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Sample records for non-destructive magic angle

  1. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  2. Non-destructive microwave evaluation of TBC delamination induced by acute angle laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, H. K.; Li, Lin; Wu, Z.; Anderson, B.; Williams, P.

    2007-01-01

    Laser drilling has been applied to the production of cooling holes of various size and angles in the modern aerospace gas turbine components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, combustion chambers and afterburner. These parts are usually made of heat resistant nickel superalloys. The superalloy substrate is coated with yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to protect them from reaching excessive temperatures in hot engine environments. Drilling the parts at acute angles to the surface is complicated because (i) multiple layers are being drilled through, (ii) the melt ejection and heat flow patterns around the hole are non-symmetrical and (iii) the drilling distance is greater than when drilling normal to the surface. In a previous investigation by the authors, delamination of TBC was addressed as a main problem of angled drilling and mechanisms involved were discussed. Characterization of delamination cracks was normally performed via metallographic techniques. It involves sectioning the samples using an abrasive cutting machine, grinding with successively finer silicon carbide paper up to the centre of the hole and polishing to allow optical microscopic analysis of the cracks. However, clamping and sectioning process of thermal-spray-coated workpieces can introduce cracks in brittle coatings due to the drag of the cut-off wheels. Hence, it is not possible to decide if the delamination is caused as a result of post-process sectioning or laser drilling. In this paper, a microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique is employed to evaluate the integrity of TBC after acute angle laser drilling. An Agilent 8510 XF network analyser operating over the frequency range of 45 MHz to 110 GHz was used to measure the amplitude and phase variations of scattered waves. The results significantly indicated the existence of delamination of 1-1.5 mm long at the TBC/substrate interface on the leading edge part of an acute-angled hole laser drilled

  3. Depth-dependent non-destructive analysis of thin overlayers using total-reflection-angle X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Noriyoshi; Okubo, Soichiro; Yonemitsu, Kyoko

    1996-07-01

    Electron-beam excited X-ray chemical analysis with very small angle condition has been applied to measure thin overlayers on substrates. Relations between the fluorescent X-ray intensity and the emission angle is investigated based on a model. It is demonstrated that the emission-angle dependence of the X-ray intensity is sensitively reflected by film thickness and layer structure. The calculations agreed well with experiments for thin Au and Pd multilayers on Si substrate. The results show that this method is applicable to a non-destructive depth profiling of chemical compositions.

  4. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  5. Magic-angle turning with double acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tatsuya; Takegoshi, K.

    2017-01-01

    The double-acquisition scheme for efficient data collection of hypercomplex data (the States method) of a two-dimensional experiment is adopted to magic-angle hopping (MAH) and magic-angle turning (MAT) experiments, which are powerful methods to measure the principal values of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in a powder sample. It is shown that the double acquisition MAT (DAMAT) sequence realizes the S/N ratio comparable to or better than those of other variants of the MAH/MAT sequences. In addition, we show that DAMAT has preferable features that there are no spinning sidebands in the indirect dimension, and no spectral shearing is necessary.

  6. Magic-angle turning with double acquisition.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tatsuya; Takegoshi, K

    2017-01-01

    The double-acquisition scheme for efficient data collection of hypercomplex data (the States method) of a two-dimensional experiment is adopted to magic-angle hopping (MAH) and magic-angle turning (MAT) experiments, which are powerful methods to measure the principal values of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in a powder sample. It is shown that the double acquisition MAT (DAMAT) sequence realizes the S/N ratio comparable to or better than those of other variants of the MAH/MAT sequences. In addition, we show that DAMAT has preferable features that there are no spinning sidebands in the indirect dimension, and no spectral shearing is necessary.

  7. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  8. Magic angle spinning NMR of paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2013-09-17

    Metal ions are ubiquitous in biochemical and cellular processes. Since many metal ions are paramagnetic due to the presence of unpaired electrons, paramagnetic molecules are an important class of targets for research in structural biology and related fields. Today, NMR spectroscopy plays a central role in the investigation of the structure and chemical properties of paramagnetic metalloproteins, linking the observed paramagnetic phenomena directly to electronic and molecular structure. A major step forward in the study of proteins by solid-state NMR came with the advent of ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) and the ability to use (1)H detection. Combined, these techniques have allowed investigators to observe nuclei that previously were invisible in highly paramagnetic metalloproteins. In addition, these techniques have enabled quantitative site-specific measurement of a variety of long-range paramagnetic effects. Instead of limiting solid-state NMR studies of biological systems, paramagnetism provides an information-rich phenomenon that can be exploited in these studies. This Account emphasizes state-of-the-art methods and applications of solid-state NMR in paramagnetic systems in biological chemistry. In particular, we discuss the use of ultrafast MAS and (1)H-detection in perdeuterated paramagnetic metalloproteins. Current methodology allows us to determine the structure and dynamics of metalloenzymes, and, as an example, we describe solid-state NMR studies of microcrystalline superoxide dismutase, a 32 kDa dimer. Data were acquired with remarkably short times, and these experiments required only a few milligrams of sample.

  9. Non-destructive analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking of api steels using acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. B.; Choi, Y.; Jung, H. G.; Kho, S. W.; Lee, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering were applied to non-destructively evaluate the hydrogen-induced cracking of API steels and to find the initiation time of the crack. The API steels had equiaxed grains with about 4 to 12-μm average grain size along the rolling, sample-normal, and transverse directions. For 5 days of immersion in a sodium-acetic solution with chloride ions (NaCl: CH3COOH: H2O: FeCl2 = 50: 5: 944: 1, pH = 2.7), micro-sized cracks were not formed in the as-received specimen, but they did form in the 7% deformed specimen. Nano-sized cracks were observed in the specimen after 3 days of immersion by small-angle neutron scattering.

  10. An efficient magic state approach to small angle rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.; O'Gorman, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Standard error-correction techniques only provide a quantum memory and need extra gadgets to perform computation. Central to quantum algorithms are small angle rotations, which can be fault-tolerantly implemented given a supply of an unconventional species of magic state. We present a low-cost distillation routine for preparing these small angle magic states. Our protocol builds on the work of Duclos-Cianci and Poulin (2015 Phys. Rev. A 91 042315) by compressing their circuit. Additionally, we present a method of diluting magic states that reduces costs associated with very small angle rotations. We quantify performance by the expected number of noisy magic states consumed per rotation, and compare with other protocols. For modest-sized angles, our protocols offer a factor 24 improvement over the best-known gate synthesis protocols and a factor 2 over the Duclos-Cianci and Poulin protocol. For very small angle rotations, the dilution protocol dramatically reduces costs, giving several orders magnitude improvement over competitors. There also exists an intermediary regime of small, but not very small, angles where our approach gives a marginal improvement over gate synthesis. We discuss how different performance metrics may alter these conclusions.

  11. Cross polarization magic-angle spinning NMR at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, V.; Kendrick, R.; Yannoni, C. S.

    A magic angle spinning (MAS) apparatus which can be used for high resolution solid state NMR at temperatures as low as 15 K is described. To demonstrate the utility of this apparatus, 13C spectra of molecules containing methyl groups have been investigated at cryogenic temperatures. The spectra, which are described in detail, provide direct evidence for the slowdown of methyl rotation.

  12. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  13. HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM NMR OF SOLIDS BY MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, {beta}{sub m} = Arccos(3{sup -1/2}), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of {beta}. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H{sub D} was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal

  14. Microcoil high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hans; Brinkmann, Andreas; van Eck, Ernst R H; van Bentum, P Jan M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2006-07-12

    We report the construction of a dual-channel microcoil nuclear magnetic resonance probehead allowing magic-angle spinning for mass-limited samples. With coils down to 235 mum inner diameter, this allows high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra to be obtained for amounts of materials of a few nanoliters. This is demonstrated by the carbon-13 spectrum of a tripeptide and a single silk rod, prepared from the silk gland of the Bombyx mori silkworm. Furthermore, the microcoil allows for radio frequency field strengths well beyond current probe technology, aiding in getting the highest possible resolution by efficiently decoupling the observed nuclei from the abundantly present proton nuclei.

  15. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Richland, WA; Wind, Robert A [Kennewick, WA; Minard, Kevin R [Kennewick, WA; Majors, Paul D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  16. Multiple quantum magic-angle spinning using rotary resonance excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosegaard, Thomas; Florian, Pierre; Massiot, Dominique; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2001-03-01

    We have discovered rotary resonances between rf field strength, ω1, and magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency, ωR, which dramatically enhance the sensitivity of triple quantum preparation and mixing in the multiple-quantum MAS experiment, particularly for quadrupolar nuclei having low gyromagnetic ratios or experiencing strong quadrupole couplings. Triple quantum excitation efficiency minima occur when 2ω1=nωR, where n is an integer, with significant maxima occurring between these minima. For triple quantum mixing we observe maxima when ω1=nωR. In both preparation and mixing the pulse lengths required to reach maxima exceed one rotor period. We have combined these rotary resonance conditions into a new experiment called FASTER MQ-MAS, and have experimentally demonstrated a factor of 3 enhancement in sensitivity in comparison to conventional MQ-MAS.

  17. Magic angle effects and angular magnetoresistance oscillations as dimensional crossovers.

    PubMed

    Lebed, A G; Bagmet, N N; Naughton, M J

    2004-10-08

    Interference effects between velocity and density of states, which occur as electrons move along open orbits in the extended Brillouin zone in anisotropic conductors, result in a change of wave functions' dimensionality at magic angle (MA) directions of a magnetic field. In particular, these 1D-->2D dimensional crossovers result in the appearance of sharp minima in a resistivity component rho perpendicular (H,alpha), perpendicular to conducting layers. This explains the main qualitative features of MA and angular magnetoresistance oscillations' phenomena observed due to the existence of quasi-one-dimensional sheets of Fermi surface in (TMTSF)2X, (DMET-TSeF)2X, and kappa-(ET)2Cu(NCS)(2) conductors.

  18. Freezing of Molecular Motions Probed by Cryogenic Magic Angle Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Borsacchi, Silvia; Johannessen, Ole G; Mennucci, Benedetta; Yang, Yifeng; Geppi, Marco; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2014-02-06

    Cryogenic magic angle spinning makes it possible to obtain the NMR spectra of solids at temperatures low enough to freeze out most molecular motions. We have applied cryogenic magic angle spinning NMR to a crystalline small-molecule solid (ibuprofen sodium salt), which displays a variety of molecular dynamics. Magic angle (13)C NMR spectra are shown for a wide range of temperatures, including in the cryogenic regime down to 20 K. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions of the molecular structure display different behavior in the cryogenic regime, with the hydrophilic region remaining well-structured, while the hydrophobic region exhibits a broad frozen conformational distribution.

  19. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacted with supercritical CO 2 and H 2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  20. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, David W; Turcu, Romulus V F; Sears, Jesse A; Rosso, Kevin M; Burton, Sarah D; Felmy, Andrew R; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ(13)C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg(2)SiO(4)) reacted with supercritical CO(2) and H(2)O at 150 bar and 50°C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  1. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. Finally, as an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  3. Magic angle magnetic resonance imaging of diode laser induced and naturally occurring lesions in equine tendons.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Mathieu; Murphy, Brian; Vallance, Stuart A; Vidal, Martin A; Whitcomb, Mary Beth; Wisner, Erik R

    2012-01-01

    Magic angle magnetic resonance (MR) imaging consists of imaging tendons at 55° to the magnetic field. In people, magic angle MR imaging is valuable for detection of chronic tendon lesions and allows calculation of tendon T1 values. Increased T1 values occur in people with chronic tendinopathy. The T1 values of normal equine tendons have been reported but there are no available data for abnormal equine tendons. Twelve limbs were studied. Two limbs had diode laser tendon lesions induced postmortem, four limbs had diode laser tendon lesions induced in vivo and six limbs had naturally occurring tendon lesions. The limbs were imaged at 1.5 T using both conventional MR imaging and magic angle MR imaging. The post-mortem laser induced lesions were identified only with magic angle MR imaging. The in vivo induced lesions and naturally occurring lesions were identified with both techniques but had a different appearance with the two imaging techniques. Magic angle imaging was helpful at identifying lesions that were hypointense on conventional imaging. Increased T1 values were observed in all abnormal tendons and in several tendons with a subjectively normal MR appearance. The increased T1 value may reflect diffuse changes in the biochemical composition of tendons. Magic angle imaging has potential as a useful noninvasive tool to assess the changes of the extracellular tendon matrix using T1 values.

  4. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\omega _0 ^{ - 2}\\end{equation*} \\end{document}ω0−2 field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ɛ = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of 1H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear 1H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements

  5. Hall Plateaus at magic angles in ultraquantum Bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Fauqué.

    2009-03-01

    The behaviour of a three-dimensional electron gas in the presence of a magnetic field strong enough to put all carriers in the first Landau level (i.e. beyond the quantum limit) is a longstanding question of theoretical condensed matter physics [1]. This issue has been recently explored by two high-field experiments on elemental semi-metal Bismuth. In a first study of transport coefficients (which are dominated by hole-like carriers), the Nernst coefficient presented three unexpected maxima that are concomitant with quasi-plateaux in the Hall coefficient [2]. In a second series of experiments, torque magnetometry (which mainly probes the three Dirac valley electron pockets) detected a field-induced phase transition [3]. The full understanding of the electron and hole behaviours above the quantum limit of pure Bi is therefore still under debate. In this talk, we will present our measurement of the Hall resistivity and torque magnetometry with magnetic field up to 31 T and rotating in the trigonal-bisectrix plane [4]. The Hall response is dominated by the hole pockets according to its sign as well as the period and the angular dependence of its quantum oscillations. In the vicinity of the quantum limit, it presents additional anomalies which are the fingerprints of the electron pockets. We found that for particular orientations of the magnetic field (namely ``magic angles''), the Hall response becomes field-independent within the experimental resolution around 20T. This drastic dependence of the plateaux on the field orientation provides strong constraints for theoretical scenarios. [4pt] [1] Bertrand I. Halperin, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, 26, Supplement 26-3 (1987).[0pt] [2] Kamran Behnia, Luis Balicas, Yakov Kopelevich, Science, 317, 1729 (2008).[0pt] [3] Lu Li, J. G. Checkelsky, Y. S. Hor, C. Uher, A. F. Hebard, R. J. Cava, and N. P. Ong , Science, 321, 5888 (2008).[0pt] [4] Benoît Fauqu'e, Luis Balicas, Ilya Sheikin, Jean Paul Issi and Kamran Behnia

  6. Theoretical aspects of Magic Angle Spinning - Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Vega, Shimon; Feintuch, Akiva

    2015-09-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) combined with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been proven in recent years to be a very powerful method for increasing solid-state NMR signals. Since the advent of biradicals such as TOTAPOL to increase the nuclear polarization new classes of radicals, with larger molecular weight and/or different spin properties have been developed. These have led to unprecedented signal gain, with varying results for different experimental parameters, in particular the microwave irradiation strength, the static field, and the spinning frequency. Recently it has been demonstrated that sample spinning imposes DNP enhancement processes that differ from the active DNP mechanism in static samples as upon sample spinning the DNP enhancements are the results of energy level anticrossings occurring periodically during each rotor cycle. In this work we present experimental results with regards to the MAS frequency dependence of the DNP enhancement profiles of four nitroxide-based radicals at two different sets of temperature, 110 and 160K. In fact, different magnitudes of reduction in enhancement are observed with increasing spinning frequency. Our simulation code for calculating MAS-DNP powder enhancements of small model spin systems has been improved to extend our studies of the influence of the interaction and relaxation parameters on powder enhancements. To achieve a better understanding we simulated the spin dynamics of a single three-spin system {ea-eb-n} during its steady state rotor periods and used the Landau-Zener formula to characterize the influence of the different anti-crossings on the polarizations of the system and their necessary action for reaching steady state conditions together with spin relaxation processes. Based on these model calculations we demonstrate that the maximum steady state nuclear polarization cannot become larger than the maximum polarization difference between the two electrons during the steady state rotor cycle. This

  7. Slow magic angle sample spinning: a non- or minimally invasive method for high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kilohertz or more (i.e., high-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well-established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow MAS, using the concept of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimally invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow sample spinning used. Although slow MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in-depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H(2)O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  8. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  9. A Theoretical Design Approach for Passive Shimming of a Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank X; Voccio, John P; Sammartino, Michael; Ahn, Minchul; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a passive shimming design approach for a magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR magnet. In order to achieve a 1.5-T magic-angle field in NMR samples, we created two independent orthogonal magnetic vector fields by two separate coils: the dipole and solenoid. These two coils create a combined 1.5-T magnetic field vector directed at the magic angle (54.74° from the spinning axis). Additionally, the stringent magnetic field homogeneity requirement of the MAS magnet is the same as that of a solenoidal NMR magnet. The challenge for the magic-angle passive shimming design is to correct both the dipole and solenoid magnetic field spherical harmonics with one set of iron pieces, the so-called ferromagnetic shimming. Furthermore, the magnetization of the iron pieces is produced by both the dipole and solenoid coils. In our design approach, a matrix of 2 mm by 5 mm iron pieces with different thicknesses was attached to a thin-walled tube, 90-mm diameter and 40-mm high. Two sets of spherical harmonic coefficients were calculated for both the dipole and solenoid coil windings. By using the multiple-objective linear programming optimization technique and coordinate transformations, we have designed a passive shimming set that can theoretically reduce 22 lower-order spherical harmonics and improve the homogeneity of our MAS NMR magnet.

  10. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  11. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  12. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, ..beta../sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of ..beta... A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of /sup 1/H with /sup 2/H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids.

  13. V-shaped nematogens with the "magic bent angle".

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Jens; Müller, Kathrin; Klein, Susanne; Lehmann, Matthias

    2011-06-21

    V-shaped nematogens 1a-c and 2a-b with benzodithiophene bending units have been synthesised. The derivatives 1a-c comprise a flat core with a bending angle of 109°, which is almost the tetrahedral angle proposed to be optimal in the realization of mesogens forming a biaxial nematic thermotropic mesophase.

  14. Towards monomaterial p-n junctions: Single-step fabrication of tin oxide films and their non-destructive characterisation by angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krzywiecki, Maciej; Sarfraz, Adnan; Erbe, Andreas

    2015-12-07

    The application of a non-destructive method for characterization of electronic structure of an ultra-thin SnO{sub 1angle dependent XPS, we quantified stoichiometry changes inside the SnO{sub 1

  15. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  16. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  17. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  18. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  19. NMR high-resolution magic angle spinning rotor design for quantification of metabolic concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holly, R.; Damyanovich, A.; Peemoeller, H.

    2006-05-01

    A new high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance technique is presented to obtain absolute metabolite concentrations of solutions. The magnetic resonance spectrum of the sample under investigation and an internal reference are acquired simultaneously, ensuring both spectra are obtained under the same experimental conditions. The robustness of the technique is demonstrated using a solution of creatine, and it is shown that the technique can obtain solution concentrations to within 7% or better.

  20. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS) wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  1. Spin-locking and cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning of uniformly labeled solids.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-07-01

    Spin-locking and cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning are investigated for uniformly (13)C and (15)N labeled solids. In particular, the interferences from chemical shift anisotropy, and (1)H heteronuclear and (13)C homonuclear dipolar couplings are identified. The physical origin of these interferences provides guidelines for selecting the best (13)C and (15)N polarization transfer rf fields. Optimal settings for both the zero- and double-quantum cross-polarization transfer mechanisms are recommended.

  2. An isotropic chemical shift-chemical shift anisotropic correlation experiment using discrete magic angle turning.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jesse A; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hoyt, David W; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2009-05-01

    An isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectroscopy is introduced that combines the advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) technologies. In this new approach, denoted DMAT for "discrete magic angle turning", the sample rotates clockwise followed by an anticlockwise rotation of exactly the same amount with each rotation less or equal than 360 degrees but greater than 240 degrees , with the rotation speed being constant only for times related to the evolution dimension. This back and forth rotation is repeated and synchronized with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. For any spin-interaction of rank-2 such as chemical shift anisotropy, isotropic magnetic susceptibility interaction, and residual homo-nuclear dipolar interaction in biological fluid samples, the projection along the isotropic dimension is a high resolution spectrum. Since a less than 360 degrees sample rotation is involved, the design potentially allows for in situ control over physical parameters such as pressure, flow conditions, feed compositions, and temperature so that true in situ NMR investigations can be carried out.

  3. Non-destructive identification of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Wang, Bo; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive identification of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is essential to various applications in the optical information processing. Here, we propose and demonstrate experimentally an efficient method to identify non-destructively the OAM by using a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our schemes are applicable not only to the case with integer charges, but also to optical vortices with noninteger charges. Our Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the non-destructive identification of twisted light with integer or noninteger topological charges, which has potential applications in the OAM-based data transmission for optical communications.

  4. 14N overtone NMR spectra under magic angle spinning: Experiments and numerically exact simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Luke A.; Brinkmann, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    It was recently shown that high resolution 14N overtone NMR spectra can be obtained directly under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions [L. A. O'Dell and C. I. Ratcliffe, Chem. Phys. Lett. 514, 168 (2011)], 10.1016/j.cplett.2011.08.030. Preliminary experimental results showed narrowed powder pattern widths, a frequency shift that is dependent on the MAS rate, and an apparent absence of spinning sidebands, observations which appeared to be inconsistent with previous theoretical treatments. Herein, we reproduce these effects using numerically exact simulations that take into account the full nuclear spin Hamiltonian. Under sample spinning, the 14N overtone signal is split into five (0, ±1, ±2) overtone sidebands separated by the spinning frequency. For a powder sample spinning at the magic angle, the +2ωr sideband is dominant while the others show significantly lower signal intensities. The resultant MAS powder patterns show characteristic quadrupolar lineshapes from which the 14N quadrupolar parameters and isotropic chemical shift can be determined. Spinning the sample at other angles is shown to alter both the shapes and relative intensities of the five overtone sidebands, with MAS providing the benefit of averaging dipolar couplings and shielding anisotropy. To demonstrate the advantages of this experimental approach, we present the 14N overtone MAS spectrum obtained from L-histidine, in which powder patterns from all three nitrogen sites are clearly resolved.

  5. The use of variable temperature and magic-angle sample spinning in studies of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earl, W.L.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Intensity distortions and poor signal to noise in the cross-polarization magic-angle sample spinning NMR of fulvic acids were investigated and attributed to molecular mobility in these ostensibly "solid" materials. We have shown that inefficiencies in cross polarization can be overcome by lowering the sample temperature to about -60??C. These difficulties can be generalized to many other synthetic and natural products. The use of variable temperature and cross-polarization intensity as a function of contact time can yield valuable qualitative information which can aid in the characterization of many materials. ?? 1987.

  6. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  7. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100 K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  8. High resolution 11B NMR of magnesium diboride using cryogenic magic angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, Peter; Denning, Mark S.; Heinmaa, Ivo; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Young, Edward A.; Stern, Raivo; Carravetta, Marina

    2012-09-01

    Static and magic-angle spinning 11B nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data at 4.7 T and 8.5 T have been obtained under cryogenic conditions on a diluted sample of magnesium diboride powder in the normal and superconducting state. The data provide accurate information on the magnetic shift and longitudinal relaxation time down to a temperature of 8 K, with a resolution improvement over the entire temperature range. The onset of superconductivity is unaffected by the sample rotation, as revealed by a steep variation of the magnetic shift just below the critical temperature.

  9. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  10. In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    RIGHI, VALERIA; APIDIANAKIS, YIORGOS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2010-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development. PMID:20596596

  11. MATPASS/CPMG: a sensitivity enhanced magic-angle spinning sideband separation experiment for disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Edwards, Trenton; Sen, Sabyasachi; Gan, Zhehong

    2012-08-01

    A Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sensitivity-enhanced spinning sideband separation experiment is presented. The experiment combines the idea of magic-angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS), allowing for isotropic/anisotropic chemical shift separation of disordered solids with line widths far greater than the magic-angle spinning frequency. The use of CPMG enhances the sensitivity of the wide-line spectra by an order of magnitude via multiple-echo acquisition. The MATPASS/CPMG protocol involves acquisition of time-domain data using a MAT/CPMG pulse sequence followed by f(1) shearing during data processing to arrive at the PASS representation. Such a protocol has √2 higher sensitivity than the conventional PASS method because all CPMG echo signals are used for the final PASS spectrum. Application of this method is demonstrated using a GeSe₄ glass sample with both ⁷⁷Se isotropic line widths and chemical shift anisotropy that far exceed the spinning frequency. The sideband separation allows for the measurement of chemical shift anisotropy of the disordered solids.

  12. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of DNP enhancements in a rotor spinning at the magic angle

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2016-02-23

    Simulations performed on model, static, samples have shown that the microwave power is non-uniformly distributed in the magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor when using conventional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation. Here, we applied the stray-field magic angle spinning imaging (STRAFI–MAS) experiment to generate a spatial map of the DNP enhancements in a full rotor, which is spun at a low rate in a commercial DNP–MAS NMR system. Notably, we observed that the enhancement factors produced in the center of the rotor can be twice as large as those produced at the top of the rotor. Surprisingly, we observed that the largest enhancement factors are observed along the axis of the rotor as opposed to against its walls, which are most directly irradiated by the microwave beam. We lastly observed that the distribution of enhancement factors can be moderately improved by degassing the sample and increasing the microwave power. The inclusion of dielectric particles greatly amplifies the enhancement factors throughout the rotor. Furthermore, the STRAFI–MAS approach can provide useful guidance for optimizing the access of microwave power to the sample, and thereby lead to further increases in sensitivity of DNP–MAS NMR.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of DNP enhancements in a rotor spinning at the magic angle

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2016-02-23

    Simulations performed on model, static, samples have shown that the microwave power is non-uniformly distributed in the magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor when using conventional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation. Here, we applied the stray-field magic angle spinning imaging (STRAFI–MAS) experiment to generate a spatial map of the DNP enhancements in a full rotor, which is spun at a low rate in a commercial DNP–MAS NMR system. Notably, we observed that the enhancement factors produced in the center of the rotor can be twice as large as those produced at the top of the rotor. Surprisingly, we observed that themore » largest enhancement factors are observed along the axis of the rotor as opposed to against its walls, which are most directly irradiated by the microwave beam. We lastly observed that the distribution of enhancement factors can be moderately improved by degassing the sample and increasing the microwave power. The inclusion of dielectric particles greatly amplifies the enhancement factors throughout the rotor. Furthermore, the STRAFI–MAS approach can provide useful guidance for optimizing the access of microwave power to the sample, and thereby lead to further increases in sensitivity of DNP–MAS NMR.« less

  15. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  16. The effect of Hartmann-Hahn mismatching on polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Tian, Changlin; Kim, Hyeongnam; Smith, Scott A; Cross, Timothy A

    2002-12-01

    The effect of the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch delta = omega(eff)-omega(1S) during polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) has been investigated, where omega(eff) and omega(1S) represent the amplitudes of the 1H effective spin-locking field at the magic angle and the 15N RF spin-locking field, respectively. During the PISEMA evolution period, the exact Hartmann-Hahn match condition (i.e., delta = 0) yields a maximum dipolar scaling factor of 0.816 for PISEMA experiments, while any mismatch results in two different effective fields for the first and second half of each frequency switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) cycle. The mismatch effect on the scaling factor depends strongly on the transition angle from one effective field to the other within each FSLG cycle as well as on the cycle time. At low RF spin-lock amplitudes in which the FSLG cycle time is relatively long, the scaling factor rapidly becomes smaller as omega(1S) becomes greater than omega(eff). On the other hand, when omega(1S) < omega(eff), there is relatively little effect on the scaling factor with variation in delta. As a result, the presence of RF inhomogeneities may significantly broaden the line-width in the dipolar dimension because of the mismatch effect. Higher RF spin-lock amplitudes result in a relatively small variation for the scaling factor. Furthermore, ramped amplitude of the 15N RF spin-lock field in synchronization with the flip-flop of the FSLG sequence minimizes the transition angle between the two effective fields within the FSLG cycle. It is shown experimentally that such a ramped amplitude not only gives rise to the same scaling factor but also results in a narrower dipolar line-width in comparison with the rectangular amplitude.

  17. Method for non-destructive testing

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-08-30

    Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

  18. Rapid Proton-Detected NMR Assignment for Proteins with Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of six 1H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5–30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide 2H/1H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary 13C/15N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  19. Non-Fermi-liquid magic angle effects in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a theoretical problem of electron-electron interactions in an inclined magnetic field in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) conductor. We show that they result in strong non-Fermi-liquid corrections to a specific heat, provided that the direction of the magnetic field is far from the so-called Lebed's magic angles (LMAs). If magnetic field is directed close to one of the LMAs, the specific heat corrections become small and the Fermi-liquid picture restores. As a result, we predict Fermi-liquid-non-Fermi-liquid angular crossovers in the vicinities of the LMA directions of the field. We suggest to perform the corresponding experiment in the Q1D conductor (Per) 2Au (mnt) 2 under pressure in magnetic fields of the order of H ≃25 T .

  20. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  1. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  2. Magic-angle spinning NMR of intact bacteriophages: Insights into the capsid, DNA and their interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. They are complex macromolecular assemblies, which are composed of multiple protein subunits that protect genomic material and deliver it to specific hosts. Various biophysical techniques have been used to characterize their structure in order to unravel phage morphogenesis. Yet, most bacteriophages are non-crystalline and have very high molecular weights, in the order of tens of MegaDaltons. Therefore, complete atomic-resolution characterization on such systems that encompass both capsid and DNA is scarce. In this perspective article we demonstrate how magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has and is used to characterize in detail bacteriophage viruses, including filamentous and icosahedral phage. We discuss the process of sample preparation, spectral assignment of both capsid and DNA and the use of chemical shifts and dipolar couplings to probe the capsid-DNA interface, describe capsid structure and dynamics and extract structural differences between viruses.

  3. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-03

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  4. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, E.; Ernst, H.; Freude, D.; Froehlich, T.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1991-01-01

    {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR was used to elucidate the nature of the catalytic activity of zeolite H-ZSM-5. {sup 1}H MAS NMR of sealed samples after mild hydrothermal dealumination shows that the enhanced activity for n-hexane cracking is not due to an enhanced Bronstead acidity. The concentrations of the various OH groups and aluminous species suggest that the reason for the enhanced catalytic activity is the interaction of the n-hexane molecule with a bridging hydroxyl group and with extra-framework aluminium species, which give rise to the enhanced activity, cannot be easily removed from their positions, and are therefore immobilized by the zeolitic framework.

  5. High resolution 11B NMR of MgB2 using cryogenic magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Raivo; Beckett, Peter; Denning, Mark S.; Heinmaa, Ivo; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Young, Edward A.; Carravetta, Marina

    2013-03-01

    Static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) 11B NMR data at 4.7 T and 8.5 T have been obtained under cryogenic conditions on a diluted sample of magnesium diboride powder in the normal and superconducting state. We demonstrate that MAS NMR is possible on type-II superconductors despite the sample rotation. The data provide accurate information on the magnetic shift variation and longitudinal relaxation data down to a temperature of 8 K, with a resolution improvement over the entire temperature range. The onset of superconductivity is unaffected by the sample rotation, as revealed by a steep variation of the magnetic shift just below the critical temperature. Appeared in JCP 137, 114201, http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4751476

  6. Efficient dipolar double quantum filtering under magic angle spinning without a (1)H decoupling field.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Rienstra, Chad M

    2016-08-01

    We present a systematic study of dipolar double quantum (DQ) filtering in (13)C-labeled organic solids over a range of magic-angle spinning rates, using the SPC-n recoupling sequence element with a range of n symmetry values from 3 to 11. We find that efficient recoupling can be achieved for values n⩾7, provided that the (13)C nutation frequency is on the order of 100kHz or greater. The decoupling-field dependence was investigated and explicit heteronuclear decoupling interference conditions identified. The major determinant of DQ filtering efficiency is the decoupling interference between (13)C and (1)H fields. For (13)C nutation frequencies greater than 75kHz, optimal performance is observed without an applied (1)H field. At spinning rates exceeding 20kHz, symmetry conditions as low as n=3 were found to perform adequately.

  7. Adiabatic sweep cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR of half-integer quadrupolar spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Kim, Chul; Schurko, Robert; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-04-01

    The use of frequency-swept radiofrequency (rf) pulses for enhancing signals in the magic-angle spinning (MAS) spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclides was explored. The broadband adiabatic inversion cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (BRAIN-CPMAS) method, involving an adiabatic inversion pulse on the S-channel and a simultaneous rectangular spin-lock pulse on the I-channel (1H), was applied to I(1/2) → S(3/2) systems. Optimal BRAIN-CPMAS matching conditions were found to involve low rf pulse strengths for both the I- and S-spin channels. At these low and easily attainable rf field strengths, level-crossing events among the energy levels | 3 / 2 >, | 1 / 2 >, | - 1 / 2 >, | - 3 / 2 > that are known to complicate the CPMAS of quadrupolar nuclei, are mostly avoided. Zero- and double-quantum polarization transfer modes, akin to those we have observed for I(1/2) → S(1/2) polarization transfers, were evidenced by these analyses even in the presence of the quadrupolar interaction. 1H-23Na and 1H-11B BRAIN-CPMAS conditions were experimentally explored on model compounds by optimizing the width of the adiabatic sweep, as well as the rf pulse powers of the 1H and 23Na/11B channels, for different MAS rates. The experimental data obtained on model compounds containing spin-3/2 nuclides, matched well predictions from numerical simulations and from an average Hamiltonian theory model. Extensions to half-integer spin nuclides with higher spins and potential applications of this BRAIN-CPMAS approach are discussed.

  8. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  9. Non-Destructive State Machine Reverse Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jessica L.

    2013-10-10

    Most of the integrated circuits (ICs) that are in electronic systems today are based on state machines. We are taking advantage of this to develop a hardware reverse engineering method that discovers the IC’s underlying state machine, rather than its transistors and gates. While there are other methods for destructively reverse engineering ICs or for non-destructively characterizing ICs, our method offers a fast and accurate analysis while remaining non-destructive. To do this, we present an intelligent brute-force method of exploring the logic of the IC using only the input and outputs designed into the IC - the I/O pins. From this exploration, we can apply a folding algorithm to discover the designed state machine.

  10. Hybrid holographic non-destructive test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic hybrid holographic non-destructive testing (HNDT) method and system capable of detecting flaws or debonds contained within certain materials are described. This system incorporates the techniques of optical holography, acoustical/optical holography and holographic correlation in determining the structural integrity of a test object. An automatic processing system including a detector and automatic data processor is used in conjunction with the three holographic techniques for correlating and interpreting the information supplied by the non-destructive systems. The automatic system also includes a sensor which directly translates an optical data format produced by the holographic techniques into electrical signals and then transmits this information to a digital computer for indicating the structural properties of the test object. The computer interprets the data gathered and determines whether further testing is necessary as well as the format of this new testing procedure.

  11. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Aerospace Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Master of Science in Materials Science Jeremy D. Johnson, BS Captain, USAF March 2009 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED...non-destructive material evaluation (NDE) were used to inspect various forms of damage commonly found in aerospace fiberglass composites: voids...ultrasound, and flash IR thermography were analyzed for the detection of defects. Test results and analysis of each NDE method’s capabilities

  12. Magic-angle sample spinning electron paramagnetic resonance--instrumentation, performance, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hessinger, D; Bauer, C; Hubrich, M; Jeschke, G; Spiess, H W

    2000-12-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup for line narrowing experiments with fast sample spinning at variable angles between the rotation axis and the static magnetic field is described and applied in the magic-angle sample spinning (MAS) EPR experiment at X-band frequencies (9.5 GHz). Sample spinning speeds up to 17 kHz at temperatures down to 200 K can be achieved with rotors of 4-mm outer and 2.5-mm inner diameter without severe losses in microwave amplitude compared to standard pulse EPR probeheads. A phase cycle is introduced that provides pure absorption MAS EPR spectra and allows one to distinguish between positive and negative frequency offsets (pseudo-quadrature detection). Possible broadening mechanisms in MAS EPR spectra are discussed. It is demonstrated both by theory and by experiment that the MAS EPR experiment requires excitation bandwidths that are comparable to the total spectral width, since otherwise destructive interference between contributions of spins with similar resonance offsets suppresses the signal. Experimental observations on the E(1) center in gamma-irradiated silica glass and on the SO(-)(3) radical in gamma-irradiated sulfamic acid are reported.

  13. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  14. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. SIMS; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

  15. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  16. High Resolution H-1 NMR Spectroscopy in a Live Mouse subjected to 1.5 Hz Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2003-12-03

    It is demonstrated that the resolution of the 1H NMR metabolite spectrum in a live mouse can be significantly enhanced by an ultra-slow magic angle spinning of the animal combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in about one hour in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. It was found that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. It is concluded that in vivo PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for biochemical and biomedical animal research.

  17. Development of a magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe with a cryogenic detection system for sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takashi; Hioka, Katsuya; Fujioka, Koji; Takegoshi, K

    2008-04-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high-resolution solid-state NMR has been developed. In this probe, temperature of the detection coil is kept at cryogenic temperature (approximately 12 K) for sensitivity enhancement, which is achieved not only by suppression of thermal noise but also by increment of a Q factor of the coil. A marked feature of this probe is that a sample rotating at magic angle is thermally isolated from the cryogenic system in order to realize high-resolution solid-state NMR measurement at various sample temperatures. We call this system as cryocoil magic-angle spinning (cryocoil MAS). (1)H MAS NMR with the coil temperature of approximately 20 K was successfully observed for solid adamantane rotating at room temperature, and signal-to-noise increment due to this cryocoil approach was confirmed.

  18. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  19. Biomolecular solid state NMR with magic-angle spinning at 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) probe has been constructed which allows the sample to be cooled with helium, while the MAS bearing and drive gases are nitrogen. The sample can be cooled to 25 K using roughly 3 liters/hour of liquid helium, while the 4 mm diameter rotor spins at 6.7 kHz with good stability (±5 Hz) for many hours. Proton decoupling fields up to at least 130 kHz can be applied. This helium-cooled MAS probe enables a variety of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments on biomolecular solids and other materials at low temperatures, with signal-to-noise proportional to 1/T. We show examples of low-temperature 13C NMR data for two biomolecular samples, namely the peptide Aβ14–23 in the form of amyloid fibrils and the protein HP35 in frozen glycerol/water solution. Issues related to temperature calibration, spin-lattice relaxation at low temperatures, paramagnetic doping of frozen solutions, and 13C MAS NMR linewidths are discussed. PMID:18922715

  20. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  1. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of 1H-1H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  2. Magic angle spinning NMR of proteins: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization and (1)H detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Yongchao; Andreas, Loren; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of amyloid and membrane proteins and large macromolecular complexes are an important new approach to structural biology. However, the applicability of these experiments, which are based on (13)C- and (15)N-detected spectra, would be enhanced if the sensitivity were improved. Here we discuss two advances that address this problem: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and (1)H-detected MAS techniques. DNP is a sensitivity enhancement technique that transfers the high polarization of exogenous unpaired electrons to nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of electron-nuclear transitions. DNP boosts NMR signal intensities by factors of 10(2) to 10(3), thereby overcoming NMR's inherent low sensitivity. Alternatively, it permits structural investigations at the nanomolar scale. In addition, (1)H detection is feasible primarily because of the development of MAS rotors that spin at frequencies of 40 to 60 kHz or higher and the preparation of extensively (2)H-labeled proteins.

  3. Spin dynamics of polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle in multiple spin systems.

    PubMed

    Gan, Z

    2000-03-01

    Polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) [J. Magn. Reson. A 109, 270 (1994)] is an important experiment in NMR structural characterization of membrane proteins in oriented lipid bilayers. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the spin dynamics in PISEMA to investigate the line-narrowing mechanism. The study focuses on the effect of neighboring protons on the spin exchange of a strongly coupled spin pair. The spin exchange is solved analytically for simple spin systems and is numerically simulated for many-spin systems. The results show that the dipolar couplings from the neighboring protons of a strongly coupled spin pair perturb the spin exchange only in the second order, therefore it has little contribution to the linewidth of PISEMA spectra in comparison to the separated-local-field spectra. The effects from proton resonance offset and the mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn condition are also discussed along with experimental results using model single-crystal samples.

  4. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  5. A unified heteronuclear decoupling strategy for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk; Madhu, P. K. E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk

    2015-05-14

    A unified strategy of two-pulse based heteronuclear decoupling for solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is presented. The analysis presented here shows that different decoupling sequences like two-pulse phase-modulation (TPPM), X-inverse-X (XiX), and finite pulse refocused continuous wave (rCW{sup A}) are basically specific solutions of a more generalized decoupling scheme which incorporates the concept of time-modulation along with phase-modulation. A plethora of other good decoupling conditions apart from the standard, TPPM, XiX, and rCW{sup A} decoupling conditions are available from the unified decoupling approach. The importance of combined time- and phase-modulation in order to achieve the best decoupling conditions is delineated. The consequences of different indirect dipolar interactions arising from cross terms comprising of heteronuclear and homonuclear dipolar coupling terms and also those between heteronuclear dipolar coupling and chemical-shift anisotropy terms are presented in order to unfold the effects of anisotropic interactions under different decoupling conditions. Extensive numerical simulation results are corroborated with experiments on standard amino acids.

  6. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  7. A permanent MRI magnet for magic angle imaging having its field parallel to the poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinley, John V. M.; Ristic, Mihailo; Young, Ian R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel design of open permanent magnet is presented, in which the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the planes of its poles. The paper describes the methods whereby such a magnet can be designed with a field homogeneity suitable for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Its primary purpose is to take advantage of the Magic Angle effect in MRI of human extremities, particularly the knee joint, by being capable of rotating the direction of the main magnetic field B0 about two orthogonal axes around a stationary subject and achieve all possible angulations. The magnet comprises a parallel pair of identical profiled arrays of permanent magnets backed by a flat steel yoke such that access in lateral directions is practical. The paper describes the detailed optimization procedure from a target 150 mm DSV to the achievement of a measured uniform field over a 130 mm DSV. Actual performance data of the manufactured magnet, including shimming and a sample image, is presented. The overall magnet system mounting mechanism is presented, including two orthogonal axes of rotation of the magnet about its isocentre.

  8. A permanent MRI magnet for magic angle imaging having its field parallel to the poles.

    PubMed

    McGinley, John V M; Ristic, Mihailo; Young, Ian R

    2016-10-01

    A novel design of open permanent magnet is presented, in which the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the planes of its poles. The paper describes the methods whereby such a magnet can be designed with a field homogeneity suitable for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Its primary purpose is to take advantage of the Magic Angle effect in MRI of human extremities, particularly the knee joint, by being capable of rotating the direction of the main magnetic field B0 about two orthogonal axes around a stationary subject and achieve all possible angulations. The magnet comprises a parallel pair of identical profiled arrays of permanent magnets backed by a flat steel yoke such that access in lateral directions is practical. The paper describes the detailed optimization procedure from a target 150mm DSV to the achievement of a measured uniform field over a 130mm DSV. Actual performance data of the manufactured magnet, including shimming and a sample image, is presented. The overall magnet system mounting mechanism is presented, including two orthogonal axes of rotation of the magnet about its isocentre.

  9. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Derocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here-which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole-circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100K which shows 30 Hz linewidths.

  10. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  11. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  12. Quantitative neuropathology by high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L. L.; Ma, M. J.; Becerra, L.; Ptak, T.; Tracey, I.; Lackner, A.; González, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method that directly relates tissue neuropathological analysis to medical imaging. Presently, only indirect and often tenuous relationships are made between imaging (such as MRI or x-ray computed tomography) and neuropathology. We present a biochemistry-based, quantitative neuropathological method that can help to precisely quantify information provided by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS), an emerging medical imaging technique. This method, high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1HMRS, is rapid and requires only small amounts of unprocessed samples. Unlike chemical extraction or other forms of tissue processing, this method analyzes tissue directly, thus minimizing artifacts. We demonstrate the utility of this method by assessing neuronal damage using multiple tissue samples from differently affected brain regions in a case of Pick disease, a human neurodegenerative disorder. Among different regions, we found an excellent correlation between neuronal loss shown by traditional neurohistopathology and decrease of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate measured by HRMAS 1HMRS. This result demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct, quantitative link between a decrease in N-acetylaspartate and neuronal loss in a human neurodegenerative disease. As a quantitative method, HRMAS 1HMRS has potential applications in experimental and clinical neuropathologic investigations. It should also provide a rational basis for the interpretation of in vivo 1HMRS studies of human neurological disorders. PMID:9177231

  13. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  14. Ultrashort echo time magnetization transfer (UTE-MT) imaging and modeling: magic angle independent biomarkers of tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Shao, Hongda; Du, Jiang; Chang, Eric Y

    2016-11-01

    MRI biomarkers such as T2 , T2 * and T1rho have been widely used, but are confounded by the magic angle effect. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of the two-dimensional ultrashort echo time magnetization transfer (UTE-MT) sequence for potential magic angle independent MR biomarkers. Magnetization transfer was investigated in cadaveric Achilles tendon samples using the UTE-MT sequence at five MT powers and five frequency offsets ranging from 2 to 50 kHz. The protocol was applied at five sample orientations ranging from 0 to 90° relative to the B0 field. The results were analyzed with a two-pool quantitative MT model. Multiple TE data were also acquired and mono-exponential T2 * was calculated for each orientation. Macromolecular proton fractions and exchange rates derived from UTE-MT modeling did not appreciably change between the various orientations, whereas the T2 * relaxation time demonstrated up to a sixfold increase from 0° to 55°. The UTE-MT technique with two-pool modeling shows promise as a clinically compatible technique that is resistant to the magic angle effect. This method provides information on the macromolecular proton pool that cannot be directly obtained by other methods, including regular UTE techniques.

