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.62–5.95). Bronchiectasis (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.21–3.38) and air trapping (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.42–4.51) in subjects 2–5 years old was more common in Melbourne subjects. The severity of structural lung disease was also worse in Melbourne patients >5 years old. Patients at both centres had a similar rate of hospitalisations and prescribed antibiotics. No procedural differences were identified that could explain the disparity between pathogen prevalence. Geographical differences in early acquisition of infection may contribute to variability in outcomes between CF centres. PMID:27957481

  15. Monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease by computed tomography. Radiation risk in perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wieying; Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A W M; Zhang, Wei; Guillerman, R Paul; van Straten, Marcel

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive technique to monitor structural changes related to cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. It detects structural pulmonary abnormalities such as bronchiectasis and trapped air, at an early stage, before they become apparent with other diagnostic tests. Clinical decisions may be influenced by knowledge of these abnormalities. CT imaging, however, comes with risk related to ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of this review is to discuss the risk of routine CT imaging in patients with CF, using current models of radiation-induced cancer, and to put this risk in perspective with other medical and nonmedical risks. The magnitude of the risk is a complex, controversial matter. Risk analyses have largely been based on a linear no-threshold model, and excess relative and excess absolute risk estimates have been derived mainly from atomic bomb survivors. The estimates have large confidence intervals. Our risk estimates are in concordance with previously reported estimates. A large proportion of radiation to which humans are exposed is from natural background sources and varies widely depending on geographical location. The risk differences due to variation in background radiation can be larger than the risks associated with CF lung disease monitoring by CT. We conclude that the risk related to routine usage of CT in clinical care is small. In addition, a life-limiting disease, such as CF, lowers the risk of radiation-induced cancer. Nonetheless, the use of CT should always be justified and the radiation dose should be kept as low as reasonably achievable.

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... into smaller parts to be used or eliminated. Congenital hepatic fibrosis is characterized by malformation of the bile ducts and the blood vessels ... that cause isolated congenital hepatic fibrosis are ... include malformation of embryonic structures called ductal plates. Each ductal ...

  18. Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Home For Patients Search ... Screening and Diagnosis FAQ171, June 2017 PDF Format Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Pregnancy What is cystic ...

  19. [Laparoscopic treatment of retroperitoneal fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Joual, Abdenbi; Rabii, Redouane; El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Debbagh, Adil; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-04-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) in a 38-year-old man presenting with obstructive acute renal failure. The initial management consisted of urinary diversion by bilateral double-J ureteric stenting. After restoration of normal renal function, CT urography demonstrated retroperitoneal fibrosis surrounding the two ureters. Surgical treatment was performed by laparoscopy using four trocars. The operation consisted of detachment of the ascending and descending colon followed by release of the ureters from the lumbar segment to the pelvic segment and finally intraperitonealization of the ureters. The operating time was six hours, the postoperative course was uneventful and the double-J stents were removed at the third week. Laparoscopic treatment of RPF is a treatment option providing all of the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. In the light of this case and a review of the literature, the authors describe the laparoscopic treatment of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis.

  20. Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis related to smoking methamphetamine with talc as filler.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Peter A; Sobenes, Juan R; Vallyathan, Val

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis accompanied by radiographic evidence of progressive massive fibrosis in a patient who had a 15-20 year history of almost daily recreational inhalation of methamphetamine. Mineralogical analysis confirmed the presence of talc on biopsy of the area of progressive massive fibrosis. The coexistence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis suggests that prolonged recreational inhalation of methamphetamine that has been "cut" with talc can result in sufficient amount of talc being inhaled to result in interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and progressive massive fibrosis in the absence of other causes.

  1. Risks of population antimicrobial resistance associated with chronic macrolide use for inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Serisier, David J

    2013-05-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have established efficacy in the management of cystic fibrosis and diffuse panbronchiolitis-uncommon lung diseases with substantial morbidity and the potential for rapid progression to death. Emerging evidence suggests benefits of maintenance macrolide treatment in more indolent respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. In view of the greater patient population affected by these disorders (and potential for macrolide use to spread to disorders such as chronic cough), widespread use of macrolides, particularly azithromycin, has the potential to substantially influence antimicrobial resistance rates of a range of respiratory microbes. In this Personal View, I explore theories around population (rather than patient) macrolide resistance, appraise evidence linking macrolide use with development of resistance, and highlight the risks posed by injudicious broadening of their use, particularly of azithromycin. These risks are weighed against the potential benefits of macrolides in less aggressive inflammatory airway disorders. A far-sighted approach to maintenance macrolide use in non-cystic fibrosis inflammatory airway diseases is needed, which minimises risks of adversely affecting community macrolide resistance: combining preferential use of erythromycin and restriction of macrolide use to those patients at greatest risk represents an appropriately cautious management approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Differences in Texture Analysis Parameters Between Active Alveolitis and Lung Fibrosis in Chest CT of Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Christopher; Blum, Anya C; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Preibsch, Heike; Ditt, Hendrik; Grimmer, Rainer; Fritz, Jan; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bösmüller, Hans; Horger, Marius

    2017-08-11

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic aid of computed tomography (CT) features for the differentiation of active alveolitis and fibrosis using a CT texture analysis (CTTA) prototype and CT densitometry in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) using ancillary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features and their longitudinal course as standard of reference. We retrospectively analyzed thin-slice noncontrast chest CT image data of 43 patients with SSc (18 men, mean age 51.55 ± 15.52 years; range 23-71 years). All of them had repeated noncontrast enhanced HRCT of the lung. Classification into active alveolitis or fibrosis was done on HRCT based on classical HRCT findings (active alveolitis [19; 44.2%] and fibrosis [24; 55.8%]) and their course at midterm. Results were compared to pulmonary functional tests and were followed up by CT. Ground glass opacity was considered suggestive of alveolitis, whereas coarse reticulation with parenchymal distortion, traction bronchiectasis, and honeycombing were assigned to fibrosis. Statistically significant differences in CTTA were found for first-order textural features (mean intensity, average, deviation, skewness) and second-order statistics (entropy of co-occurrence matrix, mean number of nonuniformity (NGLDM), entropy of NGLDM, entropy of heterogeneity, intensity, and average). Cut-off value for the prediction of fibrosis at baseline was significant for entropy of intensity (P value < .001) and for mean deviation (P value < .001), and for prediction of alveolitis was significant for uniformity of intensity (P value < .001) and for NGLDM (P value < .001). At pulmonary functional tests, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and single-breath diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide were significantly lower in fibrosis than in alveolitis 2.03 ± 0.78 vs. 2.61 ± 0.83, P < .016 and 4.51 ± 1.61 vs. 6.04 ± 1.75, P < .009, respectively. Differences in CT densitometry between

  3. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic.

    PubMed

    Sharples, L D; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-08-01

    With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. The mean difference in FEV(1) was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval -1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference pound 1497, 95% confidence interval pound 688 to pound 2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year ( pound 2625) than in the second year ( pound 411). Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources.

  4. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, L; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. Methods: A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. Results: The mean difference in FEV1 was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval –1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference £1497, 95% confidence interval £688 to £2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year (£2625) than in the second year (£411). Conclusions: Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources. PMID:12149523

  5. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the management of cystic fibrosis patients. It is arguably best provided by a qualified dietitian and nutritional care sister working in conjunction with the rest of the cystic fibrosis team. The patient's nutritional needs should be assessed, regularly reviewed, and nutritional treatment tailored to meet the changing clinical and psychosocial needs of the patient. Nutritional intervention is not without complications, and in particular attention to normal feeding behaviour and vigilance when instituting supplementary nutrition may prevent many feeding difficulties. PMID:8660059

  6. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Print A A A What's in this ... en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an inherited ...

  7. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test A A A What's in this ... cloruro en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an ...

  8. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis A A A What's in this article? What ... a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  9. The Pathogenesis of Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review manuscript discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease. PMID:23649149

  10. Survival rates in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, R W; Tyson, S L; Dinwiddie, R; Matthew, D J

    1983-01-01

    Life tables were calculated for 273 British children with cystic fibrosis for the period 1974-9. There was a marked improvement in survival rates in the meconium ileus group compared with the 1969-73 data, but there was little improvement in patients presenting later with other symptoms. PMID:6639137

  11. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, M C

    1987-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased requirement for calories and probably for all the major nutrients. The newer, enteric-coated granular preparations of pancreatic enzyme are more effective than preceding preparations and should permit a normal fat intake. Recent work has emphasized the interdependence of respiratory disease and nutrition.

  12. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype.

  13. Influence that oscillating positive expiratory pressure using predetermined expiratory pressures has on the viscosity and transportability of sputum in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Ramos, Dionei; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Moreira, Graciane Laender; Melegati, Kátia Cristina Teixeira; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Jardim, José Roberto; Oliveira, Adriana Siqueira de

    2009-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP) using predetermined expiratory pressures on the viscosity and transportability of sputum in patients with bronchiectasis. The study involved 15 stable patients with bronchiectasis (7 males; mean age = 53 +/- 16 years), submitted to two consecutive OPEP interventions, with a 24-h interval between the two, using positive expiratory pressures set at 15 cmH2O (P15) and 25 cmH2O (P25). The protocol consisted of a voluntary cough; another voluntary cough 20 min later, designated time zero (T0); a 10-min rest period; and two 10-min series (S1 and S2, using OPEP at P15 and P25 in both), with a 10-min interval between the two. The viscosity and transportability of sputum were evaluated by viscometry, relative transport velocity on frog palate, transport in a simulated cough machine and contact angle. Sputum samples were collected at T0, after S1 and after S2. Specific statistical tests were performed depending on the type of data distribution. In comparison with the values obtained at T0, sputum viscosity decreased significantly after S1 at P15 and after S2 at P25. There were no significant differences among all of the samples in terms of transportability. The fact that sputum viscosity decreased whether OPEP was performed at P15 or at P25 suggests that there is no need to generate high expiratory pressure to achieve the desired result.

  14. Relationship between thickness of fibrosis and epithelial dysplasia in oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Primali Rukmal; Nadeeka Jayasinghe, Kadawatha Arachchige; Mudiyanselage Tilakaratne, Wanninayaka

    2011-08-01

      Although oral submucous fibrosis is characterized by fibrosis of the subepithelial connective tissue, the overlying epithelial changes contribute to malignant transformation. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between thickness of fibrosis and epithelial changes in oral submucous fibrosis.   The relationship between thickness of fibrosis and presence or absence of epithelial dysplasia was evaluated in 107 biopsies containing histopathologically-confirmed oral submucous fibrosis. The results were analyzed using Student's t-test or χ(2) -test.   Fifty-seven percent (61/107) of oral submucous fibrosis lesions showed a non-dysplastic overlying epithelium, while 43% (46/107) showed varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia. The mean thickness of fibrosis of non-dysplastic lesions was 0.91±0.41 mm (mean ± standard deviation) and ranged from 0.25 to 1.9 mm. However, the mean thickness of fibrosis of dysplastic lesions was 1.17 ± 0.52 mm and ranged from 0.48 to 3 mm. The results revealed a significant increase in the incidence of epithelial dysplasia as the thickness of fibrosis increased (P = 0.004). As such, the lesions that showed increased fibrosis were more likely to present with epithelial dysplasia.   The advancement of fibrosis increases the risk of development of epithelial dysplasia in oral submucous fibrosis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care.

  17. Pseudomembranous colitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nagakumar, Prasad

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may require frequent courses of antibiotics and repeated hospital admissions. Although children with CF have high carriage rate for C.difficile, they rarely develop colitis. Pseudomembranous colitis is more common in adult post lung transplant CF patients. Although rare, paseudomembranous colitis should be considered in CF patients presenting with abdominal symptoms even in the absence of diarrhoea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Endotyping of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Amanda T; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating and incurable progressive fibrotic lung condition associated with a significant disease burden. In recent years there has been an exponential increase in the number of preclinical and clinical studies performed in IPF. IPF is defined according to rigid diagnostic criteria; hence, a significant subset of patients with unclassifiable disease has been excluded from these studies. The traditional diagnostic classification of all progressive fibrotic lung diseases uses specific clinical, radiological, and histopathological features to define each condition. However, the considerable heterogeneity within each form of pulmonary fibrosis has raised the possibility of distinct pathophysiological mechanisms culminating in a common phenotype. Thus, the classification of fibrotic lung diseases according to the driving molecular mechanisms rather than specific user-defined histopathological and radiological features could improve several aspects of clinical care. Discoveries from basic science research have defined multiple complex molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis that may provide markers for the molecular endotyping of this disease. In addition, these molecular pathways have revealed potential therapeutic targets. Reclassifying progressive fibrotic lung diseases according to molecular endotypes may allow for more accurate assessment of prognosis and individualized treatment. Furthermore, recent developments that have been applied to a narrow group of patients with IPF may be applicable to those with other progressive fibrotic lung diseases. This review presents the latest developments from translational research in this area and explains how molecular endotyping could revolutionize the diagnosis, stratification, and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Fibrosis: ultimate and proximate causes

    PubMed Central

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Zhou, Yong; Gaggar, Amit; Duncan, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrotic disorders account for an increasing burden of disease-associated morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although numerous risk factors have been recognized, the etiologies of many of these clinical syndromes have not been identified, and they are often termed idiopathic or cryptogenic. Here, we provide an evolutionary perspective on fibrosis aimed at elucidating its etiopathogenesis. By asking the ultimate question of “why” this process evolved in multicellular organisms, we hope to uncover proximate explanations for “how” it causes disease in humans. We posit that physiological fibrosis-like reactions evolved as an essential process in host defense against pathogens and in normal wound healing. Based on this premise, we reason that pathological fibrosis is related to one or more of the following: unidentified infectious or noninfectious antigens, autoimmunity, impaired regenerative responses, and the antagonistically pleiotropic action of genes involved in wound healing or development. The importance of genetic susceptibility, epigenetics, aging, and the modern-day environment are highlighted. Consideration of both ultimate and proximate causation goes beyond philosophical cogitations, as it will better inform pathobiological mechanisms of disease and aid in the prevention and treatment of fibrotic diseases. PMID:25365073

  20. Interaction and Localization of Synthetic Nanoparticles in Healthy and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells: Effect of Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raemy, David O.; Loader, Joan E.; Kailey, Jenai M; Neeves, Keith B.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Aftab; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs) produced by nanotechnology processes have taken the field of medicine by storm. Concerns about safety of these NPs in humans, however, have recently been raised. Although studies of NP toxicity have focused on lung disease the mechanistic link between NP exposure and lung injury remained unclear. This is primarily due to a lack of availability of appropriate airway disease models and sophisticated microscopic techniques to study nano-sized particulate delivery and resulting responses. Methods Air–liquid interface (ALI) cultures of non-cystic fibrosis (CF) and CF airway epithelial cells were exposed to the FITC-labeled NPs using a PennCentury microsprayer™. Uptake of NPs was assessed by FACS. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was performed and the images were analyzed by an advanced imaging software to study particle deposition and uptake. Results Flow cytometry data revealed that CF cells accumulated increased amounts of NPs. The increased NP uptake could be attributed to the reduced CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function as a similar increased retention/uptake was observed in cells whose CFTR expression was downregulated by antisense oligonucleotide. NPs alone did not induce pro-inflammatory cytokine release or cell death. The cell culture system was sensitive to ozone but exposure to the uncoated synthetic NPs used in this study, did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. LSM imaging and subsequent image restoration further indicated particle uptake and intracellular localization. Exposure to ozone increased nuclear uptake in both non-CF and CF cells. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the uptake of NPs using ALI cultures of non-CF and CF airway epithelial cells. The NPs used here were useful in demonstrating uptake by airway epithelial cells without causing adverse effects in presence or absence of ozone. However, to totally exclude toxic effects, chronic studies under in vivo conditions using

  1. Biomarkers in Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers in cystic fibrosis are used i. for the measurement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function in order to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and ii. to assess aspects of lung disease severity (e.g. inflammation, infection). Effective biomarkers can aid disease monitoring and contribute to the development of new therapies. The tests of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function each have unique strengths and weaknesses, and biomarkers of inflammation, infection and tissue destruction have the potential to enhance the management of cystic fibrosis through the early detection of disease processes. The development of biomarkers of cystic fibrosis lung disease, in particular airway inflammation and infection, is influenced by the challenges of obtaining relevant samples from infants and children for whom early detection and treatment of disease might have the greatest long term benefits.

  2. Retroperitoneal fibrosis associated with Riedel's struma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chandar R.; Ferguson, George C.; Kyle, Victor N.

    1973-01-01

    A case of retroperitoneal fibrosis with bilateral ureteral obstruction in association with Riedel's struma of the thyroid is reported. There has been a definite increase in incidence of retroperitoneal fibrosis, but with prompt recognition and adequate treatment the mortality rate has been decreased from the original 14%. The association of Riedel's struma with retroperitoneal fibrosis has been noted in the past and its association with sclerosing cholangitis has also been mentioned. It is not known whether Riedel's thyroiditis originates in the thyroid gland and spreads or whether true thyroiditis is part of a generalized process. The temporal relationship of thyroiditis and retroperitoneal fibrosis suggests an extension of fibrosis from the thyroid, but one cannot be sure which condition occurred first. Whatever the cause, the treatment remains the same as for retroperitoneal fibrosis from other causes. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4699273

  3. The advancements of heparanase in fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qianying; Zeng, Ji; He, Long

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is the endpoint in many chronic inflammatory diseases and is defined as an abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix components. Fibrosis can affect almost any tissue, especially heart, lung, liver, and kidney, and numerous studies have been conducted to find satisfactory treatments. Since heparanase is a kind of endo-β-D-glucuronidase that is capable of cleaving heparan sulfate side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on cell surfaces and the extracellular matrix, which further regulate the bioavailability of growth factors (FGF-2, TGF-β). Meanwhile, FGF-2 and TGF-β play a major role in the fibrosis process. Recent studies including ours have consistently demonstrated that heparanase could promote fibrosis process in different organs. Thus in this mini-review, we updated the advancement of heparanase in the regulation of fibrosis generation, and discussed its impact on several critical signaling pathways relevant to fibrosis. PMID:28078057

  4. The Effect of Lt to Rt Shunt Using Veno-veno-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) on Coronary Oxygenation in Lung Transplantation Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Interstitial Pulmonary Fibrosis ARDS; COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease); Bronchiectasis; Lymphangioleiomyomatosis; Primary Pulmonary Hypertension; ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

  5. Emphysema Is Common in Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Transplantation Patients: A Histopathological and Computed Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Mets, Onno M; Roothaan, Suzan M; Bronsveld, Inez; Luijk, Bart; van de Graaf, Ed A; Vink, Aryan; de Jong, Pim A

    2015-01-01

    Lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) involves excessive inflammation, repetitive infections and development of bronchiectasis. Recently, literature on emphysema in CF has emerged, which might become an increasingly important disease component due to the increased life expectancy. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and extent of emphysema in endstage CF lungs. In explanted lungs of 20 CF patients emphysema was semi-quantitatively assessed on histology specimens. Also, emphysema was automatically quantified on pre-transplantation computed tomography (CT) using the percentage of voxels below -950 Houndfield Units and was visually scored on CT. The relation between emphysema extent, pre-transplantation lung function and age was determined. All CF patients showed emphysema on histological examination: 3/20 (15%) showed mild, 15/20 (75%) moderate and 2/20 (10%) severe emphysema, defined as 0-20% emphysema, 20-50% emphysema and >50% emphysema in residual lung tissue, respectively. Visually upper lobe bullous emphysema was identified in 13/20 and more diffuse non-bullous emphysema in 18/20. Histology showed a significant correlation to quantified CT emphysema (p = 0.03) and visual emphysema score (p = 0.001). CT and visual emphysema extent were positively correlated with age (p = 0.045 and p = 0.04, respectively). In conclusion, this study both pathologically and radiologically confirms that emphysema is common in end-stage CF lungs, and is age related. Emphysema might become an increasingly important disease component in the aging CF population.

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  7. How Is Bronchiectasis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... up. Chest Physical Therapy CPT also is called physiotherapy (FIZ-e-o-THER-ah-pe) or chest ... information, go to the Health Topics Oxygen Therapy article.) Surgery Your doctor may recommend surgery if no ...

  8. Isolated right pulmonary artery agenesis with agenesis of right upper lobe and bronchiectasis of right lower lobe with anomalous arterial supply from celiac axis with normal venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, A; Rathore, M; Banavaliker, J N

    2014-01-01

    Isolated unilateral absence of pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. When detected in infancy, the condition is commonly associated with cardiovascular defects which are more frequently associated with left pulmonary artery agenesis. Patients with isolated right pulmonary artery agenesis survive into adulthood with minimal or no symptoms and are diagnosed incidentally on the chest radiographs. We report a case of a 19-year-old female patient who presented to us with recurrent haemoptysis. She was symptomatic since the age of four years. We report the rare occurrence of UAPA on right side, agenesis of right upper lobe and bronchiectasis of right lower lobe with anomalous arterial supply of right lung from coeliac axis in this patient.

  9. [Bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Munck, Anne; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-01-15

    Bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or cocolonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration; intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms. Antibiotherapy, physiotherapy and nutritional management helps to increase the survival and quality of life.