  15. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-10-04

    Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

  16. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  17. Non-destructive evaluation of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1996-01-01

    The composite materials have been used in aerospace industries for quite some time. Several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been developed to inspect composites in order to detect flaws, matrix cracking, and delamination. These methods include ultrasonics, acoustic emission, shearography, thermography, X-ray, and digital image correlation. The NDE Branch of Marshall Space Flight Center has recently acquired a thermal imaging NDE system. The same system has been used at NASA Langley Research Center for detecting disbonds. In order to compare different NDE methods, three carbon/carbon composite panels were used for experiment using ultrasonic C-scan, shearography, and thermography methods. These panels have teflon inserts to simulate the delamination between plies in a composite panel. All three methods have successfully located the insert. The experiment and results are presented in the following sections.

  18. Rotor design for high pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Romulus V F; Hoyt, David W; Rosso, Kevin M; Sears, Jesse A; Loring, John S; Felmy, Andrew R; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low (1)H and (13)C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe(2+))(3)Si(2)O(5)(OH)(4)), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) at 150 bar and 50°C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO(2), but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  19. Rotor design for high pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 °C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  20. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  1. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOEpatents

    Fong, James T.

    1996-01-01

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  2. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Haimovich, A; Goldbourt, A

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  3. Characterization of lithium coordination sites with magic-angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, A.; Goldbourt, A.

    2015-05-01

    Lithium, in the form of lithium carbonate, is one of the most common drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is also considered to have an effect on many other cellular processes hence it possesses additional therapeutic as well as side effects. In order to quantitatively characterize the binding mode of lithium, it is required to identify the interacting species and measure their distances from the metal center. Here we use magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to study the binding site of lithium in complex with glycine and water (LiGlyW). Such a compound is a good enzyme mimetic since lithium is four-coordinated to one water molecule and three carboxylic groups. Distance measurements to carbons are performed using a 2D transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR) MAS solid-state NMR experiment, and water binding is probed by heteronuclear high-resolution proton-lithium and proton-carbon correlation (wPMLG-HETCOR) experiments. Both HETCOR experiments separate the main complex from impurities and non-specifically bound lithium species, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method to probe the species in the binding site. Optimizations of the TEDOR pulse scheme in the case of a quadrupolar nucleus with a small quadrupole coupling constant show that it is most efficient when pulses are positioned on the spin-1/2 (carbon-13) nucleus. Since the intensity of the TEDOR signal is not normalized, careful data analysis that considers both intensity and dipolar oscillations has to be performed. Nevertheless we show that accurate distances can be extracted for both carbons of the bound glycine and that these distances are consistent with the X-ray data and with lithium in a tetrahedral environment. The lithium environment in the complex is very similar to the binding site in inositol monophosphatase, an enzyme associated with bipolar disorder and the putative target for lithium therapy. A 2D TEDOR experiment applied to the bacterial SuhB gene product of this enzyme was designed

  4. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  5. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  6. Use of rotary echoes in 2H magic-angle spinning NMR for the quantitative study of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Naomi H. M.; Boulton, Paul J. T.; Zorin, Vadim E.; Harris, Robin K.; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2009-06-01

    The interaction of sample spinning and chemical dynamics is analysed in the context of 2H magic-angle spinning NMR. We develop previous analyses and show that a metric based on the intensity of rotational echoes allows kinetic information to be derived without the need for full modelling of the NMR response. This approach is illustrated on the conformational exchange of 1,4-dioxane included in the channel solvate hydrate formed with finasteride. An activation barrier in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical estimates is obtained, without the need for modelling which would be very challenging due to the anisotropic tumbling of the solvent molecules.

  7. Cryogenic Storage Tank Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of cryogenic storage tanks. Four large cryogenic tanks, constructed in 1965 with perlite insulation in the annular regions, are of concern. The construction of the tanks, two Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and two Liquid Hydrogen (LH2), are described. The loss rate for the LOX tank at Pad A is slightly higher than that for the one at Pad B. The concerns for the LH2 tank at Pad B are that there is a significantly higher boil-off rate than that at Pad A, that there is mold growth, indicative of increased heat flow, that there is a long down-time needed for repairs, and that 3 of 5 full thermal cycles have been used on the Pad B LH2 tank. The advantages and disadvantages of thermal imaging are given. A detailed description of what is visible of the structures in the infra-red is given and views of the thermal images are included. Missing Perlite is given as the probable cause of the cold spot on the Pad B LH2 tank. There is no indications of problematic cold regions on the Pad A LH2 tank, as shown by the thermal images given in the presentation. There is definite indication of a cold region on the Pad A LOX tank. There is however concerns with thermal imaging, as thermal images can be significantly effected by environmental conditions, image differences on similar days but with different wind speeds. Other effects that must be considered include ambient temperature, humidity levels/dew, and cloud reflections

  8. Non destructive testing of soft body armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhise, Karan

    Pristine bullet proof vests are extremely effective at halting pre-determined projectile threats and have saved over 3000 lives. However, the effectiveness of these vests to halt a bullet is seen to decrease over time.Owing to the importance of bullet proof vests over a period of time, tests to determine their effectiveness have been carried out on every batch of vests at the time of inception and at certain time intervals by shooting a bullet through them. A few vests from every batch are picked up and shot at to check for bullet penetration during this process while these results are extrapolated onto the other vests from the batch.One of the main issues with this method is the fact that testing a few jackets among a large set of jackets does not guarantee the safety of every jacket in the entire batch.Further the jackets that are shot-at have the possibility of undergoing substantial damage during the process thus compromising its safety rendering them unsafe for future use.As the vest penetration phenomenon is extremely complex too, there arose a need for a better testing procedure that could not only help ensure more safety, but also save time and money.The new testing procedure proposed a non-destructive evaluation of the jackets that would solve the issues previous faced in testing the vests. This would lead to the building of a portable set up which could be carried to any location to test jackets in a matter of minutes thus saving time and money.

  9. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil

  10. Parameter independent low-power heteronuclear decoupling for fast magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Madhu, P. K.; Meier, Beat H.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ernst, Matthias; Agarwal, Vipin

    2017-02-01

    Major advances have recently been made in the field of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These developments have improved the resolution and sensitivity of the NMR spectrum of spins coupled to protons. One such new scheme, denoted as rCWApA, has proven to be robust with practically no need for parameter optimization [A. Equbal et al. Chem. Phys. Lett., 635, 339 (2015)]. Most of the experiments with rCWApA have been carried out in the regimes of slow to moderate magic-angle spinning while simultaneously applying high decoupling radio-frequency amplitudes. Here, we explore the performance of the rCWApA sequence and its predecessor rCWA in the regime of low-power radio-frequency irradiation and fast magic-angle spinning. The robustness of the refocused continuous-wave (rCW) schemes to experimental parameters such as pulse lengths and offset irradiation is demonstrated. Numerical simulations and analytical theory have been used to understand the effects of various nuclear spin interactions on the decoupling performance of the low-power rCW decoupling scheme relative to other decoupling methods. This has lead to the design of an "optimum low-power decoupling sequence" that can be used without parameter optimization. This result is particularly important in the context of samples with low signal to noise.

  11. Studying Dynamics by Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Schanda, Paul; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy is an important technique to study molecular structure, dynamics and interactions, and is rapidly gaining importance in biomolecular sciences. Here we provide an overview of experimental approaches to study molecular dynamics by MAS solid-state NMR, with an emphasis on the underlying theoretical concepts and differences of MAS solid-state NMR compared to solution-state NMR. The theoretical foundations of nuclear spin relaxation are revisited, focusing on the particularities of spin relaxation in solid samples under magic-angle spinning. We discuss the range of validity of Redfield theory, as well as the inherent multi-exponential behavior of relaxation in solids. Experimental challenges for measuring relaxation parameters in MAS solid-state NMR and a few recently proposed relaxation approaches are discussed, which provide information about time scales and amplitudes of motions ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds. We also discuss the theoretical basis and experimental measurements of anisotropic interactions (chemical-shift anisotropies, dipolar and quadrupolar couplings), which give direct information about the amplitude of motions. The potential of combining relaxation data with such measurements of dynamically-averaged anisotropic interactions is discussed. Although the focus of this review is on the theoretical foundations of dynamics studies rather than their application, we close by discussing a small number of recent dynamics studies, where the dynamic properties of proteins in crystals are compared to those in solution. PMID:27110043

  12. Parameter independent low-power heteronuclear decoupling for fast magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Madhu, P K; Meier, Beat H; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Ernst, Matthias; Agarwal, Vipin

    2017-02-28

    Major advances have recently been made in the field of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These developments have improved the resolution and sensitivity of the NMR spectrum of spins coupled to protons. One such new scheme, denoted as rCW(ApA), has proven to be robust with practically no need for parameter optimization [A. Equbal et al. Chem. Phys. Lett., 635, 339 (2015)]. Most of the experiments with rCW(ApA) have been carried out in the regimes of slow to moderate magic-angle spinning while simultaneously applying high decoupling radio-frequency amplitudes. Here, we explore the performance of the rCW(ApA) sequence and its predecessor rCW(A) in the regime of low-power radio-frequency irradiation and fast magic-angle spinning. The robustness of the refocused continuous-wave (rCW) schemes to experimental parameters such as pulse lengths and offset irradiation is demonstrated. Numerical simulations and analytical theory have been used to understand the effects of various nuclear spin interactions on the decoupling performance of the low-power rCW decoupling scheme relative to other decoupling methods. This has lead to the design of an "optimum low-power decoupling sequence" that can be used without parameter optimization. This result is particularly important in the context of samples with low signal to noise.

  13. Floquet-Magnus expansion for general N-coupled spins systems in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical perturbative approach for describing the NMR spectrum of strongly dipolar-coupled spin systems under fast magic-angle spinning. Our treatment is based on two approaches: the Floquet approach and the Floquet-Magnus expansion. The Floquet approach is well known in the NMR community as a perturbative approach to get analytical approximations. Numerical procedures are based on step-by-step numerical integration of the corresponding differential equations. The Floquet-Magnus expansion is a perturbative approach of the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we address the " γ -encoding" effect using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach. We show that the average over " γ " angle can be performed for any Hamiltonian with γ symmetry.

  14. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR GEOTHERMAL PIPING.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2001-03-23

    Non-destructive testing is a key component of optimized plant inspection and maintenance programs. Risk based inspection, condition based maintenance and reliability centered maintenance systems all require detection, location and sizing of defects or flaws by non-destructive methods. Internal damage of geothermal piping by corrosion and erosion-corrosion is an ongoing problem requiring inspection and subsequent maintenance decisions to ensure safe and reliable performance. Conventional manual ultrasonic testing to determine remaining wall thickness has major limitations, particularly when damage is of a random and localized nature. Therefore, it is necessary to explore alternative non-destructive methods that offer potential benefits in terms of accurate quantification of size, shape and location of damage, probability of detection, ability to use on-line over long ranges, and economics. A review of non-destructive methods and their applicability to geothermal piping was performed. Based on this, ongoing research will concentrate on long range guided wave and dynamic methods.

  15. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    In order to compare a few non-destructive classification techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  16. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi

    2011-01-01

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-γ nuclei (e.g., 13C and 15N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., 1H and 19F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in 1H detected 2D 1H{l_brace}13C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional 13C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear 1H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5m$\\bar{x}$, PMLG5mm$\\bar{x}$x and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based

  17. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Influenza A M218-60: Support for an Allosteric Mechanism of Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Loren B.; Eddy, Matthew T.; Pielak, Rafal M.; Chou, James; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    The tetrameric M2 proton channel from influenza A virus conducts protons at low pH and is inhibited by aminoadamantyl drugs such as amantadine and rimantadine. We report magic angle spinning NMR spectra of POPC and DPhPC membrane embedded M218-60, both apo and in the presence of rimantadine. Similar linewidths in spectra of apo and bound M2 indicate that rimantadine does not have a significant impact on the dynamics or conformational heterogeneity of this construct. Substantial chemical shift changes for many residues in the transmembrane region support an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. A Rmt titration supports a binding stoichiometry of >1 Rmt molecule per channel while showing that nonspecific bindin0g or changes in membrane composition are unlikely sources of the chemical shift changes. In addition, doubling of spectral lines in all of the observed samples provides evidence that the channel assembles with twofold symmetry. PMID:20698642

  18. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  19. Measurement of lateral diffusion rates in membranes by pulsed magnetic field gradient, magic angle spinning-proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Gaede, Holly C

    2007-01-01

    Membrane organization, including the presence of domains, can be characterized by measuring lateral diffusion rates of lipids and membrane-bound substances. Magic angle spinning (MAS) yields well-resolved proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of lipids in biomembranes. When combined with pulsed-field gradient NMR (rendering what is called "pulsed magnetic field gradients-MAS-NMR"), it permits precise diffusion measurements on the micrometer lengths scale for any substance with reasonably well-resolved proton MAS-NMR resonances, without the need of preparing oriented samples. Sample preparation procedures, the technical requirements for the NMR equipment, and spectrometer settings are described. Additionally, equations for analysis of diffusion data obtained from unoriented samples, and a method for correcting the data for liposome curvature are provided.

  20. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C; Wheeler, Travis B; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2017-02-22

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  1. Chemical shift powder spectra enhanced by multiple-contact cross-polarization under slow magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Raya, Jésus; Perrone, Barbara; Hirschinger, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    A simple multiple-contact cross-polarization (CP) scheme is applied to a powder sample of ferrocene and β-calcium formate under static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. We show that multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath improves the polarization transfer efficiency at short contact times and provides higher signal enhancements than state-of-the art techniques such as adiabatic passage through the Hartmann-Hahn condition CP (APHH-CP) when MAS is applied. The resulting chemical shift powder spectra then are identical to the ones obtained by using ROtor-Directed Exchange of Orientations CP (APHH-RODEO-CP) with intensity gains of a factor 1.1-1.3.

  2. Chemical shift powder spectra enhanced by multiple-contact cross-polarization under slow magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raya, Jésus; Perrone, Barbara; Hirschinger, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    A simple multiple-contact cross-polarization (CP) scheme is applied to a powder sample of ferrocene and β-calcium formate under static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. We show that multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath improves the polarization transfer efficiency at short contact times and provides higher signal enhancements than state-of-the art techniques such as adiabatic passage through the Hartmann-Hahn condition CP (APHH-CP) when MAS is applied. The resulting chemical shift powder spectra then are identical to the ones obtained by using ROtor-Directed Exchange of Orientations CP (APHH-RODEO-CP) with intensity gains of a factor 1.1-1.3.

  3. High resolution magic angle spinning NMR applied to the analysis of organic compounds bound to solid supports.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    In situ structural characterization of organic compounds attached to solid supports can be achieved by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR (HRMAS NMR), a technique that provides solution-like spectra for resin-bound molecules. This review outlines the principles of the technique, the influence of the solid support on data quality, and NMR experiments that are useful for obtaining valuable information. The review describes, with multiple examples mainly from the last 7 years, how HRMAS NMR has been applied to monitor solid-phase reactions, elucidate reaction products and quantify compound loading on a solid support. Other applications, such as conformational analysis of immobilized compounds and investigation of molecular interactions with compounds in solution, are also discussed.

  4. Properties of mixtures of cholesterol with phosphatidylcholine or with phosphatidylserine studied by (13)C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Epand, Richard M; Bain, Alex D; Sayer, Brian G; Bach, Diana; Wachtel, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of cholesterol is different in mixtures with phosphatidylcholine as compared with phosphatidylserine. In (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, resonance peaks of the vinylic carbons of cholesterol are a doublet in samples containing 0.3 or 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) or in cholesterol monohydrate crystals, but a singlet with mixtures of cholesterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC). At these molar fractions of cholesterol with POPS, resonances of the C-18 of cholesterol appear at the same chemical shifts as in pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals. These resonances do not appear in samples of POPS with 0.2 mol fraction cholesterol or with POPC up to 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol. In addition, there is another resonance from the cholesterol C18 that appears in all of the mixtures of phospholipid and cholesterol but not in pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Using direct polarization, the fraction of cholesterol present as crystallites in POPS with 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol is found to be 80%, whereas with the same mol fraction of cholesterol and POPC none of the cholesterol is crystalline. After many hours of incubation, cholesterol monohydrate crystals in POPS undergo a change that results in an increase in the intensity of certain resonances of cholesterol monohydrate in (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, indicating a rigidification of the C and D rings of cholesterol but not other regions of the molecule. PMID:12324423

  5. NonDestructive Evaluation for Industrial & Development Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, James F.

    2016-10-12

    Provide overview of weld inspection for Non-Destructive Testing at LANL. This includes radiography (RT/DR/CR/CT for x-ray & neutron sources), ultrasonic testing (UT/PAUT), dye penetrant inspection (PT), eddy current inspection (ET) and magnetic particle testing (MT). Facilities and capabilities for weld inspection will be summarized with examples.

  6. Non-destructive methods for food texture assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food texture is important to the successful marketing and profitability of food products. Non-destructive sensing would allow food producers and processors to inspect, sort, grade, or track individual product items, so that they can deliver consistent, superior food products to the marketplace. Over...

  7. Satellite transitions acquired in real time by magic angle spinning (STARTMAS): ``Ultrafast'' high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy of spin I =3/2 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrippleton, Michael J.; Ball, Thomas J.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The satellite transitions acquired in real time by magic angle spinning (STARTMAS) NMR experiment combines a train of pulses with sample rotation at the magic angle to refocus the first- and second-order quadrupolar broadening of spin I =3/2 nuclei in a series of echoes, while allowing the isotropic chemical and quadrupolar shifts to evolve. The result is real-time isotropic NMR spectra at high spinning rates using conventional MAS equipment. In this paper we describe in detail how STARTMAS data can be acquired and processed with ease on commercial equipment. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of the approach and illustrate the discussion with numerical simulations and experimental data from four different powdered solids.

  8. Gelified Biofluids for High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (1)H NMR Analysis: The Case of Urine.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Tenori, Leonardo; Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio

    2017-01-17

    In this letter, we propose an alternative, effective protocol for metabolomic characterization of biofluids based on their gelification and subsequent application of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The sample handling is very rapid and reproducible, and much less than 40 μL of neat urine are needed to obtain a sample. Our results indicate that the HRMAS spectra of gelified urine encompass all metabolites in the NMR fingerprint, as observed by solution NMR. The proposed approach can be efficiently integrated into the NMR based metabolomics analyses routines: multivariate statistical analysis of both solution and HRMAS data produced very similar statistical models, with high classification accuracy. One of the key advantages offered by the gelification approach is the improved short-term (up to 24 h) preservation of nonfrozen HRMAS NMR gel urine samples compared to the solution samples, which could lead to an alternative way for transportation or domestic collection of biofluids, without the need of cold-storage and reducing the risks of leakage.

  9. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  10. Magic angle spinning NMR study of the ferroelectric transition of KH2PO4: definitive evidence of a displacive component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Fu, Riqiang; Choi, Eun Sang; Dalal, Naresh S.

    2017-04-01

    Variable temperature magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements are reported on 1H and 31P nuclei in KH2PO4 (KDP) in the vicinity of its paraelectric–ferroelectric phase transition temperature, T c, of 123 K, to examine the transition mechanism, in particular if this is a model order–disorder type or whether it also involves a displacive component. It has been well established that the temperature variation of the isotropic chemical shift, δ iso, in NMR measurements of the nuclei directly involved in the transition should remain constant or change smoothly through T c for an order–disorder type transition but it should show an anomalous change for a displacive one. Here we demonstrate that the δ iso for both 31P and 1H nuclei in KDP show clear anomalies as a function of temperature around KDP’s T c, providing direct evidence of a displacive component for the phase transition of KDP in contrast to the generally accepted notion that it is a model order–disorder type.

  11. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states.

  12. Closed-cycle cold helium magic-angle spinning for sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Nakamura, Shinji; Fukui, Shigeo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2015-10-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is a powerful tool for studying molecular structure and dynamics, but suffers from its low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel helium-cooling MAS NMR probe system adopting a closed-loop gas recirculation mechanism. In addition to the sensitivity gain due to low temperature, the present system has enabled highly stable MAS (vR=4-12 kHz) at cryogenic temperatures (T=35-120 K) for over a week without consuming helium at a cost for electricity of 16 kW/h. High-resolution 1D and 2D data were recorded for a crystalline tri-peptide sample at T=40 K and B0=16.4 T, where an order of magnitude of sensitivity gain was demonstrated versus room temperature measurement. The low-cost and long-term stable MAS strongly promotes broader application of the brute-force sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional MAS NMR, as well as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced NMR in a temperature range lower than 100 K.

  13. Solid state 31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of crystalline glycogen phosphorylase b

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Jocelyn E.; Heyes, Stephen J.; Barford, David; Johnson, Louise N.; Dobson, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    31P cross-polarization/magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained for pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) bound to glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) in two different crystalline forms, monoclinic and tetragonal. Analysis of the intensities of the spinning sidebands in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra has enabled estimates of the principal values of the 31P chemical shift tensors to be obtained. Differences between the two sets of values suggest differences in the environment of the phosphate moiety of the pyridoxal phosphate in the two crystalline forms. The tensor for the tetragonal crystalline form, T state GPb, is fully consistent with those found for dianionic phosphate groups in model compounds. The spectrum for the monoclinic crystalline form, R state GPb, although closer to that of dianionic than monoanionic model phosphate compounds, deviates significantly from that expected for a simple dianion or monoanion. This is likely to result from specific interactions between the PLP phosphate group and residues in its binding site in the protein. A possible explanation for the spectrum of the monoclinic crystals is that the shift tensor is averaged by a proton exchange process between different ionization states of the PLP associated with the presence of a sulfate ion bound in the vicinity of the PLP. PMID:8457673

  14. Evaluating Human Breast Ductal Carcinomas with High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Leo Ling; Chang, I.-Wen; Smith, Barbara L.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of a study of human breast ductal carcinomas, conducted by using high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HRMAS 1HMRS). This recently developed spectroscopic technique can measure tissue metabolism from intact pathological specimens and identify tissue biochemical changes, which closely correspond to tumorin vivostate. This procedure objectively indicates diagnostic parameters, independent of the skill and experience of the investigator, and has the potential to reduce the sampling errors inherently associated with procedures of conventional histopathology. In this study, we measured 19 cases of female ductal carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that: (1) highly resolved spectra of intact specimens of human breast ductal carcinomas can be obtained; (2) carcinoma-free tissues and carcinomas are distinguishable by alterations in the intensities and the spin-spin relaxation time T2 of cellular metabolites; and (3) tumor metabolic markers, such as phosphocholine, lactate, and lipids, may correlate with the histopathological grade determined from evaluation of the adjacent specimen. Our results suggest that biochemical markers thus measured may function as a valuable adjunct to histopathology to improve the accuracy of and reduce the time frame required for the diagnosis of human breast cancer.

  15. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Taylor L.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2016-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics. PMID:27011205

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  17. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Taylor L; Cheng, Leo L

    2016-03-22

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics.

  18. Combination of high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale genomics to type brain tumor biopsies.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Astrakas, Loukas; Cao, Haihui; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Mindrinos, Michael; Zhang, Jiangwen; Rahme, Laurence G; Blekas, Konstantinos D; Likas, Aristidis C; Galatsanos, Nikolas P; Carroll, Rona S; Black, Peter M

    2007-08-01

    Advancements in the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumor patients, and thus in their survival and quality of life, can be achieved using biomarkers that facilitate improved tumor typing. We introduce and implement a combinatorial metabolic and molecular approach that applies state-of-the-art, high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton (1H) MRS and gene transcriptome profiling to intact brain tumor biopsies, to identify unique biomarker profiles of brain tumors. Our results show that samples as small as 2 mg can be successfully processed, the HRMAS 1H MRS procedure does not result in mRNA degradation, and minute mRNA amounts yield high-quality genomic data. The MRS and genomic analyses demonstrate that CNS tumors have altered levels of specific 1H MRS metabolites that directly correspond to altered expression of Kennedy pathway genes; and exhibit rapid phospholipid turnover, which coincides with upregulation of cell proliferation genes. The data also suggest Sonic Hedgehog pathway (SHH) dysregulation may play a role in anaplastic ganglioglioma pathogenesis. That a strong correlation is seen between the HRMAS 1H MRS and genomic data cross-validates and further demonstrates the biological relevance of the MRS results. Our combined metabolic/molecular MRS/genomic approach provides insights into the biology of anaplastic ganglioglioma and a new potential tumor typing methodology that could aid neurologists and neurosurgeons to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing evaluation of brain tumor patients.

  19. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  20. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  1. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-07-10

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  2. Non-destructive examination system of vitreous body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuma; Gong, Jin; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Masato, Makino; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Nishitsuka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Eyeball plays a quite important role in acquiring the vision. Vitreous body occupies the largest part of the eyeball and consists of biological, elastic, transparent, gel materials. In the present medical examination, the non-destructive examination method of the vitreous body has not been well established. Here, we focus on an application of dynamic light scattering to this topic. We tried to apply our lab-made apparatus, scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS), which was specially designed for observing the nanometer-scale network structure in gel materials. In order to examine the vitreous body using SMILS method, a commercial apparatus, nano Partica (Horiba Co. Ltd.) was also customized. We analyzed vitreous body using both the SMILS and the customized nano Partica. We successfully examined the vitreous bodies of healthy pigs in non-destructive way.

  3. Non-destructive microstructural analysis with depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotoyabko, E.; Quintana, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    A depth-sensitive X-ray diffraction technique has been developed with the aim of studying microstructural modifications in inhomogeneous polycrystalline materials. In that method, diffraction profiles are measured at different X-ray energies varied by small steps. X-rays at higher energies probe deeper layers of material. Depth-resolved structural information is retrieved by comparing energy-dependent diffraction profiles. The method provides non-destructive depth profiling of the preferred orientation, grain size, microstrain fluctuations and residual strains. This technique is applied to the characterization of seashells. Similarly, energy-variable X-ray diffraction can be used for the non-destructive characterization of different laminated structures and composite materials.

  4. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future.

  5. Non-destructive NIR FT Raman analysis of plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Klump, H. H.; Schenzel, K.; Schulz, H.

    1999-10-01

    Non-destructive analyses of animal and plant cells and tissues by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range have not been possible since the samples are destroyed photochemically or their fluorescence conceals the Raman spectra completely. When excited with the Nd:YAG laser line at 1064 nm fluorescence-free Raman spectra of animal or plant cells and tissues can be recorded without special preparation. In this paper we concentrate on plants and its constituents: essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices, alkaloids and fibers can be characterized. The spectra allow the observation of biochemical processes, to observe the distribution of natural products, application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding, the harvesting time and control of food—everything non-destructively in living plants!

  6. Embedded Non-Destructive Evaluation for Glass Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-05

    Unclassified In House NDE and Electromagnetic Compatibility Capabilities Millimeter wave Scanning Imager Phased Array Ultrasound Immersion Tank Low...DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Embedded NDE for Glass Armor Sensor Enhanced Armor- Non-Destructive...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Unclassified Armor Solutions Tested with Ultrasonics NDT/E leading to Sensor Enhanced

  7. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    van Schadewijk, R.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Alia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:27662620

  8. Intratumoral Agreement of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Profiles in the Metabolic Characterization of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Yoon, Dahye; Koo, Ja Seung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy data may serve as a biomarker for breast cancer, with only a small volume of tissue sample required for assessment. However, previous studies utilized only a single tissue sample from each patient. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratumoral location and biospecimen type affected the metabolic characterization of breast cancer assessed by HR-MAS MR spectroscopy This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained. Preoperative core-needle biopsies (CNBs), central, and peripheral surgical tumor specimens were prospectively collected under ultrasound (US) guidance in 31 patients with invasive breast cancer. Specimens were assessed with HR-MAS MR spectroscopy. The reliability of metabolite concentrations was evaluated and multivariate analysis was performed according to intratumoral location and biospecimen type. There was a moderate or higher agreement between the relative concentrations of 94.3% (33 of 35) of metabolites in the center and periphery, 80.0% (28 of 35) of metabolites in the CNB and central surgical specimens, and 82.9% (29 of 35) of metabolites between all 3 specimen types. However, there was no significant agreement between the concentrations of phosphocholine (PC) and phosphoethanolamine (PE) in the center and periphery. The concentrations of several metabolites (adipate, arginine, fumarate, glutamate, PC, and PE) had no significant agreement between the CNB and central surgical specimens. In conclusion, most HR-MAS MR spectroscopic data do not differ based on intratumoral location or biospecimen type. However, some metabolites may be affected by specimen-related variables, and caution is recommended in decision-making based solely on metabolite concentrations, particularly PC and PE. Further validation through future studies is needed for the clinical implementation of these biomarkers based

  9. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied.

  10. Alterations in creatine metabolism observed in experimental autoimmune myocarditis using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS.

    PubMed

    Muench, Frédéric; Retel, Joren; Jeuthe, Sarah; O h-Ici, Darach; van Rossum, Barth; Wassilew, Katharina; Schmerler, Patrick; Kuehne, Titus; Berger, Felix; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Messroghli, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rodents is an accepted model of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Altered metabolism is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DCM and heart failure (HF). Study of the metabolism may provide new diagnostic information and insights into the mechanisms of myocarditis and HF. Proton MRS ((1)H-MRS) has not yet been used to study the changes occurring in myocarditis and subsequent HF. We aimed to explore the changes in creatine metabolism using this model and compare them with the findings in healthy animals. Myocardial function of male young Lewis rats with EAM was quantified by performing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) analysis in short-axis cine images throughout the whole heart. Inflammatory cellular infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Myocardial tissue was analyzed using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS ((1)H-MAS-MRS). Myocarditis was confirmed histologically by the presence of an inflammatory cellular infiltrate and CD68 positive staining. A significant increase in the metabolic ratio of Tau/tCr (taurine/total creatine) obtained by (1)H-MAS-MRS was observed in myocarditis compared with healthy controls (21 d acute EAM, 4.38 (±0.23); 21 d control, 2.84 (±0.08); 35 d chronic EAM, 4.47 (±0.83); 35 d control, 2.59 (±0.38); P < 0.001). LVEF was reduced in diseased animals (EAM, 55.2% (±11.3%); control, 72.6% (±3.8%); P < 0.01) and correlated with Tau/tCr ratio (R = 0.937, P < 0.001). Metabolic alterations occur acutely with the development of myocarditis. Myocardial Tau/tCr ratio as detected by (1)H-MRS correlates with LVEF and is able to differentiate between healthy myocardium and myocardium from rats with EAM.

  11. Lipid biomarkers of glioma cell growth arrest and cell death detected by 1 H magic angle spinning MRS.

    PubMed

    Mirbahai, Ladan; Wilson, Martin; Shaw, Christopher S; McConville, Carmel; Malcomson, Roger D G; Kauppinen, Risto A; Peet, Andrew C

    2012-11-01

    Biomarkers of early response to treatment have the potential to improve cancer therapy by allowing treatment to be tailored to the individual. Alterations in lipids detected by in vivo MRS have been suggested as noninvasive biomarkers of cell stress and early indicators of cell death. An improved understanding of the relationship between MRS lipids and cell stress in vitro would aid in the translation of this technique into clinical use. Rat BT4C glioma cells were treated with 50 µ m cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum II (cisplatin), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, and harvested at several time points up to 72 h. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H MRS of cells was then performed on a 600-MHz NMR spectrometer. The metabolites were quantified using a time domain fitting method, TARQUIN. Increases were detected in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid resonances early during the exposure to cisplatin. The fatty acid CH(2) /CH(3) ratio was unaltered by treatment after allowing for contributions of macromolecules. Polyunsaturated fatty acids increased on treatment, with the group -CH=CH-CH(2) -CH=CH- accounting for all the unsaturated fatty acid signals. Transmission electron microscopy, in addition to Nile red and 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole co-staining, revealed that the lipid increase was associated with cytoplasmic neutral lipid droplets. Small numbers of apoptotic and necrotic cells were detected by trypan blue, annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled flow cytometry and DNA laddering after up to 48 h of cisplatin exposure. Propidium iodide flow cytometry revealed that cells accumulated in the G1 stage of the cell growth cycle. In conclusion, an increase in the size of the lipid droplets is detected in morphologically viable cells during cisplatin exposure. (1) H MRS can detect lipid alterations during cell cycle arrest and progression of cell death, and has the potential to provide a noninvasive biomarker of treatment efficacy in vivo.

  12. Distortional binding of transition state analogs to human purine nucleoside phosphorylase probed by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vetticatt, Mathew J.; Itin, Boris; Evans, Gary B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    Transition state analogs mimic the geometry and electronics of the transition state of enzymatic reactions. These molecules bind to the active site of the enzyme much tighter than substrate and are powerful noncovalent inhibitors. Immucillin-H (ImmH) and 4′-deaza-1′-aza-2′-deoxy-9-methylene Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) are picomolar inhibitors of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hPNP). Although both molecules are electronically similar to the oxocarbenium-like dissociative hPNP transition state, DADMe-ImmH is more potent than ImmH. DADMe-ImmH captures more of the transition state binding energy by virtue of being a closer geometric match to the hPNP transition state than ImmH. A consequence of these similarities is that the active site of hPNP exerts greater distortional forces on ImmH than on DADMe-ImmH to “achieve” the hPNP transition state geometry. By using magic angle spinning solid-state NMR to investigate stable isotope-labeled ImmH and DADMe-ImmH, we have explored the difference in distortional binding of these two inhibitors to hPNP. High-precision determinations of internuclear distances from NMR recoupling techniques, rotational echo double resonance, and rotational resonance, have provided unprecedented atomistic insight into the geometric changes that occur upon binding of transition state analogs. We conclude that hPNP stabilizes conformations of these chemically distinct analogs having distances between the cation and leaving groups resembling those of the known transition state. PMID:24043827

  13. Surface Interactions and Confinement of Methane: A High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning NMR and Computational Chemistry Study

    DOE PAGES

    Ok, Salim; Hoyt, David W.; Andersen, Amity; ...

    2017-01-18

    Characterization and modeling of the molecular-level behavior of simple hydrocarbon gases, such as methane, in the presence of both nonporous and nanoporous mineral matrices allows for predictive understanding of important processes in engineered and natural systems. In this study, we observed changes in local electromagnetic environments of the carbon atoms in methane under conditions of high pressure (up to 130 bar) and moderate temperature (up to 346 K) with 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy while the methane gas was mixed with two model solid substrates: a fumed nonporous, 12 nm particle size silica and a mesoporous silica with 200more » nm particle size and 4 nm average pore diameter. Examination of the interactions between methane and the silica systems over temperatures and pressures that include the supercritical regime was allowed by a novel high pressure MAS sample containment system, which provided high resolution spectra collected under in situ conditions. There was no significant thermal effects were found for the observed 13C chemical shifts at all pressures studied here (28.2, 32.6, 56.4, 65.1, 112.7, and 130.3 bar) for pure methane. However, the 13C chemical shifts of resonances arising from confined methane changed slightly with changes in temperature in mixtures with mesoporous silica. The chemical shift values of 13C nuclides in methane change measurably as a function of pressure both in the pure state and in mixtures with both silica matrices, with a more pronounced shift when meso-porous silica is present. Molecular-level simulations utilizing GCMC, MD, and DFT confirm qualitatively that the experimentally measured changes are attributed to interactions of methane with the hydroxylated silica surfaces as well as densification of methane within nanopores and on pore surfaces.« less

  14. Magic-angle-spinning NMR on solid biological systems. Analysis Of the origin of the spectral linewidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemminga, M. A.; de Jager, P. A.; Krüse, J.; Lamerichs, R. M. J. N.

    Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) high-power 1H-decoupled 13C and 31P NMR has been applied to solid biological materials to obtain information about the mechanisms that determine the spectral linewidths. The line broadening in MAS 31P NMR spectra of solid tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been investigated by selective saturation and T2 measurements. About 90 Hz stems from homogeneous effects, whereas the inhomogeneous contribution is approximately 100 Hz. The inhomogeneous line broadening is assigned to macroscopic inhomogeneities in the sample and not to variations in the nucleotide bases along the RNA strand in TMV. It is concluded that sample preparation is of vital importance for obtaining well-resolved spectra. Under optimal preparation techniques the isotropic values of the chemical shift of the different 31P sites have been determined to obtain information about the secondary structure of the viral RNA. The chemical shift anisotropy has been determined from the relative intensities of the spinning side bands in the spectra. The chemical shift information is used to make a tentative assignment of the resonance in terms of the three structurally distinguishable phosphate groups in TMV. The origin of the linewidths in MAS NMR has been examined further by 13C NMR of approximately 10% 13C-enriched coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, using selective excitation and saturation techniques, as well as measurements of the relaxation times T1 γ and T2. The CO resonance in the spectrum is composed of an inhomogeneous and homogeneous part with a total linewidth of 700 Hz. The homogeneous linewidth, contributing with 200 Hz, is found to arise from slow molecular motions in the solid on a millisecond timescale.

  15. Mineral Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High-Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, R. V.; Hoyt, D. H.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.; Hu, J. Z.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial for accurately predicting long-term storage risks. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information at geologically relevant temperatures and pressures are highly desirable and challenging to develop. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof. However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS sample rotor. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability capable of handling fluid pressure exceeding 170 bars and temperatures up to 80°C, and its application to mineral carbonation in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures. Mineral carbonation reactions of the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite and the magnesium hydroxide brucite reacted with scCO2 (up to 170 bar) and containing variable content of H2O (at, below, and above saturation in scCO2) were investigated at 50 to 70°C. In situ 13C MAS NMR spectra show peaks corresponding to the reactants, intermediates, and the magnesium carbonation products in a single spectrum. For example, Figure 1 shows the reaction dynamics, i.e., the formation and conversion of reaction intermediates, i.e., HCO3- and nesquehonite, to magnesite as a function of time at 70°C. This capability offers a significant advantage over traditional ex situ 13C MAS experiments on similar systems, where, for example, CO2 and HCO3- are not directly observable.

  16. Characterization of divalent metal metavanadates by 51V magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of the central and satellite transitions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, U G; Jakobsen, H J; Skibsted, J

    2000-05-15

    51V quadrupole coupling and chemical shielding tensors have been determined from 51V magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra at a magnetic field of 14.1 T for nine divalent metal metavanadates: Mg(VO3)2, Ca(VO3)2, Ca(VO3)(2).4H2O, alpha-Sr(VO3)2, Zn(VO3)2, alpha- and beta-Cd(VO3)2. The manifold of spinning sidebands (ssbs) from the central and satellite transitions, observed in the 15V MAS NMR spectra, have been analyzed using least-squares fitting and numerical error analysis. This has led to a precise determination of the eight NMR parameters characterizing the magnitudes and relative orientations of the quadrupole coupling and chemical shielding tensors. The optimized data show strong similarities between the NMR parameters for the isostructural groups of divalent metal metavanadates. This demonstrates that different types of metavanadates can easily be distinguished by their anisotropic NMR parameters. The brannerite type of divalent metal metavanadates exhibits very strong 51V quadrupole couplings (i.e., CQ = 6.46-7.50 MHz), which reflect the highly distorted octahedral environments for the V5+ ion in these phases. Linear correlations between the principal tensor elements for the 51V quadrupole coupling tensors and electric field gradient tensor elements, estimated from point-monopole calculations, are reported for the divalent metal metavanadates. These correlations are used in the assignment of the NMR parameters for the different crystallographic 51V sites of Ca(VO3)(2).4H2O, Pb(VO3)2, and Ba(VO3)2. For alpha-Sr(VO3)2, with an unknown crystal structure, the 51V NMR data strongly suggest that this metavanadate is isostructural with Ba(VO3)2, for which the crystal structure has been reported. Finally, the chemical shielding parameters for orthovanadates and mono- and divalent metal metavanadates are compared.

  17. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  18. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure

    DOEpatents

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1983-11-01

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure at regions of interest within the object.

  19. Local defect resonance for sensitive non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebahr, W.; Solodov, I.; Rahammer, M.; Gulnizkij, N.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic wave-defect interaction is a background of ultrasound activated techniques for imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and industrial components. The interaction, primarily, results in acoustic response of a defect which provides attenuation and scattering of ultrasound used as an indicator of defects in conventional ultrasonic NDT. The derivative ultrasonic-induced effects include e.g. nonlinear, thermal, acousto-optic, etc. responses also applied for NDT and defect imaging. These secondary effects are normally relatively inefficient so that the corresponding NDT techniques require an elevated acoustic power and stand out from conventional ultrasonic NDT counterparts for their specific instrumentation particularly adapted to high-power ultrasonic. In this paper, a consistent way to enhance ultrasonic, optical and thermal defect responses and thus to reduce an ultrasonic power required is suggested by using selective ultrasonic activation of defects based on the concept of local defect resonance (LDR). A strong increase in vibration amplitude at LDR enables to reliably detect and visualize the defect as soon as the driving ultrasonic frequency is matched to the LDR frequency. This also provides a high frequency selectivity of the LDR-based imaging, i.e. an opportunity of detecting a certain defect among a multitude of other defects in material. Some examples are shown how to use LDR in non-destructive testing techniques, like vibrometry, ultrasonic thermography and shearography in order to enhance the sensitivity of defect visualization.

  20. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed.

  1. Non destructive testing of works of art by terahertz analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Metayer, Jean-Jacques; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Detalle, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Improvements in technologies and the growing security needs in airport terminals lead to the development of non destructive testing devices using terahertz waves. Indeed, these waves have the advantage of being, on one hand, relatively penetrating. They also have the asset of not being ionizing. It is thus potentially an interesting contribution in the non destructive testing field. With the help of the VISIOM Company, the possibilities of this new industrial analysis method in assisting the restoration of works of art were then approached. The results obtained within this framework are presented here and compared with those obtained by infrared thermography. The results obtained show first that the THZ method, like the stimulated infrared thermography allows the detection of delamination located in murals paintings or in marquetries. They show then that the THZ method seems to allow detecting defects located relatively deeply (10 mm) and defects potentially concealed by other defects. It is an advantage compared to the stimulated infra-red thermography which does not make it possible to obtain these results. Furthermore, they show that the method does not seem sensitive to the various pigments constituting the pictorial layer, to the presence of a layer of "Japan paper" and to the presence of a layer of whitewash. It is not the case of the stimulated infrared thermography. It is another advantage of the THZ method. Finally, they show that the THZ method is limited in the detection of low-size defects. It is a disadvantage compared to the stimulated infrared thermography.

  2. 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipole–dipole couplings of methyl groups in stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments of peptides and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    13C NMR of isotopically labeled methyl groups has the potential to combine spectroscopic simplicity with ease of labeling for protein NMR studies. However, in most high resolution separated local field experiments, such as polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA), that are used to measure 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipolar couplings, the four-spin system of the methyl group presents complications. In this study, the properties of the 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipolar interactions of 13C-labeled methyl groups are revealed through solid-state NMR experiments on a range of samples, including single crystals, stationary powders, and magic angle spinning of powders, of 13C3 labeled alanine alone and incorporated into a protein. The spectral simplifications resulting from proton detected local field (PDLF) experiments are shown to enhance resolution and simplify the interpretation of results on single crystals, magnetically aligned samples, and powders. The complementarity of stationary sample and magic angle spinning (MAS) measurements of dipolar couplings is demonstrated by applying polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle and magic angle spinning (PISEMAMAS) to unoriented samples. PMID:19896874

  3. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  4. Magic angle effect on low field magnetic resonance images in the superficial digital flexor tendon in the equine proximal pastern region.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, C E; Mair, T S

    2016-11-01

    Recognition of artefacts is an essential component of the accurate interpretation of diagnostic images. This study aimed to investigate the presence of magic angle effect in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) in the equine proximal pastern region. The proximal pastern of four cadaver limbs was imaged using a 0.27 Tesla magnet with high-resolution sequences that are commonly utilised in clinical equine practice. The limbs were imaged in a neutral position and positions that simulated the horse 'leaning in', 'leaning out' and having internal and external rotation of the distal limb. Signal intensity changes in the SDFT were described and compared. The simulated 'leaning in' and external rotation positions resulted in increased signal intensity in the axial and middle thirds of the lateral half of the SDFT on sequences with short echo times. The simulated 'leaning out' and internal rotation positions resulted in increased signal intensity in the axial and middle thirds of the medial half of the SDFT on sequences with short echo times. These signal intensity changes did not occur or were only mild and inconsistent on T2 fast spin echo sequences with longer echo times. The increases in signal intensity in the SDFT are consistent with a position-induced magic angle artefact that has been noted in clinical cases. Attention to positioning of the equine distal limb is essential during clinical imaging; radiologists should be aware of position-induced artefacts to ensure accurate image interpretation.

  5. Orientation of functional groups of soil organic matter on the surface of water repellent soils determined by pulse saturation magic angle spinning (PSTMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kawamoto, Ken; Senani Wijewardana, Nadeeka; Müller, Karin; Møldrup, Per; Clothier, Brent; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Orientation of functional groups of soil organic matter on soil particles plays a crucial role in the occurrence of soil water repellency. In addition to a general method to characterize soil organic matter using cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, we determined the surface orientation of functional groups in water repellent soils by using pulse saturation magic angle spinning (PSTMAS) NMR technique. A preliminary experiment confirmed that the PSTMAS NMR spectrum successfully determined the high mobility of methyl group of octadecylsilylated silica gels when a comparison was made with that of CPMAS NMR. This means that the methyl group oriented towards the outside of the silica gel particle. Similarly, for an experimental system consisting of mixtures of octadecylsilylated silica gel and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the extremely high mobility of methyl group derived from DMSO was detected using the same methodology. For water repellent soils from Japan and New Zealand, it was found that the methyl and methylene groups were highly mobile. In contrast, the NMR signals of aromatic moiety, another hydrophobic moiety of soil organic matter, were not as intense in PSTMAS compared with CPMAS. From these results, we conclude that alkyl moiety (methyl and methylene groups) would be oriented towards the outside of the soil particle and would play an important role in the appearance of water repellency of soils.