  10. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Negative sweat tests and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarsfield, J K; Davies, J M

    1975-01-01

    Two brothers are described with chronic suppurative pulmonary disease. One has classical cystic fibrosis with complete pancreatic involvement and abnormal sweat test. The other had incomplete pancreatic disease with repeatedly normal sweat tests. The implications of a negative sweat test in patients with cystic fibrosis are discussed. Images FIG. PMID:1147688

  12. [SWE elastography in assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Pawluś, Aleksander; Kucharska, Marta; Inglot, Marcin

    2015-02-15

    Liver fibrosis is a relatively common consequence of chronic liver diseases, especially chronic viral hepatitis B and C. Biopsy still remains the gold standard in the assessment of liver fibrosis. However, due to its invasiveness and possible complications, less or even non-invasive methods are being developed, e.g. using biochemical parameters (Fibrotest) or elastography. Elastography is a new diagnostic tool that aims to evaluate stiffness of the tissues. Elastography techniques that are used in the assessment of liver fibrosis are transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) and shear-wave elastography (SWE). SWE is a novel real-time two-dimensional elastography technique, which allows one to estimate stiffness quantitatively in kilopascals (kPa). Moreover, lapping elastography over regular B-mode allows precise choice of the region of interest. Therefore SWE creates the opportunity for accurate assessment of liver fibrosis. In this paper we describe processes leading to liver fibrosis as well as methods of liver fibrosis assessment, e.g. liver biopsy, biochemical tests or elastography. The main goal of this paper is to present the SWE technique, its role in liver fibrosis assessment and a short review of the most important clinical studies on SWE. We also present several examples of SWE examinations performed on patients with different stages of liver fibrosis - F0 to F4 on the METAVIR scale.

  13. [Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2015-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prognosis and management of chronic liver diseases depend on the amount of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy has long remained the gold standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy is an invasive procedure with associated morbidity, it is rarely the cause for mortality, and has a few limitations. During the past two decades, in an attempt to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods for the evaluation of liver fibrosis have been developed, mainly in the field of viral hepatitis. This review will focus on different methods available for non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis including a biological approach which quantifies serum levels of biomarkers of fibrosis and physical techniques which measure liver stiffness by transient elastography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance based elastography, their accuracy, advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Procollagen propeptides: serum markers for atrial fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Cacciatore, Angela; Reil, Jan-Christian; Gräber, Stefan; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael; Mewis, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Atrial fibrosis and its spatial heterogeneity are regarded as a substrate for the perpetuation of atrial arrhythmias. During collagen synthesis and degradation, collagen propeptides and telopeptides are released into the blood. This study tested the hypothesis that serum markers of collagen turnover correlate with atrial fibrosis. We prospectively included 28 patients in sinus rhythm undergoing cardiac surgery. Plasma concentrations of the carboxy- and amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen type-I (PICP and PINP) and type-III (PIIINP), and the C-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (ICTP) were determined. Interstitial fibrosis of left (n = 10) and right atrial appendages (n = 28) was analyzed histologically. We found a correlation between left and right atrial fibrosis (r (s) = 0.79, p < 0.01). Interestingly, the higher the interstitial collagen content, the higher was the spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis (r (s) = 0.90, p < 0.001). However, PICP, PIIINP, and ICTP were not correlated to left or right atrial collagen content, or to the spatial heterogeneity of atrial fibrosis. There was a weak and even negative correlation between the serum PINP concentration and the degree of fibrosis in both the left and the right atrium (r (s) = -0.65 (p = 0.04) and r (s) = -0.42 (p = 0.03), respectively). A high degree of interstitial atrial fibrosis indicates a high degree of spatial heterogeneity of interstitial collagen. Although serum PICP is known to be correlated with ventricular fibrosis, this and other serum markers of collagen turnover (PINP, PIIINP, and ICTP) do not directly reflect atrial fibrosis in patients with severe cardiac disease.

  15. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  16. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Verma, Shyam B; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Patil, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. PMID:25914554

  17. Epigenetics of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent work by our and other groups has identified strong genetic predisposition factors for the development of pulmonary fibrosis while cigarette smoke remains the most strongly associated environmental exposure risk factor. Gene expression profiling studies of IPF lung have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease and those in peripheral blood have provided important biomarkers. However, epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptional changes associated with disease development. Moreover, epigenetic marks represent a promising therapeutic target for IPF. In this review, we will introduce the disease, summarize genetic and gene expression studies in IPF, discuss exposures relevant to IPF and known epigenetic changes associated with cigarette smoke exposure, and summarize epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF. We will end by discussing limitations, challenges and future opportunities in this field. PMID:24746870

  18. Minerals, fibrosis, and the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Heppleston, A G

    1991-01-01

    Determinants of pulmonary fibrosis induced by inhaled mineral dusts include quantity retained, particle size, and surface area, together with their physical form and the reactive surface groups presented to alveolar cells. The outstanding problem is to ascertain how these factors exert their deleterious effects. Both compact and fibrous minerals inflict membrane damage, for which chemical mechanisms still leave uncertainty. A major weakness of cytotoxicity studies, even when lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species are considered, lies in tacitly assuming that membrane damage suffices to account for fibrogenesis, whereas the parallel occurrence of such manifestations does not necessarily imply causation. The two-phase procedure established that particles, both compact and fibrous, induce release of a macrophage factor that provokes fibroblasts into collagen synthesis. The amino acid composition of the macrophage fibrogenic factor was characterized and its intracellular action explained. Fibrous particles introduce complexities respecting type, durability, and dimensions. Asbestotic fibrosis is believed to depend on long fibers, but scrutiny of the evidence from experimental and human sources reveals that a role for short fibers needs to be entertained. Using the two-phase system, short fibers proved fibrogenic. Other mechanisms, agonistic and antagonistic, may participate. Growth factors may affect the fibroblast population and collagen production, with cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor exerting control. Immune involvement is best regarded as an epiphenomenon. Downregulation of fibrogenesis may follow collagenase release from macrophages and fibroblasts, while augmented type II cell secretion of lipid can interfere with the macrophage-particle reaction. PMID:1954926

  19. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-05

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Postinjection Muscle Fibrosis from Lupron

    PubMed Central

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A.; Ballock, Tracy; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G.; Schweiger, B. Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 6.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty (CPP), which signifies the onset of secondary sexual characteristics before the age of eight in females and the age of nine in males as a result of stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Her case is likely related to her adoption, as children who are adopted internationally have much higher rates of CPP. She had left breast development at Tanner Stage 2, adult body odor, and mildly advanced bone age. In order to halt puberty and maximize adult height, she was prescribed a gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, the first line treatment for CPP. She was administered Lupron (leuprolide acetate) Depot-Ped (3 months) intramuscularly. After her second injection, she developed swelling and muscle pain at the injection site on her right thigh. She also reported an impaired ability to walk. She was diagnosed with muscle fibrosis. This is the first reported case of muscle fibrosis resulting from Lupron injection. PMID:26101682

  1. Postinjection Muscle Fibrosis from Lupron.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Raissouni, Nouhad; Ballock, Tracy; Blatnik, Terra; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G; Schweiger, B Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 6.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty (CPP), which signifies the onset of secondary sexual characteristics before the age of eight in females and the age of nine in males as a result of stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Her case is likely related to her adoption, as children who are adopted internationally have much higher rates of CPP. She had left breast development at Tanner Stage 2, adult body odor, and mildly advanced bone age. In order to halt puberty and maximize adult height, she was prescribed a gonadotropin releasing hormone analog, the first line treatment for CPP. She was administered Lupron (leuprolide acetate) Depot-Ped (3 months) intramuscularly. After her second injection, she developed swelling and muscle pain at the injection site on her right thigh. She also reported an impaired ability to walk. She was diagnosed with muscle fibrosis. This is the first reported case of muscle fibrosis resulting from Lupron injection.

  2. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  3. Human Epididymis Protein 4: A Novel Serum Inflammatory Biomarker in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Béla; Nagy, Béla; Fila, Libor; Clarke, Luka A; Gönczy, Ferenc; Bede, Olga; Nagy, Dóra; Újhelyi, Rita; Szabó, Ágnes; Anghelyi, Andrea; Major, Miklós; Bene, Zsolt; Fejes, Zsolt; Antal-Szalmás, Péter; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Balla, György; Kappelmayer, János; Amaral, Margarida D; Macek, Milan; Balogh, István

    2016-09-01

    Increased expression of the human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) was previously described in lung biopsy samples from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It remains unknown, however, whether serum HE4 concentrations are elevated in CF. Seventy-seven children with CF from six Hungarian CF centers and 57 adult patients with CF from a Czech center were enrolled. In addition, 94 individuals with non-CF lung diseases and 117 normal control subjects with no pulmonary disorders were analyzed. Serum HE4 levels were measured by using an immunoassay, and their expression was further investigated via the quantification of HE4 messenger RNA by using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in CF vs non-CF respiratory epithelium biopsy specimens. The expression of the potential regulator miR-140-5p was analyzed by using an UPL-based quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. HE4 was measured in the supernatants from unpolarized and polarized cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells expressing wild-type or F508del-CFTR. Median serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in children with CF (99.5 [73.1-128.9] pmol/L) compared with control subjects (36.3 [31.1-43.4] pmol/L; P < .0001). This observation was replicated in adults with CF (115.7 [77.8-148.7] pmol/L; P < .0001). In contrast, abnormal but lower HE4 concentrations were found in cases of severe bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis. In patients with CF, the concentrations of HE4 were positively correlated with overall disease severity and C-reactive protein concentrations, whereas a significant inverse relationship was found between HE4 and the spirometric FEV1 value. Relative HE4 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated (P = .011) with a decreased miR-140-5p expression (P = .020) in the CF vs non-CF airway biopsy specimens. Twofold higher HE4 concentrations were recorded in the supernatant of polarized F508del-CF transmembrane conductance regulator

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinases-7 and Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ben; Fan, Chuqiao; Yang, Liping; Fang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is a secreted zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidase that degrades a broad range of extracellular matrix substrates and additional substrates. MMP-7 playsa crucial role in a diverse array of cellular processes and appears to be a key regulator of fibrosis in several diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis, liver fibrosis, and cystic fibrosis. In particular, the relationship between MMP-7 and kidney fibrosis has attracted significant attention in recent years. Growing evidence indicates that MMP-7 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney fibrosis. Here, we summarize the recent progress in the understanding of the role of MMP-7 in kidney fibrosis. In particular, we discuss how MMP-7 contributes to kidney fibrotic lesions via the following three pathways: epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Further dissection of the crosstalk among and regulation of these pathways will help clinicians and researchers develop effective therapeutic approaches for treating chronic kidney disease. PMID:28239354