  6. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  7. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilbrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-01-01

    Classification of meteorites is most effectively carried out by petrographic and mineralogic studies of thin sections, but a rapid and accurate classification technique for the many samples collected in dense collection areas (hot and cold deserts) is of great interest. Oil immersion techniques have been used to classify a large proportion of the US Antarctic meteorite collections since the mid-1980s [1]. This approach has allowed rapid characterization of thousands of samples over time, but nonetheless utilizes a piece of the sample that has been ground to grains or a powder. In order to compare a few non-destructive techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  8. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-15

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation method employing dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members novelly employs a loosely mounted dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducer (DEUT) to receive and convert ultrasonic energy into an electrical signal which can be analyzed to determine the .beta. of the test material. The dielectric material is ferroelectric with a high dielectric constant .di-elect cons.. A computer-controlled measurement system coupled to the DEUT contains an excitation signal generator section and a measurement and analysis section. As a result, the DEUT measures the absolute particle displacement amplitudes in test material, leading to derivation of the nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) without the costly, low field reliability methods of the prior art.

  10. Non-destructive monitoring of river embankments using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prinzio, Monica; Bittelli, Marco; Castellarin, Attilio; Rossi Pisa, Paola

    2010-05-01

    Non-destructive investigations and controls of civil structures are improving day by day, however the scientific literature reports only a few documented cases of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) applications to the detection of voids and discontinuities in hydraulic defense structures such as river embankments and levee systems. GPR can assist decision making in a number of fields by enhancing our knowledge of subsurface features. We applied successfully GPR to the monitoring of river levees for the detectioning of animal burrows in river levees, which may trigger levee failures by piping. The manageability and the non-invasivity of GPR have resulted to be particularly suitable for this application. First because GPR is an extensive investigation method that enables one to rapidly cover a wide area, locating voids that are difficult and costly to locate using other intrusive methods. Second, GPR returns detailed information about the possible presence of voids and discontinuities within river embankments.

  11. Non-destructive evaluation of water ingress in photovoltaic modules

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Kotovsky, Jack

    2017-03-07

    Systems and techniques for non-destructive evaluation of water ingress in photovoltaic modules include and/or are configured to illuminate a photovoltaic module comprising a photovoltaic cell and an encapsulant with at least one beam of light having a wavelength in a range from about 1400 nm to about 2700 nm; capture one or more images of the illuminated photovoltaic module, each image relating to a water content of the photovoltaic module; and determine a water content of the photovoltaic module based on the one or more images. Systems preferably include one or more of a light source, a moving mirror, a focusing lens, a beam splitter, a stationary mirror, an objective lens and an imaging module.

  12. Non-destructive shadowgraph imaging of ultra-cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Hardman, K S; Hush, M R; Wei, C H; Sooriyabandara, M A; Manju, P; Close, J D; Robins, N P; Kuhn, C C N

    2016-10-15

    An imaging system is presented that is capable of far-detuned non-destructive imaging of a Bose-Einstein condensate with the signal proportional to the second spatial derivative of the density. Whilst demonstrated with application to Rb85, the technique generalizes to other atomic species and is shown to be capable of a signal-to-noise of ∼25 at 1 GHz detuning with 100 in-trap images showing no observable heating or atom loss. The technique is also applied to the observation of individual trajectories of stochastic dynamics inaccessible to single shot imaging. Coupled with a fast optical phase locked loop, the system is capable of dynamically switching to resonant absorption imaging during the experiment.

  13. Non-destructive shadowgraph imaging of ultra-cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigley, P. B.; Everitt, P. J.; Hardman, K. S.; Hush, M. R.; Wei, C. H.; Sooriyabandara, M. A.; Manju, P.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Kuhn, C. C. N.

    2016-10-01

    An imaging system is presented that is capable of far-detuned non-destructive imaging of a Bose-Einstein condensate with the signal proportional to the second spatial derivative of the density. Whilst demonstrated with application to $^{85}\\text{Rb}$, the technique generalizes to other atomic species and is shown to be capable of a signal to noise of ${\\sim}25$ at $1$GHz detuning with $100$ in-trap images showing no observable heating or atom loss. The technique is also applied to the observation of individual trajectories of stochastic dynamics inaccessible to single shot imaging. Coupled with a fast optical phase lock loop, the system is capable of dynamically switching to resonant absorption imaging during the experiment.

  14. Non-destructive photoacoustic imaging of metal surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Jeesu; Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-11-01

    The detection of metal surface defects is important in achieving the goals of product quality enhancement and manufacturing cost reduction. Identifying the defects with visual inspection is difficult, inaccurate, and time-consuming. Thus, several inspection methods using line cameras, magnetic field, and ultrasound have been proposed. However, identifying small defects on metal surfaces remains a challenge. To deal with this problem, we propose the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) as a new non-destructive imaging tool to detect metal surface defects. We successfully visualized two types of cracks (i.e., unclassified and seam cracks) in metal plate samples using PAI. In addition, we successfully extracted cracked edges from height-encoded photoacoustic maximum amplitude projection images using the Laplacian of Gaussian filtering method, and then, quantified the detected edges for a statistical analysis. We concluded that PAI can be useful in detecting metal surface defects reducing the defect rate and manufacturing cost during metal production.

  15. Non-destructive diffraction enhanced imaging of seeds.

    PubMed

    Young, Lester W; Parham, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong; Chapman, Dean; Reaney, Martin J T

    2007-01-01

    Techniques that make possible the non-destructive continuous observation of plant anatomy and developmental processes provide novel insights into these phenomena. Non-destructive imaging of seeds was demonstrated using the synchrotron-based X-ray imaging technique, diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The seed images obtained had good contrast and definition, allowing anatomical structures and physiological events to be observed. Structures such as hypocotyl-root axes, cotyledons, seed coats, air cavities, and embryo-less Brassica napus L. seeds were readily observed using DEI. Embryo axes, scutella, pericarp furrows, coleoptiles, and roots were observable over a time-course in individual germinating Triticum aestivum L. caryopses. Novel anatomical and physiological observations were also made that would have been difficult to make continuously using other techniques. The physical principles behind DEI make it a unique imaging technique. Contrast in DEI is the result of X-ray refraction at the density differences occurring at tissue boundaries, scatter caused by regions containing ordered molecules such as cellulose fibres, and attenuation. Sectioning of samples and the infusion of stains or other contrast agents are not necessary. Furthermore, as high-energy X-rays are used (30-40 keV), little X-ray absorption occurs, resulting in low levels of radiation damage. Consequently, studies of developmental processes may be performed on individuals. Individual germinating B. napus and T. aestivum seeds were imaged at several time points without incurring any apparent radiation damage. DEI offers a unique way of examining plant anatomy, development, and physiology, and provides images that are complementary to those obtained through other techniques.

  16. Non-destructive compositional analysis of historic organ reed pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manescu, A.; Fiori, F.; Giuliani, A.; Kardjilov, N.; Kasztovszky, Z.; Rustichelli, F.; Straumal, B.

    2008-03-01

    In order to be able to reproduce historic organ reed pipes, a bulk non-destructive chemical composition analysis was performed on the tongues and shallots, focusing mainly on the ratio between copper and zinc and on the presence of lead. Prompt gamma activation analysis results allowed us to observe for the first time that the ratio between the two main components of the brass alloy changed from Cu:Zn = 3:1 for the old tongues and shallots to Cu:Zn = 2:1 around the middle of the 18th century, which is typical also for the modern alloys offered to the organ builders nowadays. We also discovered that the Pb content in the old historic brass alloy diminished until the middle of 18th century when the brass alloy became mainly Pb free. The non-uniform lead distribution inside one of the shallots obtained from a prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) experiment was studied by neutron tomography. It gave us a three-dimensonal (3D) distribution of the lead inclusions inside the shallots. The lead particles are concentrated towards the base of the shallot.

  17. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H. P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg3 safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of 22Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 1025 p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa.

  18. A novel thermosonic imaging system for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, C. L.; Xiang, D.; Long, M.

    2017-02-01

    Thermosonic infrared (Sonic IR) imaging is a new non-destructive testing (NDT) technique that uses high-frequency sonic excitation together with infrared (IR) detection to image surface and subsurface defects. A conventional Sonic IR imaging system employs an ultrasonic welder, which is designed to operate at a single frequency. This single frequency ultrasonic source has been found to yield a "blind zone" for NDT due to the formation of standing waves inside the test piece. To overcome this limitation, a spring loaded ultrasonic transducer was used to generate the desired multi-frequency acoustic chaos in the test object [1]. The limitation of the spring loaded ultrasonic transducer is its repeatability and reproducibility for field applications. In this work, we present the development of a novel thermosonic imaging system, which is capable of exciting the ultrasonic transducer at difflerent frequencies for thermosonic NDT to overcome the limitations associated with a single frequency power source as well as the spring loaded transducer design. A comparison of experimental results will be made between the single frequency and the developed multi-frequency thermosonic NDT systems.

  19. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials via Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging for the non-destructive evaluation of the degree of cure, aging, and other properties of resin-based composite materials. This method can be used in air, and is portable for field use. This method operates in reflectance, absorbance, and luminescence modes. The ultraviolet source is used to illuminate a composite surface of interest. In reflectance mode, the reflected response is acquired via the imaging system or via the spectrometer. The spectra are analyzed for organic compounds (conjugated organics) and inorganic compounds (semiconducting band-edge states; luminescing defect states such as silicates, used as adhesives for composite aerospace applications; and metal oxides commonly used as thermal coating paints on a wide range of spacecraft). The spectra are compared with a database for variation in conjugation, substitution, or length of molecule (in the case of organics) or band edge position (in the case of inorganics). This approach is useful in the understanding of material quality. It lacks the precision in defining the exact chemical structure that is found in other materials analysis techniques, but it is advantageous over methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and chromatography in that it can be used in the field to assess significant changes in chemical structure that may be linked to concerns associated with weaknesses or variations in structural integrity, without disassembly of or destruction to the structure of interest.

  20. Evaluation of Transportation Options for Intermediate Non-destructive Examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non-destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.” This evaluation includes transportation options for intermediate NDE using the GE 2000 cask, BEA Research Reactor (BRR) package, Dry Transfer Cubicle (DTC) insert, and the General Electric Model 100 (GE 100) cask. The GE 2000 cask is the only Type B shipping container currently in use for shipments of irradiated material (exceeding Type A quantities) from ATR to HFEF; therefore it is included as one of the four shipping options in this evaluation. Cost and schedule estimates are provided for performing neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of a five-capsule drop-in-type ATR experiment for each transportation option. All costs provided in this evaluation are rough order-of-magnitude costs based on input from knowledgeable vendor employees and individuals at INL facilities.

  1. Biomarkers: Non-destructive Method for Predicting Meat Tenderization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arashdeep; Ahluwalia, Preeti; Rafiq, Aasima; Sharma, Savita

    2015-07-06

    Meat tenderness is the primary and most important quality attribute for the consumers worldwide. Tenderness is the process of breakdown of collagen tissue in meat to make it palatable. The earlier methods of tenderness evaluation like taste panels and shear force methods are destructive, time consuming and ill suited as they requires removing a piece of steak from the carcass for performing the test. Therefore, a non-destructive method for predicting the tenderness would be more desirable. The development of a meat quality grading and guarantee system through muscle profiling research can help to meet this demand. Biomarkers have the ability to identify if an exposure has occurred. Biomarkers of the meat quality are of prime importance for meat industry, which has ability to satisfy consumers' expectations. The biomarkers so far identified have been then sorted and grouped according to their common biological functions. All of them refer to a series of biological pathways including glycolytic and oxidative energy production, cell detoxification, protease inhibition and production of Heat Shock Proteins. On this basis, a detailed analysis of these metabolic pathways helps in identifying tenderization of meat having some domains of interest. It was, therefore, stressed forward that biomarkers can be used to determine meat tenderness. This review article summarizes the uses of several biomarkers for predicting the meat tenderness.

  2. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  3. Non-destructive evaluation of mechanical properties of magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kankolenski, K.P.; Hua, S.Z.; Yang, D.X.; Hicho, G.E.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Zang, Z.; Chopra, H.D.

    2000-07-01

    A magnetic-based non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method, which employs Barkhausen effect and measurement of the hysteresis loops, is used to correlate the magnetic and mechanical properties of ultra low carbon (ULC) steel. In particular, the NDE method was used to detect small deviations from linearity that occur in the stress-strain curve well below the 0.2% offset strain, and which generally defines the yield point in materials. Results show that three parameters: jumpsum and jumpsum rate (derived from the Barkhausen spectrum), and the relative permeability (derived from the B-H loops) varies sensitively with small permanent strains, and can be related to the plastic deformation in ULC steels. Investigation of micromagnetic structure revealed that plastic deformation leaves a residual stress state in the samples; the associated magneto-elastic energy makes the favorable easy axis of magnetization in a given grain to be the one that lies closest to the tensile axis. The consequence of this realignment of domains is that wall motion becomes intergranular in nature (as opposed to intragranular in unstrained samples). As a result, the more complex grain boundaries instead of dislocations, become the dominant pinning sites for domain walls. These observations provide a microscopic interpretation of the observed changes in the measured magnetic properties.

  4. Non-destructive acoustic defect detection in drug tablets.

    PubMed

    Akseli, Ilgaz; Mani, Girindra N; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2008-08-06

    For physical defect detection in drug tablets, a non-destructive and non-contact technique based on air coupled excitation and interferometric detection is presented. Physical properties and mechanical integrity of drug tablets can often affect their therapeutic and structural functions. The monitoring for defects and the characterization of tablet mechanical properties therefore have been of practical interest for solid oral dosage forms. The presented monitoring approach is based on the analysis of the transient vibrational responses of an acoustically excited tablet in both in temporal and spectral domains. The pulsed acoustic field exciting the tablet is generated by an air-coupled transducer. Using a laser vibrometer, the out-of-plane vibrational transient response of the tablet is detected and acquired in a non-contact manner. The physical state of the tablet is evaluated based on the spectral properties of these transient responses. In the current study, the effectiveness of three types of simple similarity measures is evaluated for their potential uses as defect detection norms, and for their potential use in quantifying the extent of tablet defect is discussed. It is found that these quantities can not only be used for identification of defective tablets, but could also provide a measure for the extent of the damage.

  5. Non-destructive investigation of thermoplastic reinforced composites

    DOE PAGES

    Hassen, Ahmed; Taheri, Hossein; Vaidya, Uday

    2016-05-09

    This paper studies various manufacturing defects in glass fiber/Polypropylene (PP) composite parts and their methods of detection. Foreign Object Inclusion (FOI) of different shapes, sizes, and materials were placed in a glass fiber/PP panel made by compression molding. The paper aims to characterize the fiber orientation and fiber related defects such as fiber waviness in the composite specimen. Comprehensive investigation for different Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques, namely X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) techniques to trace and characterize the embedded defects and the composite texture are presented. Conventional X-ray radiography successfully identified the fiber orientation in two dimension (2-D)more » plane; however, information for the sample depth was not captured. The radiography techniques showed low relative errors for the defect size measurements (maximum error was below 9.5%) when compared to the ultrasonic techniques. Ultrasonic techniques were able to map all the embedded artificial defects. Phase Array (PA) ultrasonic technique was able to precisely locate the FOI in the glass fiber/PP specimen. Nerveless, the shape and size of the defects were not accurately determined due to the high signal attenuation and distortion characteristics of the E-glass fiber.« less

  6. Non-destructive investigation of thermoplastic reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hassen, Ahmed; Taheri, Hossein; Vaidya, Uday

    2016-05-09

    This paper studies various manufacturing defects in glass fiber/Polypropylene (PP) composite parts and their methods of detection. Foreign Object Inclusion (FOI) of different shapes, sizes, and materials were placed in a glass fiber/PP panel made by compression molding. The paper aims to characterize the fiber orientation and fiber related defects such as fiber waviness in the composite specimen. Comprehensive investigation for different Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques, namely X-ray radiography and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) techniques to trace and characterize the embedded defects and the composite texture are presented. Conventional X-ray radiography successfully identified the fiber orientation in two dimension (2-D) plane; however, information for the sample depth was not captured. The radiography techniques showed low relative errors for the defect size measurements (maximum error was below 9.5%) when compared to the ultrasonic techniques. Ultrasonic techniques were able to map all the embedded artificial defects. Phase Array (PA) ultrasonic technique was able to precisely locate the FOI in the glass fiber/PP specimen. Nerveless, the shape and size of the defects were not accurately determined due to the high signal attenuation and distortion characteristics of the E-glass fiber.

  7. Non-Destructive Assay of Curium Contaminated Transuranic Waste Drums

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, L.A.

    1998-11-01

    At the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a series of non-destructive assays were performed on five transuranic waste (TRU) drums containing non-plutonium scrap metal that was potentially contaminated with weapons grade plutonium and trace quantities of curium. Typically, waste drums containing metal matrices are assayed for plutonium content using passive neutron coincidence counting techniques. The presence of trace quantities of Cm-244 prevents this type of analysis because of the strong coincidence signal created by spontaneous fission of Cm-244. To discriminate between the plutonium and curium materials present, an active neutron measurement technique was used. A Cf shuffler designed for measurement of uranium bearing materials was calibrated for plutonium in the active mode. The waste drums were then assayed for plutonium content in the shuffler using the active-mode calibration. The curium contamination levels were estimated from the difference between the active-mode measurement in the shuffler and a passive assay in a neutron coincidence counter. Far field gamma-ray measurements were made to identify additional radioactive contaminants and to corroborate the plutonium measurement results obtained from the active-mode assay. This report describes in detail the measurement process used for characterization of these waste drums. The measurement results and the estimated uncertainty will be presented.

  8. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Applications of THz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimdars, David

    2005-03-01

    The technology and applications of time domain terahertz (THz) imaging to non-destructive evaluation (NDE) will be discussed. THz imaging has shown great promise in 2 and 3 dimensional non-contact inspection of non-conductive materials such as plastics, foam, composites, ceramics, paper, wood and glass. THz imaging employs safe low power non-ionizing electromagnetic pulses, with lateral resolution < 200 um, and depth resolution < 50 um. THz pulses can be analyzed spectroscopically to reveal chemical content. Recently, highly integrated turn-key THz imaging systems have been introduced commercially. We will demonstrate the detection of voids and disbonds intentionally incorporated within the sprayed on foam insulation of a space shuttle external tank mock-up segments. An industrially hardened THz scanning system which has been deployed to scan the space shuttle tank with small remote transceiver will be described. Additional terahertz security imaging applications for the detection of weapons and explosives will also be discussed, as well as the application of terahertz sensors for high speed industrial process monitoring and quality control.

  10. Non-destructive sub-THz CW imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Nicholas; Zhong, Hua; Xu, Jingzhou; Lin, Kuang-I.; Hwang, Jenn-Shyong; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2005-03-01

    A simple, compact CW sub-THz imaging system, utilizing a 0.2 and 0.6 THz Gunn diode source is presented. A silicon beam lead diode detector and a Golay cell are used for the detection. Various results are presented, which show that the CW THz imaging modality is suitable for diverse applications, such as non-destructive testing and security. The key components of the system include the Gunn diode assembly, an optical chopper, a polyethylene lens, a detector, a lock-in amplifier, and two translation stages. The beam from the Gunn diode is focused on the sample being imaged by the polyethylene lens, the transmitted or reflected beam is measured by the detector. The energy transmitted through the sample at each point in the plane of the sample is detected. Since the system has relatively few components compared to pulsed THz imaging systems, it is less expensive and easier to design and operate, although it does not provide depth or spectral information about the sample. Since no time-delay scans take place, scanning can be done quickly compared to a time-domain system, limited by the maximum velocity of the translation stages and response of the detectors. It provides information about the macroscopic features of hidden structures within materials that are transparent to sub THz radiation, such as space shuttle insulating foam, articles of clothing, and luggage.

  11. Non-destructive characterization of archaeological glasses by neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, F.; Giunta, G.; Hilger, A.; Kardjilov, N.; Rustichelli, F.

    2006-11-01

    The present work is carried out in the framework of a National Italian Project, whose aim is the assessment of innovative physical non-destructive techniques applied to archaeology. Towards this end, some archaeological artefacts have been studied by our group, in collaboration with the National Museum of Altino (VE) and EniTecnologie S.p.A. The objects come from the excavations in Altino, near Venice, where at least three different historical layers are present, corresponding to ages starting from approximately VII century B.C. In particular, in this work the results of neutron tomography investigations on three I-II century A.D. glass fragments are reported. The experiments were performed at the cold neutron radiography facility CONRAD at HMI (Berlin). For the 3D tomographical reconstruction of the sample, 200 projections were collected while the sample was rotated around a defined axis. The rotation interval was 180 degrees. The results show that the technique is able to reconstruct well the structural features of the investigated objects such as, in particular, highly absorbing zones and the presence of defects in the bulk.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of anchorage zones by ultrasonics techniques.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, M; Gaillet, L

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of two Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods for damage assessment in bridges' anchorages. The Acousto-Ultrasonic (AU) technique is compared to classical Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in terms of defect detection and structural health classification. The AU technique is firstly used on single seven-wire strands damaged by artificial defects. The effect of growing defects on the waves traveling through the strands is evaluated. Thereafter, three specimens of anchorages with unknown defects are inspected by the AU and UT techniques. Damage assessment results from both techniques are then compared. The structural health conditions of the specimens can be then classified by a damage severity criterion. Finally, a damaged anchorage socket with mastered defects is controlled by the same techniques. The UT allows the detection and localization of damaged wires. The AU technique is used to bring out the effect of defects on acoustic features by comparing a healthy and damaged anchorage sockets. It is concluded that the UT method is suitable for local and crack-like defects, whereas the AU technique enables the assessment of the global structural health of the anchorage zones.

  13. Data fusion for automated non-destructive inspection

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, N.; Tippetts, T.; Cawley, P.

    2014-01-01

    In industrial non-destructive evaluation (NDE), it is increasingly common for data acquisition to be automated, driving a recent substantial increase in the availability of data. The collected data need to be analysed, typically necessitating the painstaking manual labour of a skilled operator. Moreover, in automated NDE a region of an inspected component is typically interrogated several times, be it within a single data channel due to multiple probe passes, across several channels acquired simultaneously or over the course of repeated inspections. The systematic combination of these diverse readings is recognized to offer an opportunity to improve the reliability of the inspection, but is not achievable in a manual analysis. This paper describes a data-fusion-based software framework providing a partial automation capability, allowing component regions to be declared defect-free to a very high probability while readily identifying defect indications, thereby optimizing the use of the operator's time. The system is designed to applicable to a wide range of automated NDE scenarios, but the processing is exemplified using the industrial ultrasonic immersion inspection of aerospace turbine discs. Results obtained for industrial datasets demonstrate an orders-of-magnitude reduction in false-call rates, for a given probability of detection, achievable using the developed software system. PMID:25002828

  14. Characterization of cromolyn sodium hydrates and its formulation by (23) Na-multiquantum and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Umino, Makoto; Higashi, Kenjirou; Masu, Hyuma; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2013-08-01

    We characterized cromolyn sodium (CS) hydrates and evaluated their molecular states in low-dose formulations using Na-multiquantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Two CS hydrates, low-water-content hydrated form and high-water-content hydrated form containing 2-3 and 5-6 hydrates, respectively, were prepared by humidification. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that these CS hydrates contained sodium channel structures and that water molecules were adsorbed on the sodium nucleus. (13) C-cross-polarization/MAS NMR spectra of these hydrates revealed similar results, confirming that the water molecules were adsorbed not on the cromolyn skeletons but mainly on the sodium nucleus. In contrast, (23) Na-MQMAS NMR analysis allowed us to clearly distinguish these hydrates without discernible effects from quadrupolar interaction. Thus, MQMAS NMR analysis is a valuable tool for evaluating salt drugs and their formulations.

  15. An NMR thermometer for cryogenic magic-angle spinning NMR: the spin-lattice relaxation of (127)I in cesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Concistrè, Maria; Johannessen, Ole G; Beckett, Peter; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Al-Mosawi, Maitham; Beduz, Carlo; Yang, Yifeng; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2011-10-01

    The accurate temperature measurement of solid samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) is difficult in the cryogenic regime. It has been demonstrated by Thurber et al. (J. Magn. Reson., 196 (2009) 84-87) [10] that the temperature dependent spin-lattice relaxation time constant of (79)Br in KBr powder can be useful for measuring sample temperature under MAS over a wide temperature range (20-296 K). However the value of T(1) exceeds 3 min at temperatures below 20K, which is inconveniently long. In this communication, we show that the spin-lattice relaxation time constant of (127)I in CsI powder can be used to accurately measure sample temperature under MAS within a reasonable experimental time down to 10 K.

  16. High resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy reveals that pectoralis muscle dystrophy in chicken is associated with reduced muscle content of anserine and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Rasmussen, Martin K; Young, Jette F; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2017-02-15

    Increased incidences of pectoralis muscle dystrophy are observed in commercial chicken products, but the muscle physiological causes for the condition remain to be identified. In the present study a high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) proton ((1)H) NMR spectroscopic examination of intact pectoralis muscle samples (n=77) were conducted to explore metabolite perturbations associated with the muscle dystrophy condition for the very first time. Both in chicken with an age of 21 and 31days, respectively, pectoralis muscle dystrophy was associated with a significantly lower content of anserine (p=0.034), carnosine (p=0.019) and creatine (p=0.049). These findings must be considered intriguing as they corroborate that characteristic muscle di-peptides composed of β-alanine and histidine derivatives such as anserine are extremely important in homeostasis of contractile muscles as a results of their role as buffering, anti-oxidative, and anti-glycation capacities.

  17. 1H-detected 1H- 1H correlation spectroscopy of a stereo-array isotope labeled amino acid under fast magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Kainosho, Masatsune; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-04-01

    The combined use of selective deuteration, stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL), and fast magic-angle spinning effectively suppresses the 1H-1H dipolar couplings in organic solids. This method provided the high-field 1H NMR linewidths comparable to those achieved by combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy. This technique was applied to two-dimensional 1H-detected 1H-1H polarization transfer CHH experiments of valine. The signal sensitivity for the 1H-detected CHH experiments was greater than that for the 13C-detected 1H-1H polarization transfer experiments by a factor of 2-4. We obtained the 1H-1H distances in SAIL valine by CHH experiments with an accuracy of about 0.2 Å by using a theory developed for 1H-1H polarization transfer in 13C-labeled organic compounds.

  18. Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling without decoupling: Double-quantum 13C NMR correlations at very fast magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymoori, Gholamhasan; Pahari, Bholanath; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2012-09-01

    We report novel symmetry-based radio-frequency (rf) pulse sequences for efficient excitation of double-quantum (2Q) coherences under very fast (>60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The recursively generated pulse-scheme series, R22p1R22p-1(p=1,2,3,…), offers broadband 13C-13C recoupling in organic solids at a very low rf power. No proton decoupling is required. A high-order average Hamiltonian theory analysis reveals a progressively enhanced resonance-offset compensation for increasing p, as verified both by numerical simulations and 2Q filtration NMR experiments on 13C2-glycine, [2,3-13C2]alanine, and [U-13C]tyrosine at 14.1 T and 66 kHz MAS, where the pulse schemes with p⩾3 compare favorably to current state-of-the-art recoupling options.

  19. Crocus sativus Petals: Waste or Valuable Resource? The Answer of High-Resolution and High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2015-09-30

    Intact Crocus sativus petals were studied for the first time by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, revealing the presence of kinsenoside (2) and goodyeroside A (3), together with 3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (4). These findings were confirmed by HR-NMR analysis of the ethanol extract of fresh petals and showed that, even though carried out rapidly, partial hydrolysis of glucopyranosyloxybutanolides occurs during extraction. On the other hand, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside (1), which is "NMR-silent" in intact petals, is present in extracts. These results suggest to evaluate the utilization of saffron petals for phytopharmaceutical and nutraceutical purposes to exploit a waste product of massive production of commercial saffron and point to the application of HR-MAS NMR for monitoring bioactive compounds directly on intact petals, avoiding the extraction procedure and the consequent hydrolysis reaction.

  20. A High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR Study of the Enantiodiscrimination of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) by an Immobilized Polysaccharide-Based Chiral Phase

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Márcio W.; Lourenço, Tiago C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of the chiral interaction between 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) enantiomers and an immobilized polysaccharide-based chiral phase. For that, suspended-state high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H HR-MAS NMR) was used. 1H HR-MAS longitudinal relaxation time and Saturation Transfer Difference (STD NMR) titration experiments were carried out yielding information at the molecular level of the transient diastereoisomeric complexes of MDMA enantiomers and the chiral stationary phase. The interaction of the enantiomers takes place through the aromatic moiety of MDMA and the aromatic group of the chiral selector by π-π stacking for both enantiomers; however, a stronger interaction was observed for the (R)-enantiomer, which is the second one to elute at the chromatographic conditions. PMID:27668862

  1. Decoupling and recoupling using continuous-wave irradiation in magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR: A unified description using bimodal Floquet theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Matthias; Samoson, Ago; Meier, Beat H.

    2005-08-08

    The application of two or more different time-dependent coherent perturbations with, in general, incommensurable frequencies occurs quite commonly in NMR experiments. Here we develop a unified description of the entire class of experiments using bimodal Floquet theory and van Vleck-Primas perturbation theory. This treatment leads to a time-independent effective Hamiltonian in Hilbert space and can be looked at as a generalization of average Hamiltonian theory to several incommensurate time dependencies. As a prototype experiment we treat the application of continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency irradiation in combination with magic-angle sample spinning. Practically relevant examples of this type of experiments are heteronuclear spin decoupling and recoupling experiments using cw irradiation, e.g., rotary-resonance recoupling. Perturbations up to the third order must be taken into account to explain all experimentally observed resonance conditions.

  2. Magic Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featonby, David

    2010-01-01

    This article examines several readily available "magic tricks" which base their "trickery" on physics principles, and questions the use of the word "magic" in the 21st century, both in popular children's science and in everyday language. (Contains 18 figures.)

  3. Non-destructive detection of corrosion for life management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, David A.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, aircraft operators have been driven to increased use of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) to ensure airworthiness during life extensions for ageing aircraft or as an integral part of a damage tolerant lifting philosophy. Major airframe static and fatigue tests are routinely used to highlight problem areas on airframes where design limitations or changes of usage may lead to early failures. The results of such tests become progressively less reliable as the age of the airframe increases and the operating conditions diverge from those under which the tests were conducted. Increased inspection, whether by visual or other means is usually the only alternative to wholesale refurbishment or replacement of aircraft or components. Almost all of the development to date of NDE techniques for corrosion detection and characterization has been concentrated on existing airframe materials, principally Aluminum alloys and steels. The current capabilities of corrosion detection techniques will be reviewed and current research aimed at areas where there is a requirement for improved detection capability will be described. New materials, such as Polymer Matrix Composites, will experience different types of 'corrosive' deterioration. The capability of NDE methods to detect material degradation in new composite materials will be discussed. Finally, reliance on NDE, choice of NDE technique and optimal scheduling of inspections all require an assessment of the reliability of NDE methods. It will be shown that a range of NDE techniques with differing capabilities and characteristics will be required to ensure compatibility with maintenance schedules if full use is to be made of NDE for life management of structures which may be subject to corrosion.

  4. Geophysical Methods for Non-Destructive Testing in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for civil engineering (e. g. ultrasonics, radar) are similar to geophysical techniques. They just differ in scale, material under investigation and vocabulary used. In spite of the fact that the same principles of physics and mathematics apply to both fields, exchange has been limited in the past. But since a few years more and more geophysical knowledge is used in civil engineering. One of the focal points in research is to improve ultrasonic testing of concrete to be able to image the inside even of large, complex structures and to detect any deterioration as early as possible. One of the main issues is the heterogeneity of concrete, including aggregates, reinforcement, cracks and many other features. Our current research focuses on three points. One is the application of state of the art geophysical migration techniques as Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to image vertical faces or the backside of voids and ducts in thick concrete structures, which isn't possible with conventional techniques used in NDT. Second, we have started to use seismic interferometric techniques to interpolate ultrasonic traces, which can't be measured directly for technical reasons. Third, we are using coda wave interferometry to detect concrete degradation due to load, fatigue, temperature or other influences as early as possible. Practical examples of the application of these techniques are given and potential future research directions will be discussed. It will be shown, how a subset of these techniques can be used for innovative monitoring systems for civil infrastructure. Imaging the interior of a concrete body by ultrasonics and reverse time migration(simulated data).

  5. Accuracy of Non-Destructive Testing of PBRs to Estimate Fragilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, J. N.; Brune, R.; Biasi, G. P.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Purvance, M.

    2011-12-01

    Prior studies of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) have involved various methods of documenting rock shapes and fragilities. These have included non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as photomodeling, and potentially destructive testing (PDT) such as forced tilt tests. PDT methods usually have the potential of damaging or disturbing the rock or its pedestal so that the PBR usefulness for future generations is compromised. To date we have force-tilt tested approximately 28 PBRs, and of these we believe 7 have been compromised. We suggest here that given other inherent uncertainties in the current methodologies, NDT methods are now sufficiently advanced as to be adequate for the current state of the art use for comparison with Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) and seismic hazard maps (SHMs). Here we compare tilt-test static toppling estimates to three non-destructive methods: (1) 3-D photographic modeling (2) profile analysis assuming the rock is 2-D, and (3) expert judgments from photographs. 3-D modeling uses the commercial Photomodeler program and photographs in the field taken from numerous directions around the rock. The output polyhedral shape is analyzed in Matlab determine the center of mass and in Autocad to estimate the static overturning angle alpha. For the 2-D method we chose the photograph in profile looking perpendicular to the estimated direction of toppling. The rock is outlined as a 2-D object in Matlab. Rock dimensions, rocking points, and a vertical reference are supplied by the photo analyst to estimate the center of gravity and static force overturning angles. For the expert opinion method we used additional photographs taken from different directions to improve the estimates of the center of mass and the rocking points. We used 7 rocks for comparisons. The error in estimating tan alpha from 3-D modeling is about 0.05. For 2-D estimates an average error is about 0.1 (?). For expert opinion estimates the error is about 0.06. For

  6. Recent advances in the use of non-destructive near infrared spectroscopy on intact olive fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this review is to illustrate the state of the art in the use of non-destructive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for quality evaluation of intact fruit in the olive industry. First, the most recent studies regarding the application of non-destructive NIR spectroscopy methods to asse...

  7. Plane Wave Imaging for ultrasonic non-destructive testing: Generalization to multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, Léonard; Robert, Sébastien; Lopez Villaverde, Eduardo; Prada, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new ultrasonic array imaging method for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) which is derived from the medical Plane Wave Imaging (PWI) technique. The objective is to perform fast ultrasound imaging with high image quality. The approach is to transmit plane waves at several angles and to record the back-scattered signals with all the array elements. Focusing in receive is then achieved by coherent summations of the signals in every point of a region of interest. The medical PWI is generalized to immersion setups where water acts as a coupling medium and to multimodal (direct, half-skip modes) imaging in order to detect different types of defects (inclusions, porosities, cracks). This method is compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM) which is the reference imaging technique in NDT. First, the two post-processing algorithms are described. Then experimental results with the array probe either in contact or in immersion are presented. A good agreement between the TFM and the PWI is observed, with three to ten times less transmissions required for the PWI.

  8. Non-destructive evaluation of spiral-welded pipes using flexural guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Tang, Zhifeng; Lü, Fuzai; Pan, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    Millions of miles of pipes are being used in both civil and industrial fields. Spiral-welded pipes, which are widely applied in fields such as drainage, architecture as well as oil and gas storage and transportation, are difficult to inspect due to their complex geometry. Guided waves have shown a great potential in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for such cases. Flexural guided waves that propagate at a helix angle relative to the axial direction of pipe, are the most appropriate modes for inspecting spiral-welded pipes. The classical Normal Mode Expansion method (NME) is adopted to disseminate the forced response and perturbation analysis of a steel pipe with respect to a time delay circular loading. A time delay circular array transducer (TDCAT) is proposed for the purpose of exciting pure flexural mode in pipes. Pure flexural mode can be excited when the time delay parameter is specifically designed. The theoretical prediction is verified by finite element numerical evaluation and spiral-welded pipe inspection experiment.

  9. Numerical study of light propagation in agricultural products for non-destructive assessment of food quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kiyohito; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Tatekura, Yuki; Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Masao

    2015-12-01

    An accurate determination of optical properties of agricultural products is crucial for non-destructive assessment of food quality. For the determination, light intensity is measured at the surface of the product; then, inverse analysis is employed based on a light propagation model such as the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The inverse analysis requires high computational loads because the light intensity is numerically calculated using the model every time the optical properties are changed. For the calculation, we propose an efficient technique by combining a numerical solution with an analytical solution of the RTE, and investigate the validity of the technique in a two-dimensional homogeneous circular medium which is regarded as a light propagation model with optical properties of kiwifruit. The proposed technique can provide accurate results of the light intensity in change of the optical properties, and the accuracy is less dependent on the boundary conditions and source-detector angles. In addition, the technique can reduce computation time compared with that for numerical calculation of the RTE. These results indicate usefulness of the proposed technique for the inverse analysis.

  10. A nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer concept for hermetically sealed magic angle spinning investigations on highly toxic, radiotoxic, or air sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Somers, J.; Berkmann, C.; Koepp, F.; Rothermel, A.; Pauvert, O.; Selfslag, C.; Farnan, I.

    2013-05-01

    A concept to integrate a commercial high-resolution, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) probe capable of very rapid rotation rates (70 kHz) in a hermetically sealed enclosure for the study of highly radiotoxic materials has been developed and successfully demonstrated. The concept centres on a conventional wide bore (89 mm) solid-state NMR magnet operating with industry standard 54 mm diameter probes designed for narrow bore magnets. Rotor insertion and probe tuning take place within a hermetically enclosed glovebox, which extends into the bore of the magnet, in the space between the probe and the magnet shim system. Oxygen-17 MAS-NMR measurements demonstrate the possibility of obtaining high quality spectra from small sample masses (˜10 mg) of highly radiotoxic material and the need for high spinning speeds to improve the spectral resolution when working with actinides. The large paramagnetic susceptibility arising from actinide paramagnetism in (Th1-xUx)O2 solid solutions gives rise to extensive spinning sidebands and poor resolution at 15 kHz, which is dramatically improved at 55 kHz. The first 17O MAS-NMR measurements on NpO2+x samples spinning at 55 kHz are also reported. The glovebox approach developed here for radiotoxic materials can be easily adapted to work with other hazardous or even air sensitive materials.

  11. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  12. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  13. Probing molecular dynamics in chromatographic systems using high-resolution 1H magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy: interaction between p-Xylene and C18-bonded silica.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann; Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Tang, Huiru; Lindon, John C

    2004-06-01

    The exact nature of the interaction between small molecules and chromatographic solid phases has been the subject of much research, but detailed understanding of the molecular dynamics in such systems remains elusive. High-resolution (1)H magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the investigation of C18-bonded silica material as used in chromatographic separation techniques together with an adsorbed model analyte, p-xylene. Two distinct p-xylene and water environments were identified within the C18-bonded silica through the measurement of (1)H NMR chemical shifts, T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and diffusion coefficients, including their temperature dependence. The results have been analyzed in terms of two environments, p-xylene within the C18 chains, in slow exchange on the NMR time scale with p-xylene in a more mobile state adsorbed as a layer in close proximity to the C18 particles, but which is distinct from free liquid p-xylene. The techniques used here could have more general applications, including the study of drug molecules bound into phospholipid membranes in micelles or vesicles.

  14. Taurine detected using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance: A potential indicator of early myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YUNLONG; YANG, LIN; ZHANG, YUE; GU, XINGHUA; XU, DANLING; FANG, FANG; SUN, AIJUN; WANG, KEQIANG; YU, YIHUA; ZUO, JI; GE, JUNBO

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique non-invasive method for detecting cardiac metabolic changes. However, MRS in cardiac diagnosis is limited due to insensitivity and low efficiency. Taurine (Tau) is the most abundant free amino acid in the myocardium. We hypothesized that Tau levels may indicate myocardial ischemia and early infarction. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups according to different time points during the course of myocardial ischemia, which was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Infarcted myocardial tissue was obtained for high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Results were validated via high-performance liquid chromatography. The Tau levels in the ischemic myocardial tissue were reduced significantly within 5 min compared with those in the control group (relative ratio from 20.27±6.48 to 8.81±0.04, P<0.05) and were maintained for 6 h post-ischemia. Tau levels declined more markedly (56.5%) than creatine levels (48.5%) at 5 min after ligation. This suggests that Tau may have potential as an indicator in the early detection of myocardial ischemia by 1H MRS. PMID:23408155

  15. Magic angle Lee-Goldburg frequency offset irradiation improves the efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP in triple-resonance MAS solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; De Angelis, Anna A; Opella, Stanley J

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP, a widely used method for selective double cross-polarization in triple-resonance magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, is improved by performing the tangential-shaped (13)C irradiation at an offset frequency that meets the Lee-Goldburg condition (LG-SPECIFIC-CP). This is demonstrated on polycrystalline samples of uniformly (13)C, (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF) at 700MHz and 900MHz (1)H resonance frequencies, respectively. For the single (13)Cα of N-acetyl-leucine, relative to conventional broad band cross-polarization, the SPECIFIC-CP signal has 47% of the intensity. Notably, the LG-SPECIFIC-CP signal has 72% of the intensity, essentially the theoretical maximum. There were no other changes in the experimental parameters. The three (13)Cα signals in MLF show some variation in intensities, reflecting the relatively narrow bandwidth of a frequency-offset procedure, and pointing to future developments for this class of experiment.

  16. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional 1H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Aiden J.; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P.

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+ kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional 1H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl 1H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion - this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional 1H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear 1H-1H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and 14N-1H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  17. Solid-state NMR adiabatic TOBSY sequences provide enhanced sensitivity for multidimensional high-resolution magic-angle-spinning 1H MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Struppe, Jochem; Black, Peter M.; Tzika, A. Aria

    2008-08-01

    We propose a solid-state NMR method that maximizes the advantages of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) applied to intact biopsies when compared to more conventional liquid-state NMR approaches. Theoretical treatment, numerical simulations and experimental results on intact human brain biopsies are presented. Experimentally, it is proven that an optimized adiabatic TOBSY (TOtal through Bond correlation SpectroscopY) solid-state NMR pulse sequence for two-dimensional 1H- 1H homonuclear scalar-coupling longitudinal isotropic mixing provides a 20%-50% improvement in signal-to-noise ratio relative to its liquid-state analogue TOCSY (TOtal Correlation SpectroscopY). For this purpose we have refined the C9151 symmetry-based 13C TOBSY pulse sequence for 1H MRS use and compared it to MLEV-16 TOCSY sequence. Both sequences were rotor-synchronized and implemented using WURST-8 adiabatic inversion pulses. As discussed theoretically and shown in simulations, the improved magnetization-transfer comes from actively removing residual dipolar couplings from the average Hamiltonian. Importantly, the solid-state NMR techniques are tailored to perform measurements at low temperatures where sample degradation is reduced. This is the first demonstration of such a concept for HRMAS metabolic profiling of disease processes, including cancer, from biopsies requiring reduced sample degradation for further genomic analysis.

  18. Elucidating connectivity and metal-binding structures of unlabeled paramagnetic complexes by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR under fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Nalinda P; Shaibat, Medhat A; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2007-08-23

    Characterizing paramagnetic complexes in solids is an essential step toward understanding their molecular functions. However, methodologies to characterize chemical and electronic structures of paramagnetic systems at the molecular level have been notably limited, particularly for noncrystalline solids. We present an approach to obtain connectivities of chemical groups and metal-binding structures for unlabeled paramagnetic complexes by 13C and 1H high-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) using very fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS, spinning speed >or=20 kHz). It is experimentally shown for unlabeled Cu(II)(Ala-Thr) that 2D 13C/1H correlation SSNMR under VFMAS provides the connectivity of chemical groups and assignments for the characterization of unlabeled paramagnetic systems in solids. We demonstrate that on the basis of the assignments provided by the VFMAS approach multiple 13C-metal distances can be simultaneously elucidated by a combination of measurements of 13C anisotropic hyperfine shifts and 13C T1 relaxation due to hyperfine interactions for this peptide-Cu(II) complex. It is also shown that an analysis of 1H anisotropic hyperfine shifts allows for the determination of electron-spin states in Fe(III)-chloroprotoporphyin-IX in solid states.

  19. A Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR of uniformly labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-08-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/ 13C α crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly-labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomol. NMR, 34 (2006) 75-87) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal.

  20. A Solid-State Study of a Novel 31P Spin Pair Using Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challoner, R.; Mcdowell, C. A.; Yoshifuji, M.; Toyota, K.; Tossell, J. A.

    The present investigation concerns the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the 31P spin pair in the novel three-membered heterocyclic compound 3-(dichloromethylene)- trans-1,2-bis( 2,4,6-tri- tert-butylphenyl)- 1,2-diphosphirane using the magic-angle-spinning (MAS) technique. The homogeneous 31P lineshapes are analyzed to extract the principal components of the shielding tensors using the Maricq and Waugh description of homonuclear spin-pair systems by average-Hamiltonian theory, modified to encompass the n = 0 rotational resonance situation. The experimental values of the shielding-tensor components are compared with those obtained from ab initio calculations performed on the model molecule P 2C 2H 4 to aid further the interpretation of the 31P MAS NMR spectrum of the chloromethylene-diphosphirane. The magnitudes and orientations of calculated shielding-tensor components of the model compound methylene-diphosphirane P 2C 2H 4 are compared with those for the phosphorus spin pair in the molecular environments of P 2, P 2H 2, and P 2H 4. The electronic structures and bonding in all of those molecular species are discussed.

  1. Vibrational 13C-cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopic and thermal characterization of poly(alanine-glycine) as model for silk I Bombyx mori fibroin.