  5. The Role of PPARs in Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Heather F.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Kottmann, R. Matthew; Garcia, Tatiana M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a group of disorders characterized by accumulation of scar tissue in the lung interstitium, resulting in loss of alveolar function, destruction of normal lung architecture, and respiratory distress. Some types of fibrosis respond to corticosteroids, but for many there are no effective treatments. Prognosis varies but can be poor. For example, patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a median survival of only 2.9 years. Prognosis may be better in patients with some other types of pulmonary fibrosis, and there is variability in survival even among individuals with biopsy-proven IPF. Evidence is accumulating that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play important roles in regulating processes related to fibrogenesis, including cellular differentiation, inflammation, and wound healing. PPARα agonists, including the hypolidipemic fibrate drugs, inhibit the production of collagen by hepatic stellate cells and inhibit liver, kidney, and cardiac fibrosis in animal models. In the mouse model of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin, a PPARα agonist significantly inhibited the fibrotic response, while PPARα knockout mice developed more serious fibrosis. PPARβ/δ appears to play a critical role in regulating the transition from inflammation to wound healing. PPARβ/δ agonists inhibit lung fibroblast proliferation and enhance the antifibrotic properties of PPARγ agonists. PPARγ ligands oppose the profibrotic effect of TGF-β, which induces differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a critical effector cell in fibrosis. PPARγ ligands, including the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic drugs, effectively inhibit lung fibrosis in vitro and in animal models. The clinical availability of potent and selective PPARα and PPARγ agonists should facilitate rapid development of successful treatment strategies based on current and ongoing research. PMID:17710235

  6. Voice Disorder in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  7. The Role of PPARs in Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Heather F; Thatcher, Thomas H; Kottmann, R Matthew; Garcia, Tatiana M; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a group of disorders characterized by accumulation of scar tissue in the lung interstitium, resulting in loss of alveolar function, destruction of normal lung architecture, and respiratory distress. Some types of fibrosis respond to corticosteroids, but for many there are no effective treatments. Prognosis varies but can be poor. For example, patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a median survival of only 2.9 years. Prognosis may be better in patients with some other types of pulmonary fibrosis, and there is variability in survival even among individuals with biopsy-proven IPF. Evidence is accumulating that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play important roles in regulating processes related to fibrogenesis, including cellular differentiation, inflammation, and wound healing. PPARalpha agonists, including the hypolidipemic fibrate drugs, inhibit the production of collagen by hepatic stellate cells and inhibit liver, kidney, and cardiac fibrosis in animal models. In the mouse model of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin, a PPARalpha agonist significantly inhibited the fibrotic response, while PPARalpha knockout mice developed more serious fibrosis. PPARbeta/delta appears to play a critical role in regulating the transition from inflammation to wound healing. PPARbeta/delta agonists inhibit lung fibroblast proliferation and enhance the antifibrotic properties of PPARgamma agonists. PPARgamma ligands oppose the profibrotic effect of TGF-beta, which induces differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a critical effector cell in fibrosis. PPARgamma ligands, including the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic drugs, effectively inhibit lung fibrosis in vitro and in animal models. The clinical availability of potent and selective PPARalpha and PPARgamma agonists should facilitate rapid development of successful treatment strategies based on current and ongoing research.

  8. Voice disorder in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  9. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Sharon I. S.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing clinical, radiologic, and pathologic recognition of the coexistence of emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis in the same patient, resulting in a clinical syndrome known as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) that is characterized by dyspnea, upper-lobe emphysema, lower-lobe fibrosis, and abnormalities of gas exchange. This syndrome frequently is complicated by pulmonary hypertension, acute lung injury, and lung cancer. The CPFE syndrome typically occurs in male smokers, and the mortality associated with this condition, especially if pulmonary hypertension is present, is significant. In this review, we explore the current state of the literature and discuss etiologic factors and clinical characteristics of the CPFE syndrome. PMID:22215830

  10. Laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, H L

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration of abnormally high concentrations of electrolytes in eccrine sweat is still the only practical laboratory procedure available for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Properly performed, the sweat test is very reliable, but there are many published reports that all of the methods in current use frequently generate incorrect diagnoses. Analysis of potential for error in sweat test methods shows that of the three essential phases involved, stimulation, collection, and analysis, the major cause of intrinsic inaccuracy occurs in the collection process. In this case the problem is due to condensate formation, which leads to the subsequent analysis of nonrepresentative sweat. Human error is also an important cause of false results and is a direct function of the number of critical manual operations involved in the technic. This review provides a critical examination of sweat test methods, identifying problem areas and suggesting ways to improve procedures in the interests of clinically reliable laboratory data in support of diagnosis.

  11. Cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Mirjam J G; Birring, Surinder S; Vancheri, Carlo; Cottin, Vincent; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Russell, Anne-Marie; Wijsenbeek, Marlies S

    2016-09-01

    Many patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) complain of chronic refractory cough. Chronic cough is a distressing and disabling symptom with a major impact on quality of life. During recent years, progress has been made in gaining insight into the pathogenesis of cough in IPF, which is most probably "multifactorial" and influenced by mechanical, biochemical and neurosensory changes, with an important role for comorbidities as well. Clinical trials of cough treatment in IPF are emerging, and cough is increasingly included as a secondary end-point in trials assessing new compounds for IPF. It is important that such studies include adequate end-points to assess cough both objectively and subjectively. This article summarises the latest insights into chronic cough in IPF. It describes the different theories regarding the pathophysiology of cough, reviews the different methods to assess cough and deals with recent and future developments in the treatment of cough in IPF.

  12. Epigenomics of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ivana V

    2012-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Gene-expression profiling studies have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease, but epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptome changes associated with the development of IPF. This review will begin with an introduction to the disease, followed by brief summaries of studies of gene expression in IPF and epigenetic marks associated with exposures relevant to IPF. The majority of the discussion will focus on epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF, the limitations, challenges nd future directions in this field.

  13. Epigenomics of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Gene-expression profiling studies have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease, but epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptome changes associated with the development of IPF. This review will begin with an introduction to the disease, followed by brief summaries of studies of gene expression in IPF and epigenetic marks associated with exposures relevant to IPF. The majority of the discussion will focus on epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF, the limitations, challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:22449190

  14. Smoking and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chad K.; Murray, Lynne A.; Molfino, Nestor A.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of unknown etiology with considerable morbidity and mortality. Cigarette smoking is one of the most recognized risk factors for development of IPF. Furthermore, recent work suggests that smoking may have a detrimental effect on survival of patients with IPF. The mechanism by which smoking may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF is largely unknown. However, accumulating evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress might promote disease progression in IPF patients who are current and former smokers. In this review, potential mechanisms by which cigarette smoking affects IPF, the effects of cigarette smoking on accelerated loss of lung function in patients with IPF, key genetic studies evaluating the potential candidate genes and gene-environment (smoking) interaction, diagnosis, and treatment with emphasis on recently closed and ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:22448328

  15. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  16. Epidemiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Brett; Collard, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic fibrotic lung disease of unknown cause that occurs in adults and has a poor prognosis. Its epidemiology has been difficult to study because of its rarity and evolution in diagnostic and coding practices. Though uncommon, it is likely underappreciated both in terms of its occurrence (ie, incidence, prevalence) and public health impact (ie, health care costs and resource utilization). Incidence and mortality appear to be on the rise, and prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population. Potential risk factors include occupational and environmental exposures, tobacco smoking, gastroesophageal reflux, and genetic factors. An accurate understanding of its epidemiology is important, especially as novel therapies are emerging. PMID:24348069

  17. [New tools in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Dournes, G; De Boeck, K; Bui, S; Vermeulen, F; Ramalho, A; Chateil, J-F; Laurent, F; Fayon, M

    2016-12-01

    The use of 3 novel tools available for the diagnosis and treatment in cystic fibrosis are described here. 1) The lung clearance index is a sensitive method which can detect functional impairment in the first months after birth. 2) Detailed morphological analyses of the lung can be performed with the new MRI sequences, without any contrast medium or risk of radiation. The analysis of functional MRI data (perfusion, diffusion, ventilation, inflammation) will be possible, and these data will be correlated to morphological data. The exploration of other organs such as the sinuses, liver and abdomen during the same examination represents another definite advantage. 3) Organoïds are a good example of personalized medicine. This tool explores CFTR function and treatment response in each of the 2000 or so known CFTR mutations. These tests are limited to specialized centers, mostly within a research context. However, their generalization after standardization is expected in the near future.

  18. Pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Paul J; Collard, Harold R; Jones, Kirk D

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease associated with aging that is characterized by the histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Although an understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF is incomplete, recent advances delineating specific clinical and pathologic features of IPF have led to better definition of the molecular pathways that are pathologically activated in the disease. In this review we highlight several of these advances, with a focus on genetic predisposition to IPF and how genetic changes, which occur primarily in epithelial cells, lead to activation of profibrotic pathways in epithelial cells. We then discuss the pathologic changes within IPF fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and we conclude with a summary of how these profibrotic pathways may be interrelated.

  19. Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Paul J.; Collard, Harold R.; Jones, Kirk D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease associated with aging that is characterized by the histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Although an understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF is incomplete, recent advances delineating specific clinical and pathologic features of IPF have led to better definition of the molecular pathways that are pathologically activated in the disease. In this review we highlight several of these advances, with a focus on genetic predisposition to IPF and how genetic changes, which occur primarily in epithelial cells, lead to activation of profibrotic pathways in epithelial cells. We then discuss the pathologic changes within IPF fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and we conclude with a summary of how these profibrotic pathways may be interrelated. PMID:24050627

  20. EGFR signaling in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in regulation of multiple biological processes, including proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and survival. Owing to its aberrant expression in a variety of malignant tumors, EGFR has been recognized as a target in anticancer therapy. Increasingly, evidence from animal studies indicates that EGFR signaling is also implicated in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. The therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition has not yet been evaluated in human kidney disease. In this article, we summarize recent research into the role of EGFR signaling in renal fibrogenesis, discuss the mechanism by which EGFR regulates this process, and consider the potential of EGFR as an antifibrotic target. PMID:26312153

  1. Tissue remodelling in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lars; Ruppert, Clemens; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Many lung diseases result in fibrotic remodelling. Fibrotic lung disorders can be divided into diseases with known and unknown aetiology. Among those with unknown aetiology, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common diagnosis. Because of its progressive character leading to a rapid decline in lung function, it is a fatal disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Thus, IPF has motivated many studies in the last few decades in order to increase our mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. The current concept suggests an ongoing injury of the alveolar epithelium, an impaired regeneration capacity, alveolar collapse and, finally, a fibroproliferative response. The origin of lung injury remains elusive but a diversity of factors, which will be discussed in this article, has been shown to be associated with IPF. Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells play a key role in lung fibrosis and their crucial role for epithelial regeneration, stabilisation of alveoli and interaction with fibroblasts, all known to be responsible for collagen deposition, will be illustrated. Whereas mechanisms of collagen deposition and fibroproliferation are the focus of many studies in the field, the awareness of other mechanisms in this disease is currently limited to biochemical and imaging studies including quantitative assessments of lung structure in IPF and animal models assigning alveolar collapse and collapse induration crucial roles for the degradation of the lung resulting in de-aeration and loss of surface area. Dysfunctional AE2 cells, instable alveoli and mechanical stress trigger remodelling that consists of collapsed alveoli absorbed by fibrotic tissue (i.e., collapse induration).