    PubMed

    Monti, Patrizia; Taddei, Paola; Freddi, Giuliano; Ohgo, Kosuke; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the conformational characterization of poly(alanine-glycine) II (pAG II) as a model for a Bombyx mori fibroin silk I structure. Raman, IR, and 13C-cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR spectra of pAG II are discussed in comparison with those of the crystalline fraction of B. mori silk fibroin (chymotryptic precipitate, Cp) with a silk I (silk I-Cp) structure. The spectral data give evidence that silk I-Cp and the synthetic copolypeptide pAG II have similar conformations. Moreover, the spectral findings reveal that silk I-Cp is more crystalline than pAG II; consequently, the latter contains a larger amount of the random coil conformation. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements confirm this result. N-Deuteration experiments on pAG II allow us to attribute the Raman component at 1320 cm(-1) to the amide III mode of a beta-turn type II conformation, thus confirming the results of those who propose a repeated beta-turn type II structure for silk I. The analysis of the Raman spectra in the nuNH region confirms that the silk I structure is characterized by the presence of different types of H-bonding arrangements, in agreement with the above model.

  2. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals Sequence-Dependent Structural Plasticity, Dynamics, and the Spacer Peptide 1 Conformation in HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hung, Ivan; Gorkov, Peter L.; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William W.; Rice, David M.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2013-11-27

    Maturation of HIV-1 virus into an infectious virion requires cleavage of the Gag polyprotein into its constituent domains and formation of a conical capsid core that encloses viral RNA and a small complement of proteins for replication. The final step of this process is the cleavage of the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into a conical capsid. The mechanism of this step, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, is under intense debate. In this report, we examine the tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using Magic Angle Spinning NMR spectroscopy. At the magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies yield outstanding-quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra, which are amenable to resonance assignments and detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two sequence variants reveals that remarkably, the conformation of SP1 tail, of the functionally important CypA loop, and of the loop preceding helix 8 are sequence dependent and modulated by the residue variations at distal sites. These findings challenge the role of SP1 as a conformational switch in the maturation process and establish sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA.

  3. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects choline as a biomarker in a swine obstructive chronic pancreatitis model at an early stage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gaofeng; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Chao; Shao, Chengwei; Hao, Jun; Zheng, Jianming; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-03-04

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory and fibrotic disease of the pancreas which encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes ranging from mild to life-threatening complications. Metabolomics has increasingly been applied to identify biomarkers for disease diagnosis with particular interest in diseases at an early stage. In this study, we tested a swine obstructive CP model by subtotal ligation of the main pancreatic duct, and the metabolic profiles of the Bama miniature swine pancreas were investigated using high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS (1)H MRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA). Increases in lactate and choline for mild CP and decreases in glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine were observed from normal pancreas to mild, moderate and severe CP. PCA results showed visual separations among the groups. The increase of choline at an early stage of CP and the decrease of glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, betaine and glycine reveal the pathogenesis of CP at a molecular level. The MRS results presented here demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiles in discriminating a normal pancreas from different stages of CP, which may be used to achieve CP early diagnosis and timely intervention to prevent irreversible destruction of the pancreas.

  4. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth.

  5. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors.

  6. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  7. Systematic evaluation of heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state NMR at the rotary-resonance conditions in the regime of fast magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Agarwal, Vipin

    2016-09-01

    The performance of heteronuclear spin decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR severely degrades when the proton radiofrequency (RF) nutation frequencies (ν1) are close to or at multiples of magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency (νr) that are referred to as rotary-resonance recoupling conditions (ν1 = n · νr). Recently, two schemes, namely, PISSARRO and rCWApA, have been shown to be less affected by the problem of MAS and RF interference, specifically at the n = 2 rotary-resonance recoupling condition, especially in the fast MAS regime. Here, we systematically evaluate the loss in intensity of several heteronuclear spin decoupling sequences at the n = 1, 2 conditions compared to high-power decoupling in the fast-MAS regime. We propose that in the fast-MAS regime (above 40 kHz) the entire discussion about RF and MAS interference can be avoided by using appropriate low-power decoupling sequences which give comparable performance to decoupling sequences with high-power 1H irradiation of ca.195 kHz.

  8. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determination of internal sample temperatures. Advantages of this method include high signal-to-noise, proximity of the 79Br NMR frequency to that of 13C, applicability from 20 K to 320 K or higher, and simultaneity with adjustment of the MAS axis direction. We show that spin-lattice relaxation in KBr is driven by a quadrupolar mechanism. We demonstrate a simple approach to including KBr powder in hydrated samples, such as biological membrane samples, hydrated amyloid fibrils, and hydrated microcrystalline proteins, that allows direct assessment of the effects of frictional and radio-frequency heating under experimentally relevant conditions.

  9. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  10. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  11. Characterization of fungal-degraded lime wood by X-ray diffraction and cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Larsson, Per Tomas; Tibirna, Carmen Mihaela; Vasile, Cornelia

    2010-09-01

    X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and solid-state cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) (13)C-NMR spectroscopy were applied to determine changes over time in the morphology and crystallinity of lime wood (Tilia cordata Miller) generated by the soft-rot fungi. Wood samples were inoculated with Trichoderma viride Pers for various durations up to 84 days. Structural and morphological modifications were assessed by comparing the structural features of decayed lime wood samples with references. Significant morphology changes such as defibration or small cavities were clearly observed on the SEM micrographs of lime wood samples exposed to fungi. Following the deconvolution process of the diffraction patterns, the degree of crystallinity, apparent lateral crystallite size, the proportion of crystallite interior chains, and the cellulose fraction have been determined. It was found that all crystallographic data vary with the duration of exposure to fungi. The degree of crystallinity and cellulose fraction tend to decrease, whereas the apparent lateral crystallite size and the proportion of crystallite interior chains increase with prolonged biodegradation processes. The most relevant signals in CP/MAS (13)C-NMR spectra were assigned according to literature data. The differences observed were discussed in terms of lignin and cellulose composition: by fixing the lignin reference signal intensity, the cellulose and hemicelluloses moieties showed a relative decrease compared to the lignin signals in decayed wood.

  12. NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD AND MEANS FOR FLAW DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Hochschild, R.

    1959-03-10

    BS>An improved method is presented for the nondestructive detection of flaws in olectrictilly conductivc articles using magnetic field. According to thc method a homogoneous mignetic field is established in the test article;it right angle" to the artyicle. A probe is aligned with its axis transverse to the translates so hat th4 probe scans the surface of the test article while the axis of the robe is transverse to the direction of translation of the article. In this manner any output current obtained in thc probe is an indication of the size and location of a flaw in the article under test, with a miiiimum of signal pick- up in the probe from the established magnetic field.

  13. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  14. Carbon-13 cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interactions between maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene and wood polymers.

    PubMed

    Rude, Erica; Laborie, Marie-Pierre G

    2008-05-01

    The chemical interactions between maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) and wood were studied with solid-state carbon-13 cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CPMAS NMR) spectroscopy. MAPP was synthesized with 100% (13)C enrichment at the C(1) and C(4) carbons to allow detection of the [1,4-(13)C(2)]MAPP functional groups and was melt blended with cellulose, lignin, and maple wood. In the cellulose/MAPP blend, changes in (13)C CPMAS NMR corrected signal intensities for the anhydride and dicarboxylic maleic acid functionalities suggested that esterification may have occurred predominantly from the more numerous diacid carbons. A single proton longitudinal relaxation in the rotating frame, (H)T(1rho), for the MAPP and the cellulose carbons in the blend suggested that they were spin coupled, i.e., homogeneous on a 10-200 Angstrom scale. Esterification was also suggested in the lignin/MAPP blend. Furthermore, the more significant changes in the intensities of the carbonyl signals and (H)T(1rho) values suggested that lignin may be more reactive to MAPP than cellulose. Finally, when maple was melt blended with MAPP, the same trends in the (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra and (H)T(1rho) behavior were observed as when MAPP was blended with cellulose or lignin. This study therefore clarifies that during melt compounding of wood with MAPP, esterification occurs with wood polymers, preferentially with lignin. Understanding the interactions of MAPP with wood is of significance for the development of natural-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites.

  15. Fast Magic-Angle Spinning Three-Dimensional NMR Experiment for Simultaneously Probing H-H and N-H Proximities in Solids.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G N Manjunatha; Malon, Michal; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2016-12-06

    A fast magic-angle spinning (MAS, 70 kHz) solid-state NMR experiment is presented that combines (1)H Double-Quantum (DQ) and (14)N-(1)H HMQC (Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Coherence) pulse-sequence elements, so as to simultaneously probe H-H and N-H proximities in molecular solids. The proposed experiment can be employed in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) versions: first, a 2D (14)N HMQC-filtered (1)H-DQ experiment provides specific DQ-SQ correlation peaks for proton pairs that are in close proximities to the nitrogen sites, thereby achieving spectral filtration. Second, a proton-detected three-dimensional (3D) (1)H(DQ)-(14)N(SQ)-(1)H(SQ) experiment correlates (1)H(DQ)-(1)H(SQ) chemical shifts with (14)N shifts such that longer range N···H-H correlations are observed between protons and nitrogen atoms with internuclear NH distances exceeding 3 Å. Both 2D and 3D versions of the proposed experiment are demonstrated for an amino acid hydrochloride salt, l-histidine·HCl·H2O, and a DNA nucleoside, guanosine·2H2O. In the latter case, the achieved spectral filtration ensures that DQ cross peaks are only observed for guanine NH and CH8 (1)H resonances and not ribose and water (1)H resonances, thus providing insight into the changes in the solid-state structure of this hydrate that occur over time; significant changes are observed in the NH and NH2(1)H chemical shifts as compared to the freshly recrystallized sample previously studied by Reddy et al., Cryst. Growth Des. 2015, 15, 5945.

  16. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  17. Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Gating in Two-Dimensional Lipid Crystalline Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminus of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) has been proposed to contain the mechanistically important gating helices that modulate channel opening and closing. In this study, we utilize magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) to determine the location and structure of the N-terminus for functional channels in lipid bilayers by measuring long-range 13C–13C distances between residues in the N-terminus and other domains of VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers. Our structural studies show that the distance between A14 Cβ in the N-terminal helix and S193 Cβ is ∼4–6 Å. Furthermore, VDAC phosphorylation by a mitochondrial kinase at residue S193 has been claimed to delay mitochondrial cell death by causing a conformational change that closes the channel, and a VDAC-Ser193Glu mutant has been reported to show properties very similar to those of phosphorylated VDAC in a cellular context. We expressed VDAC-S193E and reconstituted it into DMPC lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional 13C–13C correlation experiments showed chemical shift perturbations for residues located in the N-terminus, indicating possible structural perturbations to that region. However, electrophysiological data recorded on VDAC-S193E showed that channel characteristics were identical to those of wild type samples, indicating that phosphorylation of S193 does not directly affect channel gating. The combination of NMR and electrophysiological results allows us to discuss the validity of proposed gating models. PMID:25545271

  18. A Large Sample Volume Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for In-Situ Investigations with Constant Flow of Reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Sears, Jesse A.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ford, Joseph J.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Kake; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Hoyt, David W.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-02-21

    A large-sample-volume constant-flow magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR probe is reported for in-situ studies of the reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions. In our approach, the reactants are introduced into the catalyst bed using a fixed tube at one end of the MAS rotor while a second fixed tube, linked to a vacuum pump, is attached at the other end of the rotor. The pressure difference between both ends of the catalyst bed inside the sample cell space forces the reactants flowing through the catalyst bed, which improves the diffusion of the reactants and products. This design allows the use of a large sample volume for enhanced sensitivity and thus permitting in-situ 13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance. As an example of application, we show that reactants, products and reaction transition states associated with the 2-butanol dehydration reaction over a mesoporous silicalite supported heteropoly acid catalyst (HPA/meso-silicalite-1) can all be detected in a single 13C CF-MAS NMR spectrum at natural abundance. Coke products can also be detected at natural 13C abundance and under the stopped flow condition. Furthermore, 1H CF-MAS NMR is used to identify the surface functional groups of HPA/meso-silicalite-1 under the condition of in-situ drying . We also show that the reaction dynamics of 2-butanol dehydration using HPA/meso-silicalite-1 as a catalyst can be explored using 1H CF-MAS NMR.

  19. Nanostructures of Mg0.65Ti0.35Dx studied with x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and magic-angle-spinning H2 NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Magusin, P. C. M. M.; Kalisvaart, W. P.; Notten, P. H. L.; Cuevas, F.; Latroche, M.; van Santen, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Magnesium transition-metal alloys have a high hydrogen-storage capacity and show improved hydrogen-uptake and -release kinetics compared to magnesium alone. In the present study we have investigated the structure of bulk magnesium-titanium deuteride Mg0.65Ti0.35Dx prepared via mechanical alloying and gas-phase deuterium absorption by combined use of x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction, and magic-angle-spinning H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The initial ball-milled alloy has two XRD-distinct Mg and Ti fcc phases. Even after prolonged exposure to deuterium gas at 75 bar and 175°C the materials with and without palladium catalyst are only partly deuterated. Deuterium loading causes the formation of, on the one hand, bct (rutile) MgD2 nanodomains with interdispersed TiDy layers and, on the other hand, a separate fcc (fluorite) TiDz phase. The TiDy phase is XRD invisible, but shows clearly up at a H2 NMR shift of -43ppm between the shift of MgD2 (3 ppm) and the Knight shift of the TiDz phase (-143ppm) . Exchange NMR indicates complete deuterium exchange at 25°C between the MgD2 and TiDy phase within 1 s, as consistent with intimate contacts between these phases. Combined analysis of the XRD and NMR peak areas suggests that the deuterium concentrations y and z in the TiDy and TiDz domains are about 1.5 and 2.0, respectively. Comparing the intrinsic cell parameters of rutile MgH2 and fluorite TiH2 , we propose that stabilization of the mixed nanocomposite may arise from a coherent coupling between the crystal structures of the rutile MgD2 nanodomains and the thin layers of fcc TiDy .

  20. High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning-(1)H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Metabolic Profiling of Hippocampal Tissue in Rats with Depression-Like Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Hayato; Oshima, Shinji; Ohara, Kousuke; Negishi, Akio; Hiroyama, Hanako; Nemoto, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2017-03-04

    Depressive disorders cause large socioeconomic effects influencing not only the patients themselves but also their family and broader community as well. To better understand the physiologic factors underlying depression, in this study, we performed metabolomics analysis, an omics technique that comprehensively analyzes small molecule metabolites in biological samples. Specifically, we utilized high-resolution magic-angle spinning-(1)H NMR (HRMAS-(1)H NMR) spectroscopy to comprehensively analyze the changes in metabolites in the hippocampal tissue of rats exposed to chronic stress (CS) via multi-step principal component analysis (multi-step PCA). The rats subjected to CS exhibited obvious depression-like behaviors. High correlations were observed between the first principal component (PC1) score in the score plot obtained using multi-step PCA and measurements from depression-like behavioral testing (body weight, sucrose preference test, and open field test). Alanine, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate levels in the hippocampal tissue were significantly lower, whereas N-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol, and creatine were significantly higher in the CS group compared to the control (non-CS) group. As alanine, glutamate, and glutamine are known to be involved in energy metabolism, especially in the TCA cycle, chronic exogenous stress may have induced abnormalities in energy metabolism in the brains of the rats. The results suggest that N-acetylaspartate and creatine levels may have increased in order to complement the loss of energy-producing activity resulting from the development of the depression-like disorder. Multi-step PCA therefore allowed an exploration of the degree of depression-like symptoms as represented by changes in intrinsic metabolites.

  1. Insights into atomic-level interaction between mefenamic acid and eudragit EPO in a supersaturated solution by high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Mroue, Kamal H; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-06

    The intermolecular interaction between mefenamic acid (MFA), a poorly water-soluble nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and Eudragit EPO (EPO), a water-soluble polymer, is investigated in their supersaturated solution using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stable supersaturated solution with a high MFA concentration of 3.0 mg/mL is prepared by dispersing the amorphous solid dispersion into a d-acetate buffer at pH 5.5 and 37 °C. By virtue of MAS at 2.7 kHz, the extremely broad and unresolved (1)H resonances of MFA in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum of the supersaturated solution are well-resolved, thus enabling the complete assignment of MFA (1)H resonances in the aqueous solution. Two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) under MAS conditions reveal the interaction of MFA with EPO in the supersaturated solution at an atomic level. The strong cross-correlations observed in the 2D (1)H/(1)H NMR spectra indicate a hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic group of MFA and the backbone of EPO. Furthermore, the aminoalkyl group in the side chain of EPO forms a hydrophilic interaction, which can be either electrostatic or hydrogen bonding, with the carboxyl group of MFA. We believe these hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between MFA and EPO molecules play a key role in the formation of this extremely stable supersaturated solution. In addition, 2D (1)H/(1)H RFDR demonstrates that the molecular MFA-EPO interaction is quite flexible and dynamic.

  2. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  3. Analysis of metabolic characteristics in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis using high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Ma, Chao; Wang, Jian; Pan, Chun-Shu; Yang, Gen-Jin; Lu, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Pathological and metabolic alterations co-exist and co-develop in the progression of chronic pancreatitis (CP). The aim of the present study was to investigate the metabolic characteristics and disease severity of a rat model of CP in order to determine associations in the observed pathology and the metabolites of CP using high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR). Wistar rats (n=36) were randomly assigned into 6 groups (n=6 per group). CP was established by administering dibutyltin dichloride solution into the tail vein. After 0, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days, the pancreatic tissues were collected for pathological scoring or for HR-MAS NMR. Correlation analyses between the major pathological scores and the integral areas of the major metabolites were determined. The most representative metabolites, aspartate, betaine and fatty acids, were identified as possessing the greatest discriminatory significance. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the pathology and metabolites of the pancreatic tissues were as follows: Betaine and fibrosis, 0.454 (P=0.044); betaine and inflammatory cell infiltration, 0.716 (P=0.0001); aspartate and fibrosis, -0.768 (P=0.0001); aspartate and inflammatory cell infiltration, -0.394 (P=0.085); fatty acid and fibrosis, -0.764 (P=0.0001); and fatty acid and inflammatory cell infiltration, -0.619 (P=0.004). The metabolite betaine positively correlated with fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration in CP. In addition, aspartate negatively correlated with fibrosis, but exhibited no significant correlation with inflammatory cell infiltration. Furthermore, the presence of fatty acids negatively correlated with fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration in CP. HR-MAS NMR may be used to analyze metabolic characteristics in a rat model of different degrees of chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Wire Insulation and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I (Inventor); Anastasi, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention uses the generation and detection of acoustic guided waves to evaluate the condition of the insulation on electrical wiring. Low order axisymmetric and flexural acoustic modes are generated in the insulated wire and travel partially in the center conductor and partially in the outer insulation. The stiffness of the insulation and the insulation's condition affect the overall wave speed and amplitude of the guided wave. Analysis of the received signal provides information about the age or useful life of the wire insulation. In accordance with the present invention, signal transmission occurs at one location on the electrical wire to be evaluated, and detection occurs at one or more locations along the electrical wire. Additional receivers can be used to improve measurement accuracy. Either the transmission transducer or one or more receiver transducers may be angled at other than 90 degrees to the wire. Generation of the guided waves can be accomplished by imparting a pressure pulse on the wire. Alternative embodiments include generation via a laser, such as a Q-switched laser or a laser diode.

  5. Prediction of Eggshell Ultrastructure via Some Non-destructive and Destructive Measurements in Fayoumi Breed.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Lamiaa M; Galal, A; Shemeis, A R

    2015-07-01

    Possibilities of predicting eggshell ultrastructure from direct non-destructive and destructive measurements were examined using 120 Fayoumi eggs collected from the flock at 45 weeks of age. The non-destructive measurements included weight, length and width of the egg. The destructive measurements were breaking strength and shell thickness. The eggshell ultrastructure traits involved the total thickness of eggshell layer, thickness of palisade layer, cone layer and total score. Prediction of total thickness of eggshell layer based on non-destructive measurements individually or simultaneously was not possible (R(2) = 0.01 to 0.16). The destructive measurements were far more accurate than the non-destructive in predicting total thickness of eggshell layer. Prediction based on breaking strength alone was more accurate (R(2) = 0.85) than that based on shell thickness alone (R(2) = 0.72). Adding shell thickness to breaking strength (the best predictor) increased the accuracy of prediction by 5%. The results obtained indicated that both non-destructive and destructive measurements were not useful in predicting the cone layer (R(2) not exceeded 18%). The maximum accuracy of prediction of total score (R(2) = 0.48) was obtained from prediction based on breaking strength alone. Combining shell thicknesses and breaking strength into one equation was no help in improving the accuracy of prediction.

  6. Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT), sometimes also known as non-destructive inspection (NDI) or non-destructive examination (NDE), has been applied to solve a wide range of science and industry problems including construction, aerospace, nuclear engineering, manufacturing, space exploration, art objects, forensic studies, biological and medical fields, etc. Without any permanent changing or alteration of testing objects, NDT methods provide great advantages such as increased testing reliability, efficiency, and safety, as well as reduced time and cost. Since the second half of the 20th century, NDT technology has seen significant growth. Depending on the physical properties being measured, NDT techniques can be classified into several branches. This article will provide a brief overview of commonly used NDT methods and their up-to-date progresses including optical examination, radiography, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. For extended reviews on many presently used NDT methods, please refer to articles by Mullins [1, 2].

  7. Non-destructive testing of composite materials using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Egor V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Gavdush, Arsenii A.; Zotov, Arsen K.; Nikonovich, Maxim Y.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2016-04-01

    Development of novel methods for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials (CMs) at manufacturing and operational stages remains challenging problem of applied physics, optics and material science. In this paper, we have considered the ability to use the terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) for non-destructive evaluation of CMs. By combining the TDS technique with appropriate methods of solving the inverse ill-posed problems, we have shown that TDS could be applied for CM testing. At first, we have demonstrated that TDS could be used to control the polymerization process and, as a consequence, the CM binder curing. Secondary, we have shown the ability to detect the internal defects (non-impregnated voids) inside the CMs via the TDS-based THz time-of-flight tomography. Thereby, the results of our study allow highlighting the prospective of non-destructive evaluation of CMs using the TDS.

  8. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-19

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  9. Dynamic High-Resolution H-1 and P-31 NMR Spectroscopy and H-1 T-2 Measurements in Postmortem Rabbit Muscles Using Slow Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Andersen, Henrik J.

    2004-05-05

    Postmortem changes in rabbit muscle tissue with different glycogen status (normal vs low) were followed continuously from 13 min postmortem until 8 h postmortem and again 20 h postmortem using simultaneous magic angle spinning 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy together with measurement of the transverse relaxation time, T2, of the muscle water. The 1H metabolite spectra were measured using the phase-altered spinning sidebands (PASS) technique at a spinning rate of 40 Hz. pH values calculated from the 31P NMR spectra using the chemical shifts of the C-6 line of histidine in the 1H spectra and the chemical shifts of inorganic phosphate in the 31P spectra confirmed the different muscle glycogen status in the tissues. High-resolution 1H spectra obtained from the PASS technique revealed the presence of a new resonance line at 6.8 ppm during the postmortem period, which were absent in muscles with low muscle glycogen content. This new resonance line may originate from the aminoprotons in creatine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH effect on the exchange rate between the amino and the water protons and thereby the NMR visibility. Alternatively, the new resonance line may originate from the aromatic protons in tyrosine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH-induced protein unfolding exposing hydrophobic amino acid residues to the aqueous environment. Further studies are needed to evaluate these hypotheses. Finally, distributed analysis of the water T2 relaxation data revealed three relaxation populations and an increase in the population believed to reflect extramyofibrillar water through the postmortem period. This increase was significantly reduced (p < 0.0001) in samples from animals with low muscle glycogen content, indicating that the pH is controlling the extent of postmortem expulsion of water from myofibrillar structures. The significance of the postmortem increase in the amount extramyofibrillar water on the water-holding capacity was verified by

  10. Magic-angle spinning NMR studies of molecular organization in multibilayers formed by 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.

    PubMed Central

    Halladay, H N; Stark, R E; Ali, S; Bittman, R

    1990-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study 50%-by-weight aqueous dispersions of 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C[18]:C[10]PC) and 1-octadecanoyl-2-d19-decanoyl-PC (C[18]:C[10]PC-d19), mixed-chain phospholipids which can form interdigitated multibilayers. The 1H NMR linewidth for methyl protons of the choline headgroup has been used to monitor the liquid crystalline-to-gel (LC-to-G) phase transition and confirm variations between freezing and melting temperatures. Both 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation times indicate unusual restrictions on segmental reorientation at megahertz frequencies for C(18):C(10)PC as compared with symmetric-chain species in the LC state; nevertheless each chemical moiety of the mixed-chain phospholipid exhibits motional behavior that may be classified as liquidlike. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (NOESY) on C(18):C(10)PC and C(18):C(10)PC-d19 reveals cross-peaks between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup, and several experimental and theoretical considerations argue against an interpretation based on spin diffusion. Using NMR relaxation times and NOESY connectivities along with a computational formalism for four-spin systems (Keepers, J. W., and T. L. James. 1984. J. Magn. Reson. 57:404-426), an estimate of 3.5 A is obtained for the average distance between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup. This finding is consistent with a degree of interdigitation similar to that proposed for organized assemblies of gel-state phosphatidylcholine molecules with widely disparate acyl-chain lengths (Hui, S. W., and C.-H. Huang. 1986. Biochemistry. 25:1330-1335); however, acyl-chain bendback or other intermolecular interactions may also contribute to the NOESY results. For multibilayers of C(18):C(10)PC in the gel phase, 13C chemical

  11. High-resolution mono- and multidimensional magic angle spinning 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of membrane peptides in nondeuterated lipid membranes and H2O.

    PubMed Central

    Le Guernevé, C; Seigneuret, M

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (14 kHz) solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR has been applied to several membrane peptides incorporated into nondeuterated dilauroyl or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes suspended in H2O. It is shown that solvent suppression methods derived from solution NMR, such as presaturation or jump-return, can be used to reduce water resonance, even at relatively high water content. In addition, regioselective excitation of 1H peptide resonances promotes an efficient suppression of lipid resonances, even in cases where these are initially two orders of magnitude more intense. As a consequence, 1H MAS spectra of the peptide low-field region are obtained without interference from water and lipid signals. These display resonances from amide and other exchangeable 1H as well as from aromatic nonexchangeable 1H. The spectral resolution depends on the specific types of resonance and membrane peptide. For small amphiphilic or hydrophobic oligopeptides, resolution of most individual amide resonance is achieved, whereas for the transmembrane peptide gramicidin A, an unresolved amide spectrum is obtained. Partial resolution of aromatic 1H occurs in all cases. Multidimensional 1H-MAS spectra of membrane peptides can also be obtained by using water suppression and regioselective excitation. For gramicidin A, F2-regioselective 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra are dominated by intermolecular through-space connectivities between peptide aromatic or formyl 1H and lipid 1H. These appear to be compatible with the known structure and topography of the gramicidin pore. On the other hand, for the amphiphilic peptide leucine-enkephalin, F2-regioselective NOESY spectra mostly display cross-peaks originating from though-space proximities of amide or aromatic 1H with themselves and with aliphatic 1H. F3-regioselective 3D NOESY-NOESY spectra can be used to obtain through-space correlations within aliphatic 1H. Such intrapeptide proximities should

  12. Research on non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoons based on image processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Kong, Qing-hua; Wei, Li-fu

    2008-03-01

    The major studied in this dissertation is the non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoon's quality, based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. Through the images collection and the data analysis, procession and calculation of the tested silkworm cocoons with the non-destructive testing technology, internet applications automatically reckon all items of the classification indexes. Finally we can conclude the classification result and the purchase price of the silkworm cocoons. According to the domestic classification standard of the silkworm cocoons, the author investigates various testing methods of silkworm cocoons which are used or have been explored at present, and devices a non-destructive testing scheme of the silkworm cocoons based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. They are dissertated about the project design of the experiment. The precisions of all the implements are demonstrated. I establish Manifold mathematic models, compare them with each other and analyze the precision with technology of databank to get the best mathematic model to figure out the weight of the dried silkworm cocoon shells. The classification methods of all the complementary items are designed well and truly. The testing method has less error and reaches an advanced level of the present domestic non-destructive testing technology of the silkworm cocoons.

  13. Non-destructive assessment of human ribs mechanical properties using quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mitton, David; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Ellouz, Rafaa; Rongieras, Frédéric; Laugier, Pascal; Bruyère-Garnier, Karine

    2014-04-11

    Advanced finite element models of the thorax have been developed to study, for example, the effects of car crashes. While there is a need for material properties to parameterize such models, specific properties are largely missing. Non-destructive techniques applicable in vivo would, therefore, be of interest to support further development of thorax models. The only non-destructive technique available today to derive rib bone properties would be based on quantitative computed tomography that measures bone mineral density. However, this approach is limited by the radiation dose. Bidirectional ultrasound axial transmission was developed on long bones ex vivo and used to assess in vivo health status of the radius. However, it is currently unknown if the ribs are good candidates for such a measurement. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the relationship between ex vivo ultrasonic measurements (axial transmission) and the mechanical properties of human ribs to determine if the mechanical properties of the ribs can be quantified non-destructively. The results show statistically significant relationships between the ultrasonic measurements and mechanical properties of the ribs. These results are promising with respect to a non-destructive and non-ionizing assessment of rib mechanical properties. This ex vivo study is a first step toward in vivo studies to derive subject-specific rib properties.

  14. Non-Destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-Level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Non-destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches by Ryan Knight and...Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches Ryan Knight and Evan Cheng Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Damping Measurement for Wafer-level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  15. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-04

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated.

  16. Non-destructive method for inward leakage detection of a plate evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Ales

    2007-05-01

    A new non-destructive method was developed for the detection of refrigerant leakage at an evaporator's inflow. Nitrogen and oxygen gas were successively blown through the evaporator. A gas analyser was applied at the outflow of the evaporator and the oxygen concentration measured. It was possible to detect any leakage by investigating the oxygen concentration-time history diagram.

  17. Magical Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can contain unwanted emotions or special treasures. The project described in this article incorporates…

  18. Magic Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  19. Matisse Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Marcia

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which kindergarten and first-grade students learn about Henri Matisse and his art work. Explains that the students use "Model Magic" to create Matisse style face refrigerator magnets. Discusses in detail how to create the magnets. (CMK)

  20. Mummies & Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Jeanne E.

    1989-01-01

    Covers the cultural and aesthetic significance of Egyptian mummies, as explained in an exhibition at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts. The display, "Mummies & Magic: The Funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt," allowed for restoration work which did much to advance modern knowledge of Egyptian culture and funerary art. (LS)

  1. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-09-02

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices.

  2. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A.; Vick, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices.

  3. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy as a Non-destructive Tool for Quantification of Pesticide Residue in Apple Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixian; Wang, Yafei; Gao, Chunming; Huan, Huiting; Zhao, Binxing; Yan, Laijun

    2015-06-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the non-destructive method to detect residue of dimethyl-dichloro-vinyl-phosphate (DDVP) pesticide in a cuticle of apple, is described. After constructing the PA experimental setup and identifying three characteristic peaks of DDVP in the near ultraviolet region, the PA spectra of an apple cuticle contaminated with DDVP were collected. The artificial neural network method was then applied to analyze data quantitatively. The results show a correlation coefficient exceeding 0.99 and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm, which is within the national food safety standard for maximum residue limits for pesticides in food (GB 2763-2012). This fact and the non-destructive character of PAS make the approach promising for detection of pesticide residue in fruits.

  4. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A.; Vick, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  5. Can predatory bird feathers be used as a non-destructive biomonitoring tool of organic pollutants?

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Veerle L.B; Voorspoels, Stefan; Covaci, Adrian; Eens, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    The monitoring of different types of pollutants that are released into the environment and that present risks for both humans and wildlife has become increasingly important. In this study, we examined whether feathers of predatory birds can be used as a non-destructive biomonitor of organic pollutants. We demonstrate that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are measurable in one single tail feather of common buzzards (Buteo buteo) and that levels in this feather and internal tissues are significantly related to each other (0.35non-destructive biomonitoring of organic pollutants, although further validation may be necessary. PMID:17148383

  6. Microwaving Blood as a Non-Destructive Technique for Haemoglobin Measurements on Microlitre Samples

    PubMed Central

    Basey-Fisher, Toby H.; Guerra, Nadia; Triulzi, Chiara; Gregory, Andrew; Hanham, Stephen M.; Stevens, Molly M.; Maier, Stefan A.; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive ex vivo determination of haemoglobin (Hgb) concentration offers the capability to conduct multiple red blood cell haematological measurements on a single sample, an advantage that current optical techniques are unable to offer. Here, a microwave method and device for the accurate and non-destructive determination of Hgb concentration in microlitre blood samples are described. Using broadband microwave spectroscopy, a relationship is established between the dielectric properties of murine blood and Hgb concentration that is utilized to create a technique for the determination of Hgb concentration. Subsequently, a microwave dielectric resonator-microfluidic system is implemented in the analysis of 52 murine samples with microlitre volumes and Hgb concentrations ranging from 0 to 17 g dL−1. Using the characterized relationship, independent and minimally invasive Hgb measurements are made on nine healthy mice as well as seven with mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that leads to colorectal cancer and consequently anaemia. PMID:24002989

  7. PANDA—A novel instrument for non-destructive sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jani; Peräjärvi, Kari; Pöllänen, Roy; Toivonen, Harri

    2010-01-01

    An instrument known as PANDA (Particles And Non-Destructive Analysis) for non-destructive sample analysis has been designed and built at the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). In PANDA the measurement techniques and instruments designed for the basic research are applied to the analysis of environmental samples. PANDA has two vacuum chambers, one for loading samples and the other for measurements. In the measurement chamber there are two individual measurement positions. Currently the first one hosts an HPGe gamma detector and a position-sensitive alpha detector. The second measurement position is intended for precise characterization of found particles. PANDA's data are recorded in event mode and events are timestamped. In the present article the technical design of PANDA is presented in detail. In addition, its performance using depleted uranium particles and an air filter is demonstrated.

  8. The application of non-destructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.; Beattie, A.; Hansche, B.; Musial, W.; Allread, J.; Johnson, J.; Summers, M.

    1994-06-01

    NonDestructive Testing (NDT), also called NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE), is commonly used to monitor structures before, during, and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electron shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Furthermore, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

  9. Coded excitation for infrared non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Venkata Ghali, Subbarao

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a Barker coded excitation for defect detection using infrared non-destructive testing. Capability of the proposed excitation scheme is highlighted with recently introduced correlation based post processing approach and compared with the existing phase based analysis by taking the signal to noise ratio into consideration. Applicability of the proposed scheme has been experimentally validated on a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen containing flat bottom holes located at different depths.

  10. A novel quadruple excitation in high-Tc SQUID-based non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. Y.; Ren, Y. F.; Li, J. W.; Yu, H. W.; Chen, G. H.; Yang, Q. S.

    2006-02-01

    A high-Tc SQUID-based non-destructive evaluation (NDE) system has been set up in our laboratory. The SQUID was made on a 24° bicystal SrTiO3 substrate. A novel quadruple excitation coil was proposed for the first time and applied in the artificial holes in the aluminium multilayer structure in a noisy unshielded environment. The experimental data shows that it has good balance and is very effective at detecting small hole defects.

  11. Conceptual design of non-destructive, time profile monitor for femtosecond-long electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, I. V.; Harrison, H.; Lancaster, A. J.; Taheri, F. Bakkali; Doucas, G.; Aryshev, A.; Lekomtsev, K.; Shevelev, M.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of the project is to build a high resolution time-profile monitor for femtosecond electron beams, based on the spectral analysis of coherent Smith-Purcell radiation (cSPr). The monitor will be capable of determining the electron bunch time profile non-destructively and on a shot-by-shot basis. The results of recent experimental and theoretical studies are presented, and the conceptual design of the monitor is discussed.

  12. Feasibility Study of Non-Destructive Techniques to Measure Corrosion in SAVY Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Matthew Nicholas

    2016-07-15

    Stainless Steel SAVY containers are used to transport and store nuclear material. They are prone to interior corrosion in the presence of certain chemicals and a low-oxygen environment. SAVY containers also have relatively thin walls to reduce their weight, making their structural integrity more vulnerable to the effects of corrosion. A nondestructive evaluation system that finds and monitors corrosion within containers in use would improve safety conditions and preclude hazards. Non-destructive testing can determine whether oxidation or corrosion is occurring inside the SAVY containers, and there are a variety of non-destructive testing methods that may be viable. The feasibility study described will objectively decide which method best fits the requirements of the facility and the problem. To improve efficiency, the containers cannot be opened during the non-destructive examination. The chosen technique should also be user-friendly and relatively quick to apply. It must also meet facility requirements regarding wireless technology and maintenance. A feasibility study is an objective search for a new technology or product to solve a particular problem. First, the design, technical, and facility feasibility requirements are chosen and ranked in order of importance. Then each technology considered is given a score based upon a standard ranking system. The technology with the highest total score is deemed the best fit for a certain application.

  13. Non-destructively reading out information embedded inside real objects by using far-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Ayumi; Silapasuphakornwong, Piyarat; Suzuki, Masahiro; Torii, Hideyuki; Takashima, Youichi; Uehira, Kazutake

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a technique that can non-destructively read out information embedded inside real objects by using far-infrared-light. We propose a technique that can protect the copyrights of digital content for homemade products using digital fabrication technologies such as those used in 3D printers. It embeds information on copyrights inside real objects produced by 3D printers by forming fine structures inside the objects as a watermark that cannot be observed from the outside. Fine structures are formed near the surface inside real objects when they are being fabricated. Information embedded inside real objects needs to be read out non-destructively. We used a technique that could non-destructively read out information from inside real objects by using far-infrared light. We conducted experiments where we structured fine cavities inside objects. The disposition of the fine domain contained valuable information. We used the flat and curved surfaces of the objects to identify them. The results obtained from the experiments demonstrated that the disposition patterns of the fine structures appeared on the surface of objects as a temperature profile when far-infrared light was irradiated on their surface. Embedded information could be read out successfully by analyzing the temperature profile images of the surface of the objects that were captured with thermography and these results demonstrated the feasibility of the technique we propose.

  14. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance. PMID:26494523

  15. Non-destructive analysis of extracellular matrix development in cardiovascular tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Tuemen, M; Nguyen, D V A; Raffius, J; Flanagan, T C; Dietrich, M; Frese, J; Schmitz-Rode, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-05-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, there is an increasing demand for non-destructive methods to quantify the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagens, elastin or sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) in vitro as a quality control before clinical use. In this study, procollagen I carboxyterminal peptide (PICP), procollagen III aminoterminal peptide (PIIINP), tropoelastin and sGAGs are investigated for their potential use as non-destructive markers in culture medium of statically cultivated cell-seeded fibrin gels. Measurement of PICP as marker for type I collagen synthesis, and PIIINP as marker of type III collagen turnover, correlated well with the hydroxyproline content of the fibrin gels, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. The measurement of tropoelastin as marker of elastin synthesis correlated with the amount of elastin retained in fibrin gels with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. sGAGs were retained in fibrin gels, but were not detectable in culture medium at any time of measurement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of PICP and tropoelastin as non-destructive culture medium markers for collagen and elastin synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study in cardiovascular tissue engineering investigating the whole of here proposed biomarkers of ECM synthesis to monitor the maturation process of developing tissue non-invasively, but for comprehensive assessment of ECM development, these biomarkers need to be investigated in further studies, employing dynamic cultivation conditions and more complex tissue constructs.

  16. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  17. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  18. [Study on Non-Destructive Testing of Guqin Interior Structure Based on Computed Tomography].

    PubMed

    Zhao, De-da; Liu, Xing-e; Yang, Shu-min; Yu, Shenz; Tian, Gen-lin; Ma, Jian-feng; Wang, Qing-ping

    2015-12-01

    The wood property and production process affect quality of Guqin. At the same time, Guqin shape with cavity layout relations to the improvement of Guqin technology and inheritance, so it's very important to get the internal cavity characteristics and parameters on the condition of non-destructive the structure of Guqin. The image of interior structure in Guqin was investigated by overall scanning based on non-destructive testing technology of computed tomography, which texture of faceplate, connection method between faceplate and soleplate and interior defects were studied. The three-dimensional reconstruction of Guqin cavity was achieved through Mimics software of surface rendering method and put the two-dimensional CT tomography images convert into three-dimensional, which more complete show interior structural form in Guqin, and finally the parameter of cavity dimensions was obtained. Experimental research shows that there is significant difference in Guqin interior structure between Zhong-ni and Luo-xia type, in which the fluctuation of the interior surfacein Zhong-ni type's is larger than that in Luo-xia type; the interior volume of Zhong-ni typeis less than that of Luo-xia type, especially in Guqin neck. The accurate internal information of Guqin obtained through the computed tomography (CT) technology will provide technical support for the Guqin manufacture craft and the quality examination, as well as provide the reference in the aspect of non-destructive testing for other traditional precious internal structure research.

  19. A new non-destructive readout by using photo-recovered surface potential contrast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Jin, Kui-juan; Gu, Jun-xing; Ma, Chao; He, Xu; Zhang, Jiandi; Wang, Can; Feng, Yu; Wan, Qian; Shi, Jin-an; Gu, Lin; He, Meng; Lu, Hui-bin; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2014-11-10

    Ferroelectric random access memory is still challenging in the feature of combination of room temperature stability, non-destructive readout and high intensity storage. As a non-contact and non-destructive information readout method, surface potential has never been paid enough attention because of the unavoidable decay of the surface potential contrast between oppositely polarized domains. That is mainly due to the recombination of the surface movable charges around the domain walls. Here, by introducing a laser beam into the combination of piezoresponse force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we demonstrate that the surface potential contrast of BiFeO3 films can be recovered under light illumination. The recovering mechanism is understood based on the redistribution of the photo-induced charges driven by the internal electric field. Furthermore, we have created a 12-cell memory pattern based on BiFeO3 films to show the feasibility of such photo-assisted non-volatile and non-destructive readout of the ferroelectric memory.

  20. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A; Leiva, Luisa F; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G; Worthington, Margaret L; Miles, John W; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress.

  1. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-02-26

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  2. Non-destructive techniques for determining the material characteristics of Cr-Mo-V rotor steel

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Toru; Kadoya, Yoshikuni; Konishi, Takashi; Kamimura, Takeo; Suyama, Shouji; Haruki, Nirou; Ikuno, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Kouji

    1994-12-31

    Long-term service causes material deterioration, such as the accumulation of creep and fatigue damage, as well as softening and embrittlement, in the high-temperature components of fossil fuel power plants. Therefore, in order to extend plant life at minimum cost without any accidental outages, it is important to observe the material state, especially of rotors and conduct necessary repairs or replace them at the most appropriate time. Therefore, there is a need for non-destructive techniques to evaluate the material characteristics of Cr-Mo-V rotors under service. In this paper, a comparative report of non-destructive techniques using artificially aged and crept Cr-Mo-V steel specimens is given. The techniques tested include replication, hardness measurement, electro-magnetic and ultrasonic techniques, and conventional metallurgical techniques, which have been here to fore usable only in the laboratory, but due to expected advances in the non-destructive sampling of material from service rotors these techniques are now usable in the field. As a result of the studies, the features of each technique are well recognized and the suggestions for the further development of NDE methods for the evaluation of creep damage in Cr-Mo-V rotors are presented.

  3. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  4. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A.; Leiva, Luisa F.; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G.; Worthington, Margaret L.; Miles, John W.; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress. PMID:28243249

  5. A new non-destructive readout by using photo-recovered surface potential contrast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le; Jin, Kui-juan; Gu, Jun-xing; Ma, Chao; He, Xu; Zhang, Jiandi; Wang, Can; Feng, Yu; Wan, Qian; Shi, Jin-an; Gu, Lin; He, Meng; Lu, Hui-bin; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric random access memory is still challenging in the feature of combination of room temperature stability, non-destructive readout and high intensity storage. As a non-contact and non-destructive information readout method, surface potential has never been paid enough attention because of the unavoidable decay of the surface potential contrast between oppositely polarized domains. That is mainly due to the recombination of the surface movable charges around the domain walls. Here, by introducing a laser beam into the combination of piezoresponse force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we demonstrate that the surface potential contrast of BiFeO3 films can be recovered under light illumination. The recovering mechanism is understood based on the redistribution of the photo-induced charges driven by the internal electric field. Furthermore, we have created a 12-cell memory pattern based on BiFeO3 films to show the feasibility of such photo-assisted non-volatile and non-destructive readout of the ferroelectric memory. PMID:25381929

  6. Insight into hydrogen bonding of uranyl hydroxide layers and capsules by use of 1H magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy [Insight into the hydrogen bonding for uranyl hydroxides using 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Liao, Zuolei; Nyman, May; ...

    2016-04-27

    Solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Furthermore, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules andmore » of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.« less

  7. The use of non destructive biomarkers in the study of marine mammals.

    PubMed

    M Cristina Fossi And Letizia Marsili

    1997-01-01

    Marine mammals have been subject to heavy anthropogenic pressure by direct killing and chemical pollution all over the world. Most studies of contamination and biomarker responses in marine mammals have been conducted using animals killed by hunting out of a total of 12 cetacean species studied, 45 of the specimens were obtained by sacrificing the animal; out of a total of eight pinniped species studied, 40 of the specimens were obtained by killing. The development of a series of non destructive techniques to evaluate biomarker responses and residue levels is recommended for the hazard assessment and conservation of endangered species of marine mammals. Here we review the current status of the non destructive biomarker approach in marine mammals, describing the biological materials available for non destructive tests in stranded brain, liver, blood, skin, subcutaneous blubber, muscle and fur and free ranging animals blood, skin biopsy, fur and faeces and the respective biomarker techniques mixed function oxidase activity and DNA damage in skin biopsy samples; porphyrins in faeces and fur; esterases, porphyrins, clinical biochemical parameter, vitamin A and micronuclei in blood samples. Residue analysis can be carried out in the various biological materials. We also report the results of applying this methodological approach to cetaceans minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, fin whale-- Balaenoptera physalus, beluga whale-- Delphinapterus leucas, short finned pilot whale-- Globicephala macrorhynchus, harbour porpoise -- Phocoena phocoena, Rissos dolphin-- Risso s Grampus griseus, Dall s porpoise-- Phocoenoides dalli dalli, melon headed whale-- Peponocephala electra, bottlenose dolphin -- Tursiops truncatus, striped dolphin-- Stenella coeruleoalba, spinner dolphin-- Stenella longirostris, killer whale-- Orcinus orca and pinnipeds northern fur seal- Callorhinus ursinus, hooded seal-- Cystophora cristata, grey seal-- Halichoerus grypus, harbour seal-- Phoca vitulina

  8. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Nuclear Materials Using Non-Destructive Ball Indentation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, M.D.; Linga Murty, K.