  2. Alcaligenes infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth; Conway, Steven P; Brownlee, Keith G; Etherington, Christine; Peckham, Daniel G

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic Alcaligenes species infection of the respiratory tract on the clinical status of patients with cystic fibrosis. We conducted a retrospective case-controlled study. The microbiological records of all patients attending the Leeds Regional Pediatric and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Units from 1992-1999 were examined. Chronic Alcaligenes infection was defined as a positive sputum culture on at least three occasions over a 6-month period. These patients were compared with controls matched for age, gender, respiratory function, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Respiratory function tests, anthropometric data, Shwachman-Kulczycki score, Northern chest x-ray score, intravenous and nebulized antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroid treatment were compared from 2 years before to 2 years after Alcaligenes infection. From a clinic population of 557, 13 (2.3%) fulfilled the criteria for chronic infection. The median age at acquisition of infection was 17.2 years (range, 6.5-33.6). There was no significant difference in the changes of percentage predicted values for FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75), or Shwachman-Kulczycki and Northern chest x-ray scores, or in weight, height, and body mass index z-scores between Alcaligenes-infected cases and controls. There was also no significant difference in the use of antibiotics (intravenous and nebulized) or corticosteroids (inhaled and oral). We conclude that in our clinic, chronic infection with Alcaligenes species was uncommon. Chronically infected patients showed no excess deterioration in clinical or pulmonary function status from 2 years before to 2 years after primary acquisition.

  3. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 1. Common and organ-specific mechanisms associated with tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological scarring process that leads to destruction of organ architecture and impairment of organ function. Chronic loss of organ function in most organs, including bone marrow, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, and skin, is associated with fibrosis, contributing to an estimated one third of natural deaths worldwide. Effective therapies to prevent or to even reverse existing fibrotic lesions are not yet available in any organ. There is hope that an understanding of common fibrosis pathways will lead to development of antifibrotic therapies that are effective in all of these tissues in the future. Here we review common and organ-specific pathways of tissue fibrosis. PMID:23255577

  4. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Alters Physiology but Has Similar Mortality to Pulmonary Fibrosis Without Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Studies have described individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), with preserved lung volumes, significant reductions in gas exchange, and high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. While physiologic changes in CPFE are well documented, there is little mortality data in the CPFE population compared to appropriate controls. A study was performed to determine the features and outcomes of a group of individuals with imaging and/or pathologic evidence of CPFE to determine if individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema have different features and survival than individuals with pulmonary fibrosis alone. We conducted a retrospective study at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Included in the study were individuals hospitalized over a 5-year period who were given a clinical diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis. Individuals with confirmed imaging or pathologic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis were divided into a study group with concomitant emphysema (CPFE group, n = 20) and a control group without emphysema (isolated pulmonary fibrosis (PF) group, n = 24). The CPFE group, all current or former cigarette smokers, had significantly larger lung volumes, more expiratory airflow obstruction, and worse gas exchange than the isolated pulmonary fibrosis group. Mortality did not differ between the groups. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema results in unique physiologic features but no difference in survival compared with a group with pulmonary fibrosis alone. PMID:20614219

  5. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease. PMID:22824096

  6. "End-stage" pulmonary fibrosis in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Teirstein, Alvin T; Morgenthau, Adam S

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an unusual "end stage" in patients with sarcoidosis. Fibrosis occurs in a minority of patients, and presents with a unique physiologic combination of airways dysfunction (obstruction) superimposed on the more common restrictive dysfunction. Imagin techniques are essential to the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Standard chest radiographs and CT scans may reveal streaks, bullae, cephalad retraction of the hilar areas, deviation of the trachea and tented diaphragm. Positive gallium and PET scans indicate residual reversible granulomatous disease and are important guides to therapy decisions. Treatment, usually with corticosteroids, is effective in those patients with positive scans, but fibrosis does not improve with any treatment. With severe functional impariment and patient disability, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure may supervene for which the patient will require treatment. Oxygen, careful diuresis, sildenafil and bosentan may be salutary. These patients are candidates for lung transplantation.

  7. Unilateral subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rehan, S; Javaid, Z; Al-Bermani, A

    2015-05-01

    Subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome is a rare, potentially devastating, posterior uveitis of unknown aetiology, characterised bilaterally by initial multifocal choroiditis with later progressive subretinal fibrosis. We report a rare case of unilateral subretinal fibrosis and uveitis syndrome. To date, there are only two case reports of unilateral disease. Our patient presented with unilateral blur and was found to have reduced visual acuity. A Bartonella profile was positive and a diagnosis of Bartonella posterior uveitis was made. Several positive ocular findings in the anterior chamber and on fundoscopy consistent with the syndrome were found. When steroid therapy alone could no longer control active inflammation, the immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate was added. Over time subretinal fibrosis became established sparing the macula and associated complications occurred, but with mycophenolate, at four years, our patient's visual acuity had improved and remains stable. Moreover, four years after her initial presentation, her condition remains strictly unilateral.

  8. Antioxidants as Potential Therapeutics for Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    DAY, BRIAN J.

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease encompasses a large group of chronic lung disorders associated with excessive tissue remodeling, scarring, and fibrosis. The evidence of a redox imbalance in lung fibrosis is substantial, and the rationale for testing antioxidants as potential new therapeutics for lung fibrosis is appealing. Current animal models of lung fibrosis have clear involvement of ROS in their pathogenesis. New classes of antioxidant agents divided into catalytic antioxidant mimetics and antioxidant scavengers are being developed. The catalytic antioxidant class is based on endogenous antioxidant enzymes and includes the manganese-containing macrocyclics, porphyrins, salens, and the non–metal-containing nitroxides. The antioxidant scavenging class is based on endogenous antioxidant molecules and includes the vitamin E analogues, thiols, lazaroids, and polyphenolic agents. Numerous studies have shown oxidative stress to be associated with many interstitial lung diseases and that these agents are effective in attenuating fibroproliferative responses in the lung of animals and humans. PMID:17999627

  9. Antibiotic-associated colitis and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, C S; Bye, P T; MacLeod, C; Selby, W S

    1992-09-01

    The use of antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis is widespread, and fecal carriage of Clostridium difficile occurs in up to 50% of these patients; however, antibiotic-associated colitis appears to be a rare occurrence. The reasons why this is so remain unknown. A case of antibiotic-associated colitis occurring in a patient with cystic fibrosis is described. Possible mechanisms for the rarity of antibiotic-associated colitis are reviewed and implications for prompt diagnosis and therapy are discussed.

  10. SAHA Suppresses Peritoneal Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Io, Kumiko; Nishino, Tomoya; Obata, Yoko; Kitamura, Mineaki; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Objective: Long-term peritoneal dialysis causes peritoneal fibrosis in submesothelial areas. However, the mechanism of peritoneal fibrosis is unclear. Epigenetics is the mechanism to induce heritable changes without any changes in DNA sequences. Among epigenetic modifications, histone acetylation leads to the transcriptional activation of genes. Recent studies indicate that histone acetylation is involved in the progression of fibrosis. Therefore, we examined the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on the progression of peritoneal fibrosis in mice. ♦ Methods: Peritoneal fibrosis was induced by the injection of chlorhexidine gluconate (CG) into the peritoneal cavity of mice every other day for 3 weeks. SAHA, or a dimethylsulfoxide and saline vehicle, was administered subcutaneously every day from the start of the CG injections for 3 weeks. Morphologic peritoneal changes were assessed by Masson’s trichrome staining, and fibrosis-associated factors were assessed by immunohistochemistry. ♦ Results: In CG-injected mice, a marked thickening of the submesothelial compact zone was observed. In contrast, the administration of SAHA suppressed the progression of submesothelial thickening and type III collagen accumulation in CG-injected mice. The numbers of fibroblast-specific protein-1-positive cells and α-smooth muscle actin α-positive cells were significantly decreased in the CG + SAHA group compared to that of the CG group. The level of histone acetylation was reduced in the peritoneum of the CG group, whereas it was increased in the CG + SAHA group. ♦ Conclusions: Our results indicate that SAHA can suppress peritoneal thickening and fibrosis in mice through up-regulation of histone acetylation. These results suggest that SAHA may have therapeutic potential for treating peritoneal fibrosis. PMID:24584598

  11. SAHA Suppresses Peritoneal Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Io, Kumiko; Nishino, Tomoya; Obata, Yoko; Kitamura, Mineaki; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Long-term peritoneal dialysis causes peritoneal fibrosis in submesothelial areas. However, the mechanism of peritoneal fibrosis is unclear. Epigenetics is the mechanism to induce heritable changes without any changes in DNA sequences. Among epigenetic modifications, histone acetylation leads to the transcriptional activation of genes. Recent studies indicate that histone acetylation is involved in the progression of fibrosis. Therefore, we examined the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on the progression of peritoneal fibrosis in mice. Peritoneal fibrosis was induced by the injection of chlorhexidine gluconate (CG) into the peritoneal cavity of mice every other day for 3 weeks. SAHA, or a dimethylsulfoxide and saline vehicle, was administered subcutaneously every day from the start of the CG injections for 3 weeks. Morphologic peritoneal changes were assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, and fibrosis-associated factors were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In CG-injected mice, a marked thickening of the submesothelial compact zone was observed. In contrast, the administration of SAHA suppressed the progression of submesothelial thickening and type III collagen accumulation in CG-injected mice. The numbers of fibroblast-specific protein-1-positive cells and α-smooth muscle actin α-positive cells were significantly decreased in the CG + SAHA group compared to that of the CG group. The level of histone acetylation was reduced in the peritoneum of the CG group, whereas it was increased in the CG + SAHA group. Our results indicate that SAHA can suppress peritoneal thickening and fibrosis in mice through up-regulation of histone acetylation. These results suggest that SAHA may have therapeutic potential for treating peritoneal fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  12. Mechanisms of fibrosis in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    He, Yingli; Jin, Li; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhi; Chen, Tianyan; Zhao, Yingren

    2015-07-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a condition with high mortality and morbidity. Fibrosis in chronic liver disease was extensively researched, whereas fibrosis and underlying mechanism in acute liver failure remains unclear. Hepatitis B virus related ALF patients were recruited to investigate if there was ongoing fibrosis by liver histology and liver stiffness measurement(LSM) analysis as well as fibrosis markers assay. Sera HMGB1 were kinetically detected in progression and remission stage of ALF. Hepatic stellate cell(HSC) activation by HMGB1 was explored by testing mRNA and protein level of α-SMA and collagen 1a1 by using qPCR and western blot. Autophagy induction by HMGB1 was explored by LC3-II conversion, autophagy flux and fluorescence. Firstly, ongoing fibrosis in progression stage of ALF was confirmed by histological analysis, LS measurement as well as fibrosis markers detection. HSC activation and autophagy induction in explanted liver tissue also revealed. Next, kinetic monitoring sera HMGB1 revealed elevated HMGB1 in progression stage of ALF vs HBsAg carrier, and drop back to base level in remission stage. Thirdly, rHMGB1 dose dependently activated HSCs, as indicated by increased mRNA and proteins level in α-SMA and collagen 1a1. Moreover, autophagy was induced in HSC treated with rHMGB1, as illustrated by increased LC3 lipidation, elevated autophagy flux and GFP-LC3 puncta. Acute liver failure is accompanied by ongoing fibrosis, HSC activation and autophagy induction. Increased HMGB1 activates HSC via autophagy induction. Those findings integrate HMGB1, HSCs activation, autophagy into a common framework that underlies the fibrosis in ALF. © 2014 The Authors. Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ovarian Fibrosis: A Phenomenon of Concern

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Shi, Li-Bing; Zhang, Song-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Ovarian fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of ovarian fibroblasts and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) and it is one of the principal reasons for ovarian dysfunction. This review aimed to investigate the pathogenetic mechanism of ovarian fibrosis and to clarify the relationship between ovarian diseases and fibrosis. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for English language articles published up to November 2016. The search terms included ovarian fibrosis OR fibrosis, ovarian chocolate cyst OR ovarian endometrioma, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), premature ovarian failure, ECM, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and combinations of these terms. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the pathogenic mechanism of ovarian fibrosis and related ovarian diseases. Results: Many cytokines, such as MMPs, TIMPs, TGF-β1, CTGF, PPAR-γ, VEGF, and ET-1, are involved in ovarian fibrogenesis. Ovarian fibrogenesis is associated with various ovarian diseases, including ovarian chocolate cyst, PCOS, and premature ovarian failure. One finding of particular interest is that fibrogenesis in peripheral tissues around an ovarian chocolate cyst commonly causes ovarian function diminution, and therefore, this medical problem should arouse widespread concern in clinicians worldwide. Conclusions: Patients with ovarian fibrosis are susceptible to infertility and tend to have decreased responses to assisted fertility treatment. Thus, protection of ovarian function should be a priority for women who wish to reproduce when making therapeutic decisions about ovarian fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:28139522

  14. Innovative approaches to the therapy of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Joao A; Thannickal, Victor J

    2009-11-01

    The lung in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is susceptible to fibrosis and the ensuing respiratory insufficiency contributes to significant morbidity and mortality in this disease. The lack of effective therapies for pulmonary fibrosis has spurred a re-evaluation of pathobiological paradigms and therapeutic strategies in scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging new therapeutic targets that modulate pro-fibrotic phenotypes of tissue-resident cells and the associated aberrant tissue remodeling responses in fibrotic disorders. Progressive forms of tissue fibrosis, including scleroderma, are characterized by an accumulation of activated mesenchymal cells and their secreted extracellular matrix proteins in association with dysrepair of epithelial and endothelial cells. Recent studies suggest that emergence of cellular phenotypes that perpetuate loss of cellular homeostasis is characteristic of many fibrosis-related clinical syndromes. Therapeutic strategies that modulate the fate/phenotype of reparative structural cells, including epithelial, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells, offer new opportunities for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of fibrosis.

  15. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Situs inversus, bronchiectasis, and sinusitis and its relation to immotile cilia: history of the diseases and their discoverers-Manes Kartagener and Bjorn Afzelius.

    PubMed

    Berdon, Walter E; Willi, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of Kartagener's syndrome to immobile cilia syndrome is a fascinating merging of clinical observations and basic science in Zurich, Stockholm, and Toronto. In 1933, Manes Kartagener, a Zurich pulmonary physician, reported four patients with the triad of sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. In the following decades, he reviewed reports of hundreds of cases, but the fact that the male patients with the condition never had offspring eluded his notice. In the 1970s, Bjorn Afzelius, a Ph.D. ultrastructuralist from Stockholm, reported cilia immotility in infertile males, some of the cases occurring in families. Half of the cases had Kartagener's triad. The observation of Afzelius was soon applied to children by Jennifer Sturgess, a Ph.D. ultrastructuralist, and her medical colleagues in Toronto. With over 500 MEDLINE references since 1966 on Kartagener's and over 1,000 references on immotile cilia, the causes of the pulmonary infections have become clearer as the patients demonstrate impaired clearance of mucus with resultant sinus and bronchial disease. The cause of the situs inversus remains elusive to this day. It is appropriate to call the condition Kartagener-Afzelius syndrome.

  17. Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) test accurately identifies liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Parkes, J; Guha, I N; Roderick, P; Harris, S; Cross, R; Manos, M M; Irving, W; Zaitoun, A; Wheatley, M; Ryder, S; Rosenberg, W

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of liver fibrosis is important in determining prognosis and evaluating interventions. Due to limitations of accuracy and patient hazard of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods have been sought to provide information on liver fibrosis, including the European liver fibrosis (ELF) test, shown to have good diagnostic accuracy for the detection of moderate and severe fibrosis. Access to independent cohorts of patients has provided an opportunity to explore if this test could be simplified. This paper reports the simplification of the ELF test and its ability to identity severity of liver fibrosis in external validation studies in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Paired biopsy and serum samples from 347 naïve patients with CHC in three independent cohorts were analysed. Diagnostic performance characteristics were derived (AUROC, sensitivity and specificity, predictive values), and clinical utility modelling performed to determine the proportion of biopsies that could have been avoided if ELF test was used in this patient group. It was possible to simplify the original ELF test without loss of performance and the new algorithm is reported. The simplified ELF test was able to predict severe fibrosis [pooled AUROC of 0.85 (95% CI 0.81-0.89)] and using clinical utility modelling to predict severe fibrosis (Ishak stages 4-6; METAVIR stages 3 and 4) 81% of biopsies could have been avoided (65% correctly). Issues of spectrum effect in diagnostic test evaluations are discussed. In chronic hepatitis C a simplified ELF test can detect severe liver fibrosis with good accuracy.

  18. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  19. NEPHROGENIC SYSTEMIC FIBROSIS: CURRENT CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was first described in 2000 as a scleromyxedema-like illness in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The relationship between NSF and gadolinium contrast during magnetic resonance imaging was postulated in 2006, and subsequently, virtually all published cases of NSF have had documented prior exposure to gadolinium-containing contrast agents. NSF has been reported in patients from a variety of ethnic backgrounds from America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Skin lesions may evolve into poorly demarcated thickened plaques that range from erythematous to hyperpigmented. With time, the skin becomes markedly indurated and tethered to the underlying fascia. Extracutaneous manifestations also occur. The diagnosis of NSF is based on the presence of characteristic clinical features in the setting of chronic kidney disease, and substantiated by skin histology. Differential diagnosis is with scleroderma, scleredema, scleromyxedema, graft-versus-host disease, etc. NSF has a relentlessly progressive course. While there is no consistently successful treatment for NSF, improving renal function seems to slow or arrest the progression of this condition. Because essentially all cases of NSF have developed following exposure to a gadolinium-containing contrast agent, prevention of this devastating condition involves the careful avoidance of administering these agents to individuals at risk. PMID:21572795

  20. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  1. [Azithromycin therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Cantón Moreno, Rafael

    2004-03-06

    Progressive lung disease, caused by chronic endobronchial colonization, is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Several pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are responsible for this effect. The steadily improving prognosis of CF has been attributed to the use of antibiotics with activity against these organisms. Despite a significant increase in the amount of published material demonstrating the potential role of macrolide antibiotics as antiinflammatory agents and their effects on bacterial virulence, their mechanism of action in CF patients is still unknown. Although there is a limited number of clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of azithromycin (AZM) in CF, increasing evidence suggests that 3 to 6-month AZM treatment in CF patients is safe and well tolerated. This treatment results in clinical improvement, decreasing the number of pulmonary exacerbations and increasing pulmonary function. Therefore, chronic treatment with AZM should be considered in CF patients added to conventional therapy. Clinical experience with macrolides other than AZM in CF patients is very limited.

  2. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  3. Absence of mutations in the interspecies conserved regions of the CFTR promoter region in cystic fibrosis (CF) and CF related patients.

    PubMed Central

    Verlingue, C; Vuillaumier, S; Mercier, B; Le Gac, M; Elion, J; Férec, C; Denamur, E

    1998-01-01

    This study was aimed at testing if a 5.2 kb untranslated region on both sides of the first CFTR exon, shown to contain regulatory elements, could carry mutations responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) or CF related phenotypes. Selection of the DNA segments studied within this region was based upon the identification of conserved sequences throughout evolution (phylogenetic footprints, PFs). Comparison of the CFTR sequences in eight species representing four orders of mammals (man, gibbon, rhesus monkey, squirrel, monkey, rabbit, cow, rat, and mouse) identified four clusters of PFs within the 3.9 kb of DNA sequence upstream from the initiation codon, as well as two nearby PFs at +1 kb within intron 1. Six DNA segments containing PFs were scanned for mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in patients with CF (n = 29), congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (n = 143), or disseminated bronchiectasis (n = 33), for whom only one or no mutations had been identified despite extensive DGGE analysis of the 27 CFTR exons and exon/intron boundaries. Only one polymorphism (-966 T-->G) was identified with a frequency of 2.2% and no other sequence variations were found. This study reinforces the idea that the promoter region in the CFTR is not frequently mutated. PMID:9507393

  4. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wynn, T A

    2008-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined by the overgrowth, hardening, and/or scarring of various tissues and is attributed to excess deposition of extracellular matrix components including collagen. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli including persistent infections, autoimmune reactions, allergic responses, chemical insults, radiation, and tissue injury. Although current treatments for fibrotic diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, systemic sclerosis, progressive kidney disease, and cardiovascular fibrosis typically target the inflammatory response, there is accumulating evidence that the mechanisms driving fibrogenesis are distinct from those regulating inflammation. In fact, some studies have suggested that ongoing inflammation is needed to reverse established and progressive fibrosis. The key cellular mediator of fibrosis is the myofibroblast, which when activated serves as the primary collagen-producing cell. Myofibroblasts are generated from a variety of sources including resident mesenchymal cells, epithelial and endothelial cells in processes termed epithelial/endothelial-mesenchymal (EMT/EndMT) transition, as well as from circulating fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are derived from bone-marrow stem cells. Myofibroblasts are activated by a variety of mechanisms, including paracrine signals derived from lymphocytes and macrophages, autocrine factors secreted by myofibroblasts, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) produced by pathogenic organisms that interact with pattern recognition receptors (i.e. TLRs) on fibroblasts. Cytokines (IL-13, IL-21, TGF-beta1), chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1beta), angiogenic factors (VEGF), growth factors (PDGF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), acute phase proteins (SAP), caspases, and components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (ANG II) have been identified as important regulators of fibrosis and are being

  6. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  7. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  8. Liver fibrosis: the 2017 state of art.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, Gian P; Rosso, Chiara; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Saracco, Giorgio M; Pellicano, Rinaldo

    2017-09-05

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to a wide spectrum of chronic liver injuries. It is characterized by loss of hepatocytes and alteration in hepatic architecture following an imbalance between extracellular matrix synthesis and degradation. Irrespectively of underlying etiology, fibrosis may progress to cirrhosis and specific pathogenetic mechanisms as well as different disease patterns may be identified according to etiology. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard for fibrosis assessment, despite the fact that it is invasive, has poor patient compliance and is not exempt of complications. Several reliable and non- invasive tools are currently used in clinical practice, including imaging methods and surrogate serum biomarkers, commonly combined into composite scores. The main limitation of non-invasive methods is the low performance in the discrimination of intermediate stages of fibrosis. However, with the recent availability of novel treatment options, particularly for chronic hepatitis C, a precise staging of liver fibrosis is becoming clinically less relevant. Conversely, since patients with cirrhosis need to be monitored for the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development, the accurate detection of this condition is a primary endpoint. Finally, several promising antifibrotic agents are under investigation in phase I and II trials. Nevertheless, further efforts are needed for the identification of novel potential targets for the development of antifibrotic drugs able to arrest, and possibly revert liver fibrogenesis.