    2002-07-01

    Integrity of structural components depends on the deformation and fracture behavior of materials. For evaluating the material condition in-service, it is generally not feasible or practical or advisable to cut samples from operating structures. Non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques are required to evaluate the mechanical properties. Although several NDT techniques such as ultrasound, magnetic strength, Barkhausen noise, microhardness etc., are employed for estimating the mechanical property degradation, these methodologies are generally empirical and indirect. Automated Ball Indentation (ABI) is a non-destructive testing technique for direct measurement of mechanical and fracture properties of metallic engineering materials. Because of the small area over which the test is carried out, it is possible to determine point to point variations in the mechanical and fracture properties, such as those that exist in weldments. Although ABI technique is non-intrusive, it is a state-of-the-art mechanical test that measures directly the current/local deformation behavior of the material. In this paper, we present results from studies on the application of ABI technique to determine tensile and fracture properties of ferritic steels, an austenitic stainless steel, a nickel base superalloy and Zircaloy in different thermo-mechanical conditions. The effects of aging and cold work on these properties were determined from the ABI tests. Gradients in mechanical properties of ferritic steel welds, particularly in the narrow heat-affected zone, were clearly established. ABI technique was found to be useful in determining the anisotropy in the tensile properties of Zircaloy cladding tubes. The technique has potential as a non-destructive method for assessing structural integrity of aged components. (authors)

  9. Non-destructive Assessment of Engineered Cartilage Composition by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    McGoverin, Cushla M.; Hanifi, Arash; Palukuru, Uday P.; Yousefi, Farzad; Glenn, Padraig B. M.; Shockley, Michael; Spencer, Richard G.; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering presents a strategy to overcome the limitations of current tissue healing methods. Scaffolds, cells, external growth factors and mechanical input are combined in an effort to obtain constructs with properties that mimic native tissues. However, engineered constructs developed using similar culture environments can have very different matrix composition and biomechanical properties. Accordingly, a non-destructive technique to assess constructs during development such that appropriate compositional endpoints can be defined is desirable. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis is a modality being investigated to address the challenges associated with current evaluation techniques, which includes non-destructive compositional assessment. In the present study, cartilage tissue constructs were grown using chondrocytes seeded onto polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in similar environments in three separate tissue culture experiments and monitored using NIRS. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis models of NIR spectra were calculated and used to predict tissue composition, with biochemical assay information used as the reference data. Results showed that for combined data from all tissue culture experiments, PLS models were able to assess composition with significant correlations to reference values, including engineered cartilage water (at 5200 cm−1, R = 0.68, p = 0.03), proteoglycan (at 4310 cm−1, R = 0.82, p = 0.007), and collagen (at 4610 cm−1, R = 0.84, p = 0.005). In addition, degradation of PGA was monitored using specific NIRS frequencies. These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis provides a non-destructive modality to assess engineered cartilage, which could provide information to determine the optimal time for tissue harvest for clinical applications. PMID:26817457

  10. Research Performed within the Non-Destructive Evaluation Team at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Erin A.

    2004-01-01

    Non-destructive testing is essential in many fields of manufacturing and research in order to perform reliable examination of potentially damaged materials and parts without destroying the inherent structure of the materials. Thus, the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Team at NASA Glenn Research Center partakes in various projects to improve materials testing equipment as well as analyze materials, material defects, and material deficiencies. Due to the array of projects within the NDE Team at this time, five research aims were supplemental to some current projects. A literature survey of "DE and testing methodologies as related to rocks was performed. Also, Mars Expedition Rover technology was assessed to understand the requirements for instrumentation in harsh space environments (e.g. temperature). Potential instrumentation and technologies were also considered and documented. The literature survey provided background and potential sources for a proposal to acquire funding for ultrasonic instrumentation on board a future Mars expedition. The laboratory uses a Santec Systems AcousticScope AS200 acoustography system. Labview code was written within the current program in order to improve the current performance of the acoustography system. A sample of Reinforced Carbon/Carbon (RCC) material from the leading edge of the space shuttle underwent various non-destructive tests (guided wave scanning, thermography, computed tomography, real time x-ray, etc.) in order to characterize its structure and examine possible defects. Guided wave scan data of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel was reanalyzed utilizing image correlations and signal processing variables. Additional guided wave scans and thermography were also performed on the CMC panel. These reevaluated data and images will be used in future presentations and publications. An additional axis for the guided wave scanner was designed, constructed, and implemented. This additional axis allowed incremental spacing

  11. Non-destructive estimation of foliar carotenoid content of tree species using merged vegetation indices.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Fabian E; Stenzel, Stefanie; Gitelson, Anatoly A

    2015-03-15

    Leaf pigment content is an important indicator of plant status and can serve to assess the vigor and photosynthetic activity of plants. The application of spectral information gathered from laboratory, field and remote sensing-based spectrometers to non-destructively assess total chlorophyll (Chl) content of higher plants has been demonstrated in earlier studies. However, the precise estimation of carotenoid (Car) content with non-destructive spectral measurements has so far not reached accuracies comparable to the results obtained for Chl content. Here, we examined the potential of a recently developed angular vegetation index (AVI) to estimate total foliar Car content of three tree species. Based on an iterative search of all possible band combinations, we identified a best candidate AVIcar. The identified index showed quite close but essentially not linear relation with Car contents of the examined species with increasing sensitivity to high Car content and a lack of sensitivity to low Car content for which earlier proposed vegetation indices (VI) performed better. To make use of the advantages of both VI types, we developed a simple merging procedure, which combined the AVIcar with two earlier proposed carotenoid indices. The merged indices had close linear relationship with total Car content and outperformed all other examined indices. The merged indices were able to accurately estimate total Car content with a percental root mean square error (%RMSE) of 8.12% and a coefficient of determination of 0.88. Our findings were confirmed by simulations using the radiative transfer model PROSPECT-5. For simulated data, the merged indices again showed a quasi linear relationship with Car content. This strengthens the assumption that the proposed merged indices have a general ability to accurately estimate foliar Car content. Further examination of the proposed merged indices to estimate foliar Car content of other plant species is desirable to prove the general

  12. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T.; Sigloch, K.

    2012-04-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and architectural structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to combine non-destructive testing with a theoretical data analysis and hence to contribute to conservation strategies of archaeological and architectural structures. We analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of a variety of samples, and define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface

  13. Additive Manufacturing (AM) Activities and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.

    2017-01-01

    NASA personnel will be meeting with a delegation from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) at Langley Research Center on 2217 through 3217. The purpose of the meeting is a technical interchange between NASA and JAXA to discuss Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Additive Manufacturing (AM) parts and the HALT process (relates to accelerated life testing). The visitors will be a small group of Japanese citizens. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been asked to participate in the meeting, either in person or via teleconference. This presentation covers NDE efforts at GSFC and provides a cursory overview of AM and lab capabilities.

  14. Computed tomography for non-destructive evaluation of composites: Applications and correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B.; Hediger, L.; Noel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The state-of-the-art fabrication techniques for composite materials are such that stringent species-specific acceptance criteria must be generated to insure product reliability. Non-destructive evaluation techniques including computed tomography (CT), X-ray radiography (RT), and ultrasonic scanning (UT) are investigated and compared to determine their applicability and limitations to graphite epoxy, carbon-carbon, and carbon-phenolic materials. While the techniques appear complementary, CT is shown to provide significant, heretofore unattainable data. Finally, a correlation of NDE techniques to destructive analysis is presented.

  15. Non-destructive terahertz imaging of illicit drugs using spectral fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yuuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2003-10-01

    The absence of non-destructive inspection techniques for illicit drugs hidden in mail envelopes has resulted in such drugs being smuggled across international borders freely. We have developed a novel basic technology for terahertz imaging, which allows detection and identification of drugs concealed in envelopes, by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the targets are obtained from terahertz multispectral transillumination images, using absorption spectra measured with a tunable terahertz-wave source. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  16. [NIR spectrometer for non-destruction measurement of oil contents in a corn seed].

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhi-li; Xie, Jin-chun; Wang, Nan; Pan, Ling-ling; Song, Tong-ming; Zhang, Ye-hui; Xu, Xiao-jie

    2005-11-01

    NIR spectromneter for non-destruction measurement of oil contents in an integrated kernel of corn was manufactured. Using LED (light emitting diode) as the light source and six filters as the monochromator, the specifications of the instrument are compared with those of the commercial instruments. The regression coefficient, the standard error, and the relative error of measuring oil contents in an integrated kernel of corn are 0.9688, 0.72 and 0.062 respectively. The results meet the demand of high-oil corn breeding.

  17. Methods for Non-destructive Temperature Measurements in a Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, Frank A.; Duncan, Dwight; White, Grady R.; Lough, James; Davis, Jon P.

    2009-05-01

    Certain practical applications for precision measurements by atom interferometers require knowledge of the input atom cloud's temperature from realization to realization. Recent work [1,2] has shown how to measure the temperature of atoms in a magneto-optical trap in a non-destructive, in situ manner. We discuss an alternate, simpler method for the nondestructive measurement of the temperature of an atom cloud and compare our method with earlier techniques. [4pt] [1] T. Brzozowski, M. Brzozowska, J. Zachorowski, M. Zawada, W. Gawlik, PRA, 71, 013401 (2005).[0pt] [2] M. Brzozowska, T. Brzozowski J. Zachorowski, W. Gawlik, PRA, 72, 061401(R), (2005).

  18. Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kosek, Jacek; Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide; Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix

    2014-01-29

    In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes.

  19. The development of non destructive remote measurement method of concrete contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, V E; Potapov, V N; Ivanov, O P

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants or laboratories, the penetration depth of the contamination in concrete surfaces: walls, floor, is unknown. Its knowledge requires sample analysis, that is time consuming and expensive. The main goal of the work is to define and evaluate a non-destructive measurement technique for the evaluation of the contamination depth in concrete. Estimation of accuracy of measurements for different contamination levels, time of measurement, value of natural radionuclides (NRN) concentration in concrete and background radiation dose were carried out. The type of relevant detector depends of selected limiting sensitivity, the weight and sizes of the device. (authors)

  20. Delayed Gamma-ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mozin, Vladimir; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan

    2014-10-09

    This project addresses the need for improved non-destructive assay techniques for quantifying the actinide composition of spent nuclear fuel and for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle. High-energy delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy following neutron irradiation is a potential technique for directly assaying spent fuel assemblies and achieving the safeguards goal of quantifying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification.

  1. Non-destructive testing of biaxial stress state in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengrinovich, V. L.; Vintov, D. A.; Dmitrovich, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    The technique for biaxial stress state quantitative non destructive testing using magnetic, namely Barkhausen Noise, measurements is developed and checked experimentally. The main elaboration concerns the application of uni-axial calibration data for bi-axial stress measurement in the material which treatment pre-history is not definitely known. The article is aimed to get over difficulties, accompanying factual nondestructive stress evaluation, implied from its tensor nature. The developed technique of stress calibration and measurement assumes the bi-axial stress components recovery from uni-axial magnetic and Barkhausen noise measurement results. The complete technology, based on new calibration procedure with grid diagrams is considered in the article.

  2. Fast Non-Destructive Evaluation of Superconducting Magnet Wires using a Flow-Through SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, John; Wellstood, Frederick; Weinstock, Harold

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a cryocooled high-Tc SQUID microscope for fast non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of long wires, designed for detecting defects in superconducting magnet wire. A feedthrough mechanism pulls the wire at speeds of up to 20 cm/s through a thin mylar tube that separates the room temperature wire from the SQUID. We present results on test wires where we detect defects down to about 0.3 mm diameter. We discuss how we extract information from the data, such as defect size and location, and also outline a method for fast automated detection of defects in long wires.

  3. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, C.; Franklin, P.; Franklin, P.; Plowman, A.; Sayers, G.; Bol, J.; Shepard, D.; Fields, D.

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  4. Non-Destructive Evaluation Method and Apparatus for Measuring Acoustic Material Nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic non-linearity parameter (beta) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members obviates the need for electronic calibration of the measuring equipment. Unlike known substitutional measuring techniques requiring elaborate calibration procedures, the electrical outputs of the capacitive detector of a sample with known beta and the test sample of unknown beta are compared to determine the unknown beta. In order to provide the necessary stability of the present-inventive reference-based approach, the bandpass filters of the measurement system are maintained in a temperature-controlled environment, and the line voltage supplied to said amplifiers is well-regulated.

  5. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  6. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  7. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1986-01-01

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

  8. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOEpatents

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-02-22

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

  9. PREFACE: III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing (SibTest 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    This issue of the journal is devoted to the research and studies presented at the III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing SibTest. The conference was held in Altai, Russia, on 27-31 July 2015. The conference brought together experts from different countries and organizations who had a great opportunity to share knowledge during oral and poster presentations and to initiate discussions on topics that are of interest to the conference attendees. The conference aimed to discuss innovative methods and the application of advanced technologies in non-destructive testing. The conference also attempted to bring together university, academic and industrial science, to expand the co-operation of scientists from different countries in research and development and the commercialization of innovative technologies in non-destructive testing. The key themes of the conference were: ultrasonic and acoustic testing; electromagnetic and thermal testing; various types of radiation non-destructive testing; passive and active testing techniques. The conference organizers are the Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, with the assistance of the Russian Society for Non-Destructive Testing and Technical Diagnostics, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, National Research Tomsk State University, Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation.

  10. MAGIC highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE) side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the "bridge" of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  11. Rapid non-destructive assessment of pork edible quality by using VIS/NIR spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Song, Yulin; Zhao, Juan; Zhao, Songwei

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop a rapid non-destructive method to evaluate the edible quality of chilled pork. A total of 42 samples were packed in seal plastic bags and stored at 4°C for 1 to 21 days. Reflectance spectra were collected from visible/near-infrared spectroscopy system in the range of 400nm to 1100nm. Microbiological, physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable counts (TVC), total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters L* were determined to appraise pork edible quality. Savitzky-Golay (SG) based on five and eleven smoothing points, Multiple Scattering Correlation (MSC) and first derivative pre-processing methods were employed to eliminate the spectra noise. The support vector machines (SVM) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were applied to establish prediction models using the de-noised spectra. A linear correlation was developed between the VIS/NIR spectroscopy and parameters such as TVC, TVB-N, pH and color parameter L* indexes, which could gain prediction results with Rv of 0.931, 0.844, 0.805 and 0.852, respectively. The results demonstrated that VIS/NIR spectroscopy technique combined with SVM possesses a powerful assessment capability. It can provide a potential tool for detecting pork edible quality rapidly and non-destructively.

  12. Non-destructive on-chip cell sorting system with real-time microscopic image processing.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Hattori, Akihiro; Suzuki, Ikurou; Ichiki, Takanori; Yasuda, Kenji

    2004-06-03

    Studying cell functions for cellomics studies often requires the use of purified individual cells from mixtures of various kinds of cells. We have developed a new non-destructive on-chip cell sorting system for single cell based cultivation, by exploiting the advantage of microfluidics and electrostatic force. The system consists of the following two parts: a cell sorting chip made of poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on a 0.2-mm-thick glass slide, and an image analysis system with a phase-contrast/fluorescence microscope. The unique features of our system include (i) identification of a target from sample cells is achieved by comparison of the 0.2-microm-resolution phase-contrast and fluorescence images of cells in the microchannel every 1/30 s; (ii) non-destructive sorting of target cells in a laminar flow by application of electrostatic repulsion force for removing unrequited cells from the one laminar flow to the other; (iii) the use of agar gel for electrodes in order to minimize the effect on cells by electrochemical reactions of electrodes, and (iv) pre-filter, which was fabricated within the channel for removal of dust contained in a sample solution from tissue extracts. The sorting chip is capable of continuous operation and we have purified more than ten thousand cells for cultivation without damaging them. Our design has proved to be very efficient and suitable for the routine use in cell purification experiments.

  13. Non destructive examination of UN / U-Si fuel pellets using neutrons (preliminary assessment)

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, Mark Andrew; Vogel, Sven C.; Voit, Stewart Lancaster; Mcclellan, Kenneth James; Losko, Adrian S.; Tremsin, Anton

    2016-03-31

    Tomographic imaging and diffraction measurements were performed on nine pellets; four UN/ U Si composite formulations (two enrichment levels), three pure U3Si5 reference formulations (two enrichment levels) and two reject pellets with visible flaws (to qualify the technique). The U-235 enrichments ranged from 0.2 to 8.8 wt.%. The nitride/silicide composites are candidate compositions for use as Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF). The monophase U3Si5 material was included as a reference. Pellets from the same fabrication batches will be inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho during 2016. The goal of the Advanced Non-destructive Fuel Examination work package is the development and application of non-destructive neutron imaging and scattering techniques to ceramic and metallic nuclear fuels. Data reported in this report were collected in the LANSCE run cycle that started in September 2015 and ended in March 2016. Data analysis is ongoing; thus, this report provides a preliminary review of the measurements and provides an overview of the characterized samples.

  14. Study of concrete drilling for automated non-destructive evaluation and rehabilitation system for bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trkov, Mitja; Liu, Fei; Yi, Jingang; Baruh, Haim

    2011-04-01

    Robotic drilling is the basic process for the non-destructive rehabilitation (NDR) system in the Automated Non-destructive Evaluation and Rehabilitation System (ANDERS) for bridge decks. In this paper, we present a study and testing of a concrete drilling process that is used for robotic drilling process for bridge decks repair. We first review the ANDERS and NDR design. Then we present the experimental setup for the drilling process study. A set of testing experiments are performed considering drilling process parameters such as drill bit size, drill rotating speed, drill thrust force and types of concrete composites. Based on the experiments and analysis, we identify and find that the optimal set of drilling process parameters for the ANDERS application is 1/4-inch bit size, drill rotational speed of 1500 rpm and thrust force around 35 lbs. We also demonstrate that the monitoring of drill feeding displacement and thrust force cannot be used to detect and identify the cracks in bridge decks.

  15. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  16. Non-destructive sampling of rock-dwelling microbial communities using sterile adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Building stone provides a habitat for an array of microorganisms, many of which have been demonstrated to have a deleterious effect on the appearance and/or structural integrity of stone masonry. It is essential to understand the composition and structure of stone-dwelling (lithobiontic) microbial communities if successful stone conservation strategies are to be applied, particularly in the face of global environmental change. Ideally, the techniques used to sample such assemblages should be non-destructive due to the sensitive conservation status of many stone buildings. This paper quantitatively assesses the performance of sterile adhesive tape as a non-destructive sampling technique and compares the results of tape sampling with an alternative, destructive, sampling method. We used DNA fingerprinting (TRFLP) to characterise the algal, fungal and bacterial communities living on a stone slab. Our results demonstrate that tape sampling may be used to collect viable quantities of microbial DNA from environmental samples. This technique is ideally suited to the sampling of microbial biofilms, particularly when these communities are dominated by green algae. It provides a good approximation of total community diversity (i.e. the aggregate diversity of epilithic and endolithic communities). Tape sampling is straightforward, rapid and cost effective. When combined with molecular analytical techniques, this sampling method has the potential to make a major contribution to efforts to understand the structure of lithobiontic microbial communities and our ability to predict the response of such communities to future environmental change.

  17. Non-destructive forensic latent fingerprint acquisition with chromatic white light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leich, Marcus; Kiltz, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2011-02-01

    Non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition is an emerging field of research, which, unlike traditional methods, makes latent fingerprints available for additional verification or further analysis like tests for substance abuse or age estimation. In this paper a series of tests is performed to investigate the overall suitability of a high resolution off-the-shelf chromatic white light sensor for the contact-less and non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition. Our paper focuses on scanning previously determined regions with exemplary acquisition parameter settings. 3D height field and reflection data of five different latent fingerprints on six different types of surfaces (HDD platter, brushed metal, painted car body (metallic and non-metallic finish), blued metal, veneered plywood) are experimentally studied. Pre-processing is performed by removing low-frequency gradients. The quality of the results is assessed subjectively; no automated feature extraction is performed. Additionally, the degradation of the fingerprint during the acquisition period is observed. While the quality of the acquired data is highly dependent on surface structure, the sensor is capable of detecting the fingerprint on all sample surfaces. On blued metal the residual material is detected; however, the ridge line structure dissolves within minutes after fingerprint placement.

  18. Non-destructive measurement of soil liquefaction density change by crosshole radar tomography, Treasure Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ashford, Scott; Rollins, Kyle

    2000-01-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) experiment at the Treasure Island Test Site [TILT] was performed to non-destructively image the soil column for changes in density prior to, and following, a liquefaction event. The intervening liquefaction was achieved by controlled blasting. A geotechnical borehole radar technique was used to acquire high-resolution 2-D radar velocity data. This method of non-destructive site characterization uses radar trans-illumination surveys through the soil column and tomographic data manipulation techniques to construct radar velocity tomograms, from which averaged void ratios can be derived at 0.25 - 0.5m pixel footprints. Tomograms of void ratio were constructed through the relation between soil porosity and dielectric constant. Both pre- and post-blast tomograms were collected and indicate that liquefaction related densification occurred at the site. Volumetric strains estimated from the tomograms correlate well with the observed settlement at the site. The 2-D imagery of void ratio can serve as high-resolution data layers for numerical site response analysis.

  19. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering.

  20. Early non-destructive biofouling detection and spatial distribution: Application of oxygen sensing optodes.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N M; Staal, M; Siddiqui, A; Borisov, S M; Bucs, Sz S; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2015-10-15

    Biofouling is a serious problem in reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) applications, reducing membrane performance. Early detection of biofouling plays an essential role in an adequate anti-biofouling strategy. Presently, fouling of membrane filtration systems is mainly determined by measuring changes in pressure drop, which is not exclusively linked to biofouling. Non-destructive imaging of oxygen concentrations (i) is specific for biological activity of biofilms and (ii) may enable earlier detection of biofilm accumulation than pressure drop. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar O2 optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for early non-destructive biofouling detection. This biofouling detection is done by mapping the two-dimensional distribution of O2 concentrations and O2 decrease rates inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS). Results show that at an early stage, biofouling development was detected by the oxygen sensing optodes while no significant increase in pressure drop was yet observed. Additionally, optodes could detect spatial heterogeneities in biofouling distribution at a micro scale. Biofilm development started mainly at the feed spacer crossings. The spatial and quantitative information on biological activity will lead to better understanding of the biofouling processes, contributing to the development of more effective biofouling control strategies.

  1. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained.

  2. Non-destructive detection of pesticide residues in cucumber using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Bahareh; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Jamshidi, Jamshid; Minaei, Saeid; Sharifi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy was assessed for non-destructive detection of diazinon residues in intact cucumbers. Vis/NIR spectra of diazinon solution and cucumber samples without and with different concentrations of diazinon residue were analysed at the range of 450-1000 nm. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models were developed based on different spectral pre-processing techniques to classify cucumbers with contents of diazinon below and above the MRL as safe and unsafe samples, respectively. The best model was obtained using a first-derivative method with the lowest standard error of cross-validation (SECV = 0.366). Moreover, total percentages of correctly classified samples in calibration and prediction sets were 97.5% and 92.31%, respectively. It was concluded that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be an appropriate, fast and non-destructive technology for safety control of intact cucumbers by the absence/presence of diazinon residues.

  3. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  4. Processes for non-destructive transfer of graphene: widening the bottleneck for industrial scale production.

    PubMed

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V; Lipomi, Darren J

    2015-06-14

    The exceptional charge-transport, mechanical, and barrier properties of graphene are well known. High-quality films of single-layer graphene produced over large areas, however, are extremely expensive. The high cost of graphene precludes its use in industries-such as transparent electrodes and flexible packaging-that might take full advantage of its properties. This minireview presents several strategies for the transfer of graphene from the substrates used for growth to substrates used for the final application. Each strategy shares the characteristic of being non-destructive: that is, the growth substrate remains reusable for further synthesis of new graphene. These processes have the potential to lower significantly the costs of manufacturing graphene, to increase production yields, and to minimize environmental impact. This article is divided into sections on (i) the synthesis of high-quality single-layer graphene and (ii) its non-destructive transfer to a host substrate. Section (ii) is further divided according to the substrate from which graphene is transferred: single-crystalline wafers or flexible copper foils. We also comment, wherever possible, on defects produced as a result of the transfer, and potential strategies to mitigate these defects. We conclude that several methods for the green synthesis and transfer of graphene have several of the right characteristics to be useful in industrial scale production.

  5. A Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Method for Non-Destructive Detection of Gelatin-Encapsulated Powders.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Qin, Jianwei; Peng, Yankun; Schmidt, Walter F; Kim, Moon S; Chan, Diane E

    2017-03-18

    Non-destructive subsurface detection of encapsulated, coated, or seal-packaged foods and pharmaceuticals can help prevent distribution and consumption of counterfeit or hazardous products. This study used a Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) method to detect and identify urea, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen powders contained within one or more (up to eight) layers of gelatin capsules to demonstrate subsurface chemical detection and identification. A 785-nm point-scan Raman spectroscopy system was used to acquire spatially offset Raman spectra for an offset range of 0 to 10 mm from the surfaces of 24 encapsulated samples, using a step size of 0.1 mm to obtain 101 spectral measurements per sample. As the offset distance was increased, the spectral contribution from the subsurface powder gradually outweighed that of the surface capsule layers, allowing for detection of the encapsulated powders. Containing mixed contributions from the powder and capsule, the SORS spectra for each sample were resolved into pure component spectra using self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA) and the corresponding components were identified using spectral information divergence values. As demonstrated here for detecting chemicals contained inside thick capsule layers, this SORS measurement technique coupled with SMA has the potential to be a reliable non-destructive method for subsurface inspection and authentication of foods, health supplements, and pharmaceutical products that are prepared or packaged with semi-transparent materials.

  6. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  7. Non-destructive inspection in industrial equipment using robotic mobile manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurtua, Iñaki; Susperregi, Loreto; Ansuategui, Ander; Fernández, Ane; Ibarguren, Aitor; Molina, Jorge; Tubio, Carlos; Villasante, Cristobal; Felsch, Torsten; Pérez, Carmen; Rodriguez, Jorge R.; Ghrissi, Meftah

    2016-05-01

    MAINBOT project has developed service robots based applications to autonomously execute inspection tasks in extensive industrial plants in equipment that is arranged horizontally (using ground robots) or vertically (climbing robots). The industrial objective has been to provide a means to help measuring several physical parameters in multiple points by autonomous robots, able to navigate and climb structures, handling non-destructive testing sensors. MAINBOT has validated the solutions in two solar thermal plants (cylindrical-parabolic collectors and central tower), that are very demanding from mobile manipulation point of view mainly due to the extension (e.g. a thermal solar plant of 50Mw, with 400 hectares, 400.000 mirrors, 180 km of absorber tubes, 140m height tower), the variability of conditions (outdoor, day-night), safety requirements, etc. Once the technology was validated in simulation, the system was deployed in real setups and different validation tests carried out. In this paper two of the achievements related with the ground mobile inspection system are presented: (1) Autonomous navigation localization and planning algorithms to manage navigation in huge extensions and (2) Non-Destructive Inspection operations: thermography based detection algorithms to provide automatic inspection abilities to the robots.

  8. NON-DESTRUCTIVE THERMAL BARRIER COATING SPALLATION PREDICTION BY A LOADBASED MICRO-INDENTATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; K. Lee; B. S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-11-18

    Currently, the durability and life cycle of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) applied to gas turbine blades and combustor components are limiting the maximum temperature and subsequent efficiency at which gas turbine engines operate. The development of new materials, coating technologies and evaluation techniques is required if enhanced efficiency is to be achieved. Of the current ceramic coating materials used in gas turbine engines, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is most prevalent, its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion coefficient and outstanding mechanical strength make it ideal for use in TBC systems. However, residual stresses caused by coefficients of thermal expansion mismatches within the TBC system and unstable thermally grown oxides are considered the primary causes for its premature and erratic spallation failure. Through finite element simulations, it is shown that the residual stresses generated within the thermally grown oxide (TGO), bond coat (BC), YSZ and their interfaces create slight variations in indentation unloading surface stiffness response prior to spallation failure. In this research, seven air plasma sprayed and one electron beam physical vapor deposition yttria partially stabilized zirconia TBCs were subjected to isothermal and cyclic loadings at 1100°C. The associated coating degradation was evaluated using a non-destructive multiple partial unloading micro-indentation procedure. The results show that the proposed non-destructive micro-indentation evaluation technique can be an effective and specimenindependent TBC failure prediction tool capable of determining the location of initial spallation failure prior to its actual occurrence.

  9. A Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Method for Non-Destructive Detection of Gelatin-Encapsulated Powders

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Qin, Jianwei; Peng, Yankun; Schmidt, Walter F.; Kim, Moon S.; Chan, Diane E.

    2017-01-01

    Non-destructive subsurface detection of encapsulated, coated, or seal-packaged foods and pharmaceuticals can help prevent distribution and consumption of counterfeit or hazardous products. This study used a Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) method to detect and identify urea, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen powders contained within one or more (up to eight) layers of gelatin capsules to demonstrate subsurface chemical detection and identification. A 785-nm point-scan Raman spectroscopy system was used to acquire spatially offset Raman spectra for an offset range of 0 to 10 mm from the surfaces of 24 encapsulated samples, using a step size of 0.1 mm to obtain 101 spectral measurements per sample. As the offset distance was increased, the spectral contribution from the subsurface powder gradually outweighed that of the surface capsule layers, allowing for detection of the encapsulated powders. Containing mixed contributions from the powder and capsule, the SORS spectra for each sample were resolved into pure component spectra using self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA) and the corresponding components were identified using spectral information divergence values. As demonstrated here for detecting chemicals contained inside thick capsule layers, this SORS measurement technique coupled with SMA has the potential to be a reliable non-destructive method for subsurface inspection and authentication of foods, health supplements, and pharmaceutical products that are prepared or packaged with semi-transparent materials. PMID:28335453

  10. Non-destructive 3D shape measurement of transparent and black objects with thermal fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Anika; Rößler, Conrad; Dietrich, Patrick; Heist, Stefan; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    Fringe projection is a well-established optical method for the non-destructive contactless three-dimensional (3D) measurement of object surfaces. Typically, fringe sequences in the visible wavelength range (VIS) are projected onto the surfaces of objects to be measured and are observed by two cameras in a stereo vision setup. The reconstruction is done by finding corresponding pixels in both cameras followed by triangulation. Problems can occur if the properties of some materials disturb the measurements. If the objects are transparent, translucent, reflective, or strongly absorbing in the VIS range, the projected patterns cannot be recorded properly. To overcome these challenges, we present a new alternative approach in the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. For this purpose, two long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras (7.5 - 13 μm) are used to detect the emitted heat radiation from surfaces which is induced by a pattern projection unit driven by a CO2 laser (10.6 μm). Thus, materials like glass or black objects, e.g. carbon fiber materials, can be measured non-destructively without the need of any additional paintings. We will demonstrate the basic principles of this heat pattern approach and show two types of 3D systems based on a freeform mirror and a GOBO wheel (GOes Before Optics) projector unit.

  11. A Distributive, Non-Destructive, Real-Time Approach to Snowpack Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolik, Jeff; Skalka, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This invention is designed to ascertain the snow water equivalence (SWE) of snowpacks with better spatial and temporal resolutions than present techniques. The approach is ground-based, as opposed to some techniques that are air-based. In addition, the approach is compact, non-destructive, and can be communicated with remotely, and thus can be deployed in areas not possible with current methods. Presently there are two principal ground-based techniques for obtaining SWE measurements. The first is manual snow core measurements of the snowpack. This approach is labor-intensive, destructive, and has poor temporal resolution. The second approach is to deploy a large (e.g., 3x3 m) snowpillow, which requires significant infrastructure, is potentially hazardous [uses a approximately equal to 200-gallon (approximately equal to 760-L) antifreeze-filled bladder], and requires deployment in a large, flat area. High deployment costs necessitate few installations, thus yielding poor spatial resolution of data. Both approaches have limited usefulness in complex and/or avalanche-prone terrains. This approach is compact, non-destructive to the snowpack, provides high temporal resolution data, and due to potential low cost, can be deployed with high spatial resolution. The invention consists of three primary components: a robust wireless network and computing platform designed for harsh climates, new SWE sensing strategies, and algorithms for smart sampling, data logging, and SWE computation.

  12. Non-destructive analysis for the investigation of decomposition phenomena of historical manuscripts and prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Werner; Staub, Susanne; Simon, Rolf; Heissler, Stefan; Pataki, Andrea; Banik, Gerhard

    2007-07-01

    As a contribution to the increasing efforts to preserve cultural heritage, historical books as well as illuminated manuscripts endangered by corrosive writing and printing materials or destructive coloring matters, non-destructive analytical methods are highly desirable enabling an in-situ examination of the surface status of an object. The development and application of a novel combination of non-destructive analytic methods based on (a) synchrotron radiation induced micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) and (b) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscope allows to investigate the state as well as the effectiveness of conservation procedures for historical manuscripts. Examples of measurements include (1) an iron gall ink manuscript of a historical memo on legal land description of the year 1769, (2) an original hand colored herbal of the years 1536/38 from the Senckenbergische Bibliothek, Frankfurt, and (3) the incunabula Johannes von Saaz: "Der Ackermann aus Boehmen" fated from 1463 and printed by Albrecht Pfister, Bamberg, owned by the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbuettel.

  13. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, B. L.; Vanderstelt, J.; O'Meara, J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  14. Are those bugs reflective? Non-destructive biofilm imaging with white light interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Larimer, Curtis J.; Brann, Michelle R.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bonheyo, George T.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-08-28

    White light interferometry (WLI) is not typically used to image bacterial biofilms that are immersed in water because there is insufficient refractive index contrast to induce reflection from the biofilm’s interface. The soft structure and water-like bulk properties of hydrated biofilms make them difficult to characterize in situ by any means, especially in a non-destructive manner. Here we describe a new method for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using a WLI microscope. A microfluidic system was used to create a reflective interface on the surface of biofilms. Live biofilm samples were monitored non-destructively over time. The method enables surface metrology measurements (roughness, surface area) and a novel approach to measuring thickness of the thin hydrated biofilms. Increase in surface roughness preceded observable increase in biofilm thickness, indicating that this measure may be used to predict future development of biofilms. We have also developed a flow cell that enables WLI biofilm imaging in a dynamic environment. We have used this flow cell to observe changes in biofilm structure in response to changes in environmental conditions - flow velocity, availability of nutrients, and presence of biocides.

  15. Non-destructive Magnetic Evaluation of Laser Weld Quality in Hot Rolled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, J. N.; Chakradhar, I.; Rao, K. R. C.; Rao, V. V. L.; Kaza, Marutiram

    2015-06-01

    Weld quality evaluation was conducted on laser welded thin sectsions (2 mm) of hot-rolled (HR) low-carbon steel coils during cold rolling process. The analysis revealed that the poor welds consisting of the weld defects like incomplete fusion, cluster of porosity, and large difference in hardness between the weld zone and base metal were responsible for the weld failures. Experiments were conducted by varying the welding parameters; laser power and welding speed to optimize the parameters for minimizing the weld defects. The optimized weld process parameters have helped elimination of weld defects and the results are verified with microscopy and microhardness measurements. As destructive evaluation techniques are time consuming and not always permitted in industrial applications, attempts have been made in the present investigation for the utilization of suitable non-destructive techniques for the evaluation of weld quality. Non-destructive magnetic techniques of magnetic hysteresis loop and magnetic Barkhausen emissions were used in the present investigation to establish possible correlations of magnetic properties across the weld seam with the mechanical property (microhardness) for evaluation of weld quality. It is inferred that the magnetic properties of coercivity and inverse of root mean square voltage can be effectively utilized to determine weld quality in HR steel coils.

  16. Non-destructive dielectric assessment of water permeation in composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Boinard, P.; Boinard, E.; Pethrick, R.A.; Banks, W.M.; Crane, R.L.

    2000-07-01

    Over the last ten years, the application of high frequency dielectric spectroscopy techniques for the assessment of composite structures has been investigated. Novel approaches to assess non-destructively the evolution during ageing of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures and bulk glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) structures are presented in this paper and the results are critically assessed. The applicability and limitations of dielectric measurements, in both frequency and time domain, to the monitoring of water ingress at 30 C and 60 C are examined. The correlation between gravimetric and high frequency dielectric spectroscopy data demonstrates the suitability of the techniques regarding the assessment of water uptake in composites structures and illustrates its potential as a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique. The dielectric time domain response (TDR) study of adhesively bonded structures indicates a new way to assess such structures. The approach for frequency domain analysis of bulk GRP using a coaxial probe technique indicates the potential portability of the technique for in-situ measurements.

  17. Are those bugs reflective? non-destructive biofilm imaging with white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimer, Curtis; Brann, Michelle; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bonheyo, George; Addleman, R. Shane

    2016-08-01

    White light interferometry (WLI) is not typically used to image bacterial biofilms that are immersed in water because there is insufficient refractive index contrast to induce reflection from the biofilm's interface. The soft structure and water-like bulk properties of hydrated biofilms make them difficult to characterize in situ by any means, especially in a non-destructive manner. Here we describe a new method for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using a WLI microscope. A microfluidic system was used to create a reflective interface on the surface of biofilms. Live biofilm samples were monitored non-destructively over time. The method enables surface metrology measurements (roughness, surface area) and a novel approach to measuring thickness of the thin hydrated biofilms. Increase in surface roughness preceded observable increase in biofilm thickness, indicating that this measure may be used to predict future development of biofilms. We have also developed a flow cell that enables WLI biofilm imaging in a dynamic environment. We have used this flow cell to observe changes in biofilm structure in response to changes in environmental conditions - flow velocity, availability of nutrients, and presence of biocides.

  18. Neural network and principal component regression in non-destructive soluble solids content assessment: a comparison*

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Kim-seng; Abdul Rahim, Herlina; Abdul Rahim, Ruzairi

    2012-01-01

    Visible and near infrared spectroscopy is a non-destructive, green, and rapid technology that can be utilized to estimate the components of interest without conditioning it, as compared with classical analytical methods. The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of artificial neural network (ANN) (a nonlinear model) and principal component regression (PCR) (a linear model) based on visible and shortwave near infrared (VIS-SWNIR) (400–1000 nm) spectra in the non-destructive soluble solids content measurement of an apple. First, we used multiplicative scattering correction to pre-process the spectral data. Second, PCR was applied to estimate the optimal number of input variables. Third, the input variables with an optimal amount were used as the inputs of both multiple linear regression and ANN models. The initial weights and the number of hidden neurons were adjusted to optimize the performance of ANN. Findings suggest that the predictive performance of ANN with two hidden neurons outperforms that of PCR. PMID:22302428

  19. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Grain Structure Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Belvin, A. D.; Burrell, R. K.; Cole, E.G.

    2009-08-01

    Cast material has a grain structure that is relatively non-uniform. There is a desire to evaluate the grain structure of this material non-destructively. Traditionally, grain size measurement is a destructive process involving the sectioning and metallographic imaging of the material. Generally, this is performed on a representative sample on a periodic basis. Sampling is inefficient and costly. Furthermore, the resulting data may not provide an accurate description of the entire part's average grain size or grain size variation. This project is designed to develop a non-destructive acoustic scanning technique, using Chirp waveforms, to quantify average grain size and grain size variation across the surface of a cast material. A Chirp is a signal in which the frequency increases or decreases over time (frequency modulation). As a Chirp passes through a material, the material's grains reduce the signal (attenuation) by absorbing the signal energy. Geophysics research has shown a direct correlation with Chirp wave attenuation and mean grain size in geological structures. The goal of this project is to demonstrate that Chirp waveform attenuation can be used to measure grain size and grain variation in cast metals (uranium and other materials of interest). An off-axis ultrasonic inspection technique using air-coupled ultrasonics has been developed to determine grain size in cast materials. The technique gives a uniform response across the volume of the component. This technique has been demonstrated to provide generalized trends of grain variation over the samples investigated.

  20. Non-destructive infrared analyses: a method for provenance analyses of sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowitz, Jörg; Ehling, Angela

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy) is commonly applied in the laboratory for mineral analyses in addition to XRD. Because such technical efforts are time and cost consuming, we present an infrared-based mobile method for non-destructive mineral and provenance analyses of sandstones. IR spectroscopy is based on activating chemical bonds. By irradiating a mineral mixture, special bonds are activated to vibrate depending on the bond energy (resonance vibration). Accordingly, the energy of the IR spectrum will be reduced thereby generating an absorption spectrum. The positions of the absorption maxima within the spectral region indicate the type of the bonds and in many cases identify minerals containing these bonds. The non-destructive reflection spectroscopy operates in the near infrared region (NIR) and can detect all common clay minerals as well as sulfates, hydroxides and carbonates. The spectra produced have been interpreted by computer using digital mineral libraries that have been especially collected for sandstones. The comparison of all results with XRD, RFA and interpretations of thin sections demonstrates impressively the accuracy and reliability of this method. Not only are different minerals detectable, but also differently ordered kaolinites and varieties of illites can be identified by the shape and size of the absorption bands. Especially clay minerals and their varieties in combination with their relative contents form the characteristic spectra of sandstones. Other components such as limonite, hematite and amorphous silica also influence the spectra. Sandstones, similar in colour and texture, often can be identified by their characteristic reflectance spectra. Reference libraries with more than 60 spectra of important German sandstones have been created to enable entirely computerized interpretations and identifications of these dimension stones. The analysis of infrared spectroscopy results is demonstrated with examples of different sandstones

  1. Correlation-based imaging technique using ultrasonic transmit-receive array for Non-Destructive Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Quaegebeur, Nicolas; Masson, Patrice

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes a novel array post-processing method for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) using phased-array ultrasonic probes. The approach uses the capture and processing of the full matrix of all transmit-receive time-domain signals from a transducer array as in the case of the Total Focusing Method (TFM), referred as the standard of imaging algorithms. The proposed technique is based on correlation of measured signals with theoretical propagated signals computed over a given grid of points. In that case, real-time imaging can be simply implemented using discrete signal product. The advantage of the present technique is to take into account transducer directivity, dynamics and complex propagation patterns, such that the number of required array elements for a given imaging performance can be greatly reduced. Numerical and experimental application to contact inspection of isotropic structure is presented and real-time implementation issues are discussed.

  2. MCNP ESTIMATE OF THE SAMPLED VOLUME IN A NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; DIOSZEGI, I.; MITRA, S.

    2004-05-03

    Global warming, promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission into the atmosphere, is partially mitigated by the photosynthesis processes of the terrestrial echo systems that act as atmospheric CO{sub 2} scrubbers and sequester carbon in soil. Switching from till to no till soils management practices in agriculture further augments this process. Carbon sequestration is also advanced by putting forward a carbon ''credit'' system whereby these can be traded between CO{sub 2} producers and sequesters. Implementation of carbon ''credit'' trade will be further promulgated by recent development of a non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring system based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Volumes and depth distributions defined by the 0.1, 1.0, 10, 50, and 90 percent neutron isofluxes, from a point source located at either 5 or 30 cm above the surface, were estimated using Monte Carlo calculations.

  3. Non-destructive electron microscopy imaging and analysis of biological samples with graphene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Seong-Min; Yoo, Je Min; Kim, Youngsoo; Gorbachev, Roman; Barbolina, I. I.; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Sangmin; Yoon, Myung-Han; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Hong, Byung Hee

    2016-12-01

    In electron microscopy (EM), charging of non-conductive biological samples by focused electron beams hinders their high-resolution imaging. Gold or platinum coatings have been commonly used to prevent such sample charging, but it disables further quantitative and qualitative chemical analyses such as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Here we report that graphene-coating on biological samples enables non-destructive high-resolution imaging by EM as well as chemical analysis by EDS, utilizing graphene’s transparency to electron beams, high conductivity, outstanding mechanical strength and flexibility. We believe that the graphene-coated imaging and analysis would provide us a new opportunity to explore various biological phenomena unseen before due to the limitation in sample preparation and image resolution, which will broaden our understanding on the life mechanism of various living organisms.

  4. A modified positron lifetime spectrometer as method of non-destructive testing in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Shi, J. J.; Jiang, J.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Wu, Y. C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to develop a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and defect's chemical environment. A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the "sandwich" structure of sample-source-sample in the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer. The positron lifetime spectra of one single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. The feasibility and reliability of the positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation damage caused by mechanical treatment in metals and steels. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples without cutting off the sample materials, as well as for detecting two-dimensional distribution of defects.

  5. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  6. A Novel Application of Non-Destructive Readout Technology to Localisation Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Samuel F. H.; Snape, Mary; Hunter, C. Neil; Juárez, Miguel A.; Cadby, Ashley J.

    2017-02-01

    The fitting precision in localisation microscopy is highly dependent on the signal to noise ratio. To increase the quality of the image it is therefore important to increase the signal to noise ratio of the measurements. We present an imaging system for localisation microscopy based on non-destructive readout camera technology that can increase the signal to noise ratio of localisation based microscopy. This approach allows for much higher frame rates through subsampling a traditional camera frame. By matching the effective exposure to both the start time and duration of a single molecule we diminish the effects of read noise and temporal noise. We demonstrate the application of this novel method to localisation microscopy and show both an increase in the attainable signal to noise ratio of data collection and an increase in the number of detected events.

  7. Portable generator-based XRF instrument for non-destructive analysis at crime scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Trombka, Jacob I.; Floyd, Samuel; Selavka, Carl; Zeosky, Gerald; Gahn, Norman; McClanahan, Timothy; Burbine, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Unattended and remote detection systems find applications in space exploration, telemedicine, teleforensics, homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation programs. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals investigate crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ, together with state and local forensic laboratories. A general-purpose X-ray fluorescence system has been built for non-destructive analyses of trace and invisible material at crime scenes. This portable instrument is based on a generator that can operate to 60 kV and a Schottky CdTe detector. The instrument has been shown to be successful for the analysis of gunshot residue and a number of bodily fluids at crime scenes.

  8. Non-destructive fraud detection in rosehip oil by MIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Santana, Felipe Bachion de; Gontijo, Lucas Caixeta; Mitsutake, Hery; Mazivila, Sarmento Júnior; Souza, Leticia Maria de; Borges Neto, Waldomiro

    2016-10-15

    Rosehip oil (Rosa eglanteria L.) is an important oil in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. However, due to its high added value, it is liable to adulteration with other cheaper or lower quality oils. With this perspective, this work provides a new simple, fast and accurate methodology using mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as a means to discriminate authentic rosehip oil from adulterated rosehip oil containing soybean, corn and sunflower oils in different proportions. The model showed excellent sensitivity and specificity with 100% correct classification. Therefore, the developed methodology is a viable alternative for use in the laboratory and industry for standard quality analysis of rosehip oil since it is fast, accurate and non-destructive.

  9. A Novel Application of Non-Destructive Readout Technology to Localisation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Samuel F. H.; Snape, Mary; Hunter, C. Neil; Juárez, Miguel A.; Cadby, Ashley J.

    2017-01-01

    The fitting precision in localisation microscopy is highly dependent on the signal to noise ratio. To increase the quality of the image it is therefore important to increase the signal to noise ratio of the measurements. We present an imaging system for localisation microscopy based on non-destructive readout camera technology that can increase the signal to noise ratio of localisation based microscopy. This approach allows for much higher frame rates through subsampling a traditional camera frame. By matching the effective exposure to both the start time and duration of a single molecule we diminish the effects of read noise and temporal noise. We demonstrate the application of this novel method to localisation microscopy and show both an increase in the attainable signal to noise ratio of data collection and an increase in the number of detected events. PMID:28195127

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: PRINCIPLE AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; MITRA, S.; HENDREY, G.; ROGERS, H.; TORBERT, A.; PRIOR, S.

    2003-05-05

    Global warming is promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, while at the same time it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems. However, improvement in the understanding and monitoring of below ground carbon processes is essential for evaluating strategies for carbon sequestration including quantification of carbon stores for credits. A system for non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring in soil, based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS), is described. The system can be operated in stationary or scanning mode and measures soil to depth of approximately 30 cm. There is a good agreement between results obtained from INS and standard chemical analysis of soil cores collected from the same study site.

  11. Rapid, non-destructive evaluation of ultrathin WSe{sub 2} using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hossain, Lorraine; Eichfeld, Chad M.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) in electronic and optoelectronic devices depends on the ability to understand and control the process-property relationship during synthesis. We demonstrate that spectroscopic ellipsometry is an excellent technique for accurate, non-destructive determination of ultra-thin (<30 nm) WSe{sub 2} properties. The refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k) were found to be independent of thickness down to 1.3 nm, and were used to determine film thickness, which was confirmed to be within 9% of values found via atomic force microscopy. Finally, the optical bandgap was found to closely correlate with thickness, ranging from 1.2 to 1.55 eV as the WSe{sub 2} is thinned to the equivalent of 2 atomic layers.

  12. A robust approach to optimal matched filter design in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minghui; Hayward, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    The matched filter was demonstrated to be a powerful yet efficient technique to enhance defect detection and imaging in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of coarse grain materials, provided that the filter was properly designed and optimized. In the literature, in order to accurately approximate the defect echoes, the design utilized the real excitation signals, which made it time consuming and less straightforward to implement in practice. In this paper, we present a more robust and flexible approach to optimal matched filter design using the simulated excitation signals, and the control parameters are chosen and optimized based on the real scenario of array transducer, transmitter-receiver system response, and the test sample, as a result, the filter response is optimized and depends on the material characteristics. Experiments on industrial samples are conducted and the results confirm the great benefits of the method.

  13. PREDICTION OF DISSOLVER LIFETIMES THROUGH NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND LABORATORY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Woodsmall, T.; Hinz, W.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-03

    Non-destructive evaluation was used as the primary method of monitoring the corrosion degradation of nuclear material dissolvers and assessing the remaining lifetimes. Materials were typically processed in nitric acid based (4-14M) solutions containing fluoride concentrations less than 0.2 M. The primary corrosion issue for the stainless steel dissolvers is the occurrence of localized corrosion near the tank bottom and the heat affected zones of the welds. Laboratory data for a range of operational conditions, including solution chemistry and temperature, was used to assess the impact of processing changes on the dissolver corrosion rate. Experimental and NDE-based general corrosion rates were found to be in reasonable agreement for standard dissolution chemistries consisting of nitric acid with fluorides and at temperatures less than 95 C. Greater differences were observed when chloride was present as an impurity and temperatures exceeded 100 C.

  14. Template synthesis of test tube nanoparticles using non-destructive replication.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jonathan; Yao, Jingyuan; Rodgers, David; Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Nano test tubes are a promising delivery vehicle for a range of therapeutics, including small molecule drugs and biologics. However, current template synthesis methods of producing nano test tubes are prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Here, non-destructive template replication was used to increase nano test tube yield from porous alumina by more than a hundredfold. We demonstrate how to produce nano test tubes of several sizes and compositions, including hybrid tubes with different inner and outer surfaces for targeted surface chemistry. Nano test tubes were readily suspended and stored in aqueous solutions without the need for chemical treatment. These nano test tubes should find application as delivery vehicles for therapeutics, particularly for processive 'bionanoreactors' loaded with enzymes.

  15. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Depth of Surface Cracks Using Ultrasonic Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Sheng-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic is one of the most common uses of a non-destructive evaluation method for crack detection and characterization. The effectiveness of the acoustic-ultrasound Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for the determination of the depth of the surface crack was presented. A method for ultrasonic sizing of surface cracks combined with the time domain and frequency spectrum was adopted. The ultrasonic frequency spectrum was obtained by Fourier transform technique. A series of test specimens with various depths of surface crack ranging from 1 mm to 8 mm was fabricated. The depth of the surface crack was evaluated using the pulse-echo technique. In this work, three different longitudinal waves with frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz were employed to investigate the effect of frequency on the sizing detection of surface cracks. Reasonable accuracies were achieved with measurement errors less than 7%. PMID:25225875

  16. High-Tc planar SQUID gradiometer for eddy current non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Lang, Pei-Lin; Peng, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Ying-Fei; Chen, Ke; Zheng, Dong-Ning

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and test of a high-Tc SQUID planar gradiometer which is patterned from YBCO thin film deposited on a SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate. The measurement of noise spectrum at 77K shows that the white noise at 200 Hz is about 1×10-4Φ0/(Hz)1/2. The minimal magnetic gradient is measured and the results suggest that the minimal magnetic gradient is 94 pT/m. The planar gradiometer is used in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) experiments to detect the artifacts in conducting aluminium plates by performing eddy current testing in an unshielded environment. The effect of the exciting coil dimension on the NDE results is investigated. By mapping out the induced field distribution, flaws about 10mm below the plate surface can be clearly identified.

  17. Research on high-Tc SQUID based non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui-Wu; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Ren, Yu-Feng; Yu, Hong-Wei; Ding, Hong-Sheng; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Chen, Geng-Hua; Zhou, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Li-Hua; He, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Qian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    A non-destructive evaluation system based on high-Tc dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) incorporating a gradient field excitation has been built. By using this system a 1mm-diameter hole at a depth of 2mm inside an aluminium plate at room temperature can be easily detected and imaged in an unshielded environment. The relation between the spatial resolution, or the smallest detectable flaw size and experimental parameters is briefly analysed in terms of a simple metal ring model. The result shows that the spatial resolution depends strongly on the sensor-sample separation as well as on some other parameters, such as signal-to-noise ratio of excitation, excitation frequency and material conductivity.

  18. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  19. Barkhausen spectroscopy: Non-destructive characterization of magnetic materials as a function of depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kypris, O.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we conceptually divided a ferromagnetic specimen into layers along its depth. For each layer, we derived a non-linear integral equation that describes the attenuation with frequency and distance of magnetic Barkhausen emissions coming from that layer. We postulate that the Barkhausen spectrum measured at the surface by an induction coil can be expressed as the sum of the individual layer spectra. We show how a non-linear least squares algorithm can be used to recover the properties in individual layers. These are related to stress using an extension to the theory of ferromagnetic hysteresis. We found that the quality of the fit is influenced by the sensitivity of the ferromagnetic material to strain, as well as by the sensor-specimen coupling. The proposed method can be used for the non-destructive characterization of stress as a function of depth in magnetic materials.

  20. Model-based non-destructive investigation methods in semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilski, B.; Paz, V. Ferreras; Frenner, K.; Osten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Scatterometry is an investigation method that is gaining in importance in semiconductor industry. As an optical method it has distinct advantages that its competitor-methods do not possess: the ability for a quick and non-destructive measurement of fine features fabricated by modern generations of lithography machines. Scatterometry is very distinct from other measurement techniques also in this respect that it is a model-based method. As such it relies heavily on simulation and is essentially solving an inverse problem. In a forward optical measurement an imaging system processes the object information losing some fraction of information in the process. The measurement process in scatterometry follows the same pattern. The measurement result however is now compared against multiple simulated direct problems. The best fit between the simulation and the measurement is assumed to reconstruct the measured object.

  1. Measurements of aerospace materials and their interpretation for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Neil A.; Mason, Ian; Price, Sean; Beale, John

    2009-09-01

    Millimetre and terahertz radiation penetration into materials enables non-destructive testing capabilities for the aerospace industry, either remotely using imaging technology or locally using microscope type diagnostics. This paper presents measurements made on Norcoat and Prosial, used in the aerospace industry for thermal insulation and on carbon fibre, used for its high strength weight ratio. Michelson interferometer measurements over the band 100 GHz to 1 THz, with a 30 GHz spectral resolution, are presented, together with images of a range of samples taken using a 35 GHz real-time imaging system. The measured optical properties of these materials are examined and used in modelling to predict signatures of failure modes in these materials when they are attached to cryogenic fuel tanks.

  2. Characterization and comparison of defects detection limits of three ultrasonic non destructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronnet, E.; Eyma, F.; Welemane, H.; Pescay, C.

    2010-06-01

    This work deals with the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) process developed within the research program “FUSelage COMPosite” of DAHER SOCATA. This manufacturing process enables the realization of complex composite structures or fuselage elements in a single phase (mono-material), which considerably reduce connections and relative difficulties. The concern here is the investigation of non destructive testing (NDT) methods that can be applied to LRI-structures in order to define their capacities for defect detection, and especially their associated critical defect size. In aviation industry, the AITM standards require the ultrasonic testing as NDT for composite materials. Therefore the aim of this work is to characterize and compare three different and complementary ultrasonic techniques on composite specimens. Such analysis allows to define the NDT application field of each method in term of defect detection.

  3. Non-destructive testing of mid-IR optical fiber using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Fortin, Vincent; Vallée, Réal; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber lasers offers the advantage of being relatively compact and efficient. However, the materials such as fluoride and chalcogenide glasses used for their fabrication must be exempt of defects in order to make efficient laser systems. However, most existing quality control techniques are not compatible with chalcogenide fibers because of their limited transparency in the visible spectral range. For this reason, the Université Laval's Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL), in Quebec City, Canada, has developed a novel non-destructive testing (NDT) methodology based on infrared imaging to address this problem. The results show how this simple screening technique eases the selection of high-quality fibers for the design of high-power mid-IR lasers.

  4. Could non-destructive methodologies enhance the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in pipeline systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abbas, F.; Kakpovbia, A.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.; Spear, J.

    2013-01-01

    Stringent corrosion management programs are being deployed by oil and gas industry to ensure the integrity of pipeline systems. Parts of this program are the corrosion protection systems and inspection detection methods included non-destructive techniques. Those measures induce remnant magnetic field (RMF) in the pipeline steel. Potentially the RMF could affect the corrosion process in the pipeline including microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Microorganisms in pipelines have surface charges and produce a wide variety of metabolic products. Consequently, when they are exposed to RMF generated at the linepipe steel surface by the aforementioned sources there will be potential effects. This sequentially will increase the likelihood of biofilm formation and hence enhance/promote MIC. This study investigates the potential effects of RFM on the MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB).

  5. Contribution to the improvement of heritage mural painting non-destructive testing by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Di Pallo, Luigi; Detalle, Vincent; Vallet, Jean-Marc; Duvaut, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of heritage mural paintings by means of stimulated infrared thermography has now become rather efficient [1-14]. However, pigments, which form a pictorial layer, have contrasting radiative properties possibly leading to artifact detection. In this paper, attempts to alleviate this difficulty are presented. Based on the spectroscopic study of different paint layers, one can argue that, in the medium infrared field, this radiative disparity decreases significantly. Then, with similar settings, it can be shown that ceramic radiative sources allow reaching this wavelength band. Finally, on the basis of a study carried out on an academic sample and a partial copy of a fresco from the cathedral of Angers, combining ceramic heat sources with a laboratory SAMMTHIR experimental setup enables to make real headway in terms of defects' detection.

  6. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Robbany, Z. Handayani, G.

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  7. Design of ERL Spoke Cavity For Non-Destructive Assay Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, M.; Nagai, R.; Nishimori, N.; Hajima, R.

    2015-10-01

    We are proposing non-destructive assay system of nuclear materials with laser Compton scattering combined with an energy-recovery linac (ERL) and a laser. Since constructing accelerator system for nuclear safe guard and security requires small cavities, spoke cavities have many advantages such as shortening the distance between cavities, small frequency detune due to micro-phonics and easy adjustment of field distribution for strong cell coupling. Calculations of optimized cavity shape and HOM coupler shape have been performed and rf properties with aluminum spoke cavity model have been also measured. Considering refrigerator system required for superconducting accelerator, we are planning to develop 325MHz spoke cavity which can be practically operated with 4K liquid helium. We have started to fabricate the niobium one-spoke cavity.

  8. Non-destructive testing of mid-IR optical fiber using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Fortin, Vincent; Vallée, Réal; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2016-05-01

    Optical fiber lasers offers the advantage of being relatively compact and efficient. However, the materials such as fluoride and chalcogenide glasses used for their fabrication must be exempt of defects in order to make efficient laser systems. However, most existing quality control techniques are not compatible with chalcogenide fibers because of their limited transparency in the visible spectral range. For this reason, the Université Laval's Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL), in Quebec City, Canada, has developed a novel non-destructive testing (NDT) methodology based on infrared imaging to address this problem. The results show how this simple screening technique eases the selection of high-quality fibers for the design of high-power mid-IR lasers.

  9. Main geophysical techniques used for non-destructive evaluation in cultural built heritage: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinho, E.; Dionísio, A.

    2014-10-01

    Geophysical methodologies have been implemented, tested and validated as diagnostic and /or monitoring tools in artworks or historical monuments. They are non-destructive and can give an image of internal structure of investigated medium. This paper is a review about the main geophysical techniques applied to the study of cultural built heritage (excluding the archaeology field). A brief description of the used methodologies is presented, the main investigations done in this field are showed, the method or methods most appropriate to answer each problem (moisture detection, characterization of the materials, study of the structural continuity of the material, assessment of intervention’s effectiveness) are indicated and the main advances and gaps and future developments are also pointed out.

  10. Prediction of Service Life of Cordierite-Mullite Refractory Materials by Non-Destructive Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Kamseu, Elie; Cannio, M.; Romagnoli, M.; Veronesi, P.; Leonelli, C.; Volkov-Husoviae, T. D.; Dlouhy, I.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2008-02-15

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity testing was used to perform non-destructive quality control of refractory plates used as substrates in fast firing of porcelain whitewares. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity was used to asses the presence of internal voids or cracks originated from the manufacturing procedure. Image analysis was used to predict thermal stability of the refractory materials. Two cordierite-mullite compositions were investigated that are characterized by different microstructure morphologies and crack propagation behaviour. A brief discussion about the correlation between microstructure, crack propagation behaviour and thermal shock resistance is presented. Moreover, empirical models were developed to predict the service life of refractory plates from measured values of ultrasonic velocities in plates in the as-received state.

  11. Gigahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging for non-destructive materials research and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S.; Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Furuya, Takashi; Tani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    By using optical sampling with repetition frequency modulation of pump/probe laser pulses on photoconductive emitter/detector antennas, the high-speed time/frequency domain gigahertz imaging is reported due to the absence of opto-mechanical delay line in this optical scheme. The clear contrast for a 3-cm wide metal plate, which was placed behind a 5-cm thick concrete block, was observed with a 1 × 1 mm image pixilation. On average, it took only ~0.75 s per pixel/waveform acquisition/assignment with a 675 ps time-domain window. This could become a valuable non-destructive evaluation technique in gigahertz spectral range with all benefits of time-domain spectroscopy. PMID:27302877

  12. Non-destructive assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure by fluorimetric analysis of crab urine.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Savage, Candida; Kim, Jonathan P

    2008-12-01

    The detection of urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites by fluorescence spectrophotometry is particularly effective as a practical means to assess PAH exposure in decapod crabs. However, the practical application of this technique has thus far only been tested for the European shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and only a few field studies have been conducted in heavily polluted areas. The present study evaluated the adaptability of this method as a rapid, cost-effective and non-destructive biomonitoring tool for the New Zealand crab species, Macrophthalmus hirtipes (stalk-eyed mud crab). A field gradient could be detected among the sites and different input sources of PAH contamination could be discerned through the differentiation of pyrogenic and petrogenic PAH signatures. The present study shows that the fluorescence screening method is sensitive to relatively low levels of PAH contamination and more broadly applicable to smaller crab species than C. maenas, for which the technique was developed.

  13. The Versatile Magic Square.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Gale A.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrates the transformations that are possible to construct a variety of magic squares, including modifications to challenge students from elementary grades through algebra. Presents an example of using magic squares with students who have special needs. (YDS)

  14. Portable 1,5 MeV X-Band Linac For Non-destructive Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saversky, A. J.; Rodionov, A. E.; Shaltyrev, A. P.; Shchedrin, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Portable linear electron accelerator Y-34 developed in Small Accelerator Laboratory of MEPhI for non-destructive industrial radiography. This Linac is a fully self-contained device with the exception of external electric power 220Vx50Gz, 1 phase, 5 kVA. Full mass of Linac Y-34 - less than 300 kg. The Radiographic parameters: Nominal Energy - 1,5 MeV; Energy Range - 0,7...1,8 MeV; Maximum pulse current - 100 mA; Maximum Intensity - 15 R/min@m; Focal spot size - less than 2 mm. The Linac is comprised of 4 subassemblies. The X-ray head with weight less than 100 kg, dimensions: 0,7x0,7x1,0 m contains the traveling-wave accelerating structure with lens 0,4 m, electron gun, vacuum pump, tungsten target and RF-system with 500-kW magnetron. The permanent magnets focusing system provides focal spot less than 2 mm. The high voltage power unit consist of a line-type magnetron/electron gun modulator 2 kW power supply, the weight is equal 70 kg. The self-contained cooling water supply provides temperature controlled water for accelerator structure and magnetron. The control console allows convenient monitoring of critical system and Linac parameters by manual or remote computer. Portable X-band Linac Y-34 is the effective X - ray and/or electron beam source for such applications as non-destructive examination of nuclear reactor systems, solid rocket motors, technology research.

  15. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Fatigue damage evolution study with non-destructive magnetic properties measurement method using scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu

    The fatigue process can be precisely defined in the crack propagation stage, where the fatigue damage can be evaluated by observed cracks and where an increase of the dislocation density occurs at the first 10% of the fatigue life. But for the stages between dislocation saturation and prior to nucleation, no definition can be given due to the relative difficulty in quantifying the damage. Especially, detecting a high-cycle fatigue damage is a particularly important yet an unsolved problem in non-destructive testing. There are no reliable techniques to measure the progress of fatigue in the intermediate fatigue regime, the second stage of fatigue, where the overall dislocation density is approximately constant and the microstructural changes are subtle include about 80% of the fatigue life in high-cycle fatigue. In this study, a non-destructive evaluation method is established by continuously measuring the magnetic properties, which interact with the developing fatigue damage during cyclic loading. Dislocations and microcracks which are initiated during the fatigue act as pinning sites which impede the motion of magnetic domain walls under the applied magnetic field, thereby influencing the bulk magnetic properties. The remanence field of various fatigued steel specimens are detected using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show the development of localized peaks in remanent magnetization prior to the formation of visible fatigue cracks. Even in the second stage of fatigue, where the macroscopic state of the sample is relatively constant, the results show that a scanning SQUID microscope is capable of detecting regions of fatigue damage both on surface and in sub-surface regions.

  17. Monitoring fungal growth on brown rice grains using rapid and non-destructive hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Siripatrawan, U; Makino, Y

    2015-04-16

    This research aimed to develop a rapid, non-destructive, and accurate method based on hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for monitoring spoilage fungal growth on stored brown rice. Brown rice was inoculated with a non-pathogenic strain of Aspergillus oryzae and stored at 30 °C and 85% RH. Growth of A. oryzae on rice was monitored using viable colony counts, expressed as colony forming units per gram (CFU/g). The fungal development was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The HSI system was used to acquire reflectance images of the samples covering the visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range of 400-1000 nm. Unsupervised self-organizing map (SOM) was used to visualize data classification of different levels of fungal infection. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to predict fungal growth on rice grains from the HSI reflectance spectra. The HSI spectral signals decreased with increasing colony counts, while conserving similar spectral pattern during the fungal growth. When integrated with SOM, the proposed HSI method could be used to classify rice samples with different levels of fungal infection without sample manipulation. Moreover, HSI was able to rapidly identify infected rice although the samples showed no symptoms of fungal infection. Based on PLS regression, the coefficient of determination was 0.97 and root mean square error of prediction was 0.39 log (CFU/g), demonstrating that the HSI technique was effective for prediction of fungal infection in rice grains. The ability of HSI to detect fungal infection at early stage would help to prevent contaminated rice grains from entering the food chain. This research provides scientific information on the rapid, non-destructive, and effective fungal detection system for rice grains.

  18. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T. M.; Sigloch, K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and engineering structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of Plexiglas and rock samples, and to define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface waves in typical materials tested with a non-destructive technique (e.g., marble, unweathered and weathered concrete and natural stone).

  19. Wave field features of shallow vertical discontinuity and their application in non-destructive detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The geotechnical integrity of critical infrastructure can be seriously compromised by the presence of fractures or crevices. Non-destructive techniques to accurately detect fractures in critical infrastructure such as dams and highways could be of significant benefit to the geotechnical industry. This paper investigates the application of shallow seismic and georadar methods to the detection of a vertical discontinuity using numerical simulations. The objective is to address the kinematical analysis of a vertical discontinuity, determine the resulting wave field characteristics, and provide the basis for determining the existence of vertical discontinuities based on the recorded signals. Simulation results demonstrate that: (1) A reflection from a vertical discontinuity produces a hyperbolic feature on a seismic or georadar profile; (2) In order for a reflection from a vertical discontinuity to be produced, a reflecting horizon below the discontinuity must exist, the offset between source and receiver (x0) must be non-zero, on the same side of the vertical discontinuity; (3) The range of distances from the vertical discontinuity where a reflection event is observed is proportional to its length and to x0; (4) Should the vertical crevice (or fracture) pass through a reflecting horizon, dual hyperbolic features can be observed on the records, and this can be used as a determining factor that the vertical crevice passes through the interface; and (5) diffractions from the edges of the discontinuity can be recorded with relatively smaller amplitude than reflections and their ranges are not constrained by the length of discontinuity. If the length of discontinuity is short enough, diffractions are the dominant feature. Real-world examples show that the shallow seismic reflection method and the georadar method are capable of recording the hyperbolic feature, which can be interpreted as vertical discontinuity. Thus, these methods show some promise as effective non-destructive

  20. Variation in gymnemic acid content and non-destructive harvesting of Gymnema sylvestre (Gudmar)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Yadav, Swati

    2010-01-01

    Background: Madhunashini (Gymnema sylvestre R. Br.) commonly known as ‘Gudmar’ in Hindi is an important medicinal climber and extensively used in almost all Indian System of Medicine as a remedy for diabetes, rheumatism, cough, ulcer, jaundice, dyspepsia, constipation, eyes pain and also in snakebite. In India, it is found growing in Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharastra, Orissa, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. The major phytoconstituents are gymnemic acids, gudmarin and saponins. Methods: In the present study, Gymnema germplasm collected from various regions of Madhya Pradesh was evaluated on the basis of their morphological characteristics and gymnemic acid content. Gymnemic acid content in the leaves was estimated by HPLC. We have also standardized the non-destructive harvesting practices of Gudmar. Selective harvesting was done without harming the main plant. Only mature leaves (60%) were hand plucked in the month of October. Second harvest was done in the month of June. Results: Data revealed that gymnemic acid content varied between 0.96% ± 0.03 (Seoni) to 1.58% ±0.03 (Amarkantak). It was also observed that the leaves left at the time of 1st harvest during October matured in June at the time of 2nd harvest. Conclusion: Non destructive harvesting practice did not have any negative impact on overall development of the plant. It is evident that there is wide variation in the morphological characteristics and gymnemic acid content in G. sylvestre collected from various locations, which can be exploited for further crop improvement programmes. PMID:21589758

  1. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Stephan; Bates, Cameron; Pereverzev, Sergey

    2014-10-03

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. Among the different cryogenic detector types, Magnetic Micro-Calorimeters (MMCs) have the potential of faster count rates and better linearity. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. MMC gamma detectors measure the energy of absorbed gamma rays form the resulting change in magnetization of an erbium-doped gold (Au:Er) sensor. The signal is read out with a SQUID preamplifier and processed digitally with room temperature electronics (see inset figure 2). The objective of this project is to develop ultra-high energy resolution γ-detectors based on magnetic micro-calorimeters (MMCs) for accurate non-destructive isotope analysis (NDA). Since MMCs, like other cryogenic γ-detector technologies with operating temperatures <0.1 K, are intrinsically slow and have to be small for high resolution, special emphasis will be placed on questions that determine sensitivity and the potential for scaling to arrays. Objectives for FY14 were therefore to fabricate an improved version of MMC γ-detectors and test their energy resolution, maximum count rate, readout noise, crosstalk between pixels and linearity.

  2. Non-destructive in situ mapping of macroholes, cracks and inhomogeneities of stalagmites in cave environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegymegi, Erika; Gyöngy, Miklós; Bodolai, Tamás; Divós, Ferenc; Barta, Edit; Gribovszki, Katalin; Bokelmann, Götz; Hegymegi, Csaba; Lednická, Markéta; Kovács, Károly

    2016-04-01

    Intact and vulnerable, candle-stick type stalagmites can be used as prehistoric-earthquake indicators during seismic-hazard analysis of a given region, because they are old enough to survive several earthquakes. The continued intactness of the stalagmites indicates a lack of earthquakes that had the strength to destroy them. To make sure that the stalagmites are intact, we have to image their internal structure in order to estimate the steadiness more accurate and potential failure in the last few thousand years, during their evolution. These stalagmites play an important indicator role and carry fundamental information; however, legally they are strictly protected natural objects in Europe. Therefore it is impossible to examine them in the laboratory by conventional equipment such as computer tomography (CT) or X-ray, because this would require taking samples. With the presented non-destructive methods (ultrasound and acoustic tomography) we tried to detect macroholes, cracks and velocity anomalies inside the stalagmites on the mm scale in situ, in the cave. The acoustic tomography applied in the current work is an existing method in forest research. Forest researchers use it to non-destructively detect the size and location of decayed or hollow parts in the trunk and this technique is able to detect the velocity changing of wave propagation and anomalies in the stalagmites as well. The other method that we use is ultrasound imaging, which uses (and is able to calculate) the velocity of sound propagation. Here, the frequency used is much higher (typically 250 kHz to 5 MHz), which increases resolution but at the same time decreases penetration depth compared to acoustic tomography. In this latter work, through transmission and TOFD (time-of-flight-diffraction) ultrasound methods are using thickness-mode ultrasound transducers (Panametrics, Olympus). Such equipment is well-adapted to the cave environment and this is the first time that it has been used for these

  3. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  4. In situ non-destructive measurement of biofilm thickness and topology in an interferometric optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Larimer, Curtis; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bonheyo, George; Addleman, Raymond Shane

    2016-03-15

    Biofilms are ubiquitous and deleteriously impact a wide range of industrial processes, medical and dental health issues, and environmental problems such as transport of invasive species and the fuel efficiency of ocean going vessels. Biofilms are difficult to characterize when fully hydrated, especially in a non-destructive manner, because of their soft structure and water-like bulk properties. Herein we describe a non-destructive high resolution method of measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms of using white light interferometric optical microscopy. Using this technique, surface morphology, surface roughness, and biofilm thickness can be measured non-destructively and with high resolution as a function of time without disruption of the biofilm activity and processes. The thickness and surface topology of a P. putida biofilm were monitored growing from initial colonization to a mature biofilm. Typical bacterial growth curves were observed. Increase in surface roughness was a leading indicator of biofilm growth.

  5. Pre-processing of data coming from a laser-EMAT system for non-destructive testing of steel slabs.

    PubMed

    Sgarbi, Mirko; Colla, Valentina; Cateni, Sivia; Higson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Non destructive test systems are increasingly applied in the industrial context for their strong potentialities in improving and standardizing quality control. Especially in the intermediate manufacturing stages, early detection of defects on semi-finished products allow their direction towards later production processes according to their quality, with consequent considerable savings in time, energy, materials and work. However, the raw data coming from non destructive test systems are not always immediately suitable for sophisticated defect detection algorithms, due to noise and disturbances which are unavoidable, especially in harsh operating conditions, such as the ones which are typical of the steelmaking cycle. The paper describes some pre-processing operations which are required in order to exploit the data coming from a non destructive test system. Such a system is based on the joint exploitation of Laser and Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer technologies and is applied to the detection of surface and sub-surface cracks in cold and hot steel slabs.

  6. Destructive and non-destructive determination of the transport current density radial distribution: Application to Bi-2212 textured rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, E.; Natividad, E.; Angurel, L. A.; Navarro, R.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.

    2003-03-01

    Destructive and non-destructive methods to estimate the radial distribution of the transport critical current, Jc( r), of long cylindrical superconductors are presented. The non-destructive method is based on the measurement of self-field AC losses as a function of the current amplitude, Q( I0) and takes into account the E- J characteristics of the material. Both methods have been used to derive the Jc( r) profiles of long and thin Bi-2212 rods textured by laser-induced zone melting techniques. The obtained results have been correlated with the microstructure of the samples and their critical temperature.

  7. Probing Hydronium Ion Histidine NH Exchange Rate Constants in the M2 Channel via Indirect Observation of Dipolar-Dephased (15)N Signals in Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Miao, Yimin; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-12-14

    Water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins is an important parameter for understanding how proteins interact with their aqueous environment, but has been difficult to observe in membrane-bound biological systems. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing specific water-protein chemical exchange in membrane-bound proteins in solid-state MAS NMR. By spin-locking the (1)H magnetization along the magic angle, the (1)H spin diffusion is suppressed such that a water-protein chemical exchange process can be monitored indirectly by dipolar-dephased (15)N signals through polarization transfer from (1)H. In the example of the Influenza A full length M2 protein, the buildup of dipolar-dephased (15)N signals from the tetrad of His37 side chains have been observed as a function of spin-lock time. This confirms that hydronium ions are in exchange with protons in the His37 NH bonds at the heart of the M2 proton conduction mechanism, with an exchange rate constant of ∼1750 s(-1) for pH 6.2 at -10 °C.

  8. Protein-chromophore interactions in alpha-crustacyanin, the major blue carotenoprotein from the carapace of the lobster, Homarus gammarus. A study by 13C magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Weesie, R J; Askin, D; Jansen, F J; de Groot, H J; Lugtenburg, J; Britton, G

    1995-03-27

    MAS (magic angle spinning) 13C NMR has been used to study protein-chromophore interactions in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue astaxanthin-binding carotenoprotein of the lobster, Homarus gammarus, reconstituted with astaxanthins labelled with 13C at the 14,14' or 15,15' positions. Two signals are seen for alpha-crustacyanin containing [14,14'-13C2]astaxanthin, shifted 6.9 and 4.0 ppm downfield from the 134.1 ppm signal of uncomplexed astaxanthin in the solid state. With alpha-crustacyanin containing [15,15'-13C2]astaxanthin, one essentially unshifted broad signal is seen. Hence binding to the protein causes a decrease in electronic charge density, providing the first experimental evidence that a charge redistribution mechanism contributes to the bathochromic shift of the astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, in agreement with inferences based on resonance Raman data [Salares, et al. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 576, 176-191]. The splitting of the 14 and 14' signals provides evidence for asymmetric binding of each astaxanthin molecule by the protein.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of containment walls in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, V.; Payan, C.; Lott, M.; Ranaivomanana, N.; Balayssac, J. P.; Verdier, J.; Larose, E.; Zhang, Y.; Saliba, J.; Boniface, A.; Sbartai, Z. M.; Piwakowski, B.; Ciccarone, C.; Hafid, H.; Henault, J. M.; Buffet, F. Ouvrier

    2017-02-01

    Two functions are regularly tested on containment walls in order to anticipate a possible accident. The first is mechanical to resist a possible internal over-pressure and the second is to prevent leakage. The AAPR reference accident is the rupture of a pipe in the primary circuit of a nuclear plant. In this case, the pressure and temperature can reach 5 bar and 180°C in 20 seconds. The national project `Non-destructive testing of the containment structures of nuclear plants' aims at studying the non-destructive techniques capable to evaluate the concrete properties and its damaging and cracks. This 4-year-project is segmented into two parts. The first consists in developing and selecting the most relevant NDEs in the laboratory to reach these goals. These evaluations are developed in conditions representing the real conditions of the stresses generated during ten-yearly visits of the plants or those related to an accident. The second part consists in applying the selected techniques to two containment structures under pressure. The first structure is proposed by ONERA and the second is a mockup of a containment wall on a 1/3 scale made by EDF within the VeRCoRs project. Communication is focused on the part of the project that concerns the damage and crack process characterization by means of NDT. The tests are done in 3 or 4 points bending in order to study the cracks' generation, their propagation, as well as their opening and closing. The main ultrasonic techniques developed concern linear or non-linear acoustic: acoustic emission [1], Locadiff [2], energy diffusion, surface wave's velocity and attenuation, DAET [3]. The recorded data contribute to providing the mapping of the investigated parameters, either in volume, in surface or globally. Digital image correlation is an important additional asset to validate the coherence of the data. The spatial normalization of the data in the specimen space allows proposing algorithms on the combination of the

  10. Non-destructive Assessment of Plant Nitrogen Parameters Using Leaf Chlorophyll Measurements in Rice.

    PubMed

    Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Cao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Tang, Liang; Rehmani, Muhammad Ishaq Asif; Cao, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive assessment of plant nitrogen (N) status is essential for efficient crop production and N management in intensive rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping systems. Chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502) has been widely used as a rapid, non-destructive and cost-effective diagnostic tool for in-season assessment of crop N status. The present study was intended to establish the quantitative relationships between chlorophyll meters readings, plant N concentration (PNC), N nutrition index (NNI), accumulated N deficit (AND), and N requirement (NR), as well as to compare the stability of these relationships at different vegetative growth stages in Japonica and Indica rice cultivars. Seven multi-locational field experiments using varied N rates and seven rice cultivars were conducted in east China. The results showed that the PNC and chlorophyll meters readings increased with increasing N application rates across the cultivars, growing seasons, and sites. The PNC and chlorophyll meters readings under varied N rates ranged from 2.29 to 3.21, 1.06 to 1.82 and 37.10 to 45.4 and 37.30 to 46.6, respectively, at TL and HD stages for Japonica rice cultivars, while they ranged from 2.25 to 3.23, 1.34 to 1.91 and 35.6 to 43.3 and 37.3 to 45.5 for Indica rice cultivars, respectively. The quantitative relationships between chlorophyll meters readings, PNC, NNI, AND, and NR established at different crop growth stages in two rice ecotypes, were highly significant with R(2) values ranging from 0.69 to 0.93 and 0.71 to 0.86 for Japonica and Indica rice, respectively. The strongest relationships were observed for AND and NR at panicle initiation and booting stages in both rice ecotypes. The validation of the relationships developed in the present study with an independent data exhibited a solid model performance and confirmed their robustness as a reliable and rapid diagnostic tool for in-season estimation of plant N parameters for sustainable N management in rice. The results of this study

  11. Non-destructive Phenotyping of Lettuce Plants in Early Stages of Development with Optical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Simko, Ivan; Hayes, Ryan J; Furbank, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of plants is important for the production of 'baby-leaf' lettuce that is harvested when plants reach the four- to eight-leaf stage of growth. However, environmental factors, such as high or low temperature, or elevated concentrations of salt, inhibit lettuce growth. Therefore, non-destructive evaluations of plants can provide valuable information to breeders and growers. The objective of the present study was to test the feasibility of using non-destructive phenotyping with optical sensors for the evaluations of lettuce plants in early stages of development. We performed the series of experiments to determine if hyperspectral imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging can determine phenotypic changes manifested on lettuce plants subjected to the extreme temperature and salinity stress treatments. Our results indicate that top view optical sensors alone can accurately determine plant size to approximately 7 g fresh weight. Hyperspectral imaging analysis was able to detect changes in the total chlorophyll (RCC) and anthocyanin (RAC) content, while chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed photoinhibition and reduction of plant growth caused by the extreme growing temperatures (3 and 39°C) and salinity (100 mM NaCl). Though no significant correlation was found between Fv/Fm and decrease in plant growth due to stress when comparisons were made across multiple accessions, our results indicate that lettuce plants have a high adaptability to both low (3°C) and high (39°C) temperatures, with no permanent damage to photosynthetic apparatus and fast recovery of plants after moving them to the optimal (21°C) temperature. We have also detected a strong relationship between visual rating of the green- and red-leaf color intensity and RCC and RAC, respectively. Differences in RAC among accessions suggest that the selection for intense red color may be easier to perform at somewhat lower than the optimal temperature. This study serves as a proof of concept

  12. Non-destructive testing for the structures and civil infrastructures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, L.; Rizzo, E.

    2012-04-01

    infrared thermography and sonic testing. Finally, we investigated a radiant floor by GPR (900 MHz to 2000 MHz antennas) and long-wave infrared camera. Non-destructive diagnostic techniques allow to investigate a building structure in reinforced concrete or masonry without altering the characteristics of the element investigated. For this reason, geo-electrical and electromagnetic surveys of masonry are a suitable non-destructive tool for the diagnosis of a deteriorated concrete structure. Moreover, the integration of different NDT techniques (conventional and no-conventional) is a very powerful to maximize the capabilities and to compensate for the limitations of each method.

  13. Non-destructive Phenotyping of Lettuce Plants in Early Stages of Development with Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Ivan; Hayes, Ryan J.; Furbank, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of plants is important for the production of ‘baby-leaf’ lettuce that is harvested when plants reach the four- to eight-leaf stage of growth. However, environmental factors, such as high or low temperature, or elevated concentrations of salt, inhibit lettuce growth. Therefore, non-destructive evaluations of plants can provide valuable information to breeders and growers. The objective of the present study was to test the feasibility of using non-destructive phenotyping with optical sensors for the evaluations of lettuce plants in early stages of development. We performed the series of experiments to determine if hyperspectral imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging can determine phenotypic changes manifested on lettuce plants subjected to the extreme temperature and salinity stress treatments. Our results indicate that top view optical sensors alone can accurately determine plant size to approximately 7 g fresh weight. Hyperspectral imaging analysis was able to detect changes in the total chlorophyll (RCC) and anthocyanin (RAC) content, while chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed photoinhibition and reduction of plant growth caused by the extreme growing temperatures (3 and 39°C) and salinity (100 mM NaCl). Though no significant correlation was found between Fv/Fm and decrease in plant growth due to stress when comparisons were made across multiple accessions, our results indicate that lettuce plants have a high adaptability to both low (3°C) and high (39°C) temperatures, with no permanent damage to photosynthetic apparatus and fast recovery of plants after moving them to the optimal (21°C) temperature. We have also detected a strong relationship between visual rating of the green- and red-leaf color intensity and RCC and RAC, respectively. Differences in RAC among accessions suggest that the selection for intense red color may be easier to perform at somewhat lower than the optimal temperature. This study serves as a proof of

  14. Non-destructive Assessment of Plant Nitrogen Parameters Using Leaf Chlorophyll Measurements in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Cao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Tang, Liang; Rehmani, Muhammad Ishaq Asif; Cao, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive assessment of plant nitrogen (N) status is essential for efficient crop production and N management in intensive rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping systems. Chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502) has been widely used as a rapid, non-destructive and cost-effective diagnostic tool for in-season assessment of crop N status. The present study was intended to establish the quantitative relationships between chlorophyll meters readings, plant N concentration (PNC), N nutrition index (NNI), accumulated N deficit (AND), and N requirement (NR), as well as to compare the stability of these relationships at different vegetative growth stages in Japonica and Indica rice cultivars. Seven multi-locational field experiments using varied N rates and seven rice cultivars were conducted in east China. The results showed that the PNC and chlorophyll meters readings increased with increasing N application rates across the cultivars, growing seasons, and sites. The PNC and chlorophyll meters readings under varied N rates ranged from 2.29 to 3.21, 1.06 to 1.82 and 37.10 to 45.4 and 37.30 to 46.6, respectively, at TL and HD stages for Japonica rice cultivars, while they ranged from 2.25 to 3.23, 1.34 to 1.91 and 35.6 to 43.3 and 37.3 to 45.5 for Indica rice cultivars, respectively. The quantitative relationships between chlorophyll meters readings, PNC, NNI, AND, and NR established at different crop growth stages in two rice ecotypes, were highly significant with R2 values ranging from 0.69 to 0.93 and 0.71 to 0.86 for Japonica and Indica rice, respectively. The strongest relationships were observed for AND and NR at panicle initiation and booting stages in both rice ecotypes. The validation of the relationships developed in the present study with an independent data exhibited a solid model performance and confirmed their robustness as a reliable and rapid diagnostic tool for in-season estimation of plant N parameters for sustainable N management in rice. The results of this study

  15. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  16. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing of pieces of complex geometry with a flexible phased array transducer

    PubMed

    Chatillon; Cattiaux; Serre; Roy

    2000-03-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive testing of components of complex geometry in the nuclear industry faces several difficulties: sensitivity variations due to unmatched contact, inaccurate localization of defects due to variations of transducer orientation, and uncovered area of the component. To improve the performances of such testing and defect characterization, we propose a new concept of ultrasonic contact phased array transducer. The phased array transducer has a flexible radiating surface able to fit the actual surface of the piece to optimize the contact and thus the sensitivity of the test. To control the transmitted field, and therefore to improve the defect characterization, a delay law optimizing algorithm is developed. To assess the capability of such a transducer, the Champ-Sons model, developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission for predicting field radiated by arbitrary transducers into pieces, has to be extended to sources directly in contact with pieces of complex geometry. The good behavior of this new type of probe predicted by computations is experimentally validated with a jointed transducer positioned on pieces of various profiles.

  17. Robotic path planning for non-destructive testing of complex shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, Carmelo; Pierce, Stephen Gareth; Wright, Ben; Nicholson, Pascual Ian; Cooper, Ian

    2015-03-01

    The requirement to increase inspection speeds for non-destructive testing (NDT) of composite aerospace parts is common to many manufacturers. The prevalence of complex curved surfaces in the industry provides significant motivation for the use of 6 axis robots for deployment of NDT probes in these inspections. A new system for robot deployed ultrasonic inspection of composite aerospace components is presented. The key novelty of the approach is through the accommodation of flexible robotic trajectory planning, coordinated with the NDT data acquisition. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed a high level custom toolbox that utilizes external control of an industrial 6 axis manipulator to achieve complex path planning and provide synchronization of the employed ultrasonic phase array inspection system. The developed software maintains a high level approach to the robot programming, in order to ease the programming complexity for an NDT inspection operator. Crucially the approach provides a pathway for a conditional programming approach and the capability for multiple robot control (a significant limitation in many current off-line programming applications). Ultrasonic and experimental data has been collected for the validation of the inspection technique. The path trajectory generation for a large, curved carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) aerofoil component has been proven and is presented. The path error relative to a raster-scan tool-path, suitable for ultrasonic phased array inspection, has been measured to be within + 2mm over the 1.6 m2 area of the component surface.

  18. Neutron tomography of particulate filters: a non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toops, Todd J.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Voisin, Sophie; Gregor, Jens; Walker, Lakeisha; Strzelec, Andrea; Finney, Charles E. A.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2013-11-01

    This research describes the development and implementation of high-fidelity neutron imaging and the associated analysis of the images. This advanced capability allows the non-destructive, non-invasive imaging of particulate filters (PFs) and how the deposition of particulate and catalytic washcoat occurs within the filter. The majority of the efforts described here were performed at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the current spatial resolution is approximately 50 μm. The sample holder is equipped with a high-precision rotation stage that allows 3D imaging (i.e., computed tomography) of the sample when combined with computerized reconstruction tools. What enables the neutron-based image is the ability of some elements to absorb or scatter neutrons where other elements allow the neutron to pass through them with negligible interaction. Of particular interest in this study is the scattering of neutrons by hydrogen-containing molecules, such as hydrocarbons (HCs) and/or water, which are adsorbed to the surface of soot, ash and catalytic washcoat. Even so, the interactions with this adsorbed water/HC is low and computational techniques were required to enhance the contrast, primarily a modified simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). This effort describes the following systems: particulate randomly distributed in a PF, ash deposition in PFs, a catalyzed washcoat layer in a PF, and three particulate loadings in a SiC PF.