  9. Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, R D; Rodrigues, M M; Crawford, J S

    1978-01-01

    Congential fibrosis of the extraocular muscles is characterized by the replacement of normal contractile muscle tissue by fibrous tissue or fibrous bands in varying degrees. The clinical entities which result from the fibrous replacement can be classified under the following headings: general fibrosis syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the inferior rectus muscle with blepharoptosis, strabismus fixus, vertical retraction syndrome and congential unilateral fibrosis, enophthalmos and blepharoptosis. Genetic factors may or may not be apparent. One pedigree with general fibrosis syndrome was traced through five generations. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated replacement of normal muscle by collagen and dense fibrous tissue with occasional areas of degenerated skeletal muscle. The surgical mangement attempts to achieve some functional readjustment of the ocular and lid position as well as the abnormal head posture. The surgical results were considered satisfactory when compared with the original position of the eyes and the backward head tilt. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 9 C FIGURE 9 D PMID:754372

  10. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of α1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  11. Noninvasive Imaging of Experimental Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Gang; Antony, Veena B.; Ding, Qiang; Nath, Hrudaya; Eary, Janet F.; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Small animal models of lung fibrosis are essential for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying human fibrotic lung diseases; additionally, they are useful for preclinical testing of candidate antifibrotic agents. The current end-point measures of experimental lung fibrosis involve labor-intensive histological and biochemical analyses. These measures fail to account for dynamic changes in the disease process in individual animals and are limited by the need for large numbers of animals for longitudinal studies. The emergence of noninvasive imaging technologies provides exciting opportunities to image lung fibrosis in live animals as often as needed and to longitudinally track the efficacy of novel antifibrotic compounds. Data obtained by noninvasive imaging provide complementary information to histological and biochemical measurements. In addition, the use of noninvasive imaging in animal studies reduces animal usage, thus satisfying animal welfare concerns. In this article, we review these new imaging modalities with the potential for evaluation of lung fibrosis in small animal models. Such techniques include micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and multimodal imaging systems including PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It is anticipated that noninvasive imaging will be increasingly used in animal models of fibrosis to gain insights into disease pathogenesis and as preclinical tools to assess drug efficacy. PMID:25679265

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Speca, Silvia; Giusti, Ilaria; Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis is a chronic and progressive process characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to stiffening and/or scarring of the involved tissue. Intestinal fibrosis may develop in several different enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease. It develops through complex cell, extracellular matrix, cytokine and growth factor interactions. Distinct cell types are involved in intestinal fibrosis, such as resident mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) but also ECM-producing cells derived from epithelial and endothelial cells (through a process termed epithelial- and endothelial-mesenchymal transition), stellate cells, pericytes, local or bone marrow-derived stem cells. The most important soluble factors that regulate the activation of these cells include cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, components of the renin-angiotensin system, angiogenic factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin, and products of oxidative stress. It soon becomes clear that although inflammation is responsible for triggering the onset of the fibrotic process, it only plays a minor role in the progression of this condition, as fibrosis may advance in a self-perpetuating fashion. Definition of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal fibrosis may provide the key to developing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22851857

  13. Alveolar epithelial disintegrity in pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Joao; Zhou, Yong; Luckhardt, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of IPF primarily center on dysregulated epithelial cell repair and altered epithelial-mesenchymal communication and extracellular matrix deposition following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or environmental toxins. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed toward the role of the intercellular junctional complex in determining the specific properties of epithelia in pulmonary diseases. Additionally, recent genomewide association studies suggest that specific genetic variants predictive of epithelial cell dysfunction may confer susceptibility to the development of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A number of genetic disorders linked to pulmonary fibrosis and familial interstitial pneumonias are associated with loss of epithelial integrity. However, the potential links between extrapulmonary clinical syndromes associated with defects in epithelial cells and the development of pulmonary fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we report a case of hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia that presented with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. This case illustrates a more generalizable concept of epithelial disintegrity in the development of fibrotic lung diseases, which is explored in greater detail in this review article. PMID:27233996

  14. Targeting Hepatic Fibrosis in Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Montano-Loza, Aldo J; Thandassery, Ragesh B; Czaja, Albert J

    2016-11-01

    Hepatic fibrosis develops or progresses in 25 % of patients with autoimmune hepatitis despite corticosteroid therapy. Current management regimens lack reliable noninvasive methods to assess changes in hepatic fibrosis and interventions that disrupt fibrotic pathways. The goals of this review are to indicate promising noninvasive methods to monitor hepatic fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis and identify anti-fibrotic interventions that warrant evaluation. Laboratory methods can differentiate cirrhosis from non-cirrhosis, but their accuracy in distinguishing changes in histological stage is uncertain. Radiological methods include transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography. Methods based on ultrasonography are comparable in detecting advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, but their performances may be compromised by hepatic inflammation and obesity. Magnetic resonance elastography has excellent performance parameters for all histological stages in diverse liver diseases, is uninfluenced by inflammatory activity or body habitus, has been superior to other radiological methods in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and may emerge as the preferred instrument to evaluate fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis. Promising anti-fibrotic interventions are site- and organelle-specific agents, especially inhibitors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases, transforming growth factor beta, inducible nitric oxide synthase, lysyl oxidases, and C-C chemokine receptors types 2 and 5. Autoimmune hepatitis has a pro-fibrotic propensity, and noninvasive radiological methods, especially magnetic resonance elastography, and site- and organelle-specific interventions, especially selective antioxidants and inhibitors of collagen cross-linkage, may emerge to strengthen current management strategies.

  15. Toward surface quantification of liver fibrosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuting; Kang, Chiang Huen; Xu, Shuoyu; Tuo, Xiaoye; Trasti, Scott; Tai, Dean C. S.; Raja, Anju Mythreyi; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Welsch, Roy; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring liver fibrosis progression by liver biopsy is important for certain treatment decisions, but repeated biopsy is invasive. We envision redefinition or elimination of liver biopsy with surface scanning of the liver with minimally invasive optical methods. This would be possible only if the information contained on or near liver surfaces accurately reflects the liver fibrosis progression in the liver interior. In our study, we acquired the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of liver tissues from bile duct-ligated rat model of liver fibrosis. We extracted morphology-based features, such as total collagen, collagen in bile duct areas, bile duct proliferation, and areas occupied by remnant hepatocytes, and defined the capsule and subcapsular regions on the liver surface based on image analysis of features. We discovered a strong correlation between the liver fibrosis progression on the anterior surface and interior in both liver lobes, where biopsy is typically obtained. The posterior surface exhibits less correlation with the rest of the liver. Therefore, scanning the anterior liver surface would obtain similar information to that obtained from biopsy for monitoring liver fibrosis progression.

  16. Evidence of epigenetic tags in cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Zullo, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Infante, Teresa; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    In cardiac fibrosis, following an injury or a stress, non-functional fibrotic tissue substitutes normal myocardium, thus leading to progressive heart failure. Activated fibroblasts are principal determinants of cardiac fibrosis by producing excessive fibrotic extracellular matrix and causing hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs have been involved in these mechanisms. Therefore, there is a strong interest in reverting such epigenetic transformations in order to arrest myocardial fibrotic degeneration. Demethylating agents, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, some selective histone deacetylase inhibitors, including mocetinostat, trichostatin A, and MPT0E014, have a direct action on important inducers of cardiac fibrosis. Also dietary compounds, such as resveratrol, can suppress the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Although in vivo and in vitro studies suggest specific epigenetic therapies to treat cardiac fibrosis, the related clinical trials are still lacking. A better understanding of the epigenetic effects of dietary compounds (e.g. curcumin and green tea catechins) on the onset and progression of cardiac fibrosis, will allow the identification of protective dietary patterns and/or the generation of novel potential epidrugs.

  17. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YA-LEI; ZHU, RONG-TAO; SUN, YU-LING

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the result of a sustained wound healing response to sustained chronic liver injury, which includes viral, alcoholic and autoimmune hepatitis. Hepatic regeneration is the dominant outcome of liver damage. The outcomes of successful repair are the replacement of dead epithelial cells with healthy epithelial cells, and reconstruction of the normal hepatic structure and function. Prevention of the development of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may control and even reverse liver fibrosis. EMT is a critical process for an epithelial cell to undergo a conversion to a mesenchymal phenotype, and is believed to be an inflammation-induced response, which may have a central role in liver fibrosis. The origin of fibrogenic cells in liver fibrosis remains controversial. Numerous studies have investigated the origin of all fibrogenic cells within the liver and the mechanism of the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of EMT programs during numerous chronic liver diseases. The present study aimed to summarize the evidence to explain the possible role of EMT in liver fibrosis. PMID:26998262

  18. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  19. Gene mutation in microRNA target sites of CFTR gene: a novel pathogenetic mechanism in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Amato, Felice; Seia, Manuela; Giordano, Sonia; Elce, Ausilia; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disorder among Caucasians. It depends on alterations of a chloride channel expressed by most epithelial cells and encoded by CFTR gene. Also using scanning techniques to analyze the whole coding regions of CFTR gene, mutations are not identified in up to 10% of CF alleles, and such figure increases in CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD). Other gene regions may be the site of causing-disease mutations. We searched for genetic variants in the 1500 bp of CFTR 3' untranslated region, typical target of microRNA (miRNA) posttranscriptional gene regulation, in either CF patients with the F508del homozygous genotype and different clinical expression (n = 20), CF (n = 32) and CFTR-RD (n = 43) patients with one or none mutation after CFTR scanning and in controls (n = 50). We identified three SNPs, one of which, the c.*1043A>C, was located in a region predicted to bind miR-433 and miR-509-3p. Such mutation was peculiar of a CFTR-RD patient that had Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens (CBAVD), diffuse bronchiectasis, a borderline sweat chloride test and the heterozygous severe F508del mutation on the other allele. The expression analysis demonstrated that the c.*1043A>C increases the affinity for miR-509-3p and slightly decreases that for the miR-433. Both miRNAs cause in vitro a reduced expression of CFTR protein. Thus, the c.*1043A>C may act as a mild CFTR mutation enhancing the affinity for inhibitory miRNAs as a novel pathogenetic mechanism in CF.