  19. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification.

    PubMed

    Mota, Lia Toledo Moreira; Mota, Alexandre de Assis; Coiado, Lorenzo Campos

    2015-07-10

    Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%), which leads to a linear output response.

  20. Non-destructive mobile monitoring of microbial contaminations on meat surfaces using porphyrin fluorescence intensities.

    PubMed

    Durek, J; Fröhling, A; Bolling, J; Thomasius, R; Durek, P; Schlüter, O K

    2016-05-01

    A non-destructive mobile system for meat quality monitoring was developed and investigated for the possible application along the whole production chain of fresh meat. Pork and lamb meat was stored at 5 °C for up to 20 days post mortem and measured with a fluorescence spectrometer. Additionally, the bacterial influence on the fluorescence signals was evaluated by different experimental procedures. Fluorescence of NADH and different porphyrins could be correlated to the growth of diverse bacteria and hence used for contamination monitoring. The increase of porphyrin fluorescence started after 9 days p.m. for pork and after 2 days p.m. for lamb meat. Based on the results, a mobile fluorescence system was built and compared with the laboratory system. The corrected function of the meat slices showed a root mean square error of 1156.97 r.u. and a mean absolute percentage error of 12.59%; for lamb the values were 470.81 r.u. and 15.55%, respectively. A mobile and non-invasive measurement system would improve the microbial security of fresh meat.

  1. PHOTOACOUSTIC NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND IMAGING OF CARIES IN DENTAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.; Dewhurst, R. J.

    2010-02-22

    Dental caries is a disease wherein bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure. Traditional dental radiography has its limitations for detecting early stage caries. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with the near-infrared light source has been applied to postmortem dental samples to obtain 2-D and 3-D images. Imaging results showed that the PA technique can be used to image human teeth caries. For non-destructive photoacoustic evaluation and imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. For example, temperature rises above 5 deg. C within live human teeth will cause pulpal necrosis. Therefore, several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict temperature and pressure fields within samples. Predicted temperature levels are below corresponding safety limits, but care is required to avoid nonlinear absorption phenomena. Furthermore, PA imaging results from the phantom provide evidence for high sensitivity, which shows the imaging potential of the PA technique for detecting early stage disease.

  2. Non-Destructive Characterization of Activated Ion-Implanted Doping Profiles Based on Photomodulated Optical Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Clarysse, Trudo; Moussa, Alain; Mody, Jay; Eyben, Pierre; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Rosseel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The accurate characterization of free carrier profiles in ultra-shallow junctions, such as the source and drain extension regions, is one of the major challenges of metrology in modern silicon Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor technology. Currently, only destructive and time-consuming techniques, such as Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy, have shown the ability to solve this need. However, there is still a clear absence of an accurate, fast, non-destructive technique. For this purpose, we study the capabilities of the Photomodulated Optical Reflectance (PMOR) technique, such as implemented in the Therma-Probe® (TP) tool. PMOR is a pump-probe technique, wherein the probe laser measures, through reflection, the modulated pump-laser-induced change in refractive index. In this paper, we investigate PMOR measurements on sub-20 nm activated implantation profiles. By combining the PMOR signal with the simultaneously measured DC probe reflectance, we show that it is possible to reconstruct the underlying free carrier profile. Except for an overestimated depth (˜25%), the results are in good agreement with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy measurements.

  3. Static characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitor for non destructive evaluation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, Hussam; Laflamme, Simon; Zhang, Huanhuan; Geiger, Randall; Kessler, Michael; Rajan, Krishna

    2014-02-18

    A large and flexible strain transducer consisting of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) has been proposed by the authors. Arranged in a network setup, the sensing strategy offers tremendous potential at conducting non-destructive evaluation of large-scale surfaces. In prior work, the authors have demonstrated the performance of the sensor at tracking strain history, localizing cracks, and detecting vibration signatures. In this paper, we characterize the static performance of the proposed SEC. The characterization includes sensitivity of the signal, and temperature and humidity dependences. Tests are conducted on a simply supported aluminum beam subjected to bending as well as on a free standing sensor. The performance of the SEC is compared against off-the-shelf resistance-based strain gauges with resolution of 1 με. A sensitivity of 1190 pF/ε is obtained experimentally, in agreement with theory. Results also show the sensor linearity over the given level of strain, showing the promise of the SEC at monitoring of surface strain.

  4. Non-Destructive Micro-Chemical and Micro-Luminescence Characterization of Jadeite.

    PubMed

    Mitrani Viggiano, Alejandro; Ruvalcaba Sil, José Luis; Manrique Ortega, Mayra D; Corregidor Berdasco, Victoria

    2016-12-01

    Jadeite was greatly appreciated by pre-Hispanic cultures in Mesoamerica. Despite its importance, knowledge of its mining sources was lost after the Spanish conquest. In the 1950s the only confirmed jadeite deposits in Mesoamerica were found in the Motagua River Fault (MRF), Guatemala. The aim of this study is to present a methodology that is appropriate for the study of archeological jadeite objects using non-destructive spectroscopic and micro-ion beam analysis techniques. This methodology has been applied to perform mineral, elemental, and luminescence characterization of five jadeite samples from the MRF, with white, lilac, and green colors. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the presence of jadeite, albite, and omphacite as the main mineral phases in the samples. Elemental maps using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) with a nuclear microprobe and elemental concentration analysis from individual mineral grains using micro-PIXE coupled with micro-ionoluminescence (IL) allowed the detection of minor feldspar, titanite, and grossular mineral contents. Distinctive features from the mineral, elemental, and luminescence characterization have been found that allow the identification of these five jadeite samples.

  5. On oxidative degradation of parchment and its non-destructive characterisation and dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Možir, Alenka; Strlič, Matija; Trafela, Tanja; Cigić, Irena Kralj; Kolar, Jana; Deselnicu, Viorica; de Bruin, Gerrit

    2011-07-01

    Historic parchment is an extremely complex material, not only due to the various methods of production used and various past environmental histories of objects, but also due to its inhomogeneous structure. Many traditional methods of characterisation are empirical, but useful since they have gained recognition by the end-users. In this paper, we investigated the shrinkage temperature of collagen and the influence of lipids contained in parchment on the measurements. While the content of lipids does not seem to significantly affect shrinkage temperature measurements themselves, it strongly affects the decrease of shrinkage temperature of collagen during degradation, and thus its thermomechanical properties. This confirms the high importance of lipid peroxidation during degradation of parchment. While shrinkage temperature determination is a micro-destructive method, we also demonstrated that it is possible to determine this property using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy based on partial least squares calibration. The root-mean square error of validation (RMSEV), obtained on a set of variously delipidised and degraded samples, was 7°C, so the method could be used for condition assessment or classification of historic objects. Using a set of 185 historic objects dating from 1200-1800, we also developed a method for non-destructive dating of parchment based on NIR spectroscopy using partial least squares regression (RMSEV=72 years), and successfully determined the correct age of a historic charter from the collection of Nationaal Archief, The Netherlands.

  6. Non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2012-11-01

    The aerospace industry is in constant need of ever-more efficient inspection methods for quality control. Product inspection is also essential to maintain the safe operation of aircraft components designed to perform for decades. This paper proposes a method for non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels. Honeycomb sandwich panels are extensively employed in the aerospace industry due to their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios. In order to attach additional structures to them, panels are reinforced by filling honeycomb cells and drilling holes into the reinforced areas. The proposed procedure is designed to detect the position of the holes within the reinforced area and to provide a robust measurement of the distance between each hole and the boundary of the reinforced area. The result is a fast, safe and clean inspection method for drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels that can be used to robustly assess a possible displacement of the hole from the center of the reinforced area, which could have serious consequences. The proposed method is based on active infrared thermography, and uses state of the art methods for infrared image processing, including signal-to-nose ratio enhancement, hole detection and segmentation. Tests and comparison with X-ray inspections indicate that the proposed system meets production needs.

  7. Laser ultrasound and simulated time reversal on bulk waves for non destructive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, G.; Walaszek, H.; Kouadri-David, A.; Guégan, S.; Flifla, J.

    2014-06-01

    Laser welding of aluminium generally creates embedded welding defects, such as porosities or cracks. Non Destructive Inspection (NDI) after processing may ensure an acceptable weld quality by defect detection. Nowadays, NDI techniques used to control the inside of a weld are mainly limited to X-Rays or ultrasonics. The current paper describes the use of a Laser Ultrasound (LU) technique to inspect porosities in 2 and 4-mm thick sheet lap welds. First experimentations resulted in the detection of 0.5-mm drilled holes in bulk aluminium sheets. The measurement of the depth of these defects is demonstrated too. Further experimentations shows the applicability of the LU technique to detect porosities in aluminium laser welds. However, as the interpretation of raw measures is limiting the detection capacity of this technique, we developed a signal processing using Time-Reversal capabilities to enhance detection capacities. Furthermore, the signal processing output is a geometrical image of the material's inner state, increasing the ease of interpretation. It is based on a mass-spring simulation which enables the back-propagation of the acquired ultrasound signal. The spring-mass simulation allows the natural generation of all the different sound waves and thus enables the back-propagation of a raw signal without any need of filtering or wave identification and extraction. Therefore the signal processing uses the information contained in the compression wave as well as in the shear wave.

  8. Passive Neutron Non-Destructive Assay for Remediation of Radiological Waste at Hanford Burial Grounds- 13189

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.; Pitts, M.; Ludowise, J.D.; Valentinelli, P.; Grando, C.J.; Haggard, D.L.

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford burial grounds contains a broad spectrum of low activity radioactive wastes, transuranic (TRU) wastes, and hazardous wastes including fission products, byproduct material (thorium and uranium), plutonium and laboratory chemicals. A passive neutron non-destructive assay technique has been developed for characterization of shielded concreted drums exhumed from the burial grounds. This method facilitates the separation of low activity radiological waste containers from TRU waste containers exhumed from the burial grounds. Two identical total neutron counting systems have been deployed, each consisting of He-3 detectors surrounded by a polyethylene moderator. The counts are processed through a statistical filter that removes outliers in order to suppress cosmic spallation events and electronic noise. Upon completion of processing, a 'GO / NO GO' signal is provided to the operator based on a threshold level equivalent to 0.5 grams of weapons grade plutonium in the container being evaluated. This approach allows instantaneous decisions to be made on how to proceed with the waste. The counting systems have been set up using initial on-site measurements (neutron emitting standards loaded into surrogate waste containers) combined with Monte Carlo modeling techniques. The benefit of this approach is to allow the systems to extend their measurement ranges, in terms of applicable matrix types and container sizes, with minimal interruption to the operations at the burial grounds. (authors)

  9. METAPHIX-1 non destructive post irradiation examinations in the irradiated elements cell at Phenix

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, Laurent; Masson, M.; Garces, E.; Desjardins, S.; Fontaine, B.; Lacroix, B.; Martella, T.; Loubet, L.; Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.

    2007-07-01

    Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been developing minor actinide (MA) transmutation technology in homogeneous loading mode by use of metal fuel fast reactors in cooperation with Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Fast reactor metal fuel pins of Uranium- Plutonium-Zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloy containing 2 wt% MAs and 2 wt% rare earth elements (REs), 5 wt% MAs, and 5 wt% MAs and 5 wt% REs were irradiated in the PHENIX French fast reactor as METAPHIX experiments. In these METAPHIX experiments, three rigs each consisting of three metal fuel experimental pins and sixteen oxide fuel driver pins were irradiated. The target burnup of the three rigs is 2.4 at%, 7 at% and 11 at% which corresponds to 120, 360 and 600 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in terms of irradiation periods, respectively. The low burnup rig of 2.4 at%, METAPHIX-1, was discharged from the core in August 2004. After cooling, the non-destructive post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of the rig (visual examination, measurement of rig length and deformation) and of the metal fuel pins (visual examination, measurement of pin length and deformation, {gamma}-spectrometry and neutron radiography) were conducted in the Irradiated Elements Cell (IEC) at PHENIX. (authors)

  10. Unmanned Ground Vehicle for Autonomous Non-Destructive Testing of FRP Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhachorn, P.; Mercer, A. Scott; Halabe, Udaya B.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2007-03-01

    Current non-destructive techniques for defect analysis of FRP bridge decks have a narrow scope. These techniques are very good at detecting certain types of defects but are not robust enough to detect all defects by themselves. For example, infrared thermography (IRT) can detect air filled defects and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is good at detecting water filled ones. These technologies can be combined to create a more robust defect detection scheme. To accomplish this, an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) has been designed that incorporates both IR and GPR analysis to create a comprehensive defect map of a bridge deck. The UGV autonomously surveys the deck surface and acquires data. The UGV has two 1.5 GHz ground coupled GPR antennas that are mounted on the front of the UGV to collect GPR data. It also incorporates an active heating source and a radiometric IR camera to capture IR images of the deck, even in less than ideal weather scenarios such as cold cloudy days. The UGV is designed so that it can collect data in an assembly line fashion. It moves in 1 foot increments. When moving, it collects GPR data from the two antennas. When it stops it heats a section of the deck. The next time it stops to heat a section, the IR camera is analyzing the preheated deck section while preparing for the next section. Because the data is being continually collected using this method, the UGV can survey the entire deck in an efficient and timely manner.

  11. Thermal Wave Imaging for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Subsurface Cracks in Opaque Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Kenneth Russell

    The technique of thermal wave imaging has been applied using two approaches to detect subsurface cracks in opaque materials. These two approaches are (1) the scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) and (2) the optical deflection of laser probes (MIRAGE). These two approaches have been examined and compared in terms of signal magnitude and phase both theoretically and experimentally. The effects of sample crack size, orientation and closure on the thermal wave signal has been considered and discussed. Cracks as small as 40 (mu)m in length have been detected. Also nearly vertical closed cracks have been detected using the MIRAGE technique. As a more difficult test of the thermal wave technique, we examined the feasibility of detecting a fatigue crack on the inner surface of a bolt hole. This experiment represents the first time that a crack on the interior wall of a bolt hole has been detected using thermal wave imaging. These results emphatically demonstrate the versatility of the SPAM approach when applied to complex geometries. Thermal wave imaging has been shown to have considerable potential for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of solids for science and industry.

  12. Enhancing the bandwidth of piezoelectric composite transducers for air-coupled non-destructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Robert; O'Leary, Richard L; Hayward, Gordon

    2017-03-01

    This paper details the development of a novel method for increasing the operational bandwidth of piezocomposites without the need for lossy backing material, the aim being to increase fractional bandwith by geometrical design. Removing the need for lossy backing materials, should in turn increase the transmit efficiency in the desired direction of propagation. Finite element analysis has been employed to determine the mode of operation of the new piezocomposite devices and shows good correlation with that derived experimentally. Through a series of practical and analytical methods it has been shown that additional thickness mode resonances can be introduced into the structure by a simple machining process. The shaped composites described in this paper offer increased operational bandwidth. A simple example of a two step thickness design is described to validate and illustrate the principle. A more complex conical design is presented that illustrates a possible tenfold increase in bandwidth from 30kHz to 300kHz, operating in air without backing. An illustration of the applicability of this type of transducer technology for frequency agile guided mode non-destructive evaluation is then presented.

  13. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, Stefan Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Truong, Vo-Van

    2014-03-21

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  14. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  15. High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Tsai, Esther H R; Dinapoli, Roberto; Müller, Elisabeth; Bunk, Oliver; Raabe, Jörg; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-03-15

    Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography-a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique-can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.

  16. Non-destructive Assay Measurements Using the RPI Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Bjorn; Weltz, Adam; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Thompson, J. T.; Thompson, N.; Danon, Yaron

    2013-10-01

    The use of a Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer (LSDS) is consid- ered as a possible option for non-destructive assay of fissile material of used nuclear fuel. The primary objective is to quantify the 239Pu and 235U fissile content via a direct measurement, distinguishing them through their characteristic fission spectra in the LSDS. In this pa- per, we present several assay measurements performed at the Rensse- laer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) to demonstrate the feasibility of such a method and to provide benchmark experiments for Monte Carlo cal- culations of the assay system. A fresh UOX fuel rod from the RPI Criticality Research Facility, a 239PuBe source and several highly en- riched 235U discs were assayed in the LSDS. The characteristic fission spectra were measured with 238U and 232Th threshold fission cham- bers, which are only sensitive to fission neutron with energy above the threshold. Despite the constant neutron and gamma background from the PuBe source and the intense interrogation neutron flux, the LSDS system was able to measure the characteristic 235U and 239Pu responses. All measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simula- tions. It was shown that the available simulation tools and models are well suited to simulate the assay, and that it is possible to calculate the absolute count rate in all investigated cases.

  17. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness.

    PubMed

    Das, Anshuman J; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-08

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner.

  18. Non-destructive detection of defects in artificial skin tissue by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R.; Marx, U.; Heymer, A.; Kaufmann, M.

    2009-07-01

    The application of optical coherence tomography OCT in tissue engineering facilities offers great potential for the automated detection of defects or inhomogeneities in tissue products. This non-invasive and non-destructive measurement technique enables the high speed generation of two dimensional cross sections of tissue with micron resolution. The integration of an OCT device into a tissue production facility allows the monitoring and quality control of tissue engineering products. By the selective exclusion of tissue products with insufficient quality features a high degree in production standard is guaranteed. In a first study, OCT tomograms of artificial skin equivalents were acquired and compared with microscopic images of associated histologies. As a result, a well-defined analogy of the obtained images is presented. The most common defect in terms of hole structures that occurs due to a procedural steps could be detected. Further characteristics like the topography, homogeneity and layer structure was analysed. Hence, OCT provides a powerful measurement technique to monitor the quality of tissue products in automated tissue engineering facilities.

  19. Photoacoustic Non-Destructive Evaluation and Imaging of Caries in Dental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Dewhurst, R. J.

    2010-02-01

    Dental caries is a disease wherein bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure. Traditional dental radiography has its limitations for detecting early stage caries. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with the near-infrared light source has been applied to postmortem dental samples to obtain 2-D and 3-D images. Imaging results showed that the PA technique can be used to image human teeth caries. For non-destructive photoacoustic evaluation and imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. For example, temperature rises above 5 °C within live human teeth will cause pulpal necrosis. Therefore, several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict temperature and pressure fields within samples. Predicted temperature levels are below corresponding safety limits, but care is required to avoid nonlinear absorption phenomena. Furthermore, PA imaging results from the phantom provide evidence for high sensitivity, which shows the imaging potential of the PA technique for detecting early stage disease.

  20. Non-destructive analysis of DU content in the NIF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Gharibyan, Narek; Moody, Ken J.; Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2015-12-16

    The advantage of using depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums in high-yield deuterium-tritium (DT) shots at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is addressed by Döppner, et al., in great detail [1]. This DU based hohlraum incorporates a thin layer of DU, ~7 μm thick, on the inner surface along with a thin layer of a gold coating, ~0.7 μm thick, while the outer layer is ~22 μm thick gold. A thickness measurement of the DU layer can be performed using an optical microscope where the total DU weight can be computed provided a uniform DU layer. However, the uniformity of the thickness is not constant throughout the hohlraum since CAD drawing calculations of the DU weight do not agree with the computed values from optical measurements [2]. Therefore, a non-destructive method for quantifying the DU content in hohlraums has been established by utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy. The details of this method, along with results from several hohlraums, are presented in this report.

  1. Research Based on Optical Non-Destructive Testing of Pigment Identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Hao, Shengcai; Zhou, Wenhua; Qi, Xiaokun; Shi, Jilong

    2016-04-01

    Optical Non-Destructive Testing (ONDT) can be applied as penetrating elemental and structure analysis technology in the Pigments identification field. Three-dimensional video microscopy, Raman microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are employed to measure the materials based on a Qing Dynasty meticulous painting. The results revealed that the dark yellow area within the decorative patterns was presented due to the interaction of Emerald green and hematite, and the bright yellow edge area was delineated by Cu-Zn-Pb composition. The interesting thing is that an artificial synthetic ultramarine blue was checked in the painting. According to the first synthesized time of ultramarine blue and Paris green, the time limit of the painting completion can be identified. The principle of Pigment subtractive colorant and nitikaset method were employed to interpreting the results. Optical testing combined with the area of cultural relic identification can be a potential method to build an expert identification system successfully. This work also help lay the optical method groundwork for further cultural relic identification, sterilization, and preservation.

  2. Spectral algorithm for non-destructive damage localisation: Application to an ancient masonry arch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciotta, Maria-Giovanna; Ramos, Luís F.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Vasta, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Structural monitoring and vibration-based damage identification methods are fundamental tools for condition assessment and early-stage damage identification, especially when dealing with the conservation of historical constructions and the maintenance of strategic civil structures. However, although the substantial advances in the field, several issues must still be addressed to broaden the application range of such tools and to assert their reliability. This study deals with the experimental validation of a novel method for non-destructive damage identification purposes. This method is based on the use of spectral output signals and has been recently validated by the authors through a numerical simulation. After a brief insight into the basic principles of the proposed approach, the spectral-based technique is applied to identify the experimental damage induced on a masonry arch through statically increasing loading. Once the direct and cross spectral density functions of the nodal response processes are estimated, the system's output power spectrum matrix is built and decomposed in eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The present study points out how the extracted spectral eigenparameters contribute to the damage analysis allowing to detect the occurrence of damage and to locate the target points where the cracks appear during the experimental tests. The sensitivity of the spectral formulation to the level of noise in the modal data is investigated and discussed. As a final evaluation criterion, the results from the spectrum-driven method are compared with the ones obtained from existing non-model based damage identification methods.

  3. Quantifying tetrodotoxin levels in the California newt using a non-destructive sampling method.

    PubMed

    Bucciarelli, Gary M; Li, Amy; Zimmer, Richard K; Kats, Lee B; Green, David B

    2014-03-01

    Toxic or noxious substances often serve as a means of chemical defense for numerous taxa. However, such compounds may also facilitate ecological or evolutionary processes. The neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX), which is found in newts of the genus Taricha, acts as a selection pressure upon predatory garter snakes, is a chemical cue to conspecific larvae, which elicits antipredator behavior, and may also affect macroinvertebrate foraging behavior. To understand selection patterns and how potential variation might affect ecological and evolutionary processes, it is necessary to quantify TTX levels within individuals and populations. To do so has often required that animals be destructively sampled or removed from breeding habitats and brought into the laboratory. Here we demonstrate a non-destructive method of sampling adult Taricha that obviates the need to capture and collect individuals. We also show that embryos from oviposited California newt (Taricha torosa) egg masses can be individually sampled and TTX quantified from embryos. We employed three different extraction techniques to isolate TTX. Using a custom fabricated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system we quantified recovery of TTX. We found that a newly developed micro-extraction technique significantly improved recovery compared to previously used methods. Results also indicate our improvements to the HPLC method have high repeatability and increased sensitivity, with a detection limit of 48 pg (0.15 pmol) TTX. The quantified amounts of TTX in adult newts suggest fine geographic variation in toxin levels between sampling localities isolated by as little as 3 km.

  4. NON-DESTRUCTIVE RADIOCARBON DATING: NATURALLY MUMMIFIED INFANT BUNDLE FROM SW TEXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Steelman, K L; Rowe, M W; Turpin, S A; Guilderson, T P; Nightengale, L

    2004-09-07

    Plasma oxidation was used to obtain radiocarbon dates on six different materials from a naturally mummified baby bundle from the Lower Pecos River region of southwest Texas. This bundle was selected because it was thought to represent a single event and would illustrate the accuracy and precision of the plasma oxidation method. Five of the materials were clearly components of the original bundle with 13 dates combined to yield a weighted average of 2135 {+-} 11 B.P. Six dates from a wooden stick of Desert Ash averaged 939 {+-} 14 B.P., indicating that this artifact was not part of the original burial. Plasma oxidation is shown to be a virtually non-destructive alternative to combustion. Because only sub-milligram amounts of material are removed from an artifact over its exposed surface, no visible change in fragile materials has been observed, even under magnification. The method is best applied when natural organic contamination is unlikely and serious consideration of this issue is needed in all cases. If organic contamination is present, it will have to be removed before plasma oxidation to obtain accurate radiocarbon dates.

  5. Application of coupled electric field method for eddy current non-destructive inspection of multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchala, T.; Abdelhadi, B.; Benoudjit, A.

    2015-04-01

    The development of fast and accurate method describing the electromagnetic phenomena intervening in eddy current non-destructive systems is very interesting, since it permits the design of reliable systems permitting the detection and the characterisation of defect in conductive materials. The coupled electric field method presented in this article can assume a large part of these objectives, because it is fast in comparison to the finite element method and easily invertible since the sensor impedance variation is an explicit function of target physical and geometrical characteristics. These advantages have motivated us to extend this method for multilayered structures, very interesting in aeronautic industry, by superposing the inductive effects in different layers. The impedance of an absolute sensor operating above three conducting layers will be calculated and compared to those obtained with finite element method. Afterwards, we shall exploit the model to study the effect of defect characteristics on the sensor impedance. Furthermore, regarding to the depth penetration effect, we shall make into evidence the necessity of accomplishing an optimal choice of the exciting field frequency during the inspection of multilayered materials. The essential importance of this method, besides of its rapidity, resides in its possibility to be extended to 2D irregular and 3D asymmetric configurations.

  6. Non-destructive characterisation of iron gall ink drawings: not such a galling problem.

    PubMed

    Strlic, Matija; Cséfalvayová, Linda; Kolar, Jana; Menart, Eva; Kosek, Joanna; Barry, Caroline; Higgitt, Catherine; Cassar, May

    2010-04-15

    Iron gall inks are of extraordinary historical significance considering their widespread use for over a millennium. Due to their corrosiveness, which is a consequence of their acidity and content of transition metals, iron gall inks accelerate the degradation of the writing or drawing support, which in this study is rag paper. Characterisation of acidity (pH) and degree of polymerisation (DP) of cellulose in paper is thus of high interest as it enables the estimation of material stability and assessment of risks associated with its handling. Based on a well-characterised set of samples with iron gall ink from the 18th and 19th centuries, we developed a near infrared spectroscopic method with partial least squares calibration for non-destructive determination of pH and DP of both inked areas and paper. Using this method, 27 18th and 19th century iron gall ink drawings from the British Museum collection were analysed and in all cases, inked areas turned out to be more acidic and degraded than the surrounding paper. Based on the obtained DP data, we were able to estimate the time needed for the inked areas to degrade to the point when they become at risk of damage due to handling. Using the average uncertainty of the calculated lifetime, we propose a quantitative stability classification method which could contribute to the curatorial and conservation decision-making process.

  7. From local to global analysis of defect detectability in infrared non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Ospina, J. F.; Benitez, H. D.

    2014-03-01

    Several image processing techniques are employed in Infrared Non-Destructive Testing (IRNDT) to enhance defect detectability. To date, there is no adequate global measurement that objectively assesses defect visibility in processed frames. In this work, a Global Signal to Noise Ratio (GSNR) that comprehensively evaluates defect detectability in processed infrared (IR) images is proposed, as well as a defect visibility measure named Infrared Image Quality Index (IRIQI) that compares the structural information of defective and sound areas. In addition, GSNR and IRIQI are validated by using the area under ROC curve (AUC). AUC quantitatively assesses defect visibility by comparing the outcomes of processing techniques to human judgements. The remarkable benefit of this global approach is that it allows one to determine the frame at which processing techniques reveals the majority of the defects by evaluating the times at which AUC curves reach their maxima. The test pieces were a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) sample containing delaminations and a honeycomb specimen with delaminations, skin unbonds, excessive adhesive, and crushed core.

  8. Non-destructive analysis of museum objects by fibre-optic Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jim; Moens, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile technique that has frequently been applied for the investigation of art objects. By using mobile Raman instrumentation it is possible to investigate the artworks without the need for sampling. This work evaluates the use of a dedicated mobile spectrometer for the investigation of a range of museum objects in museums in Scotland, including antique Egyptian sarcophagi, a panel painting, painted surfaces on paper and textile, and the painted lid and soundboard of an early keyboard instrument. The investigations of these artefacts illustrate some analytical challenges that arise when analysing museum objects, including fluorescing varnish layers, ambient sunlight, large dimensions of artefacts and the need to handle fragile objects with care. Analysis of the musical instrument (the Mar virginals) was undertaken in the exhibition gallery, while on display, which meant that interaction with the public and health and safety issues had to be taken into account. Experimental set-up for the non-destructive Raman spectroscopic investigation of a textile banner in the National Museums of Scotland PMID:16953310

  9. Non-destructive analysis of museum objects by fibre-optic Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Tate, Jim; Moens, Luc

    2007-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile technique that has frequently been applied for the investigation of art objects. By using mobile Raman instrumentation it is possible to investigate the artworks without the need for sampling. This work evaluates the use of a dedicated mobile spectrometer for the investigation of a range of museum objects in museums in Scotland, including antique Egyptian sarcophagi, a panel painting, painted surfaces on paper and textile, and the painted lid and soundboard of an early keyboard instrument. The investigations of these artefacts illustrate some analytical challenges that arise when analysing museum objects, including fluorescing varnish layers, ambient sunlight, large dimensions of artefacts and the need to handle fragile objects with care. Analysis of the musical instrument (the Mar virginals) was undertaken in the exhibition gallery, while on display, which meant that interaction with the public and health and safety issues had to be taken into account. Experimental set-up for the non-destructive Raman spectroscopic investigation of a textile banner in the National Museums of Scotland.

  10. Non-destructive X-ray examination of weft knitted wire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, M.; Ellouz, M.; Aumann, S.; Martens, Y.; Bartelt, P.; Klöcker, M.; Kordisch, T.; Ehrmann, A.; Weber, M. O.

    2016-07-01

    Conductive yarns or wires are often integrated in smart textiles to enable data or energy transmission. In woven fabrics, these conductive parts are fixed at defined positions and thus protected from external loads. Knitted fabrics, however, have relatively loose structures, resulting in higher impacts of possible mechanical forces on the individual yarns. Hence, metallic wires with smaller diameters in particular are prone to break when integrated in knitted fabrics. In a recent project, wires of various materials including copper, silver and nickel with diameters varying between 0.05 mm and 0.23 mm were knitted in combination with textile yarns. Hand flat knitting machines of appropriate gauges were used to produce different structures. On these samples, non-destructive examinations, using an industrial X-ray system Seifert x|cube (225 kV) equipped with a minifocus X-ray tube, were carried out, directly after knitting as well as after different mechanical treatments (tensile, burst, and washing tests). In this way, structural changes of the stitch geometry could be visualized before failure. In this paper, the loop geometries in the knitted fabrics are depicted depending on knitted structures, wire properties and the applied mechanical load. Consequently, it is shown which metallic wires and yarns are most suitable to be integrated into knitted smart textiles.

  11. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; ...

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiationmore » damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.« less

  12. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOEpatents

    Xu, X. George; Naessens, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  13. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiation damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.

  14. Non-destructive testing of ceramic balls using high frequency ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petit, S; Duquennoy, M; Ouaftouh, M; Deneuville, F; Ourak, M; Desvaux, S

    2005-12-01

    Although ceramic balls are used more and more for bearings in the aerospace and space industries, defects in this type of ceramic material could be dangerous, particularly if such defects are located close to the surface. In this paper, we propose a non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride balls, based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy. Through the theoretical study of their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls using a vibration mode that is similar to surface wave propagation. The proposed methodology can both excite spheroidal vibrations in the ceramic balls and detect such vibrations over a large frequency range. Studying their resonance spectrums allows the balls' elastic parameters be characterized. Ours is an original method that can quickly estimate the velocity of surface waves using high frequency resonances, which permits surface and sub-surface areas to be tested specifically. Two applications are described in this paper. Both use velocity measurements to achieve their different goals, the first to differentiate between flawless balls from different manufacturing processes, and the second to detect small defects, such as cracks. Our method is rapid and permits the entire ceramic ball to be tested in an industrial context.

  15. Potential for non-destructive astrochemistry using the ExoMars PanCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Muller, J.-P.; Fisk, M. R.; Griffiths, A. D.; Coates, A. J.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the utility of adding a 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) light source to the ExoMars panoramic camera (PanCam) scheduled for launch in 2013. The modification makes it feasible to monitor rover drill cuttings for aromatic organic molecules and provide constraints on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as a function of depth to the 2-meter limit of the ExoMars drill. This non-destructive triage allows prioritized deployment of organic detection experiments requiring sample destruction and/or expenditure of non-replaceable resources. Utilizing the Beagle 2 PanCam backup filter wheel fitted with original blue (440 nm), green (530 nm), and red (670 nm) filters we captured fluorescent images following 365 nm excitation of 3-, 4- and 5-ring PAH species doped on Mars analog peridotite grains. We demonstrate a detection limit for pyrene of 1.5 μg in granular peridotite doped at pyrene levels of 50 +/- 5 ppm for camera-to-target distance of 1 meter.

  16. Non-destructive methods of control of thermo-physical properties of fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, A. B.; Kruglov, V. B.; Kharitonov, V. S.; Struchalin, P. G.; Galkin, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Information about the change of thermal properties of the fuel elements needed for a successful and safe operation of the nuclear power plant. At present, the existing amount of information on the fuel thermal conductivity change and “fuel-shell” thermal resistance is insufficient. Also, there is no technique that would allow for the measurement of these properties on the non-destructive way of irradiated fuel elements. We propose a method of measuring the thermal conductivity of the fuel in the fuel element and the contact thermal resistance between the fuel and the shell without damaging the integrity of the fuel element, which is based on laser flash method. The description of the experimental setup, implementing methodology, experiments scheme. The results of test experiments on mock-ups of the fuel elements and their comparison with reference data, as well as the results of numerical modeling of thermal processes that occur during the measurement. Displaying harmonization of numerical calculation with the experimental thermograms layout shell portions of the fuel cell, confirming the correctness of the calculation model.

  17. First-time observation of Mastro Giorgio masterpieces by means of non-destructive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padeletti, G.; Ingo, G. M.; Bouquillon, A.; Pages-Camagna, S.; Aucouturier, M.; Roehrs, S.; Fermo, P.

    2006-06-01

    For the first time some excellent pieces belonging to the majolica production of the great master Giorgio Andreoli from Gubbio (Central Italy) have been characterized from a chemical and structural point of view with the aim to identify the composition of both pigments and lustres. A series of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and Raman analyses have been performed on some plates coming from Museo del Palazzo dei Consoli (Gubbio) and several French museums (Louvre, Musée National de la Céramique, Musée National de la Renaissance) lustred by Giorgio Andreoli and decorated by famous majolica painters such as Francesco Xanto Avelli. The three techniques are complementary and useful in the investigation of art objects since they are non-destructive. Furthermore, the low detection limits allow the identification of all elements and compounds present, and RBS allows concentration profiling, too. It is worth noticing that the examined objects are characterized by the presence of both gold and ruby-red lustres, a peculiarity of Mastro Giorgio’s technique. The measurements by PIXE and RBS have been carried out on the AGLAE accelerator at C2RMF, Louvre Palace.

  18. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Wind Turbine Blades Using an Infrared Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.; Rumsey, M.

    1998-12-17

    The use of a digital infrared as a non-destructive evaluation thermography camera (NDE) tool was ex- plored in two separate wind turbine blade fatigue tests. The fwst test was a fatigue test of part of a 13.1 meter wood-epoxy-composite blade. The second test was on a 4.25 meter pultruded fiber glass blade section driven at several mechanical resonant frequencies. The digital infrared camera can produce images of either the static temperature distribution on the surface of the specimen, or the dynamic temperature distribution that is in phase with a specific frequency on a vibrating specimen. The dynamic temperature distribution (due to thermoplastic effects) gives a measure of the sum of the principal stresses at each point on the surface. In the wood- epoxy-composite blade fatigue test, the point of ultimate failure was detected long before failure occurred. The mode shapes obtained with the digital infrared camera, from the resonant blade tests, were in very good agree- ment with the finite-element calculations. In addition, the static temperature images of the resonating blade showed two areas that contained cracks. Close-up dy- namic inf%red images of these areas showed the crack structure that agreed with subsequent dye-penetrant analysis.

  19. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  20. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  1. Non-destructive diagnosis of relativistic electron beams using a short undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ponds, M.L.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The performance of an FEL depends critically on the characteristics of the electron beam used to drive it. In the past it has been very difficult to measure the details of the transverse and longitudinal phase-space distributions of high-energy electron beams with the precision required to predict FEL performance. Furthermore, the available diagnostics were generally pertubative, and could not be used simultaneously with lasing. We investigate the potential use of a short undulator insertion device for non-destructive diagnosis of relativistic electron beams. Incoherent visible to near-infrared synchrotron radiation from a single magnet in the diagnostic undulator will be used to obtain information on beam position and transverse phase-space. Coherent off-axis undulator radiation in the millimeter to sub-millimeter range will be used to measure longitudinal phase-space characteristics of the beam. These two types of radiation can be analyzed simultaneously, while the FEL is lasing; thus giving a complete picture of relevant electron beam characteristics. In this paper we analyze the theoretical and practical design issues associated with such a diagnostic undulator.

  2. Analysis of non-destructive current simulators of flux compression generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, K. A.; Curry, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    Development and evaluation of power conditioning systems and high power microwave components often used with flux compression generators (FCGs) requires repeated testing and characterization. In an effort to minimize the cost and time required for testing with explosive generators, non-destructive simulators of an FCG's output current have been developed. Flux compression generators and simulators of FCGs are unique pulsed power sources in that the current waveform exhibits a quasi-exponential increasing rate at which the current rises. Accurately reproducing the quasi-exponential current waveform of a FCG can be important in designing electroexplosive opening switches and other power conditioning components that are dependent on the integral of current action and the rate of energy dissipation. Three versions of FCG simulators have been developed that include an inductive network with decreasing impedance in time. A primary difference between these simulators is the voltage source driving them. It is shown that a capacitor-inductor-capacitor network driving a constant or decreasing inductive load can produce the desired high-order derivatives of the load current to replicate a quasi-exponential waveform. The operation of the FCG simulators is reviewed and described mathematically for the first time to aid in the design of new simulators. Experimental and calculated results of two recent simulators are reported with recommendations for future designs.

  3. Autofluorescence microscopy: a non-destructive tool to monitor mitochondrial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Macko, Peter; Palosaari, Taina; Whelan, Maurice P

    2011-10-30

    Visualization of NADH by fluorescence microscopy makes it possible to distinguish mitochondria inside living cells, allowing structure analysis of these organelles in a non-invasive way. Mitochondrial morphology is determined by the occurrence of mitochondrial fission and fusion. During normal cell function mitochondria appear as elongated tubular structures. However, cellular malfunction induces mitochondria to fragment into punctiform, vesicular structures. This change in morphology is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and early apoptosis. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that autofluorescence imaging of mitochondria in living eukaryotic cells provides structural and morphological information that can be used to assess mitochondrial health. We firstly established the illumination conditions that do not affect mitochondrial structure and calculated the maximum safe light dose to which the cells can be exposed. Subsequently, sequential recording of mitochondrial fluorescence was performed and changes in mitochondrial morphology were monitored in a continuous non-destructive way. This approach was then used to assess mitochondrial toxicity induced by potential toxicants exposed to mammalian cells. Both mouse and human cells were used to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity of different compounds with different toxicities. This technique constitutes a novel and promising approach to explore chemical induced toxicity because of its reliability to monitor mitochondrial morphology changes and corresponding toxicity in a non-invasive way.

  4. Non-Destructive Current Sensing for Energy Efficiency Monitoring in Buildings with Environmental Certification

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Lia Toledo Moreira; Mota, Alexandre de Assis; Coiado, Lorenzo Campos

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, buildings environmental certifications encourage the implementation of initiatives aiming to increase energy efficiency in buildings. In these certification systems, increased energy efficiency arising from such initiatives must be demonstrated. Thus, a challenge to be faced is how to check the increase in energy efficiency related to each of the employed initiatives without a considerable building retrofit. In this context, this work presents a non-destructive method for electric current sensing to assess implemented initiatives to increase energy efficiency in buildings with environmental certification. This method proposes the use of a sensor that can be installed directly in the low voltage electrical circuit conductors that are powering the initiative under evaluation, without the need for reforms that result in significant costs, repair, and maintenance. The proposed sensor consists of three elements: an air-core transformer current sensor, an amplifying/filtering stage, and a microprocessor. A prototype of the proposed sensor was developed and tests were performed to validate this sensor. Based on laboratory tests, it was possible to characterize the proposed current sensor with respect to the number of turns and cross-sectional area of the primary and secondary coils. Furthermore, using the Least Squares Method, it was possible to determine the efficiency of the air core transformer current sensor (the best efficiency found, considering different test conditions, was 2%), which leads to a linear output response. PMID:26184208

  5. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, Stefan; Truong, Vo-Van; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2014-03-01

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  6. Rapid and non-destructive identification of water-injected beef samples using multispectral imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Cao, Yue; Wang, Qiu; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Water-injected beef has aroused public concern as a major food-safety issue in meat products. In the study, the potential of multispectral imaging analysis in the visible and near-infrared (405-970 nm) regions was evaluated for identifying water-injected beef. A multispectral vision system was used to acquire images of beef injected with up to 21% content of water, and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm was employed to establish prediction model, leading to quantitative estimations of actual water increase with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.923. Subsequently, an optimized model was achieved by integrating spectral data with feature information extracted from ordinary RGB data, yielding better predictions (r = 0.946). Moreover, the prediction equation was transferred to each pixel within the images for visualizing the distribution of actual water increase. These results demonstrate the capability of multispectral imaging technology as a rapid and non-destructive tool for the identification of water-injected beef.

  7. Non-destructive determination of anisotropic mechanical properties of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Akseli, I; Hancock, B C; Cetinkaya, C

    2009-07-30

    The mechanical property anisotropy of compacts made from four commercially available pharmaceutical excipient powders (microcrystalline cellulose, lactose monohydrate, ascorbic acid, and aspartame) was evaluated. The speed of pressure (longitudinal) waves in the uni-axially compressed cubic compacts of each excipient in the three principle directions was determined using a contact ultrasonic method. Average Young's moduli of each compact in the axial (x) and radial (y and z) directions were characterized. The contact ultrasonic measurements revealed that average Young's modulus values vary with different testing orientations which indicate Young's modulus anisotropy in the compacts. The extent of Young's modulus anisotropy was quantified by using a dimensionless ratio and was found to be significantly different for each material (microcrystalline cellulose>lactose>aspartame>ascorbic acid). It is also observed that using the presented contact method, compacts at high solid fraction (0.857-0.859) could be differentiated than those at the solid fraction of 0.85 in their groups. The presented contact ultrasonic method is an attractive tool since it has the advantages of being sensitive to solid fraction ratio, non-destructive, requiring small amount of material and rapid. It is noteworthy that, since the approach provides insight into the performance of common pharmaceutical materials and fosters increased process knowledge, it can be applied to broaden the understanding of the effect of the mechanical properties on the performance (e.g., disintegration profiles) of solid oral dosage forms.

  8. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilgrim, C. C.; Heyes, A. L.; Feist, J. P.

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  9. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anshuman J.; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner. PMID:27606927

  10. High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Tsai, Esther H. R.; Dinapoli, Roberto; Müller, Elisabeth; Bunk, Oliver; Raabe, Jörg; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography—a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique—can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.

  11. Metal composite as backing for ultrasonic transducers dedicated to non-destructive measurements in hostile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubenia, R.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Despetis, F.; P, P.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.

    2016-03-01

    Our team is specialized in ultrasonic measurements in hostile environment especially under high temperatures. There is a need for acoustic transducers capable of continuous measurement at temperatures up to 700°C. To improve the performances of acoustic sensors we focus our works on the realisation and characterisation of transducer backings able to operate under very high temperature. Commercially, they are produced by the incorporation of tungsten powder in a plastic matrix, which limits the working temperature. The realisation of ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive measures at high temperatures requires adequate materials, manufacturing and assembly processes. To produce the backings, composites were made using very ductile metals such as tin and tungsten. These composites are manufactured by uniaxial hot pressing. First, we studied the influence of temperature and pressure on the densification of tin pellets. Then, several specimens made of tin/W were made and characterised by measuring the specific weight, speed and attenuation of sound. The acoustic measures were realised by ultrasonic spectroscopy. This test-bench was designed and tested on control samples of PMMA and on standard backings (epoxy / tungsten).

  12. X-ray based methods for non-destructive testing and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Randolf; Fuchs, Theobald; Uhlmann, Norman

    2008-06-01

    The increasing complexity and miniaturization in the field of new materials as well as in micro-production requires in the same way improvements and technical advances in the field of micro-NDT to provide better quality data and more detailed knowledge about the internal structures of micro-components. Therefore, non-destructive methods like radioscopy, ultrasound, optical or thermal imaging increasingly gain in importance with respect to ongoing product and material development in the different phases like material characterization, production control or module reliability testing. Because of the manifold different application fields, i.e., certain physical NDT methods applied to material inspection, characterization or reliability testing, this contribution will focus on the radioscopic-based methods related to their most important applications. Today, in modern industrial quality control, X-ray transmission is used in two different ways: Two-dimensional radioscopic transmission imaging (projection technique), usually applied to inline inspection tasks in application fields like lightweight material production, electronic component soldering or food production. Computed tomography (CT) for generation of three-dimensional data, representing spatial information and density distribution of objects. CT application fields are on the one hand the understanding of production process failure or component and module inspection (completeness) and on the other hand the dimensional measuring of hidden geometrical outlines (metrology). This paper demonstrates the methods including technical set-ups (X-ray source and detector), imaging and reconstruction results and the methods for high speed and high-resolution volume data generation and evaluation.

  13. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  14. Ultra-portable, wireless smartphone spectrometer for rapid, non-destructive testing of fruit ripeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anshuman J.; Wahi, Akshat; Kothari, Ishan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a smartphone based spectrometer design that is standalone and supported on a wireless platform. The device is inherently low-cost and the power consumption is minimal making it portable to carry out a range of studies in the field. All essential components of the device like the light source, spectrometer, filters, microcontroller and wireless circuits have been assembled in a housing of dimensions 88 mm × 37 mm × 22 mm and the entire device weighs 48 g. The resolution of the spectrometer is 15 nm, delivering accurate and repeatable measurements. The device has a dedicated app interface on the smartphone to communicate, receive, plot and analyze spectral data. The performance of the smartphone spectrometer is comparable to existing bench-top spectrometers in terms of stability and wavelength resolution. Validations of the device were carried out by demonstrating non-destructive ripeness testing in fruit samples. Ultra-Violet (UV) fluorescence from Chlorophyll present in the skin was measured across various apple varieties during the ripening process and correlated with destructive firmness tests. A satisfactory agreement was observed between ripeness and fluorescence signals. This demonstration is a step towards possible consumer, bio-sensing and diagnostic applications that can be carried out in a rapid manner.

  15. Feasibility for non-destructive discrimination of natural and beryllium-diffused sapphires using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyeol; Lee, Sanguk; Park, Jimin; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy based non-destructive discrimination between natural and beryllium-diffused (Be-diffused) sapphires has been attempted. The initial examination of Raman image acquired on a sapphire revealed that microscopic structural and compositional heterogeneity was apparent in the sample, so acquisition of spectra able to represent a whole body of sapphire rather than a localized area was necessary for a reliable discrimination. For this purpose, a wide area illumination (WAI) scheme (illumination area: 28.3mm(2)) providing a large sampling volume was employed to collect representative Raman spectra of sapphires. Upon the diffusion of Be into a sapphire, the band shift originated from varied lattice structure by substitution of Be at cation sites was observed and utilized as a valuable spectral signature for the discrimination. In the domain of principal component (PC) scores, the groups of natural and Be-diffused sapphires were identifiable with minor overlapping and the cross-validated discrimination error was 7.3% when k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) was used as a classifier.

  16. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, O.; Galley, R. J.; Delille, B.; Else, B. G. T.; Geilfus, N.-X.; Lemes, M.; Des Roches, M.; Francus, P.; Tison, J.-L.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-09-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate 3-D images of air-volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air-volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the size of the brine channel. We differentiate micro bubbles (∅ < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 < ∅ < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (∅ > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of air inclusions, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice microstructure (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration and can help considerably improving parameterization of these processes in sea ice biogeochemical models.

  17. Imaging air volume fraction in sea ice using non-destructive X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabeck, Odile; Galley, Ryan; Delille, Bruno; Else, Brent; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Lemes, Marcos; Des Roches, Mathieu; Francus, Pierre; Tison, Jean-Louis; Rysgaard, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Although the presence of a gas phase in sea ice creates the potential for gas exchange with the atmosphere, the distribution of gas bubbles and transport of gases within the sea ice are still poorly understood. Currently no straightforward technique exists to measure the vertical distribution of air volume fraction in sea ice. Here, we present a new fast and non-destructive X-ray computed tomography technique to quantify the air volume fraction and produce separate images of air volume inclusions in sea ice. The technique was performed on relatively thin (4-22 cm) sea ice collected from an experimental ice tank. While most of the internal layers showed air volume fractions < 2 %, the ice-air interface (top 2 cm) systematically showed values up to 5 %. We suggest that the air volume fraction is a function of both the bulk ice gas saturation factor and the brine volume fraction. We differentiate micro bubbles (Ø < 1 mm), large bubbles (1 mm < Ø < 5 mm) and macro bubbles (Ø > 5 mm). While micro bubbles were the most abundant type of gas bubbles, most of the air porosity observed resulted from the presence of large and macro bubbles. The ice texture (granular and columnar) as well as the permeability state of ice are important factors controlling the air volume fraction. The technique developed is suited for studies related to gas transport and bubble migration.

  18. Non-destructive assessment of mechanical properties of microcrystalline cellulose compacts.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Emmi; Ehlers, Henrik; Antikainen, Osmo; Sandler, Niklas; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2015-11-30

    In the present study the mechanical properties of microcrystalline cellulose compacts compressed were studied. The resistance to crushing was tested using diametral compression testing and apparent Young's modulus was determined using consecutive uniaxial compression of the full cross-sectional area of single tablets. As non-elastic deformation during the first compression cycle and reverse plasticity were discovered, the loading phase of the second compression cycle was used to determine Young's modulus. The relative standard deviation of 10 consecutive measurements was 3.6%. The results indicate a direct correlation between crushing strength and Young's modulus, which found further support when comparing surface roughness data and radial recovery of the tablets to Young's modulus. The extrapolated elastic modulus at zero-porosity was found to be 1.80±0.08 GPa, which is slightly lower than previously reported values, confirming the complexity of measuring the elastic properties of microcrystalline cellulose compacts. The method can be used for non-destructive assessment of mechanical properties of powder compacts for example during storage studies.

  19. Non-destructive optical monitoring of grape maturation by proximal sensing.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghozlen, Naïma; Cerovic, Zoran G; Germain, Claire; Toutain, Sandrine; Latouche, Gwendal

    2010-01-01

    A new, commercial, fluorescence-based optical sensor for plant constituent assessment was recently introduced. This sensor, called the Multiplex(®) (FORCE-A, Orsay, France), was used to monitor grape maturation by specifically monitoring anthocyanin accumulation. We derived the empirical anthocyanin content calibration curves for Champagne red grape cultivars, and we also propose a general model for the influence of the proportion of red berries, skin anthocyanin content and berry size on Multiplex(®) indices. The Multiplex(®) was used on both berry samples in the laboratory and on intact clusters in the vineyard. We found that the inverted and log-transformed far-red fluorescence signal called the FERARI index, although sensitive to sample size and distance, is potentially the most widely applicable. The more robust indices, based on chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratios, showed three ranges of dependence on anthocyanin content. We found that up to 0.16 mg cm(-2), equivalent to approximately 0.6 mg g(-1), all indices increase with accumulation of skin anthocyanin content. Excitation ratio-based indices decrease with anthocyanin accumulation beyond 0.27 mg cm(-2). We showed that the Multiplex(®) can be advantageously used in vineyards on intact clusters for the non-destructive assessment of anthocyanin content of vine blocks and can now be tested on other fruits and vegetables based on the same model.

  20. The use of digital image correlation for non-destructive and multi-scale damage quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Eric; Saralaya, Raghavendra; Cuadra, Jefferson; Hazeli, Kavan; Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Carmi, Rami; Bartoli, Ivan; Kontsos, Antonios

    2013-04-01

    This research demonstrates the use of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) as a non-contact, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT and E) technique by presenting experimental results pertinent to damage monitoring and quantification in several material systems at different length scales of interest. At the microstructural level compact tension aluminum alloy specimens were tested under Mode I loading conditions using an appropriate field of view to track grain scale crack initiation and growth. The results permitted the quantification of the strain accumulation near the tip of the fatigue pre-crack, as well as the computation of the relevant crack opening displacement as a function of crack length. At the mesoscale level, damage quantification in fiber reinforced composites subject to both tensile and fatigue loading conditions was achieved by using the DIC as part of a novel integrated NDT approach combining both acoustic and thermal methods. DIC in these experiments provided spatially resolved and high accuracy strain measurements capable to track the formation of damage "hot spots" that corresponded to the sites of the ultimately visible fracture pattern, while it further allowed the correlation of mechanical parameters to thermal and acoustic features. Finally, at the macrostructural level DIC measurements were also performed and compared to traditional displacement gauges mounted on a steel deck model subject to both static and dynamic loads, as well as on masonry structures including hollow and grouted concrete walls.

  1. Non-destructive Evaluation of Bonds Between Fiberglass Composite and Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Selina; Sonta, Kestutis; Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. E.; Berger, Libby

    2015-01-01

    To assess the integrity and reliability of an adhesive joint in an automotive composite component, several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies are correlated to lap shear bond strengths. A glass-fabric-reinforced composite structure was bonded to a metallic structure with a two-part epoxy adhesive. Samples were subsequently cut and tested in shear, and flaws were found in some areas. This study aims to develop a reliable and portable NDE system for service-level adhesive inspection in the automotive industry. The results of the experimental investigation using several NDE methods are presented and discussed. Fiberglass-to-metal bonding is the ideal configuration for NDE via thermography using excitation with induction heating, due to the conductive metal and non-conductive glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Excitation can be either by a research-grade induction heater of highly defined frequency and intensity, or by a service-level heater, such as would be used for sealing windshields in a body shop. The thermographs thus produced can be captured via a high-resolution infrared camera, with principal component analysis and 2D spatial Laplacian processing. Alternatively, the thermographs can be captured by low resolution thermochromic microencapsulated liquid crystal film imaging, which needs no post-processing and can be very inexpensive. These samples were also examined with phased-array ultrasound. The NDE methods are compared to the lap shear values and to each other for approximate cost, accuracy, and time and level of expertise needed.

  2. Combined non-destructive XRF and SR-XAS study of archaeological artefacts.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Fabrizio; Barone, Germana; Crupi, Vincenza; Longo, Francesca; Majolino, Domenico; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Venuti, Valentina

    2011-03-01

    We report on a non-destructive study of Sicilian ceramic fragments of cultural heritage interest, classified as "proto-majolica" pottery and dating back to the twelfth to thirteen centuries AD. The analytical approach used is based on the employment of two totally non-invasive spectroscopic techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), using a portable energy-dispersive XRF analyser, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, using synchrotron radiation as a probe (SR-XAS). XRF measurements allowed us to collect elemental and spatially resolved information on major and minor constituents of the decorated coating of archaeological pottery fragments, so providing preliminary results on the main components characterizing the surface. In particular, we assigned to Fe and Mn the role of key elements of the colouring agent. With the aim of obtaining more detailed information, we performed SR-XAS measurements at the Fe and Mn K-edges at the Italian BM08 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The experimental data were analysed by applying principal component analysis and least-squares fitting to the near-edge part of the spectra (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) to determine the samples' speciation. From the overall results, umber, a class of brownish pigments characterized by a mixture of hydrated iron and manganese oxides, has been ascribed as a pigmenting agent.

  3. Development of vibrational spectroscopic methods to rapidly and non-destructively assess quality of chicken breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of Vibrational Spectroscopic Methods to Rapidly and Non-Destructively Assess Quality of Chicken Breast Meat H. Zhuang1, M. Sohn2, S. Trabelsi1 and K. Lawrence1 1Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, 950 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 2University of Georgia, De...

  4. Non-destructive detection and quantification of blueberry bruising using near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, blueberry bruising is evaluated by either human visual/tactile inspection or firmness measurement instruments. These methods are destructive and time-consuming. The goal of this paper was to develop a non-destructive approach for blueberry bruising detection and quantification. The spe...

  5. Direct, non-destructive, and rapid evaluation of developmental cotton fibers by ATR FT-IR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical, compositional, and structural differences within the fibers at different growth stages have been investigated considerably through a number of methodologies. Due to its direct, non-destructive, and rapid attribute, this study reports the utilization of attenuated total reflection Fourier t...

  6. Development of non-destructive quality measurement technique for cabbage seed (Brassica campestris L) using hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cabbage (Brassica campestris L) is an important crop for Asian countries especially in Korea, Japan and China. In order to achieve uniform and high-yield rate of cabbage product, the seed lot quality needs to be controlled. Non-destructive evaluation of seed viability is an important technique for i...

  7. A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay with a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao Xin; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2010-08-04

    A new facility for non-destructive assay using a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 15x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays.

  8. Long-term selection using a single trait criterion, non-destructive deformation, in White Leghorns: Effect over time on genetic parameters for traits related to egg production.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Olivier; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Vincenot, Christian E; Nagamine, Yoshitaka; Moriya, Kazuyuki

    2017-02-01

    Although non-destructive deformation is relevant for assessing eggshell strength, few long-term selection experiments are documented which use non-destructive deformation as a selection criterion. This study used restricted maximum likelihood-based methods with a four-trait animal model to analyze the effect of non-destructive deformation on egg production, egg weight and sexual maturity in a two-way selection experiment involving 17 generations of White Leghorns. In the strong shell line, corresponding to the line selected for low non-destructive deformation values, the heritability estimates were 0.496 for non-destructive deformation, 0.253 for egg production, 0.660 for egg weight and 0.446 for sexual maturity. In the weak shell line, corresponding to the line selected for high non-destructive deformation values, the heritabilities were 0.372, 0.162, 0.703 and 0.404, respectively. An asymmetric response to selection was observed for non-destructive deformation, egg production and sexual maturity, whereas egg weight decreased for both lines. Using non-destructive deformation to select for stronger eggshell had a small negative effect on egg production and sexual maturity, suggesting the need for breeding programs to balance selection between eggshell traits and egg production traits. However, the analysis of the genetic correlation between non-destructive deformation and egg weight revealed that large eggs are not associated with poor eggshell quality.

  9. The Magic of Balanced Groups: Educational Applications of Magic Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Nandakumar, N. R.; Ore, Melanie L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides students with many interesting observations regarding the nature of magic squares, magic rectangles, and quasi-magic squares and provides tools for teachers to group students into ability-balanced cooperative learning groups.

  10. Structure of model peptides based on Nephila clavipes dragline silk spidroin (MaSp1) studied by 13C cross polarization/magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingying; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Knight, David; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    To obtain detailed structural information for spider dragline spidroin (MaSp1), we prepared three versions of the consensus peptide GGLGGQGAGAAAAAAGGAGQGGYGGLGSQGAGR labeled with 13C at six different sites. The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra were observed after treating the peptides with different reagents known to alter silk protein conformations. The conformation-dependent 13C NMR chemical shifts and peak deconvolution were used to determine the local structure and the fractional compositions of the conformations, respectively. After trifluoroacetic acid (solvent)/diethyl ether (coagulant) treatment, the N-terminal region of poly-Ala (PLA) sequence, Ala8 and Ala10, adopted predominantly the alpha-helix with a substantial amount of beta-sheet. The central region, Ala15, Ala18, and Leu26, and C-terminal region, Ala31, of the peptide were dominated by either 3(1)-helix or alpha-helix. There was no indication of beta-sheet, although peak broadening indicates that the torsion angle distribution is relatively large. After 9 M LiBr/dialysis treatment, three kinds of conformation, beta-sheet, random coil, and 3(1)-helix, appeared, in almost equal amounts of beta-sheet and random coil conformations for Ala8 and Ala10 residues and distorted 3(1)-helix at the central region of the peptide. In contrast, after formic acid/methanol and 8 M urea/acetonitrile treatments, all of the local structure tends to beta-sheet, although small amounts of random coil are also observed. The peak pattern of the Ala Cbeta carbon after 8 M urea/acetonitrile treatment is similar to the corresponding patterns of silk fiber from Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini. We also synthesized a longer 13C-labeled peptide containing two PLA blocks and three Gly-rich blocks. After 8 M urea/acetonitrile treatment, the conformation pattern was closely similar to that of the shorter peptide.

  11. The effect of variation in phased array element performance for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE).

    PubMed

    Duxbury, David; Russell, Jonathan; Lowe, Michael

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effects of phased array element performance on ultrasonic beam integrity. This investigation has been performed using an array beam model based on Huygens' principle to independently investigate the effects of element sensitivity and phase, and non-functioning elements via Monte Carlo simulation. The purpose of this work is to allow a new method of array calibration for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) to be adopted that focuses on probe integrity rather than beam integrity. This approach is better suited to component inspections that utilise Full Matrix Capture (FMC) to record data as the calibration routine is uncoupled from the beams that the array is required to produce. For this approach to be adopted specifications must be placed on element performance that guarantee beam quality without carrying out any beam forming. The principal result of this investigation is that the dominant outcome following variations in array element performance is the introduction of beam artefacts such as main beam broadening, raising of the noise floor of the ultrasonic field, and the enlargement or creation of side lobes. Specifications for practical allowable limits of element sensitivity, element phase, and the number of non-functioning elements have been suggested based on a minimum amplitude difference between beam artefacts and the main beam peak of 8 dB. Simulation at a number of centre frequencies has led to a recommendation that the product of transducer bandwidth and maximum phase error should be kept below 0.051 and 0.035 for focused and plane beams respectively. Element sensitivity should be within 50% of mean value of the aperture, and no more than 9% of the elements should be non-functioning.

  12. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology.

    PubMed

    Trombka, Jacob I; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-09-10

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio.

  13. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzalla, S.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad; Chabaat, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  14. Characterization of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films using microwave non-destructive testing technique.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Nor Khaizan; Wui, Wong Tin; Ghodgaonkar, Deepak K; Taib, Mohd Nasir

    2007-01-17

    The applicability of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique in characterization of matrix property of pharmaceutical films was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and loratadine were selected as model matrix polymer and drug, respectively. Both blank and drug loaded hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method and were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using microwave NDT technique as well as ultraviolet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The results indicated that blank hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H and C-H domains of the polymer chains upon conditioned at a lower level of relative humidity. In the case of loratadine loaded films, a greater propensity of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H moiety was mediated in samples conditioned at the lower level of relative humidity, and via the C-H moiety when 50% relative humidity was selected as the condition for sample storage. Apparently, the absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction involving the O-H and C-H moieties. The measurement of microwave NDT test at 8GHz was sensitive to the chemical environment involving O-H moiety while it was greatly governed by the C-H moiety in test conducted at a higher frequency band of microwave. Similar observation was obtained with respect to the profiles of microwave NDT measurements against the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films containing chlorpheniramine maleate. The microwave NDT measurement is potentially suitable for use as an apparent indicator of the state of polymer-polymer and drug

  15. Non-destructive lichen biomass estimation in northwestern Alaska: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Abbey; Neitlich, Peter; Smith, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial lichen biomass is an important indicator of forage availability for caribou in northern regions, and can indicate vegetation shifts due to climate change, air pollution or changes in vascular plant community structure. Techniques for estimating lichen biomass have traditionally required destructive harvesting that is painstaking and impractical, so we developed models to estimate biomass from relatively simple cover and height measurements. We measured cover and height of forage lichens (including single-taxon and multi-taxa "community" samples, n = 144) at 73 sites on the Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska, and harvested lichen biomass from the same plots. We assessed biomass-to-volume relationships using zero-intercept regressions, and compared differences among two non-destructive cover estimation methods (ocular vs. point count), among four landcover types in two ecoregions, and among single-taxon vs. multi-taxa samples. Additionally, we explored the feasibility of using lichen height (instead of volume) as a predictor of stand-level biomass. Although lichen taxa exhibited unique biomass and bulk density responses that varied significantly by growth form, we found that single-taxon sampling consistently under-estimated true biomass and was constrained by the need for taxonomic experts. We also found that the point count method provided little to no improvement over ocular methods, despite increased effort. Estimated biomass of lichen-dominated communities (mean lichen cover: 84.9±1.4%) using multi-taxa, ocular methods differed only nominally among landcover types within ecoregions (range: 822 to 1418 g m-2). Height alone was a poor predictor of lichen biomass and should always be weighted by cover abundance. We conclude that the multi-taxa (whole-community) approach, when paired with ocular estimates, is the most reasonable and practical method for estimating lichen biomass at landscape scales in northwest Alaska.

  16. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, Jacob I.; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-01-01

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio.

  17. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    SciTech Connect

    Harzalla, S. Chabaat, M.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  18. Microwave non-destructive testing technique for characterization of HPMC-PEG 3000 films.

    PubMed

    Wong, T W; Deepak, K G; Taib, M N; Anuar, N K

    2007-10-01

    The capacity of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique to characterize the matrix property of binary polymeric films for use as transdermal drug delivery system was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 were the choice of polymeric matrix and plasticizer, respectively with loratadine as the model drug. Both blank and drug loaded HPMC-PEG 3000 films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method. These films were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using the established methods of ultra-violet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methods, as well as, novel microwave NDT technique. Blank films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H domain upon storage at a lower level of relative humidity, whereas drug loaded films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H, C-H and/or aromatic C=C functional groups when they were stored at a lower or moderate level of relative humidity. The absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer, and/or drug-polymer interaction of the matrix. The measurements of microwave NDT test at 8 and 12 GHz were sensitive to the polar fraction of film involving functional group such as O-H moiety and the less polar environment of matrix consisting of functional groups such as C-H and aromatic C=C moieties. The state of interaction between polymer, plasticizer and/or drug of a binary polymeric film can be elucidated through its absorption and transmission profiles of microwave.

  19. A rapid and non-destructive screenable marker, FAST, for identifying transformed seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takashi L; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2010-02-01

    The creation of transgenic plants has contributed extensively to the advancement of plant science. Establishing homozygous transgenic lines is time-consuming and laborious, and using antibiotics or herbicides to select transformed plants may adversely affect the growth of some transgenic plants. Here we describe a novel technology, which we have named FAST (fluorescence-accumulating seed technology), that overcomes these difficulties. Although this technology was designed for use in Arabidopsis thaliana, it may be adapted for use in other plants. The technology is based on the expression of a fluorescent co-dominant screenable marker FAST, under the control of a seed-specific promoter, on the oil body membrane. The FAST marker harbors a fusion gene encoding either GFP or RFP with an oil body membrane protein that is prominent in seeds. The marker protein was only expressed in a specific organ (i.e. in dry seeds) and at a specific time (i.e. during dormancy), which are desirable features of selectable and/or screenable markers. This technique provides an immediate and non-destructive method for identifying transformed dry seeds. It identified the heterozygous transformed seeds among the T(1) population and the homozygous seeds among the T(2) population with a false-discovery rate of <1%. The FAST marker reduces the length of time required to produce homozygous transgenic lines from 7.5 to 4 months. Furthermore, it does not require sterilization, clean-bench protocols or the handling of large numbers of plants. This technology should greatly facilitate the generation of transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  20. Non-destructive inspection protocol for reinforced concrete barriers and bridge railings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintakunta, Satish R.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-02-01

    Reinforced concrete highway barriers and bridge railings serve to prevent errant vehicles from departing the travel way at grade separations. Despite the important role that they play in maintaining safety and their ubiquitous nature, barrier inspection rarely moves beyond visual inspection. In August 2008, a tractor-trailer fatally departed William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after it dislodged a section of the bridge barrier. Investigations following the accident identified significant corrosion of the anchor bolts attaching the bridge railing to the bridge deck. As a result of the information gathered during its investigation of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made recommendations to the Federal Highway Administration concerning Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of concrete bridge railings. The Center for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA is currently evaluating feasibility of using four technologies - ground penetrating radar (GPR), ultrasonic pulse-echo, digital radiography and infrared thermal imaging methods to develop bridge inspection methods that augment visual inspections, offer reliable measurement techniques, and are practical, both in terms of time and cost, for field inspection work. Controlled samples containing predefined corrosion levels in reinforcing steel were embedded at barrier connection points for laboratory testing. All four NDE techniques were used in the initial phase I testing. An inspection protocol for detecting and measuring the corrosion of reinforced steel embedded in the anchorage system will be developed as part of phase II research. The identified technologies shall be further developed for field testing utilizing a structure with a barrier in good condition and a structure with a barrier in poor condition.

  1. The use of non-destructive passive neutron measurement methods in dismantling and radioactive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jallu, F.; Allinei, P. G.; Bernard, P.; Loridon, J.; Soyer, P.; Pouyat, D.; Torreblanca, L.; Reneleau, A.

    2011-07-01

    The cleaning up and dismantling of nuclear facilities lead to a great volume of technological radioactive wastes which need to be characterized in order to be sent to the adequate final disposal or interim storage. The control and characterization can be performed with non-destructive nuclear measurements such as gamma-ray spectrometry. Passive neutron counting is an alternative when the alpha-gamma emitters cannot be detected due to the presence of a high gamma emission resulting from fission or activation products, or when the waste matrix is too absorbing for the gamma rays of interest (too dense and/or made of high atomic number elements). It can also be a complement to gamma-ray spectrometry when two measurement results must be confronted to improve the confidence in the activity assessment. Passive neutron assays involve the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons emitted by even nuclides ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 242}Cm, {sup 244}Cm...) and neutrons resulting from ({alpha}, n) reactions with light nuclides (O, F, Be...). The latter is conditioned by the presence of high {alpha}-activity radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am...) and low-Z elements, which depends on the chemical form (metallic, oxide or fluorine) of the plutonium or uranium contaminant. This paper presents the recent application of passive neutron methods to the cleaning up of a nuclear facility located at CEA Cadarache (France), which concerns the Pu mass assessment of 2714 historic, 100 litre radioactive waste drums produced between 1980 and 1997. Another application is the dismantling and decommissioning of an uranium enrichment facility for military purposes, which involves the {sup 235}U and total uranium quantifications in about a thousand, large compressors employed in the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. (authors)

  2. Infrared thermography non-destructive evaluation of lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    The power lithium-ion battery with its high specific energy, high theoretical capacity and good cycle-life is a prime candidate as a power source for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Safety is especially important for large-scale lithium-ion batteries, especially the thermal analysis is essential for their development and design. Thermal modeling is an effective way to understand the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion battery during charging and discharging. With the charging and discharging, the internal heat generation of the lithium-ion battery becomes large, and the temperature rises leading to an uneven temperature distribution induces partial degradation. Infrared (IR) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) has been well developed for decades years in materials, structures, and aircraft. Most thermographic methods need thermal excitation to the measurement structures. In NDE of battery, the thermal excitation is the heat generated from carbon and cobalt electrodes in electrolyte. A technique named "power function" has been developed to determine the heat by chemical reactions. In this paper, the simulations of the transient response of the temperature distribution in the lithium-ion battery are developed. The key to resolving the security problem lies in the thermal controlling, including the heat generation and the internal and external heat transfer. Therefore, three-dimensional modelling for capturing geometrical thermal effects on battery thermal abuse behaviour is required. The simulation model contains the heat generation during electrolyte decomposition and electrical resistance component. Oven tests are simulated by three-dimensional model and the discharge test preformed by test system. Infrared thermography of discharge is recorded in order to analyze the security of the lithium-ion power battery. Nondestructive detection is performed for thermal abuse analysis and discharge analysis.

  3. X-ray phase scanning setup for non-destructive testing using Talbot-Lau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachche, S.; Nonoguchi, M.; Kato, K.; Kageyama, M.; Koike, T.; Kuribayashi, M.; Momose, A.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating interferometry has a great potential for X-ray phase imaging over conventional X-ray absorption imaging which does not provide significant contrast for weakly absorbing objects and soft biological tissues. X-ray Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers which are composed of transmission gratings and measure the differential X-ray phase shifts have gained popularity because they operate with polychromatic beams. In X-ray radiography, especially for nondestructive testing in industrial applications, the feasibility of continuous sample scanning is not yet completely revealed. A scanning setup is frequently advantageous when compared to a direct 2D static image acquisition in terms of field of view, exposure time, illuminating radiation, etc. This paper demonstrates an efficient scanning setup for grating-based Xray phase imaging using laboratory-based X-ray source. An apparatus consisting of an X-ray source that emits X-rays vertically, optical gratings and a photon-counting detector was used with which continuously moving objects across the field of view as that of conveyor belt system can be imaged. The imaging performance of phase scanner was tested by scanning a long continuous moving sample at a speed of 5 mm/s and absorption, differential-phase and visibility images were generated by processing non-uniform moire movie with our specially designed phase measurement algorithm. A brief discussion on the feasibility of phase scanner with scanning setup approach including X-ray phase imaging performance is reported. The successful results suggest a breakthrough for scanning objects those are moving continuously on conveyor belt system non-destructively using the scheme of X-ray phase imaging.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Non-Destructive Examination of Dissimilar Metal Welds and Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Deborah A.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted research since 1977 in the areas of environmentally assisted cracking and assessment and reliability of non-destructive examination (NDE). Recent occurrences of cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds and Alloy 600 base metal at several domestic and overseas plants have raised several issues relating to both of these areas of NRC research. The occurrences of cracking were identified by the discovery of boric acid deposits resulting from through-wall cracking in the primary system pressure boundary. Analyses indicate that the cracking has occurred due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 82/182 welds. This cracking has occurred in two different locations: in hot leg nozzle-to-safe end welds and in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle welds. The cracking associated with safe-end welds is important due to the potential for a large loss of reactor coolant inventory, and the cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal and welds, particularly circumferential cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal, is important due to the potential for a control rod to eject resulting in a loss of coolant accident. The industry response in the U.S. to this cracking is being coordinated through the Electric Power Research Institute's Materials Reliability Project (EPRI-MRP) in a comprehensive, multifaceted effort. Although the industry program is addressing many of the issues raised by these cracking occurrences, confirmatory research is necessary for the staff to evaluate the work conducted by industry groups. Several issues requiring additional consideration regarding the generic implications of these isolated events have been identified. This paper will discuss the recent events of significant cracking in domestic and foreign plants, discuss the limitations of NDE in detecting SCC, identify deficiencies in information available in this area, discuss the USNRC approach to address these issues, and discuss the

  5. Pallasite formation after a non-destructive impact. An experimental- and image analyses-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solferino, Giulio; Golabek, Gregor J.; Nimmo, Francis; Schmidt, Max W.

    2015-04-01

    The formation conditions of pallasite meteorites in the interior of terrestrial planetesimals have been matter of debate over the last 40 years. Among other characteristics, the simple mineralogical composition (i.e., olivine, FeNi, FeS +/- pyroxene) and the dualism between fragmental and rounded olivine-bearing pallasites must be successfully reproduced by a potential formation scenario. This study incorporates a series of annealing experiments with olivine plus Fe-S, and digital image analyses of slabs from Brenham, Brahin, Seymchan, and Springwater pallasites. Additionally a 1D finite-difference numerical model was employed to show that a non-destructive collision followed by mixing of the impactor's core with the target body silicate mantle could lead to the formation of both fragmental and rounded pallasite types. Specifically, an impact occurring right after the accomplishment of the target body differentiation and up to several millions of years afterwards allows for (i) average grain sizes consistent with the observed rounded olivine-bearing pallasites, (ii) a remnant magnetization of Fe-Ni olivine inclusions as measured in natural pallasites and (iii) for the metallographic cooling rates derived from Fe-Ni in pallasites. An important result of this investigation is the definition of the grain growth rate of olivine in molten Fe-S as follows: dn - d0n = k0 exp(-Ea/RT) t, where, d0 is the starting grain size, d the grain size at time t, n = 2.42(46) the growth exponent, k0 = 9.43•E06 μm n s-1 a characteristic constant, Ea = 289 kJ/mol the activation energy for a specific growth process, R the gas constant, and T the absolute temperature. The computed olivine coarsening rate is markedly faster than in olivine-FeNi and olivine-Ni systems.

  6. Non-destructive inspection protocol for reinforced concrete barriers and bridge railings

    SciTech Connect

    Chintakunta, Satish R.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-02-18

    Reinforced concrete highway barriers and bridge railings serve to prevent errant vehicles from departing the travel way at grade separations. Despite the important role that they play in maintaining safety and their ubiquitous nature, barrier inspection rarely moves beyond visual inspection. In August 2008, a tractor-trailer fatally departed William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after it dislodged a section of the bridge barrier. Investigations following the accident identified significant corrosion of the anchor bolts attaching the bridge railing to the bridge deck. As a result of the information gathered during its investigation of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made recommendations to the Federal Highway Administration concerning Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of concrete bridge railings. The Center for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA is currently evaluating feasibility of using four technologies - ground penetrating radar (GPR), ultrasonic pulse-echo, digital radiography and infrared thermal imaging methods to develop bridge inspection methods that augment visual inspections, offer reliable measurement techniques, and are practical, both in terms of time and cost, for field inspection work. Controlled samples containing predefined corrosion levels in reinforcing steel were embedded at barrier connection points for laboratory testing. All four NDE techniques were used in the initial phase I testing. An inspection protocol for detecting and measuring the corrosion of reinforced steel embedded in the anchorage system will be developed as part of phase II research. The identified technologies shall be further developed for field testing utilizing a structure with a barrier in good condition and a structure with a barrier in poor condition.

  7. Non-Destructive Survey of Archaeological Sites Using Airborne Laser Scanning and Geophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poloprutský, Z.; Cejpová, M.; Němcová, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the non-destructive documentation of the "Radkov" (Svitavy district, Czech Republic) archaeological site. ALS, GPR and land survey mapping will be used for the analysis. The fortified hilltop settlement "Radkov" is an immovable historical monument with preserved relics of anthropogenic origin in relief. Terrain reconnaissance can identify several accentuated objects on site. ALS enables identification of poorly recognizable archaeological objects and their contexture in the field. Geophysical survey enables defunct objects identification. These objects are hidden below the current ground surface and their layout is crucial. Land survey mapping provides technical support for ALS and GPR survey. It enables data georeferencing in geodetic reference systems. GIS can then be used for data analysis. M. Cejpová and J. Němcová have studied this site over a long period of time. In 2012 Radkov was surveyed using ALS in the project "The Research of Ancient Road in Southwest Moravia and East Bohemia". Since 2015 the authors have been examining this site. This paper summarises the existing results of the work of these authors. The digital elevation model in the form of a grid (GDEM) with a resolution 1 m of 2012 was the basis for this work. In 2015 the survey net, terrain reconnaissance and GPR survey of two archaeological objects were done at the site. GDEM was compared with these datasets. All datasets were processed individually and its results were compared in ArcGIS. This work was supported by the Grant Agency of the CTU in Prague, grant No. SGS16/063/OHK1/1T/11.

  8. A 23Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, XANES, and high-temperature X-ray diffraction study of NaUO3, Na4UO5, and Na2U2O7.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Raison, P E; Martel, L; Charpentier, T; Farnan, I; Prieur, D; Hennig, C; Scheinost, A C; Konings, R J M; Cheetham, A K

    2014-01-06

    The valence state of uranium has been confirmed for the three sodium uranates NaU(V)O3/[Rn](5f(1)), Na4U(VI)O5/[Rn](5f(0)), and Na2U(VI)2O7/[Rn](5f(0)), using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Solid-state (23)Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) measurements have been performed for the first time, yielding chemical shifts at -29.1 (NaUO3), 15.1 (Na4UO5), and -14.1 and -19 ppm (Na1 8-fold coordinated and Na2 7-fold coordinated in Na2U2O7), respectively. The [Rn]5f(1) electronic structure of uranium in NaUO3 causes a paramagnetic shift in comparison to Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7, where the electronic structure is [Rn]5f(0). A (23)Na multi quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) study on Na2U2O7 has confirmed a monoclinic rather than rhombohedral structure with evidence for two distinct Na sites. DFT calculations of the NMR parameters on the nonmagnetic compounds Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7 have permitted the differentiation between the two Na sites of the Na2U2O7 structure. The linear thermal expansion coefficients of all three compounds have been determined using high-temperature X-ray diffraction: αa = 22.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 12.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 16.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 52.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for NaUO3 in the range 298-1273 K; αa = 37.1 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 6.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 81.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na4UO5 in the range 298-1073 K; αa = 6.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 14.4 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 26.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), αβ = -7.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = -217.6 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na2U2O7 in the range 298-573 K. The α to β phase transition reported for the last compound above about 600 K was not observed in the present studies, either by high-temperature X-ray diffraction or by differential scanning calorimetry.

  9. The Role of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Predicting the Invasive Component in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosed on Preoperative Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Suhkmann; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Siwon; Shim, Ye Eun; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Gong, Gyungyub

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed on preoperative biopsy. We investigated whether the metabolic profiling of tissue samples using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy could be used to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. Our institutional review board approved this combined retrospective and prospective study. Tissue samples were collected from 30 patients with pure DCIS and from 30 with DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. All patients were diagnosed with DCIS by preoperative core-needle biopsy and underwent surgical resection. The metabolic profiling of tissue samples was performed by HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. All observable metabolite signals were identified and quantified in all tissue samples. Metabolite intensity normalized by total spectral intensities was compared according to the tumor type using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). By univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations of choline-containing compounds obtained with HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy did not differ significantly between the pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma groups. However, the GPC/PC ratio was higher in the pure DCIS group than in the DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma group (p = 0.004, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.064), as well as the concentration of myo-inositol and succinate. By multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles could clearly discriminate between pure DCIS and DCIS accompanying invasive carcinoma. Our preliminary results suggest that HR-MAS MR metabolomics on breast tissue may be able to distinguish between DCIS lesions with or without an invasive component. PMID:27560937

  10. Structure of Amantadine-Bound M2 Transmembrane Peptide of Influenza A in Lipid Bilayers from Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid-State NMR: the Role of Ser31 in Amantadine Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Sarah D.; Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    The M2 proton channel of influenza A is the target of the antiviral drugs amantadine and rimantadine, whose effectiveness has been abolished by a single-site mutation of Ser31 to Asn in the transmembrane domain of the protein. Recent high-resolution structures of the M2 transmembrane domain obtained from detergent-solubilized protein in solution and crystal environments gave conflicting drug binding sites. We present magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR results of Ser31 and a number of other residues in the M2 transmembrane peptide (M2TMP) bound to lipid bilayers. Comparison of the spectra of the membrane-bound apo and complexed M2TMP indicates that Ser31 is the site of the largest chemical shift perturbation by amantadine. The chemical shift constraints lead to a monomer structure with a small kink of the helical axis at Gly34. A tetramer model is then constructed using the helix tilt angle and several interhelical distances previously measured on unoriented bilayer samples. This tetramer model differs from the solution and crystal structures in terms of the openness of the N-terminus of the channel, the constriction at Ser31, and the sidechain conformations of Trp41, a residue important for channel gating. Moreover, the tetramer model suggests that Ser31 may interact with amantadine amine via hydrogen bonding. While the apo and drug-bound M2TMP have similar average structures, the complexed peptide has much narrower linewidths at physiological temperature, indicating drug-induced changes of the protein dynamics in the membrane. Further, at low temperature, several residues show narrower lines in the complexed peptide than the apo peptide, indicating that amantadine binding reduces the conformational heterogeneity of specific residues. The differences of the current solid-state NMR structure of the bilayer-bound M2TMP from the detergent-based M2 structures suggest that the M2 conformation is sensitive to the environment, and care must be taken when interpreting

  11. The "Magic" String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Todd F.

    2010-01-01

    The "Magic" String is a discrepant event that includes a canister with what appears to be the end of two strings protruding from opposite sides of it. Due to the way the strings are attached inside the canister, it appears as if the strings can magically switch the way they are connected. When one string end is pulled, the observer's expectation…

  12. Chinese "Magic" Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Derek B.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese "magic" mirrors are made from bronze with the front side a mirror and the reverse side a molded image. When light is reflected from the mirror,the image on the reverse side appears. Discusses reflections of conventional mirrors, possible explanations for the magic mirror phenomenon, and applications of the phenomenon to…

  13. Evaluation of the quality of commercial silicon carbide wafers by an optical non-destructive inspection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, T.; Ichinoseki, K.; Fukuda, K.; Higuchi, N.; Arai, K.

    2008-03-01

    There is a great need for an in-line, high-speed and non-destructive inspection system capable of evaluating and analyzing the quality SiC wafers for SiC power devices. We have examined whether the laser-based optical non-destructive inspection system by KLA-Tencor meets these requirements. By optimizing the optical setup and improving the defect recognition and classification recipe, we have successfully mapped classified defects on a SiC wafer. Using this system, incoming inspection of purchased SiC wafers has been performed. The obtained inspection data show that micropipe density is sufficiently low in a device-grade wafer and, therefore, micropipes are not the main cause of device failure. The next challenges for a device-grade SiC wafer are reduction of epitaxial defects and relatively small defects classified as "particles".

  14. Non-invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissue engineered constructs using ultrasound imaging technologies: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R.

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multilevel information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inherent advantages of non-invasiveness and non-destructiveness, ultrasound imaging can be an ideal tool for both preclinical and clinical uses. In this review, currently available ultrasound imaging technologies that have been applied in vitro and in vivo for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are discussed and some new emerging ultrasound technologies and multi-modality approaches utilizing ultrasound are introduced. PMID:26518412

  15. Non-invasive and Non-destructive Characterization of Tissue Engineered Constructs Using Ultrasound Imaging Technologies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multi-level information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inherent advantages of non-invasiveness and non-destructiveness, ultrasound imaging can be an ideal tool for both preclinical and clinical uses. In this review, currently available ultrasound imaging technologies that have been applied in vitro and in vivo for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are discussed and some new emerging ultrasound technologies and multi-modality approaches utilizing ultrasound are introduced.

  16. LL/ILW: Post-Qualification of Old Waste through Non-Destructive Extraction of Barrels from Cement Shields - 13535

    SciTech Connect

    Oehmigen, Steffen; Ambos, Frank

    2013-07-01

    Currently there is a large number of radioactive waste drums entombed in cement shields at German nuclear power plants. These concrete containers used in the past for the waste are not approved for the final repository. Compliance with current acceptance criteria of the final repository has to be proven by qualification measures on the waste. To meet these criteria, a new declaration and new packing is necessary. A simple non-destructive extraction of about 2000 drums from their concrete shields is not possible. So different methods were tested to find a way of non-destructive extraction of old waste drums from cement shields and therefore reduce the final repository volume and final repository costs by using a container accepted and approved for Konrad. The main objective was to build a mobile system to offer this service to nuclear plant stations. (authors)

  17. [First successful DNA isolation and profiling from bone using an approach that is non-destructive toward bone surface].

    PubMed

    Pluta, Dominika; Lebioda, Arleta; Jonkisz, Anna; Dobosz, Tadeusz

    Commonly used destructive DNA isolation techniques consist of pulverization which leads to the complete destruction of smaller bones or irreversible damage to larger bones through the cutting of extensive fragments. The procedure is totally unacceptable when handling bones which are valuable for anthropological or religious reasons, as museum exhibits or due to emotional factors. Since the Department's team has already resolved this problem in the case of human teeth (A. Pilecka), efforts have been undertaken to develop a similar non-destructive technique for the isolation of DNA from human bones. To the best knowledge of the authors of the report, the study has yielded the world's first STR profile derived from DNA isolated from human bones by a technique that is non-destructive toward the bone surface.

  18. Quasi ?non-destructive? laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry fingerprinting of sapphires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillong, M.; Günther, D.

    2001-07-01

    A homogenized 193 nm excimer laser with a flat-top beam profile was used to study the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for 'quasi' non-destructive fingerprinting and sourcing of sapphires from different locations. Sapphires contain 97-99% of Al 2O 3 (corundum), with the remainder composed of several trace elements, which can be used to distinguish the origin of these gemstones. The ablation behavior of sapphires, as well as the minimum quantity of sample removal that is required to determine these trace elements, was investigated. The optimum ablation conditions were a fluency of 6 J cm -2, a crater diameter of 120 μm, and a laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. The optimum time for the ablation was determined to be 2 s, equivalent to 20 laser pulses. The mean sample removal was 60 nm per pulse (approx. 3 ng per pulse). This allowed satisfactory trace element determination, and was found to cause the minimum amount of damage, while allowing for the fingerprinting of sapphires. More than 40 isotopes were measured using different spatial resolutions (20-120 μm) and eight elements were reproducibly detected in 25 sapphire samples from five different locations. The reproducibility of the trace element distribution is limited by the heterogeneity of the sample. The mean of five or more replicate analyses per sample was used. Calibration was carried out using NIST 612 glass reference material as external standard. The linear dynamic range of the ICP-MS (nine orders of magnitude) allowed the use of Al, the major element in sapphire, as an internal standard. The limits of detection for most of the light elements were in the μg g -1 range and were better for heavier elements (mass >85), being in the 0.1 μg g -1 range. The accuracy of the determinations was demonstrated by comparison with XRF analyses of the same set of samples. Using the quantitative analyses obtained using LA-ICP-MS, natural sapphires from five different origins were statistically classified using ternary plots and

  19. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    oxygen isotope composition of ambient CO2. This non-destructive approach was tested through laboratory incubations of air-dried soils that were re-wetted with water of known isotopic composition. Performance was assessed by comparing estimates of the soil water oxygen isotope composition derived from open chamber flux measurements with those measured in the irrigation water and soil water extracted following incubations. The influence of soil pH and bovine carbonic anhydrase additions on these estimates was also investigated. Coherent values were found between the soil water composition estimates obtained from the dual steady state approach and those measured for irrigation waters. Estimates of carbonic anhydrase activity made using this approach also reflected well artificial increases to the concentration of carbonic anhydrase and indicated that this activity was sensitive to soil pH.

  20. Non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel using passive neutron Albedo reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L G; Schear, M A; Croft, S; Tobin, S J; Swinhoe, M T; Menlove, H O

    2010-01-01

    Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) is one of fourteen techniques that has been researched and evaluated to form part of a comprehensive and integrated detection system for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. PNAR implemented with {sup 3}He tubes for neutron detection (PNAR-{sup 3}He) is the measurement of time correlated neutrons from a spent fuel assembly with and without a Cadmium (Cd) layer surrounding the assembly. PNAR utilizes the self-interrogation of the fuel via reflection of neutrons born in the fuel assembly back in to the fuel assembly. The neutrons originate primarily from spontaneous fission events within the fuel itself (Curium-244) but are amplified by multiplication. The presence and removal of the Cd provides two measurement conditions with different neutron energy spectra and therefore different interrogating neutron characteristics. Cd has a high cross-section of absorption for slow neutrons and therefore greatly reduces the low energy (thermal) neutron fluence rate returning. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are known as the Cd ratios, which are related to fissile content. A potential safeguards application for which PNAR-{sup 3}He is particularly suited is 'fingerprinting'. Fingerprinting could function as an alternative to plutonium (Pu) mass determination; providing confidence that material was not diverted during transport between sites. PNAR-{sup 3}He has six primary NDA signatures: Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates measured with two energy spectra at both shipping and receiving sites. This is to uniquely identify the fuel assembly, and confirm no changes have taken place during transport. Changes may indicate all attempt to divert material for example. Here, the physics of the PNAR-{sup 3}He concept will be explained, alongside a discussion on the development of a prototypical PNAR-{sup 3}He instrument using simulation. The capabilities and performance of the