  20. Cystic Fibrosis from Laboratory to Bedside: The Role of A20 in NF-κB-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Aidan; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Schock, Bettina C; Ennis, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lifelong, inflammatory multi-organ disease and the most common lethal, genetic condition in Caucasian populations, with a median survival rate of 41.5 years. Pulmonary disease, characterized by infective exacerbations, bronchiectasis and increasing airway insufficiency is the most serious manifestation of this disease process, currently responsible for over 80% of CF deaths. Chronic dysregulation of the innate immune and host inflammatory response has been proposed as a mechanism central to this genetic condition, primarily driven by the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Chronic activation of this transcription factor complex leads to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators such as IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. A20 has been described as a central and inducible negative regulator of NF-κB. This intracellular molecule negatively regulates NF-κB-driven pro-inflammatory signalling upon toll-like receptor activation at the level of TRAF6 activation. Silencing of A20 increases cellular levels of p65 and induces a pro-inflammatory state. We have previously shown that A20 expression positively correlates with lung function (FEV1%) in CF. Despite improvement in survival rates in recent years, advancements in available therapies have been incremental. We demonstrate that the experimental use of naturally occurring plant diterpenes such as gibberellin on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell lines reduces IL-8 release in an A20-dependent manner. We discuss how the use of a novel bio-informatics gene expression connectivity-mapping technique to identify small molecule compounds that similarly mimic the action of A20 may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches capable of reducing chronic airway inflammation in CF.

  1. Prospective evaluation of respiratory exacerbations in children with cystic fibrosis from newborn screening to 5 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Catherine Ann; Vidmar, Suzanna; Cheney, Joyce L; Carlin, John B; Armstrong, David S; Cooper, Peter J; Grimwood, Keith; Moodie, Marj; Robertson, Colin F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Tiddens, Harm A; Wainwright, Claire E

    2013-01-01

    Background Newborn screening allows novel treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) to be trialled in early childhood before irreversible lung injury occurs. As respiratory exacerbations are a potential trial outcome variable, we determined their rate, duration and clinical features in preschool children with CF; and whether they were associated with growth, lung structure and function at age 5 years. Methods Respiratory exacerbations were recorded prospectively in Australasian CF Bronchoalveolar Lavage trial subjects from enrolment after newborn screening to age 5 years, when all participants underwent clinical assessment, chest CT scans and spirometry. Results 168 children (88 boys) experienced 2080 exacerbations, at an average rate of 3.66 exacerbations per person-year; 80.1% were community managed and 19.9% required hospital admission. There was an average increase in exacerbation rate of 9% (95% CI 4% to 14%; p<0.001) per year of age. Exacerbation rate differed by site (p<0.001) and was 26% lower (95% CI 12% to 38%) in children receiving 12 months of prophylactic antibiotics. The rate of exacerbations in the first 2 years was associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s z scores. Ever having a hospital-managed exacerbation was associated with bronchiectasis (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.13 to 6.31) in chest CT scans, and lower weight z scores at 5 years of age (coefficient −0.39, 95% CI −0.74 to −0.05). Conclusions Respiratory exacerbations in young children are markers for progressive CF lung disease and are potential trial outcome measures for novel treatments in this age group. PMID:23345574

  2. Clinical Course and Changes in High-Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis without Honeycombing

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Masashi; Baba, Tomohisa; Kataoka, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshihito; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Ikushima, Soichiro; Johkoh, Takeshi; Sakai, Fumikazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Hebisawa, Akira; Kawabata, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Ogura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) do not have honeycombing on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) at their initial evaluation. The clinical course and sequential changes in HRCT findings in these patients are not fully understood. We reviewed the cases of 43 patients with IPF without honeycombing on initial HRCT from institutions throughout Japan. All patients were diagnosed with IPF based on a surgical lung biopsy. Multidisciplinary discussions were held five times between 2011 and 2014, to exclude alternative etiologies. We evaluated the sequential changes in HRCT findings in 30 patients with IPF. We classified these 30 patients into three groups based on their HRCT patterns and clarified the clinical characteristics and prognosis among the groups. The patterns of all 30 patients on initial HRCT corresponded to a possible usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern which was described in the 2011 International Statement. On long-term follow-up (71.0±38.7 standard deviation [SD] months), honeycombing was seen in 16 patients (53%, the HoneyCo group); traction bronchiectasis or cysts without honeycombing was observed in 12 patients (40%, the NoHoneyCo group), and two patients showed no interval change (7%, the NoChange group) on HRCT. The mean survival periods of the HoneyCo and NoHoneyCo groups were 67.1 and 61.2 months, respectively (p = 0.76). There are some patients with IPF whose conditions chronically progress without honeycombing on HRCT. The appearance of honeycombing on HRCT during the follow-up might not be related to prognosis. PMID:27829068

  3. Quantifying fibrosis in head and neck cancer treatment: An overview.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Emma C; Brunner, Markus; Alexander, Ashlin J; Clark, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Fibrosis is a common late complication of radiotherapy and/or surgical treatment for head and neck cancers. Fibrosis is difficult to quantify and formal methods of measure are not well recognized. The purpose of this review was to summarize the methods available to quantify neck fibrosis. A PubMed search of articles was carried out using key words "neck" and "fibrosis." Many methods have been used to assess fibrosis, however, there is no preferred methodology. Specific to neck fibrosis, most studies have relied upon hand palpation rating scales. Indentation and suction techniques have been used to mechanically quantify neck fibrosis. There is scope to develop applications of ultrasound, dielectric, bioimpedance, and MRI techniques for use in the neck region. Quantitative assessment of neck fibrosis is sought after in order to compare treatment regimens and improve quality of life outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  5. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  6. The role of EMT in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Carew, Rosemarie M; Wang, Bo; Kantharidis, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    It is clear that the well-described phenomenon of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a pivotal role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis and cancer progression. EMTs have been classified into three subtypes based on the functional consequences and biomarker context in which they are encountered. This review will highlight findings on type II EMT as a direct contributor to the kidney myofibroblast population in the development of renal fibrosis, specifically in diabetic nephropathy, the signalling molecules and the pathways involved in type II EMT and changes in the expression of specific miRNA with the EMT process. These findings have provided new insights into the activation and development of EMT during disease processes and may lead to possible therapeutic interventions to suppress EMTs and potentially reverse organ fibrosis.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease affects those individuals with polygenic risk factors. The identified risk loci indicate that the genetic architecture of Crohn’s disease involves both innate and adaptive immunity and the response to the intestinal environment including the microbiome. Genetic risk alone, however, predicts only 25% of disease, indicating that other factors, including the intestinal environment, can shape the epigenome and also confer heritable risk to patients. Patients with Crohn’s disease can have purely inflammatory disease, penetrating disease or fibrostenosis. Analysis of the genetic risk combined with epigenetic marks of Crohn’s disease and other disease associated with organ fibrosis reveals common events are affecting the genes and pathways key to development of fibrosis. This review will focus on what is known about the mechanisms by which genetic and epigenetic risk factors determine development of fibrosis in Crohn’s disease and contrast that with other fibrotic conditions. PMID:27536359

  8. [Regeneration and fibrosis of corneal tissues].

    PubMed

    Simirskiĭ, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the features of the regeneration of corneal tissue and its disorders leading to the development of fibrosis are considered. The data on the presence of stem (clonogenic) cell pool in the corneal tissues (epithelium, endothelium, stroma) are given; these cells can serve as a source for regeneration of the tissues at injury or various diseases. The main steps of regeneration of corneal tissues and their disorders that lead to outstripping proliferation of myofibroblasts and secretion of extracellular matrix in the wound area and eventually cause the formation of connective tissue scar and corneal opacity are considered. Particular attention is given to the successes of translational medicine in the treatment of corneal tissue fibrosis. The methods of cell therapy aimed at the restoration of stem cell pool of corneal tissues are the most promising. Gene therapy provides more opportunities; one of its main objectives is the suppression of the myofibroblast proliferation responsible for the development of fibrosis.

  9. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2011-07-06

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 23 February 2011).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (EMBASE) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 30th March 2011). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (95% confidence

  10. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2014-09-08

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 22 August 2013).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (Embase) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 01 February 2014 ). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (i.e. 3.51 kg) (95

  11. [Therapeutical targets for revert liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    García B, Leonel; Gálvez G, Javier; Armendáriz B, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common response to chronic liver injury, ultimately leading to cirrhosis and its complications: portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatic encephalopathy, and hepatocellular carcinoma and others. Efficient and well-tolerated antifibrotic drugs are still lacking, and current treatment of hepatic fibrosis is limited to withdrawal of the noxious agent. Efforts over the past decade have mainly focused on fibrogenic cells generating the scarring response, although promising data on inhibition of parenchymal injury or reduction of liver inflammation have also been obtained. A large number of approaches have been validated in culture studies and in animal models, and several clinical trials are underway or anticipated for a growing number of molecules. This review highlight recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and discusses mechanistically based strategies that have recently emerged.

  12. Matrix Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; O'Reilly, Philip; Antony, Veena B; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema are chronic lung diseases characterized by a progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A hallmark of these diseases is recurrent or persistent alveolar epithelial injury, typically caused by common environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke. We propose that critical determinants of the outcome of the injury-repair processes that result in fibrosis versus emphysema are mesenchymal cell fate and associated extracellular matrix dynamics. In this review, we explore the concept that regulation of mesenchymal cells under the influence of soluble factors, in particular transforming growth factor-β1, and the extracellular matrix determine the divergent tissue remodeling responses seen in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

  13. Essential Role of Lyn in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hung; Birtolo, Chiara; Chheda, Chintan; Yang, Wendy; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Liu, Sandy T.; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Lewis, Michael S.; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Pandol, Stephen J.; Ptasznik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic disorders involve replacement of normal parenchyma with myofibroblasts, which deposit connective tissue, leading to obliteration of the function of the underlying organ. The treatment options are inadequate and reflect the fact that signaling targets in myofibroblasts are unknown. Here we identify the hyperactive Lyn signaling in myofibroblasts of patients with chronic pancreatitis-induced fibrosis. Lyn activation coexpress with markers of activated myofibroblasts, and is increased ~11-fold in chronic pancreatitis compared to normal tissue. Inhibition of Lyn with siRNA or INNO-406 leads to the substantial decrease of migration and proliferation of human chronic pancreatitis myofibroblasts in vitro, while leaving migration and proliferation of normal myofibroblasts only slightly affected. Furthermore, inhibition of Lyn prevents synthesis of procollagen and collagen in myofibroblasts in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis-induced fibrosis. We conclude that Lyn, as a positive regulator of myofibroblast migration, proliferation, and collagen production, is a key target for preventing fibrosis. PMID:27630579

  14. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2015-04-09

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 February 2015.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 13 February 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. The searches identified 38 trials; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status necessitates it.

  15. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2012-12-12

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 03 September 2012.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books